WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume 500-600 ml

  1. White cell labeling: 20 ML VS 4 ML of blood volume-case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Some times, it becomes difficult to draw 20 mL blood from a patient with bad veins. On two occasions, we could collect only about 4 mL of blood, that too with a great deal of struggle, and then we carried out the routine labelling procedure. A labelling efficiency of 98.2% and 95.6% was achieved. The white cell scan was negative in one patient, but positive in the next one. In a third patient, a comparison of labelling efficiency was done between 5 and 20 mLs of blood volumes separately and the results were found to be identical, 98.5% and 98.4%, respectively. As we have achieved the usual pattern of white cell scan with as low as 4-5 mL of blood, it appears that enough number of white cells is present even in the 4-5 mL of blood that is capable of generating a white cell scan and so, it seems rational to reduce the blood volume from 20 mL to 4 or 5 mL. However, further studies are warranted before adopting this modification. The procedure appears to carry the following advantages: ease of blood collection, handling and re-injection and less risk to the patient

  2. A 500-600 MHz GaN power amplifier with RC-LC stability network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinyu; Duan, Baoxing; Yang, Yintang

    2017-08-01

    A 500-600 MHz high-efficiency, high-power GaN power amplifier is designed and realized on the basis of the push-pull structure. The RC-LC stability network is proposed and applied to the power amplifier circuit for the first time. The RC-LC stability network can significantly reduce the high gain out the band, which eliminates the instability of the power amplifier circuit. The developed power amplifier exhibits 58.5 dBm (700 W) output power with a 17 dB gain and 85% PAE at 500-600 MHz, 300 μs, 20% duty cycle. It has the highest PAE in P-band among the products at home and abroad. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB339901).

  3. Lower tidal volume strategy (?3?ml/kg) combined with extracorporeal CO2 removal versus ?conventional? protective ventilation (6?ml/kg) in severe ARDS

    OpenAIRE

    Bein, Thomas; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Goldmann, Anton; M?ller, Thomas; Staudinger, Thomas; Brederlau, J?rg; Muellenbach, Ralf; Dembinski, Rolf; Graf, Bernhard M.; Wewalka, Marlene; Philipp, Alois; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Lubnow, Matthias; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by damage to the lung caused by various insults, including ventilation itself, and tidal hyperinflation can lead to ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). We investigated the effects of a low tidal volume (V T) strategy (V T???3?ml/kg/predicted body weight [PBW]) using pumpless extracorporeal lung assist in established ARDS. Methods Seventy-nine patients were enrolled after a ?stabilization period? (24?h with optimized therapy an...

  4. Quantification of gastrointestinal liquid volumes and distribution following a 240 mL dose of water in the fasted state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudie, Deanna M; Murray, Kathryn; Hoad, Caroline L; Pritchard, Susan E; Garnett, Martin C; Amidon, Gordon L; Gowland, Penny A; Spiller, Robin C; Amidon, Gregory E; Marciani, Luca

    2014-09-02

    The rate and extent of drug dissolution and absorption from solid oral dosage forms is highly dependent upon the volumes and distribution of gastric and small intestinal water. However, little is known about the time courses and distribution of water volumes in vivo in an undisturbed gut. Previous imaging studies offered a snapshot of water distribution in fasted humans and showed that water in the small intestine is distributed in small pockets. This study aimed to quantify the volume and number of water pockets in the upper gut of fasted healthy humans following ingestion of a glass of water (240 mL, as recommended for bioavailability/bioequivalence (BA/BE) studies), using recently validated noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent upper and lower abdominal MRI scans before drinking 240 mL (8 fluid ounces) of water. After ingesting the water, they were scanned at intervals for 2 h. The drink volume, inclusion criteria, and fasting conditions matched the international standards for BA/BE testing in healthy volunteers. The images were processed for gastric and intestinal total water volumes and for the number and volume of separate intestinal water pockets larger than 0.5 mL. The fasted stomach contained 35 ± 7 mL (mean ± SEM) of resting water. Upon drinking, the gastric fluid rose to 242 ± 9 mL. The gastric water volume declined rapidly after that with a half emptying time (T50%) of 13 ± 1 min. The mean gastric volume returned back to baseline 45 min after the drink. The fasted small bowel contained a total volume of 43 ± 14 mL of resting water. Twelve minutes after ingestion of water, small bowel water content rose to a maximum value of 94 ± 24 mL contained within 15 ± 2 pockets of 6 ± 2 mL each. At 45 min, when the glass of water had emptied completely from the stomach, total intestinal water volume was 77 ± 15 mL distributed into 16 ± 3 pockets of 5 ± 1 mL each. MRI provided unprecedented insights into

  5. Is a volume of 3.6 mL better than 1.8 mL for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Sara; Reader, Al

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the success of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block using either 3.6 mL or 1.8 mL 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in patients presenting with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. As part of 7 previously published studies, 319 emergency patients presenting with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis received either a 1.8-mL volume or 3.6-mL volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in an IAN block. One hundred ninety patients received a 1.8-mL volume, and 129 received a 3.6-mL volume. Endodontic emergency treatment was completed on each subject. Success was defined as the ability to access and instrument the tooth without pain (visual analog scale score of 0) or mild pain (VAS rating ≤54 mm). Success of the 1.8-mL volume was 28%, and for the 3.6-mL volume it was 39%. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 volumes. In conclusion, for patients presenting with irreversible pulpitis, success was not significantly different between a 3.6-mL volume and a 1.8-mL volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. The success rates (28%-39%) with either volume were not high enough to ensure complete pulpal anesthesia. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lower tidal volume strategy (≈3 ml/kg) combined with extracorporeal CO2 removal versus 'conventional' protective ventilation (6 ml/kg) in severe ARDS: the prospective randomized Xtravent-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bein, Thomas; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Goldmann, Anton; Müller, Thomas; Staudinger, Thomas; Brederlau, Jörg; Muellenbach, Ralf; Dembinski, Rolf; Graf, Bernhard M; Wewalka, Marlene; Philipp, Alois; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Lubnow, Matthias; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2013-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by damage to the lung caused by various insults, including ventilation itself, and tidal hyperinflation can lead to ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). We investigated the effects of a low tidal volume (V(T)) strategy (V(T) ≈ 3 ml/kg/predicted body weight [PBW]) using pumpless extracorporeal lung assist in established ARDS. Seventy-nine patients were enrolled after a 'stabilization period' (24 h with optimized therapy and high PEEP). They were randomly assigned to receive a low V(T) ventilation (≈3 ml/kg) combined with extracorporeal CO2 elimination, or to a ARDSNet strategy (≈6 ml/kg) without the extracorporeal device. The primary outcome was the 28-days and 60-days ventilator-free days (VFD). Secondary outcome parameters were respiratory mechanics, gas exchange, analgesic/sedation use, complications and hospital mortality. Ventilation with very low V(T)'s was easy to implement with extracorporeal CO2-removal. VFD's within 60 days were not different between the study group (33.2 ± 20) and the control group (29.2 ± 21, p = 0.469), but in more hypoxemic patients (PaO2/FIO2 ≤150) a post hoc analysis demonstrated significant improved VFD-60 in study patients (40.9 ± 12.8) compared to control (28.2 ± 16.4, p = 0.033). The mortality rate was low (16.5%) and did not differ between groups. The use of very low V(T) combined with extracorporeal CO2 removal has the potential to further reduce VILI compared with a 'normal' lung protective management. Whether this strategy will improve survival in ARDS patients remains to be determined (Clinical trials NCT 00538928).

  7. Army Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems Program. The ML-1 analytical design report. Volume IV. Electrical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1961-10-01

    The analysis preceding and supporting the design of the ML-1--a mobile, low-power, nuclear power plant--is described in sufficient detail for an engineer, not a specialist, to follow the development of the design. Test results and similar data are used to support the calculations whenever possible. Useless repetition of detail is avoided: when the development of several items of equipment, performing a similar function under similar conditions, is described the calculations and derivations are given only once.

  8. Army Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems Program. ML-1 analytical design report. Volume II. Systems analysis: heat transfer and fluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1961-01-01

    The analysis preceding and supporting the design of the cooling system of the ML-1, a mobile, low-power, nuclear power plant, is described in sufficient detail for an engineer to follow the development of the design. Test results and similar data are used to support the calculations whenever possible.

  9. RED-ML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Heng; Liu, Dongbing; Li, Qiye

    2017-01-01

    using diverse RNA-seq datasets, we have developed a software tool, RED-ML: RNA Editing Detection based on Machine learning (pronounced as "red ML"). The input to RED-ML can be as simple as a single BAM file, while it can also take advantage of matched genomic variant information when available...... accurately detect novel RNA editing sites without relying on curated RNA editing databases. We have also made this tool freely available via GitHub . We have developed a highly accurate, speedy and general-purpose tool for RNA editing detection using RNA-seq data....... With the availability of RED-ML, it is now possible to conveniently make RNA editing a routine analysis of RNA-seq. We believe this can greatly benefit the RNA editing research community and has profound impact to accelerate our understanding of this intriguing posttranscriptional modification process....

  10. Comparison of the anaesthetic efficacy of different volumes of 4% articaine (1.8 and 3.6 mL) as supplemental buccal infiltration after failed inferior alveolar nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, M; Subbiya, A; Aggarwal, V; Vivekanandhan, P; Yadav, S; Yadav, H; Venkatesh, A; Geethapriya, N; Sharma, V

    2015-01-01

    To compare the anaesthetic efficacy of different volumes (1.8 mL vs. 3.6 mL) of 4% articaine with 1 : 100 000 epinephrine injected as buccal infiltrations after a failed inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Two hundred and thirty-four adult patients, diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in a mandibular tooth, participated in this multicentre, randomized double-blinded trial. Patients received IANB with 1.8 mL of 4% articaine with 1 : 100 000 epinephrine. Pain during treatment was recorded using the Heft-Parker visual analogue scale (HP VAS). The primary outcome measure, and the definition of 'success', was the ability to undertake pulp chamber access and canal instrumentation with no or mild pain (HP VAS score <55 mm). Patients who experienced 'moderate-to-severe' pain (HP VAS score ≥ 55 mm) were randomly allocated into two groups and received buccal infiltrations with either 1.8 mL or 3.6 mL of 4% articaine with 1 : 100 000 epinephrine. Root canal treatment was re-initiated after 10 min. Success was again defined as no pain or weak/mild pain during endodontic access preparation and instrumentation. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests. The initial IANB of 4% articaine gave an overall success rate of 37%. The success rate of supplementary buccal infiltration with 1.8 and 3.6 mL volumes was 62% and 64%, respectively. The difference between the success rates of the two volumes was not statistically significant. Increasing the volume of 4% articaine with 1 : 100 000 epinephrine from 1.8 to 3.6 mL, given as supplementary buccal infiltrations after a failed primary IANB with 1.8 mL of 4% articaine with 1 : 100 000, did not improve the anaesthetic success rates in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. qcML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walzer, Mathias; Pernas, Lucia Espona; Nasso, Sara

    2014-01-01

    provide tools for the calculation of a wide range of quality metrics as well as a database format and interconversion tools, so that existing LIMS systems can easily add relational storage of the quality control data to their existing schema. We here describe the qcML specification, along with possible...... use cases and an illustrative example of the subsequent analysis possibilities. All information about qcML is available at http://code.google.com/p/qcml....

  12. MPS and ML

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals about MPS and ML, the National MPS Society has created a central location for more information on MPS. Click here to go to the MPS Library. Share Tweet Our Mission The National MPS Society exists to cure, support and advocate for MPS ...

  13. CLAS App ML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maher, Bridget; Hartkopf, Kathleen; Stieger, Lina; Schroeder, Hanna; Sopka, Sasa; Orrego, Carola; Drachsler, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    This is a multi-language (ML) update of the CLAS App original design by Bridget Maher from the School of Medicine at University College Cork, Ireland. The current version has an improve counting mechanism and has been translated from English to Spanish, Catalan and German languages within the

  14. Superconducting magnet for 'ML-100'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, R; Fujinaga, T; Tada, N; Kimura, H

    1974-07-01

    A magneticaly levitated experimental vehicle (Ml-100) was designed and constructed in commemoration of the centenary of the Japanese National Railways. For magnetic levitation the vehicle is provided with two superconducting magnets. In the test operation of the vehicle, these superconducting magnets showed stable performance in levitating vehicle body.

  15. Reactive Programming in Standard ML

    OpenAIRE

    Pucella, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    Reactive systems are systems that maintain an ongoing interaction with their environment, activated by receiving input events from the environment and producing output events in response. Modern programming languages designed to program such systems use a paradigm based on the notions of instants and activations. We describe a library for Standard ML that provides basic primitives for programming reactive systems. The library is a low-level system upon which more sophisticated reactive behavi...

  16. Proceedings ML Family/OCaml Users and Developers workshops

    OpenAIRE

    Kiselyov, Oleg; Garrigue, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects the extended versions of selected papers originally presented at the two ACM SIGPLAN workshops: ML Family Workshop 2014 and OCaml 2014. Both were affiliated with ICFP 2014 and took place on two consecutive days, on September 4 and 5, 2014 in Gothenburg, Sweden. The ML Family workshop aims to recognize the entire extended family of ML and ML-like languages: languages that are Higher-order, Typed, Inferred, and Strict. It provides the forum to discuss common issues, both pr...

  17. Description of the sodium loop ML-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, de la M.; Melches, I; Lapena, J.; Martinez, T.A.; Miguel, de D.; Duran, F.

    1979-01-01

    The sodium loop ML-3 is described. The main objective of this facility is to obtain mechanical property data for LMFBR materials in creep and low cycle fatigue testing in flowing sodium. ML-3 includes 10 test stations for creep and two for fatigue. It is possible to operate simultaneously at three different temperature levels. The maximum operating temperature is 650 deg C at flow velocities up to 5 m/s. The ML-3 loop has been located in a manner that permits the fill/dump tank cover gas and security systems to be shared with an earlier circuit, the ML-1. (author)

  18. ML Arvutite aktsiakapital suurenes / Anne Oja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Oja, Anne, 1970-

    2006-01-01

    ML Arvutid omanik Aivar Paalberg tõstis aktsiakapitali seniselt 10 miljonilt 24 miljonile eesmärgiga tugevdada oma positsioone Eesti turul ja kasvada kiiremas tempos kui kogu turg. Diagramm: Majandusnäitajad

  19. Adductor Canal Block With 10 mL Versus 30 mL Local Anesthetics and Quadriceps Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Pia; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J; Hilsted, Karen Lisa

    2015-01-01

    weakness. METHODS: We performed a paired, blinded, randomized trial including healthy men. All subjects received bilateral ACBs with ropivacaine 0.1%; 10 mL in 1 leg and 30 mL in the other leg. The primary outcome was the difference in number of subjects with quadriceps strength reduced by more than 25...... of the predefined time points or in sensory block. The only statistically significant difference between volumes was found in the 30-Second Chair Stand Test at 2 hours (P = 0.02), but this difference had disappeared at 4 hours (P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: Varying the volume of ropivacaine 0.1% used for ACB between 10...

  20. CellML, SED-ML, and the Physiome Model Repository

    OpenAIRE

    Nickerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Invited presentation delivered at COMBINE 2016.CellML, SED-ML, and the Physiome Model Repository.David Nickerson, Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland, New Zealand.CellML is an XML-based protocol for storing and exchanging computer-based mathematical models in an unambiguous, modular, and reusable manner. In addition to introducing CellML, in this presentation I will provide some of physiological examples that have help drive the development and adoption of CellML. I will...

  1. Comparative study of induction of labour with Foley’s catheter inflated to 30 mL versus 60 mL

    OpenAIRE

    Indira I; Latha G; Lakshmi Narayanamma V

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ripeness of the cervix is an important determinant of the success of induction of labour. One of the mechanical methods of cervical ripening is the use of a transcervical Foley catheter. In this study we compared the efficacy in induction of labour of two insufflation volumes of Foley catheter bulb 30 mL and 60mL. Methods: This was a randomized, single-blind study conducted in 100 women, randomly allocated to the 30 mL group (n=50) and 60 mL group (n=50). Foley’s cath...

  2. ML Confidential : machine learning on encrypted data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graepel, T.; Lauter, K.; Naehrig, M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that by using a recently proposed somewhat homomorphic encryption (SHE) scheme it is possible to delegate the execution of a machine learning (ML) algorithm to a compute service while retaining confidentiality of the training and test data. Since the computational complexity of the

  3. HEP meets ML award talk : XGBoost

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; CHEN, Tianqi

    2015-01-01

    Tianqi Chen and Tong He (team crowwork) have provided very early in the challenge to all participants XGBoost (for eXtreme Gradient Boosted). It is a parallelised software to train boost decision trees, which has been effectively used by many participants to the challenge. For this, they have won the "HEP meets ML" award which is the invitation to CERN happening today.

  4. GeoSciML and EarthResourceML Update, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, S. M.; Commissionthe Management; Application Inte, I.

    2012-12-01

    CGI Interoperability Working Group activities during 2012 include deployment of services using the GeoSciML-Portrayal schema, addition of new vocabularies to support properties added in version 3.0, improvements to server software for deploying services, introduction of EarthResourceML v.2 for mineral resources, and collaboration with the IUSS on a markup language for soils information. GeoSciML and EarthResourceML have been used as the basis for the INSPIRE Geology and Mineral Resources specifications respectively. GeoSciML-Portrayal is an OGC GML simple-feature application schema for presentation of geologic map unit, contact, and shear displacement structure (fault and ductile shear zone) descriptions in web map services. Use of standard vocabularies for geologic age and lithology enables map services using shared legends to achieve visual harmonization of maps provided by different services. New vocabularies have been added to the collection of CGI vocabularies provided to support interoperable GeoSciML services, and can be accessed through http://resource.geosciml.org. Concept URIs can be dereferenced to obtain SKOS rdf or html representations using the SISSVoc vocabulary service. New releases of the FOSS GeoServer application greatly improve support for complex XML feature schemas like GeoSciML, and the ArcGIS for INSPIRE extension implements similar complex feature support for ArcGIS Server. These improved server implementations greatly facilitate deploying GeoSciML services. EarthResourceML v2 adds features for information related to mining activities. SoilML provides an interchange format for soil material, soil profile, and terrain information. Work is underway to add GeoSciML to the portfolio of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) specifications.

  5. CytometryML and other data formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Robert C.

    2006-02-01

    Cytology automation and research will be enhanced by the creation of a common data format. This data format would provide the pathology and research communities with a uniform way for annotating and exchanging images, flow cytometry, and associated data. This specification and/or standard will include descriptions of the acquisition device, staining, the binary representations of the image and list-mode data, the measurements derived from the image and/or the list-mode data, and descriptors for clinical/pathology and research. An international, vendor-supported, non-proprietary specification will allow pathologists, researchers, and companies to develop and use image capture/analysis software, as well as list-mode analysis software, without worrying about incompatibilities between proprietary vendor formats. Presently, efforts to create specifications and/or descriptions of these formats include the Laboratory Digital Imaging Project (LDIP) Data Exchange Specification; extensions to the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM); Open Microscopy Environment (OME); Flowcyt, an extension to the present Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS); and CytometryML. The feasibility of creating a common data specification for digital microscopy and flow cytometry in a manner consistent with its use for medical devices and interoperability with both hospital information and picture archiving systems has been demonstrated by the creation of the CytometryML schemas. The feasibility of creating a software system for digital microscopy has been demonstrated by the OME. CytometryML consists of schemas that describe instruments and their measurements. These instruments include digital microscopes and flow cytometers. Optical components including the instruments' excitation and emission parts are described. The description of the measurements made by these instruments includes the tagged molecule, data acquisition subsystem, and the format of the list-mode and/or image data. Many

  6. AllerML: markup language for allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu; Gendel, Steven M; Power, Trevor D; Schein, Catherine H; Braun, Werner

    2011-06-01

    Many concerns have been raised about the potential allergenicity of novel, recombinant proteins into food crops. Guidelines, proposed by WHO/FAO and EFSA, include the use of bioinformatics screening to assess the risk of potential allergenicity or cross-reactivities of all proteins introduced, for example, to improve nutritional value or promote crop resistance. However, there are no universally accepted standards that can be used to encode data on the biology of allergens to facilitate using data from multiple databases in this screening. Therefore, we developed AllerML a markup language for allergens to assist in the automated exchange of information between databases and in the integration of the bioinformatics tools that are used to investigate allergenicity and cross-reactivity. As proof of concept, AllerML was implemented using the Structural Database of Allergenic Proteins (SDAP; http://fermi.utmb.edu/SDAP/) database. General implementation of AllerML will promote automatic flow of validated data that will aid in allergy research and regulatory analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. OpenML : An R package to connect to the machine learning platform OpenML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casalicchio, G.; Bossek, J.; Lang, M.; Kirchhoff, D.; Kerschke, P.; Hofner, B.; Seibold, H.; Vanschoren, J.; Bischl, B.

    2017-01-01

    OpenML is an online machine learning platform where researchers can easily share data, machine learning tasks and experiments as well as organize them online to work and collaborate more efficiently. In this paper, we present an R package to interface with the OpenML platform and illustrate its

  8. Using VS30 to Estimate Station ML Adjustments (dML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, A.; Herrick, J.; Cochran, E. S.; Andrews, J. R.; Yu, E.

    2017-12-01

    Currently, new seismic stations added to a regional seismic network cannot be used to calculate local or Richter magnitude (ML) until a revised region-wide amplitude decay function is developed. The new station must record a minimum number of local and regional events that meet specific amplitude requirements prior to re-calibration of the amplitude decay function. Therefore, there can be significant delay between when a new station starts contributing real-time waveform packets and when the data can be included in magnitude estimation. The station component adjustments (dML; Uhrhammer et al., 2011) are calculated after first inverting for a new regional amplitude decay function, constrained by the sum of dML for long-running stations. Here, we propose a method to calculate an initial dML using known or proxy values of seismic site conditions. For site conditions, we use the time-averaged shear-wave velocity (VS) of the upper 30 m (VS30). We solve for dML as described in Equation (1) by Uhrhammer et al. (2011): ML = log (A) - log A0 (r) + dML, where A is the maximum Wood and Anderson (1925) trace amplitude (mm), r is the distance (km), and dML is the station adjustment. Measured VS30 and estimated dML data are comprised of records from 887 horizontal components (east-west and north-south orientations) from 93 seismic monitoring stations in the California Integrated Seismic Network. VS30 values range from 202 m/s to 1464 m/s and dML range from -1.10 to 0.39. VS30 and dML exhibit a positive correlation coefficient (R = 0.72), indicating that as VS30 increases, dML increases. This implies that greater site amplification (i.e., lower VS30) results in smaller ML. When we restrict VS30 regional network ML estimates immediately without the need to wait until a minimum set of earthquake data has been recorded.

  9. International Conference ML4CPS 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Niggemann, Oliver; Kühnert, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The work presents new approaches to Machine Learning for Cyber Physical Systems, experiences and visions. It contains some selected papers from the international Conference ML4CPS – Machine Learning for Cyber Physical Systems, which was held in Karlsruhe, September 29th, 2016. Cyber Physical Systems are characterized by their ability to adapt and to learn: They analyze their environment and, based on observations, they learn patterns, correlations and predictive models. Typical applications are condition monitoring, predictive maintenance, image processing and diagnosis. Machine Learning is the key technology for these developments. The Editors Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jürgen Beyerer is Professor at the Department for Interactive Real-Time Systems at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. In addition he manages the Fraunhofer Institute of Optronics, System Technologies and Image Exploitation IOSB. Prof. Dr. Oliver Niggemann is Professor for Embedded Software Engineering. His research interests are in the field of Di...

  10. ML 3.1 developer's guide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Marzio; Hu, Jonathan Joseph (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Tuminaro, Raymond Stephen (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2004-05-01

    ML development was started in 1997 by Ray Tuminaro and Charles Tong. Currently, there are several full- and part-time developers. The kernel of ML is written in ANSI C, and there is a rich C++ interface for Trilinos users and developers. ML can be customized to run geometric and algebraic multigrid; it can solve a scalar or a vector equation (with constant number of equations per grid node), and it can solve a form of Maxwell's equations. For a general introduction to ML and its applications, we refer to the Users Guide [SHT04], and to the ML web site, http://software.sandia.gov/ml.

  11. The XBabelPhish MAGE-ML and XML translator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Don; Wymore, Farrell; Sherlock, Gavin; Ball, Catherine A

    2008-01-18

    MAGE-ML has been promoted as a standard format for describing microarray experiments and the data they produce. Two characteristics of the MAGE-ML format compromise its use as a universal standard: First, MAGE-ML files are exceptionally large - too large to be easily read by most people, and often too large to be read by most software programs. Second, the MAGE-ML standard permits many ways of representing the same information. As a result, different producers of MAGE-ML create different documents describing the same experiment and its data. Recognizing all the variants is an unwieldy software engineering task, resulting in software packages that can read and process MAGE-ML from some, but not all producers. This Tower of MAGE-ML Babel bars the unencumbered exchange of microarray experiment descriptions couched in MAGE-ML. We have developed XBabelPhish - an XQuery-based technology for translating one MAGE-ML variant into another. XBabelPhish's use is not restricted to translating MAGE-ML documents. It can transform XML files independent of their DTD, XML schema, or semantic content. Moreover, it is designed to work on very large (> 200 Mb.) files, which are common in the world of MAGE-ML. XBabelPhish provides a way to inter-translate MAGE-ML variants for improved interchange of microarray experiment information. More generally, it can be used to transform most XML files, including very large ones that exceed the capacity of most XML tools.

  12. Allelism of Genes in the Ml-a locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Nanna Henriette; Jensen, Hans Peter; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1980-01-01

    Seven barley lines or varieties, each with a different gene at the Ml-a locus for resistance to Erysiphe graminis were intercrossed. Progeny testing of the F2s using two different fungal isolates per cross provided evidence that there are two or more loci in the Ml-a region. Apparent recombinants...... were also screened for recombination between the Hor1 and Hor2 loci which are situated either side of the Ml-a locus. The cross between Ricardo and Iso42R (Rupee) yielded one possible recombinant, with Ml-a3 and Ml-a(Rul) in the coupling phase; other recombinants had wild-type genes in the coupling...... phase. Iso20R, derived from Hordeum spontaneum 'H204', carrying Ml-a6, had an additional gene, in close coupling with Ml-a6, tentatively named Ml-aSp2 or Reglv, causing an intermediate infection type with isolate EmA30. It is suggested that Ml-a(Ar) in Emir and Ml-a(Rul), shown to differ from other Ml...

  13. jmzML, an open-source Java API for mzML, the PSI standard for MS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Richard G; Reisinger, Florian; Martens, Lennart

    2010-04-01

    We here present jmzML, a Java API for the Proteomics Standards Initiative mzML data standard. Based on the Java Architecture for XML Binding and XPath-based XML indexer random-access XML parser, jmzML can handle arbitrarily large files in minimal memory, allowing easy and efficient processing of mzML files using the Java programming language. jmzML also automatically resolves internal XML references on-the-fly. The library (which includes a viewer) can be downloaded from http://jmzml.googlecode.com.

  14. ML at ATLAS&CMS : setting the stage

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of the LHC the canonical problems of classification and regression were mostly addressed using simple cut-based techniques. Today, ML techniques (some already pioneered in pre-LHC or non collider experiments) play a fundamental role in the toolbox of any experimentalist. The talk will introduce, through a representative collection of examples, the problems addressed with ML techniques at the LHC. The goal of the talk is to set the stage for a constructive discussion with non-HEP ML practitioners, focusing on the specificities of HEP applications.

  15. Model-driven Service Engineering with SoaML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvesæter, Brian; Carrez, Cyril; Mohagheghi, Parastoo; Berre, Arne-Jørgen; Johnsen, Svein G.; Solberg, Arnor

    This chapter presents a model-driven service engineering (MDSE) methodology that uses OMG MDA specifications such as BMM, BPMN and SoaML to identify and specify services within a service-oriented architecture. The methodology takes advantage of business modelling practices and provides a guide to service modelling with SoaML. The presentation is case-driven and illuminated using the telecommunication example. The chapter focuses in particular on the use of the SoaML modelling language as a means for expressing service specifications that are aligned with business models and can be realized in different platform technologies.

  16. QuakeML - An XML Schema for Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, A.; Schorlemmer, D.; Maraini, S.; Baer, M.; Wiemer, S.

    2004-12-01

    We propose an extensible format-definition for seismic data (QuakeML). Sharing data and seismic information efficiently is one of the most important issues for research and observational seismology in the future. The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is playing an increasingly important role in the exchange of a variety of data. Due to its extensible definition capabilities, its wide acceptance and the existing large number of utilities and libraries for XML, a structured representation of various types of seismological data should in our opinion be developed by defining a 'QuakeML' standard. Here we present the QuakeML definitions for parameter databases and further efforts, e.g. a central QuakeML catalog database and a web portal for exchanging codes and stylesheets.

  17. Preparing for the future: opportunities for ML in ATLAS & CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    ML is an established tool in HEP and there are many examples which demonstrate its importance for the kind of classification and regression problem we have in our field. However, there is also a big potential for future applications in yet untapped areas. I will summarise these opportunities and highlight recent, ongoing and planned studies of novel ML applications in HEP. Certain aspects of the problems we are faced with in HEP are quite unique and represent interesting benchmark problems for the ML community as a whole. Hence, efficient communication and close interaction between the ML and HEP community is expected to lead to promising cross-fertilisation. This talk attempts to serve as a starting point for such a prospective collaboration.

  18. The jmzQuantML programming interface and validator for the mzQuantML data standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Da; Krishna, Ritesh; Jones, Andrew R

    2014-03-01

    The mzQuantML standard from the HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative has recently been released, capturing quantitative data about peptides and proteins, following analysis of MS data. We present a Java application programming interface (API) for mzQuantML called jmzQuantML. The API provides robust bridges between Java classes and elements in mzQuantML files and allows random access to any part of the file. The API provides read and write capabilities, and is designed to be embedded in other software packages, enabling mzQuantML support to be added to proteomics software tools (http://code.google.com/p/jmzquantml/). The mzQuantML standard is designed around a multilevel validation system to ensure that files are structurally and semantically correct for different proteomics quantitative techniques. In this article, we also describe a Java software tool (http://code.google.com/p/mzquantml-validator/) for validating mzQuantML files, which is a formal part of the data standard. © 2014 The Authors. Proteomics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. WeedML: a Tool for Collaborative Weed Demographic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Niels

    2010-01-01

    WeedML is a proposed standard to formulate models of weed demography, or maybe even complex models in general, that are both transparent and straightforward to re-use as building blocks for new models. The paper describes the design and thoughts behind WeedML which relies on XML and object-oriented systems development. Proof-of-concept software is provided as open-source C++ code and executables that can be downloaded freely.

  20. Aggressiveness of powdery mildew on 'ml-o'- resistant barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Lars

    1990-01-01

    The ml-o genes in barley are important sources in breeding for resistance against the barley powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis). The resistance mechanism is a rapid formation of a large callose containing cell wall apposition at the site of the pathogen's infection attempt. This reduces the chances of infection to almost nil in all epidermal cells, except in the small subsidiary cells, in which appositions are rarely formed. Small mildew colonies from infections in subsidiary cells may be seen on the otherwise resistant leaf. This is described by the infection type 0/(4). Mildew isolate HL 3 selected by SCHWARZBACH has increased aggressiveness. No ml-o-virulent isolates are known. However, ml-o-resistant varieties when grown extensively in Europe, will introduce field selection for mildew pathotypes with aggressiveness or virulence to ml-o resistance. Studies on increased aggressiveness require new methods. The material comprises two powdery mildew isolates: GE 3 without ml-o aggressiveness and the aggressive HL 3/5; and two near-isogenic barley lines in Carlsberg II: Riso 5678(R) with the recessive mutant resistance gene ml-o5 and Riso 5678(S) with the wild-type gene for susceptibility. Latent period and disease efficiency show no significant differences between the two isolates on the susceptible barley line (S) but the isolates differ from each other on the resistant barley line

  1. QuakeML 2.0: Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, Fabian; Kästli, Philipp; Heiniger, Lukas; Saul, Joachim; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Clinton, John

    2016-04-01

    QuakeML is a community-backed data model for seismic event parameter description. Its current version 1.2, released in 2013, has become the gold standard for parametric data dissemination at seismological data centers, and has been adopted as an FDSN standard. It is supported by several popular software products and data services, such as FDSN event web services, QuakePy, and SeisComP3. Work on the successor version 2.0 is under way since 2015. The scope of QuakeML has been expanded beyond event parameter description. Thanks to a modular architecture, many thematic packages have been added, which cover peak ground motion, site and station characterization, hydraulic parameters of borehole injection processes, and macroseismics. The first three packages can be considered near final and implementations of program codes and SQL databases are in productive use at various institutions. A public community review process has been initiated in order to turn them into community-approved standards. The most recent addition is a package for single station quake location, which allows a detailed probabilistic description of event parameters recorded at a single station. This package adds some information elements such as angle of incidence, frequency-dependent phase picks, and dispersion relations. The package containing common data types has been extended with a generic type for probability density functions. While on Earth, single station methods are niche applications, they are of prominent interest in planetary seismology, e.g., the NASA InSight mission to Mars. So far, QuakeML is lacking a description of seismic instrumentation (inventory). There are two existing standards of younger age (FDSN StationXML and SeisComP3 Inventory XML). We discuss their respective strengths, differences, and how they could be combined into an inventory package for QuakeML, thus allowing full interoperability with other QuakeML data types. QuakeML is accompanied by QuakePy, a Python package

  2. GeoSciML version 3: A GML application for geologic information

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Union of Geological Sciences., I. C.; Richard, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    orientation (e.g. 'miarolitic cavities'). The Earth material package allows for the description of both individual components, such as minerals, and compound materials, such as rocks or unconsolidated materials. Provision is made for alteration, weathering, metamorphism, particle geometry, fabric, and petrophysical descriptions. Mapped features describe the shape of the geological features using standard GML geometries, such as polygons, lines, points or 3D volumes. Geological events provide the age, process and environment of formation of geological features. The Earth Resource section includes features to represent mineral occurrences and mines and associated human activities independently. This addition allows description of resources and reserves that can comply with national and internationally accepted reporting codes. GeoSciML v3 is under consideration as the data model for INSPIRE annex 2 geologic reporting in Europe.

  3. Modelling CRM implementation services with SysML

    OpenAIRE

    Bibiano, Luis H.; Pastor Collado, Juan Antonio; Mayol Sarroca, Enric

    2009-01-01

    CRM information systems are valuable tools for enterprises. But CRM implementation projects are risky and present a high failure rate. In this paper we regard CRM implementation projects as services that could be greatly improved by addressing them in a methodological way that can be designed with the help of tools such as SysML. Here we introduce and comment on our first experience on the use of SysML language, not very well known, for modelling the elements involved in the CRM implementatio...

  4. The Bonding of Pa to d8-ML3 Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Sung-Kwon; Albright, Thomas A.; Silvestre, Jerome

    1985-01-01

    Extended Hiickel calculmions were carried out on 171, 'f/ 2, and 'f/3 complexes of P4 to Rh(PH3)2Cl. The 'f/ 1-square planar and an 'f/2 complex with C2v symmetry are the most stable. Geometrical optimizations and a detailed account of the bonding in each have been carried out. d10 'f/1-tetrahedral complexes of P4 are expected to be quite stable. The best candidate for an 'f/3 mode of bonding is the trimer Fe3(C0)9. Alternative complexes at 'f/3 include a d6-ML3 and d4-ML...

  5. Absorption kinetics of two highly concentrated preparations of growth hormone: 12 IU/ml compared to 56 IU/ml

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Susgaard, Søren; Jensen, Flemming Steen

    1994-01-01

    was to compare the relative bioavailability of two highly concentrated (12 IU/ml versus 56 IU/ml) formulations of biosynthetic human growth hormone administered subcutaneously. After pretreatment with growth hormone for at least four weeks, nine growth hormone deficient patients with a mean age of 26.2 years......AbstractSend to: Pharmacol Toxicol. 1994 Jan;74(1):54-7. Absorption kinetics of two highly concentrated preparations of growth hormone: 12 IU/ml compared to 56 IU/ml. Laursen T1, Susgaard S, Jensen FS, Jørgensen JO, Christiansen JS. Author information Abstract The purpose of this study...... (range 17-43) were studied two times in a randomized design, the two studies being separated by at least one week. At the start of each study period (7 p.m.), growth hormone was injected subcutaneously in a dosage of 3 IU/m2. The 12 IU/ml preparation of growth hormone was administered on one occasion...

  6. Radioactivity measurement of 18F in 16 ml vials for calibration of radionuclide calibrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurdiyanto, Gatot; Marsoem, Pujadi; Candra, Hermawan; Wijono, Paidi

    2012-01-01

    Fluorine-18 is obtained through the reaction 18 O(p, n) 18 F using a cyclotron that is situated in a hospital in Jakarta. Standardization of the 18 F solution is performed by gamma spectrometry using calibration sources of 152 Eu, 60 Co and 137 Cs that have traceability to the International System of units (SI). The activities in the 16 ml vials that were used for calibrating the radionuclide calibrators were between 1 and 2 GBq, with expanded uncertainties of 3.8%. The expanded uncertainty, at a coverage factor of k=2, on the derived calibration factor for the radionuclide calibrator was 6.6%. - Highlights: ► PTKMR–BATAN as a NMI of Indonesia is required to have procedures to calibrate the radionuclide calibrators. ► Standardizations were carried out on a solution of [ 18 F]FDG using gamma spectrometry. ► The volume of 18 F solutions used was 16 ml because this is the volume often used in hospitals. ► The Secondary Standard ionization chamber is a CRC-7BT Capintec radionuclide calibrator. ► A dial setting for 16 ml of [ 18 F]FDG solution in a vial is 443 for the Capintec dose calibrator.

  7. CytometryML: a markup language for analytical cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.; Leif, Suzanne B.

    2003-06-01

    Cytometry Markup Language, CytometryML, is a proposed new analytical cytology data standard. CytometryML is a set of XML schemas for encoding both flow cytometry and digital microscopy text based data types. CytometryML schemas reference both DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) codes and FCS keywords. These schemas provide representations for the keywords in FCS 3.0 and will soon include DICOM microscopic image data. Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS) list-mode has been mapped to the DICOM Waveform Information Object. A preliminary version of a list mode binary data type, which does not presently exist in DICOM, has been designed. This binary type is required to enhance the storage and transmission of flow cytometry and digital microscopy data. Index files based on Waveform indices will be used to rapidly locate the cells present in individual subsets. DICOM has the advantage of employing standard file types, TIF and JPEG, for Digital Microscopy. Using an XML schema based representation means that standard commercial software packages such as Excel and MathCad can be used to analyze, display, and store analytical cytometry data. Furthermore, by providing one standard for both DICOM data and analytical cytology data, it eliminates the need to create and maintain special purpose interfaces for analytical cytology data thereby integrating the data into the larger DICOM and other clinical communities. A draft version of CytometryML is available at www.newportinstruments.com.

  8. Introducing the Collaborative Learning Modeling Language (ColeML)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundsgaard, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    in this area, represented by, for example, the Workflow Management Coalition (Hollingsworth, 1995) and the very widespread standard Business Process Modeling and Notation (BPMN), has been criticized on the basis of research in knowledge work processes. Inspiration for ColeML is found in this research area...

  9. Malignant lymphomas (ML and HIV infection in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwakigonja Amos R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection is reported to be associated with some malignant lymphomas (ML so called AIDS-related lymphomas (ARL, with an aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. The ML frequency, pathogenicity, clinical patterns and possible association with AIDS in Tanzania, are not well documented impeding the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. Methods Sections of 176 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies of ML patients at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH/Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS, Tanzania from 1996–2001 were stained for hematoxylin and eosin and selected (70 cases for expression of pan-leucocytic (CD45, B-cell (CD20, T-cell (CD3, Hodgkin/RS cell (CD30, histiocyte (CD68 and proliferation (Ki-67 antigen markers. Corresponding clinical records were also evaluated. Available sera from 38 ML patients were screened (ELISA for HIV antibodies. Results The proportion of ML out of all diagnosed tumors at MNH during the 6 year period was 4.2% (176/4200 comprising 77.84% non-Hodgkin (NHL including 19.32% Burkitt's (BL and 22.16% Hodgkin's disease (HD. The ML tumors frequency increased from 0.42% (1997 to 0.70% (2001 and 23.7% of tested sera from these patients were HIV positive. The mean age for all ML was 30, age-range 3–91 and peak age was 1–20 years. The male:female ratio was 1.8:1. Supra-diaphragmatic presentation was commonest and histological sub-types were mostly aggressive B-cell lymphomas however, no clear cases of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL were diagnosed. Conclusion Malignant lymphomas apparently, increased significantly among diagnosed tumors at MNH between 1996 and 2001, predominantly among the young, HIV infected and AIDS patients. The frequent aggressive clinical and histological presentation as well as the dominant B-immunophenotype and the HIV serology indicate a pathogenic association with AIDS. Therefore

  10. Malignant lymphomas (ML) and HIV infection in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakigonja, Amos R; Kaaya, Ephata E; Mgaya, Edward M

    2008-06-10

    HIV infection is reported to be associated with some malignant lymphomas (ML) so called AIDS-related lymphomas (ARL), with an aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. The ML frequency, pathogenicity, clinical patterns and possible association with AIDS in Tanzania, are not well documented impeding the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. Sections of 176 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies of ML patients at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH)/Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS), Tanzania from 1996-2001 were stained for hematoxylin and eosin and selected (70) cases for expression of pan-leucocytic (CD45), B-cell (CD20), T-cell (CD3), Hodgkin/RS cell (CD30), histiocyte (CD68) and proliferation (Ki-67) antigen markers. Corresponding clinical records were also evaluated. Available sera from 38 ML patients were screened (ELISA) for HIV antibodies. The proportion of ML out of all diagnosed tumors at MNH during the 6 year period was 4.2% (176/4200) comprising 77.84% non-Hodgkin (NHL) including 19.32% Burkitt's (BL) and 22.16% Hodgkin's disease (HD). The ML tumors frequency increased from 0.42% (1997) to 0.70% (2001) and 23.7% of tested sera from these patients were HIV positive. The mean age for all ML was 30, age-range 3-91 and peak age was 1-20 years. The male:female ratio was 1.8:1. Supra-diaphragmatic presentation was commonest and histological sub-types were mostly aggressive B-cell lymphomas however, no clear cases of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) were diagnosed. Malignant lymphomas apparently, increased significantly among diagnosed tumors at MNH between 1996 and 2001, predominantly among the young, HIV infected and AIDS patients. The frequent aggressive clinical and histological presentation as well as the dominant B-immunophenotype and the HIV serology indicate a pathogenic association with AIDS. Therefore, routine HIV screening of all malignant lymphoma

  11. Interoperability between OPC UA and AutomationML

    OpenAIRE

    Henßen, Robert; Schleipen, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    OPC UA (OPC Unified Architecture) is a platform-independent standard series (IEC 62541) [1], [2] for communication of industrial automation devices and systems. The OPC Unified Architecture is an advanced communication technology for process control. Certainly the launching costs for the initial information model are quite high. AutomationML (Automation Markup Language) is an upcoming open standard series (IEC 62714) [3], [4] for describing production plants or plant components. The goal of t...

  12. Representing Misalignments of the STAR Geometry Model using AgML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jason C.; Lauret, Jérôme; Perevotchikov, Victor; Smirnov, Dmitri; Van Buren, Gene

    2017-10-01

    The STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was designed to provide high-precision tracking for the identification of charmed hadron decays in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. It consists of three independently mounted subsystems, providing four precision measurements along the track trajectory, with the goal of pointing decay daughters back to vertices displaced by less than 100 microns from the primary event vertex. The ultimate efficiency and resolution of the physics analysis will be driven by the quality of the simulation and reconstruction of events in heavy-ion collisions. In particular, it is important that the geometry model properly accounts for the relative misalignments of the HFT subsystems, along with the alignment of the HFT relative to STARs primary tracking detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The Abstract Geometry Modeling Language (AgML) provides a single description of the STAR geometry, generating both our simulation (GEANT 3) and reconstruction geometries (ROOT). AgML implements an ideal detector model, while misalignments are stored separately in database tables. These have historically been applied at the hit level. Simulated detector hits are projected from their ideal position along the track’s trajectory, until they intersect the misaligned detector volume, where the struck detector element is calculated for hit digitization. This scheme has worked well as hit errors have been negligible compared with the size of sensitive volumes. The precision and complexity of the HFT detector require us to apply misalignments to the detector volumes themselves. In this paper we summarize the extension of the AgML language and support libraries to enable the static misalignment of our reconstruction and simulation geometries, discussing the design goals, limitations and path to full misalignment support in ROOT/VMC-based simulation.

  13. QualityML: a dictionary for quality metadata encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninyerola, Miquel; Sevillano, Eva; Serral, Ivette; Pons, Xavier; Zabala, Alaitz; Bastin, Lucy; Masó, Joan

    2014-05-01

    The scenario of rapidly growing geodata catalogues requires tools focused on facilitate users the choice of products. Having quality fields populated in metadata allow the users to rank and then select the best fit-for-purpose products. In this direction, we have developed the QualityML (http://qualityml.geoviqua.org), a dictionary that contains hierarchically structured concepts to precisely define and relate quality levels: from quality classes to quality measurements. Generically, a quality element is the path that goes from the higher level (quality class) to the lowest levels (statistics or quality metrics). This path is used to encode quality of datasets in the corresponding metadata schemas. The benefits of having encoded quality, in the case of data producers, are related with improvements in their product discovery and better transmission of their characteristics. In the case of data users, particularly decision-makers, they would find quality and uncertainty measures to take the best decisions as well as perform dataset intercomparison. Also it allows other components (such as visualization, discovery, or comparison tools) to be quality-aware and interoperable. On one hand, the QualityML is a profile of the ISO geospatial metadata standards providing a set of rules for precisely documenting quality indicator parameters that is structured in 6 levels. On the other hand, QualityML includes semantics and vocabularies for the quality concepts. Whenever possible, if uses statistic expressions from the UncertML dictionary (http://www.uncertml.org) encoding. However it also extends UncertML to provide list of alternative metrics that are commonly used to quantify quality. A specific example, based on a temperature dataset, is shown below. The annual mean temperature map has been validated with independent in-situ measurements to obtain a global error of 0.5 ° C. Level 0: Quality class (e.g., Thematic accuracy) Level 1: Quality indicator (e.g., Quantitative

  14. The observation of soybean yield components in Ml generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muryono, H.

    1978-01-01

    Some properties of the soybean yield component in Ml generation were investigated. Soybean seed variety of Taichung were irradiated with gamma rays from the cobalt source at the Gamma Atomic Energy Research Centre, Yogyakarta. Seven different doses at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 krads were used. Subsequent growth of the irradiated seed was carried out in the field and the ages of flowering, seedling height number of pods, number of fertile and infertile pods and percentage of sterility were recorded. It was found that the significant effect on the above variables was observed due to the gamma radiation doses between 8-12 krads. (author)

  15. TrackML : The High Energy Physics Tracking Challenge

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    We organize on the Kaggle platform a  data science competition to stimulate both the ML and HEP communities to renew core tracking algorithms in preparation of the next generation of particle detectors at the LHC.    In a nutshell : one event has 100.000 3D points  ; how to associate the points onto 10.000 unknown approximately helicoidal trajectories ? avoiding combinatorial explosion ? you have a few seconds. But we do give you 100.000 events to train on. We ran ttbar+200 minimum bias event into ACTS a simplified (yet accurate) simulation of a generic LHC silicon detectors, and wrote out ...

  16. Sodium corrosion tests in the ML 1 circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1977-01-01

    In the ML-1 circuit of the 'Juan Vigon' research centre in Madrid, sodium corrosion tests are being carried out on the austenitic steels DIN 1.4970 (X10NiCrMoTiB1515) and DIN 1.4301 (X5CrNi189) at temperatures between 500 and 700 0 C. The exposure time of the samples amounts to 6,000 h by now. Every 1,000 h, the samples were weighed in order to measure corrosion and deposition effects. After 3,000 and 6,000 h, some selected samples were destroyed for inspection. The results are given. (GSC) [de

  17. Ovarian volume throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham

    2013-01-01

    conception to 82 years of age. This model shows that 69% of the variation in ovarian volume is due to age alone. We have shown that in the average case ovarian volume rises from 0.7 mL (95% CI 0.4-1.1 mL) at 2 years of age to a peak of 7.7 mL (95% CI 6.5-9.2 mL) at 20 years of age with a subsequent decline...... to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis......The measurement of ovarian volume has been shown to be a useful indirect indicator of the ovarian reserve in women of reproductive age, in the diagnosis and management of a number of disorders of puberty and adult reproductive function, and is under investigation as a screening tool for ovarian...

  18. Simple ML Detector for Multiple Antennas Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Taqwa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to support providing broadband wireless communication services against limited and expensive frequency bandwidth, we have to develop a bandwidth efficient system. Therefore, in this paper we propose a closed-loop MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output system using ML (Maximum Likelihood detector to optimize capacity and to increase system performance. What is especially exciting about the benefits offered by MIMO is that a high capacity and performance can be attained without additional frequency-spectral resource. The grand scenario of this concept is the attained advantages of transformation matrices having capability to allocate transmitted signals power suit to the channel. Furthermore, product of these matrices forms parallel singular channels. Due to zero inter-channels correlation, thus we can design ML detector to increase the system performance. Finally, computer simulations validates that at 0 dB SNR our system can reach optimal capacity up to 1 bps/Hz and SER up to 0.2 higher than opened-loop MIMO.

  19. Biodegradation of malathion by Bacillus licheniformis strain ML-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malathion, a well-known organophosphate pesticide, has been used in agriculture over the last two decades for controlling pests of economically important crops. In the present study, a single bacterium, ML-1, was isolated by soil-enrichment technique and identified as Bacillus licheniformis on the basis of the 16S rRNA technique. The bacterium was grown in carbon-free minimal salt medium (MSM and was found to be very efficient in utilizing malathion as the sole source of carbon. Biodegradation experiments were performed in MSM without carbon source to determine the malathion degradation by the selected strain, and the residues of malathion were determined quantitatively using HPLC techniques. Bacillus licheniformis showed very promising results and efficiently consumed malathion as the sole carbon source via malathion carboxylesterase (MCE, and about 78% malathion was degraded within 5 days. The carboxylesterase activity was determined by using crude extract while using malathion as substrate, and the residues were determined by HPLC. It has been found that the MCE hydrolyzed 87% malathion within 96 h of incubation. Characterization of crude MCE revealed that the enzyme is robust in nature in terms of organic solvents, as it was found to be stable in various concentrations of ethanol and acetonitrile. Similarly, and it can work in a wide pH and temperature range. The results of this study highlighted the potential of Bacillus licheniformis strain ML-1 as a biodegrader that can be used for the bioremediation of malathion-contaminated soil.

  20. Clinical application of l-123 MlBG cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young [College of Medicine, Donga Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-10-01

    Cardiac neurotransmission imaging allows in vivo assessment of presynaptic reuptake, neurotransmitter storage and postsynaptic receptors. Among the various neurotransmitter, I-123 MlBG is most available and relatively well-established. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an analogue of the false neurotransmitter guanethidine. It is taken up to adrenergic neurons by uptake-1 mechanism as same as norepinephrine. As tagged with I-123, it can be used to image sympathetic function in various organs including heart with planar or SPECT techniques. I-123 MIBG imaging has a unique advantage to evaluate myocardial neuronal activity in which the heart has no significant structural abnormality or even no functional derangement measured with other conventional examination. In patients with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, this imaging has most sensitive technique to predict prognosis and treatment response of betablocker or ACE inhibitor. In diabetic patients, it allow very early detection of autonomic neuropathy. In patients with dangerous arrhythmia such as ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, MIBG imaging may be only an abnormal result among various exams. In patients with ischemic heart disease, sympathetic derangement may be used as the method of risk stratification. In heart transplanted patients, sympathetic reinnervation is well evaluated. Adriamycin-induced cardiotoxicity is detected earlier than ventricular dysfunction with sympathetic dysfunction. Neurodegenerative disorder such as Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies has also cardiac sympathetic dysfunction. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity with l-123 MlBG imaging may be improve understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiac disease and make a contribution to predict survival and therapy efficacy.

  1. Clinical application of l-123 MlBG cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac neurotransmission imaging allows in vivo assessment of presynaptic reuptake, neurotransmitter storage and postsynaptic receptors. Among the various neurotransmitter, I-123 MlBG is most available and relatively well-established. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an analogue of the false neurotransmitter guanethidine. It is taken up to adrenergic neurons by uptake-1 mechanism as same as norepinephrine. As tagged with I-123, it can be used to image sympathetic function in various organs including heart with planar or SPECT techniques. I-123 MIBG imaging has a unique advantage to evaluate myocardial neuronal activity in which the heart has no significant structural abnormality or even no functional derangement measured with other conventional examination. In patients with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, this imaging has most sensitive technique to predict prognosis and treatment response of betablocker or ACE inhibitor. In diabetic patients, it allow very early detection of autonomic neuropathy. In patients with dangerous arrhythmia such as ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, MIBG imaging may be only an abnormal result among various exams. In patients with ischemic heart disease, sympathetic derangement may be used as the method of risk stratification. In heart transplanted patients, sympathetic reinnervation is well evaluated. Adriamycin-induced cardiotoxicity is detected earlier than ventricular dysfunction with sympathetic dysfunction. Neurodegenerative disorder such as Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies has also cardiac sympathetic dysfunction. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity with l-123 MlBG imaging may be improve understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiac disease and make a contribution to predict survival and therapy efficacy

  2. Improving Interoperability by Incorporating UnitsML Into Markup Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, Ismet; Dragoset, Robert A; Olsen, Karen J; Schaefer, Reinhold; Kramer, Gary W

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of analytical data over time is a challenge. Years ago, data were recorded on paper that was pasted directly into a laboratory notebook. The digital age has made maintaining the integrity of data harder. Nowadays, digitized analytical data are often separated from information about how the sample was collected and prepared for analysis and how the data were acquired. The data are stored on digital media, while the related information about the data may be written in a paper notebook or stored separately in other digital files. Sometimes the connection between this "scientific meta-data" and the analytical data is lost, rendering the spectrum or chromatogram useless. We have been working with ASTM Subcommittee E13.15 on Analytical Data to create the Analytical Information Markup Language or AnIML-a new way to interchange and store spectroscopy and chromatography data based on XML (Extensible Markup Language). XML is a language for describing what data are by enclosing them in computer-useable tags. Recording the units associated with the analytical data and metadata is an essential issue for any data representation scheme that must be addressed by all domain-specific markup languages. As scientific markup languages proliferate, it is very desirable to have a single scheme for handling units to facilitate moving information between different data domains. At NIST, we have been developing a general markup language just for units that we call UnitsML. This presentation will describe how UnitsML is used and how it is being incorporated into AnIML.

  3. Modeling the Observed Microwave Emission from Shallow Multi-Layer Tundra Snow Using DMRT-ML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Saberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The observed brightness temperatures (Tb at 37 GHz from typical moderate density dry snow in mid-latitudes decreases with increasing snow water equivalent (SWE due to volume scattering of the ground emissions by the overlying snow. At a certain point, however, as SWE increases, the emission from the snowpack offsets the scattering of the sub-nivean emission. In tundra snow, the Tb slope reversal occurs at shallower snow thicknesses. While it has been postulated that the inflection point in the seasonal time series of observed Tb V 37 GHz of tundra snow is controlled by the formation of a thick wind slab layer, the simulation of this effect has yet to be confirmed. Therefore, the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory for Multi Layered (DMRT-ML snowpack is used to predict the passive microwave response from airborne observations over shallow, dense, slab-layered tundra snow. Airborne radiometer observations coordinated with ground-based in situ snow measurements were acquired in the Canadian high Arctic near Eureka, NT, in April 2011. The DMRT-ML was parameterized with the in situ snow measurements using a two-layer snowpack and run in two configurations: a depth hoar and a wind slab dominated pack. With these two configurations, the calibrated DMRT-ML successfully predicted the Tb V 37 GHz response (R correlation of 0.83 when compared with the observed airborne Tb footprints containing snow pits measurements. Using this calibrated model, the DMRT-ML was applied to the whole study region. At the satellite observation scale, observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E over the study area reflected seasonal differences between Tb V 37 GHz and Tb V 19 GHz that supports the hypothesis of the development of an early season volume scattering depth hoar layer, followed by the growth of the late season emission-dominated wind slab layer. This research highlights the necessity to consider the two

  4. The Chances of Subsequent Cancer Detection in Patients with a PSA > 20 ng/ml and an Initial Negative Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Shaida

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS–guided prostate biopsy is known to carry a significant false-negative rate, leading some patients to have multiple biopsies. We investigated cancer detection rates in patients with a PSA >20 ng/ml and a negative initial biopsy. We reviewed our database of 2396 TRUS-guided biopsies done between 1997 and 2002 in order to give a follow-up of at least 6 years. PSA, PSA density (PSAD, PSA velocity (PSAV, prostate volume, and DRE findings were analysed in relation to cancer status. Of the patients, 388 (16% had a PSA >20 ng/ml, including 99 (26% with benign biopsies. Of those, 67 were rebiopsied, including 19 (28% with cancer on the first rebiopsy and four (6% on further biopsies. PSAD, DRE, and volume significantly differed between rebiopsied patients with and without cancer (p 20 ng/ml and have an initial negative biopsy have a high chance of malignancy being detected on a second biopsy. However, if a second biopsy is also negative, then the chances of subsequent biopsies showing signs of cancer are very low if the DRE is normal and particularly if the PSAD is >0.35 ng/ml/cm3.

  5. Application and performance of an ML-EM algorithm in NEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, A.; Lerche, C.; Monrabal, F.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Álvarez, V.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Benlloch-Rodríguez, J. M.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Botas, A.; Cárcel, S.; Carrión, J. V.; Cebrián, S.; Conde, C. A. N.; Díaz, J.; Diesburg, M.; Escada, J.; Esteve, R.; Felkai, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Goldschmidt, A.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Henriques, C. A. O.; Hernandez, A. I.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrero, V.; Jones, B. J. P.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Lebrun, P.; Liubarsky, I.; López-March, N.; Losada, M.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; McDonald, A. D.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Musti, M.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Novella, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Palmeiro, B.; Para, A.; Pérez, J.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Rogers, L.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Stiegler, T.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.

    2017-08-01

    The goal of the NEXT experiment is the observation of neutrinoless double beta decay in 136Xe using a gaseous xenon TPC with electroluminescent amplification and specialized photodetector arrays for calorimetry and tracking. The NEXT Collaboration is exploring a number of reconstruction algorithms to exploit the full potential of the detector. This paper describes one of them: the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (ML-EM) method, a generic iterative algorithm to find maximum-likelihood estimates of parameters that has been applied to solve many different types of complex inverse problems. In particular, we discuss a bi-dimensional version of the method in which the photosensor signals integrated over time are used to reconstruct a transverse projection of the event. First results show that, when applied to detector simulation data, the algorithm achieves nearly optimal energy resolution (better than 0.5% FWHM at the Q value of 136Xe) for events distributed over the full active volume of the TPC.

  6. Chromosomal studies on 2 mL of celomic fluid obtained during the fifth week of development in the timed-pregnant baboon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaya-Forgas, Joaquin; De Leon-Luis, Juan; Shen, Zhion; McCorquodale, Maureen

    2005-09-01

    To determine if chromosomal studies could be performed using 2 mL of celomicfluid obtained during the fifth postfertilization week in pregnant baboons. Nine ultrasound-guided celocenteses were performed. The initial 0.5 mL of celomic fluid was discarded to decrease maternal cell contamination. Approximately 2 mL of celomic fluid was then collected. The fluid was centrifuged and the supernatant removed to a final volume of 0.5 mL. The celomic fluid sample was placed in either a small plastic flaskette chamber slide with a mix of 0.5 mL celomic fluid, 1 mL of Amniomax, and 1 mL of usedfibroblast culture medium to spread on the entire surface (n=4), or a 3.5 x 1-cm plastic Petri dish with a 24 x 30-mm glass coverslip to keep the 0.5 mL celomic fluid mixed with 1 mL of Amniomax (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, California) within a 1 cm2 area (n=5). The medium was changed on day 5 and thereafter every second to third day. The cells were harvested when the number of cells appeared sufficient for chromosomal analysis. Standard chromosomal studies were possible in 5 of the 9 celomicfluid samples. Mean (+/-SD) celomic fluid volume used for culture was 1.85 +/- 0.3 mL. Mean (+/-SD) time to karyotype result was 18.8 +/- 1.8 days. The findings of this study suggest that there are living cells at 36-42 days of embryonic development in the extraembryonic celomic fluid of primates and that they can be cultured for chromosomal studies. However, significant improvements in understanding the biology of cells present at 5 weeks after fertilization in celomic fluid are needed to improve culture conditions.

  7. mzML2ISA & nmrML2ISA: generating enriched ISA-Tab metadata files from metabolomics XML data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Martin; Lawson, Thomas N; Weber, Ralf J M; Moreno, Pablo; Haug, Kenneth; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Viant, Mark R; Steinbeck, Christoph; Salek, Reza M

    2017-08-15

    Submission to the MetaboLights repository for metabolomics data currently places the burden of reporting instrument and acquisition parameters in ISA-Tab format on users, who have to do it manually, a process that is time consuming and prone to user input error. Since the large majority of these parameters are embedded in instrument raw data files, an opportunity exists to capture this metadata more accurately. Here we report a set of Python packages that can automatically generate ISA-Tab metadata file stubs from raw XML metabolomics data files. The parsing packages are separated into mzML2ISA (encompassing mzML and imzML formats) and nmrML2ISA (nmrML format only). Overall, the use of mzML2ISA & nmrML2ISA reduces the time needed to capture metadata substantially (capturing 90% of metadata on assay and sample levels), is much less prone to user input errors, improves compliance with minimum information reporting guidelines and facilitates more finely grained data exploration and querying of datasets. mzML2ISA & nmrML2ISA are available under version 3 of the GNU General Public Licence at https://github.com/ISA-tools. Documentation is available from http://2isa.readthedocs.io/en/latest/. reza.salek@ebi.ac.uk or isatools@googlegroups.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. jqcML: an open-source java API for mass spectrometry quality control data in the qcML format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittremieux, Wout; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Valkenborg, Dirk; Martens, Lennart; Laukens, Kris

    2014-07-03

    The awareness that systematic quality control is an essential factor to enable the growth of proteomics into a mature analytical discipline has increased over the past few years. To this aim, a controlled vocabulary and document structure have recently been proposed by Walzer et al. to store and disseminate quality-control metrics for mass-spectrometry-based proteomics experiments, called qcML. To facilitate the adoption of this standardized quality control routine, we introduce jqcML, a Java application programming interface (API) for the qcML data format. First, jqcML provides a complete object model to represent qcML data. Second, jqcML provides the ability to read, write, and work in a uniform manner with qcML data from different sources, including the XML-based qcML file format and the relational database qcDB. Interaction with the XML-based file format is obtained through the Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB), while generic database functionality is obtained by the Java Persistence API (JPA). jqcML is released as open-source software under the permissive Apache 2.0 license and can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/proteinspector/jqcml .

  9. Feasibility of 320-row area detector CT coronary angiography using 40 mL of contrast material: assessment of image quality and diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Rihyeon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To assess the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of 320-row area detector CT (320-ADCT) coronary angiography using 40 mL of contrast material in comparison with 60-mL protocol. This retrospective study included 183 patients who underwent 320-ADCT coronary angiography using 40 mL of contrast and additional 183 sex- and body mass index-matched patients using 60 mL of contrast constituting the control group. Both groups used the same 5-mL/sec injection rate. Quantitative image quality measurements and diagnostic accuracies were calculated and compared. Mean attenuation and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at the aorta and all coronary arteries were lower in the 40-mL group than in the 60-mL group (all, p < 0.05), except for the CNR at proximal coronary arteries at 100 kVp (p = 0.073). However, the proportion of coronary segments with vessel attenuation >250 HU was not different between groups (all, p > 0.05), except for distal coronary arteries at 80 kVp (p = 0.001). Furthermore, there were no differences in per-patient and per-segment diagnostic accuracies between the groups (all, p > 0.05). 320-ADCT coronary angiography using 40 mL of contrast showed image quality and diagnostic accuracy comparable to the 60-mL protocol, demonstrating the clinical feasibility of lowering the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy through contrast volume reduction. (orig.)

  10. Desempenho de idosos brasileiros no teste de deglutição de 100 ml de água Performance of Brazilian elderly on the 100 ml water swallowing test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Maria Martins Moreira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o desempenho de idosos brasileiros, residentes em uma instituição de longa permanência, no teste de deglutição de 100 ml de água com os resultados obtidos em idosos ingleses. MÉTODOS: Dezoito idosos residentes numa instituição de longa permanência, considerados normais para a função de deglutição (13 mulheres e cinco homens, com idade média de 83,46 anos foram solicitados a beber 100 ml de água de um copo plástico, reproduzindo o estudo inglês. O avaliador observou lateralmente o número de goles, tempo gasto e intercorrências, gerando três índices: volume por deglutição (ml, tempo por deglutição (s e capacidade de deglutição (ml/s. RESULTADOS: A capacidade de deglutição para homens foi menor do que a das mulheres, divergindo do estudo original. O tempo médio de cada deglutição e o volume médio por deglutição foi semelhante para ambos os gêneros. CONCLUSÃO: A capacidade de deglutição em idosos é inferior à de adultos normais, indicando lentificação da deglutição. A diferença entre gêneros encontrada no estudo original não foi reproduzida, entretanto nossa amostra foi mais idosa.PURPOSE: To compare the performance of Brazilian elderly patients living in a long-term care facility on the 100 ml water swallowing test with the results obtained with British elderly. METHODS: Eighteen elderly subjects (13 women and five men, mean age 83.46, residents in a long-term care facility and considered normal regarding the swallowing function, were selected to take part in this study. As in a British study, they were laterally observed by the examiner while swallowing 100 ml of water from a plastic cup. The examiner observed the number of sips, the time taken, and complications during the test, which generated the following indices: volume per swallow (ml, time per swallow (s, and swallowing capacity (ml/s. RESULTS: The elderly men had lower swallowing capacity than the women in the research

  11. Intra-articular sodium hyaluronate 2 mL versus physiological saline 20 mL versus physiological saline 2 mL for painful knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard, C.; Dufour, N.; Fallentin, E.

    2008-01-01

    , Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) criteria, and global assessment of the patient's condition. Results: The mean age of the patients was 69.4 years; 55% were women. The effects of hyaluronate 2 mL, physiological saline 20 m......Objective: Methodological constraints weaken previous evidence on intra-articular viscosupplementation and physiological saline distention for osteoarthritis. We conducted a randomized, patient- and observer-blind trial to evaluate these interventions in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis....... Methods: We centrally randomized 251 patients with knee ostcoarthritis to four weekly intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate 2 mL (Hyalgan(R) 10.3 mg/mL) versus physiological saline 20 mL (distention) versus physiological saline 2 mL (placebo) and followed patients for 26 weeks. Inclusion...

  12. Small volume target for F-18 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicioli, M.; Schuler, J.; Marchand, P.; Brasse, D.

    2017-05-01

    In order to reduce the volume of O-18 enriched water used for each F-18 production for research a small volume target of 1 ml has been designed at IPHC. The designed is derived from ACSI 3.8ml F-18 target and uses both water and Helium cooling. After one year of use production yield is reported.

  13. A prospective randomized, controlled trial deems a drainage of 300 ml/day safe before removal of the last chest drain after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Ya; Xu, Kai; Tang, Jin-Xing; Bian, Wen; Ma, Hai-Tao; Zhao, Jun; Ni, Bin

    2015-08-01

    To study the feasible and safe volume threshold for chest tube removal following video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical lobectomy. One hundred and sixty-eight consecutive patients (18 were excluded) who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy or bilobectomy with two incisions between August 2012 and February 2014 were included. Eligible patients were randomized into three groups: Group A (chest tube was removed at a drainage volume of 150 ml/day or less. n = 49); Group B (chest tube was removed when the drainage volume was less than 300 ml/day. n = 50); Group C (chest tube was removed when the drainage volume was less than 450 ml/day. n = 51). The postoperative care of all patients was consistent. The time of extracting the drainage tube, postoperative hospital stay, postoperative visual analogue scale grades, dosage of analgesic, and the incidence of complications and thoracocentesis were measured. Group B and C had a much shorter drainage time and postoperative hospital stay than Group A (P 0.05). The mean dosage of pethidine hydrochloride was 248.9 ± 33.3 mg in Group B and 226.1 ± 32.7 mg in Group C (P > 0.05). The dosage of pethidine hydrochloride of Group A was significantly higher than that of Group B and C (P 0.05), Group A had a significantly higher total VAS score than Group B and C (P drains among the three groups (P > 0.05). A 300-ml/day volume threshold for chest tube removal after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy is feasible and safe, demonstating more advantages than the 150-ml/day volume threshold. However, a 450-ml/day volume threshold for chest tube removal may increase the risk of thoracentesis compared with the 300- and the 150-ml/day volume threshold. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. The difference of contrast effects of myelography in normal dogs: Comparison of iohexol (180 mgI/ml), iohexol (240 mgI/ml) and iotrolan (240 mgI/ml)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, J.; Yamada, K.; Kishimoto, M.; Iwasaki, T.; Miyake, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The contrast effects of three different contrast media preparations (iohexol 180 mgI/ml, iohexol 240 mgI/ml and iotrolan 240 mgI/ml) in conventional and CT myelography were compared. Three beagle dogs were used and the study employed a cross-over method (total of 9) for each contrast media. The result of CT myelography showed that the contrast effect of iohexol (180 mgI/ml), which had low viscosity, was highest in cranial sites, and the contrast effect of high-viscosity iotrolan (240 mgI/ml) was highest in caudal sites 5 min after injection of the contrast media preparations. This shows that the diffusion of contrast media preparations in the subarachnoid space is influenced by viscosity. The results of conventional myelography also showed that the diffusion of contrast media preparations is influenced by viscosity. Therefore, it is important to identify the location of spinal lesions in veterinary practice, and low viscosity contrast medium preparation with wide spread contrast effects is considered suitable for myelography

  15. SED-ML web tools: generate, modify and export standard-compliant simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Frank T; Nickerson, David; Waltemath, Dagmar; Scharm, Martin

    2017-04-15

    The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) is a standardized format for exchanging simulation studies independently of software tools. We present the SED-ML Web Tools, an online application for creating, editing, simulating and validating SED-ML documents. The Web Tools implement all current SED-ML specifications and, thus, support complex modifications and co-simulation of models in SBML and CellML formats. Ultimately, the Web Tools lower the bar on working with SED-ML documents and help users create valid simulation descriptions. http://sysbioapps.dyndns.org/SED-ML_Web_Tools/ . fbergman@caltech.edu . © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Suppression of phase separation in $(AlAs)_{2ML} (InAs)_{2ML}$ superlattices using $Al_{0.48}In_{0.52}$ As monolayer insertions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S R; Follstaedt, D M

    2001-01-01

    Al/sub 0.48/In/sub 0.52/As monolayers (ML) are inserted at the binary-compound interfaces of (AlAs)/sub 2/ /sub ML/(InAs)/sub 2/ /sub ML/ short-period superlattices (SPSs) during growth on (001) In P. The insertion of Al/sub 0.48/In/sub 0.52/As interlayers greater than 2 ML thick tends to suppress the phase separation that normally occurs during molecular beam epitaxy of the SPS. The degree of suppression is a sensitive function of both the monolayer-scale thickness, and the intraperiod growth sequence, of the interlayers in the SPS. Given this sensitivity to monolayer-scale variations in the surface-region composition, we propose that cyclical phase transition of the reconstructed surface initiates SPS decomposition. (21 refs).

  17. Small-Volume Injections: Evaluation of Volume Administration Deviation From Intended Injection Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Chen, Michael I; Claure, Rebecca E; Drover, David R; Efron, Bradley; Fitch, William L; Hammer, Gregory B

    2017-10-01

    In the perioperative period, anesthesiologists and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses routinely prepare and administer small-volume IV injections, yet the accuracy of delivered medication volumes in this setting has not been described. In this ex vivo study, we sought to characterize the degree to which small-volume injections (≤0.5 mL) deviated from the intended injection volumes among a group of pediatric anesthesiologists and pediatric postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses. We hypothesized that as the intended injection volumes decreased, the deviation from those intended injection volumes would increase. Ten attending pediatric anesthesiologists and 10 pediatric PACU nurses each performed a series of 10 injections into a simulated patient IV setup. Practitioners used separate 1-mL tuberculin syringes with removable 18-gauge needles (Becton-Dickinson & Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ) to aspirate 5 different volumes (0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mL) of 0.25 mM Lucifer Yellow (LY) fluorescent dye constituted in saline (Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) from a rubber-stoppered vial. Each participant then injected the specified volume of LY fluorescent dye via a 3-way stopcock into IV tubing with free-flowing 0.9% sodium chloride (10 mL/min). The injected volume of LY fluorescent dye and 0.9% sodium chloride then drained into a collection vial for laboratory analysis. Microplate fluorescence wavelength detection (Infinite M1000; Tecan, Mannedorf, Switzerland) was used to measure the fluorescence of the collected fluid. Administered injection volumes were calculated based on the fluorescence of the collected fluid using a calibration curve of known LY volumes and associated fluorescence.To determine whether deviation of the administered volumes from the intended injection volumes increased at lower injection volumes, we compared the proportional injection volume error (loge [administered volume/intended volume]) for each of the 5 injection volumes using a linear

  18. IrML – a gene encoding a new member of the ML protein family from the hard tick, Ixodes ricinus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáčková, J.; Rudenko, Natalia; Golovchenko, Maryna; Havlíková, S.; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2010), s. 410-418 ISSN 1081-1710 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/06/1479; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * tick * ML-domain containing protein * in situ hybridization * gene expression * ML (MD-2-related lipid-recognition) domain Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.256, year: 2010

  19. Correlation of ultrasound estimated placental volume and umbilical cord blood volume in term pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannopnut, Papinwit; Kitporntheranunt, Maethaphan; Paritakul, Panwara; Kongsomboon, Kittipong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between ultrasound measured placental volume and collected umbilical cord blood (UCB) volume in term pregnancy. An observational cross-sectional study of term singleton pregnant women in the labor ward at Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Medical Center was conducted. Placental thickness, height, and width were measured using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound and calculated for placental volume using the volumetric mathematic model. After the delivery of the baby, UCB was collected and measured for its volume immediately. Then, birth weight, placental weight, and the actual placental volume were analyzed. The Pearson's correlation was used to determine the correlation between each two variables. A total of 35 pregnant women were eligible for the study. The mean and standard deviation of estimated placental volume and actual placental volume were 534±180 mL and 575±118 mL, respectively. The median UCB volume was 140 mL (range 98-220 mL). The UCB volume did not have a statistically significant correlation with the estimated placental volume (correlation coefficient 0.15; p=0.37). However, the UCB volume was significantly correlated with the actual placental volume (correlation coefficient 0.62; pcorrelation coefficient 0.38; p=0.02). The estimated placental volume by 2D ultrasound was not significantly correlated with the UCB volume. Further studies to establish the correlation between the UCB volume and the estimated placental volume using other types of placental imaging may be needed.

  20. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Enhanced Melamine (ML) Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) funded a proposal to achieve initial basic acoustic characterization of ML (melamine) foam, which could serve as a starting point for a future, more comprehensive acoustic test program for ML foam. A project plan was developed and implemented to obtain acoustic test data for both normal and enhanced ML foam. This project became known as the NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT). This document contains the outcome of the NEMFAT project.

  1. A MuDDy Experience-ML Bindings to a BDD Library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ken Friis

    2009-01-01

    . This combination of an ML interface to a high-performance C library is surprisingly fruitful. ML allows you to quickly experiment with high-level symbolic algorithms before handing over the grunt work to the C library. I show how, with a relatively little effort, you can make a domain specific language...... for concurrent finite state-machines embedded in Standard ML and then write various custom model-checking algorithms for this domain specific embedded language (DSEL)....

  2. Determination of a normogram for testicular volume measured by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4.67years, 1.18±0.29m, 24.79±14.76kg and 15.82±2.63kg/m2. The mean testicular volume in the study population was 1.93±3.31ml. The right and left mean testicular volume were 2.27±+3.66ml and 2.23±3.61ml, respectively. Testicular volume ...

  3. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen chemisorption on Pd(111), Re(0001) and PdML/Re(0001), ReML/Pd(111) pseudomorphic overlayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallassana, Venkataraman; Neurock, Matthew; Hansen, Lars Bruno

    1999-01-01

    not appear to provide an independent parameter for assessing surface reactivity. The weak chemisorption of hydrogen on the Pd-ML/Re(0001) surface relates to substantial lowering of the d-band center of Pd, when it is pseudomorphically deposited as a monolayer on a Re substrate. [S0163-1829(99)00331-2].......Gradient-corrected density-functional theory (DFT-GGA) periodic slab calculations have been used to analyze the binding of atomic hydrogen on monometallic Pd(111), Re(0001), and bimetallic Pd-mL/Re(0001) [pseudomorphic monolayer of Pd(111) on Re(0001)] and Re-ML/Pd(111) surfaces. The computed...

  4. SysML for systems engineering a model-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Jon

    2013-01-01

    This new edition of this popular text has been fully updated to reflect SysML 1.3, the latest version of the standard, and the discussion has been extended to show the power of SysML as a tool for systems engineering in an MBSE context.

  5. A SysML Test Model and Test Suite for the ETCS Ceiling Speed Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braunstein, Cécile; Peleska, Jan; Schulze, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    System specification. The model is provided in SysML, and it is equipped with a formal semantics that is consistent with the (semi formal) SysML standard published by the Object Management Group (OMG). The model and its description are publicly available on http://www.mbt-benchmarks.de, a website...

  6. Post-void residual urine under 150 ml does not exclude voiding dysfunction in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khayyami, Yasmine; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: It has been claimed that post-void residual urine (PVR) below 150 ml rules out voiding dysfunction in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and provides license to perform sling surgery. The cut-off of 150 ml seems arbitrary, not evidence-based, and so we sough...

  7. Evaluation of ML-MC as a Depth Discriminant in Yellowstone, USA and Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Sun, D.; D'Amico, S.

    2017-12-01

    Recent work has shown that the difference between two magnitude scales, ML (local Richter magnitude) and MC (coda/duration magnitude), acts as a depth discriminant in Utah. Shallow seismic sources, such as mining induced earthquakes and explosions, have strongly negative ML-MC values, while deeper tectonic earthquakes have ML-MC values near zero. These observations imply that ML-MC might be effective at discriminating small explosions from deeper natural earthquakes at local distances. In this work, we examine seismicity catalogs for the Yellowstone region and Italy to determine if ML-MCacts as a depth discriminant in these regions as well. We identified 4,780 earthquakes that occurred in the Yellowstone region between Sept. 24, 1994 and March 31, 2017 for which both ML and MC were calculated. The ML-MC distribution is well described by a Gaussian function with a mean of 0.102 and a standard deviation of 0.326. We selected a subset of these events with accurate depths and determined mean ML-MC values in various depth bins. An event depth was considered accurate if the formal depth error was less than 2 km and either (1) the nearest station was within one focal depth or (2) the distance to the nearest station was smaller than the bin size. We find that ML-MC decreases as event depths become shallower than about 10 km. Similar to the results for Utah, the decrease is statistically significant and is robust with respect to small changes in bin size and the criteria used to define accurate depths. We used a similar process to evaluate whether ML-MC was a function of source depth for 63,555 earthquakes that occurred between April 16, 2005 and April 30, 2012 in Italy. The ML-MC values in Italy are also well described by a normal distribution, with a mean of -0.477 and standard deviation of 0.315. We again find a statistically significant decrease in ML-MC for shallow earthquakes. In contrast to the Yellowstone results, for Italy ML-MC decreases at a nearly constant rate

  8. The performance review of EEWS(Earthquake Early Warning System) about Gyeongju earthquakes with Ml 5.1 and Ml 5.8 in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Ho; Chi, Heon-Cheol; Lim, In-Seub; Seong, Yun-Jeong; Park, Jihwan

    2017-04-01

    EEW(Earthquake Early Warning) service to the public has been officially operated by KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) from 2015 in Korea. For the KMA's official EEW service, KIGAM has adopted ElarmS from UC Berkeley BSL and modified local magnitude relation, 1-D travel time curves and association procedures with real time waveform from about 201 seismic stations of KMA, KIGAM, KINS and KEPRI. There were two moderate size earthquakes with magnitude Ml 5.1 and Ml 5.8 close to Gyeongju city located at the southeastern part of Korea on Sep. 12. 2016. We have checked the performance of EEWS(Earthquake Early Warning System) named as TrigDB by KIGAM reviewing of these two Gyeongju earthquakes. The nearest station to epicenters of two earthquakes Ml 5.1(35.7697 N, 129.1904 E) and Ml 5.8(35.7632 N, 129.1898 E) was MKL which detected P phases in about 2.1 and 3.6 seconds after the origin times respectively. The first events were issued in 6.3 and 7.0 seconds from each origin time. Because of the unstable results on the early steps due to very few stations and unexpected automated analysis, KMA has the policy to wait for more 20 seconds for confirming the reliability. For these events KMA published EEW alarms in about 26 seconds after origin times with M 5.3 and M 5.9 respectively.

  9. jmzIdentML API: A Java interface to the mzIdentML standard for peptide and protein identification data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Florian; Krishna, Ritesh; Ghali, Fawaz; Ríos, Daniel; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Jones, Andrew R

    2012-03-01

    We present a Java application programming interface (API), jmzIdentML, for the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO) Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI) mzIdentML standard for peptide and protein identification data. The API combines the power of Java Architecture of XML Binding (JAXB) and an XPath-based random-access indexer to allow a fast and efficient mapping of extensible markup language (XML) elements to Java objects. The internal references in the mzIdentML files are resolved in an on-demand manner, where the whole file is accessed as a random-access swap file, and only the relevant piece of XMLis selected for mapping to its corresponding Java object. The APIis highly efficient in its memory usage and can handle files of arbitrary sizes. The APIfollows the official release of the mzIdentML (version 1.1) specifications and is available in the public domain under a permissive licence at http://www.code.google.com/p/jmzidentml/. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Polymorphic New World monkeys with more than three M/L cone types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gerald H.; Deegan, Jess F.

    2005-10-01

    Most New World (platyrrhine) monkeys have M/L cone photopigment polymorphisms that map directly into individual variations in visual sensitivity and color vision. We used electroretinogram flicker photometry to examine M/L cone photopigments in the New World monkey Callicebus moloch (the dusky Titi). Like other New World monkeys, this species has an M/L cone photopigment polymorphism that reflects the presence of X-chromosome opsin gene alleles. However, unlike other platyrrhines in which three M/L photopigments are typical, Callicebus has a total of five M/L cone photopigments. The peak sensitivity values for these pigments extend across the range from 530 to 562 nm. The result is an enhanced array of potential color vision phenotypes in this species.

  11. A practical guide to SysML the systems modeling language

    CERN Document Server

    Friendenthal,Sanford; Steiner, Rick

    2009-01-01

    This book is the bestselling, authoritative guide to SysML for systems and software engineers, providing a comprehensive and practical resource for modeling systems with SysML. Fully updated to cover newly released version 1.3, it includes a full description of the modeling language along with a quick reference guide, and shows how an organization or project can transition to model-based systems engineering using SysML, with considerations for processes, methods, tools, and training. Numerous examples help readers understand how SysML can be used in practice, while reference material facilitates studying for the OMG Systems Modeling Professional (OCSMP) Certification Program, designed to test candidates' knowledge of SysML and their ability to use models to represent real-world systems.

  12. QuakeML: Status of the XML-based Seismological Data Exchange Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, Fabian; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Kästli, Philipp; Quakeml Working Group

    2010-05-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange standard for seismology that is in its fourth year of active community-driven development. The current release (version 1.2) is based on a public Request for Comments process that included contributions from ETH, GFZ, USC, SCEC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, GNS, ZAMG, BRGM, Nanometrics, and ISTI. QuakeML has mainly been funded through the EC FP6 infrastructure project NERIES, in which it was endorsed as the preferred data exchange format. Currently, QuakeML services are being installed at several institutions around the globe, including EMSC, ORFEUS, ETH, Geoazur (Europe), NEIC, ANSS, SCEC/SCSN (USA), and GNS Science (New Zealand). Some of these institutions already provide QuakeML earthquake catalog web services. Several implementations of the QuakeML data model have been made. QuakePy, an open-source Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit using the QuakeML data model, is being developed at ETH. QuakePy is part of the software stack used in the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) testing center installations, developed by SCEC. Furthermore, the QuakeML data model is part of the SeisComP3 package from GFZ Potsdam. QuakeML is designed as an umbrella schema under which several sub-packages are collected. The present scope of QuakeML 1.2 covers a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Work on additional packages (macroseismic information, seismic inventory, and resource metadata) has been started, but is at an early stage. Contributions from the community that help to widen the thematic coverage of QuakeML are highly welcome. Online resources: http://www.quakeml.org, http://www.quakepy.org

  13. Limiting volume with modern ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Thomas J; Haan, Lutana; Ashworth, Lonny J; Anderson, Jeff

    2015-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) network low tidal-volume study comparing tidal volumes of 12 ml/kg versus 6 ml/kg was published in 2000. The study was stopped early as data revealed a 22% relative reduction in mortality rate when using 6 ml/kg tidal volume. The current generation of critical care ventilators allows the tidal volume to be set during volume-targeted, assist/control (volume A/C); however, some ventilators include options that may prevent the tidal volume from being controlled. The purpose of this bench study was to evaluate the delivered tidal volume, when these options are active, in a spontaneously breathing lung model using an electronic breathing simulator. Four ventilators were evaluated: CareFusion AVEA (AVEA), Dräger Evita® XL (Evita XL), Covidien Puritan Bennett® 840(TM) (PB 840), and Maquet SERVO-i (SERVO-i). Each ventilator was connected to the Hans Rudolph Electronic Breathing Simulator at an amplitude of 0 cm H2O and then 10 cm H2O. All four ventilators were set to deliver volume A/C, tidal volume 400 ml, respiratory rate 20 bpm, positive end-expiratory pressure 5 cm H2O, peak flowrate 60 L/min. The displayed tidal volume was recorded for each ventilator at the above settings with additional options OFF and then ON. The AVEA has two options in volume A/C: demand breaths and V-sync. When activated, these options allow the patient to exceed the set tidal volume. When using the Evita XL, the option AutoFlow can be turned ON or OFF, and when this option is ON, the tidal volume may vary. The PB 840 does not have any additional options that affect volume delivery, and it maintains the set tidal volume regardless of patient effort. The SERVO-i's demand valve allows additional flow if the patient's inspiratory flowrate exceeds the set flowrate, increasing the delivered tidal volume; this option can be turned OFF with the latest software upgrade. Modern ventilators have an increasing number of optional settings. These settings may

  14. Volume-Dependent Overestimation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hematoma Volume by the ABC/2 Formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chih-Wei Wang; Chun-Jung Juan; Hsian-He Hsu; Hua-Shan Liu; Cheng-Yu Chen; Chun-Jen Hsueh; Hung-Wen Kao; Guo-Shu Huang; Yi-Jui Liu; Chung-Ping Lo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although the ABC/2 formula has been widely used to estimate the volume of intracerebral hematoma (ICH), the formula tends to overestimate hematoma volume. The volume-related imprecision of the ABC/2 formula has not been documented quantitatively. Purpose: To investigate the volume-dependent overestimation of the ABC/2 formula by comparing it with computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA). Material and Methods: Forty patients who had suffered spontaneous ICH and who had undergone non-enhanced brain computed tomography scans were enrolled in this study. The ICH volume was estimated based on the ABC/2 formula and also calculated by CAVA. Based on the ICH volume calculated by the CAVA method, the patients were divided into three groups: group 1 consisted of 17 patients with an ICH volume of less than 20 ml; group 2 comprised 13 patients with an ICH volume of 20 to 40 ml; and group 3 was composed of 10 patients with an ICH volume larger than 40 ml. Results: The mean estimated hematoma volume was 43.6 ml when using the ABC/2 formula, compared with 33.8 ml when using the CAVA method. The mean estimated difference was 1.3 ml, 4.4 ml, and 31.4 ml for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, corresponding to an estimation error of 9.9%, 16.7%, and 37.1% by the ABC/2 formula (P<0.05). Conclusion: The ABC/2 formula significantly overestimates the volume of ICH. A positive association between the estimation error and the volume of ICH is demonstrated

  15. qcML: an exchange format for quality control metrics from mass spectrometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Mathias; Pernas, Lucia Espona; Nasso, Sara; Bittremieux, Wout; Nahnsen, Sven; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Pichler, Peter; van den Toorn, Henk W P; Staes, An; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Mazanek, Michael; Taus, Thomas; Scheltema, Richard A; Kelstrup, Christian D; Gatto, Laurent; van Breukelen, Bas; Aiche, Stephan; Valkenborg, Dirk; Laukens, Kris; Lilley, Kathryn S; Olsen, Jesper V; Heck, Albert J R; Mechtler, Karl; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gevaert, Kris; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Martens, Lennart

    2014-08-01

    Quality control is increasingly recognized as a crucial aspect of mass spectrometry based proteomics. Several recent papers discuss relevant parameters for quality control and present applications to extract these from the instrumental raw data. What has been missing, however, is a standard data exchange format for reporting these performance metrics. We therefore developed the qcML format, an XML-based standard that follows the design principles of the related mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML, and TraML standards from the HUPO-PSI (Proteomics Standards Initiative). In addition to the XML format, we also provide tools for the calculation of a wide range of quality metrics as well as a database format and interconversion tools, so that existing LIMS systems can easily add relational storage of the quality control data to their existing schema. We here describe the qcML specification, along with possible use cases and an illustrative example of the subsequent analysis possibilities. All information about qcML is available at http://code.google.com/p/qcml. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. qcML: An Exchange Format for Quality Control Metrics from Mass Spectrometry Experiments*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Mathias; Pernas, Lucia Espona; Nasso, Sara; Bittremieux, Wout; Nahnsen, Sven; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Pichler, Peter; van den Toorn, Henk W. P.; Staes, An; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Mazanek, Michael; Taus, Thomas; Scheltema, Richard A.; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Gatto, Laurent; van Breukelen, Bas; Aiche, Stephan; Valkenborg, Dirk; Laukens, Kris; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Heck, Albert J. R.; Mechtler, Karl; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gevaert, Kris; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Martens, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Quality control is increasingly recognized as a crucial aspect of mass spectrometry based proteomics. Several recent papers discuss relevant parameters for quality control and present applications to extract these from the instrumental raw data. What has been missing, however, is a standard data exchange format for reporting these performance metrics. We therefore developed the qcML format, an XML-based standard that follows the design principles of the related mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML, and TraML standards from the HUPO-PSI (Proteomics Standards Initiative). In addition to the XML format, we also provide tools for the calculation of a wide range of quality metrics as well as a database format and interconversion tools, so that existing LIMS systems can easily add relational storage of the quality control data to their existing schema. We here describe the qcML specification, along with possible use cases and an illustrative example of the subsequent analysis possibilities. All information about qcML is available at http://code.google.com/p/qcml. PMID:24760958

  17. The abstract geometry modeling language (AgML): experience and road map toward eRHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jason; Lauret, Jerome; Perevoztchikov, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The STAR experiment has adopted an Abstract Geometry Modeling Language (AgML) as the primary description of our geometry model. AgML establishes a level of abstraction, decoupling the definition of the detector from the software libraries used to create the concrete geometry model. Thus, AgML allows us to support both our legacy GEANT 3 simulation application and our ROOT/TGeo based reconstruction software from a single source, which is demonstrably self- consistent. While AgML was developed primarily as a tool to migrate away from our legacy FORTRAN-era geometry codes, it also provides a rich syntax geared towards the rapid development of detector models. AgML has been successfully employed by users to quickly develop and integrate the descriptions of several new detectors in the RHIC/STAR experiment including the Forward GEM Tracker (FGT) and Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) upgrades installed in STAR for the 2012 and 2013 runs. AgML has furthermore been heavily utilized to study future upgrades to the STAR detector as it prepares for the eRHIC era. With its track record of practical use in a live experiment in mind, we present the status, lessons learned and future of the AgML language as well as our experience in bringing the code into our production and development environments. We will discuss the path toward eRHIC and pushing the current model to accommodate for detector miss-alignment and high precision physics.

  18. pymzML--Python module for high-throughput bioinformatics on mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bald, Till; Barth, Johannes; Niehues, Anna; Specht, Michael; Hippler, Michael; Fufezan, Christian

    2012-04-01

    pymzML is an extension to Python that offers (i) an easy access to mass spectrometry (MS) data that allows the rapid development of tools, (ii) a very fast parser for mzML data, the standard data format in MS and (iii) a set of functions to compare or handle spectra. pymzML requires Python2.6.5+ and is fully compatible with Python3. The module is freely available on http://pymzml.github.com or pypi, is published under LGPL license and requires no additional modules to be installed. christian@fufezan.net.

  19. Rare A2ML1 variants confer susceptibility to otitis media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Chiong, Charlotte M.; Reyes-Quintos, Ma. Rina T.; Tantoco, Ma. Leah C.; Wang, Xin; Acharya, Anushree; Abbe, Izoduwa; Giese, Arnaud P.; Smith, Joshua D.; Allen, E. Kaitlynn; Li, Biao; Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria; Garcia, Marieflor Cristy; Llanes, Erasmo Gonzalo D.V.; Labra, Patrick John; Gloria-Cruz, Teresa Luisa I.; Chan, Abner L.; Wang, Gao T.; Daly, Kathleen A.; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Patel, Janak A.; Riazuddin, Saima; Sale, Michele M.; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Abes, Generoso T.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    A duplication variant within middle-ear-specific gene A2ML1 co-segregates with otitis media in an indigenous Filipino pedigree (LOD score=7.5 at reduced penetrance) and lies within a founder haplotype that is also shared by three otitis-prone European- and Hispanic-American children, but is absent in non-otitis-prone children and >62,000 next-generation sequences. Seven additional A2ML1 variants were identified in six otitis-prone children. Collectively our studies support a role for A2ML1 in the pathophysiology of otitis media. PMID:26121085

  20. cluML: A markup language for clustering and cluster validity assessment of microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakova, Nadia; Cunningham, Pádraig

    2005-01-01

    cluML is a new markup language for microarray data clustering and cluster validity assessment. The XML-based format has been designed to address some of the limitations observed in traditional formats, such as inability to store multiple clustering (including biclustering) and validation results within a dataset. cluML is an effective tool to support biomedical knowledge representation in gene expression data analysis. Although cluML was developed for DNA microarray analysis applications, it can be effectively used for the representation of clustering and for the validation of other biomedical and physical data that has no limitations.

  1. Analisis Pengawasan Logistik Produk Aqua Ukuran 330ml Pada CV. Dlu'x Resto Samarinda

    OpenAIRE

    Mardiana, Ali Masuhud, H. Mulyadi Syp

    2016-01-01

    The problem in this research is "Are Determination Against Aqua Products Logistics Control 330ml sizes on CV. DLux Resto has been optimized? "This study aims to determine the amount of inventory on the CV aqua 330ml sizes. Dlu'x Resto in Samarinda.Formulation of the problem in this study is whether the determination of the logistical monitoring product inventory aqua 330ml sizes that have been carried out on the CV. Dlu'x Resto Samarinda already performed optimally.The hypothesis in this stud...

  2. Evaluating the Impact of Design-Driven Requirements Using SysML

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research will develop SysML requirements modeling patterns and scripts to automate the evaluation of the impact of design driven requirements....

  3. SED-ED, a workflow editor for computational biology experiments written in SED-ML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard R

    2012-04-15

    The simulation experiment description markup language (SED-ML) is a new community data standard to encode computational biology experiments in a computer-readable XML format. Its widespread adoption will require the development of software support to work with SED-ML files. Here, we describe a software tool, SED-ED, to view, edit, validate and annotate SED-ML documents while shielding end-users from the underlying XML representation. SED-ED supports modellers who wish to create, understand and further develop a simulation description provided in SED-ML format. SED-ED is available as a standalone Java application, as an Eclipse plug-in and as an SBSI (www.sbsi.ed.ac.uk) plug-in, all under an MIT open-source license. Source code is at https://sed-ed-sedmleditor.googlecode.com/svn. The application itself is available from https://sourceforge.net/projects/jlibsedml/files/SED-ED/.

  4. Machine learning (ML)-guided OPC using basis functions of polar Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suhyeong; Shim, Seongbo; Shin, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    With shrinking feature size, runtime has become a limitation of model-based OPC (MB-OPC). A few machine learning-guided OPC (ML-OPC) have been studied as candidates for next-generation OPC, but they all employ too many parameters (e.g. local densities), which set their own limitations. We propose to use basis functions of polar Fourier transform (PFT) as parameters of ML-OPC. Since PFT functions are orthogonal each other and well reflect light phenomena, the number of parameters can significantly be reduced without loss of OPC accuracy. Experiments demonstrate that our new ML-OPC achieves 80% reduction in OPC time and 35% reduction in the error of predicted mask bias when compared to conventional ML-OPC.

  5. On the use of successive data in the ML-EM algorithm in Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmedt, P; Lemahieu, I [University of Ghent, ELIS Department, SInt-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Gent, (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    The Maximum Likelihood-Expectation Maximization (ML-EM) algorithm is the most popular statistical reconstruction technique for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The ML-EM algorithm is however also renowned for its long reconstruction times. An acceleration technique for this algorithm is studied in this paper. The proposed technique starts the ML-EM algorithm before the measurement process is completed. Since the reconstruction is initiated during the scan of the patient, the time elapsed before a reconstruction becomes available is reduced. Experiments with software phantoms indicate that the quality of the reconstructed image using successive data is comparable to the quality of the reconstruction with the normal ML-EM algorithm. (authors). 7 refs, 3 figs.

  6. The enhanced callose deposition in barley with ml-o powdery mildew resistance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Jens-Peder

    1985-01-01

    Carborundum treatment of barley leaves induced a callose deposition which was detected as diffuse blotches in the epidermal cells of susceptible barleys and as deeply stained tracks along the scratches in barleys with the ml-o powdery mildew resistance gene. Subsequent inoculation with powdery...... mildew resulted in appositions that enlarged inversely to their size in the respective varieties when inoculated without carborundum treatment. Aphids sucking the leaves resulted in rows of callose containing spots along the anticlinal cell walls. The spots were larger in the ml-o mutant than...... in the mother variety. Callose was deposited in connection with the pleiotropic necrotic spotting in barleys with the ml-o gene. Modification of the necrotic spotting by crossing the ml-o gene into other gene backgrounds did not result in any change in the size of appositions upon inoculation with powdery...

  7. Comparison of actual tidal volume in neonatal lung model volume control ventilation using three ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, H; Endo, Y; Ejima, Y; Matsubara, M; Kurosawa, S

    2011-07-01

    In neonates, small changes in tidal volumes (V(T)) may lead to complications. Previous studies have shown a significant difference between ventilator-measured tidal volume and tidal volume delivered (actual V(T)). We evaluated the accuracy of three different ventilators to deliver small V(T) during volume-controlled ventilation. We tested Servo 300, 840 ventilator and Evita 4 Neoflow ventilators with lung models simulating normal and injured neonatal lung compliance models. Gas volume delivered from the ventilator into the test circuit (V(TV)) and actual V(T) to the test lung were measured using Ventrak respiration monitors at set V(T) (30 ml). The gas volume increase of the breathing circuit was then calculated. Tidal volumes of the SV300 and PB840 in both lung models were similar to the set V(T) and the actual tidal volumes in the injured model (20.7 ml and 19.8 ml, respectively) were significantly less than that in the normal model (27.4 ml and 23.4 ml). PB840 with circuit compliance compensation could not improve the actual V(T). V(TV) of the EV4N in the normal and the injured models (37.8 ml and 46.6 ml) were markedly increased compared with set V(T), and actual V(T) were similar to set V(T) in the normal and injured model (30.2 ml and 31.9 ml, respectively). EV4N measuring V(T) close to the lung could match actual V(T) to almost the same value as the set V(T) however the gas volume of the breathing circuit was increased. If an accurate value for the patient's actual V(T) is needed, this V(T) must be measured by a sensor located between the Y-piece and the tracheal tube.

  8. QuakeML: XML for Seismological Data Exchange and Resource Metadata Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Becker, J.; Heinloo, A.; Kästli, P.; Saul, J.; Weber, B.; QuakeML Working Group

    2007-12-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange format for seismology that is under development. Current collaborators are from ETH, GFZ, USC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, and ISTI. QuakeML development was motivated by the lack of a widely accepted and well-documented data format that is applicable to a broad range of fields in seismology. The development team brings together expertise from communities dealing with analysis and creation of earthquake catalogs, distribution of seismic bulletins, and real-time processing of seismic data. Efforts to merge QuakeML with existing XML dialects are under way. The first release of QuakeML will cover a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Further extensions are in progress or planned, e.g., for macroseismic information, location probability density functions, slip distributions, and ground motion information. The QuakeML language definition is supplemented by a concept to provide resource metadata and facilitate metadata exchange between distributed data providers. For that purpose, we introduce unique, location-independent identifiers of seismological resources. As an application of QuakeML, ETH Zurich currently develops a Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit as a contribution to CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability). We follow a collaborative and transparent development approach along the lines of the procedures of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). QuakeML currently is in working draft status. The standard description will be subjected to a public Request for Comments (RFC) process and eventually reach the status of a recommendation. QuakeML can be found at http://www.quakeml.org.

  9. Diguanylate cyclase activity of the Mycobacterium leprae T cell antigen ML1419c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotcheewaphan, Suwatchareeporn; Belisle, John T; Webb, Kristofor J; Kim, Hee-Jin; Spencer, John S; Borlee, Bradley R

    2016-09-01

    The second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (cyclic di-GMP), is involved in the control of multiple bacterial phenotypes, including those that impact host-pathogen interactions. Bioinformatics analyses predicted that Mycobacterium leprae, an obligate intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of leprosy, encodes three active diguanylate cyclases. In contrast, the related pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes only a single diguanylate cyclase. One of the M. leprae unique diguanylate cyclases (ML1419c) was previously shown to be produced early during the course of leprosy. Thus, functional analysis of ML1419c was performed. The gene encoding ML1419c was cloned and expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to allow for assessment of cyclic di-GMP production and cyclic di-GMP-mediated phenotypes. Phenotypic studies revealed that ml1419c expression altered colony morphology, motility and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 in a manner consistent with increased cyclic di-GMP production. Direct measurement of cyclic di-GMP levels by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that ml1419c expression increased cyclic di-GMP production in P. aeruginosa PAO1 cultures in comparison to the vector control. The observed phenotypes and increased levels of cyclic di-GMP detected in P. aeruginosa expressing ml1419c could be abrogated by mutation of the active site in ML1419c. These studies demonstrated that ML1419c of M. leprae functions as diguanylate cyclase to synthesize cyclic di-GMP. Thus, this protein was renamed DgcA (Diguanylate cyclase A). These results also demonstrated the ability to use P. aeruginosa as a heterologous host for characterizing the function of proteins involved in the cyclic di-GMP pathway of a pathogen refractory to in vitro growth, M. leprae.

  10. CytometryML: a data standard which has been designed to interface with other standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Robert C.

    2007-02-01

    Because of the differences in the requirements, needs, and past histories including existing standards of the creating organizations, a single encompassing cytology-pathology standard will not, in the near future, replace the multiple existing or under development standards. Except for DICOM and FCS, these standardization efforts are all based on XML. CytometryML is a collection of XML schemas, which are based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS) datatypes. The CytometryML schemas contain attributes that link them to the DICOM standard and FCS. Interoperability with DICOM has been facilitated by, wherever reasonable, limiting the difference between CytometryML and the previous standards to syntax. In order to permit the Resource Description Framework, RDF, to reference the CytometryML datatypes, id attributes have been added to many CytometryML elements. The Laboratory Digital Imaging Project (LDIP) Data Exchange Specification and the Flowcyt standards development effort employ RDF syntax. Documentation from DICOM has been reused in CytometryML. The unity of analytical cytology was demonstrated by deriving a microscope type and a flow cytometer type from a generic cytometry instrument type. The feasibility of incorporating the Flowcyt gating schemas into CytometryML has been demonstrated. CytometryML is being extended to include many of the new DICOM Working Group 26 datatypes, which describe patients, specimens, and analytes. In situations where multiple standards are being created, interoperability can be facilitated by employing datatypes based on a common set of semantics and building in links to standards that employ different syntax.

  11. Assembling Components using SysML with Non-Functional Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Chouali , Samir; Hammad , Ahmed; Mountassir , Hassan

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Non-functional requirements of component based systems are important as their functional requirements, therefore they must be considered in components assembly. These properties are beforehand specified with SysML requirement diagram. We specify component based system architecture with SysML block definition diagram, and component behaviors with sequence diagrams. We propose to specify formally component interfaces with interface automata, obtained from requirement and...

  12. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML--the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltemath, Dagmar; Adams, Richard; Bergmann, Frank T; Hucka, Michael; Kolpakov, Fedor; Miller, Andrew K; Moraru, Ion I; Nickerson, David; Sahle, Sven; Snoep, Jacky L; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from different fields of research

  13. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML - The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. Results In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. Conclusions With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from

  14. Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML Level 1 Version 3 (L1V3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergmann Frank T.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The creation of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research poses challenges to reproduce, annotate, archive, and share such experiments. Efforts such as SBML or CellML standardize the formal representation of computational models in various areas of biology. The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML describes what procedures the models are subjected to, and the details of those procedures. These standards, together with further COMBINE standards, describe models sufficiently well for the reproduction of simulation studies among users and software tools. The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML is an XML-based format that encodes, for a given simulation experiment, (i which models to use; (ii which modifications to apply to models before simulation; (iii which simulation procedures to run on each model; (iv how to post-process the data; and (v how these results should be plotted and reported. SED-ML Level 1 Version 1 (L1V1 implemented support for the encoding of basic time course simulations. SED-ML L1V2 added support for more complex types of simulations, specifically repeated tasks and chained simulation procedures. SED-ML L1V3 extends L1V2 by means to describe which datasets and subsets thereof to use within a simulation experiment.

  15. VarioML framework for comprehensive variation data representation and exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Myles; Fokkema, Ivo Fac; Lancaster, Owen; Adamusiak, Tomasz; Ahonen-Bishopp, Anni; Atlan, David; Béroud, Christophe; Cornell, Michael; Dalgleish, Raymond; Devereau, Andrew; Patrinos, George P; Swertz, Morris A; Taschner, Peter Em; Thorisson, Gudmundur A; Vihinen, Mauno; Brookes, Anthony J; Muilu, Juha

    2012-10-03

    Sharing of data about variation and the associated phenotypes is a critical need, yet variant information can be arbitrarily complex, making a single standard vocabulary elusive and re-formatting difficult. Complex standards have proven too time-consuming to implement. The GEN2PHEN project addressed these difficulties by developing a comprehensive data model for capturing biomedical observations, Observ-OM, and building the VarioML format around it. VarioML pairs a simplified open specification for describing variants, with a toolkit for adapting the specification into one's own research workflow. Straightforward variant data can be captured, federated, and exchanged with no overhead; more complex data can be described, without loss of compatibility. The open specification enables push-button submission to gene variant databases (LSDBs) e.g., the Leiden Open Variation Database, using the Cafe Variome data publishing service, while VarioML bidirectionally transforms data between XML and web-application code formats, opening up new possibilities for open source web applications building on shared data. A Java implementation toolkit makes VarioML easily integrated into biomedical applications. VarioML is designed primarily for LSDB data submission and transfer scenarios, but can also be used as a standard variation data format for JSON and XML document databases and user interface components. VarioML is a set of tools and practices improving the availability, quality, and comprehensibility of human variation information. It enables researchers, diagnostic laboratories, and clinics to share that information with ease, clarity, and without ambiguity.

  16. WaterML: an XML Language for Communicating Water Observations Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidment, D. R.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D.

    2007-12-01

    One of the great impediments to the synthesis of water information is the plethora of formats used to publish such data. Each water agency uses its own approach. XML (eXtended Markup Languages) are generalizations of Hypertext Markup Language to communicate specific kinds of information via the internet. WaterML is an XML language for water observations data - streamflow, water quality, groundwater levels, climate, precipitation and aquatic biology data, recorded at fixed, point locations as a function of time. The Hydrologic Information System project of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc (CUAHSI) has defined WaterML and prepared a set of web service functions called WaterOneFLow that use WaterML to provide information about observation sites, the variables measured there and the values of those measurments. WaterML has been submitted to the Open GIS Consortium for harmonization with its standards for XML languages. Academic investigators at a number of testbed locations in the WATERS network are providing data in WaterML format using WaterOneFlow web services. The USGS and other federal agencies are also working with CUAHSI to similarly provide access to their data in WaterML through WaterOneFlow services.

  17. Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) Level 1 Version 3 (L1V3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Frank T; Cooper, Jonathan; König, Matthias; Moraru, Ion; Nickerson, David; Le Novère, Nicolas; Olivier, Brett G; Sahle, Sven; Smith, Lucian; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2018-03-19

    The creation of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research poses challenges to reproduce, annotate, archive, and share such experiments. Efforts such as SBML or CellML standardize the formal representation of computational models in various areas of biology. The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) describes what procedures the models are subjected to, and the details of those procedures. These standards, together with further COMBINE standards, describe models sufficiently well for the reproduction of simulation studies among users and software tools. The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) is an XML-based format that encodes, for a given simulation experiment, (i) which models to use; (ii) which modifications to apply to models before simulation; (iii) which simulation procedures to run on each model; (iv) how to post-process the data; and (v) how these results should be plotted and reported. SED-ML Level 1 Version 1 (L1V1) implemented support for the encoding of basic time course simulations. SED-ML L1V2 added support for more complex types of simulations, specifically repeated tasks and chained simulation procedures. SED-ML L1V3 extends L1V2 by means to describe which datasets and subsets thereof to use within a simulation experiment.

  18. Spectra, chromatograms, Metadata: mzML-the standard data format for mass spectrometer output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turewicz, Michael; Deutsch, Eric W

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes Mass Spectrometry Markup Language (mzML), an XML-based and vendor-neutral standard data format for storage and exchange of mass spectrometer output like raw spectra and peak lists. It is intended to replace its two precursor data formats (mzData and mzXML), which had been developed independently a few years earlier. Hence, with the release of mzML, the problem of having two different formats for the same purposes is solved, and with it the duplicated effort of maintaining and supporting two data formats. The new format has been developed by a broad-based consortium of major instrument vendors, software vendors, and academic researchers under the aegis of the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO), Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI), with full participation of the main developers of the precursor formats. This comprehensive approach helped mzML to become a generally accepted standard. Furthermore, the collaborative development insured that mzML has adopted the best features of its precursor formats. In this chapter, we discuss mzML's development history, its design principles and use cases, as well as its main building components. We also present the available documentation, an example file, and validation software for mzML.

  19. An Ontology for State Analysis: Formalizing the Mapping to SysML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David A.; Bennett, Matthew B.; Karban, Robert; Rouquette, Nicolas; Jenkins, Steven; Ingham, Michel

    2012-01-01

    State Analysis is a methodology developed over the last decade for architecting, designing and documenting complex control systems. Although it was originally conceived for designing robotic spacecraft, recent applications include the design of control systems for large ground-based telescopes. The European Southern Observatory (ESO) began a project to design the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), which will require coordinated control of over a thousand articulated mirror segments. The designers are using State Analysis as a methodology and the Systems Modeling Language (SysML) as a modeling and documentation language in this task. To effectively apply the State Analysis methodology in this context it became necessary to provide ontological definitions of the concepts and relations in State Analysis and greater flexibility through a mapping of State Analysis into a practical extension of SysML. The ontology provides the formal basis for verifying compliance with State Analysis semantics including architectural constraints. The SysML extension provides the practical basis for applying the State Analysis methodology with SysML tools. This paper will discuss the method used to develop these formalisms (the ontology), the formalisms themselves, the mapping to SysML and approach to using these formalisms to specify a control system and enforce architectural constraints in a SysML model.

  20. Synovial volume--a marker of disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis? Quantification by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    MR-images. Ten knees with clinically active gonarthritis (CAG), 8 knees with clinically inactive gonarthritis (CIG) and 5 healthy controls (HC) were examined. The synovial volume of CAG-, CIG- and HC-knees were significantly different. The median volumes were 79 ml, 21 ml and 3 ml, respectively...

  1. Characteristic mutations found in the ML0411 gene of Mycobacterium leprae isolated in Northeast Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, M; Nakata, N; Matsuoka, M; Sekizuka, T; Kuroda, M; Makino, M

    2013-10-01

    Genome analysis of Mycobacterium leprae strain Kyoto-2 in this study revealed characteristic nucleotide substitutions in gene ML0411, compared to the reference genome M. leprae strain TN. The ML0411 gene of Kyoto-2 had six SNPs compared to that of TN. All SNPs in ML0411 were non-synonymous mutations that result in amino acid replacements. In addition, a seventh SNP was found 41 bp upstream of the start codon in the regulatory region. The seven SNP sites in the ML0411 region were investigated by sequencing in 36 M. leprae isolates from the Leprosy Research Center in Japan. The SNP pattern in 14 of the 36 isolates showed similarity to that of Kyoto-2. Determination of the standard SNP types within the 36 stocked isolates revealed that almost all of the Japanese strains belonged to SNP type III, with nucleotide substitutions at position 14676, 164275, and 2935685 of the M. leprae TN genome. The geographical distribution pattern of east Asian M. leprae isolates by discrimination of ML0411 SNPs was investigated and interestingly turned out to be similar to that of tandem repeat numbers of GACATC in the rpoT gene (3 copies or 4 copies), which has been established as a tool for M. leprae genotyping. All seven Korean M. leprae isolates examined in this study, as well as those derived from Honshu Island of Japan, showed 4 copies of the 6-base tandem repeat plus the ML0411 SNPs observed in M. leprae Kyoto-2. They are termed Northeast Asian (NA) strain of M. leprae. On the other hand, many of isolates derived from the Okinawa Islands of Japan and from the Philippines showed 3 copies of the 6-base tandem repeat in addition to the M. leprae TN ML0411 type of SNPs. These results demonstrate the existence of M. leprae strains in Northeast Asian region having characteristic SNP patterns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. HepML, an XML-based format for describing simulated data in high energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, S.; Dudko, L.; Kekelidze, D.; Sherstnev, A.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we describe a HepML format and a corresponding C++ library developed for keeping complete description of parton level events in a unified and flexible form. HepML tags contain enough information to understand what kind of physics the simulated events describe and how the events have been prepared. A HepML block can be included into event files in the LHEF format. The structure of the HepML block is described by means of several XML Schemas. The Schemas define necessary information for the HepML block and how this information should be located within the block. The library libhepml is a C++ library intended for parsing and serialization of HepML tags, and representing the HepML block in computer memory. The library is an API for external software. For example, Matrix Element Monte Carlo event generators can use the library for preparing and writing a header of an LHEF file in the form of HepML tags. In turn, Showering and Hadronization event generators can parse the HepML header and get the information in the form of C++ classes. libhepml can be used in C++, C, and Fortran programs. All necessary parts of HepML have been prepared and we present the project to the HEP community. Program summaryProgram title: libhepml Catalogue identifier: AEGL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPLv3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 138 866 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 613 122 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, C Computer: PCs and workstations Operating system: Scientific Linux CERN 4/5, Ubuntu 9.10 RAM: 1 073 741 824 bytes (1 Gb) Classification: 6.2, 11.1, 11.2 External routines: Xerces XML library ( http://xerces.apache.org/xerces-c/), Expat XML Parser ( http://expat.sourceforge.net/) Nature of problem: Monte Carlo simulation in high

  3. ISAC's Gating-ML 2.0 data exchange standard for gating description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spidlen, Josef; Moore, Wayne; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2015-07-01

    The lack of software interoperability with respect to gating has traditionally been a bottleneck preventing the use of multiple analytical tools and reproducibility of flow cytometry data analysis by independent parties. To address this issue, ISAC developed Gating-ML, a computer file format to encode and interchange gates. Gating-ML 1.5 was adopted and published as an ISAC Candidate Recommendation in 2008. Feedback during the probationary period from implementors, including major commercial software companies, instrument vendors, and the wider community, has led to a streamlined Gating-ML 2.0. Gating-ML has been significantly simplified and therefore easier to support by software tools. To aid developers, free, open source reference implementations, compliance tests, and detailed examples are provided to stimulate further commercial adoption. ISAC has approved Gating-ML as a standard ready for deployment in the public domain and encourages its support within the community as it is at a mature stage of development having undergone extensive review and testing, under both theoretical and practical conditions. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. Physical Properties of Asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, a Potential Spacecraft Target, from Spitzer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Harris, A. W.

    2006-09-01

    We report on results from recent Spitzer observations of near-Earth asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, which is among the lowest-ranking objects in terms of the specific momentum Δv required to reach it from Earth. It was originally considered as a target for Hayabusa and is now under consideration as a target of the planned ESA mission Don Quijote. Unfortunately, little is known about the physical properties of 1989 ML, in particular its size and albedo are unknown. Its exhibits an X type reflection spectrum, so depending on its albedo, 1989 ML may be an E, M, or P type asteroid. Provisional results from thermal-infrared observations carried out with Spitzer indicate that the albedo of 1989 ML is compatible with an M- or E-type classification. We will discuss our results and their implications for the physical properties and the rotation period of 1989 ML, and its importance as a potential spacecraft target. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  5. The additional benefit of the ML Flow test to classify leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Illarramendi, Ximena; Teles, Rose B; Penna, Maria Lucia F; Nery, José Augusto C; Sales, Anna Maria; Oskam, Linda; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Sarno, Euzenir N

    2009-08-01

    The use of the skin lesion counting classification leads to both under and over diagnosis of leprosy in many instances. Thus, there is a need to complement this classification with another simple and robust test for use in the field. Data of 202 untreated leprosy patients diagnosed at FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was analyzed. There were 90 patients classified as PB and 112 classified as MB according to the reference standard. The BI was positive in 111 (55%) patients and the ML Flow test in 116 (57.4%) patients. The ML Flow test was positive in 95 (86%) of the patients with a positive BI. The lesion counting classification was confirmed by both BI and ML Flow tests in 65% of the 92 patients with 5 or fewer lesions, and in 76% of the 110 patients with 6 or more lesions. The combination of skin lesion counting and the ML Flow test results yielded a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 87% for MB classification, and correctly classified 86% of the patients when compared to the standard reference. A considerable proportion of the patients (43.5%) with discordant test results in relation to standard classification was in reaction. The use of any classification system has limitations, especially those that oversimplify a complex disease such as leprosy. In the absence of an experienced dermatologist and slit skin smear, the ML Flow test could be used to improve treatment decisions in field conditions.

  6. The evolution of the CUAHSI Water Markup Language (WaterML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D.; Maidment, D.; Tarboton, D. G.; Whiteaker, T.; Hooper, R.; Kirschtel, D.; Rodriguez, M.

    2009-04-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS, his.cuahsi.org) uses web services as the core data exchange mechanism which provides programmatic connection between many heterogeneous sources of hydrologic data and a variety of online and desktop client applications. The service message schema follows the CUAHSI Water Markup Language (WaterML) 1.x specification (see OGC Discussion Paper 07-041r1). Data sources that can be queried via WaterML-compliant water data services include national and international repositories such as USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), USEPA STORET (Storage & Retrieval), USDA SNOTEL (Snowpack Telemetry), NCDC ISH and ISD(Integrated Surface Hourly and Daily Data), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and DAYMET (Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries). Besides government data sources, CUAHSI HIS provides access to a growing number of academic hydrologic observation networks. These networks are registered by researchers associated with 11 hydrologic observatory testbeds around the US, and other research, government and commercial groups wishing to join the emerging CUAHSI Water Data Federation. The Hydrologic Information Server (HIS Server) software stack deployed at NSF-supported hydrologic observatory sites and other universities around the country, supports a hydrologic data publication workflow which includes the following steps: (1) observational data are loaded from static files or streamed from sensors into a local instance of an Observations Data Model (ODM) database; (2) a generic web service template is configured for the new ODM instance to expose the data as a WaterML-compliant water data service, and (3) the new water data service is registered at the HISCentral registry (hiscentral.cuahsi.org), its metadata are harvested and semantically tagged using concepts from a hydrologic ontology. As a result, the new service is indexed in the CUAHSI central metadata catalog, and becomes

  7. Serologic follow-up of IgG responses against recombinant mycobacterial proteins ML0405, ML2331 and LID-1 in a leprosy hyperendemic area in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Rada

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a slowly evolving disease that occurs mainly in adults. In this study, the Mamaría Village, state of Portuguesa was selected because it had one of the highest prevalence rates (13.25% of leprosy cases in 1997. Between 1998-2004, 20.2% of the 89 cases registered in this village were less than 15 years old and 61.8% were males. Pau-cibacillary (PB lesions were the predominant clinical forms identified, although also multibacillary (MB forms were found. Additionally, 76% of the patients were bacteriologically negative. At the time of diagnosis, 75% of the patients presented with grade 0 disabilities, 23% with grade 1 and 2% with grade 2. Serum samples were collected from 18 PB and 15 MB patients, in addition to 14 family contacts, at the beginning and end of treatment. All the groups were re-evaluated during a three-year period (2008-2011. The proteins used for evaluation were ML0405, ML2331 and LID-1. These mycobacterial proteins were highly specific for Mycobacterium leprae and the IgG responses decreased in both MB and PB patients during multidrug treatment. Our results suggest that these antigens could be used as markers for successful treatment of non-reactional lepromatous patients.

  8. The WUW ML bundle detector A flow through detector for alpha-emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Wenzel, U; Lochny, M

    1999-01-01

    Using conventional laboratory ware, we designed and manufactured a flow through cell for monitoring alpha-bearing solutions. The cell consists of a bundle of thermoplastic, transparent tubes coated with a thin layer of the meltable scintillator MELTILEX sup T sup M at the inner surface. With appropriate energy windows set, the detector can suppress beta-particles to a great extent due to its geometrical dimensions. For pure alpha-solutions, the detection limits are 5 Bq/ml, for composite nuclide mixtures, the detector is capable to monitor the decontamination of medium active waste (<=10 sup 7 Bq/ml) down to 100 Bq alpha/g solution. At a throughput of 1 ml/s, the pressure build-up amounts to approx 2 bar. We have developed a quality control program to ensure the regularity of the individual bundle loops.

  9. Gating-ML: XML-based gating descriptions in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spidlen, Josef; Leif, Robert C; Moore, Wayne; Roederer, Mario; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2008-12-01

    The lack of software interoperability with respect to gating due to lack of a standardized mechanism for data exchange has traditionally been a bottleneck, preventing reproducibility of flow cytometry (FCM) data analysis and the usage of multiple analytical tools. To facilitate interoperability among FCM data analysis tools, members of the International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) Data Standards Task Force (DSTF) have developed an XML-based mechanism to formally describe gates (Gating-ML). Gating-ML, an open specification for encoding gating, data transformations and compensation, has been adopted by the ISAC DSTF as a Candidate Recommendation. Gating-ML can facilitate exchange of gating descriptions the same way that FCS facilitated for exchange of raw FCM data. Its adoption will open new collaborative opportunities as well as possibilities for advanced analyses and methods development. The ISAC DSTF is satisfied that the standard addresses the requirements for a gating exchange standard.

  10. Alkaline protease production from industrial wastes by bacillus subtilis ML-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, M.G.; Nadeem, M.; Syed, Q.; Irfan, M.; Baig, S.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of various culture conditions on protease production by Bacillus subtilis ML-4 was studied in the presence of growth medium containing poultry feed waste (5%), K/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/ (0.3%), CaCl/sub 2/ (0.03%) and MgSO/sub 4/ (0.015%). Maximum protease production (264.25 +- 1.86 U/ml) was observed at initial pH 9 with 3% (v/v) of inoculum size after 48 h of incubation at 37 degree C. The alkaline protease was stable over a broad range of temperature (30 to 60 degree C) and pH (8 to 11). However, maximum activity (155.45 U/ml) was observed at temperature 50 degree C and pH 10. (author)

  11. The gel electrophoresis markup language (GelML) from the Proteomics Standards Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frank; Hoogland, Christine; Martinez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Wipat, Anil; Hermjakob, Henning; Almeida, Jonas S; Stanislaus, Romesh; Paton, Norman W; Jones, Andrew R

    2010-09-01

    The Human Proteome Organisation's Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed the GelML (gel electrophoresis markup language) data exchange format for representing gel electrophoresis experiments performed in proteomics investigations. The format closely follows the reporting guidelines for gel electrophoresis, which are part of the Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment (MIAPE) set of modules. GelML supports the capture of metadata (such as experimental protocols) and data (such as gel images) resulting from gel electrophoresis so that laboratories can be compliant with the MIAPE Gel Electrophoresis guidelines, while allowing such data sets to be exchanged or downloaded from public repositories. The format is sufficiently flexible to capture data from a broad range of experimental processes, and complements other PSI formats for MS data and the results of protein and peptide identifications to capture entire gel-based proteome workflows. GelML has resulted from the open standardisation process of PSI consisting of both public consultation and anonymous review of the specifications.

  12. HLS4ML: deploying deep learning on FPGAs for L1 trigger and Data Acquisition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Machine learning is becoming ubiquitous across HEP. There is great potential to improve trigger and DAQ performances with it. However, the exploration of such techniques within the field in low latency/power FPGAs has just begun. We present HLS4ML, a user-friendly software, based on High-Level Synthesis (HLS), designed to deploy network architectures on FPGAs. As a case study, we use HLS4ML for boosted-jet tagging with deep networks at the LHC. We show how neural networks can be made fit the resources available on modern FPGAs, thanks to network pruning and quantization. We map out resource usage and latency versus network architectures, to identify the typical problem complexity that HLS4ML could deal with. We discuss possible applications in current and future HEP experiments.

  13. QuakeML: status of the XML-based seismological data exchange format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Saul

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange standard for seismology that is in its fourth year of active community-driven development. Its development was motivated by the need to consolidate existing data formats for applications in statistical seismology, as well as setting a cutting-edge, community-agreed standard to foster interoperability of distributed infrastructures. The current release (version 1.2 is based on a public Request for Comments process and accounts for suggestions and comments provided by a broad international user community. QuakeML is designed as an umbrella schema under which several sub-packages are collected. The present scope of QuakeML 1.2 covers a basic description of seismic events including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Work on additional packages (macroseismic information, ground motion, seismic inventory, and resource metadata has been started, but is at an early stage. Several applications based on the QuakeML data model have been created so far. Among these are earthquake catalog web services at the European Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC, GNS Science, and the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC, and QuakePy, an open-source Python-based seismicity analysis toolkit. Furthermore, QuakeML is being used in the SeisComP3 system from GFZ Potsdam, and in the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP testing center installations, developed by Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC. QuakeML is still under active and dynamic development. Further contributions from the community are crucial to its success and are highly welcome.

  14. VarioML framework for comprehensive variation data representation and exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne Myles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing of data about variation and the associated phenotypes is a critical need, yet variant information can be arbitrarily complex, making a single standard vocabulary elusive and re-formatting difficult. Complex standards have proven too time-consuming to implement. Results The GEN2PHEN project addressed these difficulties by developing a comprehensive data model for capturing biomedical observations, Observ-OM, and building the VarioML format around it. VarioML pairs a simplified open specification for describing variants, with a toolkit for adapting the specification into one's own research workflow. Straightforward variant data can be captured, federated, and exchanged with no overhead; more complex data can be described, without loss of compatibility. The open specification enables push-button submission to gene variant databases (LSDBs e.g., the Leiden Open Variation Database, using the Cafe Variome data publishing service, while VarioML bidirectionally transforms data between XML and web-application code formats, opening up new possibilities for open source web applications building on shared data. A Java implementation toolkit makes VarioML easily integrated into biomedical applications. VarioML is designed primarily for LSDB data submission and transfer scenarios, but can also be used as a standard variation data format for JSON and XML document databases and user interface components. Conclusions VarioML is a set of tools and practices improving the availability, quality, and comprehensibility of human variation information. It enables researchers, diagnostic laboratories, and clinics to share that information with ease, clarity, and without ambiguity.

  15. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org .

  16. An overview of the CellML API and its implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halstead Matt

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CellML is an XML based language for representing mathematical models, in a machine-independent form which is suitable for their exchange between different authors, and for archival in a model repository. Allowing for the exchange and archival of models in a computer readable form is a key strategic goal in bioinformatics, because of the associated improvements in scientific record accuracy, the faster iterative process of scientific development, and the ability to combine models into large integrative models. However, for CellML models to be useful, tools which can process them correctly are needed. Due to some of the more complex features present in CellML models, such as imports, developing code ab initio to correctly process models can be an onerous task. For this reason, there is a clear and pressing need for an application programming interface (API, and a good implementation of that API, upon which tools can base their support for CellML. Results We developed an API which allows the information in CellML models to be retrieved and/or modified. We also developed a series of optional extension APIs, for tasks such as simplifying the handling of connections between variables, dealing with physical units, validating models, and translating models into different procedural languages. We have also provided a Free/Open Source implementation of this application programming interface, optimised to achieve good performance. Conclusions Tools have been developed using the API which are mature enough for widespread use. The API has the potential to accelerate the development of additional tools capable of processing CellML, and ultimately lead to an increased level of sharing of mathematical model descriptions.

  17. TumorML: Concept and requirements of an in silico cancer modelling markup language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Cooper, Jonathan; McKeever, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the initial groundwork carried out as part of the European Commission funded Transatlantic Tumor Model Repositories project, to develop a new markup language for computational cancer modelling, TumorML. In this paper we describe the motivations for such a language, arguing that current state-of-the-art biomodelling languages are not suited to the cancer modelling domain. We go on to describe the work that needs to be done to develop TumorML, the conceptual design, and a description of what existing markup languages will be used to compose the language specification.

  18. Model-driven development of smart grid services using SoaML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, Anna Magdalena; Gehrke, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model-driven software devel- opment process which can be applied to the design of smart grid services. The Service Oriented Architecture Modelling Language (SoaML) is used to describe the architecture as well as the roles and interactions between service participants....... The individual modelling steps and an example design of a SoaML model for a voltage control service are presented and explained. Finally, the paper discusses a proof-of-concept implementation of the modelled service in a smart grid testing laboratory....

  19. The analysis results of EEWS(Earthquake Early Warning System) about Iksan(Ml4.3) and Ulsan(Ml5.0) earthquakes in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Chi, H. C.; Lim, I. S.; Seong, Y. J.; Pak, J.

    2016-12-01

    EEW(Earthquake Early Warning) service to the public has been officially operated by KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) from 2015 in Korea. For the KMA's official EEW service, KIGAM has adopted ElarmS from UC Berkeley BSL and modified local magnitude relation, 1-D travel time curves and association procedures with real time waveforms from about 160 seismic stations of KMA and KIGAM. We have checked the performance of EEWS(Earthquake Early Warning System) reviewing two moderate size earthquakes: one is Iksan Eq.(Ml4.3) inside of networks and the other is Ulsan Eq.(Ml5.0) happened at the southern east sea of Korea outside of networks. The first trigger time at NPR station of the Iksan Eq. took 2.3 sec and BUY and JEO2 stations were associated to produce the first event version in 10.07 sec from the origin time respectively. Because the epicentral distance of JEO2 station is about 30 km and the estimated travel time is 6.2 sec, the delay time including transmission and processing is estimated as 3.87 sec with assumption that P wave velocity is 5 km/sec and the focal depth is 8 km. The first magnitude was M4.9 which was a little bigger than Ml4.3 by KIGAM. After adding 3 more triggers of stations (CHO, KMSA, PORA), the estimated magnitude became to M4.6 and the final was settled down to M4.3 with 10 stations. In the case of Ulsan the first trigger time took 11.04 sec and the first alert time with 3 stations in 14.8 sec from the origin time (OT) respectively. The first magnitude was M5.2, however, the difference between the first EEW epicenter and the manual final result was about 63 km due to the poor azimuth coverage outside of seismic network. After 16.2 sec from OT the fourth station YSB was used to update the location near to the manual results within 6 km with magnitude 5.0 and location and magnitude were stable with more stations. Ulsan Eq. was the first case announced to the public by EEWS and the process and result were successful, however, we have to

  20. Disc volume reduction with percutaneous nucleoplasty in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kasch

    Full Text Available STUDY DESIGN: We assessed volume following nucleoplasty disc decompression in lower lumbar spines from cadaveric pigs using 7.1Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. PURPOSE: To investigate coblation-induced volume reductions as a possible mechanism underlying nucleoplasty. METHODS: We assessed volume following nucleoplastic disc decompression in pig spines using 7.1-Tesla MRI. Volumetry was performed in lumbar discs of 21 postmortem pigs. A preoperative image data set was obtained, volume was determined, and either disc decompression or placebo therapy was performed in a randomized manner. Group 1 (nucleoplasty group was treated according to the usual nucleoplasty protocol with coblation current applied to 6 channels for 10 seconds each in an application field of 360°; in group 2 (placebo group the same procedure was performed but without coblation current. After the procedure, a second data set was generated and volumes calculated and matched with the preoperative measurements in a blinded manner. To analyze the effectiveness of nucleoplasty, volumes between treatment and placebo groups were compared. RESULTS: The average preoperative nucleus volume was 0.994 ml (SD: 0.298 ml. In the nucleoplasty group (n = 21 volume was reduced by an average of 0.087 ml (SD: 0.110 ml or 7.14%. In the placebo group (n = 21 volume was increased by an average of 0.075 ml (SD: 0.075 ml or 8.94%. The average nucleoplasty-induced volume reduction was 0.162 ml (SD: 0.124 ml or 16.08%. Volume reduction in lumbar discs was significant in favor of the nucleoplasty group (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that nucleoplasty has a volume-reducing effect on the lumbar nucleus pulposus in an animal model. Furthermore, we show the volume reduction to be a coblation effect of nucleoplasty in porcine discs.

  1. Using SensorML to describe scientific workflows in distributed web service environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, TL

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available for increased collaboration through workflow sharing. The Sensor Web is an open complex adaptive system the pervades the internet and provides access to sensor resources. One mechanism for describing sensor resources is through the use of Sensor ML. It is shown...

  2. Using SensorML to describe scientific workflows in distributed web service environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, TL

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available for increased collaboration through workflow sharing. The Sensor Web is an open complex adaptive system the pervades the internet and provides access to sensor resources. One mechanism for describing sensor resources is through the use of SensorML. It is shown...

  3. The uniform order convergence structure on ML ( X ) | van der Walt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The uniform convergence space completion of ML(X) is constructed as the space all normal lower semi-continuous functions on X. It is then shown how these results may be applied to solve nonlinear PDEs. In particular, we construct generalized solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions, subject ...

  4. iML1515, a knowledgebase that computes Escherichia coli traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monk, Jonathan M.; Lloyd, Colton J.; Brunk, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    To the Editor: Extracting knowledge from the many types of big data produced by high-throughput methods remains a challenge, even when data are from Escherichia coli, the best characterized bacterial species. Here, we present iML1515, the most complete genome-scale reconstruction of the metabolic...

  5. Physical Properties of Asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, a Potential Spacecraft Target, from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Harris, A. W.

    2006-01-01

    We report on results from recent Spitzer observations of near-Earth asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, which is among the lowest-ranking objects in terms of the specific momentum Δv required to reach it from Earth. It was originally considered as a target for Hayabusa and is now under consideration as a

  6. Correlation between ELISA and ML Flow assays applied to 60 Brazilian patients affected by leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva, Rozana C.; Lyon, Sandra; Lyon, Ana C.; Grossi, Maria A. F.; Lyon, Silvia H.; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Antunes, Carlos M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Serological tests can be helpful in classifying leprosy patients as having either the paucibacillary or the multibacillary form. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concordance between two serological assays, i.e. ML Flow and ELISA, in a population of leprosy patients in Brazil. The

  7. Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML) Level 1 Version 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Frank T; Cooper, Jonathan; Le Novère, Nicolas; Nickerson, David; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2015-09-04

    The number, size and complexity of computational models of biological systems are growing at an ever increasing pace. It is imperative to build on existing studies by reusing and adapting existing models and parts thereof. The description of the structure of models is not sufficient to enable the reproduction of simulation results. One also needs to describe the procedures the models are subjected to, as recommended by the Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) guidelines. This document presents Level 1 Version 2 of the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML), a computer-readable format for encoding simulation and analysis experiments to apply to computational models. SED-ML files are encoded in the Extensible Markup Language (XML) and can be used in conjunction with any XML-based model encoding format, such as CellML or SBML. A SED-ML file includes details of which models to use, how to modify them prior to executing a simulation, which simulation and analysis procedures to apply, which results to extract and how to present them. Level 1 Version 2 extends the format by allowing the encoding of repeated and chained procedures.

  8. ML-o-Scope: A Diagnostic Visualization System for Deep Machine Learning Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-16

    Huawei , Intel, Microsoft, NetApp, Pivotal, Splunk, Virdata, VMware, WANdisco and Yahoo!. ML-o-scope: a diagnostic visualization system for deep machine...Facebook, GameOnTalis, Guavus, HP, Huawei , Intel, Microsoft, NetApp, Pivotal, Splunk, Virdata, VMware, WANdisco and Yahoo!. References [1] Bruna, J., and

  9. A best-first tree-searching approach for ML decoding in MIMO system

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chung-An; Eltawil, Ahmed M.; Mondal, Sudip; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    In MIMO communication systems maximum-likelihood (ML) decoding can be formulated as a tree-searching problem. This paper presents a tree-searching approach that combines the features of classical depth-first and breadth-first approaches to achieve

  10. WaterML, an Information Standard for the Exchange of in-situ hydrological observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, D.; Taylor, P.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2012-04-01

    The WaterML 2.0 Standards Working Group (SWG), working within the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and in cooperation with the joint OGC-World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Hydrology Domain Working Group (HDWG), has developed an open standard for the exchange of water observation data; WaterML 2.0. The focus of the standard is time-series data, commonly generated from in-situ style monitoring. This is high value data for hydrological applications such as flood forecasting, environmental reporting and supporting hydrological infrastructure (e.g. dams, supply systems), which is commonly exchanged, but a lack of standards inhibits efficient reuse and automation. The process of developing WaterML required doing a harmonization analysis of existing standards to identify overlapping concepts and come to agreement on a harmonized definition. Generally the formats captured similar requirements, all with subtle differences, such as how time-series point metadata was handled. The in-progress standard WaterML 2.0 incorporates the semantics of the hydrologic information: location, procedure, and observations, and is implemented as an application schema of the Geography Markup Language version 3.2.1, making use of the OGC Observations & Measurements standards. WaterML2.0 is designed as an extensible schema to allow encoding of data to be used in a variety of exchange scenarios. Example areas of usage are: exchange of data for operational hydrological monitoring programs; supporting operation of infrastructure (e.g. dams, supply systems); cross-border exchange of observational data; release of data for public dissemination; enhancing disaster management through data exchange; and exchange in support of national reporting The first phase of WaterML2.0 focused on structural definitions allowing for the transfer of time-series, with less work on harmonization of vocabulary items such as quality codes. Vocabularies from various organizations tend to be specific and take time to

  11. A best-first tree-searching approach for ML decoding in MIMO system

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chung-An

    2012-07-28

    In MIMO communication systems maximum-likelihood (ML) decoding can be formulated as a tree-searching problem. This paper presents a tree-searching approach that combines the features of classical depth-first and breadth-first approaches to achieve close to ML performance while minimizing the number of visited nodes. A detailed outline of the algorithm is given, including the required storage. The effects of storage size on BER performance and complexity in terms of search space are also studied. Our result demonstrates that with a proper choice of storage size the proposed method visits 40% fewer nodes than a sphere decoding algorithm at signal to noise ratio (SNR) = 20dB and by an order of magnitude at 0 dB SNR.

  12. Seismicity Controlled by a Frictional Afterslip During a Small-Magnitude Seismic Sequence (ML Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Alexandre; Godano, Maxime; Hsu, Ya-Ju; Lee, Hsin-Ming; Linde, Alan T.; Sacks, Selwyn

    2018-02-01

    We report evidence for frictional afterslip at shallow depths (about 5 to 7 km) during a small-magnitude seismic sequence (with MLTaiwan. The afterslip, which was recorded by a nearby borehole dilatometer, lasted about a month with a cumulative geodetic moment magnitude of 4.8 ± 0.2. The afterslip comprised two stages and controlled the aftershock sequence. The first postseismic stage, which followed a ML 4.6 earthquake, lasted about 6 h and mostly controlled the ruptures of neighboring asperities (e.g., multiplets) near the hypocenter. Then, a 4 week duration large afterslip event following a ML 4.9 earthquake controlled the rate of aftershocks during its first 2 days through brittle creep. The study presents a rare case of simultaneous seismological and geodetic observations for afterslip following earthquakes with magnitude lower than 5. Furthermore, the geodetic moment of the postseismic phase is at least equivalent to the coseismic moment of the sequence.

  13. Leak Detection and Location of Water Pipes Using Vibration Sensors and Modified ML Prefilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jihoon; Shin, Joonho; Song, Choonggeun; Han, Suyong; Park, Doo Il

    2017-09-13

    This paper proposes a new leak detection and location method based on vibration sensors and generalised cross-correlation techniques. Considering the estimation errors of the power spectral densities (PSDs) and the cross-spectral density (CSD), the proposed method employs a modified maximum-likelihood (ML) prefilter with a regularisation factor. We derive a theoretical variance of the time difference estimation error through summation in the discrete-frequency domain, and find the optimal regularisation factor that minimises the theoretical variance in practical water pipe channels. The proposed method is compared with conventional correlation-based techniques via numerical simulations using a water pipe channel model, and it is shown through field measurement that the proposed modified ML prefilter outperforms conventional prefilters for the generalised cross-correlation. In addition, we provide a formula to calculate the leak location using the time difference estimate when different types of pipes are connected.

  14. Leak Detection and Location of Water Pipes Using Vibration Sensors and Modified ML Prefilter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihoon Choi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new leak detection and location method based on vibration sensors and generalised cross-correlation techniques. Considering the estimation errors of the power spectral densities (PSDs and the cross-spectral density (CSD, the proposed method employs a modified maximum-likelihood (ML prefilter with a regularisation factor. We derive a theoretical variance of the time difference estimation error through summation in the discrete-frequency domain, and find the optimal regularisation factor that minimises the theoretical variance in practical water pipe channels. The proposed method is compared with conventional correlation-based techniques via numerical simulations using a water pipe channel model, and it is shown through field measurement that the proposed modified ML prefilter outperforms conventional prefilters for the generalised cross-correlation. In addition, we provide a formula to calculate the leak location using the time difference estimate when different types of pipes are connected.

  15. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  16. QuakeML: status of the XML-based seismological data exchange format

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Saul; Philipp Kästli; Fabian Euchner; Danijel Schorlemmer

    2011-01-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based data exchange standard for seismology that is in its fourth year of active community-driven development. Its development was motivated by the need to consolidate existing data formats for applications in statistical seismology, as well as setting a cutting-edge, community-agreed standard to foster interoperability of distributed infrastructures. The current release (version 1.2) is based on a public Request for Comments process and accounts for suggestions and comments...

  17. Bitumen and cement solidifications of LL and ML liquid radwaste. The SGN experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchemitcheff, E.; Roux, P.

    1993-01-01

    The presentation is focused on the thin-film evaporator technology and the experience gained in the field of the NPPs and research centers on radwaste conditioning. As early as 1970, SGN was licensed by the CEA for the bituminization of LL and ML radwaste. With the support of EDF and COGEMA, SGN has been performing in depth research on cement solidification of borated concentrates and ion exchange resins generated by reactors or reprocessing plant since 1983

  18. Using DSM and MDM Methodologies to Analyze Structural SysML Models

    OpenAIRE

    Maisenbacher, S.;Kernschmidt, Konstantin;Kasperek, Daniel;Vogel-Heuser, B.;Maurer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Matrices and graph-based representations are commonly used visual models of system structures. Depending on the objective of the observer, both representations offer different opportunities and advantages. A standardized graph-based modeling language is SysML, while the design structure matrix (DSM) and the multiple domain matrix (MDM) are typical matrices used during the development of complex systems. Although both modeling techniques are wide spread, up to now they are hardly used conjoint...

  19. Comparison: Mediation Solutions of WSMOLX and WebML/WebRatio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba, Maciej; Zaharia, Raluca; Turati, Andrea; Brambilla, Marco; Vitvar, Tomas; Ceri, Stefano

    In this chapter we compare the WSMO/WSML/WSMX andWebML/WebRatio approaches to the SWS-Challenge workshop mediation scenario in terms of the utilized underlying technologies and delivered solutions. In the mediation scenario one partner uses Roset-taNet to define its B2B protocol while the other one operates on a proprietary solution. Both teams shown how these partners could be semantically integrated.

  20. Quality control and stability study of 100 mg/ml paracetamol oral drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Penna, Caridad M.; Montes de Oca Porto, Yanet; Salomon Izquierdo, Suslebys

    2013-01-01

    Paracetamol is an effective analgesic and antipyretic drug of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug group. Paracetamol oral drops are indicated for use in infant population aged up to 5 years to relieve fever, headache, toothache and symptomatic relief of common cold. To validate two analytical methods for the quality control and the stability study and to study the stability of 100 mg/ml Paracetamol oral drops made in Cuba

  1. A SysML-based Integration Framework for the Engineering of Mechatronic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chami, Muhammad; Seemüller, Holger; Voos, Holger

    2010-01-01

    The engineering discipline mechatronics is one of the main innovation leader in industry nowadays. With the need for an optimal synergetic integration of the involved disciplines, the engineering process of mechatronic systems is faced with an increasing complexity and the interdisciplinary nature of these systems. New methods and techniques have to be developed to deal with these challenges. This document presents an approach of a SysML-based integration framework that s...

  2. blood and plasma volumes in normal west african dwarf sheep

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    volume (PCV) and haemoglobin (Hb) values were determined as descried by Benjamin (1978) using the microhaematocrit and ... Standard dye concentration of 20 mg/ml was used for determining the dye concentration in plasma. ... Haemoglobin (Hb), Plasma Volume and Blood Volume in the West African Dwarf. Sheep.

  3. EnzML: multi-label prediction of enzyme classes using InterPro signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Ferrari Luna

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manual annotation of enzymatic functions cannot keep up with automatic genome sequencing. In this work we explore the capacity of InterPro sequence signatures to automatically predict enzymatic function. Results We present EnzML, a multi-label classification method that can efficiently account also for proteins with multiple enzymatic functions: 50,000 in UniProt. EnzML was evaluated using a standard set of 300,747 proteins for which the manually curated Swiss-Prot and KEGG databases have agreeing Enzyme Commission (EC annotations. EnzML achieved more than 98% subset accuracy (exact match of all correct Enzyme Commission classes of a protein for the entire dataset and between 87 and 97% subset accuracy in reannotating eight entire proteomes: human, mouse, rat, mouse-ear cress, fruit fly, the S. pombe yeast, the E. coli bacterium and the M. jannaschii archaebacterium. To understand the role played by the dataset size, we compared the cross-evaluation results of smaller datasets, either constructed at random or from specific taxonomic domains such as archaea, bacteria, fungi, invertebrates, plants and vertebrates. The results were confirmed even when the redundancy in the dataset was reduced using UniRef100, UniRef90 or UniRef50 clusters. Conclusions InterPro signatures are a compact and powerful attribute space for the prediction of enzymatic function. This representation makes multi-label machine learning feasible in reasonable time (30 minutes to train on 300,747 instances with 10,852 attributes and 2,201 class values using the Mulan Binary Relevance Nearest Neighbours algorithm implementation (BR-kNN.

  4. M&C ML: A modeling language for monitoring and control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwari, Puneet, E-mail: patwari.puneet@tcs.com; Chaudhuri, Subhrojyoti Roy; Natarajan, Swaminathan; Muralikrishna, G

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • It is challenging to maintain consistency in the current approach to M&C design. • Based on similarity across various projects, it looks ideal to propose a solution at domain level. • Approach to create a DSL for M&C involves viewing a system through lenses of various domains. • M&CML provides a standard vocabulary and the entire process of M&C solution creation domain-aware. • M&CML provides a holistic view of control architecture. • M&CML has support for inherent consistency checks, user assistance and third party support. - Abstract: The use of System Engineering (SE) language such as SysML [1,20] is common within the community of control system designers. However the design handoff to the subsequent phases of the control system development is carried out manually in most cases without much tool support. The approach to agreeing on the control interface between components is a good example where engineers still rely on either manually created Interface Control Documents (ICD) or one off tools implemented by individual projects. Square Kilometer Array (SKA) [2] and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [3] are two good examples of such large projects adopting these approaches. This results in non-uniformity in the overall system design since individual groups invent their own vocabulary while using a language like SysML which leads to inconsistencies across the design, interface and realized code. To mitigate this, we propose the development of a Monitoring and Control Modeling Language (M&CML), a domain specific language (DSL) [4,22] for specifying M&C solutions. M&C ML starts with defining a vocabulary borrowing concepts from standard practices used in the control domain and incorporates a language which ensures uniformity and consistency across the M&C design, interfaces and implementation artifacts. In this paper we discuss this language with an analysis of its usage to point out its benefits.

  5. M&C ML: A modeling language for monitoring and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patwari, Puneet; Chaudhuri, Subhrojyoti Roy; Natarajan, Swaminathan; Muralikrishna, G

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • It is challenging to maintain consistency in the current approach to M&C design. • Based on similarity across various projects, it looks ideal to propose a solution at domain level. • Approach to create a DSL for M&C involves viewing a system through lenses of various domains. • M&CML provides a standard vocabulary and the entire process of M&C solution creation domain-aware. • M&CML provides a holistic view of control architecture. • M&CML has support for inherent consistency checks, user assistance and third party support. - Abstract: The use of System Engineering (SE) language such as SysML [1,20] is common within the community of control system designers. However the design handoff to the subsequent phases of the control system development is carried out manually in most cases without much tool support. The approach to agreeing on the control interface between components is a good example where engineers still rely on either manually created Interface Control Documents (ICD) or one off tools implemented by individual projects. Square Kilometer Array (SKA) [2] and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [3] are two good examples of such large projects adopting these approaches. This results in non-uniformity in the overall system design since individual groups invent their own vocabulary while using a language like SysML which leads to inconsistencies across the design, interface and realized code. To mitigate this, we propose the development of a Monitoring and Control Modeling Language (M&CML), a domain specific language (DSL) [4,22] for specifying M&C solutions. M&C ML starts with defining a vocabulary borrowing concepts from standard practices used in the control domain and incorporates a language which ensures uniformity and consistency across the M&C design, interfaces and implementation artifacts. In this paper we discuss this language with an analysis of its usage to point out its benefits.

  6. ML-Ask: Open Source Affect Analysis Software for Textual Input in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Ptaszynski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present ML-Ask – the first Open Source Affect Analysis system for textual input in Japanese. ML-Ask analyses the contents of an input (e.g., a sentence and annotates it with information regarding the contained general emotive expressions, specific emotional words, valence-activation dimensions of overall expressed affect, and particular emotion types expressed with their respective expressions. ML-Ask also incorporates the Contextual Valence Shifters model for handling negation in sentences to deal with grammatically expressible shifts in the conveyed valence. The system, designed to work mainly under Linux and MacOS, can be used for research on, or applying the techniques of Affect Analysis within the framework Japanese language. It can also be used as an experimental baseline for specific research in Affect Analysis, and as a practical tool for written contents annotation.   Funding statement: This research has been supported by: a Research Grant from the Nissan Science Foundation (years 2009–2010, The GCOE Program founded by Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (years 2009–2010, (JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows (Project Number: 22-00358 (years 2010–2012, (JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Project Number: 24600001 (years 2012–2015, (JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Research Activity Start-up (Project Number: 25880003 (years 2013–2015, and (JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Encouragement of Young Scientists (B (Project Number: 15K16044 (years 2015-present, project estimated to end in March 2018.

  7. VolcanoGasML: a format to exchange geochemical volcanic gases data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Reiter

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analyses of volcanic gases consist of: location of sampling, date of sampling, identification of the sampling, etc. Nowadays, these data are generally represented in different formats. All of these formats are inflexible and machine dependent. XML has become the most important method of transferring data between computers. VolcanoGasML is a new format, based on XML, for the chemical analyses of volcanic gases. Its definition is divided into several layers: the first one describes the general information concerning the sample, the second, which is organized in several sublayers, contains the chemical data.

  8. Pharmacometrics Markup Language (PharmML): Opening New Perspectives for Model Exchange in Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swat, MJ; Moodie, S; Wimalaratne, SM; Kristensen, NR; Lavielle, M; Mari, A; Magni, P; Smith, MK; Bizzotto, R; Pasotti, L; Mezzalana, E; Comets, E; Sarr, C; Terranova, N; Blaudez, E; Chan, P; Chard, J; Chatel, K; Chenel, M; Edwards, D; Franklin, C; Giorgino, T; Glont, M; Girard, P; Grenon, P; Harling, K; Hooker, AC; Kaye, R; Keizer, R; Kloft, C; Kok, JN; Kokash, N; Laibe, C; Laveille, C; Lestini, G; Mentré, F; Munafo, A; Nordgren, R; Nyberg, HB; Parra-Guillen, ZP; Plan, E; Ribba, B; Smith, G; Trocóniz, IF; Yvon, F; Milligan, PA; Harnisch, L; Karlsson, M; Hermjakob, H; Le Novère, N

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a common exchange format for mathematical models in pharmacometrics has been a long-standing problem. Such a format has the potential to increase productivity and analysis quality, simplify the handling of complex workflows, ensure reproducibility of research, and facilitate the reuse of existing model resources. Pharmacometrics Markup Language (PharmML), currently under development by the Drug Disease Model Resources (DDMoRe) consortium, is intended to become an exchange standard in pharmacometrics by providing means to encode models, trial designs, and modeling steps. PMID:26225259

  9. PharmML in Action: an Interoperable Language for Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzotto, R; Smith, G; Yvon, F; Kristensen, NR; Swat, MJ

    2017-01-01

    PharmML1 is an XML‐based exchange format2, 3, 4 created with a focus on nonlinear mixed‐effect (NLME) models used in pharmacometrics,5, 6 but providing a very general framework that also allows describing mathematical and statistical models such as single‐subject or nonlinear and multivariate regression models. This tutorial provides an overview of the structure of this language, brief suggestions on how to work with it, and use cases demonstrating its power and flexibility. PMID:28575551

  10. Anesthetic success of 1.8ml lidocaine 2% for mandibular tooth extraction. A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Aravena; Nicol Bustos; Andrea Cerón; Viviana Castillo; Claudio González

    2013-01-01

    RESUMEN Objetivo: Determinar el efecto anestésico de un cartucho de 1,8ml de anestesia lidocaína al 2% con epinefrina 1:100.000 en la técnica troncular al nervio alveolar inferior (NAI) para la exodoncia de dientes mandibulares. Material y método: Estudio piloto de carácter analítico. Participaron pacientes voluntarios del servicio Urgencia Dental de Valdivia-Chile con indicación de exodoncia en dientes mandibulares entre Mayo y Julio del año 2010. La técnica anestésica fue realizada por un ...

  11. The carbohydrate sequence markup language (CabosML): an XML description of carbohydrate structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Norihiro; Kameyama, Akihiko; Nakaya, Shuuichi; Ito, Hiromi; Sato, Takashi; Shikanai, Toshihide; Takahashi, Yoriko; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2005-04-15

    Bioinformatics resources for glycomics are very poor as compared with those for genomics and proteomics. The complexity of carbohydrate sequences makes it difficult to define a common language to represent them, and the development of bioinformatics tools for glycomics has not progressed. In this study, we developed a carbohydrate sequence markup language (CabosML), an XML description of carbohydrate structures. The language definition (XML Schema) and an experimental database of carbohydrate structures using an XML database management system are available at http://www.phoenix.hydra.mki.co.jp/CabosDemo.html kikuchi@hydra.mki.co.jp.

  12. Pharmacometrics Markup Language (PharmML): Opening New Perspectives for Model Exchange in Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swat, M J; Moodie, S; Wimalaratne, S M; Kristensen, N R; Lavielle, M; Mari, A; Magni, P; Smith, M K; Bizzotto, R; Pasotti, L; Mezzalana, E; Comets, E; Sarr, C; Terranova, N; Blaudez, E; Chan, P; Chard, J; Chatel, K; Chenel, M; Edwards, D; Franklin, C; Giorgino, T; Glont, M; Girard, P; Grenon, P; Harling, K; Hooker, A C; Kaye, R; Keizer, R; Kloft, C; Kok, J N; Kokash, N; Laibe, C; Laveille, C; Lestini, G; Mentré, F; Munafo, A; Nordgren, R; Nyberg, H B; Parra-Guillen, Z P; Plan, E; Ribba, B; Smith, G; Trocóniz, I F; Yvon, F; Milligan, P A; Harnisch, L; Karlsson, M; Hermjakob, H; Le Novère, N

    2015-06-01

    The lack of a common exchange format for mathematical models in pharmacometrics has been a long-standing problem. Such a format has the potential to increase productivity and analysis quality, simplify the handling of complex workflows, ensure reproducibility of research, and facilitate the reuse of existing model resources. Pharmacometrics Markup Language (PharmML), currently under development by the Drug Disease Model Resources (DDMoRe) consortium, is intended to become an exchange standard in pharmacometrics by providing means to encode models, trial designs, and modeling steps.

  13. A RuleML Study on Integrating Geographical and Health Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Sheng; Mioc, Darka; Boley, Harold

    2008-01-01

    To facilitate health surveillance, flexible ways to represent, integrate, and deduce health information become increasingly important. In this paper, an ontology is used to support the semantic definition of spatial, temporal and thematic factors of health information. The ontology is realized...... as an interchangeable RuleML knowledge base, consisting of facts and rules. Rules are also used for integrating geographical and health information. The implemented eHealthGeo system uses the OO jDREW reasoning engine to deduce implicit information such as spatial relationships. The system combines this with spatial...

  14. Bench test evaluation of volume delivered by modern ICU ventilators during volume-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyazidi, Aissam; Thille, Arnaud W; Carteaux, Guillaume; Galia, Fabrice; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2010-12-01

    During volume-controlled ventilation, part of the volume delivered is compressed into the circuit. To correct for this phenomenon, modern ventilators use compensation algorithms. Humidity and temperature also influence the delivered volume. In a bench study at a research laboratory in a university hospital, we compared nine ICU ventilators equipped with compensation algorithms, one with a proximal pneumotachograph and one without compensation. Each ventilator was evaluated under normal, obstructive, and restrictive conditions of respiratory mechanics. For each condition, three tidal volumes (V (T)) were set (300, 500, and 800 ml), with and without an inspiratory pause. The insufflated volume and the volume delivered at the Y-piece were measured independently, without a humidification device, under ambient temperature and pressure and dry gas conditions. We computed the actually delivered V (T) to the lung under body temperature and pressure and saturated water vapour conditions (BTPS). For target V (T) values of 300, 500, and 800 ml, actually delivered V (T) under BTPS conditions ranged from 261 to 396 ml (-13 to +32%), from 437 to 622 ml (-13 to +24%), and from 681 to 953 ml (-15 to +19%), respectively (p ventilators.

  15. Post treatment PSA nadirs support continuing dose escalation study in patients with pretreatment PSA levels >10 ng/ml, but not in those with PSA <10 NG/ML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, D.H.; Hanlon, A.L.; Movsas, B.; Hanks, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: We have recently shown that ICRU reporting point radiation doses above 71 Gy are not associated with improved bNED survival in prostate cancer patients with pretreatment PSA level 20 ng/ml we found a strong correlation between dose and nadir values < 1.0 ng/ml (p=.003) as well as for nadir's < 0.5 ng/ml (p=.04). This dose/nadir effect held at several dose levels, but 74 Gy for nadir values < 1.0 ng/ml and 72 Gy for nadir's < 0.5 ng/ml remained the most significant. 32% of these patients achieved a nadir < 1.0ng/ml and 15% < 0.5ng/ml. Conclusions: This analysis provides strong additional support that patients with pretreatment PSA values of < 10 ng/ml do not benefit from dose escalation beyond an ICRU reporting point dose of 71 Gy. For patients with pretreatment PSA's of 10-19.9 ng/ml there is no dose/nadir response evaluated at a nadir of 1.0 ng/ml; however, there is a borderline effect observed at a nadir of 0.5 ng/ml. Patients with pretreatment PSA's of 20 ng/ml or greater clearly benefit from higher doses as evaluated by PSA nadirs of 1.0 ng/ml, and 0.5 ng/ml. These studies support the continued investigation of dose escalation in treating patients with PSA levels over 10 ng/ml, they do not support continued investigation of dose escalation beyond 71 Gy in patients with pretreatment PSA levels < 10 ng/ml. The failure to demonstrate any dose response for the low PSA group and the finding of only a borderline effect for the intermediate PSA group may be influenced by the relatively small number of patients in our series treated to doses < 70 Gy and the fact that none of our patients were treated to doses below 65.98 Gy. The lower limit of acceptible dose has yet to be defined

  16. Estudo comparativo da eficácia analgésica pós-operatória de 20, 30 ou 40 mL de ropivacaína no bloqueio de plexo braquial pela via posterior Estudio comparativo de la eficacia analgésica postoperatoria de 20, 30 o 40 mL de ropivacaína en el bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior A comparative study on the postoperative analgesic efficacy of 20, 30, or 40 mL of ropivacaine in posterior brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Guilherme Cunha Cruvinel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: As intervenções cirúrgicas por via artroscópica no ombro estão relacionadas com a dor pós-operatória de grande intensidade. Dentre as técnicas de analgesia, o bloqueio do plexo braquial é a que oferece os melhores resultados. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar qual volume de anestésico local no bloqueio de plexo braquial pela via posterior propicia analgesia pós-operatória para essas operações de maneira mais eficiente. MÉTODO: Noventa pacientes submetidos a bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via posterior foram divididos aleatoriamente em três grupos de 30. Grupo 1 - volume de 20 mL; Grupo 2 - volume de 30 mL; e Grupo 3 - volume de 40 mL. Em todos os grupos, o anestésico usado foi a ropivacaína a 0,375%. O bloqueio foi avaliado por meio da pesquisa de sensibilidade térmica utilizando-se algodão embebido em álcool e a dor pós-operatória foi avaliada seguindo-se uma escala numérica verbal (ENV nas primeiras 24 horas. RESULTADOS: Nos três grupos a analgesia pós-operatória foi similar segundo os parâmetros avaliados; ENV de dor média, tempo até a primeira queixa de dor e consumo de opióides no pós-operatório. No grupo de 20 mL houve um maior consumo de analgésicos não-opióides após a 12ª hora de pós-operatório. Nos grupos de 30 e 40 mL a extensão do bloqueio foi muito maior. CONCLUSÕES: Este estudo mostrou que o bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via posterior é uma técnica que promove analgesia eficaz para intervenções cirúrgicas no ombro. Os três diferentes volumes estudados promoveram analgesia similar. A maior extensão do bloqueio com volumes maiores não se traduziu em melhor analgesia.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Las intervenciones quirúrgicas por vía artroscópica en hombro están relacionadas al dolor postoperatorio de gran intensidad. Entre las técnicas de analgesia, el bloqueo del plexo braquial es el que ofrece los mejores resultados. El objetivo de este estudio

  17. Effect of volume loading on the Frank-Starling relation during reductions in central blood volume in heat-stressed humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Wilson, T E; Seifert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    -body heating after intravascular volume expansion. Volume expansion was accomplished by administration of a combination of a synthetic colloid (HES 130/0.4, Voluven) and saline. Before LBNP, SV was not affected by heating (122 +/- 30 ml; mean +/- s.d.) compared to normothermia (110 +/- 20 ml; P = 0...

  18. BER PERFORMANCE COMPARISON OF MIMO SYSTEMS USING OSTBC WITH ZF AND ML DECODING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenitha Rehman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO systems with multiple antenna elements at both transmitter and receiver ends are an efficient solution for wireless communication systems. They provide high data rates by exploiting the spatial domain under the constraints of limited bandwidth and transmit power. Space-Time Block Coding (STBC is a MIMO transmit strategy which exploits transmit diversity and provides high reliability. Implementation of orthogonal space-time block codes (OSTBCs for a two transmitter–two receiver system under AWGN (Additive White Gaussian Noise channel and flat fading channel is performed. Alamouti code is employed for the STBC. The modulation techniques used are BPSK, QPSK and 16-QAM. Decoding is done using the Zero Forcing (ZF algorithm and Maximum Likelihood (ML algorithm. The BER Performance of each modulation scheme is compared with the un-coded version of the same. Performance comparison between the two decoding techniques is also done. It is found that ML detection offers a slightly better performance for BPSK and QPSK system than ZF detection.

  19. Experimental and Analytical Studies on Improved Feedforward ML Estimation Based on LS-SVR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqian Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maximum likelihood (ML algorithm is the most common and effective parameter estimation method. However, when dealing with small sample and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, threshold effects are resulted and estimation performance degrades greatly. It is proved that support vector machine (SVM is suitable for small sample. Consequently, we employ the linear relationship between least squares support vector regression (LS-SVR’s inputs and outputs and regard LS-SVR process as a time-varying linear filter to increase input SNR of received signals and decrease the threshold value of mean square error (MSE curve. Furthermore, it is verified that by taking single-tone sinusoidal frequency estimation, for example, and integrating data analysis and experimental validation, if LS-SVR’s parameters are set appropriately, not only can the LS-SVR process ensure the single-tone sinusoid and additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN channel characteristics of original signals well, but it can also improves the frequency estimation performance. During experimental simulations, LS-SVR process is applied to two common and representative single-tone sinusoidal ML frequency estimation algorithms, the DFT-based frequency-domain periodogram (FDP and phase-based Kay ones. And the threshold values of their MSE curves are decreased by 0.3 dB and 1.2 dB, respectively, which obviously exhibit the advantage of the proposed algorithm.

  20. Isolation of a novel LPS-induced component of the ML superfamily in Ciona intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzini, Aiti; Bonura, Angela; Longo, Valeria; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Parrinello, Daniela; Cammarata, Matteo; Colombo, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    ML superfamily represents a group of proteins playing important roles in lipid metabolism and innate immune response. In this study, we report the identification of the first component of the ML superfamily in the invertebrate Ciona intestinalis by means of a subtractive hybridization strategy. Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis showed that this protein forms a specific clade with vertebrate components of the Niemann-Pick type C2 protein and, for this reason, it has been named Ci-NPC2. The putative Ci-NPC2 is a 150 amino acids long protein with a short signal peptide, seven cysteine residues, three putative lipid binding site and a three-dimensional model showing a characteristic β-strand structure. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that the Ci-NPC2 protein is positively upregulated after LPS inoculum with a peak of expression 1 h after challenge. Finally, in-situ hybridization demonstrated that the Ci-NPC2 protein is preferentially expressed in hemocytes inside the vessel lumen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. PepArML: A Meta-Search Peptide Identification Platform for Tandem Mass Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nathan J

    2013-12-01

    The PepArML meta-search peptide identification platform for tandem mass spectra provides a unified search interface to seven search engines; a robust cluster, grid, and cloud computing scheduler for large-scale searches; and an unsupervised, model-free, machine-learning-based result combiner, which selects the best peptide identification for each spectrum, estimates false-discovery rates, and outputs pepXML format identifications. The meta-search platform supports Mascot; Tandem with native, k-score and s-score scoring; OMSSA; MyriMatch; and InsPecT with MS-GF spectral probability scores—reformatting spectral data and constructing search configurations for each search engine on the fly. The combiner selects the best peptide identification for each spectrum based on search engine results and features that model enzymatic digestion, retention time, precursor isotope clusters, mass accuracy, and proteotypic peptide properties, requiring no prior knowledge of feature utility or weighting. The PepArML meta-search peptide identification platform often identifies two to three times more spectra than individual search engines at 10% FDR.

  2. Radical prostatectomy outcome when performed with PSA above 20 ng/ml.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, S S

    2012-02-01

    Many centres currently do not offer radical prostatectomy (RP) to men with high-risk localised prostate cancer due to concerns regarding poor outcome, despite evidence to the contrary. We identified 18 men undergoing RP with serum PSA >20 ng\\/ml (high-risk by National Comprehensive Cancer Network definition) and minimum follow-up of 12 years (mean 13.5). Mean preoperative PSA was 37.0 ng\\/ml (Range 21.1-94.0). Prostatectomy pathology reported extracapsular disease in 16 (88.9%), positive surgical margins in 15 (83%) and positive pelvic lymph nodes in 5 (27.8%). Overall and cancer-specific survival at 5 and 10-years was 83.3%, 88.2%, 72% and 76.5% respectively. With complete follow-up 11 (61.1%) are alive, and 5 (27.8%) avoided any adjuvant therapy. Complete continence (defined as no involuntary urine leakage and no use of pads) was achieved in 60%, with partial continence in the remainder. We conclude that surgery for this aggressive variant of localised prostate cancer can result in satisfactory outcome.

  3. The ML1Nx2 Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-Bisphosphate Probe Shows Poor Selectivity in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Gerald R V; Takasuga, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Takehiko; Balla, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (3,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2) is a quantitatively minor phospholipid in eukaryotic cells that plays a fundamental role in regulating endocytic membrane traffic. Despite its clear importance for cellular function and organism physiology, mechanistic details of its biology have so far not been fully elucidated. In part, this is due to a lack of experimental tools that specifically probe for PtdIns(3,5)P2 in cells to unambiguously identify its dynamics and site(s) of action. In this study, we have evaluated a recently reported PtdIns(3,5)P2 biosensor, GFP-ML1Nx2, for its veracity as such a probe. We report that, in live cells, the localization of this biosensor to sub-cellular compartments is largely independent of PtdIns(3,5)P2, as assessed after pharmacological, chemical genetic or genomic interventions that block the lipid's synthesis. We therefore conclude that it is unwise to interpret the localization of ML1Nx2 as a true and unbiased biosensor for PtdIns(3,5)P2.

  4. Anesthetic success of 1.8ml lidocaine 2% for mandibular tooth extraction. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Aravena

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the anesthetic effect of a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthetic lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:100,000 in inferior alveolar nerve block (NAI for the extraction in mandibular teeth. Material and methods: A pilot study with analitic design. Participating patients of Dental Emergency Service volunteers from Valdivia-Chile for mandibular teeth extractions attending between May and July of 2010. The anesthetic technique was performed by a dentist using only one cartridge of anesthetic to the NAI. After 15 minutes, the effect was considered effective when anesthetic not require reinforcement with additional anesthesia during extraction of teeth. We analyzed the relationship between success anesthetic effect with sex, age, diagnosis of tooth and type and level of pain observed (chi-square and logistic regression, p<0.05. Results: 62 patients were selected, of which only 47(75.8% was achieved anesthetic success. There was no statistical association with sex, age, type or dental diagnosis and perceived pain. Conclusion: Using a 1.8ml cartridge of anesthesia was effective in three of four patients treated by extraction of mandibular teeth. It suggests further research in relation to the clinical effectiveness of other anesthetics with the same dose in NAI.

  5. Safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the ML29 reassortant vaccine for Lassa fever in small non-human primates✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashevich, Igor S.; Carrion, Ricardo; Salvato, Maria S.; Mansfield, Keith; Brasky, Kathleen; Zapata, Juan; Cairo, Cristiana; Goicochea, Marco; Hoosien, Gia E.; Ticer, Anysha; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Hammamieh, Rasha; Mayda, Maria; Jett, Marti; Patterson, Jean

    2008-01-01

    A single injection of ML29 reassortant vaccine for Lassa fever induces low, transient viremia, and low or moderate levels of ML29 replication in tissues of common marmosets depending on the dose of the vaccination. The vaccination elicits specific immune responses and completely protects marmosets against fatal disease by induction of sterilizing cell-mediated immunity. DNA array analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors exposed to ML29 revealed that gene expression patterns in ML29-exposed PBMC and control, media-exposed PBMC, clustered together confirming safety profile of the ML29 in non-human primates. The ML29 reassortant is a promising vaccine candidate for Lassa fever. PMID:18692539

  6. An immunomagnetic separator for concentration of pathogenic micro-organisms from large volume samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotariu, Ovidiu; Ogden, Iain D.; MacRae, Marion; Badescu, Vasile; Strachan, Norval J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The standard method of immunomagnetic separation of pathogenic bacteria from food and environmental matrices processes 1 ml volumes. Pathogens present at low levels ( 50 ml). Preliminary results show that between 70 and 113 times more Escherchia coli O157 are recovered compared with the standard 1 ml method

  7. Design Analysis Method for Multidisciplinary Complex Product using SysML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jihong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the design of multidisciplinary complex products, model-based systems engineering methods are widely used. However, the methodologies only contain only modeling order and simple analysis steps, and lack integrated design analysis methods supporting the whole process. In order to solve the problem, a conceptual design analysis method with integrating modern design methods has been proposed. First, based on the requirement analysis of the quantization matrix, the user’s needs are quantitatively evaluated and translated to system requirements. Then, by the function decomposition of the function knowledge base, the total function is semi-automatically decomposed into the predefined atomic function. The function is matched into predefined structure through the behaviour layer using function-structure mapping based on the interface matching. Finally based on design structure matrix (DSM, the structure reorganization is completed. The process of analysis is implemented with SysML, and illustrated through an aircraft air conditioning system for the system validation.

  8. Software support for SBGN maps: SBGN-ML and LibSBGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Iersel, Martijn P; Villéger, Alice C; Czauderna, Tobias; Boyd, Sarah E; Bergmann, Frank T; Luna, Augustin; Demir, Emek; Sorokin, Anatoly; Dogrusoz, Ugur; Matsuoka, Yukiko; Funahashi, Akira; Aladjem, Mirit I; Mi, Huaiyu; Moodie, Stuart L; Kitano, Hiroaki; Le Novère, Nicolas; Schreiber, Falk

    2012-08-01

    LibSBGN is a software library for reading, writing and manipulating Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN) maps stored using the recently developed SBGN-ML file format. The library (available in C++ and Java) makes it easy for developers to add SBGN support to their tools, whereas the file format facilitates the exchange of maps between compatible software applications. The library also supports validation of maps, which simplifies the task of ensuring compliance with the detailed SBGN specifications. With this effort we hope to increase the adoption of SBGN in bioinformatics tools, ultimately enabling more researchers to visualize biological knowledge in a precise and unambiguous manner. Milestone 2 was released in December 2011. Source code, example files and binaries are freely available under the terms of either the LGPL v2.1+ or Apache v2.0 open source licenses from http://libsbgn.sourceforge.net. sbgn-libsbgn@lists.sourceforge.net.

  9. Using SysML for verification and validation planning on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvy, Brian M.; Claver, Charles; Angeli, George

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of the tool, language, and methodology used for Verification and Validation Planning on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Project. LSST has implemented a Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) approach as a means of defining all systems engineering planning and definition activities that have historically been captured in paper documents. Specifically, LSST has adopted the Systems Modeling Language (SysML) standard and is utilizing a software tool called Enterprise Architect, developed by Sparx Systems. Much of the historical use of SysML has focused on the early phases of the project life cycle. Our approach is to extend the advantages of MBSE into later stages of the construction project. This paper details the methodology employed to use the tool to document the verification planning phases, including the extension of the language to accommodate the project's needs. The process includes defining the Verification Plan for each requirement, which in turn consists of a Verification Requirement, Success Criteria, Verification Method(s), Verification Level, and Verification Owner. Each Verification Method for each Requirement is defined as a Verification Activity and mapped into Verification Events, which are collections of activities that can be executed concurrently in an efficient and complementary way. Verification Event dependency and sequences are modeled using Activity Diagrams. The methodology employed also ties in to the Project Management Control System (PMCS), which utilizes Primavera P6 software, mapping each Verification Activity as a step in a planned activity. This approach leads to full traceability from initial Requirement to scheduled, costed, and resource loaded PMCS task-based activities, ensuring all requirements will be verified.

  10. Influence of 5% dextrose volume on amphotericin B deoxycholate preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pingping; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Zhihao; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Pan; Li, Shuxia

    2016-04-01

    Preparation of amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmB-d) in different volumes of 5% dextrose (D5W) was studied to investigate a interesting phenomenon that AmB-d was easy to bring pipe blockage when diluted in 500 ml but not in 50 ml. AmB-d (25 mg/vial) in 50 ml, 250 ml or 500 ml D5W was prepared. Fluids were collected before and after infusion, then were assayed by validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Light obscuration assay was used to detect the particles in transfusions. pH values of different volumes of D5W were all about 3.7, which was lower than the requirement of AmB-d package insert (pH > 4.2). The number of insoluble particles >10 μm/25 μm in 25 mg/500 ml infusions exceeded China Pharmacopoeia limit. Filters in 25 mg/500 ml infusion set were full of AmB-d after dripping slowly for 6 h, and 331.3 ml solution was left in the bottles and only 11.3% of AmB-d could flow out. Whereas the AmB-d infusion consists of 25 mg/50 ml, 25 mg/250 ml and 50 mg/500 ml could meet with China Pharmacopoeia standards, and they flowed out easily and completely. In practice, 25 mg/250 ml and 50 mg/500 ml would be more suitable for clinical use, rather than 25 mg/500 ml. We provided a convenient method for AmB-d preparation. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society, Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology.

  11. libNeuroML and PyLEMS: using Python to combine procedural and declarative modeling approaches in computational neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Michael; Cannon, Robert C; Crook, Sharon; Davison, Andrew P; Ganapathy, Gautham; Robinson, Hugh P C; Silver, R Angus; Gleeson, Padraig

    2014-01-01

    NeuroML is an XML-based model description language, which provides a powerful common data format for defining and exchanging models of neurons and neuronal networks. In the latest version of NeuroML, the structure and behavior of ion channel, synapse, cell, and network model descriptions are based on underlying definitions provided in LEMS, a domain-independent language for expressing hierarchical mathematical models of physical entities. While declarative approaches for describing models have led to greater exchange of model elements among software tools in computational neuroscience, a frequent criticism of XML-based languages is that they are difficult to work with directly. Here we describe two Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) written in Python (http://www.python.org), which simplify the process of developing and modifying models expressed in NeuroML and LEMS. The libNeuroML API provides a Python object model with a direct mapping to all NeuroML concepts defined by the NeuroML Schema, which facilitates reading and writing the XML equivalents. In addition, it offers a memory-efficient, array-based internal representation, which is useful for handling large-scale connectomics data. The libNeuroML API also includes support for performing common operations that are required when working with NeuroML documents. Access to the LEMS data model is provided by the PyLEMS API, which provides a Python implementation of the LEMS language, including the ability to simulate most models expressed in LEMS. Together, libNeuroML and PyLEMS provide a comprehensive solution for interacting with NeuroML models in a Python environment.

  12. libNeuroML and PyLEMS: using Python to combine imperative and declarative modelling approaches in computational neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eVella

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available NeuroML is an XML-based model description language, which provides a powerful common data format for defining and exchanging models of neurons and neuronal networks. In the latest version of NeuroML, the structure and behavior of ion channel, synapse, cell,and network model descriptions are based on underlying definitions provided in LEMS, a domain-independent language for expressing hierarchical mathematical models of physical entities. While declarative approaches for describing models have led to greater exchange of model elements among software tools in computational neuroscience, a frequent criticism of XML-based languages is that they are difficult to work with directly. Here we describe two APIs (Application Programming Interfaces written in Python (http://www.python.org, which simplify the process of developing and modifying models expressed in NeuroML and LEMS. The libNeuroML API provides a Python object model with a direct mapping to all NeuroML concepts defined by the NeuroML Schema, which facilitates reading and writing the XML equivalents. In addition, it offers a memory-efficient, array-based internal representation, which is useful for handling large-scale connectomics data. The libNeuroML API also includes support for performing common operations that are required when working with NeuroML documents. Access to the LEMS data model is provided by the PyLEMS API, which provides a Python implementation of the LEMS language, including the ability to simulate most models expressed in LEMS. Together, libNeuroML and PyLEMS provide a comprehensive solution for interacting with NeuroML models in a Python environment.

  13. The accuracy of MRI-determined synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes in arthritis. A comparison of pre- and post-aspiration volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Henriksen, O

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 18 knees of patients with arthritis was performed before and immediately after arthrocentesis. Pre- and post-aspiration volumes were calculated by adding the outlined areas of synovium/effusion from a continuous series of gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced 5 mm transversal...... T1-weighted MR-images. The difference between MRI-determined and syringe-determined volumes of aspirated joint fluid was 0-7 ml, median 2 ml, corresponding to 0-18%, median 7%, of the pre-aspiration effusion volume. Synovial membrane volumes, determined before and after arthrocentesis varied 0-10 ml......, median 3 ml (0-17%, median 7%). No significant systematic misinterpretation of the borderline between joint fluid and synovium was found. We conclude that effusion volumes and in all probability also synovial membrane volumes, can be determined by MRI with a maximal analytical error of approximately 20...

  14. Major obstetric haemorrhage of 2000 ml or greater: a clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, J; Mansfield, R; Talbot, R; Cairns, A E

    2018-05-04

    Haemorrhage remains a leading cause of maternal death. We conducted an audit to identify strategies to improve the management at our local NHS Trust. A data collection form was based on our local guideline. A coded database search was conducted for all deliveries where the estimated blood loss was ≥2000 ml (from June 1 2015 to December 31 2015), returning 68 search results (13.7/1000 births). Fifty-six records were included. Poor compliance (<75%) was seen in some key areas including the major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH) call activation (52%), the presence of an anaesthetic consultant (63%) and tranexamic acid administration (46%). Thirty out of 56 cases (54%) were acutely transfused. Women, who were not transfused acutely, appeared to be more likely to need a secondary transfusion if no MOH call had been activated (9/27 (33%) versus 3/29 (10%), p = .052). A key area for improvement was the activation of MOH calls. Following this audit, we adjusted our guideline to make it more clinically useful and staff training sessions were held, including simulation training. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? A postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is an obstetric emergency. A structured approach is important to optimise the care of the mothers during this dangerous time, and has been shown to reduce the transfusion requirements. However, clinical practice may not adhere to the guideline recommendations. What the results of this study add? With the objective evidence of increased rates of PPH ≥2000 ml at our institution, our work identifying the flaws in management was a critical component of the work to improve the outcomes. This study gives impetus to find innovative ways to improve adherence to guidelines, and inspired an update of our local guideline to improve the applicability and utility. This project suggests a new marker for the adequacy of an acute management (a requirement for secondary blood transfusion without having received an acute

  15. Volume of hydration in terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, E; Belzile, M; Watanabe, S; Fainsinger, R L

    1996-03-01

    In this retrospective study we reviewed the volume and modality of hydration of consecutive series of terminal cancer patients in two different settings. In a palliative care unit 203/290 admitted patients received subcutaneous hydration for 12 +/- 8 days at a daily volume of 1015 +/- 135 ml/day. At the cancer center, 30 consecutive similar patients received intravenous hydration for 11.5 +/- 5 days (P > 0.2) but at a daily volume of 2080 +/- 720 ml/day (P palliative care unit patients required discontinuation of hydration because of complications. Hypodermoclysis was administered mainly as a continuous infusion, an overnight infusion, or in one to three 1-h boluses in 62 (31%), 98 (48%) and 43 (21%) patients, respectively. Our findings suggest that, in some settings, patients may be receiving excessive volumes of hydration by less comfortable routes such as the intravenous route. Increased education and research in this area are badly needed.

  16. GeoSciML v3.0 - a significant upgrade of the CGI-IUGS geoscience data model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, O.; Duclaux, G.; Boisvert, E.; Cipolloni, C.; Cox, S.; Laxton, J.; Letourneau, F.; Richard, S.; Ritchie, A.; Sen, M.; Serrano, J.-J.; Simons, B.; Vuollo, J.

    2012-04-01

    GeoSciML version 3.0 (http://www.geosciml.org), released in late 2011, is the latest version of the CGI-IUGS* Interoperability Working Group geoscience data interchange standard. The new version is a significant upgrade and refactoring of GeoSciML v2 which was released in 2008. GeoSciML v3 has already been adopted by several major international interoperability initiatives, including OneGeology, the EU INSPIRE program, and the US Geoscience Information Network, as their standard data exchange format for geoscience data. GeoSciML v3 makes use of recently upgraded versions of several Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and ISO data transfer standards, including GML v3.2, SWE Common v2.0, and Observations and Measurements v2 (ISO 19156). The GeoSciML v3 data model has been refactored from a single large application schema with many packages, into a number of smaller, but related, application schema modules with individual namespaces. This refactoring allows the use and future development of modules of GeoSciML (eg; GeologicUnit, GeologicStructure, GeologicAge, Borehole) in smaller, more manageable units. As a result of this refactoring and the integration with new OGC and ISO standards, GeoSciML v3 is not backwardly compatible with previous GeoSciML versions. The scope of GeoSciML has been extended in version 3.0 to include new models for geomorphological data (a Geomorphology application schema), and for geological specimens, geochronological interpretations, and metadata for geochemical and geochronological analyses (a LaboratoryAnalysis-Specimen application schema). In addition, there is better support for borehole data, and the PhysicalProperties model now supports a wider range of petrophysical measurements. The previously used CGI_Value data type has been superseded in favour of externally governed data types provided by OGC's SWE Common v2 and GML v3.2 data standards. The GeoSciML v3 release includes worked examples of best practice in delivering geochemical

  17. Architecting the Human Space Flight Program with Systems Modeling Language (SysML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Maddalena M.; Fernandez, Michela Munoz; McVittie, Thomas I.; Sindiy, Oleg V.

    2012-01-01

    The next generation of missions in NASA's Human Space Flight program focuses on the development and deployment of highly complex systems (e.g., Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, Space Launch System, 21st Century Ground System) that will enable astronauts to venture beyond low Earth orbit and explore the moon, near-Earth asteroids, and beyond. Architecting these highly complex system-of-systems requires formal systems engineering techniques for managing the evolution of the technical features in the information exchange domain (e.g., data exchanges, communication networks, ground software) and also, formal correlation of the technical architecture to stakeholders' programmatic concerns (e.g., budget, schedule, risk) and design development (e.g., assumptions, constraints, trades, tracking of unknowns). This paper will describe how the authors have applied System Modeling Language (SysML) to implement model-based systems engineering for managing the description of the End-to-End Information System (EEIS) architecture and associated development activities and ultimately enables stakeholders to understand, reason, and answer questions about the EEIS under design for proposed lunar Exploration Missions 1 and 2 (EM-1 and EM-2).

  18. Specification and Design of Electrical Flight System Architectures with SysML

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvin, Mark L., Jr.; Jimenez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Modern space flight systems are required to perform more complex functions than previous generations to support space missions. This demand is driving the trend to deploy more electronics to realize system functionality. The traditional approach for the specification, design, and deployment of electrical system architectures in space flight systems includes the use of informal definitions and descriptions that are often embedded within loosely coupled but highly interdependent design documents. Traditional methods become inefficient to cope with increasing system complexity, evolving requirements, and the ability to meet project budget and time constraints. Thus, there is a need for more rigorous methods to capture the relevant information about the electrical system architecture as the design evolves. In this work, we propose a model-centric approach to support the specification and design of electrical flight system architectures using the System Modeling Language (SysML). In our approach, we develop a domain specific language for specifying electrical system architectures, and we propose a design flow for the specification and design of electrical interfaces. Our approach is applied to a practical flight system.

  19. Implementation of a Goal-Based Systems Engineering Process Using the Systems Modeling Language (SysML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenridge, Jonathan T.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Building upon the purpose, theoretical approach, and use of a Goal-Function Tree (GFT) being presented by Dr. Stephen B. Johnson, described in a related Infotech 2013 ISHM abstract titled "Goal-Function Tree Modeling for Systems Engineering and Fault Management", this paper will describe the core framework used to implement the GFTbased systems engineering process using the Systems Modeling Language (SysML). These two papers are ideally accepted and presented together in the same Infotech session. Statement of problem: SysML, as a tool, is currently not capable of implementing the theoretical approach described within the "Goal-Function Tree Modeling for Systems Engineering and Fault Management" paper cited above. More generally, SysML's current capabilities to model functional decompositions in the rigorous manner required in the GFT approach are limited. The GFT is a new Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) approach to the development of goals and requirements, functions, and its linkage to design. As a growing standard for systems engineering, it is important to develop methods to implement GFT in SysML. Proposed Method of Solution: Many of the central concepts of the SysML language are needed to implement a GFT for large complex systems. In the implementation of those central concepts, the following will be described in detail: changes to the nominal SysML process, model view definitions and examples, diagram definitions and examples, and detailed SysML construct and stereotype definitions.

  20. Radiological evaluation of lung volume among Koreans with silicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Byung Chull

    1975-01-01

    1. Radiological evaluation of lung volumes was carried out thirty Korean males patients with silicosis, and following results were obtained. 2. The mean radiological lung volume among those patients was 7,587 ml. 3. When compared with the group of normal Korean male adults ranging from 31 to 55 years of age, the mean lung volume was increased by 2,346 ml. 4. The lung volume of these patients was even slightly larger than that of the group of Korean athletes of all ages. 5. On the other hand, the vital capacity in patients with silicosis was markedly diminished, the mean vital capacity being 2,909 ml. 6. The patients with silicosis also revealed emphysematous changes in the lung as well as increased residual volumes. The vital capacity was smallest in the latest stage.

  1. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V003 (ML2HNO3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  2. MLS/Aura Level 2 Hypochlorous Acid (HOCl) Mixing Ratio V003 (ML2HOCL) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HOCL is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hypochlorous acid derived from radiances measured primarily by the 640 GHz radiometer. The...

  3. MLS/Aura Level 2 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Mixing Ratio V004 (ML2HNO3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HNO3 is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for nitric acid derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer at and below 10 hPa,...

  4. AstroML: "better, faster, cheaper" towards state-of-the-art data mining and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezic, Zeljko; Connolly, Andrew J.; Vanderplas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    We present AstroML, a Python module for machine learning and data mining built on numpy, scipy, scikit-learn, matplotlib, and astropy, and distributed under an open license. AstroML contains a growing library of statistical and machine learning routines for analyzing astronomical data in Python, loaders for several open astronomical datasets (such as SDSS and other recent major surveys), and a large suite of examples of analyzing and visualizing astronomical datasets. AstroML is especially suitable for introducing undergraduate students to numerical research projects and for graduate students to rapidly undertake cutting-edge research. The long-term goal of astroML is to provide a community repository for fast Python implementations of common tools and routines used for statistical data analysis in astronomy and astrophysics (see http://www.astroml.org).

  5. A Study on GPU-based Iterative ML-EM Reconstruction Algorithm for Emission Computed Tomographic Imaging Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Woo Seok; Kim, Soo Mee; Park, Min Jae; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) is the statistical reconstruction algorithm derived from probabilistic model of the emission and detection processes. Although the ML-EM has many advantages in accuracy and utility, the use of the ML-EM is limited due to the computational burden of iterating processing on a CPU (central processing unit). In this study, we developed a parallel computing technique on GPU (graphic processing unit) for ML-EM algorithm. Using Geforce 9800 GTX+ graphic card and CUDA (compute unified device architecture) the projection and backprojection in ML-EM algorithm were parallelized by NVIDIA's technology. The time delay on computations for projection, errors between measured and estimated data and backprojection in an iteration were measured. Total time included the latency in data transmission between RAM and GPU memory. The total computation time of the CPU- and GPU-based ML-EM with 32 iterations were 3.83 and 0.26 sec, respectively. In this case, the computing speed was improved about 15 times on GPU. When the number of iterations increased into 1024, the CPU- and GPU-based computing took totally 18 min and 8 sec, respectively. The improvement was about 135 times and was caused by delay on CPU-based computing after certain iterations. On the other hand, the GPU-based computation provided very small variation on time delay per iteration due to use of shared memory. The GPU-based parallel computation for ML-EM improved significantly the computing speed and stability. The developed GPU-based ML-EM algorithm could be easily modified for some other imaging geometries

  6. nmrML: A Community Supported Open Data Standard for the Description, Storage, and Exchange of NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Daniel; Jacob, Daniel; Wilson, Michael; Cruz, Joseph A; Marcu, Ana; Grant, Jason R; Moing, Annick; Deborde, Catherine; de Figueiredo, Luis F; Haug, Kenneth; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Easton, John; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Hao, Jie; Ludwig, Christian; Günther, Ulrich L; Rosato, Antonio; Klein, Matthias S; Lewis, Ian A; Luchinat, Claudio; Jones, Andrew R; Grauslys, Arturas; Larralde, Martin; Yokochi, Masashi; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Porzel, Andrea; Griffin, Julian L; Viant, Mark R; Wishart, David S; Steinbeck, Christoph; Salek, Reza M; Neumann, Steffen

    2018-01-02

    NMR is a widely used analytical technique with a growing number of repositories available. As a result, demands for a vendor-agnostic, open data format for long-term archiving of NMR data have emerged with the aim to ease and encourage sharing, comparison, and reuse of NMR data. Here we present nmrML, an open XML-based exchange and storage format for NMR spectral data. The nmrML format is intended to be fully compatible with existing NMR data for chemical, biochemical, and metabolomics experiments. nmrML can capture raw NMR data, spectral data acquisition parameters, and where available spectral metadata, such as chemical structures associated with spectral assignments. The nmrML format is compatible with pure-compound NMR data for reference spectral libraries as well as NMR data from complex biomixtures, i.e., metabolomics experiments. To facilitate format conversions, we provide nmrML converters for Bruker, JEOL and Agilent/Varian vendor formats. In addition, easy-to-use Web-based spectral viewing, processing, and spectral assignment tools that read and write nmrML have been developed. Software libraries and Web services for data validation are available for tool developers and end-users. The nmrML format has already been adopted for capturing and disseminating NMR data for small molecules by several open source data processing tools and metabolomics reference spectral libraries, e.g., serving as storage format for the MetaboLights data repository. The nmrML open access data standard has been endorsed by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative (MSI), and we here encourage user participation and feedback to increase usability and make it a successful standard.

  7. A Study on GPU-based Iterative ML-EM Reconstruction Algorithm for Emission Computed Tomographic Imaging Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Woo Seok; Kim, Soo Mee; Park, Min Jae; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2009-01-01

    The maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) is the statistical reconstruction algorithm derived from probabilistic model of the emission and detection processes. Although the ML-EM has many advantages in accuracy and utility, the use of the ML-EM is limited due to the computational burden of iterating processing on a CPU (central processing unit). In this study, we developed a parallel computing technique on GPU (graphic processing unit) for ML-EM algorithm. Using Geforce 9800 GTX+ graphic card and CUDA (compute unified device architecture) the projection and backprojection in ML-EM algorithm were parallelized by NVIDIA's technology. The time delay on computations for projection, errors between measured and estimated data and backprojection in an iteration were measured. Total time included the latency in data transmission between RAM and GPU memory. The total computation time of the CPU- and GPU-based ML-EM with 32 iterations were 3.83 and 0.26 sec, respectively. In this case, the computing speed was improved about 15 times on GPU. When the number of iterations increased into 1024, the CPU- and GPU-based computing took totally 18 min and 8 sec, respectively. The improvement was about 135 times and was caused by delay on CPU-based computing after certain iterations. On the other hand, the GPU-based computation provided very small variation on time delay per iteration due to use of shared memory. The GPU-based parallel computation for ML-EM improved significantly the computing speed and stability. The developed GPU-based ML-EM algorithm could be easily modified for some other imaging geometries

  8. ART-ML: a new markup language for modelling and representation of biological processes in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvounis, E C; Exarchos, T P; Fotiou, E; Sakellarios, A I; Iliopoulou, D; Koutsouris, D; Fotiadis, D I

    2013-01-01

    With an ever increasing number of biological models available on the internet, a standardized modelling framework is required to allow information to be accessed and visualized. In this paper we propose a novel Extensible Markup Language (XML) based format called ART-ML that aims at supporting the interoperability and the reuse of models of geometry, blood flow, plaque progression and stent modelling, exported by any cardiovascular disease modelling software. ART-ML has been developed and tested using ARTool. ARTool is a platform for the automatic processing of various image modalities of coronary and carotid arteries. The images and their content are fused to develop morphological models of the arteries in 3D representations. All the above described procedures integrate disparate data formats, protocols and tools. ART-ML proposes a representation way, expanding ARTool, for interpretability of the individual resources, creating a standard unified model for the description of data and, consequently, a format for their exchange and representation that is machine independent. More specifically, ARTool platform incorporates efficient algorithms which are able to perform blood flow simulations and atherosclerotic plaque evolution modelling. Integration of data layers between different modules within ARTool are based upon the interchange of information included in the ART-ML model repository. ART-ML provides a markup representation that enables the representation and management of embedded models within the cardiovascular disease modelling platform, the storage and interchange of well-defined information. The corresponding ART-ML model incorporates all relevant information regarding geometry, blood flow, plaque progression and stent modelling procedures. All created models are stored in a model repository database which is accessible to the research community using efficient web interfaces, enabling the interoperability of any cardiovascular disease modelling software

  9. Evaluation of the accuracy of ventricular volume measurement by ultrafast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wei; Dai Ruping; Guo Yuyin

    1997-01-01

    The authors evaluated the accuracy of ventricular volume measured by ultrafast CT (UFCT); and (2) compared the value of ventricular volume derived from long- and short-axis view. Fourteen human left ventricular casts and 15 right ventricular casts were scanned by Imatron C-150 scanner along both the long- and short-axis. The scan protocol was similar to that used in vivo. Eight 7 mm-thick slices were obtained from each cast for both long- and short-axis views. Ventricular volume was determined by the modified Simpson's rule provided by Inamtron Inc. The actual volumes of the ventricular casts were determined by the amount of water displacement by the cast. The actual volumes for left and right ventricles were 55.57 +- 28.91 ml and 64.23 +- 24.51 ml, respectively, the left and right ventricular volumes determined by UFCT were 66.50 +- 33.04 ml and 76.47 +-28.70 ml from long-axis view, and 60.36 +- 29.90 ml and 75.36 +- 28.73 ml from short-axis view, respectively. The measurements by UFCT were significantly greater than the actual volumes of the casts, both for the left and right ventricles (P 0.990). Both left and right ventricular volumes can be determined by UFCT with identical accuracy for both long- and short-axis views in calculating ventricular volume; however, overestimation of ventricular volume by UFCT should be noted

  10. Role of Ultrasound Volume Measurements of Testes in Evaluation of Infertile Men with Azoospermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Seo, Ju Tae; Chun, Yi Keong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the usefulness of ultrasound determined testicular volume in the evaluation of the infertile men with azoospermia. A computerized search from October 2005 to June 2010 generated a list of 45 infertile men with azoospermia (mean age, 34 years: age range, 26-44 years) who underwent both scrotal ultrasound and testis biopsy. Ultrasound determined testicular volumes were compared between infertile men with obstructive azoospermia and those with non-obstructive azoospermia. Testicular volume for obstructive azoospermia ranged from 6.4 ml to 26.9 ml, with a median volume of 14.0 ml. This volume was significantly larger than that of those with non-obstructive azoospermia, which ranged from 1.0 ml to 12.8 ml, with a median volume of 6.1 ml (p < 0.001). The area under the ROC curve for distinguishing non-obstructive azoospermia from obstructive azoospermia using testicular volume was 0.91. A cutoff value of less than or equal to 11.4 ml could distinguish non-obstructive azoospermia from obstructive azoospermia, with a sensitivity of 94.1% (95% CI; 71.3-99.9%) and a specificity of 73.3% (95% CI; 54.1-87.7%). Ultrasound-determined testicular volume can be helpful in the differentiation of obstructive azoospermia from non-obstructive azoospermia

  11. Seismogenic structures of the 2006 ML4.0 Dangan Island earthquake offshore Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shaohong; Cao, Jinghe; Sun, Jinlong; Lv, Jinshui; Xu, Huilong; Zhang, Xiang; Wan, Kuiyuan; Fan, Chaoyan; Zhou, Pengxiang

    2018-02-01

    The northern margin of the South China Sea, as a typical extensional continental margin, has relatively strong intraplate seismicity. Compared with the active zones of Nanao Island, Yangjiang, and Heyuan, seismicity in the Pearl River Estuary is relatively low. However, a ML4.0 earthquake in 2006 occurred near Dangan Island (DI) offshore Hong Kong, and this site was adjacent to the source of the historical M5.8 earthquake in 1874. To reveal the seismogenic mechanism of intraplate earthquakes in DI, we systematically analyzed the structural characteristics in the source area of the 2006 DI earthquake using integrated 24-channel seismic profiles, onshore-offshore wide-angle seismic tomography, and natural earthquake parameters. We ascertained the locations of NW- and NE-trending faults in the DI sea and found that the NE-trending DI fault mainly dipped southeast at a high angle and cut through the crust with an obvious low-velocity anomaly. The NW-trending fault dipped southwest with a similar high angle. The 2006 DI earthquake was adjacent to the intersection of the NE- and NW-trending faults, which suggested that the intersection of the two faults with different strikes could provide a favorable condition for the generation and triggering of intraplate earthquakes. Crustal velocity model showed that the high-velocity anomaly was imaged in the west of DI, but a distinct entity with low-velocity anomaly in the upper crust and high-velocity anomaly in the lower crust was found in the south of DI. Both the 1874 and 2006 DI earthquakes occurred along the edge of the distinct entity. Two vertical cross-sections nearly perpendicular to the strikes of the intersecting faults revealed good spatial correlations between the 2006 DI earthquake and the low to high speed transition in the distinct entity. This result indicated that the transitional zone might be a weakly structural body that can store strain energy and release it as a brittle failure, resulting in an earthquake

  12. Control de la calidad y estudio de estabilidad del paracetamol gotas orales 100 mg/ml

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caridad M García Peña

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: las gotas orales de Paracetamol, están indicadas a la población infantil hasta los 5 años para el alivio de la fiebre, dolor de cabeza, dolores dentales y proporciona alivio sintomático del resfriado común. Objetivo: validar dos métodos analíticos, para el control de la calidad y el estudio de estabilidad y estudiar la estabilidad de las gotas orales de producción nacional. Métodos: para cuantificar el principio activo para el estudio de estabilidad, la separación se realizó a través de una columna cromatográfica Lichrosorb RP - 18 (5µm (250 x 4 mm, con detección ultravioleta a 243 nm, empleando una fase móvil compuesta por Agua destilada: Metanol (3:1. Mientras que el método para el control de la calidad se utilizó un Espectrofotómetro SPECTRONIC GENESYS 2.Para el estudio de estabilidad, se emplearon los métodos de vida de estante (a temperatura inferior a 30 º C y de estabilidad acelerada (40 ± 2ºC mediante cromatografía líquida de alta eficiencia. Resultados: los resultados obtenidos de los parámetros evaluados en las validaciones se encontraron dentro de los límites establecidos. Los resultados del estudio de estabilidad realizado, demuestran que el producto terminado cumplió con las especificaciones de calidad durante el estudio. Conclusiones: los métodos analíticos por espectrofotometría UV y cromatografía líquida de alta resolución, son válidos para el control de la calidad y estudio de estabilidad de las gotas orales de Paracetamol 100 mg/mL, ya que resultaron lineales, precisos, exactos y específicos. Se demostró la estabilidad física, química y microbiológica del producto por espacio de 12 meses a temperatura inferior a 30 ºC, envasados en frascos de vidrio ámbar por 15 mL, boca 18 mm, calidad hidrolítica III. Además se evidenció que el producto es estable durante 30 días después de abierto el frasco.

  13. The effect of volume and quenching on estimation of counting efficiencies in liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoche, H.W.; Parkhurst, A.M.; Tam, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of volume on the liquid scintillation counting performance of 14 C-samples has been investigated. A decrease in counting efficiency was observed for samples with volumes below about 6 ml and those above about 18 ml when unquenched samples were assayed. Two quench-correction methods, sample channels ratio and external standard channels ratio, and three different liquid scintillation counters, were used in an investigation to determine the magnitude of the error in predicting counting efficiencies when small volume samples (2 ml) with different levels of quenching were assayed. The 2 ml samples exhibited slightly greater standard deviations of the difference between predicted and determined counting efficiencies than did 15 ml samples. Nevertheless, the magnitude of the errors indicate that if the sample channels ratio method of quench correction is employed, 2 ml samples may be counted in conventional counting vials with little loss in counting precision. (author)

  14. High-pitch dual-source CT coronary angiography with low volumes of contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembcke, Alexander; Hein, Patrick A.; Knobloch, Gesine; Durmus, Tahir; Hamm, Bernd; Schwenke, Carsten; Huppertz, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effect of lower volumes of contrast medium (CM) on image quality in high-pitch dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). One-hundred consecutive patients (body weight 65-85 kg, stable heart rate ≤65 bpm, cardiac index ≥2.5 L/min/m 2 ) referred for CTCA were prospectively enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to one of five groups of different CM volumes (G 30 , 30 mL; G 40 , 40 mL; G 50 , 50 mL; G 60 , 60 mL; G 70 , 70 mL; flow rate 5 mL/s each, iodine content 370 mg/mL). Attenuation within the proximal and distal coronary artery segments was analysed. Mean attenuation for men and women ranged from 345.0 and 399.1 HU in G 30 to 478.2 and 571.8 HU in G 70 . Mean attenuation values were higher in groups with higher CM volumes (P 30 , G 40 , G 50 , G 60 and G 70 were 89 %, 95 %, 98 %, 98 % and 99 %. CM volume of 30 mL in women and 40 mL in men proved to be sufficient to guarantee attenuation of at least 300 HU. In selected patients high-pitch dual-source CTCA can be performed with CM volumes of 40 mL in men or 30 mL in women. (orig.)

  15. Radiocardiographic determination of the stroke volume and of the heart minute volume in athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattler, R; Stoll, W [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik

    1981-11-01

    Radiocardiography, a novel radioisotope method for the problemless determination of many cardiodynamic parameters which can be applied also at given physical exercise is presented. On the basis of stroke volume and heart minute volume values from 35 athletes practising different sports and of a comparison with normal values reported in the literature, differences in the cardiac adaptation and the function of athletic hearts and so-called normal hearts are pointed out. The stroke volume of endurance-trained athletes exceeds that of untrained individuals by 30-40 ml. Under exercise the increase of the stroke volume is considerably greater in endurance athletes than in individuals practising other sports or in untrained subjects. At rest the values of the heart minute volume are almost the same in athletes and untrained individuals. Under exercise the heart minute volume of endurance athletes (40 l/min) is nearly twice that of untrained individuals (volume reserve of the athlete).

  16. Radiocardiographic determination of the stroke volume and of the heart minute volume in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, R.; Stoll, W.

    1981-01-01

    Radiocardiography, a novel radioisotope method for the problemless determination of many cardiodynamic parameters which can be applied also at given physical exercise is presented. On the basis of stroke volume and heart minute volume values from 35 athletes practising different sports and of a comparison with normal values reported in the literature, differences in the cardiac adaptation and the function of athletic hearts and so-called normal hearts are pointed out. The stroke volume of endurance-trained athetes exceed that of untrained individuals by 30-40 ml. Under exercise the increase of the stroke volume is considerably greater in endurance athletes than in individuals practising other sports or in untrained subjects. At rest the values of the heart minute volume are almost the same in athletes and untrained individuals. Under exercise the heart minute volume of endurance athletes (40 l/min) is nearly twice that of untrained individuals (volume reserve of the athlete). (author)

  17. Reduced central blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Sørensen, T I

    1989-01-01

    than 0.0001). The lowest values (18 ml/kg) were found in patients with gross ascites and a reduced systemic vascular resistance. In patients with cirrhosis central blood volume was inversely correlated to the hepatic venous pressure gradient (r = -0.41, p less than 0.01), and the total blood volume...... was inversely correlated to the systemic vascular resistance (r = -0.49, p less than 0.001), the latter being significantly reduced in the patient group. Patients with cirrhosis apparently are unable to maintain a normal central blood volume. This may be due to arteriolar vasodilation, portosystemic collateral...

  18. Contrail Cirrus Forecasts for the ML-CIRRUS Experiment and Some Comparison Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Graf, Kaspar; Bugliaro, Luca; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Giez, Andreas; Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Krämer, Martina; Minikin, Andreas; Schäfler, Andreas; Voigt, Christiane; Wirth, Martin; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Model simulations with the contrail cirrus prediction model CoCiP driven by numerical weather prediction (NWP) data provided from the European Centre for Medium Range Forecasts (ECMWF) and global aircraft waypoint data show a mean computed cover (for optical depth larger than 0.1) of 0.23% globally, and 5.4% over mid Europe (Schumann and Graf, JGR, 2013). The computed mean longwave radiative forcing (RF) reaches 3 W m-2 over mid Europe (10°W-20°E and 40°N-55°N), and 0.13 W m-2 globally. The global net RF is about 40-60% smaller because of compensating shortwave cooling induced by contrails during daytime. The results depend on several model details such as the number of ice particles forming from aircraft soot emissions, the contrail plume dispersion, ice particle sedimentation etc., all influencing contrail life time and their optical properties. The quantitative results depend also strongly on ambient relative humidity, vertical motion and on ice water content of other cirrus predicted by the NWP model. In order to test and possibly improve this and other contrail models, high-quality observations are needed to which multi-parameter model output can be compared. The Mid-Latitude Cirrus Experiment ML-CIRRUS was performed (see C. Voigt et al., this conference) with a suite of in-situ and Lidar instruments for airborne measurements on the research aircraft HALO. Before and during the mission, CoCiP was run daily to provide 3-days forecasts of contrail cover using operational ECMWF forecasts and historical traffic data. CoCiP forecast output was made available in an internet tool twice a day for experiment planning. The one-day and two-day contrail forecasts often showed only small differences. Still, most recent forecasts and detailed satellite observations results were transmitted via satellite link to the crew for onboard campaign optimization. After the campaign, a data base of realistic air traffic data has been setup from various sources, and CoCiP was

  19. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from different mammalian species by relaxin peptide and small molecule agonist ML290

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaohua eHuang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Relaxin peptide (RLN, which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1 GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyzed their activation by RLN and ML290. HEK293T cells expressing macaque or pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin and ML290 treatment as measured by an increase of cAMP production. Guinea pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin but had very low response to ML290 treatment only at highest concentrations used. The rabbit RXFP1 amino acid sequence was the most divergent, with a number of unique substitutions within the ectodomain and the 7-transmembrane domain (7TM. Two splice variants of rabbit RXFP1 derived through alternative splicing of the forth exon were identified. In contrast to the other species, rabbit RXFP1s were activated by ML290, but not with human, pig, mouse, or rabbit relaxins. Using FLAG-tagged constructs, we have shown that both rabbit RXFP1 variants are expressed on the cell surface. No binding of human Eu-labeled relaxin to rabbit RXFP1 was detected, suggesting that in this species RXFP1 might be non-functional. We used chimeric rabbit-human and guinea pig-human constructs to identify regions important for RLN or ML290 receptor activation. Chimeras with the human ectodomain and rabbit 7TM domain were activated by RLN, whereas substitution of part of the guinea pig 7TM domain with the human sequence only partially restored ML290 activation, confirming the allosteric mode of action for the two ligands. Our data demonstrate that macaque and pig models can be used for ML290 testing.

  20. Container volume and subirrigation schedule influence Quercus variabilis seedling growth and nutrient status in the nursery and field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiaoyu Sun; R. Kasten Dumroese; Yong Liu

    2018-01-01

    Container volume and irrigation management affect seedling growth in the nursery and field. We evaluated the effects of container volumes (D40, 656 ml; D60, 983 ml) and subirrigation schedules (85%, 75%, 65%, and 55% of 100% total substrate moisture content, TSMC) on seedling growth in a greenhouse and outplanting performance of Chinese cork oak (Quercus variabilis...

  1. Fine physical and genetic mapping of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 originating from wild emmer (Triticum dicoccoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Ouyang

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important wheat diseases in the world. In this study, a single dominant powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 was identified in the IW172 wild emmer accession and mapped to the distal region of chromosome arm 7AL (bin7AL-16-0.86-0.90 via molecular marker analysis. MlIW172 was closely linked with the RFLP probe Xpsr680-derived STS marker Xmag2185 and the EST markers BE405531 and BE637476. This suggested that MlIW172 might be allelic to the Pm1 locus or a new locus closely linked to Pm1. By screening genomic BAC library of durum wheat cv. Langdon and 7AL-specific BAC library of hexaploid wheat cv. Chinese Spring, and after analyzing genome scaffolds of Triticum urartu containing the marker sequences, additional markers were developed to construct a fine genetic linkage map on the MlIW172 locus region and to delineate the resistance gene within a 0.48 cM interval. Comparative genetics analyses using ESTs and RFLP probe sequences flanking the MlIW172 region against other grass species revealed a general co-linearity in this region with the orthologous genomic regions of rice chromosome 6, Brachypodium chromosome 1, and sorghum chromosome 10. However, orthologous resistance gene-like RGA sequences were only present in wheat and Brachypodium. The BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds that we have developed provide a framework for the physical mapping and map-based cloning of MlIW172.

  2. QuakeML: Recent Development and First Applications of the Community-Created Seismological Data Exchange Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Kästli, P.; Quakeml Group, T

    2008-12-01

    QuakeML is an XML-based exchange format for seismological data which is being developed using a community-driven approach. It covers basic event description, including picks, arrivals, amplitudes, magnitudes, origins, focal mechanisms, and moment tensors. Contributions have been made from ETH, GFZ, USC, SCEC, USGS, IRIS DMC, EMSC, ORFEUS, GNS, ZAMG, BRGM, and ISTI. The current release (Version 1.1, Proposed Recommendation) reflects the results of a public Request for Comments process which has been documented online at http://quakeml.org/RFC_BED_1.0. QuakeML has recently been adopted as a distribution format for earthquake catalogs by GNS Science, New Zealand, and the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC). These institutions provide prototype QuakeML web services. Furthermore, integration of the QuakeML data model in the CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability, http://www.cseptesting.org) testing center software developed by SCEC is under way. QuakePy is a Python- based seismicity analysis toolkit which is based on the QuakeML data model. Recently, QuakePy has been used to implement the PMC method for calculating network recording completeness (Schorlemmer and Woessner 2008, in press). Completeness results for seismic networks in Southern California and Japan can be retrieved through the CompletenessWeb (http://completenessweb.org). Future QuakeML development will include an extension for macroseismic information. Furthermore, development on seismic inventory information, resource identifiers, and resource metadata is under way. Online resources: http://www.quakeml.org, http://www.quakepy.org

  3. Therapy reduction in patients with Down syndrome and myeloid leukemia: the international ML-DS 2006 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uffmann, Madita; Rasche, Mareike; Zimmermann, Martin; von Neuhoff, Christine; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Scheffers, Lenie; Hasle, Henrik; Zwaan, C Michel; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning

    2017-06-22

    Children with myeloid leukemia associated with Down syndrome (ML-DS) have superior outcome compared with non-DS patients, but suffer from higher constitutional cytotoxic drug susceptibility. We analyzed the outcome of 170 pediatric patients with ML-DS enrolled in the prospective, multicenter, open-label, nonrandomized ML-DS 2006 trial by Nordic Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (NOPHO), Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG), and Acute Myeloid Leukemia-Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (AML-BFM) study group. Compared with the historical control arm (reduced-intensity protocol for ML-DS patients from the AML-BFM 98 trial), treatment intensity was reduced by lowering the cumulative dose of etoposide (950 to 450 mg/m 2 ) and intrathecal central nervous system prophylaxis while omitting maintenance therapy. Still, 5-year overall survival (89% ± 3% vs 90% ± 4%; P log-rank = .64), event-free survival (EFS; 87% ± 3% vs 89% ± 4%; P log-rank = .71), and cumulative incidence of relapse/nonresponse (CIR/NR; 6% ± 3% vs 6% ± 2%; P Gray = .03) did not significantly differ between the ML-DS 2006 trial and the historical control arm. Poor early treatment response (5-year EFS, 58% ± 16% vs 88% ± 3%; P log rank = .0008) and gain of chromosome 8 (CIR/NR, 16% ± 7% vs 3% ± 2%, P Gray = .02; 5-year EFS, 73% ± 8% vs 91% ± 4%, P log rank = .018) were identified as independent prognostic factors predicting a worse EFS. Five of 7 relapsed patients (71%) with cytogenetic data had trisomy 8. Our study reveals prognostic markers for children with ML-DS and illustrates that reducing therapy did not impair excellent outcome. The trial was registered at EudraCT as #2007-006219-2. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Characterization of ML0314c of Mycobacterium leprae and deciphering its role in the immune response in leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurkamajit; Sharma, Aashish; Narang, Tarun; Dogra, Sunil; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2018-02-15

    Mycobacterium leprae has a reduced genome size due to the reductive evolution over a long period of time. Lipid metabolism plays an important role in the life cycle and pathogenesis of this bacterium. In comparison to 26 lip genes (Lip A-Z) of M. tuberculosis, M. leprae retained only three orthologs indicating their importance in its life cycle. ML0314c (LipU) is one of them. It is conserved throughout the mycobacterium species. Bioinformatics analysis showed the presence of an α/β hydrolase fold and 'GXSXG' characteristic of the esterases/lipases. The gene was expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity. It showed preference towards short chain esters with pNP-acetate as the preferred substrate. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 45°C and pH8.0. ML0314c protein was stable between temperatures ranging from 20 to 60°C and pH5.0-8.0, i.e., relatively acidic and neutral conditions. The active site residues predicted bioinformatically were confirmed to be Ser168, Glu267, and His297 by site directed mutagenesis. E-serine, DEPC and Tetrahydrolipstatin (THL) completely inhibited the activity of ML0314c. The protein was localized in cell wall and extracellular medium. Several antigenic epitopes were predicted in ML0314c. Protein elicited strong humoral immune response in leprosy patients, whereas, a reduced immune response was observed in the relapsed cases. No humoral response was observed in treatment completed patients. Overexpression of ml0314c in the surrogate host M. smegmatis showed marked difference in the colony morphology and growth rate. In conclusion, ML0314c is a secretary carboxyl esterase that could modulate the immune response in leprosy patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Postoperative Urinary Catheterization Thresholds of 500 versus 800 ml after Fast-track Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lars Stryhn; Hornum, Ulla Marianne; Troldborg, C.

    2016-01-01

    arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: This was a randomized, controlled, open-label trial that included patients greater than or equal to 18 yr who underwent THA or TKA in three Danish, fast-track, orthopedic departments. Consenting patients were eligible if they were cooperative......BACKGROUND: No evidence-based threshold exists for postoperative urinary bladder catheterization. The authors hypothesized that a catheterization threshold of 800 ml was superior to 500 ml in reducing postoperative urinary catheterization and urological complications after fast-track total hip...

  6. ML-Space: Hybrid Spatial Gillespie and Particle Simulation of Multi-Level Rule-Based Models in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittig, Arne T; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M

    2017-01-01

    Spatio-temporal dynamics of cellular processes can be simulated at different levels of detail, from (deterministic) partial differential equations via the spatial Stochastic Simulation algorithm to tracking Brownian trajectories of individual particles. We present a spatial simulation approach for multi-level rule-based models, which includes dynamically hierarchically nested cellular compartments and entities. Our approach ML-Space combines discrete compartmental dynamics, stochastic spatial approaches in discrete space, and particles moving in continuous space. The rule-based specification language of ML-Space supports concise and compact descriptions of models and to adapt the spatial resolution of models easily.

  7. Transformation of Arden Syntax's medical logic modules into ArdenML for a business rules management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chai Young; Choi, Jong-Ye; Jeong, Seong Jik; Cho, Kyunghee; Koo, Yong Duk; Bae, Jin Hee; Kim, Sukil

    2016-05-16

    Arden Syntax is a Health Level Seven International (HL7) standard language that is used for representing medical knowledge as logic statements. Arden Syntax Markup Language (ArdenML) is a new representation of Arden Syntax based on XML. Compilers are required to execute medical logic modules (MLMs) in the hospital environment. However, ArdenML may also replace the compiler. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that MLMs, encoded in ArdenML, can be transformed into a commercial rule engine format through an XSLT stylesheet and made executable in a target system. The target rule engine selected was Blaze Advisor. We developed an XSLT stylesheet to transform MLMs in ArdenML into Structured Rules Language (SRL) in Blaze Advisor, through a comparison of syntax between the two languages. The stylesheet was then refined recursively, by building and applying rules collected from the billing and coding guidelines of the Korean health insurance service. Two nurse coders collected and verified the rules and two information technology (IT) specialists encoded the MLMs and built the XSLT stylesheet. Finally, the stylesheet was validated by importing the MLMs into Blaze Advisor and applying them to claims data. The language comparison revealed that Blaze Advisor requires the declaration of variables with explicit types. We used both integer and real numbers for numeric types in ArdenML. "IF∼THEN" statements and assignment statements in ArdenML become rules in Blaze Advisor. We designed an XSLT stylesheet to solve this issue. In addition, we maintained the order of rule execution in the transformed rules, and added two small programs to support variable declarations and action statements. A total of 1489 rules were reviewed during this study, of which 324 rules were collected. We removed duplicate rules and encoded 241 unique MLMs in ArdenML, which were successfully transformed into SRL and imported to Blaze Advisor via the XSLT stylesheet. When applied to 73

  8. Quantifying normal ankle joint volume: An anatomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draeger Reid

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many therapeutic and diagnostic modalities such as intraarticular injections, arthrography and ankle arthroscopy require introduction of fluid into the ankle joint. Little data are currently available in the literature regarding the maximal volume of normal, nonpathologic, human ankle joints. The purpose of this study was to measure the volume of normal human ankle joints. Materials and Methods: A fluoroscopic guided needle was passed into nine cadaveric adult ankle joints. The needle was connected to an intracompartmental pressure measurement device. A radiopaque dye was introduced into the joint in 2 mL boluses, while pressure measurements were recorded. Fluid was injected into the joint until three consecutive pressure measurements were similar, signifying a maximal joint volume. Results: The mean maximum ankle joint volume was 20.9 ± 4.9 mL (range, 16-30 mL. The mean ankle joint pressure at maximum volume was 142.2 ± 13.8 mm Hg (range, 122-166 mm Hg. Two of the nine samples showed evidence of fluid tracking into the synovial sheath of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. Conclusion: Maximal normal ankle joint volume was found to vary between 16-30 mL. This study ascertains the communication between the ankle joint and the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. Exceeding maximal ankle joint volume suggested by this study during therapeutic injections, arthrography, or arthroscopy could potentially damage the joint.

  9. Body surface area adapted iopromide 300 mg/ml versus 370 mg/ml contrast medium injection protocol: Influence on quantitative and clinical assessment in combined PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A., E-mail: fverburg@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Apitzsch, Jonas [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Lensing, Carina [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Kuhl, Christiane K. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus [Bayer Pharma AG, Müllerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the quantitative and qualitative differences between combined positron emission tomography and computed X-ray tomography (PET/CT) enhanced with contrast medium with either an iodine concentration 300 mg/ml or 370 mg/ml. Materials and methods: 120 consecutive patients scheduled for F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT were included. The first (second) 60 patients received contrast medium with 300 (370) mg iodine/ml. Intravenous injection protocols were adapted for an identical iodine delivery rate (1.3 mg/s) and body surface area (BSA) adapted iodine dose (22.26 g I/m{sup 2}). Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}) and contrast enhancement (HU) were determined in the ascending aorta, the abdominal aorta, the inferior vena cava, the portal vein, the liver and the right kidney in the venous contrast medium phase. PET data were evaluated visually for the presence of malignancy and image quality. Results: Both media caused significantly higher values for HU, SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} for the enhanced PET/CT than the non-enhanced one (all p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in the degree of increase of HU, SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} between the two contrast media at any anatomic site (all p > 0.05). Visual evaluation of lesions showed no differences between contrast and non-contrast PET/CT or between the two different contrast media (p = 0.77). Conclusion: When using a constant iodine delivery rate and total iodine dose in a BSA adapted injection protocol, there are no quantitative or qualitative differences in either CT or PET between contrast media with an iodine concentration of 300 mg/ml and 370 mg/ml, respectively.

  10. Measurement of synovial fluid volume using urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Stabler, T V; Kong, S Y; Varju, G; McDaniel, G

    2007-10-01

    To examine the utility of using urea concentrations for determining Synovial Fluid (SF) joint volume in effused and non-effused joints. Knee joint SF was aspirated from 159 human study participants with symptomatic osteoarthritis of at least one knee either directly (165 knees) or by lavage (110 knees). Serum was obtained immediately prior to SF aspiration. Participants were asked to rate individual knee pain, aching or stiffness. SF and serum urea levels were determined using a specific enzymatic method run on an automated CMA600 analyzer. Cell counts were performed on direct SF aspirates when volume permitted. The formula for calculating SF joint volume was as follows: V(j)=C(D)(V(I))/(C-C(D)) with V(j)=volume of SF in entire joint, C(D)=concentration of urea in diluted (lavage) SF, V(I)=volume of saline injected into joint, and C=concentration of urea in undiluted (neat) SF derived below where C=0.897(C(S)) and C(s)=concentration of urea in serum. There was an excellent correlation (r(2)=0.8588) between SF and serum urea in the direct aspirates with a ratio of 0.897 (SF/serum). Neither urea levels nor the SF/serum ratio showed any correlation with Kellgren Lawrence (KL) grade, or cell count. While urea levels increased with age there was no change in the ratio. Intraarticular SF volumes calculated for the lavaged knees ranged from 0.555 to 71.71ml with a median volume of 3.048ml. There was no correlation of SF volume to KL grade but there was a positive correlation (P=0.001) between SF volume and self-reported individual knee pain. Our urea results for direct aspirates indicate an equilibrium state between serum and SF with regard to the water fraction. This equilibrium exists regardless of disease status (KL grade), inflammation (cell count), or age, making it possible to calculate intraarticular volume of lavaged joints based upon this urea method. Most of the joint volumes we calculated fell within the previously reported range for normal knees of 0.5-4.0ml

  11. Normal reference values for vertebral artery flow volume by color Doppler sonography in Korean adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Cha, Jang Gyu; Park, Seong Jin; Joh, Joon Hee; Park, Jai Soung; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyung; Ahn, Hyun Cheol [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    Vertebrobasilar ischemia has been attributed to a reduction of net vertebral artery flow volume. This study was to establish the reference values for the flow volume of the vertebral artery using color Doppler sonography in the normal Korea adults. Thirty five normal Korea adults without any underlying disease including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, heart disease, obesity (body mas index>30), or carotid artery stenosis was included. There were 17 males and 18 females, age ranged from 20 to 53 years (average=32.86 years). Flow velocities and vessel diameters were recorded in the intertransverse (V2) segment, usually at C5-6 level, bilaterally. The flow volume (Q) was calculated. (Q=time averaged mean velocity x cross sectional area of vessel) A lower Flow velocity and smaller vessel diameter were measured on the right side compared to those of the left side, resulting in a lower flow volume. The calculated flow volumes using the equation were 77.0 +- 39.7 ml/min for the right side and 127.6 +- 71.0 ml/min for the left side (p=0.0001) while the net vertebral artery flow volume was 204.6 +- 81.8 ml/min. Decrease in the vertebral artery flow volume was statistically significant with advanced age. (r=-0.36, p=0.032). Vertebral artery blood flow volume was 191.20 +- 59.19 ml/min in male, and 217.28 +- 98.67 ml/min in female (p=0.6). The normal range for the net vertebral artery flow volume defined by the 5th to 95th percentiles was between 110.06 and 364.1 ml/min. The normal range for the net vertebral artery flow volume was between 110.06 and 364.1 ml/min. Vertebral artery flow volume decreased with the increase of age. However, gender did not affect the blood flow volume.

  12. Plane-dependent ML scatter scaling: 3D extension of the 2D simulated single scatter (SSS) estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Ahmadreza; Salvo, Koen; Vahle, Thomas; Panin, Vladimir; Casey, Michael; Boada, Fernando; Defrise, Michel; Nuyts, Johan

    2017-08-01

    Scatter correction is typically done using a simulation of the single scatter, which is then scaled to account for multiple scatters and other possible model mismatches. This scaling factor is determined by fitting the simulated scatter sinogram to the measured sinogram, using only counts measured along LORs that do not intersect the patient body, i.e. ‘scatter-tails’. Extending previous work, we propose to scale the scatter with a plane dependent factor, which is determined as an additional unknown in the maximum likelihood (ML) reconstructions, using counts in the entire sinogram rather than only the ‘scatter-tails’. The ML-scaled scatter estimates are validated using a Monte-Carlo simulation of a NEMA-like phantom, a phantom scan with typical contrast ratios of a 68Ga-PSMA scan, and 23 whole-body 18F-FDG patient scans. On average, we observe a 12.2% change in the total amount of tracer activity of the MLEM reconstructions of our whole-body patient database when the proposed ML scatter scales are used. Furthermore, reconstructions using the ML-scaled scatter estimates are found to eliminate the typical ‘halo’ artifacts that are often observed in the vicinity of high focal uptake regions.

  13. Quality of red cell concentrates in relation to the volume of the buffy coat removed by automated processing in a top and bottom system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietersz, R N; Dekker, W J; Reesink, H A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of automated removal of increasing volumes of buffy coat in a 'top and bottom' system on the composition of red cell concentrates (RCC) was investigated. The volume of the buffy coat was adjusted to group 1:50 ml (n = 31), group 2: 70 ml (n = 31) and group 3: 100 ml (n = 31), respectively. The numbers of platelets and leukocytes in the buffy coats were comparable between the groups, whereas the red cell volumes in the buffy coats showed a significant difference (17 +/- 3.6 ml group 1, versus 22 +/- 4.1 ml group 2 and 26 +/- 3.88 ml group 3; p less than 0.001). The volumes, hematocrits and cell counts of the RCC were not significantly different. The plasma volumes were inversely correlated with the volume of buffy coat removed, i.e. 268 +/- 19 ml group 1, versus 257 +/- 15 ml group 2 and 233 +/- 20 ml group 3 (p less than 0.001). We conclude that in the 'top and bottom' system an increase of the volume of the buffy coat from 50 to 100 ml did not improve the quality of the RCC regarding contamination with leukocytes and platelets.

  14. A multicenter evaluation of seven commercial ML-EM algorithms for SPECT image reconstruction using simulation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Keiichi; Ohnishi, Hideo; Niida, Hideharu; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Wada, Yasuhiro; Kida, Tetsuo

    2003-01-01

    The maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm has become available as an alternative to filtered back projection in SPECT. The actual physical performance may be different depending on the manufacturer and model, because of differences in computational details. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of seven different types of ML-EM algorithms using simple simulation data. Seven ML-EM algorithm programs were used: Genie (GE), esoft (Siemens), HARP-III (Hitachi), GMS-5500UI (Toshiba), Pegasys (ADAC), ODYSSEY-FX (Marconi), and Windows-PC (original software). Projection data of a 2-pixel-wide line source in the center of the field of view were simulated without attenuation or scatter. Images were reconstructed with ML-EM by changing the number of iterations from 1 to 45 for each algorithm. Image quality was evaluated after a reconstruction using full width at half maximum (FWHM), full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), and the total counts of the reconstructed images. In the maximum number of iterations, the difference in the FWHM value was up to 1.5 pixels, and that of FWTM, no less than 2.0 pixels. The total counts of the reconstructed images in the initial few iterations were larger or smaller than the converged value depending on the initial values. Our results for the simplest simulation data suggest that each ML-EM algorithm itself provides a simulation image. We should keep in mind which algorithm is being used and its computational details, when physical and clinical usefulness are compared. (author)

  15. New algorithms and methods to estimate maximum-likelihood phylogenies: assessing the performance of PhyML 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindon, Stéphane; Dufayard, Jean-François; Lefort, Vincent; Anisimova, Maria; Hordijk, Wim; Gascuel, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    PhyML is a phylogeny software based on the maximum-likelihood principle. Early PhyML versions used a fast algorithm performing nearest neighbor interchanges to improve a reasonable starting tree topology. Since the original publication (Guindon S., Gascuel O. 2003. A simple, fast and accurate algorithm to estimate large phylogenies by maximum likelihood. Syst. Biol. 52:696-704), PhyML has been widely used (>2500 citations in ISI Web of Science) because of its simplicity and a fair compromise between accuracy and speed. In the meantime, research around PhyML has continued, and this article describes the new algorithms and methods implemented in the program. First, we introduce a new algorithm to search the tree space with user-defined intensity using subtree pruning and regrafting topological moves. The parsimony criterion is used here to filter out the least promising topology modifications with respect to the likelihood function. The analysis of a large collection of real nucleotide and amino acid data sets of various sizes demonstrates the good performance of this method. Second, we describe a new test to assess the support of the data for internal branches of a phylogeny. This approach extends the recently proposed approximate likelihood-ratio test and relies on a nonparametric, Shimodaira-Hasegawa-like procedure. A detailed analysis of real alignments sheds light on the links between this new approach and the more classical nonparametric bootstrap method. Overall, our tests show that the last version (3.0) of PhyML is fast, accurate, stable, and ready to use. A Web server and binary files are available from http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/phyml/.

  16. Assessment of left atrial volume and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühl, J Tobias; Lønborg, Jacob; Fuchs, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    dynamic LA volume changes. Conversely, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) appears more appropriate for such measures. We sought to determine the relationship between LA size assessed with TTE and LA size and function assessed with CMR and MSCT. Fifty......-four patients were examined 3 months post myocardial infarction with echocardiography, CMR and MSCT. Left atrial volumes and LA reservoir function were assessed by TTE. LA time-volume curves were determined and LA reservoir function (cyclic change and fractional change), passive emptying function (reservoir...... between CMR and MSCT, with a small to moderate bias in LA(max) (4.9 ± 10.4 ml), CC (3.1 ± 9.1 ml) and reservoir volume (3.4 ± 9.1 ml). TTE underestimates LA(max) with up to 32% compared with CMR and MSCT (P ...

  17. Assessment of testicular volume: A comparison of fertile and sub-fertile West African men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.H. Tijani

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Testicular volume on scrotal ultrasound correlates well with severity of oligospermia in men with sub-fertility. While the critical mean testicular volume necessary for adequate spermatogenesis has not been determined, it appears there is an optimal testicular volume of 18–20 ml at which spermatogenesis is at its peak in sub-fertile Nigerian men.

  18. Estimation of standard liver volume in Chinese adult living donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-Gui, L; Lu-Nan, Y; Bo, L; Yong, Z; Tian-Fu, W; Ming-Qing, X; Wen-Tao, W; Zhe-Yu, C

    2009-12-01

    To determine a formula predicting the standard liver volume based on body surface area (BSA) or body weight in Chinese adults. A total of 115 consecutive right-lobe living donors not including the middle hepatic vein underwent right hemi-hepatectomy. No organs were used from prisoners, and no subjects were prisoners. Donor anthropometric data including age, gender, body weight, and body height were recorded prospectively. The weights and volumes of the right lobe liver grafts were measured at the back table. Liver weights and volumes were calculated from the right lobe graft weight and volume obtained at the back table, divided by the proportion of the right lobe on computed tomography. By simple linear regression analysis and stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, we correlated calculated liver volume and body height, body weight, or body surface area. The subjects had a mean age of 35.97 +/- 9.6 years, and a female-to-male ratio of 60:55. The mean volume of the right lobe was 727.47 +/- 136.17 mL, occupying 55.59% +/- 6.70% of the whole liver by computed tomography. The volume of the right lobe was 581.73 +/- 96.137 mL, and the estimated liver volume was 1053.08 +/- 167.56 mL. Females of the same body weight showed a slightly lower liver weight. By simple linear regression analysis and stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, a formula was derived based on body weight. All formulae except the Hong Kong formula overestimated liver volume compared to this formula. The formula of standard liver volume, SLV (mL) = 11.508 x body weight (kg) + 334.024, may be applied to estimate liver volumes in Chinese adults.

  19. Effect of water volume based on water absorption and mixing time on physical properties of tapioca starch – wheat composite bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prameswari, I. K.; Manuhara, G. J.; Amanto, B. S.; Atmaka, W.

    2018-05-01

    Tapioca starch application in bread processing change water absorption level by the dough, while sufficient mixing time makes the optimal water absorption. This research aims to determine the effect of variations in water volume and mixing time on physical properties of tapioca starch – wheat composite bread and the best method for the composite bread processing. This research used Complete Randomized Factorial Design (CRFD) with two factors: variations of water volume (111,8 ml, 117,4 ml, 123 ml) and mixing time (16 minutes, 17 minutes 36 seconds, 19 minutes 12 seconds). The result showed that water volume significantly affected on dough volume, bread volume and specific volume, baking expansion, and crust thickness. Mixing time significantly affected on dough volume and specific volume, bread volume and specific volume, baking expansion, bread height, and crust thickness. While the combination of water volume and mixing time significantly affected for all physical properties parameters except crust thickness.

  20. Can Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 2 reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies in men with PSA levels of 4-10 ng/ml?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Wu, Yu-Peng; Chen, Dong-Ning; Ke, Zhi-Bin; Cai, Hai; Wei, Yong; Zheng, Qing-Shui; Huang, Jin-Bei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xue, Xue-Yi

    2018-05-01

    To explore the value of Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 2 (PI-RADS v2) for predicting prostate biopsy results in patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels of 4-10 ng/ml. We retrospectively reviewed multi-parameter magnetic resonance images from 528 patients with PSA levels of 4-10 ng/ml who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies between May 2015 and May 2017. Among them, 137 were diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa), and we further subdivided them according to pathological results into the significant PCa (S-PCa) and insignificant significant PCa (Ins-PCa) groups (121 cases were defined by surgical pathological specimen and 16 by biopsy). Age, PSA, percent free PSA, PSA density (PSAD), prostate volume (PV), and PI-RADS score were collected. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of pathological results. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to analyze the diagnostic value of PI-RADS v2 in PCa. Multivariate analysis indicated that age, PV, percent free PSA, and PI-RADS score were independent predictors of biopsy findings, while only PI-RADS score was an independent predictor of S-PCa (P PSA, and PI-RADS score were 0.570, 0.430, 0.589 and 0.836, respectively. The area under the curve for diagnosing S-PCa with respect to PI-RADS score was 0.732. A PI-RADS score of 3 was the best cutoff for predicting PCa, and 4 was the best cutoff for predicting S-PCa. Thus, 92.8% of patients with PI-RADS scores of 1-2 would have avoided biopsy, but at the cost of missing 2.2% of the potential PCa cases. Similarly, 83.82% of patients with a PI-RADS score ≤ 3 would have avoided biopsy, but at the cost of missing 3.3% of the potential S-PCa cases. PI-RADS v2 could be used to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies in patients with PSA levels of 4-10 ng/ml.

  1. Potentials and limitations of low-concentration contrast medium (150 mg iodine/ml) in CT pulmonary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon, M.R.; Kaduthodil, M.J.; Jagdish, J.; Matthews, S.; Hill, C.; Bull, M.J.; Morcos, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess the feasibility of producing diagnostic multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) pulmonary angiography with low iodine concentration contrast media (150 mg iodine/ml) in patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism. Materials and methods: Ninety-five randomized patients underwent MDCT (64 row) pulmonary angiography with 100 ml iopromide either at low concentration (LC) of 150 mg iodine/ml (n = 45) or high concentration (HC) of 300 mg iodine/ml (n = 50), delivered at the rate of 5 ml/s via a power injector. Two experienced radiologists, blinded to the concentration used, subjectively assessed the diagnostic quality and confidence using a four-point scale [1 = poor (not diagnostic), 2 = satisfactory, 3 = good, 4 = excellent]. Attenuation values (in HU) were measured in the main proximal branches of the pulmonary arteries. Results: The median diagnostic quality score for both observers was 3.5 (interquartile range 3-4) in the HC group and 2.5 (interquartile range 1.5-3) in the LC group (p < 0.01). The median diagnostic confidence score for both observers was 4 (interquartile range 3-4) in the HC group and 3 (interquartile range 1.5-4) in the LC group (p < 0.01). Both observers rated examinations as diagnostic in 69% of cases in the LC group, compared with 96% of cases in the HC group. Good interobserver agreement was found in both groups (K value 0.72 in the LC group and 0.73 in the HC). Obesity, poor scan timing, and dilution by venous return of non-opacified blood were the main reasons for a reduction in diagnostic quality of examinations in the LC group. Conclusion: Despite a 50% reduction of contrast medium dose in comparison to the standard technique, 150 mg iodine/ml can produce diagnostic MDCT pulmonary angiogram studies in the absence of obesity or high cardiac output and hyper-dynamic pulmonary circulation. Reducing the dose of contrast media would minimize the risk of contrast nephropathy in patients at risk of this complication

  2. Behavioral and functional neuroanatomical correlates of anterograde autobiographical memory in isolated retrograde amnesic patient M.L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Brian; Svoboda, Eva; Turner, Gary R; Mandic, Marina; Mackey, Allison

    2009-09-01

    Patient M.L. [Levine, B., Black, S. E., Cabeza, R., Sinden, M., Mcintosh, A. R., Toth, J. P., et al. (1998). Episodic memory and the self in a case of isolated retrograde amnesia. Brain, 121, 1951-1973], lost memory for events occurring before his severe traumatic brain injury, yet his anterograde (post-injury) learning and memory appeared intact, a syndrome known as isolated or focal retrograde amnesia. Studies with M.L. demonstrated a dissociation between episodic and semantic memory. His retrograde amnesia was specific to episodic autobiographical memory. Convergent behavioral and functional imaging data suggested that his anterograde memory, while appearing normal, was accomplished with reduced autonoetic awareness (awareness of the self as a continuous entity across time that is a crucial element of episodic memory). While previous research on M.L. focused on anterograde memory of laboratory stimuli, in this study, M.L.'s autobiographical memory for post-injury events or anterograde autobiographical memory was examined using prospective collection of autobiographical events via audio diary with detailed behavioral and functional neuroanatomical analysis. Consistent with his reports of subjective disconnection from post-injury autobiographical events, M.L. assigned fewer "remember" ratings to his autobiographical events than comparison subjects. His generation of event-specific details using the Autobiographical Interview [Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. (2002). Aging and autobiographical memory: dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689] was low, but not significantly so, suggesting that it is possible to generate episodic-like details even when re-experiencing of those details is compromised. While listening to the autobiographical audio diary segments, M.L. showed reduced activation relative to comparison subjects in midline frontal and posterior nodes previously identified as part of the

  3. Determination of adrenal volume by MRI in healthy children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Annette; Johansen, Marie Lindhardt; Wohlfahrt-Veje, Christine

    2014-01-01

    , to estimate adrenal size in healthy children and to evaluate determinants of adrenal volume such as age, gender, body size, pubic hair stage and serum levels of adrenal androgens. DESIGN: Two hundred and thirty-five healthy children (116 girls and 119 boys) (age range 10.0-14.8 years) were examined by MRI......% of healthy children aged 10-15 years. Adrenal volume increased with age and Tanner stage of pubic hair. Future studies will unravel whether adrenal MRI is useful when evaluating children with adrenal diseases....... (estimate B = 0.34 ml/year, P = 0.03), age (estimate B = 0.05 ml/year, P = 0.021) and pubic hair stage (estimate B = 0.05 ml/stage, P = 0.075). No associations between adrenal size and serum levels of adrenal androgens were observed. CONCLUSION: It was possible to determine adrenal volume by MRI in only 50...

  4. Early changes in left atrial volume after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakkestrom, R.; Andersen, Mads J; Ersboll, M.

    2016-01-01

    . The objective was to assess changes in LA volume early after MI in patients with diastolic dysfunction and the relation to invasive hemodynamics and natriuretic peptides. Methods: 62 patients with left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) >= 45%, diastolic E/e' > 8 and LA volume index >34 ml/m(2) within 48 h......Background: Dilatation of left atrium (LA) reflects chronic LA pressure or volume overload that possesses considerable prognostic information. Little is known regarding the interaction between LA remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (MI) and left atrial pressure at rest and during exercise...... of MI were enrolled. After 1 and 4 months blood sampling, echocardiography and right heart catheterization were performed during exercise test. Results: LA remodeling was considered in patients with a change from mild (35-41 ml/m(2)), to severe (>48ml/m(2)) dilatation after 4 months (Found in 22...

  5. ART-ML - a novel XML format for the biological procedures modeling and the representation of blood flow simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvounis, E C; Tsakanikas, V D; Fotiou, E; Fotiadis, D I

    2010-01-01

    The paper proposes a novel Extensible Markup Language (XML) based format called ART-ML that aims at supporting the interoperability and the reuse of models of blood flow, mass transport and plaque formation, exported by ARTool. ARTool is a platform for the automatic processing of various image modalities of coronary and carotid arteries. The images and their content are fused to develop morphological models of the arteries in easy to handle 3D representations. The platform incorporates efficient algorithms which are able to perform blood flow simulation. In addition atherosclerotic plaque development is estimated taking into account morphological, flow and genetic factors. ART-ML provides a XML format that enables the representation and management of embedded models within the ARTool platform and the storage and interchange of well-defined information. This approach influences in the model creation, model exchange, model reuse and result evaluation.

  6. Validation by theoretical approach to the experimental estimation of efficiency for gamma spectrometry of gas in 100 ml standard flask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, V.; Chudalayandi, K.; Sundaram, M.; Krishnamony, S.

    1996-01-01

    Estimation of gaseous activity forms an important component of air monitoring at Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). The gases of importance are argon 41 an air activation product and fission product noble gas xenon 133. For estimating the concentration, the experimental method is used in which a grab sample is collected in a 100 ml volumetric standard flask. The activity of gas is then computed by gamma spectrometry using a predetermined efficiency estimated experimentally. An attempt is made using theoretical approach to validate the experimental method of efficiency estimation. Two analytical models named relative flux model and absolute activity model were developed independently of each other. Attention is focussed on the efficiencies for 41 Ar and 133 Xe. Results show that the present method of sampling and analysis using 100 ml volumetric flask is adequate and acceptable. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Paediatric cardiac catheterization. Controlled, randomized study of two iodinated contrast media: iopromide 300 and ioxaglate 320 mgI/ml

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiel, M.; Revel, D.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-one children were included in a prospective randomized trial comparing a new non-ionic contrast medium, iopromide 300 and the ionic low osmolar contrast medium, ioxaglate 320 mgI/ml in pediatric cardiac catheterization. There were fewer adverse effects with iopromide but no statistically significant difference was demonstrated in this small population, with a very low incidence of allergoid reactions; this tendency was confirmed by meta-analysis of the multicentre study [fr

  8. ArdenML: The Arden Syntax Markup Language (or Arden Syntax: It's Not Just Text Any More!)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailors, R. Matthew

    2001-01-01

    It is no longer necessary to think of Arden Syntax as simply a text-based knowledge base format. The development of ArdenML (Arden Syntax Markup Language), an XML-based markup language allows structured access to most of the maintenance and library categories without the need to write or buy a compiler may lead to the development of simple commercial and freeware tools for processing Arden Syntax Medical Logic Modules (MLMs)

  9. Quantitation of mandibular symphysis volume as a source of bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Fernando; Simonian, Krikor; Smith McDonald, Roberto; Nowzari, Hessam

    2010-06-01

    Autogenous intramembranous bone graft present several advantages such as minimal resorption and high concentration of bone morphogenetic proteins. A method for measuring the amount of bone that can be harvested from the symphysis area has not been reported in real patients. The aim of the present study was to intrasurgically quantitate the volume of the symphysis bone graft that can be safely harvested in live patients and compare it with AutoCAD (version 16.0, Autodesk, Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA) tomographic calculations. AutoCAD software program quantitated symphysis bone graft in 40 patients using computerized tomographies. Direct intrasurgical measurements were recorded thereafter and compared with AutoCAD data. The bone volume was measured at the recipient sites of a subgroup of 10 patients, 6 months post sinus augmentation. The volume of bone graft measured by AutoCAD averaged 1.4 mL (SD 0.6 mL, range: 0.5-2.7 mL). The volume of bone graft measured intrasurgically averaged 2.3 mL (SD 0.4 mL, range 1.7-2.8 mL). The statistical difference between the two measurement methods was significant. The bone volume measured at the recipient sites 6 months post sinus augmentation averaged 1.9 mL (SD 0.3 mL, range 1.3-2.6 mL) with a mean loss of 0.4 mL. AutoCAD did not overestimate the volume of bone that can be safely harvested from the mandibular symphysis. The use of the design software program may improve surgical treatment planning prior to sinus augmentation.

  10. Analysis of a Multilevel Dual Active Bridge (ML-DAB DC-DC Converter Using Symmetric Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Moonem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dual active bridge (DAB converters have been popular in high voltage, low and medium power DC-DC applications, as well as an intermediate high frequency link in solid state transformers. In this paper, a multilevel DAB (ML-DAB has been proposed in which two active bridges produce two-level (2L-5L, 5L-2L and 3L-5L voltage waveforms across the high frequency transformer. The proposed ML-DAB has the advantage of being used in high step-up/down converters, which deal with higher voltages, as compared to conventional two-level DABs. A three-level neutral point diode clamped (NPC topology has been used in the high voltage bridge, which enables the semiconductor switches to be operated within a higher voltage range without the need for cascaded bridges or multiple two-level DAB converters. A symmetric modulation scheme, based on the least number of angular parameters rather than the duty-ratio, has been proposed for a different combination of bridge voltages. This ML-DAB is also suitable for maximum power point tracking (MPPT control in photovoltaic applications. Steady-state analysis of the converter with symmetric phase-shift modulation is presented and verified using simulation and hardware experiments.

  11. MMP2 and MMP9 participate in S1P-induced invasion of follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, Veronica; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-03-15

    The bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has emerged as a potent inducer of cancer cell migration and invasion. Previously, we have shown that S1P induces invasion of ML-1 follicular thyroid cancer cells via S1P receptors 1 and 3 (S1P1,3). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes used by cells for degradation of the extracellular matrix during invasion and migration. In the present study, we examined the role of MMP2 and MMP9 for S1P-induced invasion of ML-1 cells, and found that S1P regulates the secretion and activity of MMP2 and MMP9 via S1P1,3. Both pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA knockdown of MMP2 and MMP9 could attenuate S1P-induced invasion. Additionally, we show that calpains and Rac1 mediate S1P-induced secretion of MMP2 and MMP9. In conclusion, MMP2 and MMP9 participate in S1P-evoked follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cell invasion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Blind and semi-blind ML detection for space-time block-coded OFDM wireless systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zaib, Alam; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the joint maximum likelihood (ML) data detection and channel estimation problem for Alamouti space-time block-coded (STBC) orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) wireless systems. The joint ML estimation and data detection is generally considered a hard combinatorial optimization problem. We propose an efficient low-complexity algorithm based on branch-estimate-bound strategy that renders exact joint ML solution. However, the computational complexity of blind algorithm becomes critical at low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as the number of OFDM carriers and constellation size are increased especially in multiple-antenna systems. To overcome this problem, a semi-blind algorithm based on a new framework for reducing the complexity is proposed by relying on subcarrier reordering and decoding the carriers with different levels of confidence using a suitable reliability criterion. In addition, it is shown that by utilizing the inherent structure of Alamouti coding, the estimation performance improvement or the complexity reduction can be achieved. The proposed algorithms can reliably track the wireless Rayleigh fading channel without requiring any channel statistics. Simulation results presented against the perfect coherent detection demonstrate the effectiveness of blind and semi-blind algorithms over frequency-selective channels with different fading characteristics.

  13. SU-G-IeP1-12: Size Selective Arterial Cerebral Blood Volume Mapping Using Multiple Inversion Time Arterial Spin Labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Y; Johnston, M; Whitlow, C [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-salem, NC (United States); Liu, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel method for size specific arterial cerebral blood volume (aCBV) mapping using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), with multiple TI. Methods: Multiple PCASL images were obtained from a subject with TI of [300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000, 3500, 4000] ms. Each TI pair was averaged six times. Two scans were performed: one without a flow crusher gradient and the other with a crusher gradient (10cm/s in three directions) to remove signals from large arteries. Scan times were 5min. without a crusher gradient and 5.5 min with a crusher gradient. Non-linear fitting algorithm finds the minimum mean squared solution of per-voxel based aCBV, cerebral blood flow, and arterial transit time, and fits the data into a hemodynamic model that represents superposition of blood volume and flow components within a single voxel. Results: aCBV maps with a crusher gradient represent signals from medium and small sized arteries, while those without a crusher gradient represent signals from all sized arteries, indicating that flow crusher gradients can be effectively employed to achieve size-specific aCBV mapping. Regardless of flow crusher, the CBF and ATT maps are very similar in appearance. Conclusion: Quantitative size selective blood volume mapping controlled by a flow crusher is feasible without additional information because the ASL quantification process doesn’t require an arterial input function measured from a large artery. The size specific blood volume mapping is not interfered by sSignals from large arteries do not interfere with size specific aCBV mapping in the applications of interest in for applications in which only medium or small arteries are of interest.

  14. Errors during MRT measurements of the left ventricular volume using a multi-slice technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M.B.; Just, M.; Grebe, P.; Kreitner, K.F.; Erbel, R.; Thelen, M.

    1992-01-01

    A multi-slice technique for MRT measurements of the left ventricular volume is much faster than the use of single-slice methods and is therefore better tolerated, leaving time for additional measurements. The end-diastolic left ventricular volume can be reliably measured by this method (123.3±13.5 ml vs. 124.1±ml). The end-systolic volume is consistently overestimated by 23.7±18,3% compared with the reference value obtained by single slice measurements (47.9±8.9 ml vs 39.1±7.9 ml). Correspondingly, stroke volume and ejection fraction is underestimated on average by 10.6±9.7% and 10.6±7.6% respectively). (orig.) [de

  15. Clinical Experience With 11,460 mL of a 20-mg/mL, Smooth, Highly Cohesive, Viscous Hyaluronic Acid Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Shannon; Carruthers, Jean; Carruthers, Alastair

    2015-09-01

    A 3-dimensional approach to facial rejuvenation restores volume lost over time. Hyaluronic acid (HA) filling agents provide long-lasting correction with minimal side effects and a high level of patient satisfaction. The newest HA formulation is a 20-mg/mL smooth cohesive filler (Juvéderm Voluma [HA-V]) that combines both low- and high-molecular-weight HA for more efficient cross-linking and greater lift capabilities. To document the clinical experience with HA-V over the course of 68 months. The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of patients who received HA-V for facial augmentation between February 1, 2009, and October 1, 2014. Clinical results were assessed 2 weeks after initial treatment, with touch-ups performed as necessary. Color photographs were taken before and after treatment, and adverse events were documented. Over 68 months, the authors treated 2,342 patients with 11,460 mL of HA-V. Aesthetic results lasted upwards of 12 months, and most side effects were transient and mild. Three patients developed signs of vascular compromise that was promptly treated and resolved within 2 months. Twenty-one patients (<0.5%) experienced late-onset, temporary, nontender nodules that were successfully managed with conservative measures. Easy to use and well tolerated, HA-V is ideally formulated for soft-tissue augmentation in the face, with clinical effects lasting 12 months or longer.

  16. (VI) ML6 Complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A geometric analysis revealed that beta-(C-H) and alpha-(C-C) can occupy the seventh and eighth coordination sites in the title Fischer carbene complexes as agostic interactions, which allows classifying the carbene as a η3 ligand in these cases. This theory was supported by the relative energies of the conformers and an ...

  17. Volume-based characterization of postocclusion surge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Jaime; Zacharias, Sergio

    2005-10-01

    To propose an alternative method to characterize postocclusion surge using a collapsible artificial anterior chamber to replace the currently used rigid anterior chamber model. Fundación Oftamológica Los Andes, Santiago, Chile. The distal end of a phacoemulsification handpiece was placed inside a compliant artificial anterior chamber. Digital recordings of chamber pressure, chamber volume, inflow, and outflow were performed during occlusion break of the phacoemulsification tip. The occlusion break profile of 2 different consoles was compared. Occlusion break while using a rigid anterior chamber model produced a simultaneous increase of chamber inflow and outflow. In the rigid chamber model, pressure decreased sharply, reaching negative pressure values. Alternatively, with the collapsible chamber model, a delay was observed in the inflow that occurs to compensate the outflow surge. Also, the chamber pressure drop was smaller in magnitude, never undershooting below atmospheric pressure into negative values. Using 500 mm Hg as vacuum limit, the Infiniti System (Alcon) performed better that the Legacy (Alcon), showing an 18% reduction in peak volume variation. The collapsible anterior chamber model provides a more realistic representation of the postocclusion surge events that occur in the real eye during cataract surgery. Peak volume fluctuation (mL), half volume recovery time(s), and volume fluctuation integral value (mL x s) are proposed as realistic indicators to characterize the postocclusion surge performance. These indicators show that the Infiniti System has a better postocclusion surge behavior than the Legacy System.

  18. Proper Measurement of the Prostate Volume by Transrectal Ultrasound: Experimental Study about the Prostate with Focal Intravesical Protrusion of the Enlarged Central Gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Kyoung; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To evaluate the proper volume measurement of prostate with focal intravesical protrusion of enlarged central gland by comparison between methods using craniocaudal length from top of protruded central gland and from prostate base near bladder neck to prostate apex. We made 20 prostate models with focal intravesical protrusion (volume range: 20{approx}50 mL, height of protrusion: about 1 cm) using devil's tongue jelly. Two radiologists measured volume of models 3 times by two kinds of methods using craniocaudal length from top of protruded central gland (method 1) and from prostate base near bladder neck (method 2) by transrectal ultrasound. The accuracy of volume measurement of models was evaluated statistically by comparing their average volume to true volume. Intra- and interobserver agreement was also evaluated. Average true volume of models was 31.05 mL. Each average volume using method 1 by two observers was 37.07 mL and 38.56 mL. Each average volume using method 2 was 30.69 mL and 31.55 mL. Volume measurement using method 2 was approximated to true volume of prostate statistically (p = .654, .823). There was no significant inter- and intra-observer variation in both methods. To measure the accurate volume of prostate with focal intravesical protrusion of enlarged central gland, its craniocaudal length should be measured from prostate base near bladder neck

  19. Validation of attenuation-corrected equilibrium radionuclide angiographic determinations of right ventricular volume: comparison with cast-validated biplane cineventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Italia, L.J.; Starling, M.R.; Walsh, R.A.; Badke, F.R.; Lasher, J.C.; Blumhardt, R.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of attenuation-corrected equilibrium radionuclide angiographic determinations of right ventricular volumes, the authors initially studied 14 postmortem human right ventricular casts by water displacement and biplane cineventriculography. Biplane cineventriculographic right ventricular cast volumes, calculated by a modification of Simpson's rule algorithm, correlated well with right ventricular cast volumes measured by water displacement (r = .97, y = 8 + 0.88x, SEE = 6 ml). Moreover, the mean volumes obtained by both methods were no different (73 +/- 28 vs 73 +/- 25 ml). Subsequently, they studied 16 patients by both biplane cineventriculography and equilibrium radionuclide angiography. The uncorrected radionuclide right ventricular volumes were calculated by normalizing background corrected end-diastolic and end-systolic counts from hand-drawn regions of interest obtained by phase analysis for cardiac cycles processed, frame rate, and blood sample counts. Attenuation correction was performed by a simple geometric method. The attenuation-corrected radionuclide right ventricular end-diastolic volumes correlated with the cineventriculographic end-diastolic volumes (r = .91, y = 3 + 0.92x, SEE = 27 ml). Similarly, the attenuation-corrected radionuclide right ventricular end-systolic volumes correlated with the cineventriculographic end-systolic volumes (r = .93, y = - 1 + 0.91x, SEE = 16 ml). Also, the mean attenuation-corrected radionuclide end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were no different than the average cineventriculographic end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (160 +/- 61 and 83 +/- 44 vs 170 +/- 61 and 86 +/- 43 ml, respectively)

  20. Analgesic efficacy of local anaesthetic wound administration in knee arthroplasty: volume vs concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L Ø; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Kristensen, B B

    2010-01-01

    arthroplasty were randomly assigned to receive either a high volume/low concentration solution of ropivacaine (20 ml, 0.5%) or a low volume/high concentration solution of ropivacaine (10 ml, 1%), 6 and 24 h postoperatively through an intracapsular catheter. Pain was assessed for 2 h after administration. Pain...... was reduced in both groups with ropivacaine administration 24 h postoperatively (p ropivacaine injection 6 h postoperatively. The median (IQR [range]) dose of oxycodone administered...

  1. The volume of the human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matziolis, Georg; Roehner, Eric; Windisch, Christoph; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Despite its clinical relevance, particularly in septic knee surgery, the volume of the human knee joint has not been established to date. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine knee joint volume and whether or not it is dependent on sex or body height. Sixty-one consecutive patients (joints) who were due to undergo endoprosthetic joint replacement were enrolled in this prospective study. During the operation, the joint volume was determined by injecting saline solution until a pressure of 200 mmHg was achieved in the joint. The average volume of all knee joints was 131 ± 53 (40-290) ml. The volume was not found to be dependent on sex, but it was dependent on the patients' height (R = 0.312, p = 0.014). This enabled an estimation of the joint volume according to V = 1.6 height - 135. The considerable inter-individual variance of the knee joint volume would suggest that it should be determined or at least estimated according to body height if the joint volume has consequences for the diagnostics or therapy of knee disorders.

  2. Volume determination of organs using NMR-CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kunihiko; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Nobuo; Tateno, Yukio.

    1986-01-01

    Water phantoms with the volume of 10, 50, 100, 200 and 300 ml surrounded by salad oil were made. The basic experiments were achieved with these phantoms to investigate the accuracy of volume determination and the influence of RF pulse series. NMR - CT employed was Asahi Mark - J. The magnetic field was 0.1T (conductive magnet). The slice thickness were 15 mm. The contour of the phantoms was determined manually using truck - ball and/or automatically by a computer program developed by us. The volume was calculated by the summation of contour area multiplied by the slice pitch. At volumes < 50 ml the error is quite significant but at larger volumes greater than 300 ml the error is reduced to ± 10 %. The volumes of the liver and spleen were measured using both coronal and transverse scans. The error in volume measurement between the scans taken in different planes was found to be 7.0 ± 4.1 % for the liver and 12.4 ± 4.65 % for the spleen. (author)

  3. Multi-slice CT three dimensional volume measurement of tumors and livers in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yuanlong; Li Liangcai; Tang Binghang; Hu Zemin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the accuracy of multi-slice CT (MSCT) three dimensional (3D) volume measurement of tumors and livers in hepatocellular carcinoma cases by using immersion method as the standard. Methods: (1) The volume of 25 porkling livers was measured using immersion method in experiment group in vitro. Then the models were built according to Matsumoto's method and CT scanning and special software were used to measure the volume of the livers. (2) The volume of the tumors in 25 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma was measured using diameter measurement method and special volume measurement software (tissue measurements). Two tumors of them were measured respectively using MSCT 3D measurement, diameter measurement before the operation and immersion method after the operation. The data of the two groups were examined using pairing t test. Results: (1) The volume range of 25 porkling livers was 68.50-1150.10 ml using immersion method and 69.78-1069.97 ml using MSCT 3D measurement. There was no significant difference of the data in these two groups using t-test (t=1.427, P>0.05). (2) The volume range of 25 hepatocellular tumors was 395.16-2747.7 ml using diameter measurement and 203.10-1463.19 ml using MSCT 3D measurement before the operation. There was significant difference of the data in these two groups using t-test (t=7.689, P<0.001). In 2 ablated tumors, 1 case's volume was (21.75±0.60) ml using MSCT 3D measurement and 33.73 ml using diameter measurement before the operation and 21.50 ml using immersion measurement after the operation. The other case's volume was (696.13±5.30) ml using MSCT 3D measurement and 1323.51 ml using diameter measurement before the operation and 685.50 ml using immersion measurement after the operation. Conclusion: MSCT 3D volume measurement can accurately measure the volume of tumor and liver and has important clinical application value. There is no significant difference between MSCT 3D volume measurement and immersion method

  4. Comparison in myelography between iodixanol 270 and 320 mgI/ml and iotrolan 300 mgI/ml: a multicentre, randomised, parallel-group, double-blind, phase III trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmers, Yvan; Kuhn, Fritz-Peter; Petersen, Dirk; De Greef, Danielle

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the trial was to compare the safety and efficacy of the non-ionic, dimeric, isotonic contrast medium iodixanol (Visipaque 270 and 320 mgI/ml) with those of iotrolan (Isovist 300 mgI/ml) in myelography. After lumbar or cervical puncture, 315 patients were examined in a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, comparative myelography study. Image quality, changes in vital signs, immediate and delayed adverse events were registered. There was a tendency for better images with iodixanol 320 than with iodixanol 270 and iotrolan 300, but the overall quality was good or excellent with all products. The frequency of patients reporting adverse events and headache varied much across centres, but there was no statistically significant difference between the contrast media. The incidence of events was higher after lumbar puncture than after cervical puncture, in women rather than in men, and after puncture with a 22-gauge (G) bevel-tipped needle compared with a 24 G Sprotte needle. The frequency of headache did not correlate with the absence of pathology. The higher iodine concentration in iodixanol 320 could be an advantage for film quality. When compared with iotrolan 300, iodixanol 320 and 270 give similar incidences of adverse events, including headache. (orig.)

  5. Stage T1-2 prostate cancer with pretreatment PSA 10 ng/ml or less: radiotherapy or surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyser, Douglas; Kupelian, Patrick; Zippe, Craig; Klein, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Presently, patients with pretreatment PSA levels ≤10 ng/ml constitute the majority of cases presenting for definitive treatment. Our aim was to determine whether the type of treatment (radiotherapy versus surgery) affected biochemical failure rates in this group of patients. This study is based on 389 patients treated at a single institution. Material and Methods: The charts of all patients treated with either radiotherapy or prostatectomy alone between 1987 and 1993 were reviewed (n=811). Patients with clinical stage T1 or T2 disease, and a pretreatment PSA level (iPSA) of 10.0 or less were analyzed (n=389). Two hundred forty nine (64%) received radical prostatectomy and 140 (36%) received radiotherapy (median dose 66.6 Gy). Pretreatment patient characteristics including clinical stage, biopsy Gleason score (GS) and iPSA level were not significantly different between the radiation and surgery groups (Table 1). The patients treated with radiation were significantly older (median age 70 years vs. 64 years, p<0.05). A total of 37% of the prostatectomy patients had a positive margin. The median follow-up time was 33 months; 1458 follow-up PSA levels were available for analysis. Biochemical failure was defined as a rise in PSA level of 1.0 ng/ml above the nadir PSA level in radiotherapy cases, or any value above 0.2 ng/ml in the prostatectomy cases. Results: The overall 5 year actuarial biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS) rate was 70%. The 5-year bRFS rates for prostatectomy and radiotherapy were identical (70%) (Fig.1). The significant factors affecting bRFS rates were iPSA level (≤4 vs. 4-10 ng/ml) and Gleason score (≤6 vs. ≥7) (Table 2). The 5-year bRFS rates of patients with iPSA ≤4 vs. iPSA 4-10 ng/ml were 92% vs. 61% respectively, p<0.01. The 5-year clinical relapse free survival was 93%. All clinical failures were preceded by biochemical failure. Patients with positive surgical margins did significantly worse than those with negative

  6. In vivo estimation of renal volume using a rotating gamma camera for sup(99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, J; Itoh, H; Yoshida, O; Fujita, T; Torizuka, K

    1984-03-01

    The in vivo renal volume was determined using SPECT for sup(99m)Tc-DMSA renal imaging. The total renal volume was derived by summing the DMSA distribution volumes of the transaxial slices in the whole kidney. In 20 healthy subjects the renal volume in the right kidney was 220 ml for men and 195.2 ml for women, while that in the left kidney was 213 ml for men and 193.7 ml for women. Differences in those values were not statistically significant. A good correlation was found between renal volumes in both kidneys and body surface area. In 106 kidneys including solitary and pathological kidneys, individual renal volume correlated well with individual DMSA renal uptake rate which demonstrates cortical functioning mass, depending on the cortical blood flow. Thus, SPECT enables an accurate noninvasive means of estimating in vivo functioning renal volume.

  7. SysML Model of the Pick and Place Unit for Papyrus UML: Scenario Sc4b

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel-Heuser, Birgit; Folmer, Jens; Legat, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The Pick and Place Unit (PPU) is a bench-scale lab demonstrator which is open to the research community to investigate a variety of different topics. To conduct research on the evolution of production automation systems, a variety of different manifestations of the PPU (referred to as scenarios) were developed. A documentation of the PPU and its scenarios is publicly available at www.ppu-demonstrator.org. In this zipped file, a SysML model consisting of state charts and block definition diagr...

  8. Clinically significant change in stroke volume in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolferen, Serge A; van de Veerdonk, Marielle C; Mauritz, Gert-Jan; Jacobs, Wouter; Marcus, J Tim; Marques, Koen M J; Bronzwaer, Jean G F; Heymans, Martijn W; Boonstra, Anco; Postmus, Pieter E; Westerhof, Nico; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton

    2011-05-01

    Stroke volume is probably the best hemodynamic parameter because it reflects therapeutic changes and contains prognostic information in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Stroke volume directly reflects right ventricular function in response to its load, without the correction of compensatory increased heart rate as is the case for cardiac output. For this reason, stroke volume, which can be measured noninvasively, is an important hemodynamic parameter to monitor during treatment. However, the extent of change in stroke volume that constitutes a clinically significant change is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the minimal important difference (MID) in stroke volume in PH. One hundred eleven patients were evaluated at baseline and after 1 year of follow-up with a 6-min walk test (6MWT) and cardiac MRI. Using the anchor-based method with 6MWT as the anchor, and the distribution-based method, the MID of stroke volume change could be determined. After 1 year of treatment, there was, on average, a significant increase in stroke volume and 6MWT. The change in stroke volume was related to the change in 6MWT. Using the anchor-based method, an MID of 10 mL in stroke volume was calculated. The distribution-based method resulted in an MID of 8 to 12 mL. Both methods showed that a 10-mL change in stroke volume during follow-up should be considered as clinically relevant. This value can be used to interpret changes in stroke volume during clinical follow-up in PH.

  9. Intraarticular volume and clearance in human synovial effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallis, W.J.; Simkin, P.A.; Nelp, W.B.; Foster, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Intraarticular volumes were measured by radiolabeled albumin (RISA) distribution in chronic knee effusions from 11 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 9 osteoarthritis patients. Volumes of synovial fluid obtained at joint aspiration were substantially less than those found by RISA dilution. Up to 24 hours was needed for full distribution of RISA throughout the intraarticular compartment. Measured 123I and RISA radioactivity over the knee described monoexponential rate constants, lambda (minute-1). The clearance of 123I and RISA from synovial effusions was derived by the formulation volume (ml) X lambda (minute-1) = clearance (ml/minute). RISA clearance in rheumatoid effusions was significantly greater than that found in osteoarthritis effusions. Intraarticular volume and isotope clearance were easily quantified and provide measures for further evaluating the microvascular physiology of synovial effusions

  10. Colloid volume loading does not mitigate decreases in central blood volume during simulated hemorrhage while heat stressed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crandall, Craig G; Wilson, Thad E; Marving, Jens

    2012-01-01

    attenuates the reduction in regional blood volumes during a simulated hemorrhagic challenge imposed via lower-body negative pressure (LBNP). Seven subjects underwent 30 mmHg LBNP while normothermic, during passive heat stress (increased internal temperature ~1°C), and while continuing to be heated after...... intravenous colloid volume loading (11 ml/kg). Relative changes in torso and regional blood volumes were determined by gamma camera imaging with technetium-99m labeled erythrocytes. Heat stress reduced blood volume in all regions (ranging from 7 to 16%), while subsequent volume loading returned those values...... to normothermic levels. While normothermic, LBNP reduced blood volume in all regions (torso: 22±8%; heart: 18±6%; spleen: 15±8%). During LBNP while heat stressed, the reductions in blood volume in each region were markedly greater when compared to LBNP while normothermic (torso: 73±2%; heart: 72±3%; spleen: 72...

  11. The decrease of cardiac chamber volumes and output during positive-pressure ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Kyhl; Ahtarovski, Kiril Aleksov; Iversen, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    the effect of PPV on the central circulation by studying cardiac chamber volumes with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). We hypothesized that PPV lowers cardiac output (CO) mainly via the Frank-Starling relationship. In 18 healthy volunteers, cardiac chamber volumes and flow in aorta and the pulmonary...... artery were measured by CMR during PPV levels of 0, 10, and 20 cmH2O applied via a respirator and a face mask. All cardiac chamber volumes decreased in proportion to the level of PPV. Following 20-cmH2O PPV, the total diastolic and systolic cardiac volumes (±SE) decreased from 605 (±29) ml to 446 (±29......) ml (P volume decreased by 27 (±4) ml/beat; heart rate increased by 7 (±2) beats/min; and CO decreased by 1.0 (±0.4) l/min (P

  12. Effect of intravenous contrast agent volume on colorectal cancer vascular parameters as measured by perfusion computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, V.; Bartram, C.; Halligan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the effect of two different contrast agent volumes on quantitative and semi-quantitative vascular parameters as measured by perfusion computed tomography (CT) in colorectal cancer. Materials and methods: Following ethical approval and informed consent, eight prospectively recruited patients with proven colorectal adenocarcinoma underwent two separate perfusion CT studies on the same day after (a) 100 ml and (b) 50 ml of a 340 mg/ml iodinated contrast medium, respectively. Quantitative (blood volume, blood flow, permeability surface area product) and semi-quantitative (peak enhancement, time to peak enhancement) tumour vascular parameters were determined using commercial software based on distributed parameter analysis and compared using t-testing. Results: Tumour blood volume, blood flow, and permeability surface area product were not substantially different following the injection of 100 ml and 50 ml contrast medium: 6.12 versus 6.23 ml/100 g tissue; 73.4 versus 71.3 ml/min/100 g tissue; 15.6 versus 15.3 ml/min/100 g tissue for 100 and 50 ml, respectively; p > 0.05. Tumour peak enhancement and time to peak were significantly greater following the injection of 100 ml versus 50 ml contrast medium: 41.2 versus 28.5 HU; 16.1 versus 11.8 s for 100 ml and 50 ml, respectively; p = 0.002; p = 0.0003. Conclusion: Quantitative parameters do not appear to change substantially with a higher contrast agent volume suggesting a combined diagnostic staging-perfusion CT study following a single injection is feasible for colorectal cancer

  13. Effect of different saline chaser volumes and flow rates on intravascular contrast enhancement in CT using a circulation phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrendt, Florian F.; Bruners, Philipp; Keil, Sebastian; Plumhans, Cedric; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Das, Marco; Ackermann, Diana; Guenther, Rolf W.; Muehlenbruch, Georg

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of different saline chaser volumes and different saline chaser flow rates on the intravascular contrast enhancement in MDCT. Materials and methods: In a physiological flow phantom contrast medium (120 ml, 300 mgI/ml, Ultravist 300) was administered at a flow rate of 6 ml/s followed by different saline chaser volumes (0, 30, 60 and 90 ml) at the same injection rate or followed by a 30-ml saline chaser at different injection rates (2, 4, 6 and 8 ml/s). Serial CT-scans at a level covering the pulmonary artery, the ascending and the descending aorta replica were obtained. Time-enhancement curves were computed and both pulmonary and aortic peak enhancement and peak time were determined. Results: Compared to contrast medium injection without a saline chaser the pushing with a saline chaser (30, 60, and 90 ml) resulted in a statistically significant increased pulmonary peak enhancement (all p = 0.008) and prolonged peak time (p = 0.032, p = 0.024 and p = 0.008, respectively). Highest aortic peak enhancement values were detected for a saline chaser volume of 30 ml. A saline chaser flow rate of 8 ml/s resulted in the highest pulmonary peak enhancement values compared to flow rates of 2, 4 and 6 ml/s (all p = 0.008). Aortic peak enhancement showed the highest values for a flow rate of 6 ml/s. Conclusion: A saline chaser volume of 30 ml and an injection rate of 6 ml/s are sufficient to best improve vascular contrast enhancement in the pulmonary artery and the aorta in MDCT.

  14. Blood and plasma volumes in normal west African dwarf sheep ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood and plasma volumes were determined using T-1824 in 36 normal adult West African Dwarf sheep. In the rams, dry ewes, pregnant ewes and lactating ewes, the mean values for the blood volume (ml/kg body weight) were 64.08 ± 6.11, 55.74 ± 9.31, 71.46 ± 6.46 and 147.12 ± 12.79 respectively, while the mean values ...

  15. Effect of pulmonary hyperinflation on central blood volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijacika, Tanja; Kyhl, Kasper; Frestad, Daria

    2017-01-01

    (11±7%) above the total lung capacity. All cardiac chambers decreased in volume and despite a heart rate increase of 24±29 bpm (39±50%), pulmonary blood flow decreased by 2783±1820mL (43±20%). The pulmonary transit time remained unchanged at 7.5±2.2s and pulmonary blood volume decreased by 354±176m...

  16. ML-7 amplifies the quinocetone-induced cell death through akt and MAPK-mediated apoptosis on HepG2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Shen; Deng, Sijun; Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Yang, Xiayun; Li, Daowen; Zhao, Kena; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-01-01

    The study aims at evaluating the combination of the quinocetone and the ML-7 in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma models. To this end, the effect of quinocetone and ML-7 on apoptosis induction and signaling pathways was analyzed on HepG2 cell lines. Here, we report that ML-7, in a nontoxic concentration, sensitized the HepG2 cells to quinocetone-induced cytotoxicity. Also, ML-7 profoundly enhances quinocetone-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cell line. Mechanistic investigations revealed that ML-7 and quinocetone act in concert to trigger the cleavage of caspase-8 as well as Bax/Bcl-2 ratio up-regulation and subsequent cleavage of Bid, capsases-9 and -3. Importantly, ML-7 weakened the quinocetone-induced Akt pathway activation, but strengthened the phosphorylation of p-38, ERK and JNK. Further treatment of Akt activator and p-38 inhibitor almost completely abolished the ML-7/quinocetone-induced apoptosis. In contrast, the ERK and JNK inhibitor aggravated the ML-7/quinocetone-induced apoptosis, indicating that the synergism critically depended on p-38 phosphorylation and HepG2 cells provoke Akt, ERK and JNK signaling pathways to against apoptosis. In conclusion, the rational combination of quinocetone and ML-7 presents a promising approach to trigger apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma, which warrants further investigation.

  17. Is the Ellipsoid Formula the New Standard for 3-Tesla MRI Prostate Volume Calculation without Endorectal Coil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Matthias; Günzel, Karsten; Miller, Kurt; Hamm, Bernd; Cash, Hannes; Asbach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Prostate volume in multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) is of clinical importance. For 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil, there is no distinctive standard for volume calculation. We tested the accuracy of the ellipsoid formula with planimetric volume measurements as reference and investigated the correlation of gland volume and cancer detection rate on MRI/ultrasound (MRI/US) fusion-guided biopsy. One hundred forty-three patients with findings on 3-Tesla mpMRI suspicious of cancer and subsequent MRI/US fusion-guided targeted biopsy and additional systematic biopsy were analyzed. T2-weighted images were used for measuring the prostate diameters and for planimetric volume measurement by a segmentation software. Planimetric and calculated prostate volumes were compared with clinical data. The median prostate volume was 48.1 ml (interquartile range (IQR) 36.9-62.1 ml). Volume calculated by the ellipsoid formula showed a strong concordance with planimetric volume, with a tendency to underestimate prostate volume (median volume 43.1 ml (IQR 31.2-58.8 ml); r = 0.903, p Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil. It allows a fast, valid volume calculation in prostate MRI datasets. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Estimation of lung volumes from chest radiographs using shape information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.J.; Brown, D.J.; Holmes, M.; Cumming, G.; Denison, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The cross-sectional shapes of the chest and its contained structures were assessed in post-mortem anatomical sections and from computerised tomographic scans in living subjects. These shapes are described by simple equations that can be used to increase the accuracy of measuring lung volumes from chest radiographs. Radiographic estimates of total lung capacity, using the equations, were compared with plethysmographic and single-breath helium dilution measurements in 35 normal subjects. After correction for posture effects the radiographic estimates of TLC, which measure the displacement volume of the lung, exceeded the plethysmographic estimates of contained gas volume by a mean of 720 ml, which was taken as the volume of tissue, blood, and water in the lungs. The single-breath dilution estimates of TLC fell short of the plethysmographic values by a mean of 480 ml, taken as the volume of contained gas that was inaccessible to helium in 10 seconds. The tomographic studies suggested that the radiographic technique of measuring lung displacement volumes has an accuracy of +- 210 ml. The method is rapid and simple to use and the intra- and inter-observer variabilities of <1% and <5% respectively. (author)

  19. Assisted editing od SensorML with EDI. A bottom-up scenario towards the definition of sensor profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oggioni, Alessandro; Tagliolato, Paolo; Fugazza, Cristiano; Bastianini, Mauro; Pavesi, Fabio; Pepe, Monica; Menegon, Stefano; Basoni, Anna; Carrara, Paola

    2015-04-01

    Sensor observation systems for environmental data have become increasingly important in the last years. The EGU's Informatics in Oceanography and Ocean Science track stressed the importance of management tools and solutions for marine infrastructures. We think that full interoperability among sensor systems is still an open issue and that the solution to this involves providing appropriate metadata. Several open source applications implement the SWE specification and, particularly, the Sensor Observation Services (SOS) standard. These applications allow for the exchange of data and metadata in XML format between computer systems. However, there is a lack of metadata editing tools supporting end users in this activity. Generally speaking, it is hard for users to provide sensor metadata in the SensorML format without dedicated tools. In particular, such a tool should ease metadata editing by providing, for standard sensors, all the invariant information to be included in sensor metadata, thus allowing the user to concentrate on the metadata items that are related to the specific deployment. RITMARE, the Italian flagship project on marine research, envisages a subproject, SP7, for the set-up of the project's spatial data infrastructure. SP7 developed EDI, a general purpose, template-driven metadata editor that is composed of a backend web service and an HTML5/javascript client. EDI can be customized for managing the creation of generic metadata encoded as XML. Once tailored to a specific metadata format, EDI presents the users a web form with advanced auto completion and validation capabilities. In the case of sensor metadata (SensorML versions 1.0.1 and 2.0), the EDI client is instructed to send an "insert sensor" request to an SOS endpoint in order to save the metadata in an SOS server. In the first phase of project RITMARE, EDI has been used to simplify the creation from scratch of SensorML metadata by the involved researchers and data managers. An interesting by

  20. Rupture Speed and Dynamic Frictional Processes for the 1995 ML4.1 Shacheng, Hebei, China, Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B.; Shi, B.

    2010-12-01

    An earthquake with ML4.1 occurred at Shacheng, Hebei, China, on July 20, 1995, followed by 28 aftershocks with 0.9≤ML≤4.0 (Chen et al, 2005). According to ZÚÑIGA (1993), for the 1995 ML4.1 Shacheng earthquake sequence, the main shock is corresponding to undershoot, while aftershocks should match overshoot. With the suggestion that the dynamic rupture processes of the overshoot aftershocks could be related to the crack (sub-fault) extension inside the main fault. After main shock, the local stresses concentration inside the fault may play a dominant role in sustain the crack extending. Therefore, the main energy dissipation mechanism should be the aftershocks fracturing process associated with the crack extending. We derived minimum radiation energy criterion (MREC) following variational principle (Kanamori and Rivera, 2004)(ES/M0')min≧[3M0/(ɛπμR3)](v/β)3, where ES and M0' are radiated energy and seismic moment gained from observation, μ is the modulus of fault rigidity, ɛ is the parameter of ɛ=M0'/M0,M0 is seismic moment and R is rupture size on the fault, v and β are rupture speed and S-wave speed. From II and III crack extending model, we attempt to reconcile a uniform expression for calculate seismic radiation efficiency ηG, which can be used to restrict the upper limit efficiency and avoid the non-physics phenomenon that radiation efficiency is larger than 1. In ML 4.1 Shacheng earthquake sequence, the rupture speed of the main shock was about 0.86 of S-wave speed β according to MREC, closing to the Rayleigh wave speed, while the rupture speeds of the remained 28 aftershocks ranged from 0.05β to 0.55β. The rupture speed was 0.9β, and most of the aftershocks are no more than 0.35β using II and III crack extending model. In addition, the seismic radiation efficiencies for this earthquake sequence were: for the most aftershocks, the radiation efficiencies were less than 10%, inferring a low seismic efficiency, whereas the radiation efficiency

  1. Influence of dosing volume on the neurotoxicity of bifenthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolansky, M J; McDaniel, K L; Moser, V C; Crofton, K M

    2007-01-01

    Pyrethroids are pesticides with high insecticidal activity and relatively low potency in mammals. The influence of dosing volume on the neurobehavioral syndrome following oral acute exposure to the Type-I pyrethroid insecticide bifenthrin in corn oil was evaluated in adult male Long Evans rats. We tested bifenthrin effects at 1 and 5 ml/kg, two commonly used dose volumes in toxicological studies. Two testing times (4 and 7 h) were used in motor activity and functional observational battery (FOB) assessments. Four to eight doses were examined at either dosing condition (up to 20 or 26 mg/kg, at 1 and 5 ml/kg, respectively). Acute oral bifenthrin exposure produced toxic signs typical of Type I pyrethroids, with dose-related increases in fine tremor, decreased motor activity and grip strength, and increased pawing, head shaking, click response, and body temperature. Bifenthrin effects on motor activity and pyrethroid-specific clinical signs were approximately 2-fold more potent at 1 ml/kg than 5 ml/kg. This difference was clearly evident at 4 h and slightly attenuated at 7 h post-dosing. Benchmark dose (BMD) modeling estimated similar 2-fold potency differences in motor activity and pyrethroid-specific FOB data. These findings demonstrate that dose volume, in studies using corn oil as the vehicle influences bifenthrin potency. Further, these data suggest that inconsistent estimates of pyrethroid potency between laboratories are at least partially due to differences in dosing volume.

  2. Proceedings of the 15. annual British Columbia MEND ML/ARD workshop : the management of tailings and tailings impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    This Mine Environment Neutral Drainage (MEND) workshop was held to promote the exchange of information and ideas on environmental protection and reclamation associated with mining. The workshop covered a broad spectrum of reclamation issues and the key environmental challenges facing the mining industry, such as acid mine drainage (AMD) control, and metal leaching and acid rock drainage (ML/ARD). The theme for the 2008 workshop was the management of tailings and tailings impoundments. Topics of discussion included hydrogeology and geochemistry; tailings disposal; mitigation; closure plans; and postclosure performance. The emphasis was on full-scale case studies, practical constraints and sustaining successful disposal strategies and remediation. The session on tailings management reviewed overarching policies and practices; methods of subaerial tailings disposal and case studies of tailings management; and detailed investigations of geochemical properties and processes. The conference featured 22 presentations, of which 4 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  3. Primary standards for measuring flow rates from 100 nl/min to 1 ml/min - gravimetric principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Hugo; Petter, Harm Tido; Lucas, Peter; Batista, Elsa; Filipe, Eduarda; Almeida, Nelson; Ribeiro, Luis Filipe; Gala, João; Martins, Rui; Savanier, Benoit; Ogheard, Florestan; Niemann, Anders Koustrup; Lötters, Joost; Sparreboom, Wouter

    2015-08-01

    Microflow and nanoflow rate calibrations are important in several applications such as liquid chromatography, (scaled-down) process technology, and special health-care applications. However, traceability in the microflow and nanoflow range does not go below 16 μl/min in Europe. Furthermore, the European metrology organization EURAMET did not yet validate this traceability by means of an intercomparison between different National Metrology Institutes (NMIs). The NMIs METAS, Centre Technique des Industries Aérauliques et Thermiques, IPQ, Danish Technological Institute, and VSL have therefore developed and validated primary standards to cover the flow rate range from 0.1 μl/min to at least 1 ml/min. In this article, we describe the different designs and methods of the primary standards of the gravimetric principle and the results obtained at the intercomparison for the upper flow rate range for the various NMIs and Bronkhorst High-Tech, the manufacturer of the transfer standards used.

  4. The hazard map of ML6.6 0206 Meinong earthquake near Guanmiao and its Neotectonic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, L. H.; Shyu, J. B. H.; Huang, M. H.; Yang, K. M.; Le Beon, M.; Lee, Y. H.; Chuang, R.; Yi, D.

    2016-12-01

    The serious damage was occurred in SW Taiwan by ML 6.6 0206 Meinong earthquake. Based on InSAR result, 10 cm oval-raised surface deformation is 15 km away from its epicenter, and two obviously N-S trend sharp phase change nearby Guanmiao area. Our field investigation shows bulling damage and surface fracture are high related with the two sharp phase change. Here, we perform the detailed shallow underground geometry by using reflection seismic data, geologic data, and field hazard investigation. This N-S trend surface deformation may be induced by local shallow folding, while the huge uplift west of Guanmiao may be related with pure shear deformation of thick clayey Gutingkeng (GTK) Formation. Our results imply that not only a moderate lower crustal earthquake can trigger active structure at shallower depth, but also those minor shallow active structures are occurred serious damage and surface deformation.

  5. [Estimation of volume of pleural fluid and its impact on spirometrical parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwat, Krzysztof; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz; Bielicki, Piotr; Hildebrand, Katarzyna; Nowacka-Mazurek, Magdalena; Nasiłowski, Jacek; Rubinsztajn, Renata; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2014-03-01

    In the course of various diseases, there is an accumulation of fluid in the pleural cavities. Pleural fluid accumulation causes thoracic volume expansion and reduction of volume lungs, leading to formation of restrictive disorders. The aim of the study was to estimate the volume of pleural fluid by ultrasonography and to search for the relationship between pleural fluid volume and spirometrical parameters. The study involved 46 patients (26 men, 20 women) aged 65.7 +/- 14 years with pleural effusions who underwent thoracentesis. Thoracentesis was preceded by ultrasonography of the pleura, spirometry test and plethysmography. The volume of the pleural fluid was calculated with the Goecke' and Schwerk' (GS) or Padykuła (P) equations. The obtained values were compared with the actual evacuated volume. The median volume of the removed pleural fluid was 950 ml. Both underestimated the evacuated volume (the median volume 539 ml for GS and 648 ml for P, respectively). Pleural fluid removal resulted in a statistically significant improvement in VC (increase 0.20 +/- 0.35 ; p Pleural fluid removal causes a significant improvement in lung function parameters. The analyzed equations for fluid volume calculation do not correlate with the actual volume.

  6. High-pitch dual-source CT coronary angiography with low volumes of contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembcke, Alexander; Hein, Patrick A.; Knobloch, Gesine; Durmus, Tahir; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Schwenke, Carsten [SCO:SSiS - Schwenke Consulting, Berlin (Germany); Huppertz, Alexander [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); ISI - Imaging Science Institute Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To assess the effect of lower volumes of contrast medium (CM) on image quality in high-pitch dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). One-hundred consecutive patients (body weight 65-85 kg, stable heart rate ≤65 bpm, cardiac index ≥2.5 L/min/m{sup 2}) referred for CTCA were prospectively enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to one of five groups of different CM volumes (G{sub 30}, 30 mL; G{sub 40}, 40 mL; G{sub 50}, 50 mL; G{sub 60}, 60 mL; G{sub 70}, 70 mL; flow rate 5 mL/s each, iodine content 370 mg/mL). Attenuation within the proximal and distal coronary artery segments was analysed. Mean attenuation for men and women ranged from 345.0 and 399.1 HU in G{sub 30} to 478.2 and 571.8 HU in G{sub 70}. Mean attenuation values were higher in groups with higher CM volumes (P < 0.0001) and higher in women than in men (P < 0.0001). The proportions of segments with attenuation of at least 300 HU in G{sub 30}, G{sub 40}, G{sub 50}, G{sub 60} and G{sub 70} were 89 %, 95 %, 98 %, 98 % and 99 %. CM volume of 30 mL in women and 40 mL in men proved to be sufficient to guarantee attenuation of at least 300 HU. In selected patients high-pitch dual-source CTCA can be performed with CM volumes of 40 mL in men or 30 mL in women. (orig.)

  7. Can prostatic arterial embolisation (PAE) reduce the volume of the peripheral zone? MRI evaluation of zonal anatomy and infarction after PAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yen-Ting [Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris. Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Vascular and Oncological Interventional Radiology, Paris (France); Department of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung City (China); Amouyal, Gregory; Pereira, Helena; Del Giudice, Costantino; Dean, Carole [Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris. Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Vascular and Oncological Interventional Radiology, Paris (France); Correas, Jean-Michel [Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris. Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Vascular and Oncological Interventional Radiology, Paris (France); Hopital Necker, Radiology Department, Paris (France); Pellerin, Olivier; Sapoval, Marc [Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris. Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Vascular and Oncological Interventional Radiology, Paris (France); Inserm (Institut national de la sante et de la recherche medicale) U970, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Paris (France); Thiounn, Nicolas [Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Urology, Paris (France)

    2016-10-15

    To assess the impact of prostatic arterial embolisation (PAE) on various prostate gland anatomical zones. We retrospectively reviewed paired MRI scans obtained before and after PAE for 25 patients and evaluated changes in volumes of the median lobe (ML), central gland (CG), peripheral zone (PZ) and whole prostate gland (WPV) following PAE. We used manual segmentation to calculate volume on axial view T2-weighted images for ML, CG and WPV. We calculated PZ volume by subtracting CG volume from WPV. Enhanced phase on dynamic contrasted-enhanced MRI was used to evaluate the infarction areas after PAE. Clinical results of International Prostate Symptom Score and International Index of Erectile Function questionnaires and the urodynamic study were evaluated before and after PAE. Significant reductions in volume were observed after PAE for ML (26.2 % decrease), CG (18.8 %), PZ (16.4 %) and WPV (19.1 %; p < 0.001 for all these volumes). Patients with clinical failure had smaller volume reductions for WPV, ML and CG (all p < 0.05). Patients with significant CG infarction after PAE displayed larger WPV, ML and CG volume reductions (all p < 0.01). PAE can significantly decrease WPV, ML, CG and PZ volumes, and poor clinical outcomes are associated with smaller volume reductions. (orig.)

  8. Blood Volume, Plasma Volume and Circulation Time in a High-Energy-Demand Teleost, the Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brill, R.W.; Cousins, K.L.; Jones, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    We measured red cell space with 51Cr-labeled red blood cells, and dextran space with 500 kDa fluorescein-isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (FITC-dextran), in two groups of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares). Red cell space was 13.8+/-0.7 ml kg-1 (mean +/- s.e.m.) Assuming a whole- body hematocrit...... for albacore (Thunnus alalunga, 82-197 ml kg-1). Plasma volume within the primary circulatory system (calculated from the 51Cr-labeled red blood cell data) was 32.9+/-2.3 ml kg-1. Dextran space was 37.0+/-3.7 ml kg-1. Because 500 kDa FITC-dextran appeared to remain within the vascular space, these data imply...

  9. Phantom study of PET/CT guided delineation of radiation therapy volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lin; Zheng Rong; Wang Yibin; Geng Jianhua; Wu Ning; Zhao Ping

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To propose a model-based method for calculating the threshold in GTV determination by 18 F-FDG PET in a phantom study. Methods: A phantom was constructed of a 9 L cylindrical tank.Glass spheres with volumes ranging from 0.5 to 16 ml (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 ml) were suspended within the tank. The six spheres were filled with an identical concentration of FDG (203.5 MBq/L) and suspended within 3 different background baths of FDG (6.179, 16.021, 0 MBq/L) solutions, creating 3 target-to-background ratios of 32.96 : 1, 12.69 : 1 and target to zero background. A linear regressive function was constructed which represented the relationship between the threshold and the average activity concentration of the target. A 40% of maximum intensity threshold and the linear regressive function method were applied to define the spheres filled with 18 F-FDG. The volume differences between the two methods and the true volumes of the spheres were compared with t-test. Results: The linear regressive function model was derived as:threshold =(mean target concentration + 2.6227)/1.9752. The results indicated that a smaller deviation occurred when the function was utilized to estimate the volumes of the phantoms as compared to the 40% of maximum intensity threshold method, but there were no significant differences between them (t=0.306, P>0.05). The effect of the linear regressive function on volume was such that when the phantom sphere volumes were ≥ 1 ml, the average deviation between the defined volumes and the true volumes of phantoms was 1.01%; but when the phantom sphere volume was 0.5 ml, the average deviation was 9.53%. When the 40% of maximum intensity threshold method was applied to define the phantom spheres of volume ≥2 ml, the average deviation between the defined volumes and the true volumes of phantoms was -4.62%; but, the average deviation of that was 19.9% when the volumes of spheres were 0.5 and 1 ml. When the linear regressive function was applied to

  10. Developing a Valid Version of an Inventory to Measure Anger in Mexican Adolescents of Middle School Level: The ML-STAXI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcázar-Olán, Raúl J.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Escamilla-Tecalco, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    The goals were to develop a valid version of the Multicultural Latin American Inventory of Anger Expression and Hostility (ML-STAXI) for middle school Mexican youth (ML-STAXI-MS) and to test a new Questionnaire about Anger Expression with Physical Aggression (QAEPA). Five hundred and four adolescents (258 males, 246 females); (M[subscript age] =…

  11. Melanoma inhibitor of apoptosis protein (ML-IAP) specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes cross-react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek Sørensen, Rikke; Faurschou, Mikkel; Troelsen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of melanoma patients host a spontaneous T-cell response specifically against ML-IAP-derived peptides. In this study, we describe that some ML-IAP-specific cytotoxic T cells isolated from melanoma patients cross react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56. SS56 is a recentl...

  12. Optimization of cocktail volume in estimation of Tritium activity using liquid scintillation spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumaravel, S.; Narashimha Nath, V.; Prashanth Kumar, M.; Sunil, C.N.; Raghunath, T.; Bera, Utpal; Ramakrishna, V.; Nair, B.S.K.; Ganesh, G.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid Scintillation Spectrometers (LSS) are widely used for the estimation of Tritium in Nuclear Industry and Environmental labs to find out the Tritium concentration. The main component used for the detection of tritium is the liquid scintillation cocktail composed of different chemicals. To reduce the radioactive chemical wastes and the cost of liquid scintillation cocktails the use of as small volume of cocktail as possible is required. Typically, 1 ml of the aqueous sample is added with 5 ml of the liquid scintillation cocktail in a 20 ml low potassium glass. In this study, suitability of the combination of I ml aqueous sample with 2.5 ml cocktail in a 7 ml low potassium glass vial using a HIDEX 300 SL TDCR LSS was carried out instead of the other combination

  13. Effect of hydration status on atrial and ventricular volumes and function in healthy adult volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schantz, Daryl I. [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Manitoba, Variety Children' s Heart Centre, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Dragulescu, Andreea [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Memauri, Brett [University of Manitoba, Department of Radiology, St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Grotenhuis, Heynric B. [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    Assessment of cardiac chamber volumes is a fundamental part of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. While the effects of inter- and intraobserver variability have been studied and have a recognized effect on the comparability of serial cardiac MR imaging studies, the effect of differences in hydration status has not been evaluated. To evaluate the effects of volume administration on cardiac chamber volumes. Thirteen healthy adults underwent a baseline cardiac MR to evaluate cardiac chamber volumes after an overnight fast. They were then given two saline boluses of 10 ml/kg of body weight and the cardiac MR was repeated immediately after each bolus. From the baseline scan to the final scan there was a significant increase in all four cardiac chamber end-diastolic volumes. Right atrial volumes increased 8.0%, from 61.1 to 66.0 ml/m2 (P<0.001), and left atrial volumes increased 10.0%, from 50.0 to 55.0 ml/m2 (P<0.001). Right ventricular volumes increased 6.0%, from 91.1 to 96.5 ml/m2 (P<0.001), and left ventricular volumes increased 3.2%, from 87.0 to 89.8 ml/m2 (P<0.001). Hydration status has a significant effect on the end-diastolic volumes of all cardiac chambers assessed by cardiac MR. Thus, hydration represents a ''variable'' that should be taken into account when assessing cardiac chamber volumes, especially when performing serial imaging studies in a patient. (orig.)

  14. Effect of hydration status on atrial and ventricular volumes and function in healthy adult volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schantz, Daryl I.; Dragulescu, Andreea; Memauri, Brett; Grotenhuis, Heynric B.; Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cardiac chamber volumes is a fundamental part of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. While the effects of inter- and intraobserver variability have been studied and have a recognized effect on the comparability of serial cardiac MR imaging studies, the effect of differences in hydration status has not been evaluated. To evaluate the effects of volume administration on cardiac chamber volumes. Thirteen healthy adults underwent a baseline cardiac MR to evaluate cardiac chamber volumes after an overnight fast. They were then given two saline boluses of 10 ml/kg of body weight and the cardiac MR was repeated immediately after each bolus. From the baseline scan to the final scan there was a significant increase in all four cardiac chamber end-diastolic volumes. Right atrial volumes increased 8.0%, from 61.1 to 66.0 ml/m2 (P<0.001), and left atrial volumes increased 10.0%, from 50.0 to 55.0 ml/m2 (P<0.001). Right ventricular volumes increased 6.0%, from 91.1 to 96.5 ml/m2 (P<0.001), and left ventricular volumes increased 3.2%, from 87.0 to 89.8 ml/m2 (P<0.001). Hydration status has a significant effect on the end-diastolic volumes of all cardiac chambers assessed by cardiac MR. Thus, hydration represents a ''variable'' that should be taken into account when assessing cardiac chamber volumes, especially when performing serial imaging studies in a patient. (orig.)

  15. Do new anesthesia ventilators deliver small tidal volumes accurately during volume-controlled ventilation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiller, Patricia R; McDonough, Joseph M; Feldman, Jeffrey M

    2008-05-01

    During mechanical ventilation of infants and neonates, small changes in tidal volume may lead to hypo- or hyperventilation, barotrauma, or volutrauma. Partly because breathing circuit compliance and fresh gas flow affect tidal volume delivery by traditional anesthesia ventilators in volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) mode, pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) using a circle breathing system has become a common approach to minimizing the risk of mechanical ventilation for small patients, although delivered tidal volume is not assured during PCV. A new generation of anesthesia machine ventilators addresses the problems of VCV by adjusting for fresh gas flow and for the compliance of the breathing circuit. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of new anesthesia ventilators to deliver small tidal volumes. Four anesthesia ventilator systems were evaluated to determine the accuracy of volume delivery to the airway during VCV at tidal volume settings of 100, 200, and 500 mL under different conditions of breathing circuit compliance (fully extended and fully contracted circuits) and lung compliance. A mechanical test lung (adult and infant) was used to simulate lung compliances ranging from 0.0025 to 0.03 L/cm H(2)O. Volumes and pressures were measured using a calibrated screen pneumotachograph and custom software. We tested the Smartvent 7900, Avance, and Aisys anesthesia ventilator systems (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI) and the Apollo anesthesia ventilator (Draeger Medical, Telford, PA). The Smartvent 7900 and Avance ventilators use inspiratory flow sensors to control the volume delivered, whereas the Aisys and Apollo ventilators compensate for the compliance of the circuit. We found that the anesthesia ventilators that use compliance compensation (Aisys and Apollo) accurately delivered both large and small tidal volumes to the airway of the test lung under conditions of normal and low lung compliance during VCV (ranging from 95.5% to 106.2% of the set tidal volume

  16. Control de la calidad y estudio de estabilidad del paracetamol gotas orales 100 mg/ml Quality control and stability study of 100 mg/ml paracetamol oral drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caridad M García Peña

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: las gotas orales de Paracetamol, están indicadas a la población infantil hasta los 5 años para el alivio de la fiebre, dolor de cabeza, dolores dentales y proporciona alivio sintomático del resfriado común. Objetivo: validar dos métodos analíticos, para el control de la calidad y el estudio de estabilidad y estudiar la estabilidad de las gotas orales de producción nacional. Métodos: para cuantificar el principio activo para el estudio de estabilidad, la separación se realizó a través de una columna cromatográfica Lichrosorb RP - 18 (5µm (250 x 4 mm, con detección ultravioleta a 243 nm, empleando una fase móvil compuesta por Agua destilada: Metanol (3:1. Mientras que el método para el control de la calidad se utilizó un Espectrofotómetro SPECTRONIC GENESYS 2.Para el estudio de estabilidad, se emplearon los métodos de vida de estante (a temperatura inferior a 30 º C y de estabilidad acelerada (40 ± 2ºC mediante cromatografía líquida de alta eficiencia. Resultados: los resultados obtenidos de los parámetros evaluados en las validaciones se encontraron dentro de los límites establecidos. Los resultados del estudio de estabilidad realizado, demuestran que el producto terminado cumplió con las especificaciones de calidad durante el estudio. Conclusiones: los métodos analíticos por espectrofotometría UV y cromatografía líquida de alta resolución, son válidos para el control de la calidad y estudio de estabilidad de las gotas orales de Paracetamol 100 mg/mL, ya que resultaron lineales, precisos, exactos y específicos. Se demostró la estabilidad física, química y microbiológica del producto por espacio de 12 meses a temperatura inferior a 30 ºC, envasados en frascos de vidrio ámbar por 15 mL, boca 18 mm, calidad hidrolítica III. Además se evidenció que el producto es estable durante 30 días después de abierto el frasco.Introduction: paracetamol is an effective analgesic and antipyretic drug of

  17. Gastric residual volume (GRV) and gastric contents measurement by refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Kuo; McClave, Stephen A; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Chao, You-Chen

    2007-01-01

    Traditional use of gastric residual volumes (GRVs), obtained by aspiration from a nasogastric tube, is inaccurate and cannot differentiate components of the gastric contents (gastric secretion vs delivered formula). The use of refractometry and 3 mathematical equations has been proposed as a method to calculate the formula concentration, GRV, and formula volume. In this paper, we have validated these mathematical equations so that they can be implemented in clinical practice. Each of 16 patients receiving a nasogastric tube had 50 mL of water followed by 100 mL of dietary formula (Osmolite HN, Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, OH) infused into the stomach. After mixing, gastric content was aspirated for the first Brix value (BV) measurement by refractometry. Then, 50 mL of water was infused into the stomach and a second BV was measured. The procedure of infusion of dietary formula (100 mL) and then water (50 mL) was repeated and followed by subsequent BV measurement. The same procedure was performed in an in vitro experiment. Formula concentration, GRV, and formula volume were calculated from the derived mathematical equations. The formula concentrations, GRVs, and formula volumes calculated by using refractometry and the mathematical equations were close to the true values obtained from both in vivo and in vitro validation experiments. Using this method, measurement of the BV of gastric contents is simple, reproducible, and inexpensive. Refractometry and the derived mathematical equations may be used to measure formula concentration, GRV, and formula volume, and also to serve as a tool for monitoring the gastric contents of patients receiving nasogastric feeding.

  18. Postprandial hepatic volume change: spiral CT evaluation in case of liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Kwang Suk; Moon, Jang Il; Ko, Myong Kwan; Byun, Joo Nam; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Young Chol; Oh, Jae Hee

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of evaluating liver cirrhosis through the measurement of liver volume. In a control group(20 normal subjects) and 20 cirrhotic patients, variations in liver volume before and after a meal were obtained. A case-control study was conducted between the two groups. In the control group, the range of increased liver volume after the meal was 67-186ml. Mean increased liver volume was 119.3ml, the range of percentage increase was 6-12.4% and the mean percentage increase was 9.89%. In cirrhotic patients, the range of increased liver volume after the meal was 1-20ml. Mean increase liver volume was 6.9ml, the range of percentage increase was 0-1.9% and the mean percentage increase was 0.65%. Compared with the control group, cirrhotic patients showed a much smaller increase in liver volume(p<0.01). Difference in variation of liver volume between a control group and cirrhotic patients before and after a meal can be used for the evaluation of liver cirrhosis

  19. Study of factors affecting thyroid volume determination by SPECT and preliminary clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yan

    1992-01-01

    Volumes of 7 thyroid phantoms (12-113.4 ml) and 25 thyroids of hyperthyroid patients were determined using TOSHIBA GCA-901A SPECT scanner. Accuracy of calculated volumes was strongly affected by the spatial resolution, total counts of acquisition and the threshold of background subtraction which depended on the thyroid size and the type of collimator used

  20. Transcranial sonography: integration into target volume definition for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Becker, Georg; Flentje, Michael; Richter, Susanne; Goerttler-Krauspe, Irene; Koelbl, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies indicate that transcranial sonography (TCS) reliably displays the extension of malignant brain tumors. The effect of integrating TCS into radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was investigated herein. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients subtotally resected for GBM underwent TCS during radiotherapy planning and were conventionally treated (54 to 60 Gy). Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and stereotactic boost planning target volumes (PTVs, 3-mm margin) were created, based on contrast enhancement on computed tomography (CT) only (PTV CT ) or the combined CT and TCS information (PTV CT+TCS ). Noncoplonar conformal treatment plans for both PTVs were compared. Tumor progression patterns and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were related to both PTVs. Results: A sufficient temporal bone window for TCS was present in 11 of 13 patients. GTVs as defined by TCS were considerably larger than the respective CT volumes: Of the composite GTV CT+TCS (median volume 42 ml), 23%, 13%, and 66% (medians) were covered by the overlap of both methods, CT only and TCS only, respectively. Median sizes of PTV CT and PTV CT+TCS were 34 and 74 ml, respectively. Addition of TCS to CT information led to a median increase of the volume irradiated within the 80% isodose by 32 ml (median factor 1.51). PTV CT+TCS volume was at median 24% of a 'conventional' MRI(T2)-based PTV. Of eight progressions analyzed, three and six occurred inside the 80% isodose of the plans for PTV CT and for PTV CT+TCS , respectively. Conclusion: Addition of TCS tumor volume to the contrast-enhancing CT volume in postoperative radiotherapy planning for GBM increases the treated volume by a median factor of 1.5. Since a high frequency of marginal recurrences is reported from dose-escalation trials of this disease, TCS may complement established methods in PTV definition

  1. Upper Airway Volume Segmentation Analysis Using Cine MRI Findings in Children with Tracheostomy Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Bradley L.; Abbott, M. Bret; Donnelly, Lane F.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Poe, Stacy A.; Kalra, Maninder; Amin, Raouf S.; Cotton, Robin T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States)

    2007-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the airway dynamics of the upper airway as depicted on cine MRI in children with tracheotomy tubes during two states of airflow through the upper airway. Sagittal fast gradient echo cine MR images of the supra-glottic airway were obtained with a 1.5T MRI scanner on seven children with tracheotomy tubes. Two sets of images were obtained with either the tubes capped or uncapped. The findings of the cine MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Volume segmentation of the cine images to compare the airway volume change over time (mean volume, standard deviation, normalized range, and coefficient of variance) was performed for the capped and uncapped tubes in both the nasopharynx and hypopharynx (Signed Rank Test). Graphical representation of the airway volume over time demonstrates a qualitative increased fluctuation in patients with the tracheotomy tube capped as compared to uncapped in both the nasopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal regions of interest. In the nasopharynx, the mean airway volume (capped 2.72 mL, uncapped 2.09 mL, p = 0.0313), the airway volume standard deviation (capped 0.42 mL, uncapped 0.20 mL, p = 0.0156), and the airway volume range (capped 2.10 mL, uncapped 1.09 mL, p = 0.0156) were significantly larger in the capped group of patients. In the hypopharynx, the airway volume standard deviation (capped 1.54 mL, uncapped 0.67 mL, p = 0.0156), and the airway volume range (capped 6.44 mL, uncapped 2.93 mL, p = 0.0156) were significantly larger in the capped tubes. The coefficient of variance (capped 0.37, uncapped 0.26, p = 0.0469) and the normalized range (capped 1.52, uncapped 1.09, p = 0.0313) were significantly larger in the capped tubes. There is a statistically significant change in airway dynamics in children with tracheotomy tubes when breathing via the airway as compared to breathing via the tracheotomy tube.

  2. Upper Airway Volume Segmentation Analysis Using Cine MRI Findings in Children with Tracheostomy Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, Bradley L.; Abbott, M. Bret; Donnelly, Lane F.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Poe, Stacy A.; Kalra, Maninder; Amin, Raouf S.; Cotton, Robin T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the airway dynamics of the upper airway as depicted on cine MRI in children with tracheotomy tubes during two states of airflow through the upper airway. Sagittal fast gradient echo cine MR images of the supra-glottic airway were obtained with a 1.5T MRI scanner on seven children with tracheotomy tubes. Two sets of images were obtained with either the tubes capped or uncapped. The findings of the cine MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Volume segmentation of the cine images to compare the airway volume change over time (mean volume, standard deviation, normalized range, and coefficient of variance) was performed for the capped and uncapped tubes in both the nasopharynx and hypopharynx (Signed Rank Test). Graphical representation of the airway volume over time demonstrates a qualitative increased fluctuation in patients with the tracheotomy tube capped as compared to uncapped in both the nasopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal regions of interest. In the nasopharynx, the mean airway volume (capped 2.72 mL, uncapped 2.09 mL, p = 0.0313), the airway volume standard deviation (capped 0.42 mL, uncapped 0.20 mL, p = 0.0156), and the airway volume range (capped 2.10 mL, uncapped 1.09 mL, p = 0.0156) were significantly larger in the capped group of patients. In the hypopharynx, the airway volume standard deviation (capped 1.54 mL, uncapped 0.67 mL, p = 0.0156), and the airway volume range (capped 6.44 mL, uncapped 2.93 mL, p = 0.0156) were significantly larger in the capped tubes. The coefficient of variance (capped 0.37, uncapped 0.26, p = 0.0469) and the normalized range (capped 1.52, uncapped 1.09, p = 0.0313) were significantly larger in the capped tubes. There is a statistically significant change in airway dynamics in children with tracheotomy tubes when breathing via the airway as compared to breathing via the tracheotomy tube

  3. Ontological Encoding of GeoSciML and INSPIRE geological standard vocabularies and schemas: application to geological mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Vincenzo; Piana, Fabrizio; Mimmo, Dario; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Giardino, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Encoding of geologic knowledge in formal languages is an ambitious task, aiming at the interoperability and organic representation of geological data, and semantic characterization of geologic maps. Initiatives such as GeoScience Markup Language (last version is GeoSciML 4, 2015[1]) and INSPIRE "Data Specification on Geology" (an operative simplification of GeoSciML, last version is 3.0 rc3, 2013[2]), as well as the recent terminological shepherding of the Geoscience Terminology Working Group (GTWG[3]) have been promoting information exchange of the geologic knowledge. There have also been limited attempts to encode the knowledge in a machine-readable format, especially in the lithology domain (see e.g. the CGI_Lithology ontology[4]), but a comprehensive ontological model that connect the several knowledge sources is still lacking. This presentation concerns the "OntoGeonous" initiative, which aims at encoding the geologic knowledge, as expressed through the standard vocabularies, schemas and data models mentioned above, through a number of interlinked computational ontologies, based on the languages of the Semantic Web and the paradigm of Linked Open Data. The initiative proceeds in parallel with a concrete case study, concerning the setting up of a synthetic digital geological map of the Piemonte region (NW Italy), named "GEOPiemonteMap" (developed by the CNR Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, CNR IGG, Torino), where the description and classification of GeologicUnits has been supported by the modeling and implementation of the ontologies. We have devised a tripartite ontological model called OntoGeonous that consists of: 1) an ontology of the geologic features (in particular, GeologicUnit, GeomorphologicFeature, and GeologicStructure[5], modeled from the definitions and UML schemata of CGI vocabularies[6], GeoScienceML and INSPIRE, and aligned with the Planetary realm of NASA SWEET ontology[7]), 2) an ontology of the Earth materials (as defined by the

  4. Feasibility and safety of cavity-directed stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases at a high-volume medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rava, MD PhD

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Excellent local control is achievable with cavity-directed SRS in well-selected patients, particularly for lesions with diameter <3 cm and resection cavity volumes <14 mL. Long-term survival is possible for select patients.

  5. WE-FG-206-05: New Arterial Spin Labeling Method for Simultaneous Estimation of Arterial Cerebral Blood Volume, Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, M; Whitlow, C; Jung, Y [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Liu, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) method for simultaneously measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial transit time (ATT), and arterial cerebral blood volume (aCBV) without the use of a contrast agent. Methods: A series of multi-TI ASL images were acquired from one healthy subject on a 3T Siemens Skyra, with the following parameters: PCASL labeling with variable TI [300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000, 3500, 4000] ms, labeling bolus 1400 ms when TI allows, otherwise 100 ms less than TI, TR was minimized for each TI, two sinc shaped pre-saturation pulses were applied in the imaging plane immediately before 2D EPI acquisition. 64×64×24 voxels, 5 mm slice thickness, 1 mm gap, full brain coverage, 6 averages per TI, no crusher gradients, 11 ms TE, scan time of 4:56. The perfusion weighted time-series was created for each voxel and fit to a novel model. The model has two components: 1) the traditional model developed by Buxton et al., accounting for CBF and ATT, and 2) a box car function characterizing the width of the labeling bolus, with variable timing and height in proportion to the aCBV. All three parameters were fit using a nonlinear fitting routine that constrained all parameters to be positive. The main purpose of the high-temporal resolution TI sampling for the first second of data acquisition was to precisely estimate the blood volume component for better detection of arrival time and magnitude of signal. Results: Whole brain maps of CBF, ATT, and aCBV were produced, and all three parameters maps are consistent with similar maps described in the literature. Conclusion: Simultaneous mapping of CBF, ATT, and aCBV is feasible with a clinically tractable scan time (under 5 minutes).

  6. Vascular volumes and hematology in male and female runners and cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, H J; Carter, S; Grant, S; Tupling, R; Coates, G; Ali, M

    1999-02-01

    To examine the hypothesis that foot-strike hemolysis alters vascular volumes and selected hematological properties is trained athletes, we have measured total blood volume (TBV), red cell volume (RCV) and plasma volume (PV) in cyclists (n = 21) and runners (n = 17) and compared them to those of untrained controls (n = 20). TBV (ml x kg(-1)) was calculated as the sum of RCV (ml x kg(-1)) and PV (ml x kg(-1)) obtained using 51Cr and 125I-labelled albumin, respectively. Hematological assessment was carried out using a Coulter counter. Peak aerobic power (VO2peak) was measured during progressive exercise to fatigue using both cycle and treadmill ergometry. RCV was 15% higher (P strike hemolysis would not appear to have an effect on that parameter. The significant correlations (P role for the vascular system in realizing a high aerobic power.

  7. Correlation of serum androgens and pituitary hormone levels with serum PSA less than 2.5 ng/ml.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikerim, Mustafa; Oruç, Ozgür; Eskicorapci, Sadettin; Guliyev, Fuat; Ozen, Haluk

    2007-07-27

    The aim of this clinical study was to determine whether there is a relationship between total serum testosterone, free testosterone, FSH (Follicle-Stimulating Hormone), LH (Luteinizing Hormone) and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. We postulated that such a correlation existed then the use of hormone specific reference ranges might enhance the usefullness of PSA concentrations 40 years of age visiting our urology outpatient clinics. PSA was correlated to age (r = 0.23, p = 0.019), but there none between serum testosterone and age. No significant correlation was noted between testosterone or free testosterone and serum PSA levels, and none between serum FSH or LH and PSA. In age specific reference groups (41-49; 50-59; 60-69 years), we found no significant correlation between PSA and hormone concentrations. In this population of eugonadal men with serum PSA values less than 2.5 ng/ml, serum androgens and pituitary hormones do not appear to correlate with serum PSA.

  8. Proceedings of the 14. annual British Columbia MEND ML/ARD workshop : challenges in collection and treatment of mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    Metal leaching and acid rock drainage (ML/ARD) are among the largest environmental challenge facing the mining industry. Efforts are underway to open new mines without long-term consequences of acid drainage. This Mine Environment Neutral Drainage (MEND) workshop focused on the development and application of new technologies that prevent and control acid mine drainage (AMD). It presented a broad range of options that are now available to the mining industry which address this issue. The workshop focused on the collection and treatment of mine drainage. The treatment of effluent during and after closure of a mining property may be complicated by the presence of AMD which may require long term collection and treatment. Known chemical and passive treatment technologies were reviewed with reference to their costs of construction, operation and maintenance, as well as their ability to meet regulations and control toxicity. The conference featured 24 presentations, of which 3 has been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  9. Analysis of the possibility of SysML and BPMN application in formal data acquisition system description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćwikła, G.; Gwiazda, A.; Banaś, W.; Monica, Z.; Foit, K.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the study of possible application of selected methods of complex description, that can be used as a support of the Manufacturing Information Acquisition System (MIAS) methodology, describing how to design a data acquisition system, allowing for collecting and processing real-time data on the functioning of a production system, necessary for management of a company. MIAS can allow conversion into Cyber-Physical Production System. MIAS is gathering and pre-processing data on the state of production system, including e.g. realisation of production orders, state of machines, materials and human resources. Systematised approach and model-based development is proposed for improving the quality of the design of MIAS methodology-based complex systems supporting data acquisition in various types of companies. Graphical specification can be the baseline for any model-based development in specified areas. The possibility of application of SysML and BPMN, both being UML-based languages, representing different approaches to modelling of requirements, architecture and implementation of the data acquisition system, as a tools supporting description of required features of MIAS, were considered.

  10. PeakML/mzMatch: a file format, Java library, R library, and tool-chain for mass spectrometry data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheltema, Richard A; Jankevics, Andris; Jansen, Ritsert C; Swertz, Morris A; Breitling, Rainer

    2011-04-01

    The recent proliferation of high-resolution mass spectrometers has generated a wealth of new data analysis methods. However, flexible integration of these methods into configurations best suited to the research question is hampered by heterogeneous file formats and monolithic software development. The mzXML, mzData, and mzML file formats have enabled uniform access to unprocessed raw data. In this paper we present our efforts to produce an equally simple and powerful format, PeakML, to uniformly exchange processed intermediary and result data. To demonstrate the versatility of PeakML, we have developed an open source Java toolkit for processing, filtering, and annotating mass spectra in a customizable pipeline (mzMatch), as well as a user-friendly data visualization environment (PeakML Viewer). The PeakML format in particular enables the flexible exchange of processed data between software created by different groups or companies, as we illustrate by providing a PeakML-based integration of the widely used XCMS package with mzMatch data processing tools. As an added advantage, downstream analysis can benefit from direct access to the full mass trace information underlying summarized mass spectrometry results, providing the user with the means to rapidly verify results. The PeakML/mzMatch software is freely available at http://mzmatch.sourceforge.net, with documentation, tutorials, and a community forum.

  11. Criação de um tradutor XML para a linguagem de marcações sobre emoção EmotionML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Nichele

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo visa apresentar e descrever a criação de um tradutor XML para a linguagem EmotionML 1.0. EmotionML é uma linguagem de marcação criada para padronizar a representação das emoções em computadores. O tradutor deve ser capaz de: (i identificar os elementos da EmotionML, em um documento XML, e retorná-los como objetos instanciados; (ii gerar dinamicamente classes a partir da gramática definida para a linguagem EmotionML para a instanciação de objetos; (iii gerar arquivos EmotionML a partir de objetos EmotionML instanciados. Dessa forma, o tradutor proposto pode ser usado nos mais variados tipos de aplicações em Computação Afetiva que envolvam inferência, expressão ou síntese de emoções. A utilização do tradutor permite a um sistema computacional afetivo recuperar informações mantidas em arquivos, modificar os dados do arquivo em tempo real, assim como armazenar novamente as informações no formato EmotionML para futuros acessos ou modificações.

  12. Delivery of tidal volume from four anaesthesia ventilators during volume-controlled ventilation: a bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, G; Bonnet, A; Guérin, C

    2013-06-01

    Tidal volume (V(T)) must be accurately delivered by anaesthesia ventilators in the volume-controlled ventilation mode in order for lung protective ventilation to be effective. However, the impact of fresh gas flow (FGF) and lung mechanics on delivery of V(T) by the newest anaesthesia ventilators has not been reported. We measured delivered V(T) (V(TI)) from four anaesthesia ventilators (Aisys™, Flow-i™, Primus™, and Zeus™) on a pneumatic test lung set with three combinations of lung compliance (C, ml cm H2O(-1)) and resistance (R, cm H2O litre(-1) s(-2)): C60R5, C30R5, C60R20. For each CR, three FGF rates (0.5, 3, 10 litre min(-1)) were investigated at three set V(T)s (300, 500, 800 ml) and two values of PEEP (0 and 10 cm H2O). The volume error = [(V(TI) - V(Tset))/V(Tset)] ×100 was computed in body temperature and pressure-saturated conditions and compared using analysis of variance. For each CR and each set V(T), the absolute value of the volume error significantly declined from Aisys™ to Flow-i™, Zeus™, and Primus™. For C60R5, these values were 12.5% for Aisys™, 5% for Flow-i™ and Zeus™, and 0% for Primus™. With an increase in FGF, absolute values of the volume error increased only for Aisys™ and Zeus™. However, in C30R5, the volume error was minimal at mid-FGF for Aisys™. The results were similar at PEEP 10 cm H2O. Under experimental conditions, the volume error differed significantly between the four new anaesthesia ventilators tested and was influenced by FGF, although this effect may not be clinically relevant.

  13. Decreased right heart blood volume determined by magnetic resonance imaging: evidence of central underfilling in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Søndergaard, L; Møgelvang, J

    1995-01-01

    mL, NS), and left atrial volume (70 vs. 57 mL, P = .08) were normal or slightly increased. The right ejection fraction (68% vs. 53%, P fraction was slightly reduced (61% vs. 69%, NS). The central and arterial blood volume (CBV), assessed......Whether the central blood volume is reduced or expanded in cirrhosis is still under debate. Accordingly, the current study was undertaken to assess the volume of the heart cavities. Ten cirrhotic patients and matched controls had their right and left ventricular end-diastolic volumes (RVDV and LVDV...... as the cardiac output (CO) multiplied by the central circulation time, was significantly decreased (1.47 vs. 1.81 L, P blood volume (4.43 vs. 3.64 L, P

  14. Intraprocedural blood volume measurement using C-arm CT as a predictor for treatment response of malignant liver tumours undergoing repetitive transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Schaefer, Patrik; Lehnert, Thomas; Mbalisike, Emmanuel; Hammerstingl, Renate; Eichler, Katrin; Zangos, Stephan; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Ackermann, Hanns; Naguib, Nagy N.N.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate feasibility of measuring parenchymal blood volume (PBV) of malignant hepatic tumours using C-arm CT, test the changes in PBV following repeated transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and correlate these changes with the change in tumour size in MRI. 111 patients with liver malignancy were included. Patients underwent MRI and TACE in a 4- to 6-week interval. During intervention C-arm CT was performed. Images were post-processed to generate PBV maps. Blood volume data in C-arm CT and change in size in MRI were evaluated. The correlation between PBV and size was tested using Spearman rank test. Pre-interventional PBV maps showed a mean blood volume of 84.5 ml/1000 ml ± 62.0, follow-up PBV maps after multiple TACE demonstrated 61.1 ml/1000 ml ± 57.5. The change in PBV was statistically significant (p = 0.02). Patients with initial tumour blood volume >100 ml/1000 ml dropped 7.1 % in size and 47.2 % in blood volume; 50-100 ml/1000 ml dropped 4.6 % in size and 25.7 % in blood volume; and <50 ml/1000 ml decreased 2.8 % in size and increased 82.2 % in blood volume. PBV measurement of malignant liver tumours using C-arm CT is feasible. Following TACE PBV decreased significantly. Patients with low initial PBV show low local response rates and further increase in blood volume, whereas high initial tumour PBV showed better response to TACE. (orig.)

  15. Use of ultrasound for gastric volume evaluation after ingestion of different volumes of isotonic solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Margarida Barra Bisinotto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The current preoperative fasting guidelines allow fluid intake up to 2 h before surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastric volume of volunteers after an overnight fast and compare it with the gastric volume 2 h after ingestion of 200 and 500 mL of isotonic solution, by means of ultrasound assessment. Method: Eighty volunteers underwent gastric ultrasound at three times: after 8 h of fasting; 2 h after ingestion of 200 mL isotonic saline, followed by the first scan; and on another day, 2 h after ingestion of 500 mL of the same solution after an overnight fast. The evaluation was quantitative (antrum area and gastric volume, and the ratio of participants’ gastric volume/weight and qualitative (absence or presence of gastric contents on right lateral decubitus and supine positions. A p-value  0.05. Five volunteers (6.25% had a volume/weight over 1.5 mL kg−1 at fasting and 2 h after ingestion of 200 mL and 6 (7.5% after 500 mL. Qualitatively, the presence of gastric fluid occurred in more volunteers after fluid ingestion, especially 500 mL (18.7%, although not statistically significant. Conclusion: Ultrasound assessment of gastric volume showed no significant difference, both qualitative and quantitative, 2 h after ingestion of 200 mL or 500 mL of isotonic solution compared to fasting, although gastric fluid content has been identified in more volunteers, especially after ingestion of 500 mL isotonic solution. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: As diretrizes recentes de jejum pré-operatório permitem a ingestão de líquidos até 2 horas antes da cirurgia. O objetivo do presente estudo foi, por meio de ultrassonografia gástrica, avaliar o volume gástrico de voluntários após jejum noturno e comparar com o volume gástrico duas horas após a ingestão de 200 e 500 ml de solução isotônica. Método: Foram submetidos à ultrassonografia gástrica 80 voluntários em três momentos

  16. The relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Akahane, Keiko; Shikama, Naoto; Takahashi, Osamu; Hama, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is no current consensus regarding the optimal bladder volumes in definitive radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between the bladder volume and optimal treatment planning in radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Two hundred and forty-three patients underwent definitive radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for intermediate- and high-risk localized prostate cancer. The prescribed dose defined as 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 100 % of the prescription dose was 76 Gy in 38 fractions. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the prostate with a 5-mm margin and 2 cm of the proximal seminal vesicle. The PTV was defined as the CTV with a 5-mm margin. Treatment plans were optimized to satisfy the dose constraints defined by in-house protocols for PTV and organs at risk (rectum wall, bladder wall, sigmoid colon and small intestine). If all dose constraints were satisfied, the plan was defined as an optimal plan (OP). Results: An OP was achieved with 203 patients (84%). Mean bladder volume (± 1 SD) was 266 ml (± 130 ml) among those with an OP and 214 ml (±130 ml) among those without an OP (p = 0.02). Logistic regression analysis also showed that bladder volumes below 150 ml decreased the possibility of achieving an OP. However, the percentage of patients with an OP showed a plateau effect at bladder volumes above 150 ml. Conclusions. Bladder volume is a significant factor affecting OP rates. However, our results suggest that bladder volumes exceeding 150 ml may not help meet planning dose constraints

  17. Early chest tube removal after video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy with serous fluid production up to 500 ml/day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lars S; Jensen, Katrine; Petersen, Rene Horsleben

    2014-01-01

    In fast-track pulmonary resections, we removed chest tubes after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy with serous fluid production up to 500 ml/day. Subsequently, we evaluated the frequency of recurrent pleural effusions requiring reintervention....

  18. Ada (Trade Name) Bibliography. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    GLENN DOCUMENT NUMBER: 3268 TYPE: JOURNAL ARTICLE .5-., SCIENCE VOL 215 ISSUE 34 PP. 775-779S In this article, two principal themes are observed in...AINST LANAN RD NAY 83 ND9S-8-C-936 UNCLASSIFIED F/6 12/5 ML -4.4 ’-4-4----" ’°p..l i . d N N L. 131 t ’ll /II~ Ada Bibliography Volume I 95 𔃾- This...BUDAPEST,HUNGARY 4102 -01 ON THE TYPE CONCEPT OF ADA 6224 -03 UNORTHOGONALITIES IN THE IDENTIFICATION RULES IN ADA BACON, GLENN , IBM SANTA TERESA LABS

  19. The determination of blood volume in horses using stable isotope 50Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Nobuhiko; Kunugiyama, Iwao; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Inoue, Megumi; Furukawa, Yoshinori; Hiraga, Atsushi; Yamanobe, Akira; Kubo, Katsuyoshi.

    1991-01-01

    A method using stable isotope 50 Cr was presented to determine equine blood volumes accurately in the field. The erythrocyte labelled with 50 Cr was injected intravenously, then small amount of blood was collected at regular intervals, and the erythrocyte volume was measured from dilution rate of 50 Cr. A blood volume was calculated from the erythrocyte volume and the packed cell volume (PCV). The present results suggested that the optimum time of collecting blood at rest was 2 h after injection of tagged blood. The red cell volumes and the total blood volumes of fifteen thoroughbred horses measured by the 50 Cr method were 46.6±9.9 and 133±17 ml/kg body weight, respectively. The mean red cell volume of stallion was larger than mare (t-test, p<0.05), and three was no significant difference in the blood volume. (author)

  20. The determination of blood volume in horses using stable isotope sup 50 Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Nobuhiko; Kunugiyama, Iwao; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Inoue, Megumi; Furukawa, Yoshinori (Kitasato Univ., Towada, Aomori (Japan). School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences); Hiraga, Atsushi; Yamanobe, Akira; Kubo, Katsuyoshi

    1991-05-01

    A method using stable isotope {sup 50}Cr was presented to determine equine blood volumes accurately in the field. The erythrocyte labelled with {sup 50}Cr was injected intravenously, then small amount of blood was collected at regular intervals, and the erythrocyte volume was measured from dilution rate of {sup 50}Cr. A blood volume was calculated from the erythrocyte volume and the packed cell volume (PCV). The present results suggested that the optimum time of collecting blood at rest was 2 h after injection of tagged blood. The red cell volumes and the total blood volumes of fifteen thoroughbred horses measured by the {sup 50}Cr method were 46.6+-9.9 and 133+-17 ml/kg body weight, respectively. The mean red cell volume of stallion was larger than mare (t-test, p<0.05), and three was no significant difference in the blood volume. (author).

  1. Tissue hepatic blood volume and liver function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuyama, Mamoru

    1997-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scan has an advantage that it can measure regional organ blood flow and volume not only quantitatively but also non-invasively. In order to estimate the liver function, tissue hepatic blood volume was measured using C 15 O inhalation in conjunction with positron emission tomography. PET scans of the liver were performed after the single breath inhalation of 20 mCi of high specific activity 15 O-labeled carbon monoxide in 105 patients which were classified 3 groups; normal, chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis. They consist of 61, 14, and 30 patients, respectively. Significant differences between normal and cirrhotic patients were noted in tissue hepatic blood volume (mean 20.4, 18.2, 16.0 ml/100 g, respectively). Tissue hepatic blood volume (tHBV) correlated with the reaction of the peripheral reticuloendothelial compartment and protein synthesis, because there was a potent correlation between tHBV and hepatic fibrosis. In normal livers, we were able to demonstrate significant differences in tissue hepatic blood volume among liver segments. (author)

  2. Normal reference values for vertebral artery flow volume by color Doppler sonography in Korean adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Cha, Jang Gyu; Park, Seong Jin; Joh, Joon Hee; Park, Jai Soung; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyung; Ahn, Hyun Cheol

    2003-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar ischemia has been attributed to a reduction of net vertebral artery flow volume. This study was to establish the reference values for the flow volume of the vertebral artery using color Doppler sonography in the normal Korea adults. Thirty five normal Korea adults without any underlying disease including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, heart disease, obesity (body mas index>30), or carotid artery stenosis was included. There were 17 males and 18 females, age ranged from 20 to 53 years (average=32.86 years). Flow velocities and vessel diameters were recorded in the intertransverse (V2) segment, usually at C5-6 level, bilaterally. The flow volume (Q) was calculated. (Q=time averaged mean velocity x cross sectional area of vessel) A lower Flow velocity and smaller vessel diameter were measured on the right side compared to those of the left side, resulting in a lower flow volume. The calculated flow volumes using the equation were 77.0 ± 39.7 ml/min for the right side and 127.6 ± 71.0 ml/min for the left side (p=0.0001) while the net vertebral artery flow volume was 204.6 ± 81.8 ml/min. Decrease in the vertebral artery flow volume was statistically significant with advanced age. (r=-0.36, p=0.032). Vertebral artery blood flow volume was 191.20 ± 59.19 ml/min in male, and 217.28 ± 98.67 ml/min in female (p=0.6). The normal range for the net vertebral artery flow volume defined by the 5th to 95th percentiles was between 110.06 and 364.1 ml/min. The normal range for the net vertebral artery flow volume was between 110.06 and 364.1 ml/min. Vertebral artery flow volume decreased with the increase of age. However, gender did not affect the blood flow volume.

  3. Comparison of the accuracy of three angiographic methods for calculating left ventricular volume measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Lin; Cui Wei; Shi Hanwen; Tian Yingping; Wang Weigang; Feng Yanguang; Huang Xueyan; Liu Zhisheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the relative accuracy of three methods measuring left ventricular volume by X-ray ventriculography: single plane area-length method, biplane area-length method, and single-plane Simpson's method. Methods: Left ventricular casts were obtained within 24 hours after death from 12 persons who died from non-cardiac causes. The true left ventricular cast volume was measured by water displacement. The calculated volume of the casts was obtained with 3 angiographic methods, i.e., single-plane area-length method, biplane area-length method, and single-plane Simpson's method. Results: The actual average volume of left ventricular casts was (61.17±26.49) ml. The left ventricular volume was averagely (97.50±35.56) ml with single plane area-length method, (90.51±36.33) ml with biplane area-length method, and (65.00± 23.63) ml with single-plane Simpson's method. The left ventricular volumes calculated with single-plane and biplane area-length method were significantly larger than that the actual volumes (P 0.05). The left ventricular volumes calculated with single-plane and biplane area-length method were significantly larger than those calculated with single-plane Simpson's method (P 0.05). The over-estimation of left ventricular volume by single plane area-length method (36.34±17.98) ml and biplane area-length method (29.34±15.59) ml was more obvious than that calculated by single-plane Simpson's method (3.83±8.48) ml. Linear regression analysis showed that there was close correlations between left ventricular volumes calculated with single plane area-length method, biplane area-length method, Simpson's method and the true volume (all r>0.98). Conclusion: Single-plane Simpson's method is more accurate than single plane area-length method and biplane area-length method for left ventricular volume measurement; however, both the single-plane and biplane area-length methods could be used in clinical practice, especially in those imaging modality

  4. A Test Case for the Source Inversion Validation: The 2014 ML 5.5 Orkney, South Africa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, W. L.; Ogasawara, H.; Boettcher, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    The ML5.5 earthquake of August 5, 2014 occurred on a near-vertical strike slip fault below abandoned and active gold mines near Orkney, South Africa. A dense network of surface and in-mine seismometers recorded the earthquake and its aftershock sequence. In-situ stress measurements and rock samples through the damage zone and rupture surface are anticipated to be available from the "Drilling into Seismogenic Zones of M2.0-M5.5 Earthquakes in South African gold mines" project (DSeis) that is currently progressing toward the rupture zone (Science, doi: 10.1126/science.aan6905). As of 24 July, 95% of drilled core has been recovered from a 427m-section of the 1st hole from 2.9 km depth with minimal core discing and borehole breakouts. A 2nd hole is planned to intersect the fault at greater depth. Absolute differential stress will be measured along the holes and frictional characteristics of the recovered core will be determined in the lab. Surface seismic reflection data and exploration drilling from the surface down to the mining horizon at 3km depth is also available to calibrate the velocity structure above the mining horizon and image reflective geological boundaries and major faults below the mining horizon. The remarkable quality and range of geophysical data available for the Orkney earthquake makes this event an ideal test case for the Source Inversion Validation community using actual seismic data to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of earthquake rupture. We invite anyone with an interest in kinematic modeling to develop a rupture model for the Orkney earthquake. Seismic recordings of the earthquake and information on the faulting geometry can be found in Moyer et al. (2017, doi: 10.1785/0220160218). A workshop supported by the Southern California Earthquake Center will be held in the spring of 2018 to compare kinematic models. Those interested in participating in the modeling exercise and the workshop should contact the authors for additional

  5. Effect of immersion on lung capacities and volumes: implications for the densitometric estimation of relative body fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, R T; Hamdorf, P A

    1989-01-01

    Immersion of 18 male subjects in water caused a 20.4% (787 ml) increase (P less than 0.05) in the mean inspiratory capacity (IC) whereas there were no changes (P greater than 0.05) in tidal volume (VT) and the frequency of respiration. All the means for the other pulmonary variables decreased (P less than 0.05) by varying amounts: total lung capacity (TLC) = 8.4% (599 ml), vital capacity (VC) = 5.5% (308 ml), functional residual capacity (FRC) = 42.6% (1386 ml), expiratory reserve volume (ERV) = 61.9% (1095 ml) and residual volume (RV) = 19.7% (292 ml). Variation of only the RV in the body density (BD) formula from which the percentage body fat (%BF) is estimated resulted in a significantly (P less than 0.05) lower mean of 15.2% BF for the RV in air (means = 1482 ml) compared with that of 17.1% BF for the RV in water (means = 1190 ml). All but one of the subjects exhibited a smaller RV in water than in air; the six largest differences were equivalent to 2.4-5.1% BF. These results indicate that the net effect of the hydrostatic pressure (decreases RV), pulmonary vascular engorgement (decreases RV) and diminished compliance (increases RV) is to reduce the ventilated RV. It is therefore advisable to measure the RV when the subject is immersed in order to minimize error in the determination of BD and hence the estimation of % BF.

  6. Study of liver volume measurement and its clinical application for liver transplantation using multiple-slice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Zhiyi; Yu Zhefeng; Kuang Pingding; Xiao Shengxiang; Huang Dongsheng; Zheng Shusen; Wu Jian

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the accuracy of liver volume measurement using MSCT and its application in liver transplantation. Methods: (1) Experimental study. Ten pig livers were scanned using MSCT with two collimations (3.2 mm and 6.5 mm) and pitch 1.25. Semi-automatic method was used to reconstruct 3D liver models to measure the liver volume. (2) Clinical study. Twenty-three patients received MSCT scan with collimation of 6.5 mm before liver transplantation. Same method was used to calculate the liver volume and the measurement was repeated by the same observer after 1 month. Results: (1) Experimental study. Actual liver volumes were (1134.1 ± 288.0) ml. Liver volumes by MSCT with two collimations were (1125.0 ± 282.5) ml (3.2 mm) and (1101.6 ± 277.6) ml (6.5 mm). The accuracy was (99.5 ± 0.8)% and (97.4 ± 0.8)%, respectively. Both showed same good agreement with actual liver volume: r=0.999, P<0.01 (2) Clinical study. Actual liver volumes were (1455.7±730.0) ml. Liver volume by MSCT was (1462.7 ± 774.1) ml. The accuracy was (99.5±9.6)%, r=0.986, P<0.01. Liver volume measured again was (1449.4 ± 768.9) ml, r=0.991 (P<0.01). Conclusion: MSCT can assess the liver volume correctly, and could be used as a routine step for evaluations before liver transplantation

  7. Cartilage volume quantification with multi echo data image combination sequence in swine knee at 3.0 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lirong; Wang Dongqing; Wei Chuanshe; Ma Cong; Wang Dehang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of multi echo data imagine combination (MEDIC) sequence with water excitation at 3.0 T in swine knee cartilage. Methods: Sagittal MEDIC sequences (0.6 mm slice thickness, isotropic) were acquired twice at 3.0 T MRI in 30 swine knees. The knee cartilage was then removed and the volume was directly measured with water substitution method. The cartilage volume was also determined with a validated open source image software OsiriX by two observers (A and B). The cartilage volumes obtained by two methods were compared. The reproducibility of MEDIC for quantitative measurement was accessed by the root-mean-square (RMS) of variation coefficient. Interobserver and intraobserver precision errors were compared using a paired students t-test. The accuracy of MEDIC for quantitative measurement was determined by the random pairwise differences, systematic pairwise differences and the Pearson, correlation coefficients. Time of semiautomatic and manual segmentation were recorded. Results: Time was saved about 75% by using semiautomatic segmentation methods [(4.0± 1.5) min] versus manual segmentation [(16.0±0.9) min]. Interobserver precision errors (RMS CV% for paired analysis) between A and B for cartilage volume measurement were (2.66±0.82) ml and(2.61± 0.81) ml, t=0.24, P=0.81 (patella); (2.40±0.69) ml and (2.49±0.85) ml, t=-0.45, P=0.65 (medial femoral condyle); (2.28±0.74) ml and(2.41±0.78) ml, t=-0.66, P=0.51 (lateral femoral condyle); (3.43±1.28) ml and (3.51±1.08) ml, t=-0.26, P=0.79 (femora trochlea) with sagittal MEDIC. Intraobserver precision errors (RMS CV% for paired analysis) of observer A for the first and second cartilage volume measurement were (2.64±0.62) ml and (2.67±0.60) ml, t=-0.19, P=0.85 (patella); (2.43±0.60) ml and (2.39±0.59) ml, t=0.26, P=0.80 (medial femoral condyle); (2.26±0.56) ml and (2.30±0.57) ml, t=-0.27, P=0.78 (lateral femoral condyle); (3.40± 1.20) ml and (3.47±1

  8. What is the manner of gastric emptying after ingestion of liquids with differences in the volume under uniform glucose-based energy content?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Tadashi; Terashima, Hideo; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro

    2017-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that the gastric emptying rate of liquids chiefly depended on the total amount of calories (energy content) in a uniform volume. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of different volumes of liquids with a uniform energy content on gastric emptying. Three types of test solutions were prepared with a uniform amount of calories (200 kcal provided by glucose) and step-wise increments in volume (200 ml, 400 ml, and 600 ml). The gastric volume of each solution was determined by ultrasound measurements of the gastric antral cross-sectional area after their ingestion by 8 healthy volunteers. The mean gastric volume decreased exponentially to nearly 0 ml 70 min after ingestion in the 200 ml group, 90 min in the 400 ml group, and 100 min in the 600 ml group. Each gastric emptying curve converged with identical slopes on the graph when the points at which the gastric emptying curves of the 200 ml and 400 ml groups reached the zero point on the Y-axis (mean gastric volume) were shifted toward 110 min on the X-axis (time scale). The volume of liquid ingested with a uniform glucose-based energy content is a critical determinant of liquid gastric emptying. The gastric emptying time may be predicted following the ingestion of an isocaloric liquid with any volume over a predefined range once a gastric emptying curve following the ingestion of a liquid has been plotted on a graph. UMIN000014930. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  9. Mean nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the following nine parameters with respect to their prognostic value in females with endometrial cancer: four stereologic parameters [mean nuclear volume (MNV), nuclear volume fraction, nuclear index and mitotic index], the immunohistochemical expression of cancer antigen (CA125...

  10. Blood volume studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, S.M.; Yin, J.A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of dilution analysis with such radioisotopes as 51 Cr, 32 P, sup(99m)Tc and sup(113m)In for measuring red cell volume is reviewed briefly. The use of 125 I and 131 I for plasma volume studies is also considered and the subsequent determination of total blood volume discussed, together with the role of the splenic red cell volume. Substantial bibliography. (UK)

  11. 99mTc-albumin can replace 125I-albumin to determine plasma volume repeatedly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonfils, Peter K; Damgaard, Morten; Stokholm, Knud H

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Plasma volume assessment may be of importance in several disorders. The purpose of the present study was to compare the reliability of plasma volume measurements by technetium-labeled human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-HSA) with a simultaneously performed plasma volume determination...... with iodine-labeled human serum albumin ((125)I-HSA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 15 healthy volunteers, simultaneous plasma volume measurements with (99m)Tc-HSA and (125)I-HSA were performed after ½ hour in the supine position. Blood samples were obtained 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes after the injection...... for accurate retropolation from the plasma counts to time zero to correct for leakage of the isotopes from the circulation. RESULTS: The mean difference (bias) between plasma volume measured with (125)I-albumin and (99m)Tc-albumin was 8 ml (0.1 ml/kg) with limits of agreement (bias ±1.96 SD) ranging from -181...

  12. Timing of low tidal volume ventilation and intensive care unit mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome. A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Dale M; Yang, Ting; Dinglas, Victor D; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Shanholtz, Carl; Sevransky, Jonathan E; Brower, Roy G; Pronovost, Peter J; Colantuoni, Elizabeth

    2015-01-15

    Reducing tidal volume decreases mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the effect of the timing of low tidal volume ventilation is not well understood. To evaluate the association of intensive care unit (ICU) mortality with initial tidal volume and with tidal volume change over time. Multivariable, time-varying Cox regression analysis of a multisite, prospective study of 482 patients with ARDS with 11,558 twice-daily tidal volume assessments (evaluated in milliliter per kilogram of predicted body weight [PBW]) and daily assessment of other mortality predictors. An increase of 1 ml/kg PBW in initial tidal volume was associated with a 23% increase in ICU mortality risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.44; P = 0.008). Moreover, a 1 ml/kg PBW increase in subsequent tidal volumes compared with the initial tidal volume was associated with a 15% increase in mortality risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.02-1.29; P = 0.019). Compared with a prototypical patient receiving 8 days with a tidal volume of 6 ml/kg PBW, the absolute increase in ICU mortality (95% CI) of receiving 10 and 8 ml/kg PBW, respectively, across all 8 days was 7.2% (3.0-13.0%) and 2.7% (1.2-4.6%). In scenarios with variation in tidal volume over the 8-day period, mortality was higher when a larger volume was used earlier. Higher tidal volumes shortly after ARDS onset were associated with a greater risk of ICU mortality compared with subsequent tidal volumes. Timely recognition of ARDS and adherence to low tidal volume ventilation is important for reducing mortality. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00300248).

  13. The accuracy of ventricular volume measurement and the optimal slice thickness by using multislice helical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wei; Guo Yuyin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the optimal slice thickness for ventricular volume measurement by tomographic multislice Simpson's method and to evaluate the accuracy of ventricular volume measured by multislice helical computed tomography (MSCT) in human ventricular casts. Methods: Fourteen human left ventricular (LV) and 15 right ventricular (RV) casts were scanned with MSCT scanner by using a scanning protocol similar to clinical practice. A series of LV and RV short-axis images were reconstructed with slice thickness of 2 mm, 3.5 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, and 10 mm, respectively. Multislice Simpson's method was used to calculate LV and RV volumes and true cast volume was determined by water displacement. Results: The true LV and RV volumes were (55.57 ± 28.91) ml, and (64.23 ± 24.51) ml, respectively. The calculated volumes from different slice thickness ranged from (58.78 ± 28.93) ml to (68.15 ± 32.57) ml for LV casts, and (74.45 ± 27.81) ml to (88.14 ± 32.91) ml for RV casts, respectively. Both the calculated LV and RV volumes correlated closely with the corresponding true volumes (all r > 0.95, P<0.001), but overestimated the corresponding true volume by (3.21 ± 5.95) to (12.58 ± 8.56) ml for LV and (10.22 ± 8.45) to (23.91 ± 12.24) ml for RV (all P<0.01). There was a close correlation between the overestimation and the selected slice thickness for both LV and RV volume measurements (r=0.998 and 0.996, P<0.001). However, when slice thickness was reduced to 5.0 mm, the overestimation became nonsignificant for slice thickness through 2.0 mm to 5.0 mm, and also for both LV and RV volume measurements. Conclusion: Both LV and RV volumes can be accurately calculated with MSCT. A 5 mm slice thickness is enough and most efficient for accurate measurement of LV and RV volume. (authors)

  14. Association of thyroid gland volume, serum insulin-like growth factor-I, and anthropometric variables in euthyroid prepubertal children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    . DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A total of 859 prepubertal euthyroid Danish children aged 4-9 yr underwent a thorough clinical investigation, including anthropometrical measurements and determination of TSH, thyroid hormones, autoantibodies, urinary iodine excretion, and thyroid volume (TV) by ultrasound....... Longitudinal growth data from birth were available. RESULTS: TV increased significantly with age (r = 0.487; P TV +/- sd for different age groups were as follows: 4 yr, 2.2 +/- 1.4 ml; 5 yr, 2.5 +/- 1.3 ml; 6 yr, 2.8 +/- 1.3 ml; 7 yr, 3.2 +/- 1.3 ml; 8 yr, 3.5 +/- 1.3 ml; 9 yr, 3.7 +/- 1.3 ml....... We found a significant positive association between IGF-I and TV (P

  15. Left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes as measured by 3D echocardiography and ultrafast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Nomura, Cesar H.; Tranchesi Junior, Bernardino; Oliveira, Wercules A. de; Naccarato, Gustavo; Serpa, Bruna S.; Passos, Rodrigo B.D.; Funari, Marcelo B. G.; Fischer, Claudio H.; Morhy, Samira S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT-3D-Echo) and ultrafast computed tomography (CT) are two novel methods for the analysis of LV ejection fraction and volumes. Objective: To compare LVEF and volume measurements as obtained using RT-3D-Echo and ultrafast CT. Methods: Thirty nine consecutive patients (27 men, mean age of 57+- 12 years) were studied using RT-3D-Echo and 64-slice ultrafast CT. LVEF and LV volumes were analyzed. Statistical analysis: coefficient of correlation (r: Pearson), Bland-Altman analysis, linear regression analysis, 95% CI, p 5 .58)%; end-diastolic volume ranged from 49.6 to 178.2 (87+-27.8) ml; end-systolic volume ranged from 11.4 to 78 (33.1+-13.6) ml. CT scan measurements: LVEF ranged from 53 to 86% (67.8+-7.78); end-diastolic volume ranged from 51 to 186 (106.5+-30.3) ml; end-systolic volume ranged from 7 to 72 (35.5+-13.4)ml. Correlations between RT-3D-Echo and CT were: LVEF (r: 0.7888, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.6301 to 0.8843); end-diastolic volume (r: 0.7695, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.5995 to 0.8730); end-systolic volume (r: 0.8119, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.6673 to 0.8975). Conclusion: Good correlation between LVEF and ventricular volume parameters as measured by RT-3D-Echo and 64-slice ultrafast CT was found in the present case series. (author)

  16. Pathological Outcome following Radical Prostatectomy in Men with Prostate Specific Antigen Greater than 10 ng/ml and Histologically Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiwoong; Kwon, Young Suk; Kim, Sinae; Han, Christopher Sejong; Farber, Nicholas; Kim, Jongmyung; Byun, Seok Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Jeon, Seong Soo; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2016-05-01

    Active surveillance is now the treatment of choice in men with low risk prostate cancer. Although there is no consensus on which patients are eligible for active surveillance, prostate specific antigen above 10 ng/ml is generally excluded. In an attempt to determine the validity of using a prostate specific antigen cutoff of 10 ng/ml to counsel men considering active surveillance we analyzed a multi-institution database to determine the pathological outcome in men with prostate specific antigen greater than 10 ng/ml but histologically favorable risk prostate cancer. We queried a prospectively maintained database of men with histologically favorable risk prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy between 2003 and 2015. The cohort was categorized into 3 groups based on prostate specific antigen level, including low-less than 10 ng/ml, intermediate-10 or greater to less than 20 and high-20 or greater. Associations of prostate specific antigen group with adverse pathological and oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Of 2,125 patients 1,327 were categorized with histologically favorable risk disease. However on multivariate analyses the rates of up staging and upgrading were similar between the intermediate and low prostate specific antigen groups. In contrast compared to the intermediate prostate specific antigen group the high group had higher incidences of up staging (p = 0.02) and upgrading to 4 + 3 or greater disease (p = 0.046). Biochemical recurrence-free survival rates revealed no pairwise intergroup differences except between the low and high groups. Patients with preoperatively elevated prostate specific antigen between 10 and less than 20 ng/ml who otherwise had histologically favorable risk prostate cancer were not at higher risk for adverse pathological outcomes than men with prostate specific antigen less than 10 ng/ml. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ground motion response to an ML 4.3 earthquake using co-located distributed acoustic sensing and seismometer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Herbert F.; Zeng, Xiangfang; Miller, Douglas E.; Fratta, Dante; Feigl, Kurt L.; Thurber, Clifford H.; Mellors, Robert J.

    2018-06-01

    The PoroTomo research team deployed two arrays of seismic sensors in a natural laboratory at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada in March 2016. The 1500 m (length) × 500 m (width) × 400 m (depth) volume of the laboratory overlies a geothermal reservoir. The distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) array consisted of about 8400 m of fiber-optic cable in a shallow trench and 360 m in a well. The conventional seismometer array consisted of 238 shallowly buried three-component geophones. The DAS cable was laid out in three parallel zig-zag lines with line segments approximately 100 m in length and geophones were spaced at approximately 60 m intervals. Both DAS and conventional geophones recorded continuously over 15 d during which a moderate-sized earthquake with a local magnitude of 4.3 was recorded on 2016 March 21. Its epicentre was approximately 150 km south-southeast of the laboratory. Several DAS line segments with co-located geophone stations were used to compare signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in both time and frequency domains and to test relationships between DAS and geophone data. The ratios were typically within a factor of five of each other with DAS SNR often greater for P-wave but smaller for S-wave relative to geophone SNR. The SNRs measured for an earthquake can be better than for active sources because the earthquake signal contains more low-frequency energy and the noise level is also lower at those lower frequencies. Amplitudes of the sum of several DAS strain-rate waveforms matched the finite difference of two geophone waveforms reasonably well, as did the amplitudes of DAS strain waveforms with particle-velocity waveforms recorded by geophones. Similar agreement was found between DAS and geophone observations and synthetic strain seismograms. The combination of good SNR in the seismic frequency band, high-spatial density, large N and highly accurate time control among individual sensors suggests that DAS arrays have potential to assume a role in earthquake

  18. Seasonal variations in the volume of the haemolymph and body weight of the horseshoe crab, Tachypleus gigas (Muller)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Rathod, V.; Parulekar, A.H.

    in sizes between 121-140 mm. An inverse relationship was observed between the volume of haemolymph and salinity of the environment. Maximum volume of haemolymph (57.3 ml) in females was observed when the salinity of the environment was low in October...

  19. Radionuclide method for blood volume determination in kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trindev, P.; Nikolov, D.; Shejretova, E.; Garcheva-Tsacheva, M.

    1989-01-01

    The method is applied in nephrology for diagnosing changes in blood circulation of the kidneys. The blood volume of each kidney is determined separately by perfusion angioscintigraphy (PAS) with improved accuracy. The method consists in intravenous injection of 300-450 MBq 99m Tc for in-vivo labelling of the erythrocytes. About 30 images are registered every 2 sec, and through zones of interest perfusion histograms of kidneys are derived. Ten minutes later kidneys images (one full-face and two profiles) are registered. Correction coefficients for kidneys depth are derived and the activities registered according to full-face images and amplitudes of perfusion histograms are corrected. The activity of 1 ml blood is determined from blood sample of the patient. The blood volume of each kidney is expressed as a ratio of the activity corrected for background and depth and the activity of 1 ml blood of the sample. 1 claim

  20. Evaluation of right ventricular volume and function by 2D and 3D echocardiography compared to MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Petersen, Claus Leth; Kjaer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    : Thirty-four subjects with (a) prior inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction (n=17), (b) a history of pulmonary embolism and persistent dyspnea (n=7) or (c) normal subjects (n=10) had 2D and 3D echocardiography, SPECT and MRI within 24h. End-diastolic volume and peak tricuspid regurgitation velocity...... were increased in patients with a history of pulmonary embolism compared to healthy subjects, 130+/-26 ml vs. 94+/-26 ml, P... volume showed significant correlation to RV volumes by MRI. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) had the better correlation to RVEF by MRI, r=0.48, P

  1. Therapeutic hip injections: Is the injection volume important?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.; Harding, J.; Kingsly, A.; Bradley, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess whether an increased volume of local anaesthetic injection given with intra-articular steroids improves symptom relief in osteoarthritis of the hip. Materials and methods: One hundred and ten patients with hip osteoarthritis were randomized into two groups (A and B). All patients were given 40 mg triamcinolone and 2 ml bupivicaine, and patients from group B were also given 6 ml of sterile water for injection. Change in WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index Version 3.1) scores from baseline to 3 months were calculated and assessed for clinical and statistical significance. The patients were assessed for pain at 2 weekly intervals using the Oxford pain chart. Results: Patients from group B showed some reduction in stiffness (7%) and improved function (3%) compared with group A, and there were more clinical responders in these two categories. However, there was no significant statistical or clinical difference in WOMAC scores between the two groups at 3 months. There was also no statistical difference in pain symptoms between the two groups during the study period, measured at 2 weekly intervals. One hundred and two patients reached the study endpoint; eight patients who had bilateral hip injections were subsequently included in the analysis, and these patients did not alter the findings significantly. Conclusions: Published total injection volumes used for treating osteoarthritis of the hip with intra-articular steroids vary from 3 to 12 ml. The present study has shown that there is no detriment to using a larger volume of injectate, and recommends that practitioners use total volumes between 3 and 9 ml.

  2. Therapeutic hip injections: Is the injection volume important?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, R., E-mail: russell.young@gwh.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Great Western Hospital, Swindon (United Kingdom); Harding, J. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Coventry, Coventry (United Kingdom); Kingsly, A. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Bristol Institue of Technology, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom); Bradley, M. [Department of Radiology, Southmead Hospital, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    Aim: To assess whether an increased volume of local anaesthetic injection given with intra-articular steroids improves symptom relief in osteoarthritis of the hip. Materials and methods: One hundred and ten patients with hip osteoarthritis were randomized into two groups (A and B). All patients were given 40 mg triamcinolone and 2 ml bupivicaine, and patients from group B were also given 6 ml of sterile water for injection. Change in WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index Version 3.1) scores from baseline to 3 months were calculated and assessed for clinical and statistical significance. The patients were assessed for pain at 2 weekly intervals using the Oxford pain chart. Results: Patients from group B showed some reduction in stiffness (7%) and improved function (3%) compared with group A, and there were more clinical responders in these two categories. However, there was no significant statistical or clinical difference in WOMAC scores between the two groups at 3 months. There was also no statistical difference in pain symptoms between the two groups during the study period, measured at 2 weekly intervals. One hundred and two patients reached the study endpoint; eight patients who had bilateral hip injections were subsequently included in the analysis, and these patients did not alter the findings significantly. Conclusions: Published total injection volumes used for treating osteoarthritis of the hip with intra-articular steroids vary from 3 to 12 ml. The present study has shown that there is no detriment to using a larger volume of injectate, and recommends that practitioners use total volumes between 3 and 9 ml.

  3. Rectal compliance as a routine measurement: extreme volumes have direct clinical impact and normal volumes exclude rectum as a problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt-Bersma, R J; Sloots, C E; Poen, A C; Cuesta, M A; Meuwissen, S G

    2000-12-01

    The clinical impact of rectal compliance and sensitivity measurement is not clear. The aim of this study was to measure the rectal compliance in different patient groups compared with controls and to establish the clinical effect of rectal compliance. Anorectal function tests were performed in 974 consecutive patients (284 men). Normal values were obtained from 24 controls. Rectal compliance measurement was performed by filling a latex rectal balloon with water at a rate of 60 ml per minute. Volume and intraballoon pressure were measured. Volume and pressure at three sensitivity thresholds were recorded for analysis: first sensation, urge, and maximal toleration. At maximal toleration, the rectal compliance (volume/pressure) was calculated. Proctoscopy, anal manometry, anal mucosal sensitivity, and anal endosonography were also performed as part of our anorectal function tests. No effect of age or gender was observed in either controls or patients. Patients with fecal incontinence had a higher volume at first sensation and a higher pressure at maximal toleration (P = 0.03), the presence of a sphincter defect or low or normal anal pressures made no difference. Patients with constipation had a larger volume at first sensation and urge (P 500 ml had complaints of constipation. No correlation between rectal and anal mucosal sensitivity was found. Rectal compliance measurement with a latex balloon is easily feasible. In this series of 974 patients, some patient groups showed an abnormal rectal visceral sensitivity and compliance, but there was an overlap with controls. Rectal compliance measurement gave a good clinical impression about the contribution of the rectum to the anorectal problem. Patients with proctitis and pouchitis had the smallest rectal compliance. A maximal toleration volume 500 ml was only seen in constipated patients, and therapy should be given to prevent further damage to the pelvic floor. Values close to or within the normal range rule out the

  4. Assessment of tidal volume and thoracoabdominal motion using volume and flow-oriented incentive spirometers in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.F. Parreira

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate incentive spirometers using volume- (Coach and Voldyne and flow-oriented (Triflo II and Respirex devices. Sixteen healthy subjects, 24 ± 4 years, 62 ± 12 kg, were studied. Respiratory variables were obtained by respiratory inductive plethysmography, with subjects in a semi-reclined position (45º. Tidal volume, respiratory frequency, minute ventilation, inspiratory duty cycle, mean inspiratory flow, and thoracoabdominal motion were measured. Statistical analysis was performed with Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, t-test and ANOVA. Comparison between the Coach and Voldyne devices showed that larger values of tidal volume (1035 ± 268 vs 947 ± 268 ml, P = 0.02 and minute ventilation (9.07 ± 3.61 vs 7.49 ± 2.58 l/min, P = 0.01 were reached with Voldyne, whereas no significant differences in respiratory frequency were observed (7.85 ± 1.24 vs 8.57 ± 1.89 bpm. Comparison between flow-oriented devices showed larger values of inspiratory duty cycle and lower mean inspiratory flow with Triflo II (0.35 ± 0.05 vs 0.32 ± 0.05 ml/s, P = 0.00, and 531 ± 137 vs 606 ± 167 ml/s, P = 0.00, respectively. Abdominal motion was larger (P < 0.05 during the use of volume-oriented devices compared to flow-oriented devices (52 ± 11% for Coach and 50 ± 9% for Voldyne; 43 ± 13% for Triflo II and 44 ± 14% for Respirex. We observed that significantly higher tidal volume associated with low respiratory frequency was reached with Voldyne, and that there was a larger abdominal displacement with volume-oriented devices.

  5. Epidural anesthesia, hypotension, and changes in intravascular volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Foss, Nicolai B; Svensén, Christer

    2004-01-01

    receiving hydroxyethyl starch. RESULTS: Plasma volume did not change per se after thoracic epidural anesthesia despite a decrease in blood pressure. Plasma volume increased with fluid administration but remained unchanged with vasopressors despite that both treatments had similar hemodynamic effects...... constant was 56 ml/min. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic epidural anesthesia per se does not lead to changes in blood volumes despite a reduction in blood pressure. When fluid is infused, there is a dilution, and the fluid initially seems to be located centrally. Because administration of hydroxyethyl starch......BACKGROUND: The most common side effect of epidural or spinal anesthesia is hypotension with functional hypovolemia prompting fluid infusions or administration of vasopressors. Short-term studies (20 min) in patients undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia suggest that plasma volume may increase when...

  6. Influence of calcium acetate on rye bread volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina FUCKERER

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The positive accepted savoury taste of rye bread is dependent on acetate concentration in the dough of such breads. In order to study how calcium acetate influences rye bread properties, the pH of rye doughs fortified with calcium acetate and the resulting volume of the breads were measured. Furthermore, CO2 formation of yeast with added calcium acetate and yeast with different pH levels (4, 7, 9 were measured. Thereby, it was determined that the addition of calcium acetate increased the pH of dough from 4.42 to 5.29 and significantly reduced the volume of the breads from 1235.19 mL to 885.52 mL. It could be proven that bread volume was affected by a 30.9% lower CO2 amount production of yeast, although bread volume was not affected by changing pH levels. Due to reduced bread volume, high concentrations of calcium acetate additions are not recommended for improving rye bread taste.

  7. Effects of body position and extension of the neck and extremities on lung volume measured via computed tomography in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Christoph; Drees, Randi; Sladky, Kurt K; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Kircher, Patrick R

    2013-10-15

    To determine the effects of body position and extension of the neck and extremities on CT measurements of ventilated lung volume in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans). Prospective crossover-design study. 14 adult red-eared slider turtles. CT was performed on turtles in horizontal ventral recumbent and vertical left lateral recumbent, right lateral recumbent, and caudal recumbent body positions. In sedated turtles, evaluations were performed in horizontal ventral recumbent body position with and without extension of the neck and extremities. Lung volumes were estimated from helical CT images with commercial software. Effects of body position, extremity and neck extension, sedation, body weight, and sex on lung volume were analyzed. Mean ± SD volume of dependent lung tissue was significantly decreased in vertical left lateral (18.97 ± 14.65 mL), right lateral (24.59 ± 19.16 mL), and caudal (9.23 ± 12.13 mL) recumbent positions, compared with the same region for turtles in horizontal ventral recumbency (48.52 ± 20.08 mL, 50.66 ± 18.08 mL, and 31.95 ± 15.69 mL, respectively). Total lung volume did not differ among positions because of compensatory increases in nondependent lung tissue. Extension of the extremities and neck significantly increased total lung volume (127.94 ± 35.53 mL), compared with that in turtles with the head, neck, and extremities withdrawn into the shell (103.24 ± 40.13 mL). Vertical positioning of red-eared sliders significantly affected lung volumes and could potentially affect interpretation of radiographs obtained in these positions. Extension of the extremities and neck resulted in the greatest total lung volume.

  8. Determination of the autonomously functioning volume of the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emrich, D.; Erlenmaier, U.; Pohl, M.; Luig, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the autonomously functioning volume in euthyroid and hyperthyroid goitres for prognostic and therapeutic pruposes. To this end, various groups of patients were selected: Individuals without evidence of thyroid disease, euthyroid patients with diffuse goitre of normal structure and function, euthyroid patients with evidence of autonomy and patients with hyperthyroidism due to autonomy. In all of them the thyroid uptake of Technetium-99m was determined under exogeneous suppression (TcU s ) in the euthyroid state and under endogenous suppression (TcU) in the hyperthyroid state. It was demonstrated that: 1. In patients with unifocal autonomy the TcU s and TcU correlated linearly with the autonomous volume delineated and measured by sonography. 2. A nearly identical result was obtained if the mean autonomous volume in individuals without thyroid disease of 2.2±1.1 ml calculated by TcU s /TcU x total thyroid volume was used as a basis. 3. The critical autonomous volume, i.e. the volume at which hyperthryroidism will occur, was found to be 16 ml at a cumulated sensitivity and specificity of >0.9. The method can be used to select patients for definitive treatment before hyperthryroidism occurs and to measure the autonomously functioning volume independent of its distribution within the thyroid for treatment with radioiodine. The method is easy to perform and is also an example of how a relative parameter of a function can be converted into an absolute parameter of a functioning volume. (orig.)

  9. SAND ML: Software para el diagnóstico y control de información de máquinas eléctricas rotatorias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago A Dorrbercker Drake

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available SAND ML es un software de aplicación que automatiza los procesos asociados a: inventarios yprocesamiento de la información según lo establecido en las normas y procedimientos para el diagnósticode máquinas eléctricas rotatorias, aprobadas por la Unión de la Electricidad de la República de Cuba. Elmismo está concebido en una implementación cliente-servidor, lo cual posibilita, entre otros aspectos, laexistencia de una base de datos a la cual fluye la información procedente de diferentes ensayos viabilizandoasí la emisión de diagnósticos de estado; por otra parte, SAND ML permite al usuario estimar los períodosde muestreo más aconsejables para la repetición de ensayos o ejecución de mantenimientos.  SAND ML is an application software which automates the process related to: Inventories and infor-mationprocessing according to Cuban Standards and Procedures of Electric Rotating Machines Diagnostic.This software has been conceived in a client-server conception. This offers us an updated data base. Inthe other hand, SAND ML gives technical diagnostic and working service prognosis. All those allows tomanagers make a proper decision about maintenance.

  10. Pancířníci (Acari: Oribatida) NPR Brouskův mlýn, Jižní Čechy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starý, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 45, - (2005), s. 113-123 ISSN 0139-8172 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SE/620/2/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : oribatid mites * Nature Reserve Brouskův mlýn Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exposed to Lassa Virus and to the Attenuated Mopeia/Lassa Reassortant 29 (ML29), a Vaccine Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan Carlos; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L.; Crasta, Oswald; Zhang, Yan; Mani, Sachin; Jett, Marti; Poonia, Bhawna; Djavani, Mahmoud; White, David M.; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV) are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG), as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease. PMID:24069471

  12. Transcriptome analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to Lassa virus and to the attenuated Mopeia/Lassa reassortant 29 (ML29, a vaccine candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Zapata

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG, as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease.

  13. Evaluation of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer in Patients with Prostate-specific Antigen <20 ng/ml

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The PI-RADS score correlates with the PCa detection rate in patients with PSA <20 ng/ml. The summed score of T2WI + DWI has the highest accuracy in detection of PCa. However, the sensitivity should be further improved.

  14. Assessment of volume and leak measurements during CPAP using a neonatal lung model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H S; Roehr, C C; Proquitté, H; Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    2008-01-01

    Although several commercial devices are available which allow tidal volume and air leak monitoring during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in neonates, little is known about their measurement accuracy and about the influence of air leaks on volume measurement. The aim of this in vitro study was the validation of volume and leak measurement under CPAP using a commercial ventilatory device, taking into consideration the clinical conditions in neonatology. The measurement accuracy of the Leoni ventilator (Heinen and Löwenstein, Germany) was investigated both in a leak-free system and with leaks simulated using calibration syringes (2–10 ml, 20–100 ml) and a mechanical lung model. Open tubes of variable lengths were connected for leak simulation. Leak flow was measured with the flow-through technique. In a leak-free system the mean relative volume error ±SD was 3.5 ± 2.6% (2–10 ml) and 5.9 ± 0.7% (20–60 ml), respectively. The influence of CPAP level, driving flow, respiratory rate and humidification of the breathing gas on the volume error was negligible. However, an increasing F i O 2 caused the measured tidal volume to increase by up to 25% (F i O 2 = 1.0). The relative error ±SD of the leak measurements was −0.2 ± 11.9%. For leaks >19%, measured tidal volume was underestimated by more than 10%. In conclusion, the present in vitro study showed that the Leoni allowed accurate volume monitoring under CPAP conditions similar to neonates. Air leaks of up to 90% of patient flow were reliably detected. For an F i O 2 >0.4 and for leaks >19%, a numerical correction of the displayed volume should be performed

  15. Assessment of volume and leak measurements during CPAP using a neonatal lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, H S; Roehr, C C; Proquitté, H; Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    2008-01-01

    Although several commercial devices are available which allow tidal volume and air leak monitoring during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in neonates, little is known about their measurement accuracy and about the influence of air leaks on volume measurement. The aim of this in vitro study was the validation of volume and leak measurement under CPAP using a commercial ventilatory device, taking into consideration the clinical conditions in neonatology. The measurement accuracy of the Leoni ventilator (Heinen & Löwenstein, Germany) was investigated both in a leak-free system and with leaks simulated using calibration syringes (2-10 ml, 20-100 ml) and a mechanical lung model. Open tubes of variable lengths were connected for leak simulation. Leak flow was measured with the flow-through technique. In a leak-free system the mean relative volume error +/-SD was 3.5 +/- 2.6% (2-10 ml) and 5.9 +/- 0.7% (20-60 ml), respectively. The influence of CPAP level, driving flow, respiratory rate and humidification of the breathing gas on the volume error was negligible. However, an increasing F(i)O(2) caused the measured tidal volume to increase by up to 25% (F(i)O(2) = 1.0). The relative error +/- SD of the leak measurements was -0.2 +/- 11.9%. For leaks > 19%, measured tidal volume was underestimated by more than 10%. In conclusion, the present in vitro study showed that the Leoni allowed accurate volume monitoring under CPAP conditions similar to neonates. Air leaks of up to 90% of patient flow were reliably detected. For an F(i)O(2) > 0.4 and for leaks > 19%, a numerical correction of the displayed volume should be performed.

  16. Volume regulation in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    to amphibian skin and mammalian cortical collecting tubule of low and intermediate osmotic permeability. Crosstalk between entrance and exit mechanisms interferes with volume regulation both at aniso-osmotic and iso-osmotic volume perturbations. It has been proposed that cell volume regulation is an intrinsic...... regulation are cloned. The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) exhibiting specific electrophysiological characteristics seems exclusive to serve cell volume regulation. This is contrary to K+ channels as well as cotransporters and exchange mechanisms that may serve both transepithelial transport and cell...... volume regulation. In the same cell, these functions may be maintained by different ion pathways that are separately regulated. RVD is often preceded by increase in cytosolic free Ca2+, probably via influx through TRP channels, but Ca2+ release from intracellular stores has also been observed. Cell...

  17. Changes in circulating blood volume after infusion of hydroxyethyl starch 6% in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P; Andersson, J; Rasmussen, S E

    2001-01-01

    The cardiovascular response to a volume challenge with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) (200/0.5) 6% depends on the relation between the volume of HES 6% infused and the expansion of the blood volume in critically ill patients. However, only relatively limited data exist on the plasma expanding effect...... of infusion of HES 6% in critically ill patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the variation in the expansion of the circulating blood volume (CBV) in critically ill patients after infusion of 500 ml of colloid (HES (200/0.5) 6%) using the carbon monoxide method....

  18. Uncertainty associated with assessing semen volume: are volumetric and gravimetric methods that different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Bryan; Gossen, Nicole; Meadows, Jessica; Tomlinson, Mathew

    2016-12-01

    The World Health Organization laboratory manual for the examination of human semen suggests that an indirect measurement of semen volume by weighing (gravimetric method) is more accurate than a direct measure using a serological pipette. A series of experiments were performed to determine the level of discrepancy between the two methods using pipettes and a balance which had been calibrated to a traceable standard. The median weights of 1.0ml and 5.0ml of semen were 1.03 g (range 1.02-1.05 g) and 5.11 g (range 4.95-5.16 g), respectively, suggesting a density for semen between 1.03g and 1.04 g/ml. When the containers were re-weighed after the removal of 5.0 ml semen using a serological pipette, the mean residual loss was 0.12 ml (120 μl) or 0.12 g (median 100 μl, range 70-300 μl). Direct comparison of the volumetric and gravimetric methods in a total of 40 samples showed a mean difference of 0.25ml (median 0.32 ± 0.67ml) representing an error of 8.5%. Residual semen left in the container by weight was on average 0.11 g (median 0.10 g, range 0.05-0.19 g). Assuming a density of 1 g/ml then the average error between volumetric and gravimetric methods was approximately 8% (p gravimetric measurement of semen volume. Laboratories may therefore prefer to provide in-house quality assurance data in order to be satisfied that 'estimating' semen volume is 'fit for purpose' as opposed to assuming a lower uncertainty associated with the WHO recommended method.

  19. Volume 9 Number 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    the villages by a variety of small scale methods into many different products that cater for the local preferences and for industrial use. The popular form in which cassava is eaten in West Africa is in a ... weighed using analytical weighing balance and added to 10 ml of sterile distilled water in a test tube. The content was then ...

  20. Conformal technique dose escalation in prostate cancer: improved cancer control with higher doses in patients with pretreatment PSA {>=} 10 ngm/ml

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, G E; Lee, W R; Hanlon, A L; Kaplan, E; Epstein, B; Schultheiss, T

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Single institutions and an NCI supported group of institutions have been investigating the value of dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer treated by conformal treatment techniques. Improvement in morbidity has been previously established, while this report identifies the pretreatment PSA level subgroups of patients who benefitted in cancer control from higher dose. Materials and Methods: We report actuarial bNED survival rates for 375 consecutive patients with known pretreatment PSA levels treated with conformal technique between 5/89 and 12/93. The whole pelvis was treated to 45 Gy in 25 fractions in all T2C,3, all Gleason 8, 9, 10 and all patients with pretreatment PSA {>=}20. The prostate {+-} seminal vesicles was boosted at 2.1 Gy/day to the center of the prostate to 65-79 Gy (65-69 N=50), 70-72.49 N=94, 72.5-74.9 N=82, 75-77.49 N=129 and {>=}77.5 N=20). The median followup is 21 mos with a range of 3 to 67 mos. The highest dose patients have the least followup, reducing the impact of the highest dose levels at this time. Patients are analyzed for the entire group divided at 71 Gy and at 73 Gy calculated at the center of the prostate. Each dose group is then subdivided by pretreatment PSA levels <10, 10-19.9, and {>=}20 ngm/ml and dose levels are compared within pretreatment PSA level group. bNED failure is defined as PSA {>=}1.5 ngm/ml and rising on two consecutive values. Results: Table 1 shows the bNED survival rates at 24 and 36 mos for all patients and the three pretreatment PSA level groups. For all patients pooled, there is an overall advantage to using doses {>=}71 Gy (64% vs 85% at 36 mo, p=.006) and {>=}73 Gy (71% vs 86% at 36 mo, p=.07). The subgroup of PSA <10 ngm/ml, however, shows no benefit in bNED survival when using doses over 71 Gy (90% vs 93% at 36 mo) or 73 Gy (91 vs 94% at 36 mo). The subgroup PSA 10 ngm/ml to 19.9 ngm/ml shows improved cancer control when using doses over 71 Gy (61% vs 88% at 36 mo, p=.03) and over 73

  1. Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) significantly improve prostate cancer detection at initial biopsy in a total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; Bruzzese, Dario; Perdonà, Sisto; Marino, Ada; Mazzarella, Claudia; Perruolo, Giuseppe; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Chun, Felix K; Terracciano, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Many efforts to reduce prostate specific antigen (PSA) overdiagnosis and overtreatment have been made. To this aim, Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) have been proposed as new more specific biomarkers. We evaluated the ability of phi and PCA3 to identify prostate cancer (PCa) at initial prostate biopsy in men with total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml. The performance of phi and PCA3 were evaluated in 300 patients undergoing first prostate biopsy. ROC curve analyses tested the accuracy (AUC) of phi and PCA3 in predicting PCa. Decision curve analyses (DCA) were used to compare the clinical benefit of the two biomarkers. We found that the AUC value of phi (0.77) was comparable to those of %p2PSA (0.76) and PCA3 (0.73) with no significant differences in pairwise comparison (%p2PSA vs phi p = 0.673, %p2PSA vs. PCA3 p = 0.417 and phi vs. PCA3 p = 0.247). These three biomarkers significantly outperformed fPSA (AUC = 0.60), % fPSA (AUC = 0.62) and p2PSA (AUC = 0.63). At DCA, phi and PCA3 exhibited a very close net benefit profile until the threshold probability of 25%, then phi index showed higher net benefit than PCA3. Multivariable analysis showed that the addition of phi and PCA3 to the base multivariable model (age, PSA, %fPSA, DRE, prostate volume) increased predictive accuracy, whereas no model improved single biomarker performance. Finally we showed that subjects with active surveillance (AS) compatible cancer had significantly lower phi and PCA3 values (pphi and PCA3 comparably increase the accuracy in predicting the presence of PCa in total PSA range 2-10 ng/ml at initial biopsy, outperforming currently used %fPSA.

  2. Therapeutic significance of a D-dimer cut-off level of >3 μg/ml in colorectal cancer patients treated with standard chemotherapy plus bevacizumab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Satoshi; Yoshino, Takayuki; Kojima, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism has been reported to increase when receiving bevacizumab. Many cancer patients are reported to have elevated D-dimer levels. It is not clear what D-dimer level might indicate an increased risk of venous thromboembolism in the colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy. The D-dimer levels and any event concurrent with an elevated D-dimer level were evaluated in patients receiving bevacizumab. The D-dimer cut-off level was determined using the receiver-operating characteristic analysis. The selection criteria were as follows: histologically proven metastatic and unresectable colorectal adenocarcinoma; no prior chemotherapy containing bevacizumab; D-dimer test performed repetitively on the baseline and during bevacizumab administration; no venous thromboembolism identified at the baseline; and enhanced computed tomographic scan performed every 2 months. Sixty-nine patients were included. The chemotherapy regimens with bevacizumab included the regimen of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), the regimen of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan (FOLFIRI), and leucovorin-modulated 5-fluorouracil. The median baseline D-dimer level was 1.2 μg/ml. The appropriate D-dimer cut-off level was 3 μg/ml with the negative predictive value of 98% and relative risk of 6.9. Twenty-one of 69 patients showed elevated D-dimer levels of >3 μg/ml, with 11 patients for unknown reasons, 6 with tumor progression, 3 with venous thromboembolism and 1 with sepsis. In the remaining 48 patients whose D-dimer levels were ≤3 μg/ml, only one patient developed a venous thromboembolism. A D-dimer cut-off level of 3 μg/ml might be a useful indicator level to exclude venous thromboembolism or show an increased risk for venous thromboembolism in colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy. (author)

  3. Right atrial volume calculated by multi-detector computed tomography. Useful predictor of atrial fibrillation recurrence after pulmonary vein catheter ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kyouichi; Akutsu, Yasushi; Kodama, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether right atrial (RA) volume could be used to predict the recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after pulmonary vein catheter ablation (CA). We evaluated 65 patients with paroxysmal AF (mean age, 60+10 years, 81.5% male) and normal volunteers (57±14 years, 41.7% male). Sixty-four-slice multi-detector computed tomography was performed for left atrial (LA) and RA volume estimations before CA. The recurrence of AF was assessed for 6 months after the ablation. Both left and right atrial volumes were larger in the AF patients than the normal volunteers (LA: 99.7+33.2 ml vs. 59.7+17.4 ml; RA: 82.9+35.7 ml vs. 43.9+12 ml; P 100 ml) for predicting the recurrence of AF was 81.3% in 13 of 16 patients with AF recurrence, and the specificity was 69.4% in 34 of 49 patients without recurrence. The sensitivity with large RA volumes (>87 ml) was 81.3% in 13 of 16 patients with AF recurrence, and the specificity was 75.5% in 37 of 49 patients without recurrence. RA volume is a useful predictor of the recurrence of AF, similar to LA volume. (author)

  4. Measuring tongue volumes and visualizing the chewing and swallowing process using real-time TrueFISP imaging - initial clinical experience in healthy volunteers and patients with acromegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajaj, W.; Goyen, M.; Herrmann, B.; Massing, S.; Goehde, S.; Lauenstein, T.; Ruehm, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed both two-dimensional (2D) TrueFISP imaging for quantifying tongue volume and real-time TrueFISP imaging for evaluating chewing and swallowing in healthy volunteers and patients with acromegaly. In 50 healthy volunteers, tongue volumes were measured using a 2D TrueFISP sequence. Chewing and swallowing were visualized using a real-time TrueFISP sequence. Ten patients with acromegaly were examined twice with the same magnetic resonance imaging protocol: once prior to therapy and a second time 6 months after therapy. Prior to therapy, healthy volunteers had an average tongue volume of 140 ml for men and 90 ml for women, and patients with acromegaly had an average tongue volume of 180 ml for men and 145 ml for women. However, 6 months after therapy the mean tongue volumes in patients with acromegaly had decreased to 154 ml in the men and to 125 ml in the women. The chewing and swallowing process was normal in all volunteers. Prior to therapy, just two patients showed a chewing and swallowing pathology, which disappeared after therapy. Patients with acromegaly had larger tongue volumes than healthy volunteers, and TrueFISP imaging proved feasible for visualizing chewing and swallowing in real time and is capable of detecting possible pathologies. Furthermore, TrueFISP imaging can be used to monitor therapeutic approaches in patients with acromegaly. (orig.)

  5. Measuring tongue volumes and visualizing the chewing and swallowing process using real-time TrueFISP imaging - initial clinical experience in healthy volunteers and patients with acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajaj, W.; Goyen, M.; Herrmann, B.; Massing, S.; Goehde, S.; Lauenstein, T.; Ruehm, S.G. [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Essen (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    This study assessed both two-dimensional (2D) TrueFISP imaging for quantifying tongue volume and real-time TrueFISP imaging for evaluating chewing and swallowing in healthy volunteers and patients with acromegaly. In 50 healthy volunteers, tongue volumes were measured using a 2D TrueFISP sequence. Chewing and swallowing were visualized using a real-time TrueFISP sequence. Ten patients with acromegaly were examined twice with the same magnetic resonance imaging protocol: once prior to therapy and a second time 6 months after therapy. Prior to therapy, healthy volunteers had an average tongue volume of 140 ml for men and 90 ml for women, and patients with acromegaly had an average tongue volume of 180 ml for men and 145 ml for women. However, 6 months after therapy the mean tongue volumes in patients with acromegaly had decreased to 154 ml in the men and to 125 ml in the women. The chewing and swallowing process was normal in all volunteers. Prior to therapy, just two patients showed a chewing and swallowing pathology, which disappeared after therapy. Patients with acromegaly had larger tongue volumes than healthy volunteers, and TrueFISP imaging proved feasible for visualizing chewing and swallowing in real time and is capable of detecting possible pathologies. Furthermore, TrueFISP imaging can be used to monitor therapeutic approaches in patients with acromegaly. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of left atrial function by multidetector computed tomography before left atrial radiofrequency-catheter ablation: Comparison of a manual and automated 3D volume segmentation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Florian; Ourednicek, Petr; Loewe, Christian; Richter, Bernhard; Goessinger, Heinz David; Gwechenberger, Marianne; Plank, Christina; Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Toepker, Michael; Lammer, Johannes; Feuchtner, Gudrun M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare a manual and automated 3D volume segmentation tool for evaluation of left atrial (LA) function by 64-slice multidetector-CT (MDCT). Methods and materials: In 33 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation a MDCT scan was performed before radiofrequency-catheter ablation. Atrial function (minimal volume (LAmin), maximal volume (LAmax), stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF)) was evaluated by two readers using a manual and an automatic tool and measurement time was evaluated. Results: Automated LA volume segmentation failed in one patient due to low LA enhancement (103HU). Mean LAmax, LAmin, SV and EF were 127.7 ml, 93 ml, 34.7 ml, 27.1% by the automated, and 122.7 ml, 89.9 ml, 32.8 ml, 26.3% by the manual method with no significant difference (p > 0.05) and high Pearsons correlation coefficients (r = 0.94, r = 0.94, r = 0.82 and r = 0.85, p < 0.0001), respectively. The automated method was significantly faster (p < 0.001). Interobserver variability was low for both methods with Pearson's correlation coefficients between 0.98 and 0.99 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Evaluation of LA volume and function with 64-slice MDCT is feasible with a very low interobserver variability. The automatic method is as accurate as the manual method but significantly less time consuming permitting a routine use in clinical practice before RF-catheter ablation.

  7. Quantitation of mandibular ramus volume as a source of bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Fernando; Simonian, Krikor; Smith McDonald, Roberto; Nowzari, Hessam

    2009-10-01

    When alveolar atrophy impairs dental implant placement, ridge augmentation using mandibular ramus graft may be considered. In live patients, however, an accurate calculation of the amount of bone that can be safely harvested from the ramus has not been reported. The use of a software program to perform these calculations can aid in preventing surgical complications. The aim of the present study was to intra-surgically quantify the volume of the ramus bone graft that can be safely harvested in live patients, and compare it to presurgical computerized tomographic calculations. The AutoCAD software program quantified ramus bone graft in 40 consecutive patients from computerized tomographies. Direct intra-surgical measurements were recorded thereafter and compared to software data (n = 10). In these 10 patients, the bone volume was also measured at the recipient sites 6 months post-sinus augmentation. The mandibular second and third molar areas provided the thickest cortical graft averaging 2.8 +/- 0.6 mm. The thinnest bone was immediately posterior to the third molar (1.9 +/- 0.3 mm). The volume of ramus bone graft measured by AutoCAD averaged 0.8 mL (standard deviation [SD] 0.2 mL, range: 0.4-1.2 mL). The volume of bone graft measured intra-surgically averaged 2.5 mL (SD 0.4 mL, range: 1.8-3.0 mL). The difference between the two measurement methods was significant (p AutoCAD software program did not overestimate the volume of bone that can be safely harvested from the mandibular ramus.

  8. Lung volumes during sustained microgravity on Spacelab SLS-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    Gravity is known to influence the mechanical behavior of the lung and chest wall. However, the effect of sustained microgravity (microgravity) on lung volumes has not been reported. Pulmonary function tests were performed by four subjects before, during, and after 9 days of microgravity exposure. Ground measurements were made in standing and supine postures. Tests were performed using a bag-in-box-and-flowmeter system and a respiratory mass spectrometer. Measurements included functional residual capacity (FRC), expiratory reserve volume (ERV), residual volume (RV), inspiratory and expiratory vital capacities (IVC and EVC), and tidal volume (V9sub T)). Total lung capacity (TLC) was derived from the measured EVC and RV values. With preflight standing values as a comparison, FRC was significantly reduced by 15% (approximately 500 ml) in microgravity and 32% in the supine posture. ERV was reduced by 10 - 20% in microgravity and decreased by 64% in the supine posture. RV was significantly reduced by 18% (310 ml) in microgravity but did not significantly change in the supine posture compared with standing. IVC and EVC were slightly reduced during the first 24 h of microgravity but returned to 1-G standing values within 72 h of microgravity exposure. IVC and EVC in the supine posture were significantly reduced by 12% compared with standing. During microgravity, V(sub T) decreased by 15% (approximately 90 ml), but supine V(sub T) was unchanged compared with preflight standing values. TLC decreased by approximately 8% during microgravity and in the supine posture compared with preflight standing. The reductions in FRC, ERV, and RV during microgravity are probably due to the cranial shift of the diaphragm, an increase in intrathoracic blood volume, and more uniform alveolar expansion.

  9. Variable volume combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  10. Postoperative volume balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, H; Mortensen, C.R.; Secher, Niels H.

    2017-01-01

    In healthy humans, stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) do not increase with expansion of the central blood volume by head-down tilt or administration of fluid. Here, we exposed 85 patients to Trendelenburg's position about one hour after surgery while cardiovascular variables were determin...

  11. Clinical appraisal of stereotactic hematoma aspiration surgery for hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage; With respect to volume of the hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Koji; Matsumoto, Keizo (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-06-01

    Three hundred and four patients with hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage were managed by medical treatment, ventricular drainage, or CT-controlled stereotactic aspiration surgery (AS). The therapeutic results of the 6-month outcome were analyzed and correlated with the volume of the hematoma. A hematoma volume of 20 ml was thought to be the critical size in determining whether the outcome would be favorable or unfavorable. Indications for AS are suggested as follows. In patients with a small-sized hematoma having a volume of less than 10 ml use of AS should be restricted to patients with severe paralysis or other neurological complications and the elderly (aged 70 years or older). For patients with a medium-sized hematoma having a volume between 10 ml and 20 ml, AS is indicated for patients having severe paralysis and disturbances of consciousness. For patients with a large-sized hematoma having a volume of 20 ml or more, AS increases not only the survival rate of patients but also reduces the number of bedridden patients. We conclude that AS opens up a new avenue of surgical treatment for hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage, which has been no indication for hematoma evacuation by conventional craniotomy. (author).

  12. Measurement of Gallbladder Volume with Ultrasonography in Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sait Kapicioglu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasting and postprandial gallbladder volumes were investigated using ultrasonography in three groups (10 subjects in each of healthy women: third trimester pregnant women, postpartum women up to 10 days after giving birth and nonpregnant controls. The scans were performed at 09:00 after a 12 h fast. After the basal measurement was taken, gallbladder volumes were rescanned in 15 min intervals for 60 mins. At the end of this period, all volunteers received a standard liquid test meal, and scans were performed again for 1 h. The mean basal gallbladder volume was 22.2±4.2 mL in the nonpregnant (control group. In the third trimester group, the basal volume was 37.8±10.5 mL – 70.5% higher than in the nonpregnant group (P<0.001. In the postpartum group, the mean basal volume was 37.9% lower (27.4±6.5 mL than that of the third trimester group (P<0.02. This basal volume was 23.6% greater than that of the control group (P<0.05. After administration of a test meal, the postprandial gallbladder volumes decreased during the first few minutes compared with baseline values. The volumes decreased by 10.2% to 39.8% (23.5±7.3 to 34.0±10.2; P<0.01 in the third trimester group, by 14.9% to 43.2% (16.6±4.3 to 23.3±5.5; P<0.01, 0.001 in the postpartum group and by 19.2% to 51.6% (11.9±3.5 to 17.9±3.6; P<0.02, 0.05, 0.01, 0.001 in the control group. Postprandial mean gallbladder volumes of the third trimester (P<0.02 and postpartum groups (P<0.02 to 0.01 were significantly different from those of the control group. In conclusion, incomplete emptying of the gallbladder after eating during the third trimester of pregnancy may contribute to cholesterol-gallstone formation, and pregnancy may thus increase the risk of gallstones.

  13. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume...... but are also essential for a number of physiological processes such as proliferation, controlled cell death, migration and endocrinology. The thesis have been focusing on two Channels, namely the swelling activated Cl- channel (ICl, swell) and the transient receptor potential Vanilloid (TRPV4) channel. I: Cl......- serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...

  14. Freezing Baboon Red Blood Cells in the Original 800 ml Polyvinylchloride Plastic Bag With 40% W/V Glycerol and Storage at -80 C and Deglycerolization Using the IBM Code Blood Processor 2991

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    ...) plastic collection bag. Up to four hundred fifty (450 + 45 ml) ml of blood is collected in a quadruple plastic bag system with a special adaptor port on the tubing connecting the primary 800 ml PVC plastic bag to the three transfer packs...

  15. Variations in gastric emptying of liquid elicited by acute blood volume changes in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondim F. de-A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We have observed that acute blood volume expansion increases the gastroduodenal resistance to the flow of liquid in anesthetized dogs, while retraction decreases it (Santos et al. (1991 Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, 143: 261-269. This study evaluates the effect of blood volume expansion and retraction on the gastric emptying of liquid in awake rats using a modification of the technique of Scarpignato (1980 (Archives Internationales de Pharmacodynamie et de Therapie, 246: 286-294. Male Wistar rats (180-200 g were fasted for 16 h with water ad libitum and 1.5 ml of the test meal (0.5 mg/ml phenol red solution in 5% glucose was delivered to the stomach immediately after random submission to one of the following protocols: 1 normovolemic control (N = 22, 2 expansion (N = 72 by intravenous infusion (1 ml/min of Ringer-bicarbonate solution, volumes of 1, 2, 3 or 5% body weight, or 3 retraction (N = 22 by controlled bleeding (1.5 ml/100 g. Gastric emptying of liquid was inhibited by 19-51.2% (P<0.05 after blood volume expansion (volumes of 1, 2, 3 or 5% body weight. Blood volume expansion produced a sustained increase in central venous pressure while mean arterial pressure was transiently increased during expansion (P<0.05. Blood volume retraction increased gastric emptying by 28.5-49.9% (P<0.05 and decreased central venous pressure and mean arterial pressure (P<0.05. Infusion of the shed blood 10 min after bleeding reversed the effect of retraction on gastric emptying. These findings suggest that gastric emptying of liquid is subject to modulation by the blood volume.

  16. Regional reference values of thyroid gland volume in Turkish adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şahin Ertan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is important to know the size of the thyroid gland, and its normal value may vary among different geographic regions. Objective. In this study, we aimed to establish reference ranges for thyroid volume in euthyroid adults and to compare these results with the literature data. Methods. Between June 2011 and June 2012, 461 patients with normal laboratory results (serum TSH, anti-TG, anti-TPO antibodies and urine iodine level that underwent thyroid gland ultrasound examination were retrospectively analyzed. Two hundred and 92 patients were females and 169 were males; the age range was 18-61 years with mean age 30.84±9.97 years. Length, breadth and thickness were measured, and the volume of each lobe was estimated using the ellipsoid formula. Results. The overall mean thyroid volume in all patients who were examined was 12.98±2.53 mL. The mean thyroid volume in females and males was 12.09±2.05 mL and 14.53±2.55, respectively (p<0.05. The right thyroid lobe volume was greater than the left in all patients of both sexes. In addition, the study establishes a significant correlation between the thyroid volume and height, weight and body surface area of the subjects of both sexes (p<0.05. In the light of our findings we can provide reference values in order to evaluate patients who have thyroid hyperplasia or who are considered as normal. Conclusion. We consider that further studies are necessary to establish national references thyroid volume for each country.

  17. Should measurement of maximum urinary flow rate and residual urine volume be a part of a "minimal care" assessment programme in female incontinence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Pia; Mouritsen, L; Andersen, J Thorup

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of routine measurements of urinary flow rate and residual urine volume as a part of a "minimal care" assessment programme for women with urinary incontinence in detecting clinical significant bladder emptying problems. MATERIAL AND METHODS....... Twenty-six per cent had a maximum flow rate less than 15 ml/s, but only 4% at a voided volume > or =200 ml. Residual urine more than 149 ml was found in 6%. Two women had chronic retention with overflow incontinence. Both had typical symptoms with continuous leakage, stranguria and chronic cystitis...

  18. Evaluation of Accordance of Magnetic Resonance Volumetric and Flow Measurements in Determining Ventricular Stroke Volume in Cardiac Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeltsch, M.; Ranft, S.; Klass, O.; Aschoff, A.J.; Hoffmann, M.H.K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has become an established noninvasive method for evaluating ventricular function utilizing three-dimensional volumetry. Postprocessing of volumetric measurements is still tedious and time consuming. Stroke volumes obtained by flow quantification across the aortic root or pulmonary trunk could be utilized to increase both speed of workflow and accuracy. Purpose: To assess accuracy of stroke volume quantification using MR volumetric imaging compared to flow quantification in patients with various cardiac diseases. Strategies for the augmentation of accuracy in clinical routine were deduced. Material and Methods: 78 patients with various cardiac diseases -excluding intra- or extracardiac shunts, regurgitant valvular defects, or heart rhythm disturbance -underwent cardiac function analysis with flow measurements across the aortic root and cine imaging of the left ventricle. Forty-six patients additionally underwent flow measurements in the pulmonary trunk and cine imaging of the right ventricle. Results: Left ventricular stroke volume (LVSV) and stroke volume of the aortic root (SVAo) correlated with r=0.97, and Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of 0.11 ml and a standard error of estimation (SEE) of 4.31 ml. Ninety-two percent of the data were within the 95% limits of agreement. Right ventricular stroke volume (RVSV) and stroke volume of the pulmonary trunk (SVP) correlated with a factor of r=0.86, and mean difference in the Bland-Altman analysis was fixed at -2.62 ml (SEE 8.47 ml). For RVSV and SVP, we calculated r=0.82, and Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean difference of 1.27 ml (SEE 9.89 ml). LVSV and RVSV correlated closely, with r=0.91 and a mean difference of 2.79 ml (SEE 7.17 ml). SVAo and SVP correlated with r=0.95 and a mean difference of 0.50 ml (SEE 5.56 ml). Conclusion: Flow quantification can be used as a guidance tool, providing accurate and reproducible stroke volumes of both

  19. Density Functional Calculation of the 0.5ML-Terminated Allyl Mercaptan/Si(100)-(2 × 1) Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun-Mei, Tang; Kai-Ming, Deng; Xuan, Chen; Chuan-Yun, Xiao; Yu-Zhen, Liu; Qun-Xiang, Li

    2009-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of the 0.5 ML-terminated allyl mercaptan (ALM)/Si(100)-(2 × 1) surface are studied using the density functional method. The calculated absorption energy of the ALM molecule on the 0.5 ML-terminated ALM/Si(100)-(2 × 1) surface is 3.36 eV, implying that adsorption is strongly favorable. The electronic structure calculations show that the ALM/Si(100)-(2 × 1), the clean Si(100)-(2 × 1), and the fully-terminated H/Si(100)-(2 × 1) surfaces have the nature of an indirect band gap semiconductor. The highest occupied molecular orbital is dominated by the ALM, confirming the mechanism proposed by Hossain for its chain reaction. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  20. Risk factors influencing the pleural drainage volume after transthoracic oesophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yajima, Kazuhito; Ishikawa, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kaoru

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the factors influencing pleural drainage volume after transthoracic oesophagectomy and to determine criteria for the selection of patients who would benefit from the early removal of chest drains. Clinicopathological characteristics of 155 patients who underwent transthoracic oesophagectomy were prospectively collected, and the daily drainage volume of each patient was retrospectively reviewed. Potential risk factors were compared between the high-output group (n = 39) and low-output group (n = 116), which were dichotomized using the 75th percentile of total pleural drainage volume of the total study population. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent risk factors. The median duration of drainage was 10 days, with a median total drainage volume of 2258 ml. Of 27 potential risk factors influencing the drainage volume, creatinine clearance (P = 0.04), operative approach (P = 0.03) and thoracic duct removal (P = 0.01) were significantly associated with the total pleural drainage volume. The removal of the thoracic duct (P = 0.02; odds ratio, 4.02; 95% confidence interval 1.20-13.41) and lower creatinine clearance (P = 0.04; odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.04) was independent risk factors for increased pleural drainage volume after transthoracic oesophagectomy. The early removal of chest drains may be possible in patients without these risk factors.

  1. Caloric effect of a 16-ounce (473-mL) portion-size cap on sugar-sweetened beverages served in restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Claire; Vine, Seanna M

    2013-08-01

    New York City recently proposed a restriction to cap the portion size of all sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) sold in food-service establishments at 16 oz (473 mL). One critical question is whether such a policy may disproportionally affect low-income or overweight individuals. The objective was to determine the demographic characteristics of US individuals potentially affected by a 16-oz portion-size cap on SSBs and the potential effect on caloric intake. We analyzed dietary records from the NHANES 2007-2010. We estimated the proportion of individuals who consumed at least one SSB >16 fluid oz (473 mL) in restaurants by age, household income, and weight status. Of all SSBs >16 oz (473 mL) purchased from food-service establishments, 64.7% were purchased from fast food restaurants, 28.2% from other restaurants, and 4.6% from sports, recreation, and entertainment facilities. On a given day, the policy would affect 7.2% of children and 7.6% of adults. Overweight individuals are more likely to consume these beverages, whereas there was no significant difference between income groups. If 80% of affected consumers choose a 16-oz (473-mL) beverage, the policy would result in a change of -57.6 kcal in each affected consumer aged 2-19 y (95% CI: -65.0, -50.1) and -62.6 kcal in those aged ≥20 y (95% CI: -67.9, -57.4). A policy to cap portion size is likely to result in a modest reduction in excess calories from SSBs, especially among young adults and children who are overweight.

  2. Development and Evaluation of the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Media Literacy (SSB-ML) Scale and Its Relationship With SSB Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yvonnes; Porter, Kathleen J.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Zoellner, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how adults’ media literacy skill sets impact their sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake provides insight into designing effective interventions to enhance their critical analysis of marketing messages and thus improve their healthy beverage choices. However, a media literacy scale focusing on SSBs is lacking. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from a large randomized controlled trial to (a) describe the psychometric properties of an SSB Media Literacy Scale (SSB-ML) ...

  3. A new electric method for non-invasive continuous monitoring of stroke volume and ventricular volume-time curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konings Maurits K

    2012-08-01

    caused a pattern over the thorax quite distinct from that of atrial filling. The in-vivo tests of the HCP with LVot Doppler resulted in a Pearson’s correlation of R = 0.892, and Bland-Altman plotting of SV yielded a mean bias of -1.6 ml and 2SD =14.8 ml. Conclusions The results indicate that the HCP was able to track the changes in ventricular stroke volume reliably. Furthermore, the HCP produced ventricular volume-time curves that were consistent with the literature, and may be a diagnostic tool as well.

  4. MANAJEMEN KULTUR ROTIFER DENGAN TANGKI VOLUME KECIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Teguh Imanto

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Keberhasilan pembenihan ikan sangat dipengaruhi keberhasilan produksi jasad pakan rotifer secara tepat dan efisien. Penelitian kultur rotifer dengan tangki volume kecil bertujuan untuk mendapatkan efisiensi produksi yang paling optimal dan memenuhi prinsip dasar akuakultur low volume high density. Penelitian menggunakan tangki polyethylene dengan volume 500 L dan volume media awal 100 L, padat tebar awal 200 ind. rotifer per mL dengan sediaan pakan dasar fitoplankton Nannocloropsis occulata, ragi roti (0,05 g/mio.rot./feeding dan suplemen Scott emulsion (0,005 g/mio.rot./feeding. Penelitian dilakukan secara bertahap; tahap pertama (I tanpa penambahan air laut, peningkatan volume hanya dari penambahan 15 L Nannochloropsis tiap hari sampai hari kelima, tahap kedua (II dengan penambahan alga 40 L dan air laut 40 L; serta tahap ketiga (III dengan menggandakan pemberian ragi roti. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pada percobaan tahap I: total produksi rata-rata 122,37 x 106 ind. rotifer, pada tahap II: 97,67 x 106 ind. rotifer, dan pada tahap III: dicapai rata-rata total produksi tertinggi dengan 187,17 x 106 ind. rotifer per tanki kultur 500 L. Pengelolaan kultur pada tahap III memberikan hasil terbaik dengan simpangan terkecil antar tangki kultur ulangan, dan membuktikan sebagai pengelolaan terbaik untuk kultur rotifer dengan tangki volume kecil.  Success of marine seed production is highly influenced by effective and efficient production performance of life food rotifer. Observation on rotifer culture using small volume tank was aimed to get the optimum production and efficiency, to fulfill the basic principle of aquaculture “low volume high density”. Polyethylene tanks of 500 L. were used as culture container, with initial 100 liter sea water as culture medium and initial density of 200 ind. rotifer per mL. N. occulata, baker yeast (0.05 g/mio.rotifer/feeding and Scott emulsion (0.005 g/mio.rotifer/feeding were used as basic feed, and

  5. Regional reference values of thyroid gland volume in Turkish Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Ertan; Elboğa, Umut; Kalender, Ebuzer

    2015-01-01

    It is important to know the size of the thyroid gland, and its normal value may vary among different geographic regions. In this study, we aimed to establish reference ranges for thyroid volume in euthyroid adults and to compare these results with the literature data. Between June 2011 and June 2012,461 patients with normal laboratory results (serum TSH, anti-TG, anti-TPO antibodies and urine iodine level) that underwent thyroid gland ultrasound examination were retrospectively analyzed.Two hundred and 92 patients were females and 169 were males; the age range was 18-61 years with mean age 30.84±9.97 years. Length, breadth and thickness were measured, and the volume of each lobe was estimated using the ellipsoid formula. The overall mean thyroid volume in all patients who were examined was 12.98±2.53 mL. The mean thyroid volume in females and males was 12.09±2.05 mL and 14.53±2.55, respectively (pbody surface area of the subjects of both sexes (pcountry.

  6. Intranasal localizability of odorants: influence of stimulus volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasnelli, J; Hummel, T; Berg, J; Huang, G; Doty, R L

    2011-05-01

    When an odorant is presented to one side of the nose and air to the other, the ability to localize which side received the odorant depends upon trigeminal nerve stimulation. It has been shown that performance on this lateralization task increases as stimulus concentration increases. In this study, we determined the influences of stimulus volume and sex on the ability to localize each of 8 odorants presented at neat concentrations: anethole, geraniol, limonene, linalool, menthol, methyl salicylate, phenyl ethanol, and vanillin. At a low stimulus volume (11 mL), only menthol was localized at an above-chance level. At a high stimulus volume (21 mL), above-chance localization occurred for all odorants except vanillin. Women were significantly better than men in localizing menthol. Stimuli rated as most intense were those that were most readily localized. The detection performance measures, as well as rated intensity values, significantly correlated with earlier findings of the trigeminal detectability of odorants presented to anosmic and normosmic subjects. This study suggests that differences in stimulus volume may explain some discrepant findings within the trigeminal chemosensory literature and supports the concept that vanillin may be a "relatively pure" olfactory stimulus.

  7. Pulmonary 64-MDCT angiography with 50 mL of iodinated contrast material in an unselected patient population: a feasible protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trad, Henrique Simao; Boasquevisque, Gustavo Santos; Giacometti, Tiago Rangon; Trad, Catherine Yang; Zoghbi Neto, Orlando Salomao; Trad, Clovis Simao, E-mail: hsimtrad@gmail.com [Central de Diagnostico Ribeirao Preto (CEDIRP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To propose a protocol for pulmonary angiography using 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (64-MDCT) with 50 mL of iodinated contrast material, in an unselected patient population, as well as to evaluate vascular enhancement and image quality. Materials and methods: We evaluated 29 patients (22-86 years of age). The body mass index ranged from 19.0 kg/m{sup 2} to 41.8 kg/m{sup 2}. Patients underwent pulmonary CT angiography in a 64-MDCT scanner, receiving 50 mL of iodinated contrast material via venous access at a rate of 4.5 mL/s. Bolus tracking was applied in the superior vena cava. Two experienced radiologists assessed image quality and vascular enhancement. Results: The mean density was 382 Hounsfield units (HU) for the pulmonary trunk; 379 and 377 HU for the right and left main pulmonary arteries, respectively; and 346 and 364 HU for the right and left inferior pulmonary arteries, respectively. In all patients, subsegmental arteries were analyzed. There were streak artifacts from contrast material in the superior vena cava in all patients. However, those artifacts did not impair the image analysis. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pulmonary angiography using 64-MDCT with 50 mL of iodinated contrast can produce high quality images in unselected patient populations. (author)

  8. Evaluation of radiolabeled ML04, a putative irreversible inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor, as a bioprobe for PET imaging of EGFR-overexpressing tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abourbeh, Galith; Dissoki, Samar; Jacobson, Orit; Litchi, Amir; Daniel, Revital Ben; Laki, Desirediu; Levitzki, Alexander; Mishani, Eyal

    2007-01-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been implicated in tumor development and malignancy. Evaluating the degree of EGFR expression in tumors could aid in identifying patients for EGFR-targeted therapies and in monitoring treatment. Nevertheless, no currently available assay can reliably quantify receptor content in tumors. Radiolabeled inhibitors of EGFR-TK could be developed as bioprobes for positron emission tomography imaging. Such imaging agents would not only provide a noninvasive quantitative measurement of EGFR content in tumors but also serve as radionuclide carriers for targeted radiotherapy. The potency, reversibility, selectivity and specific binding characteristics of ML04, an alleged irreversible inhibitor of EGFR, were established in vitro. The distribution of the F-18-labeled compound and the extent of EGFR-specific tumor uptake were evaluated in tumor-bearing mice. ML04 demonstrated potent, irreversible and selective inhibition of EGFR, combined with specific binding to the receptor in intact cells. In vivo distribution of the radiolabeled compound revealed tumor/blood and tumor/muscle activity uptake ratios of about 7 and 5, respectively, 3 h following administration of a radiotracer. Nevertheless, only minor EGFR-specific uptake of the compound was detected in these studies, using either EGFR-negative tumors or blocking studies as controls. To improve the in vivo performance of ML04, administration via prolonged intravenous infusion is proposed. Detailed pharmacokinetic characterization of this bioprobe could assist in the development of a kinetic model that would afford accurate measurement of EGFR content in tumors

  9. Effects of respiratory rate and tidal volume on gas exchange in total liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph L; Tredici, Stefano; Fujioka, Hideki; Komori, Eisaku; Grotberg, James B; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2009-01-01

    Using a rabbit model of total liquid ventilation (TLV), and in a corresponding theoretical model, we compared nine tidal volume-respiratory rate combinations to identify a ventilator strategy to maximize gas exchange, while avoiding choked flow, during TLV. Nine different ventilation strategies were tested in each animal (n = 12): low [LR = 2.5 breath/min (bpm)], medium (MR = 5 bpm), or high (HR = 7.5 bpm) respiratory rates were combined with a low (LV = 10 ml/kg), medium (MV = 15 ml/kg), or high (HV = 20 ml/kg) tidal volumes. Blood gases and partial pressures, perfluorocarbon gas content, and airway pressures were measured for each combination. Choked flow occurred in all high respiratory rate-high volume animals, 71% of high respiratory rate-medium volume (HRMV) animals, and 50% of medium respiratory rate-high volume (MRHV) animals but in no other combinations. Medium respiratory rate-medium volume (MRMV) resulted in the highest gas exchange of the combinations that did not induce choke. The HRMV and MRHV animals that did not choke had similar or higher gas exchange than MRMV. The theory predicted this behavior, along with spatial and temporal variations in alveolar gas partial pressures. Of the combinations that did not induce choked flow, MRMV provided the highest gas exchange. Alveolar gas transport is diffusion dominated and rapid during gas ventilation but is convection dominated and slow during TLV. Consequently, the usual alveolar gas equation is not applicable for TLV.

  10. Oxygen-transfer performance of a newly designed, very low-volume membrane oxygenator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Felice; Ciocan, Sorin; Carmona, Natalia Mendez; Berner, Marion; Sourdon, Joevin; Carrel, Thierry P; Tevaearai Stahel, Hendrik T; Longnus, Sarah L

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenation of blood and other physiological solutions are routinely required in fundamental research for both in vitro and in vivo experimentation. However, very few oxygenators with suitable priming volumes (parallel-oriented microporous polypropylene hollow fibres, placed inside a hollow shell with a lateral-luer outlet, and sealed at both extremities. With this design, perfusate is delivered via the core-tube to the centre of the mini-oxygenator, and exits via the luer port. A series of mini-oxygenators were constructed and tested in an in vitro perfusion circuit by monitoring oxygen transfer using modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer or whole porcine blood. Effects of perfusion pressure and temperature over flows of 5-60 ml × min(-1) were assessed. Twelve mini-oxygenators with a mean priming volume of 1.5 ± 0.3 ml were evaluated. With buffer, oxygen transfer reached a maximum of 14.8 ± 1.0 ml O2 × l(-1) (pO2: 450 ± 32 mmHg) at perfusate flow rates of 5 ml × min(-1) and decreased with an increase in perfusate flow to 7.8 ± 0.7 ml ml O2 × l(-1) (pO2: 219 ± 24 mmHg) at 60 ml × min(-1). Similarly, with blood perfusate, oxygen transfer also decreased as perfusate flow increased, ranging from 33 ± 5 ml O2 × l(-1) at 5 ml × min(-1) to 11 ± 2 ml O2 × l(-1) at 60 ml × min(-1). Furthermore, oxygen transfer capacity remained stable with blood perfusion over a period of at least 2 h. We have developed a new miniaturized membrane oxygenator with an ultra-low priming volume (circuits, such as small animal extracorporeal circulation and ex vivo organ perfusion. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. [Relationship between tumor volume and PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Momose, Akishi; Okamoto, Akiko; Yamamoto, Hayato; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Iwabuchi, Ikuya; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Ohyama, Chikara

    2010-02-01

    We examined whether the tumor volume (TV) is a good predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Data were collected for 158 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in our hospital since April 2005 to September 2007. Along with the routine pathological assessment, TV was assessed in all prostatectomy specimens. PSA recurrence was defined as PSA levels of greater than 0.2 ng/ml. The TVs were 1.81+/-1.66 ml (mean +/-SD) ranging from 0.02 to 8.20 ml. The TV in cT1c was 1.77+/-1.64, and 1.89+/-1.72 ml in cT2 (not significant). Significant differences were observed between TV and pT. The TVs in pT2a, pT2b and pT3/4 were 0.54+/-0.54, 1.63+/-1.47 and 2.67+/-1.80 ml, respectively. The median follow-up period was 32.3 months (range from 15 to 45) after radical prostatectomy, and PSA recurrence was observed in 32 cases. Patients with smaller TV (TV TV (TV > or = 1.3 ml, 66.7%) with a significant difference atp TV, pT, Gleason Score (GS), and surgical margins. Significant differences were observed for GS, and surgical margins, but not for TV. Clinically organ-confined disease in Japanese patients with prostate cancer included various cancers from clinically insignificant to locally advanced ones. In our series, TV was not regarded as a predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

  12. SU-F-T-113: Inherent Functional Dependence of Spinal Cord Doses of Variable Irradiated Volumes in Spine SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L; Braunstein, S; Chiu, J [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Spinal cord tolerance for SBRT has been recommended for the maximum point dose level or at irradiated volumes such as 0.35 mL or 10% of contoured volumes. In this study, we investigated an inherent functional relationship that associates these dose surrogates for irradiated spinal cord volumes of up to 3.0 mL. Methods: A hidden variable termed as Effective Dose Radius (EDR) was formulated based on a dose fall-off model to correlate dose at irradiated spinal cord volumes ranging from 0 mL (point maximum) to 3.0 mL. A cohort of 15 spine SBRT cases was randomly selected to derive an EDR-parameterized formula. The mean prescription dose for the studied cases was 21.0±8.0 Gy (range, 10–40Gy) delivered in 3±1 fractions with target volumes of 39.1 ± 70.6 mL. Linear regression and variance analysis were performed for the fitting parameters of variable EDR values. Results: No direct correlation was found between the dose at maximum point and doses at variable spinal cord volumes. For example, Pearson R{sup 2} = 0.643 and R{sup 2}= 0.491 were obtained when correlating the point maximum dose with the spinal cord dose at 1 mL and 3 mL, respectively. However, near perfect correlation (R{sup 2} ≥0.99) was obtained when corresponding parameterized EDRs. Specifically, Pearson R{sup 2}= 0.996 and R{sup 2} = 0.990 were obtained when correlating EDR (maximum point dose) with EDR (dose at 1 mL) and EDR(dose at 3 mL), respectively. As a result, high confidence level look-up tables were established to correlate spinal cord doses at the maximum point to any finite irradiated volumes. Conclusion: An inherent functional relationship was demonstrated for spine SBRT. Such a relationship unifies dose surrogates at variable cord volumes and proves that a single dose surrogate (e.g. point maximum dose) is mathematically sufficient in constraining the overall spinal cord dose tolerance for SBRT.

  13. Peak systolic pressure-volume relationships in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Haruhiko; Sugihara, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Katsume, Hiroshi; Ochiai, Masakazu; Ijichi, Hamao

    1985-01-01

    We determined the relationship between left ventricular (LV) peak systolic pressure (PSP) and end-systolic volume, non-invasively using cuff sphygmomanometry and radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) measured in the arm was substituted for PSP. LV enddiastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF) were determined by a non-geometric method of gated RNA and recorded in three different hemodynamic states: at rest (basal state), during increased SBP after angiotensin administration (initial dose, 1-2 μg/min) and during decreased SBP after nitrate (sublingual nitroglycerin, 0.3-0.6 mg, or intravenous isosorbide dinitrate, 0.5-1.0 mg/min). The reproducibility of this method, tested in six subjects, proved to be good. Fifty-five subjects were divided into four groups based on EF at rest. The EDV and ESV were increased by angiotensin, and decreased by nitrate in all groups. EF was decreased by angiotensin and increased by nitrate. In contrast, the changes in PSP/ESVI due to these drugs remained in a narrow range in all groups. The regression lines of the PSP/ESVI relationship were almost linear and were steeper in the group with higher EF. Esub(max), the slope of the lines, was 5.75 +- 3.48 mmHg/ml/m 2 in group 1 (EF>50%), 3.16 +- 1.83 mmHg/ml/m 2 in group 2 (EF 49-40%), 2.27 +- 0.86 mmHg/ml/m 2 in group 3 (EF 39-30%) and 0.59 +- 0.50 mmHg/ml/m 2 in group 4 (EF<29%). The theoretical volume at zero pressure (VoI) did not meet in a definite value and was not related to EF at rest. Thus, the left ventricular peak systolic pressure-end-systolic volume relationship can be assessed non-invasively from radionuclide angiocardiography, which can be widely used for the evaluation of ventricular contractility, even in patients with asynergic ventricular contraction for whom echocardiography is unsuitable in measuring ventricular volume. (author)

  14. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Sicat, Ronell Barrera; Kruger, Jens; Moller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined

  15. Count-based left ventricular volume determination utilizing a left posterior oblique view for attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovitch, M.A.; Kalff, V.; Koral, K.

    1984-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the inherent error of the left ventricular volume measurement from the gated equilibrium blood pool scintigram utilizing the count-based technique. The study population consisted of 26 patients who had undergone biplane contrast ventriculography. The patients were imaged with a parallel-hole collimator in the left anterior oblique position showing the septum to best advantage. A reference blood sample was counted and radionuclide volumes calculated without correction for attenuation. Attenuation corrected volumes were derived with the factor 1/e/sup -/+d/, where d = distance from skin marker to center of the left ventricle in the orthogonal left posterior oblique view and μ = linear attenuation coefficient. A series of μ values from 0.08 to 0.15 cm -1 was evaluated. The tightest 95% confidence limits achieved for an end-diastolic 150-ml ventricle were +/- 44ml, and for an end-systolic 75-ml ventricle +/- 32 ml. In view of the magnitude of inherent error, the count-based volume measurement may be more suitable for group analyses and in cases in which an individual patient serves as his own control

  16. Türkiye’de yaşam boyu kanser olma yığılımlı riskleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Eser

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amaç: Epidemiyolojik kavramlar olan yığılımlı hız ve yığılımlı risk ülkemizde çok bilinmeyen, yerinde kullanılmayan kavramlardır. Bu çalışmada, başlıca kanserlerin dört ilimizdeki yığılımlı riskleri hesaplanmış ve bu kavramların uygun kullanımları tartışılmıştır. Yöntem: Bu çalışmada, Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5C vol.10’da yayımlanmış olan İzmir, Antalya, Edirne ve Trabzon iline ait yığılımlı insidans hızları kullanılarak erkek ve kadınlar için bütün kanserler, erkeklerde akciğer ve kadınlarda meme kanseri başta olmak üzere sık görülen kanserler için yığılımlı riskler hesaplanmıştır. Türkiye için yığılımlı riskler, Globocan 2012 tahminlerinden alınmıştır. Bulgular: Başka ölüm nedenlerinin olmadığı, yani doğan her kişinin 75 yaşına kadar yaşadığının varsayıldığı hipotetik durumda, İzmir'de yaşayan üç erkekten, Antalya, Edirne ve Trabzon ve Türkiye genelinde dört erkekten birisi, yaşamları boyunca herhangi bir kansere yakalanmaktadır. Bu dört ilde ve Türkiye genelinde yaklaşık altı kadından birisi yaşamlarının bir döneminde kanser tanısı almaktadır. Türkiye genelinde 25 kadından birisi yaşamının bir döneminde meme kanserine yakalanmaktadır. İzmir’de 9 erkekten, Türkiye genelinde ise 13 erkekten birisi yaşamı boyunca, öldürücülüğü çok yüksek ancak basitçe tütünden kaçınarak korunabilecek olan akciğer kanserine yakalanmaktadır. Sonuç: Bu çalışmada verilen kanser yığılımlı riskleri, özellikle birincil ve ikincil korunma çalışmalarında, risk faktörlerinden kaçınma, sağlıklı yaşam davranışları edinme, taramalara katılım ve erken tanı konularında toplumsal farkındalığı artırmaya yönelik olarak araştırmacıların, hizmet planlayıcı ve yürütücülerin kullanımına sunulmuştur. 

  17. A STUDY COMPARING DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF ROPIVACAINE 0.125% VS. 0.2%, WHEN GIVEN WITH FENTANYL 2 MCG/ML FOR EPIDURAL LABOUR ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindhya K

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Epidural administration of local anaesthetics, with or without opioids, is commonly used for the relief of pain in labor. Lower concentration of local anesthetics is used for providing labor epidural analgesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS After approval of the Institutional Ethical Committee, this study was conducted at a teaching hospital in GGH, Kakinada on 50 term parturients. 50 parturients of ASA I & II, primi or multi gravida with singleton pregnancy having vertex presentation were taken up for the study. They were randomly divided into 2 groups–Group R1 and Group R2 each comprising of 25 parturients. Study patients (n=50 were randomly assigned to one of two groups of 25 each. They received aliquots of epidural injection using either, 10 ml of ropivacaine 0.125 % with 2 μg/ml fentanyl (group R1 or 10 ml of ropivacaine 0.2% with 2 μg/ml fentanyl (group R2. RESULTS Demographic data, obstetric data, and injection delivery interval were comparable in both groups. Effective labor analgesia with no motor blockade was observed in both groups. Duration of analgesia after initial bolus dose was also significantly longer in group R2 (126.45 ± 12.34 min than in group R1 (73.05±27.4min. Ropivacaine at both concentrations (0.2% vs. 0.125% along with fentanyl 2μg / ml decreased visual analog scale (VAS scores to <3 in all parturients uniformly. Mean VAS scores were significantly less in group R2 than in group R1 at 5,60, and 90 min. Requirement of top-up doses was significantly less in group R2 as compared to group R1. Consumption of ropivacaine was comparable in both the groups (58.23 ± 5.48 mg in group R1 and 65.88 ± 6.29 mg in group R2, but consumption of fentanyl was significantly more in group R1 (94.31 ± 4.93 mg as compared to group R2 (31.58 ± 2.38 mg. There were no significant changes in haemodynamics, nor adverse effects related to neonatal or maternal outcomes in both groups. CONCLUSION We conclude that both the concentrations

  18. Tierless Web programming in ML

    OpenAIRE

    Radanne , Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Eliom is a dialect of OCaml for Web programming in which server and client pieces of code can be mixed in the same file using syntactic annotations. This allows to build a whole application as a single distributed program, in which it is possible to define in a composable way reusable widgets with both server and client behaviors. Eliom is type-safe, as it ensures that communications are well-behaved through novel language constructs that match the specificity of Web programming. Eliom is als...

  19. A newly developed maneuver, field change conversion (FCC), improved evaluation of the left ventricular volume more accurately on quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Osamu; Shibasaki, Masaki; Hoshi, Toshiko; Imai, Kamon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a newly developed maneuver that reduces the reconstruction area by a half more accurately evaluates left ventricular (LV) volume on quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) analysis. The subjects were 38 patients who underwent left ventricular angiography (LVG) followed by G-SPECT within 2 weeks. Acquisition was performed with a general purpose collimator and a 64 x 64 matrix. On QGS analysis, the field magnification was 34 cm in original image (Original: ORI), and furthermore it was changed from 34 cm to 17 cm to enlarge the re-constructed image (Field Change Conversion: FCC). End-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) of the left ventricle were also obtained using LVG. EDV was 71±19 ml, 83±20 ml and 98±23 ml for ORI, FCC and LVG, respectively (p<0.001: ORI versus LVG, p<0.001: ORI versus FCC, p<0.001: FCC versus LVG). ESV was 28±12 ml, 34±13 ml and 41±14 ml for ORI, FCC and LVG, respectively (p<0.001: ORI versus LVG, p<0.001: ORI versus FCC, p<0.001: FCC versus LVG). FCC was better than ORI for calculating LV volume in clinical cases. Furthermore, FCC is a useful method for accurately measuring the LV volume on QGS analysis. (author)

  20. [Extracellular fluid, plasma and interstitial volume in cirrhotic patients without clinical edema or ascites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera Viñas, E C; Hames, W; Mothe, G; Barrionuevo, M P

    1989-01-01

    Extracellular fluid volume (E.C.F.) and plasma volume (P.V.), were measured with sodium sulfate labeled with 35I and 131I human serum albumin, respectively, by the dilution technique in control subjects and in cirrhotic patients without clinical ascites or edema, renal or hepatic failure, gastrointestinal bleeding or diuretics. Results are expressed as mean +/- DS in both ml/m2 and ml/kg. In normal subjects E.C.F. (n = 8) was 7,533 +/- 817 ml/m2 (201.3 +/- 182 ml/kg), P.V. (n = 11) 1,767 +/- 337 ml/m2 (47.2 +/- 9.3 ml/kg), and interstitial fluid (I.S.F.) (n = 7) 5,758 +/- 851 ml/m2 (Table 2). In cirrhotic patients E.C.F. (n = 11) was 10,318 +/- 2,980 ml/m2 (261.7 +/- 76.8 ml/kg), P.V. (n = 12) 2,649 +/- 558 ml/m2 (67.7 +/- 15.6 ml/kg) and I.S.F. (n = 11) 7,866 +/- 2,987 ml/m2 (Table 3). Cirrhotic patients compared with normal subjects have hypervolemia due to a significant E.C.F. and P.V. expansion (p less than 0.02 and less than 0.001 respectively) (Fig. 1). Reasons for E.C.F. and P.V. abnormalities in cirrhotic patients may reflect urinary sodium retention related to portal hipertension which stimulates aldosterone release or enhanced renal tubular sensitivity to the hormone. However, it is also possible that these patients, in the presence of hypoalbuminemia (Table 1), have no clinical edema or ascites due to increased glomerular filtration, suppressed release of vasopressin, increased natriuretic factor, and urinary prostaglandin excretion, in response to the intravascular expansion, all of which increased solute and water delivery to the distal nephron and improved renal water excretion. We conclude that in our clinical experience cirrhotic patients without ascites or edema have hypervolemia because of a disturbance in E.C.F.

  1. Integers annual volume 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Landman, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    ""Integers"" is a refereed online journal devoted to research in the area of combinatorial number theory. It publishes original research articles in combinatorics and number theory. This work presents all papers of the 2013 volume in book form.

  2. Volume 9 Number 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    Agro-Science Journal of Tropical Agriculture, Food, Environment and Extension. Volume 9 Number 1 ... of persistent dumping of cheap subsidized food imports from developed ... independence of the inefficiency effects in the two estimation ...

  3. Vesicoureteral refluxed volume and renal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, V.; Capkun, V.; Eterovic, D.; Stanicic, A.; Saraga, M.

    1994-01-01

    The therapeutical approach to vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) depends on assessment of the renal involvement. The effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and parenchymal mean transit time of radiotracer (pMTT) of the affected kidney are sensitive functional parameters. We investigated the association of these functional indices with the volume of refluxed urine. In 64 children (mean age 6.4 yrs) the presence of VUR was confirmed with direct radionuclide cystography in 80 ureters (48 unilateral and 32 bilateral) and the maximal volume of refluxed urine (MVRU) was determined for each uretero-renal unit. All patients also underwent dynamic renal scintigraphy with I-131-hippuran, providing the values of pMTT and relative renal hippuran clearances of the respective kidneys by deconvolution analysis. In 37 of the affected kidneys ERPF was also determined by combining the latter results with total ERPF, determined by plasma clearance of hippuran. Using the borderline value of MVRU of 4 ml, the group with higher MVRU exhibited significantly lower ERPF of the affected kidney (194±93 vs. 270±77 ml/min/1.73 m2, p=.002) and significantly higher proportion of pMTT's over 3.5 min (31/33 vs. 17/47, p=.003). The negative linear correlation between MVRU and ERPF was found (r=-.45, p=.006). We conclude that quantitative radionuclide cystography, aside from diagnosis and follow-up of VUR, may also provide insight in the function of the affected kidney and thus contribute in designing the therapeutical approach. (author)

  4. Gastric volume rather than nutrient content inhibits food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R J; Powley, T L

    1996-09-01

    To evaluate the separate contributions of distension and nutrient stimulation of the stomach to the inhibition of short-term food intake and, particularly, to reassess previous analyses based on the inflatable gastrointestinal cuff, four experiments were performed. Rats equipped with pyloric cuffs and indwelling gastric catheters consumed a liquid diet ad libitum. Their consumption during short-term (30 min) feeding bout was measured after gastric infusions on cuff-open and cuff-closed trials. Animals taking meals (approximately 5 ml) with cuffs closed immediately after receiving intragastric infusions of 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10 ml of normal saline exhibited both suppression at the smallest infusion and a dose-dependent reduction across the other volumes (experiment 1). Additionally, when the test diet concentration was varied, animals with their cuffs closed consumed a constant volume, not a constant number of calories (experiment 2). Furthermore, cuff-closed animals exhibited no more suppression to 5-ml intragastric infusions of nutrients (including, on different trials, 50 and 100% Isocal diet; 10, 20, and 40% glucose; and 40% sucrose and 40% fructose) than to the same volume of saline (experiments 3 and 4). In contrast, on cuff-open trials in which gastric contents could empty into the duodenum, these same nutrient loads were more effective (except fructose) than saline in producing suppression of food intake. In summary, although both limited gastric distension with the pylorus occluded and intestinal nutrient stimulation with the cuff open effectively reduced intake, cuff-closed gastric loads of mixed macronutrients or carbohydrate solutions of 2-8 kcal, pH from 5.8 to 6.7, and osmolarities between 117 and 2,294 mosM/kg produced only the distension-based suppression generated by the same volume of saline.

  5. Effect of fluid loading with normal saline and 6% hydroxyethyl starch on stroke volume variability and left ventricular volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanda H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirotsugu Kanda,1 Yuji Hirasaki,2 Takafumi Iida,1 Megumi Kanao,1 Yuki Toyama,1 Takayuki Kunisawa,1 Hiroshi Iwasaki,11Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, 2Department of Anatomy, The Jikei University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate changes in stroke volume variability (SVV and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV after a fluid bolus of crystalloid or colloid using real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3D-TEE and the Vigileo-FloTrac™ system.Materials and methods: After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval, and informed consent from the research participants, 22 patients undergoing scheduled peripheral vascular bypass surgery were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mL of hydroxyethyl starch (HES; HES group, n=11 or normal saline (Saline group, n=11 for fluid replacement therapy. SVV was measured using the Vigileo-FloTrac system. LVEDV, stroke volume, and cardiac output were measured by 3D-TEE. The measurements were performed over 30 minutes before and after the fluid bolus in both groups.Results: SVV significantly decreased after fluid bolus in both groups (HES group, 14.7%±2.6% to 6.9%±2.7%, P<0.001; Saline group, 14.3%±3.9% to 8.8%±3.1%, P<0.001. LVEDV significantly increased after fluid loading in the HES group (87.1±24.0 mL to 99.9±27.2 mL, P<0.001, whereas no significant change was detected in the Saline group (88.8±17.3 mL to 91.4±17.6 mL, P>0.05. Stroke volume significantly increased after infusion in the HES group (50.6±12.5 mL to 61.6±19.1 mL, P<0.01 but not in the Saline group (51.6±13.4 mL to 54.1±12.8 mL, P>0.05. Cardiac output measured by 3D-TEE significantly increased in the HES group (3.5±1.1 L/min to 3.9±1.3 L/min, P<0.05, whereas no significant change was seen in the Saline group (3.4±1.1 L/min to 3.3±1.0 L

  6. BP volume reduction equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Yoshinori; Muroo, Yoji; Hamanaka, Isao

    2003-01-01

    A new type of burnable poison (BP) volume reduction system is currently being developed. Many BP rods, a subcomponent of spent fuel assemblies are discharged from nuclear power reactors. This new system reduces the overall volume of BP rods. The main system consists of BP rod cutting equipment, equipment for the recovery of BP cut pieces, and special transport equipment for the cut rods. The equipment is all operated by hydraulic press cylinders in water to reduce operator exposure to radioactivity. (author)

  7. Electroanalytical chemistry. Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    This volume is part of a series aimed at authoritative reviews of electroanalytical techniques and related areas of investigation. Volume 14 clearly maintains the high standards and proven usefulness of the series. Topics covered include conformation change and isomerization associated with electrode reactions, infrared vibrational spectroscopy of the electrode-solution interface, and precision in linear sweep and cyclic voltametry. A short history of electrochemical techniques which include the term square wave is provided

  8. Ventilatory protective strategies during thoracic surgery: effects of alveolar recruitment maneuver and low-tidal volume ventilation on lung density distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, Alf; Schilling, Thomas; Schütze, Hartmut; Senturk, Mert; Hachenberg, Thomas; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2011-05-01

    The increased tidal volume (V(T)) applied to the ventilated lung during one-lung ventilation (OLV) enhances cyclic alveolar recruitment and mechanical stress. It is unknown whether alveolar recruitment maneuvers (ARMs) and reduced V(T) may influence tidal recruitment and lung density. Therefore, the effects of ARM and OLV with different V(T) on pulmonary gas/tissue distribution are examined. Eight anesthetized piglets were mechanically ventilated (V(T) = 10 ml/kg). A defined ARM was applied to the whole lung (40 cm H(2)O for 10 s). Spiral computed tomographic lung scans were acquired before and after ARM. Thereafter, the lungs were separated with an endobronchial blocker. The pigs were randomized to receive OLV in the dependent lung with a V(T) of either 5 or 10 ml/kg. Computed tomography was repeated during and after OLV. The voxels were categorized by density intervals (i.e., atelectasis, poorly aerated, normally aerated, or overaerated). Tidal recruitment was defined as the addition of gas to collapsed lung regions. The dependent lung contained atelectatic (56 ± 10 ml), poorly aerated (183 ± 10 ml), and normally aerated (187 ± 29 ml) regions before ARM. After ARM, lung volume and aeration increased (426 ± 35 vs. 526 ± 69 ml). Respiratory compliance enhanced, and tidal recruitment decreased (95% vs. 79% of the whole end-expiratory lung volume). OLV with 10 ml/kg further increased aeration (atelectasis, 15 ± 2 ml; poorly aerated, 94 ± 24 ml; normally aerated, 580 ± 98 ml) and tidal recruitment (81% of the dependent lung). OLV with 5 ml/kg did not affect tidal recruitment or lung density distribution. (Data are given as mean ± SD.) The ARM improves aeration and respiratory mechanics. In contrast to OLV with high V(T), OLV with reduced V(T) does not reinforce tidal recruitment, indicating decreased mechanical stress.

  9. Low contrast media volume in pre-TAVI CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Madeleine; Turek, Jakub; Mihl, Casper; Reinartz, Sebastian D; Gohmann, Robin F; Nijssen, Estelle C; Kats, Suzanne; van Ommen, Vincent G; Kietselaer, Bas L J H; Wildberger, Joachim E; Das, Marco

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate image quality using reduced contrast media (CM) volume in pre-TAVI assessment. Forty-seven consecutive patients referred for pre-TAVI examination were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups: group 1 BMI  28 kg/m(2) (n = 18). Patients received a combined scan protocol: retrospective ECG-gated helical CTA of the aortic root (80kVp) followed by a high-pitch spiral CTA (group 1: 70 kV; group 2: 80 kVp) from aortic arch to femoral arteries. All patients received one bolus of CM (300 mgI/ml): group 1: volume = 40 ml; flow rate = 3 ml/s, group 2: volume = 53 ml; flow rate = 4 ml/s. Attenuation values (HU) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured at the levels of the aortic root (helical) and peripheral arteries (high-pitch). Diagnostic image quality was considered sufficient at attenuation values > 250HU and CNR > 10. Diagnostic image quality for TAVI measurements was obtained in 46 patients. Mean attenuation values and CNR (HU ± SD) at the aortic root (helical) were: group 1: 381 ± 65HU and 13 ± 8; group 2: 442 ± 68HU and 10 ± 5. At the peripheral arteries (high-pitch), mean values were: group 1: 430 ± 117HU and 11 ± 6; group 2: 389 ± 102HU and 13 ± 6. CM volume can be substantially reduced using low kVp protocols, while maintaining sufficient image quality for the evaluation of aortic root and peripheral access sites. • Image quality could be maintained using low kVp scan protocols. • Low kVp protocols reduce contrast media volume by 34-67 %. • Less contrast media volume lowers the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy.

  10. Reachable volume RRT

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 IEEE. Reachable volumes are a new technique that allows one to efficiently restrict sampling to feasible/reachable regions of the planning space even for high degree of freedom and highly constrained problems. However, they have so far only been applied to graph-based sampling-based planners. In this paper we develop the methodology to apply reachable volumes to tree-based planners such as Rapidly-Exploring Random Trees (RRTs). In particular, we propose a reachable volume RRT called RVRRT that can solve high degree of freedom problems and problems with constraints. To do so, we develop a reachable volume stepping function, a reachable volume expand function, and a distance metric based on these operations. We also present a reachable volume local planner to ensure that local paths satisfy constraints for methods such as PRMs. We show experimentally that RVRRTs can solve constrained problems with as many as 64 degrees of freedom and unconstrained problems with as many as 134 degrees of freedom. RVRRTs can solve problems more efficiently than existing methods, requiring fewer nodes and collision detection calls. We also show that it is capable of solving difficult problems that existing methods cannot.

  11. Reachable volume RRT

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy; Thomas, Shawna; Amato, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 IEEE. Reachable volumes are a new technique that allows one to efficiently restrict sampling to feasible/reachable regions of the planning space even for high degree of freedom and highly constrained problems. However, they have so far only been applied to graph-based sampling-based planners. In this paper we develop the methodology to apply reachable volumes to tree-based planners such as Rapidly-Exploring Random Trees (RRTs). In particular, we propose a reachable volume RRT called RVRRT that can solve high degree of freedom problems and problems with constraints. To do so, we develop a reachable volume stepping function, a reachable volume expand function, and a distance metric based on these operations. We also present a reachable volume local planner to ensure that local paths satisfy constraints for methods such as PRMs. We show experimentally that RVRRTs can solve constrained problems with as many as 64 degrees of freedom and unconstrained problems with as many as 134 degrees of freedom. RVRRTs can solve problems more efficiently than existing methods, requiring fewer nodes and collision detection calls. We also show that it is capable of solving difficult problems that existing methods cannot.

  12. Effect of hydration status on atrial and ventricular volumes and function in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schantz, Daryl I; Dragulescu, Andreea; Memauri, Brett; Grotenhuis, Heynric B; Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Assessment of cardiac chamber volumes is a fundamental part of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. While the effects of inter- and intraobserver variability have been studied and have a recognized effect on the comparability of serial cardiac MR imaging studies, the effect of differences in hydration status has not been evaluated. To evaluate the effects of volume administration on cardiac chamber volumes. Thirteen healthy adults underwent a baseline cardiac MR to evaluate cardiac chamber volumes after an overnight fast. They were then given two saline boluses of 10 ml/kg of body weight and the cardiac MR was repeated immediately after each bolus. From the baseline scan to the final scan there was a significant increase in all four cardiac chamber end-diastolic volumes. Right atrial volumes increased 8.0%, from 61.1 to 66.0 ml/m2 (PHydration status has a significant effect on the end-diastolic volumes of all cardiac chambers assessed by cardiac MR. Thus, hydration represents a "variable" that should be taken into account when assessing cardiac chamber volumes, especially when performing serial imaging studies in a patient.

  13. Validity of the accuracy of right ventricular volume measurement with single plane Simpson's rule based on a new half-circle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wei

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Right ventricular volume calculation is the basis of right ventricular function evaluation. The complexity of right ventricular shape makes it more difficult for measuring right ventricular volume, and therefore limits the widespread use of right ventricular function assessment. However, the short-axis view of the right ventricle is usually crescent, and might be assumed as half of a circle. This hypothesis can be applied to calculate right ventricular volume by using the plane Simpson's rule, but the final right ventricular volume should be about half of the original calculated value. The aim of this study was to test the accuracy of right ventricular volume measurement based on this new assumption in human right ventricular casts. Methods: Fifteen human right ventricular casts were obtained within 24 hours after death from 15 subjects who did not have overt cardiac disease. These casts were scanned with Toshiba multislice helical CT (Aquilion) using a scanning protocol similar to clinical practice. Right ventricular sagittal MPR images that correspond to right anterior oblique view were reconstructed later and single-plane Simpson's method was used to calculate right ventricular volumes. The calculated right ventricular volume was defined as the original calculated value divided by 2. The actual right ventricular casts volumes were determined by water displacement method. Results: The actual right ventricular volume was (64.23±24.51) ml, while the calculated volume was (53.18±26.22) ml. The calculated right ventricular volume significantly underestimated the actual volume by (11.05±13.09) ml (t=3.27, P=0.006). However, there was a close correlation between the actual cast volume and the calculated volume (r=0.869, P<0.001), with a regression equation of RV actual volume=21.04+0.812 x RV calculated volume. Conclusion: Right ventricular volume could be calculated accurately with single-plane Simpson's rule based on our new proposed half

  14. Feasibility of prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary CT angiography with 30 mL iodinated contrast agent at 70 kVp: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Qi, Li; Tang, Chun Xiang; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Ji, Xue Man; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Jing [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Cardiology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Spearman, James V.; De Cecco, Carlo Nicola; Meinel, Felix G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality and radiation dose of prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with 30 mL contrast agent at 70 kVp. Fifty-eight patients with suspected coronary artery disease, a body mass index (BMI) of less than 25 kg/m{sup 2}, sinus rhythm and a heart rate (HR) of less than 70 beats per minute (bpm) were prospectively enrolled in this study. Thirty mL of 370 mg I/mL iodinated contrast agent was administrated at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. All patients underwent prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch CCTA on a second-generation dual-source CT system at 70 kVp using automated tube current modulation. Fifty-six patients (96.6 %) had diagnostic CCTA images and two patients (3.4 %) had one vessel with poor image quality each rated as non-diagnostic. No significant effects of HR, HR variability and BMI on CCTA image quality were observed (all P > 0.05). Effective dose was 0.17 ± 0.02 mSv and the size-specific dose estimate was 1.03 ± 0.13 mGy. Prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch CCTA at 70 kVp with 30 mL of contrast agent can provide diagnostic image quality at a radiation dose of less than 0.2 mSv in patients with a BMI of less than 25 kg/m{sup 2} and an HR of less than 70 bpm. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic Nickel iron Electroformed Trap (MagNET): a master/replica fabrication strategy for ultra-high throughput (>100 mL h−1) immunomagnetic sorting†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jina; Yelleswarapu, Venkata; Singh, Anup; Shah, Nishal

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices can sort immunomagnetically labeled cells with sensitivity and specificity much greater than that of conventional methods, primarily because the size of microfluidic channels and micro-scale magnets can be matched to that of individual cells. However, these small feature sizes come at the expense of limited throughput (ϕ 10 mL whole blood. Here, we report a new approach to micromagnetic sorting that can achieve highly specific cell separation in unprocessed complex samples at a throughput (ϕ > 100 mL h−1) 100× greater than that of conventional microfluidics. To achieve this goal, we have devised a new approach to micromagnetic sorting, the magnetic nickel iron electroformed trap (MagNET), which enables high flow rates by having millions of micromagnetic traps operate in parallel. Our design rotates the conventional microfluidic approach by 90° to form magnetic traps at the edges of pores instead of in channels, enabling millions of the magnetic traps to be incorporated into a centimeter sized device. Unlike previous work, where magnetic structures were defined using conventional microfabrication, we take inspiration from soft lithography and create a master from which many replica electroformed magnetic micropore devices can be economically manufactured. These free-standing 12 µm thick permalloy (Ni80Fe20) films contain micropores of arbitrary shape and position, allowing the device to be tailored for maximal capture efficiency and throughput. We demonstrate MagNET's capabilities by fabricating devices with both circular and rectangular pores and use these devices to rapidly (ϕ = 180 mL h−1) and specifically sort rare tumor cells from white blood cells. PMID:27170379

  16. Successful Multi-Leg Completion of KS-13 ML-1 & Increased Power Generation of Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV), Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, P. S.; Spielman, P.; Peters, B.

    2017-12-01

    Located in the Puna district on the Big Island in Hawaii, Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) is the only geothermal power plant in the state. PGV is comprised of two air-cooled power plants with a total generating capacity of 38 MW. Commercial operation commenced in 1993 and the project was acquired by Ormat in June 2004. Over the years, generation has increased by upgrading the plant through resource development and with the addition of a bottoming OEC (Ormat Energy Converter) in 2011. The geothermal reservoir at PGV is hosted within a step-over along the axis of the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone (LERZ). Subsurface permeability at PGV is controlled by sub-vertical and rift-parallel fractures/faults and dike swarms which are the result of active tectonic dilation across the rift and shallow volcanic activity related to Kilauea. At PGV, the location and attitude of these fractures are well constrained at depth by drilling to be orientated at N63°E and dipping at 5° NW. These fractures are aligned en-echelon and form a major left-step along the rift axis which results in a localized zone of enhanced dilation. In 2016, a program was initiated to increase injection capacity and enthalpy in the PGV wellfield. Existing injection well KS-13 was selected as a candidate for re-drill based on a comprehensive resource model and reservoir modeling predictions. KS-13 ML1 was designed as a multi-leg completion from the existing KS-13 well, whereby the final completion is a forked well composed of the original wellbore and the newly completed second wellbore. The target area for the new multi-leg (ML) were large aperture, steeply dipping fractures associated with the 1955 eruptive fissure. Well KS-13 ML1 was drilled using PGV's Rig and a retrievable whipstock to mill a casing exit window. With the original wellbore temporarily plugged, a multi-rate water loss test was performed and an injectivity of 6 gpm/psi was measured. Following the removal of the whipstock ramp and packer from

  17. Analýza marketingového prostředí firmy Pekárkův mlýn

    OpenAIRE

    Dvořáková, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the part of the marketing plan of the selected company. The aim of this thesis is to analyze the internal and external environment of the company Pekárkův mlýn and the subsequent setting marketing objectives of the company. The theoretical part defines and analyzes the various steps by which the marketing plans. The practical part describes the chosen company, its goals and mission, carried out an analysis of internal and external environment, which were mentioned in the...

  18. Finančná analýza podniku Choceňská mlékárna, s.r.o.

    OpenAIRE

    Zigo, Michal

    2011-01-01

    The bachelor thesis assesses a financial position of the company Choceňská mlékárna, s.r.o. with the help of financial analysis tools such as horizontal and vertical analyses, parallel and pyramidal system of financial ratios, creditworthy and bankruptcy models, and economic value added in the horizon of five years. Theoretical-methodological part describes the financial analysis as a tool for an assessment of the financial position of the company and it further defines the evaluation apparat...

  19. The DMRT-ML Model: Numerical Simulations of the Microwave Emission of Snowpacks Based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Picard, Ghislain; Roy, Alexandre; Dupont, Florent; Fily, Michel; Royer, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Microwave radiometer observations have been used to retrieve snow depth and snow water equivalent on both land and sea ice, snow accumulation on ice sheets, melt events, snow temperature, and snow grain size. Modeling the microwave emission from snow and ice physical properties is crucial to improve the quality of these retrievals. It also is crucial to improve our understanding of the radiative transfer processes within the snow cover, and the snow properties most relevant in microwave remote sensing. Our objective is to present a recent microwave emission model and its validation. The model is named DMRT-ML (DMRT Multi-Layer), and is available at http:lgge.osug.frpicarddmrtml.

  20. Altitude Acclimatization and Blood Volume: Effects of Exogenous Erythrocyte Volume Expansion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sawka, M

    1996-01-01

    ...: (a) altitude acclimatization effects on erythrocyte volume and plasma volume; (b) if exogenous erythrocyte volume expansion alters subsequent erythrocyte volume and plasma volume adaptations; (c...

  1. A simple method to determine the blood volume of newborns with serum-albumin labeled with technetium-99m (HSA-sup(99m)Tc)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.; Vaz, F.A.C.; Rockmann, R.L.; Barreto, T.M.; Eston, T.E. de; Carvalho, N.

    1973-01-01

    A method for determination of small volumes, with which it is determined blood volume of 11 newborns, is described. By injecting through the anterior fontannelle 1 ml a human serum albumin solution labelled with technetium-99m and withdrawing from the posterior fontanelle blood samples of 1.2 to 1.5 ml at 10, 20 and 30 minutes after the injection, the possibility of determining blood volume with only two of these samples without using a standard is shown. Non-significant whole body radiation (3.2 mrad/6h) is shown as well [pt

  2. Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) Significantly Improve Prostate Cancer Detection at Initial Biopsy in a Total PSA Range of 2–10 ng/ml

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdonà, Sisto; Marino, Ada; Mazzarella, Claudia; Perruolo, Giuseppe; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Chun, Felix K.; Terracciano, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Many efforts to reduce prostate specific antigen (PSA) overdiagnosis and overtreatment have been made. To this aim, Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) have been proposed as new more specific biomarkers. We evaluated the ability of phi and PCA3 to identify prostate cancer (PCa) at initial prostate biopsy in men with total PSA range of 2–10 ng/ml. The performance of phi and PCA3 were evaluated in 300 patients undergoing first prostate biopsy. ROC curve analyses tested the accuracy (AUC) of phi and PCA3 in predicting PCa. Decision curve analyses (DCA) were used to compare the clinical benefit of the two biomarkers. We found that the AUC value of phi (0.77) was comparable to those of %p2PSA (0.76) and PCA3 (0.73) with no significant differences in pairwise comparison (%p2PSA vs phi p = 0.673, %p2PSA vs. PCA3 p = 0.417 and phi vs. PCA3 p = 0.247). These three biomarkers significantly outperformed fPSA (AUC = 0.60), % fPSA (AUC = 0.62) and p2PSA (AUC = 0.63). At DCA, phi and PCA3 exhibited a very close net benefit profile until the threshold probability of 25%, then phi index showed higher net benefit than PCA3. Multivariable analysis showed that the addition of phi and PCA3 to the base multivariable model (age, PSA, %fPSA, DRE, prostate volume) increased predictive accuracy, whereas no model improved single biomarker performance. Finally we showed that subjects with active surveillance (AS) compatible cancer had significantly lower phi and PCA3 values (p<0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, both phi and PCA3 comparably increase the accuracy in predicting the presence of PCa in total PSA range 2–10 ng/ml at initial biopsy, outperforming currently used %fPSA. PMID:23861782

  3. Prostate Health Index (Phi and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3 significantly improve prostate cancer detection at initial biopsy in a total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Ferro

    Full Text Available Many efforts to reduce prostate specific antigen (PSA overdiagnosis and overtreatment have been made. To this aim, Prostate Health Index (Phi and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3 have been proposed as new more specific biomarkers. We evaluated the ability of phi and PCA3 to identify prostate cancer (PCa at initial prostate biopsy in men with total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml. The performance of phi and PCA3 were evaluated in 300 patients undergoing first prostate biopsy. ROC curve analyses tested the accuracy (AUC of phi and PCA3 in predicting PCa. Decision curve analyses (DCA were used to compare the clinical benefit of the two biomarkers. We found that the AUC value of phi (0.77 was comparable to those of %p2PSA (0.76 and PCA3 (0.73 with no significant differences in pairwise comparison (%p2PSA vs phi p = 0.673, %p2PSA vs. PCA3 p = 0.417 and phi vs. PCA3 p = 0.247. These three biomarkers significantly outperformed fPSA (AUC = 0.60, % fPSA (AUC = 0.62 and p2PSA (AUC = 0.63. At DCA, phi and PCA3 exhibited a very close net benefit profile until the threshold probability of 25%, then phi index showed higher net benefit than PCA3. Multivariable analysis showed that the addition of phi and PCA3 to the base multivariable model (age, PSA, %fPSA, DRE, prostate volume increased predictive accuracy, whereas no model improved single biomarker performance. Finally we showed that subjects with active surveillance (AS compatible cancer had significantly lower phi and PCA3 values (p<0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively. In conclusion, both phi and PCA3 comparably increase the accuracy in predicting the presence of PCa in total PSA range 2-10 ng/ml at initial biopsy, outperforming currently used %fPSA.

  4. Left ventricular volume determination from single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunker, S.R.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Schmidt, W.P.; Cawthon, M.A.; Karl, R.D. Jr.; Bauman, J.M.; Howard, W.H. III; Rubal, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with that of contrast cineangiography in measuring left ventricular end-diastolic volume, 25 consecutive patients undergoing catheterizaiton for coronary artery or valvular heart disease were first evaluated scintigraphically. SPECT volume values showed a high degree of correlation with those determined by angiography with a standard error of the estimate of 23 ml. SPECT offers a highly accurate and essentially noninvasive method for measuring chamber volumes that is independent of geometric assumptions about ventricular configuration and chest wall attenuation and does not require blood sample counting

  5. Left ventricular volume determination from single-photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunker, S.R.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Schmidt, W.P.; Cawthon, M.A.; Karl, R.D. Jr.; Bauman, J.M.; Howard, W.H. III; Rubal, B.J.

    1985-02-01

    To compare the accuracy of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with that of contrast cineangiography in measuring left ventricular end-diastolic volume, 25 consecutive patients undergoing catheterizaiton for coronary artery or valvular heart disease were first evaluated scintigraphically. SPECT volume values showed a high degree of correlation with those determined by angiography with a standard error of the estimate of 23 ml. SPECT offers a highly accurate and essentially noninvasive method for measuring chamber volumes that is independent of geometric assumptions about ventricular configuration and chest wall attenuation and does not require blood sample counting.

  6. Value of radionuclide angiocardiography for determination of left ventricular volume in patients with valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konieczna, S.; Madeja, G.; Gosiewska-Marcinkowska, E.; Szumilak, B.; Brodzki, L.M.; Leszek, P.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate usability of the Massardo method in calculating the left ventricular volume in patients with valvular defect. The group consisted of 21 patients with mitral defect. Left ventricular volumes obtained by contrast ventriculography were used for reference. The correlation coefficient between these two methods was 0.94, SEE=29 ml, V nucl =0.94 V c.vent +11. The end-systolic and end-diastolic outlines were marked manually. We concluded that the Massardo methods is an effective method of calculating the left ventricular volume also in group of patients with mitral defect. (author). 11 refs, 4 tabs

  7. 3D CT modeling of hepatic vessel architecture and volume calculation in living donated liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frericks, Bernd B.; Caldarone, Franco C.; Savellano, Dagmar Hoegemann; Stamm, Georg; Kirchhoff, Timm D.; Shin, Hoen-Oh; Galanski, Michael; Nashan, Bjoern; Klempnauer, Juergen; Schenk, Andrea; Selle, Dirk; Spindler, Wolf; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a software tool for non-invasive preoperative volumetric assessment of potential donors in living donated liver transplantation (LDLT). Biphasic helical CT was performed in 56 potential donors. Data sets were post-processed using a non-commercial software tool for segmentation, volumetric analysis and visualisation of liver segments. Semi-automatic definition of liver margins allowed the segmentation of parenchyma. Hepatic vessels were delineated using a region-growing algorithm with automatically determined thresholds. Volumes and shapes of liver segments were calculated automatically based on individual portal-venous branches. Results were visualised three-dimensionally and statistically compared with conventional volumetry and the intraoperative findings in 27 transplanted cases. Image processing was easy to perform within 23 min. Of the 56 potential donors, 27 were excluded from LDLT because of inappropriate liver parenchyma or vascular architecture. Two recipients were not transplanted due to poor clinical conditions. In the 27 transplanted cases, preoperatively visualised vessels were confirmed, and only one undetected accessory hepatic vein was revealed. Calculated graft volumes were 1110±180 ml for right lobes, 820 ml for the left lobe and 270±30 ml for segments II+III. The calculated volumes and intraoperatively measured graft volumes correlated significantly. No significant differences between the presented automatic volumetry and the conventional volumetry were observed. A novel image processing technique was evaluated which allows a semi-automatic volume calculation and 3D visualisation of the different liver segments. (orig.)

  8. Quantification of subarachnoid hemorrhage by three-dimensional computed tomography. Correlation between hematoma volume and symptomatic vasospasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Taku; Sakuma, Jun; Sasaki, Tatsuya

    2011-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) volume was measured by three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) and the correlation examined between the SAH volume and the occurrence of symptomatic vasospasm (SVS). Experimental (in vitro) hematomas were made with blood obtained from 10 volunteers. The hematoma volume was determined by actual measurements and by 3D-CT using a CT number in the range of 40-80 Hounsfield units (HU) on days 1, 4, 7, 11, and 14. The coefficients on days 1 and 4 were relatively high and the correlation between measured and estimated volumes was significant on days 7, 11, and 14. 3D-CT was also performed in 50 patients with SAH at onset (day 0) and on days 1, 4, 7, and 14. The hematoma volume including the volume of normal structures was automatically calculated (V1). The volume of normal structures (V2) with CT numbers of 40-80 HU was calculated in another 50 patients without intracranial lesions as 12 ml. The total hematoma volume was defined as V1 minus mean V2. The mean SAH volume was 44, 36, 21, 11, and 8 ml on days 0, 1, 4, 7, and 14, respectively. The hematoma volumes were significantly larger in patients with SVS than in patients without SVS at all time points. The minimum hematoma volume in patients with SVS was 92, 76, 42, 24, and 12 ml on days 0, 1, 4, 7, and 14, respectively. This method allows the quantitative determination of SAH volume based on 3D-CT, and may be useful in clinical studies of cerebral vasospasm. (author)

  9. /sup 3/H-dextran method for measurements of the blood volume in the rat choroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsusaka, T [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan); Morimoto, K; Kikkawa, Y

    1980-01-01

    A new method was developed using /sup 3/H-dextran for measuring the blood volume in the choroid. Under pentobarbital-anesthesia, albino rats weighing 200 grams were perfused through the left ventricle with a 2.5 percent glutaraldehyde solution containing the radioactive dextran. The procedure allowed exchange of the choroidal blood with the /sup 3/H-dextran solution with a simultaneous fixation of the choroid. The blood volume in the choroid was calculated from the radioactivity count, which is estimated to be 1.690 x 10/sup -4/ ml per mg wet weight and 5.070 x 10/sup -4/ ml per mg dry weight. Epinephrine subconjunctivally injected diminished the blood volume in the choroid by 68 percent. Pretreatment with lidocaine almost nullified the effect of epinephrine. Applicability of this method to the analytical study of the choroidal circulation is discussed.

  10. 3H-dextran method for measurements of the blood volume in the rat choroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsusaka, Toshihiko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Kikkawa, Yoshizo.

    1980-01-01

    A new method was developed using 3 H-dextran for measuring the blood volume in the choroid. Under pentobarbital-anesthesia, albino rats weighing 200 grams were perfused through the left ventricle with a 2.5 percent glutaraldehyde solution containing the radioactive dextran. The procedure allowed exchange of the choroidal blood with the 3 H-dextran solution with a simultaneous fixation of the choroid. The blood volume in the choroid was calculated from the radioactivity count, which is estimated to be 1.690 x 10 -4 ml per mg wet weight and 5.070 x 10 -4 ml per mg dry weight. Epinephrine subconjunctivally injected diminished the blood volume in the choroid by 68 percent. Pretreatment with lidocaine almost nullified the effect of epinephrine. Applicability of this method to the analytical study of the choroidal circulation is discussed. (author)

  11. Analgesic efficacy of local anaesthetic wound administration in knee arthroplasty: volume vs concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L Ø; Gaarn-Larsen, L; Kristensen, B B

    2010-01-01

    was reduced in both groups with ropivacaine administration 24 h postoperatively (p time intervals. No reduction in pain scores was observed with ropivacaine injection 6 h postoperatively. The median (IQR [range]) dose of oxycodone administered......Wound administration of local anaesthetic may be effective for postoperative pain management in knee arthroplasty, but the analgesic efficacy of local anaesthetic in relation to volume vs concentration has not been determined. In a double-blinded trial, 48 patients scheduled for total knee...... arthroplasty were randomly assigned to receive either a high volume/low concentration solution of ropivacaine (20 ml, 0.5%) or a low volume/high concentration solution of ropivacaine (10 ml, 1%), 6 and 24 h postoperatively through an intracapsular catheter. Pain was assessed for 2 h after administration. Pain...

  12. The determination of the volume of the thyroid gland by a new ultrasonic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Naokata; Izumi, Motomori; Nagataki, Shigenobu; Hazama, Ryuji; Kurata, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Ito, Kunihiko.

    1984-01-01

    A newly developed high-resolution ultrasonic scanner for determining the volume of the thyroid gland was employed in 1983's health screening for A-bomb survivors in Nishiyama district (Nagasaki), and effects of radiation on the thyroid gland were examined. Thirty-one inhabitants who have been living in Nishiyama district since the A-bombing were selected as subjects (Nishiyama group) and their sex- and age-matched persons were selected as controls (control group). Regarding the incidence of chronic thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid adenoma, and hypothyroidism, there was no significant difference between the groups. The volume of the thyroid gland was 14.6+-6.2 ml in the Nishiyama group and 13.1+-4.0 ml in the control group; the average volume of the thyroid gland was a little higher in the Nishiyama group than in the control group, but this was not statistically significant. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Contrast enhancement in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) of the abdomen: intraindividual comparison of contrast media containing 300 mg versus 370 mg iodine per ml

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrendt, F.F.; Mahnken, A.H.; Keil, S.; Das, M.; Hohl, C.; Guenther, R.W.; Muehlenbruch, G.; Bauer, D.; Seidensticker, P.; Jost, E.; Wildberger, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to intraindividually evaluate the difference in intraluminal vessel and parenchyma contrast enhancement of two different iodine concentrations in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) of the abdomen. Eighty-three patients underwent baseline and follow-up MDCT-scanning (Somatom Sensation 16; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) of the abdomen using contrast media containing 370 mg iodine/ml (protocol A; Ultravist 370, Bayer Schering Pharma, Berlin, Germany) and 300 mg iodine/ml (protocol B; Ultravist 300). The total iodine load (37 g iodine) and the iodine delivery rate (1.29 g iodine/s) were identical for both protocols. Contrast enhancement in the portal venous phase was measured in the abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, portal vein, liver, spleen, pancreas and kidney. Mean attenuation values were compared using paired t-test. Intraindividual comparison revealed no statistically significant differences of the mean attenuation values between protocols A and B for all anatomic sites: abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, portal vein, liver, spleen, pancreas and kidney (all P > 0.05). Given an injection protocol with constant total iodine load and constant iodine delivery rate, the iodine concentration of contrast media does not significantly influence abdominal contrast enhancement in the portal venous phase. (orig.)

  14. Extra metal adatom surface diffusion simulation on 1/3 ML Si(111) √3×√3 metal-induced surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luniakov, Yu V

    2013-01-01

    A first-principle simulation of the surface diffusion of an extra metal (Me) adatom has been performed on the corresponding 1/3 monolayer (ML) Si(111) √3×√3 Me-induced surfaces. Using the nudged elastic band (NEB) optimization method, the minimum energy paths and the activation energy barrier profiles for all known Me-inducing √3×√3 reconstruction on an Si(111) surface at the 1/3 ML coverage have been obtained and compared with the available experimental data. The activation barrier is shown to depend on the atomic size of the diffusing adatom: the barrier has the highest value for the largest Me adatom, Pb (0.44 eV); lower values for the smaller Me adatoms, Sn (0.36 eV), In (0.22 eV) and Ga (0.13 eV); and the lowest value for the smallest Me adatom, Al (0.08 eV). The Arrhenius pre-exponential factors that were obtained in the harmonic approximation are as large as ∼10 11−13 Hz for all of the investigated surfaces, which supports the single-adatom diffusion model considered here. (paper)

  15. Development and Evaluation of the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Media Literacy (SSB-ML) Scale and Its Relationship With SSB Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yvonnes; Porter, Kathleen J.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Zoellner, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how adults’ media literacy skill sets impact their sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake provides insight into designing effective interventions to enhance their critical analysis of marketing messages and thus improve their healthy beverage choices. However, a media literacy scale focusing on SSBs is lacking. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from a large randomized controlled trial to (a) describe the psychometric properties of an SSB Media Literacy Scale (SSB-ML) scale and its subdomains, (b) examine how the scale varies across demographic variables, and (c) explain the scale’s concurrent validity to predict SSB consumption. Results from 293 adults in rural southwestern Virginia (81.6% female, 94.0% White, 54.1% receiving SNAP and/or WIC benefits, average 410 SSB kcal daily) show that overall SSB-ML scale and its subdomains have strong internal consistencies (Cronbach’s alphas ranging from 0.65 to 0.83). The Representation & Reality domain significantly predicted SSB kilocalories, after controlling for demographic variables. This study has implications for the assessment and inclusion of context-specific media literacy skills in behavioral interventions. PMID:27690635

  16. Development and Evaluation of the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Media Literacy (SSB-ML) Scale and Its Relationship With SSB Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yvonnes; Porter, Kathleen J; Estabrooks, Paul A; Zoellner, Jamie

    2017-10-01

    Understanding how adults' media literacy skill sets impact their sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake provides insight into designing effective interventions to enhance their critical analysis of marketing messages and thus improve their healthy beverage choices. However, a media literacy scale focusing on SSBs is lacking. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from a large randomized controlled trial to (a) describe the psychometric properties of an SSB Media Literacy Scale (SSB-ML) scale and its subdomains, (b) examine how the scale varies across demographic variables, and (c) explain the scale's concurrent validity to predict SSB consumption. Results from 293 adults in rural southwestern Virginia (81.6% female, 94.0% White, 54.1% receiving SNAP and/or WIC benefits, average 410 SSB kcal daily) show that overall SSB-ML scale and its subdomains have strong internal consistencies (Cronbach's alphas ranging from 0.65 to 0.83). The Representation & Reality domain significantly predicted SSB kilocalories, after controlling for demographic variables. This study has implications for the assessment and inclusion of context-specific media literacy skills in behavioral interventions.

  17. Awa1p on the cell surface of sake yeast inhibits biofilm formation and the co-aggregation between sake yeasts and Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Satoru; Shimizu, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Furukawa, Soichi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    We examined mixed-species biofilm formation between Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 and both foaming and non-foaming mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeasts. Wild-type strains showed significantly lower levels of biofilm formation compared with the non-foaming mutants. Awa1p, a protein involved in foam formation during sake brewing, is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein and is associated with the cell wall of sake yeasts. The AWA1 gene of the non-foaming mutant strain Kyokai no. 701 (K701) has lost the C-terminal sequence that includes the GPI anchor signal. Mixed-species biofilm formation and co-aggregation of wild-type strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7) were significantly lower than K701 UT-1 (K701 ura3/ura3 trp1/trp1), while the levels of strain K701 UT-1 carrying the AWA1 on a plasmid were comparable to those of K7. The levels of biofilm formation and co-aggregation of the strain K701 UT-1 harboring AWA1 with a deleted GPI anchor signal were similar to those of K701 UT-1. These results clearly demonstrate that Awa1p present on the surface of sake yeast strain K7 inhibits adhesion between yeast cells and L. plantarum ML11-11, consequently impeding mixed-species biofilm formation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. OPTIMASI PROSES MESIN STRETCH BLOW MOULDING PADA BOTOL 600 ML DENGAN METODE RSM (RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY STUDI KASUS DI PT. UNIPLASTINDO INTERBUANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochamad Mas'ud

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pada proses produksi Aqua botol plastik 600 ml menggunakan mesin stretch blow moulding dengan sistem pneumatik, Pembuatan produk dengan menggunakan mesin ini memiliki faktor-faktor yang dapat mempengaruhi kualitas botol yang dihasilkan . Penyimpangan ukuran (pemerataan tebal botol dan kemiringan botol tidak sesuai dengan spesifikasi mengakibatkan botol dibagian pundak putih dan bergelang (shrinkage. Tujuan dari penelitian ini yaitu mengoptimalkan setting parameter mesin stretch blow moulding agar menghasilkan kualitas baik pada produk botol plastik 600 ml. Adapun variable(prediktor yang di pilih yaitu preblow (bar, preform temperature (, dan P1 point (mm, sedangkan respon yang dicari yaitu kemiringan minimal dan tebal maksimal. Metode yang di gunakan dalam penelitian ini yaitu menggunakan Response Surface Metodhology (RSM yang mana dalam perhitungannya menggunakan software minitab 16. Dengan menggunakan Box Behnken Design dan 3 level factorial di hasilkan run 15 percobaan. Berdasarkan hasil kondisi yang optimal parameter yaitu preblow sebesar 6,5 bar, preform temperature sebesar 114 , dan P1 Point sebesar 25 mm. Dengan setting sebesar tersebut akan menghasilkan respon tebal botol sebesar 0,1446 dan kemiringan botol sebesar 0,1875.

  19. Volumizing effects of a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid volumizing filler: prospective European study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Klaus

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facial volume loss contributes significantly to facial aging. The 20-mg/mL hyaluronic acid (HA formulation used in this study is a smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, fully reversible, volumizing filler indicated to restore facial volume. This first prospective study evaluated use in current aesthetic clinical practice. Methods A pan-European evaluation conducted under guidelines of the World Association of Opinion and Marketing Research, the trial comprised a baseline visit (visit 1 and a follow-up (visit 2 at 14 ± 7 days posttreatment. Physicians photographed patients at each visit. Each patient was treated with the 20-mg/mL HA volumizing filler as supplied in standard packaging. Procedural details, aesthetic outcomes, safety, and physician and patient ratings of their experience were recorded. Results Fifteen physicians and 70 patients (91% female; mean age: 50 years participated. Mean volume loss at baseline was 3.7 (moderate on the Facial Volume Loss Scale. Local anesthesia was used in 64.3% of cases. Most injections (85% were administered with needles rather than cannulas. Of the 208 injections, 59% were in the malar region, primarily above the periosteum. Subcutaneous injections were most common for other sites. The mean total injection volume per patient was 4.6 mL. The mean volume loss score declined significantly (P Conclusion The 20-mg/mL smooth, highly cohesive, viscous, volumizing HA filler was effective, well tolerated, and easy to use in current clinical practice. Participants were very likely to recommend this product to colleagues and friends, and patients would be very or quite likely to request this product for future treatments.

  20. Ultrasonography of pleural effusion. The quantification of minimal detectable volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sustic, A.; Medved, I.; Ekl, D.; Simic, O.; Kovac, D.; Ivanis, N.

    2001-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to establish a minimal volume of free thoracic fluid in the pleural space of the supine cadaver detectable by ultrasonography. Material and methods. A prospective study with an experimental model on 20 cadavers (10 male, 10 female; age 66 ±11 yr.; height 172 ±9 cm; weight 75 ±12.6 kg; body surface area (BSA) 1.87 ±0.2 m 2 ) was used. Each cadaver was punctured bilaterally in 5 th or 6 th intercostal space at the medioclavicular line with venous cannula infusing in NaCl 0,9% solution at randomised speed in the chest. During the procedure the laterodorsal part of the thoracic wall next to the pulmonal base and phrenicocostal sinus was ultrasonographically scanned. At the moment of the visualisation of anechogenic line pertaining to the free fluid between dorsal thoracic wall and lungs, the installation was stopped and the amount of injected fluid verified. Results. Minimal, by ultrasonography detectable amount of free fluid in the right pleural space was 223±52 ml with the significant positive correlation to height (r = 0.69; p < 0.001), weight (r 0.68; p < 0.01) and the BSA (r = 0.71; p < 0.001) of cadaver. Detectable volume in the left pleural space was notably smaller than contra lateral, namely 172±53 ml also with a significant correlation to the cadaver's height (r = 0.55; p < 0.05), weight (r = 0.59; p < 0.01) and BSA (r = 0.60; p < 0.01). Conclusions. The authors affirm that ultrasonographically detectable quantity of free fluid in the chest positively correlates with height, weight and BSA of cadavers, and that the measured amount in the supine position is approximately 223 ml for the right space versus 172 ml for the left pleural space. (author)

  1. HARNESSING BIG DATA VOLUMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan DINU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Big Data can revolutionize humanity. Hidden within the huge amounts and variety of the data we are creating we may find information, facts, social insights and benchmarks that were once virtually impossible to find or were simply inexistent. Large volumes of data allow organizations to tap in real time the full potential of all the internal or external information they possess. Big data calls for quick decisions and innovative ways to assist customers and the society as a whole. Big data platforms and product portfolio will help customers harness to the full the value of big data volumes. This paper deals with technical and technological issues related to handling big data volumes in the Big Data environment.

  2. MRI of the small bowel: can sufficient bowel distension be achieved with small volumes of oral contrast?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinner, Sonja; Kuehle, Christiane A.; Ladd, Susanne C.; Barkhausen, Joerg; Herbig, Sebastian; Haag, Sebastian; Lauenstein, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    Sufficient luminal distension is mandatory for small bowel imaging. However, patients often are unable to ingest volumes of currently applied oral contrast compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate if administration of low doses of an oral contrast agent with high-osmolarity leads to sufficient and diagnostic bowel distension. Six healthy volunteers ingested at different occasions 150, 300 and 450 ml of a commercially available oral contrast agent (Banana Smoothie Readi-Cat, E-Z-EM; 194 mOsmol/l). Two-dimensional TrueFISP data sets were acquired in 5-min intervals up to 45 min after contrast ingestion. Small bowel distension was quantified using a visual five-grade ranking (5 very good distension, 1 = collapsed bowel). Results were statistically compared using a Wilcoxon-Rank test. Ingestion of 450 ml and 300 ml resulted in a significantly better distension than 150 ml. The all-over average distension value for 450 ml amounted to 3.4 (300 ml: 3.0, 150 ml: 2.3) and diagnostic bowel distension could be found throughout the small intestine. Even 45 min after ingestion of 450 ml the jejunum and ileum could be reliably analyzed. Small bowel imaging with low doses of contrast leads to diagnostic distension values in healthy subjects when a high-osmolarity substance is applied. These findings may help to further refine small bowel MRI techniques, but need to be confirmed in patients with small bowel disorders. (orig.)

  3. Reduced cortical distribution volume of iodine-123 iomazenil in Alzheimer's disease as a measure of loss of synapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soricelli, A.; Postiglione, A.; Grivet-Fojaja, M.R.; Mainenti, P.P.; Discepolo, A.; Varrone, A.; Salvatore, M.; Lassen, N.A.

    1996-01-01

    Iodine-123 labelled iomazenil (IMZ) is a specific tracer for the GABA A receptor, the dominant inhibitory synapse of the brain. The cerebral distribution volume (V d ) of IMZ may be taken as a quantitative measure of these synapses in Alzheimer's disease (AD), where synaptic loss tends indiscriminately to affect all cortical neurons, albeit more so in some areas than in others. In this pilot study we measured V d in six patients with probable AD and in five age-matched controls using a brain-dedicated single-photon emission tomography scanner allowing all cortical levels to be sampled simultaneously. Reduced values were found in all regions except in the occipital (visual) cortex. In particular, temporal and parietal cortex V d was significantly (P d averaged 69 ml/ml in normals and 51 ml/ml in AD, and parietal V d averaged 71 ml/ml in normals and 48 ml/ml in AD. These results accord well with emission tomographic studies of blood flow or labelled glucose. This supports the idea that while only measuring a subpopulation of synapses, the IMZ method reflects synaptic loss and hence functional loss in AD. The method constitutes an in vivo version of synaptic quantitation that in histopathological studies has been shown to correlated closely with the mental deterioration in AD. (orig.)

  4. Automatic tumour volume delineation in respiratory-gated PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Kanakatte, Aparna; Mani, Nallasamy; Kron, Tomas; Binns, David; Srinivasan, Bala

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a state-of-the-art functional imaging technique used in the accurate detection of cancer. The main problem with the tumours present in the lungs is that they are non-stationary during each respiratory cycle. Tumours in the lungs can get displaced up to 2.5 cm during respiration. Accurate detection of the tumour enables avoiding the addition of extra margin around the tumour that is usually used during radiotherapy treatment planning. This paper presents a novel method to detect and track tumour in respiratory-gated PET images. The approach followed to achieve this task is to automatically delineate the tumour from the first frame using support vector machines. The resulting volume and position information from the first frame is used in tracking its motion in the subsequent frames with the help of level set (LS) deformable model. An excellent accuracy of 97% is obtained using wavelets and support vector machines. The volume calculated as a result of the machine learning (ML) stage is used as a constraint for deformable models and the tumour is tracked in the remaining seven phases of the respiratory cycle. As a result, the complete information about tumour movement during each respiratory cycle is available in relatively short time. The combination of the LS and ML approach accurately delineated the tumour volume from all frames, thereby providing a scope of using PET images towards planning an accurate and effective radiotherapy treatment for lung cancer.

  5. Evaluation of single right atrial volume and function with magnetic resonance imaging in children with hypoplastic left heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijarnsorn, Chodchanok [University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Stollery Children' s Hospital, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Mahidol University, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Myers, Kimberley; Patton, David J. [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Calgary, AB (Canada); Noga, Michelle; Crawley, Cinzia; Tham, Edythe [University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Stollery Children' s Hospital, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Standardized methods to evaluate atrial properties in single ventricles are lacking. To determine the feasibility of quantifying right atrial volumes and function in hypoplastic left heart using MRI. We studied 15 infants with hypoplastic left heart prior to Glenn surgery (mean age 4.2 months [standard deviation 0.3]) who underwent cardiac MRI with evaluation of atrial volumes and emptying fraction using monoplane two-chamber, monoplane four-chamber, and biplane methods, all of which were compared to the atrial short-axial oblique stack method. We compared atrial end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and emptying fraction among these methods. We analyzed reproducibility of the methods using Bland-Altman plots. Both four-chamber and biplane methods showed high correlations for atrial end-diastolic volume (r = 0.7 and r = 0.8, respectively; P < 0.01) and end-systolic volume (r = 0.8 and r = 0.9, respectively; P < 0.01) with small mean differences (-0.2 ± 2.9 standard deviation [SD] ml and -0.8 ± 1.6 ml, respectively, for atrial end-diastolic volume and -0.8 ± 1.5 ml and -0.9 ± 0.9 ml, respectively, for atrial end-systolic volume). The short-axial oblique method was the most reproducible, followed by the four-chamber method. MRI assessment of atrial volume and function is feasible in hypoplastic left heart and might provide further insight into single-ventricle mechanics. (orig.)

  6. The volume of a soliton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, C.; Haberichter, M.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-01-01

    There exists, in general, no unique definition of the size (volume, area, etc., depending on dimension) of a soliton. Here we demonstrate that the geometric volume (area etc.) of a soliton is singled out in the sense that it exactly coincides with the thermodynamical or continuum-mechanical volume. In addition, this volume may be defined uniquely for rather arbitrary solitons in arbitrary dimensions.

  7. The volume of a soliton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, C., E-mail: adam@fpaxp1.usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela and Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Haberichter, M. [School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Kent, Canterbury, CT2 7NF (United Kingdom); Wereszczynski, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Lojasiewicza 11, Kraków (Poland)

    2016-03-10

    There exists, in general, no unique definition of the size (volume, area, etc., depending on dimension) of a soliton. Here we demonstrate that the geometric volume (area etc.) of a soliton is singled out in the sense that it exactly coincides with the thermodynamical or continuum-mechanical volume. In addition, this volume may be defined uniquely for rather arbitrary solitons in arbitrary dimensions.

  8. Aperiodic Volume Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tim D.

    Presented in this thesis is an investigation into aperiodic volume optical devices. The three main topics of research and discussion are the aperiodic volume optical devices that we call computer-generated volume holograms (CGVH), defects within periodic 3D photonic crystals, and non-periodic, but ordered 3D quasicrystals. The first of these devices, CGVHs, are designed and investigated numerically and experimentally. We study the performance of multi-layered amplitude computer-generated volume holograms in terms of efficiency and angular/frequency selectivity. Simulation results show that such aperiodic devices can increase diffraction efficiency relative to periodic amplitude volume holograms while maintaining angular and wavelength selectivity. CGVHs are also designed as voxelated volumes using a new projection optimization algorithm. They are investigated using a volumetric diffraction simulation and a standard 3D beam propagation technique as well as experimentally. Both simulation and experiment verify that the structures function according to their design. These represent the first diffractive structures that have the capacity for generating arbitrary transmission and reflection wave fronts and that provide the ability for multiplexing arbitrary functionality given different illumination conditions. Also investigated and discussed in this thesis are 3D photonic crystals and quasicrystals. We demonstrate that these devices can be fabricated using a femtosecond laser direct writing system that is particularly appropriate for fabrication of such arbitrary 3D structures. We also show that these devices can provide 3D partial bandgaps which could become complete bandgaps if fabricated using high index materials or by coating lower index materials with high index metals. Our fabrication method is particularly suited to the fabrication of engineered defects within the periodic or quasi-periodic systems. We demonstrate the potential for fabricating defects within

  9. Volume holographic memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Denz

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Volume holography represents a promising alternative to existing storage technologies. Its parallel data storage leads to high capacities combined with short access times and high transfer rates. The design and realization of a compact volume holographic storage demonstrator is presented. The technique of phase-coded multiplexing implemented to superimpose many data pages in a single location enables to store up to 480 holograms per storage location without any moving parts. Results of analog and digital data storage are shown and real time optical image processing is demonstrated.

  10. Flow velocity and volume measurement of superior and inferior mesenteric artery with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Cooper, T.G.; Jenner, G.; Potchen, E.J.; Ishigaki, Takeo.

    1994-01-01

    The flow velocity and volume of the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries (SMA, IMA) were measured with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in five healthy volunteers. Each volunteer was first measured in a fasting state, and then one, two, and three hours after a meal. The average SMA flow volume of the volunteers was 230.3±46.8 ml/min (mean±standard error) during the fasting state, and 714.7±207.7 ml/min, 339.2±85.7 ml/min, and 263.8±21.0 ml/min, respectively, at one, two, and three hours postmeal. The increase at one hour postmeal was statistically significant (p<0.05). The corresponding flow measurements in the IMA were 63.1±11.2 ml/min, 67.6±11.2 ml/min, 57.9±8.6 ml/min, and 53.2±6.8 ml/min. These values do not represent a statistically significant flow volume change in the IMA. In all volunteers, the SMA volumetric flow increased the most one hour after the food challenge (72-400% relative to baseline). Diastolic velocity in the SMA increased significantly one hour postmeal, but systolic velocity did not change significantly. The IMA did not demonstrate a significant change in either systolic or diastolic velocity. The difference between the SMA and IMA in the way of reacting against the food challenge is thought to represent the difference between the requirements of small and large intestine for blood supply after the food challenge. These data demonstrate the possibility of this modality for the assessment of conditions such as chronic mesenteric ischemia. (author)

  11. The extent of the perihemorrhagic perfusion zone correlates with hematoma volume in patients with lobar intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beseoglu, Kerim; Etminan, Nima; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Haenggi, Daniel; Turowski, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Existing data on perfusion imaging assumes the perihemorrhagic zone (PHZ) in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) to be size steady. This study investigates the size of the perihemorrhagic zone (PHZ) in patients with lobar ICH in relation to hematoma volume during the course of treatment using perfusion CT (PCT). The present analysis is based on a previously reported cohort of 20 patients undergoing surgical evacuation for lobar SICH, with pre- and early postoperative PCT scanning. Time to peak of the residue function (T max ) was measured based on the 360 cortical banding method and singular value decomposition. The size of PHZ was determined before and after treatment and correlated with hematoma volume. Preoperative mean hematoma volume constituted 63.0 ml (interquartile ranges (IQR) 39.7-99.4 ml), which correlated significantly (r = 0.563, p = 0.010) with mean PHZ size (5.67 cm, IQR 5.44-8.17 cm). Following a surgical hematoma evacuation, mean hematoma volume was reduced to 2.5 ml IQR 0.0-9.5 ml, which also resulted in a significant reduction of PHZ size to 0.45 cm(IQR 0.0-1.36 cm; p < 0.001). There was no association between postoperative hematoma volume and size of the PHZ. Our findings illustrate that the extent of the PHZ cannot be generally assumed to be constant in size and that this differs significantly following hematoma reduction in patients with space occupying lobar SICH. (orig.)

  12. The extent of the perihemorrhagic perfusion zone correlates with hematoma volume in patients with lobar intracerebral hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beseoglu, Kerim; Etminan, Nima; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Haenggi, Daniel [Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Turowski, Bernd [Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Existing data on perfusion imaging assumes the perihemorrhagic zone (PHZ) in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) to be size steady. This study investigates the size of the perihemorrhagic zone (PHZ) in patients with lobar ICH in relation to hematoma volume during the course of treatment using perfusion CT (PCT). The present analysis is based on a previously reported cohort of 20 patients undergoing surgical evacuation for lobar SICH, with pre- and early postoperative PCT scanning. Time to peak of the residue function (T{sub max}) was measured based on the 360 cortical banding method and singular value decomposition. The size of PHZ was determined before and after treatment and correlated with hematoma volume. Preoperative mean hematoma volume constituted 63.0 ml (interquartile ranges (IQR) 39.7-99.4 ml), which correlated significantly (r = 0.563, p = 0.010) with mean PHZ size (5.67 cm, IQR 5.44-8.17 cm). Following a surgical hematoma evacuation, mean hematoma volume was reduced to 2.5 ml IQR 0.0-9.5 ml, which also resulted in a significant reduction of PHZ size to 0.45 cm(IQR 0.0-1.36 cm; p < 0.001). There was no association between postoperative hematoma volume and size of the PHZ. Our findings illustrate that the extent of the PHZ cannot be generally assumed to be constant in size and that this differs significantly following hematoma reduction in patients with space occupying lobar SICH. (orig.)

  13. "Pulmonary valve replacement diminishes the presence of restrictive physiology and reduces atrial volumes": a prospective study in Tetralogy of Fallot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijuan-Domenech, Antonia; Pineda, Victor; Castro, Miguel Angel; Sureda-Barbosa, Carlos; Ribera, Aida; Cruz, Luz M; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Dos-Subirà, Laura; Subirana-Domènech, Teresa; Garcia-Dorado, David; Casaldàliga-Ferrer, Jaume

    2014-11-15

    Pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) reduces right ventricular (RV) volumes in the setting of long-term pulmonary regurgitation after Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) repair; however, little is known of its effect on RV diastolic function. Right atrial volumes may reflect the burden of RV diastolic dysfunction. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the clinical, echocardiographic, biochemical and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) variables, focusing particularly on right atrial response and right ventricular diastolic function prior to and after elective PVR in adult patients with ToF. This prospective study was conducted from January 2009 to April 2013 in consecutive patients > 18 years of age who had undergone ToF repair in childhood and were accepted for elective PVR. Twenty patients (mean age: 35 years; 70% men) agreed to enter the study. PVR was performed with a bioporcine prosthesis. Concomitant RV reduction was performed in all cases when technically possible. Pulmonary end-diastolic forward flow (EDFF) decreased significantly from 5.4 ml/m(2) to 0.3 ml/m(2) (p volumes by 25% (p = 0.0024): mean indexed diastolic/systolic atrial volumes prior to surgery were 43 ml/m(2) (SD+/-4.6)/63 ml/m(2) (SD+/-5.5), and dropped to 33 ml/m(2) (SD+/-3)/46 ml/m(2) (SD+/-2.55) post-surgery. All patients presented right ventricular diastolic and systolic volume reductions, with a mean volume reduction of 35% (p volumes in keeping with the known reduction in RV volumes, after PVR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bladder filling variations during concurrent chemotherapy and pelvic radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients: early experience of bladder volume assessment using ultrasound scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jee Suk; Yoon, Hong In; Cha, Hye Jung; Chang, Yoon Sun; Cho, Yeo Na; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub

    2013-01-01

    To describe the early experience of analyzing variations and time trends in bladder volume of the rectal cancer patients who received bladder ultrasound scan. We identified 20 consecutive rectal cancer patients who received whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) and bladder ultrasound scan between February and April 2012. Before simulation and during the entire course of treatment, patients were scanned with portable automated ultrasonic bladder scanner, 5 times consecutively, and the median value was reported. Then a radiation oncologist contoured the bladder inner wall shown on simulation computed tomography (CT) and calculated its volume. Before simulation, the median bladder volume measured using simulation CT and bladder ultrasound scan was 427 mL (range, 74 to 1,172 mL) and 417 mL (range, 147 to 1,245 mL), respectively. There was strong linear correlation (R = 0.93, p < 0.001) between the two results. During the course of treatment, there were wide variations in the bladder volume and every time, measurements were below the baseline with statistical significance (12/16). At 6 weeks after RT, the median volume was reduced by 59.3% to 175 mL. Compared to the baseline, bladder volume was reduced by 38% or 161 mL on average every week for 6 weeks. To our knowledge, this study is the first to prove that there are bladder volume variations and a reduction in bladder volume in rectal cancer patients. Moreover, our results will serve as the basis for implementation of bladder training to patients receiving RT with full bladder.

  15. Ultrasonographic gastric antral area and gastric contents volume in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Achim; Thomas, Schraner; Melanie, Fruehauf; Rabia, Liamlahi; Klaghofer, Richard; Weiss, Markus; Kellenberger, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Cross-sectional gastric antral area (GAA) measurements by ultrasonography (US) have been proposed for preoperative assessment of gastric volume in adults but not been validated in children. This study investigates whether in children gastric volumes can be predicted by US performed in different patient positions. Gastric fluid and air volumes were examined by magnetic resonance imaging before or up to 120 min after ingestion of 7 ml·kg(-1) diluted raspberry syrup in healthy volunteers who had fasted overnight. GAA was measured with US three times each in supine (SUP), elevated 45° degree supine (E45) and right decubital (RDC) position using imaging planes defined by vascular landmarks. Correlation coefficients (Pearson) between GAA and gastric volumes were calculated and Bland-Altman analysis performed. Sixteen children aged from 6.4 to 12.8 (9.2) years were included in 23 examinations: 6 after overnight fasting, 3 directly after, and 14 with a delay of 74 ± 35 min after fluid intake. GAA was 221 ± 116, 218 ± 112, and 347 ± 188 mm(2) for SUP, E45, and RDC position, respectively. The best correlation between body weight corrected total gastric/gastric fluid volume (TGV(w)/GFV(w)) with GAA was found for RDC position (R = 0.79; P < 0.01/R = 0.78; P < 0.01). Bias and precision of calculated and measured GFV(w) was 0 ± 2.8 ml·kg(-1). Correlations between GAA and TGV(w) or GFV(w) in children are best in the RDC position, but not sufficient to predict GFV(w) with a given GAA. Interpretation of isolated GAA values may be misleading. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of maximum voided volume in Korean children by use of a 48-h frequency volume chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Ouck; Kim, Kyung Do; Kim, Young Sig; Kim, Jun Mo; Moon, Du Geon; Park, Sungchan; Lee, Sang Don; Chung, Jae Min; Cho, Won Yeol

    2012-08-01

    Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort). Level of Evidence 2a. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The relationship between the maximum voided volume followed a linear curve. The formula presented, bladder capacity (mL) = 12 ×[age (years) + 11], is thought to be a reasonable one for Korean children. Korean children have a smaller bladder capacity than that reported in previous Western studies. • To develop practical guidelines for the prediction of normal bladder capacity in Korean children measured by a frequency volume chart (FVC), maximum voided volume (MVV) is an important factor in the diagnosis of children with abnormal voiding function. • In all, 298 children, aged 3-13 years, with no history of voiding disorders volunteered for the study. The MVV was determined in 219 subjects by use of a completely recorded FVC. • Linear regression analysis was used to define the exact relationship between age and bladder capacity. An approximate formula related age to bladder capacity as follows: bladder capacity (mL) = 12 ×[age (years) + 11]. • The relationship between the MVV measured by a FVC by age (3-13 years) of Korean children followed a linear curve. • When applied to normal voiding patterns, the formula presented appears to be a reasonable one for Korean children. © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  17. Effect of Pb-acetate on Testicle Weight and Volume of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israhnanto Isradji

    2011-12-01

    Design and Method: Eighty male mice placed in individual cages according to the group. Food and drink provided ad libitum. The treatment of male mice given for 6 weeks. Treatment with 0.2 ml distilled water to PI, P II were given a solution of 400 ppm Pb acetate total of 0.2 ml, P III was given a solution of 1000 ppm Pb acetate as many as 0.2 ml, and P IV were given a solution of 2000 ppm Pb acetate total of 0,2 ml by using a gastric sonde, every morning once a day for 42 days. At week 7, mice were surgery to take the testis. Testicular volume was measured and weighed. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, hypothesis is accepted when p 0.05, testis weight obtained by ANOVA test probability of 0.216 (> 0.05, mean Pb -acetate had no effect on testis weight and volume. Conclusion: Pb-acetate had no effect on testis weight and volume (Sains Medika, 3(2:150-156.

  18. Feasibility of low contrast media volume in CT angiography of the aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seehofnerová, Anna; Kok, Madeleine; Mihl, Casper; Douwes, Dave; Sailer, Anni; Nijssen, Estelle; Haan, Michiel J.W. de; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Das, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Using smaller volumes of contrast media (CM) in CT angiography (CTA) is desirable in terms of cost reduction and prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). The purpose was to evaluate the feasibility of low CM volume in CTA of the aorta. 77 patients referred for CTA of the aorta were scanned using a standard MDCT protocol at 100 kV. A bolus of 50 ml CM (Iopromide 300 mg Iodine/ml) at a flow rate of 6 ml/s was applied (Iodine delivery rate IDR = 1.8 g/s; Iodine load 15 g) followed by a saline bolus of 40 ml at the same flow rate. Scan delay was determined by the test bolus method. Subjective image quality was assessed and contrast enhancement was measured at 10 anatomical levels of the aorta. Diagnostic quality images were obtained for all patients, reaching a mean overall contrast enhancement of 324 ± 28 HU. Mean attenuation was 350 ± 60 HU at the thoracic aorta and 315 ± 83 HU at the abdominal aorta. A straightforward low volume CM protocol proved to be technically feasible and led to CTA examinations reaching diagnostic image quality of the aorta at 100 kV. Based on these findings, the use of a relatively small CM bolus can be incorporated into routine clinical imaging

  19. Evaluation of methods for MR imaging of human right ventricular heart volumes and mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauhiainen, T.; Jaervinen, V.M.; Hekali, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of two different imaging directions in the evaluation of human right ventricular (RV) heart volumes and mass with MR imaging; to compare breath-hold vs. non-breath-hold imaging in volume analysis; and to compare turbo inversion recovery imaging (TIR) with gradient echo imaging in RV mass measurement. Material and Methods: We examined 12 healthy volunteers (age 27-59 years). Breath-hold gradient echo MR imaging was performed in two imaging planes: 1) perpendicular to the RV inflow tract (RVIT view), and 2) in the transaxial view (TA view). The imaging was repeated in the TA view while the subjects were breathing freely. To analyze RV mass using TIR images, the RV was again imaged at end-diastole using the two views. The RV end-diastolic cavity (RVEDV) and muscle volume as well as end-systolic cavity volume (RVESV) were determined with the method of discs. All measurements were done blindly twice to assess repeatability of image analysis. To assess reproducibility of the measurements, 6 of the subjects were imaged twice at an interval of 5-9 weeks. Results: RVEDV averaged 133.2 ml, RVESV 61.5 ml and the RVmass 46.2 g in the RVIT view and 119.9 ml, 56.9 ml and 38.3 g in the TA view, respectively. The volumes obtained with breath-holding were slightly but not significantly smaller than the volumes obtained during normal breathing. There were no marked differences in the RV muscle mass obtained with gradient echo imaging compared to TIR imaging in either views. Repeatability of volume analysis was better in TA than RVIT view: the mean differences were 0.7±4.0 ml and 5.4±14.0 ml in end-diastole and 1.6±3.1 ml and 1.5±13.9 ml in end-systole, respectively. Repeatability of mass analysis was good in both TIR and cine images in the RVIT view but slightly better in TIR images: 0.5±2.4 g compared to 0.8±2.9 g in cine images. Reproducibility of imaging was good, mean differences for RVEDV and RVESV were 1.0±4.8 ml and 0.8±2.8 ml

  20. Efeitos de diferentes volumes correntes e da pressão expiratória final positiva sobre a troca gasosa na fístula broncopleural experimental Effects of different tidal volumes and positive end expiratory pressure on gas exchange in experimental bronchopleural fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela Cavicchia Toneloto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O presente estudo foi desenhado para identificar o efeito da pressão expiratória final positiva (PEEP e o volume corrente pulmonar ideal para ventilar animais com fístula broncopleural produzida cirurgicamente, com o intuito de reduzir a vazão da fístula sem afetar a troca gasosa. MÉTODOS: Avaliação hemodinâmica e respiratória da troca gasosa foi obtida em cinco porcos jovens, saudáveis, da linhagem Large White, ventilados mecanicamente no modo ventilatório volume controlado com FiO2 de 0.4 e relação inspiração:expiração em torno de 1:2, com freqüência respiratória mantida em 22 cpm. A fístula broncopleural foi produzida pela ressecção da língula. Um sistema de drenagem a selo d'água foi instalado e o tórax foi hermeticamente fechado. A troca gasosa e o débito da fístula broncopleural foram medidos com animais ventilados sequencialmente com volumes correntes de 4 ml/kg, 7 ml/kg e 10 ml/Kg alternando zero de pressão expiratória final positiva (ZEEP e PEEP de 10 cmH2O, sempre na mesma ordem. RESULTADOS: Esses dados são atribuídos à ventilação alveolar reduzida e às anormalidades da ventilação/perfusão que foram atenuadas com volumes correntes mais altos. PEEP aumentou o vazamento de ar pela fístula, mesmo com baixos volumes, de 2.0 ± 2,8mL para 31 ± 20,7mL (p= 0,006 e diminuiu a ventilação alveolar em todos os volumes correntes. A ventilação alveolar melhorou com altos volumes correntes, mas aumentou o débito da fístula (4 ml/kg - 2,0 ± 2,8mL e 10 mL/kg - 80,2 ± 43,9mL; p=0,001. Baixos volumes correntes resultaram em hipercapnia (ZEEP - 83,7± 6,9 mmHg e com PEEP 10 -93 ± 10,1mmHg e diminuição significativa da saturação de oxigênio arterial, em torno de 84%. CONCLUSÃO: O volume corrente de 7 ml/kg com ZEEP foi considerado o melhor volume corrente, visto que, apesar da hipercapnia moderada, a saturação de oxigênio arterial é sustentada em torno de 90%. A ventilação alveolar

  1. Mielografia em cães sadios com o meio de contraste ioversol 240 mg I/ml: Resultados clínicos e radiológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Virgínia Costa Sarmento

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o período de opacificação e a qualidade diagnóstica do ioversol 240 mg I/ml, nas regiões torácica e lombar após sua injeção na cisterna magna, e verificar seus efeitos sobre o sistema nervoso por meio de observações clínicas e neurológicas. Utilizaram-se 30 cães sadios, sem distinção de sexo ou raça, com peso entre 9 e 12 kg, divididos em três grupos de 10 animais cada. Nos animais anestesiados com diazepam e tiopental sódico, o ioversol foi injetado na dose de 0,5 ml/kg. Foram obtidas radiografias cervicais aos cinco minutos para confirmar a injeção do contraste e toracolombares aos 30, 40, 50 e 60 minutos para avaliar o período de opacificação. Exames clínicos e neurológicos foram realizados diariamente até os 7, 14 e 28 dias para os grupos I, II e III respectivamente. Efeitos adversos como movimentos de pedalagem, início de convulsão, espasmos musculares, apnéia, dispnéia e ânsia de vômito foram observados apenas durante o procedimento mielográfico. O ioversol apresentou boas radiopacidade, difusão e miscibilidade com o líquor, oferecendo também a possibilidade de redução de custos, já que pode ser autoclavado. O tempo de opacificação do contraste com valor diagnóstico atingiu 60 minutos em 60% das radiografias torácicas e em 80% das radiografias lombares. Havendo baixa incidência de alterações clínicas e neurológicas, e apropriadas qualidades radiográficas, concluiu-se que o ioversol na concentração de 240 mg I/ml é adequado e seguro para ser utilizado em mielografia de cães.

  2. Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 and Vitamin D Metabolism in Subjects with eGFR ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m².

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Shinya; Nakatani, Ayumi; Tsugawa, Naoko; Yamada, Shinsuke; Mori, Katsuhito; Imanishi, Yasuo; Ishimura, Eiji; Okano, Toshio; Inaba, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23 and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are both potent phosphaturic hormones. Since they exert opposite effects on vitamin D metabolism, the measurement of 3 vitamin D metabolites; 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25(OH)2D), allows the distinction of the effects of FGF-23 from those of PTH. The aim of this study was to elucidate which factor, FGF-23 or PTH, plays a more important role in the regulation of vitamin D metabolites in subjects with estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Subjects with eGFR ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (n = 20) were enrolled and their serum levels of FGF-23, intact PTH, and vitamin D metabolites were determined. Serum FGF-23 correlated inversely with 1,25(OH)2D (r = -0.717, p = 0.0004) and the 1,25(OH)2D/25-OH-D ratio (r = -0.518, p = 0.019), compared with a significant positive correlation between serum intact PTH and the 1,25(OH)2D/25-OH-D ratio (r = 0.562, p = 0.010). Multiple regression analyses revealed serum FGF-23 as a significant factor that was associated with serum 1,25(OH)2D (β = -0.593, p = 0.018), 1,25(OH)2D/25-OH-D ratio (β = -0.521, p = 0.025), and the 24,25(OH)2D/1,25(OH)2D ratio (β = 0.632, p = 0.008), and intact PTH as a significant factor associated with the 1,25(OH)2D/25-OH-D ratio (β = 0.445, p = 0.028). This study demonstrated that, even in subjects with eGFR ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2), FGF-23 might play an important role in the regulation of vitamin D metabolism. In addition to the established role of PTH, the association between FGF-23 and indices of vitamin D metabolism suggested the potential role of FGF-23 on phosphate metabolism in such patients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Design for volume reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, R.; Boks, C.; Stevels, A.

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally packaging design-for-sustainability (DfS) strongly focuses on resource conservation and material recycling. The type and amount of materials used has been the driver in design. For consumer electronics (CE) products this weight-based approach is too limited; a volume-based approach is

  4. Another year, another volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill Block

    2012-01-01

    This issue represents the final one in volume 76 of Journal of Wildlife Management. As this one is pretty much in the books, one cannot help but wonder what the future holds for the journal. Lenny Brennan is putting together a piece for Wildlife Society Bulletin to examine how The Wildlife Society publications have changed through time. He solicited input from past and...

  5. Operation, Maintenance and Performance Evaluation of the Potomac Estuary Experimental Water Treatment Plant. Appendix. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    TO 16 MARCH 1983 VIRUS ASSAY (Continued) Lower Volume Detect ion v Samw lno Filtered CeIll Limit Concentration Date (Gallons) Line (MPNCU/Gallon...through a glass fiber filter which has been prepared with 100 ml of Milli-Q. 11. Collect samples of and/or analyze filtrate for the parameters listed below...constant for each jar test at 50 mg/L k 2. 200 ml of supernatant filtered through a Gelman glass fiber filter Discussion. The results summarized above

  6. Immunoglobulin G levels during collection of large volume plasma for fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Thomas; Rothe, Remo; Moog, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    There is a need of comprehensive work dealing with the quality of plasma for fractionation with respect to the IgG content as today most plasma derivates are used to treat patients with immunodeficiencies and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, a prospective study was carried out to analyse IgG levels before plasmapheresis and every 200ml collected plasma. Fifty-four experienced plasmapheresis donors were recruited for subsequent 850ml plasmapheresis using the Aurora Plasmapheresis System. Donorś peripheral blood counts were analysed before and after plasmapheresis using an electronic counter. Total protein, IgG and citrate were measured turbidometrically before, during and after apheresis as well as in the plasma product. Furthermore, platelets, red and white blood cells were analysed as parameters of product quality. An average of 2751±247ml blood was processed in 47±6min. The collected plasma volume was 850±1mL and citrate consumption was 177±15mL. A continuous drop of donors' IgG level was observed during plasmapheresis. The drop was 13% of the IgG baseline value at 800mL collected plasma. Total protein, IgG and cell counts of the plasma product met current guidelines of plasma for fractionation. Donors' IgG levels during apheresis showed a steady decrease without compromising the quality of plasma product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Blood volume of nonsplenectomized and splenectomized cats before and after acute hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breznock, E.M.; Strack, D.

    1982-01-01

    Blood volume (BV) was determined in awake, nonsplenectomized (NSPX) and splenectomized (SPX) cats before and after hemorrhage (6 ml/kg). Each NSPX cat had a determined BV at least 10 ml/kg greater than the same cat after splenectomy. The mean BV of SPX cats was 43.4 +/- 8.94. ml kg (4.3% of body weight). The calculated RBC masses of NSPX and SPX cats were 17.0 +/- 4.07 and 12.2 +/- 1.12 ml/kg, respectively. Each NSPX cat had apparent RBC masses of 5 ml/kg greater than that of the same cat after splenectomy was done. At 1 hour after a hemorrhage, the BV and RBC masses determined in SPX cats were 46.7 +/- 12.1 and 9.7 +/- 1.90 ml/kg, respectively. Extravascular-to-intravascular fluid flux (calculated from RBC masses and plasma protein dilution) was approximately 0.80% of body weight. The indirect method with 51 Cr-labeled RBC for BV determination was accurate and precise in awake, SPX cats; in awake, NSPX cats, the 51 Cr-labeled RBC dilution method was precise, but not accurate. The spleen in the cat resulted in marked overestimations of BV and RBC masses

  8. The Application of Stable Isotopes for Assessing the Hydrological, Sulfur, and Iron Balances of Acidic Mining Lake ML 111 (Lusatia, Germany) as a Basis for Biotechnological Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoeller, K.; Strauch, G.

    2002-01-01

    Stable isotope (δ 18 O-H 2 O, δ 2 H-H 2 O δ 34 S-SO 4 2- ) and hydrochemical data (SO 4 2- , Fe-concentrations) have been used to estimate the annual groundwater inflow and outflow of mining lake ML 111 and to calculate the total amount of dissolved sulfate and iron that is carried into the lake by groundwater. The hydrological balance suggests an annual groundwater inflow of 23 700 m 3 and an annual groundwater outflow of 15 700 m 3 . The calculation of the sulfur and iron balances yielded an annual sulfate input of 37 800 kg and an annual iron input of 7000 kg with the groundwater inflow. Furthermore it was shown that significant fluxes of these elements go into the lake sediments which results in continuous release of acidity in the lake water

  9. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT for the detection of bone metastasis in recurrent prostate cancer and a PSA level <2 ng/ml

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars J; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja

    2017-01-01

    /computed tomography ((68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT) is a novel and promising method for imaging in prostate cancer. The present study reports two cases of patients with prostate cancer with biochemical recurrence, with evidence of bone metastases on (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT images and low prostate specific antigen PSA levels (.../ml) and PSA doubling time >6 months. The bone metastases were verified by supplementary imaging with (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT and magnetic resonance imaging as well as biochemical responses to androgen deprivation therapy. Therefore, (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT is promising for the restaging of patients...... with prostate cancer with biochemical recurrence, including patients with low PSA levels and low PSA kinetics....

  10. M2Lite: An Open-source, Light-weight, Pluggable and Fast Proteome Discoverer MSF to mzIdentML Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyetan, Paul; Zhang, Bai; Chen, Lily; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Hui

    2014-04-28

    Proteome Discoverer is one of many tools used for protein database search and peptide to spectrum assignment in mass spectrometry-based proteomics. However, the inadequacy of conversion tools makes it challenging to compare and integrate its results to those of other analytical tools. Here we present M2Lite, an open-source, light-weight, easily pluggable and fast conversion tool. M2Lite converts proteome discoverer derived MSF files to the proteomics community defined standard - the mzIdentML file format. M2Lite's source code is available as open-source at https://bitbucket.org/paiyetan/m2lite/src and its compiled binaries and documentation can be freely downloaded at https://bitbucket.org/paiyetan/m2lite/downloads.

  11. WellnessRules: A Web 3.0 Case Study in RuleML-Based Prolog-N3 Profile Interoperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boley, Harold; Osmun, Taylor Michael; Craig, Benjamin Larry

    An interoperation study, WellnessRules, is described, where rules about wellness opportunities are created by participants in rule languages such as Prolog and N3, and translated within a wellness community using RuleML/XML. The wellness rules are centered around participants, as profiles, encoding knowledge about their activities conditional on the season, the time-of-day, the weather, etc. This distributed knowledge base extends FOAF profiles with a vocabulary and rules about wellness group networking. The communication between participants is organized through Rule Responder, permitting wellness-profile translation and distributed querying across engines. WellnessRules interoperates between rules and queries in the relational (Datalog) paradigm of the pure-Prolog subset of POSL and in the frame (F-logic) paradigm of N3. An evaluation of Rule Responder instantiated for WellnessRules revealed acceptable Web response times.

  12. In-treatment stroke volume predicts cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnebakken, Mai T; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    , the prespecified primary study endpoint, was assessed in Cox regression analysis using data from baseline and annual follow-up visits in 855 patients during 4.8 years of randomized losartan-based or atenolol-based treatment in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) echocardiography...... with higher risk of cardiovascular events {hazard ratio 1.69 per 1 SD (6 ml/m2.04) lower stroke volume [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35–2.11], P secondary model also independent of stress-corrected midwall shortening......, hence, adds information on cardiovascular risk in treated hypertensive patients beyond assessment of left ventricular structure alone....

  13. he effect of exercise on hippocampal volume and neurotrophines in patients with major depression–A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Rostrup, Egill; Thomsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hippocampal volume is reduced in patients with major depression. Exercise leads to an increased hippocampal volume in schizophrenia and in healthy old adults. The effect of exercise on hippocampal volume is potentially mediated by brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), vascular...... endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). The aim of this trial was to assess the effect of an aerobic exercise intervention on hippocampal volume and serum BDNF, VEGF, and IGF-1 in patients with major depression. METHODS: Patients were randomized to an aerobic exercise...... intervention (n=41) or a control condition (n=38). Both interventions consisted of three supervised sessions per week during a three months period. RESULTS: Post-intervention the increase in maximal oxygen uptake was 3.90 ml/kg/min (SD 5.1) in the aerobic exercise group and 0.95 ml/kg/min (SD 6...

  14. Tumor Volume Changes Assessed by Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Volumetry in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation: The Impact of the Volume Reduction Ratio on the Prediction of Pathologic Complete Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Young Wan; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Jin Soo; Min, Byung Soh; Kim, Hogeun; Lim, Joon Seok; Seong, Jinsil; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between tumor volume changes assessed by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry and the histopathologic tumor response in rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by radical surgery were prospectively enrolled in the study. The post-treatment tumor volume and tumor volume reduction ratio (% decrease ratio), as shown by 3D MR volumetry, were compared with the histopathologic response, as shown by T and N downstaging and the tumor regression grade (TRG). Results: There were no significant differences in the post-treatment tumor volume and the volume reduction ratio shown by 3D MR volumetry with respect to T and N downstaging and the tumor regression grade. In a multivariate analysis, the tumor volume reduction ratio was not significantly associated with T and N downstaging. The volume reduction ratio (>75%, p = 0.01) and the pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level (≤3 ng/ml, p = 0.01), but not the post-treatment volume shown by 3D MR (≤ 5ml), were, however, significantly associated with an increased pathologic complete response rate. Conclusion: More than 75% of the tumor volume reduction ratios were significantly associated with a high pathologic complete response rate. Therefore, limited treatment options such as local excision or simple observation might be considered after preoperative CRT in this patient population.

  15. How to Improve Fault Tolerance in Disaster Predictions: A Case Study about Flash Floods Using IoT, ML and Real Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furquim, Gustavo; Filho, Geraldo P R; Jalali, Roozbeh; Pessin, Gustavo; Pazzi, Richard W; Ueyama, Jó

    2018-03-19

    The rise in the number and intensity of natural disasters is a serious problem that affects the whole world. The consequences of these disasters are significantly worse when they occur in urban districts because of the casualties and extent of the damage to goods and property that is caused. Until now feasible methods of dealing with this have included the use of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for data collection and machine-learning (ML) techniques for forecasting natural disasters. However, there have recently been some promising new innovations in technology which have supplemented the task of monitoring the environment and carrying out the forecasting. One of these schemes involves adopting IP-based (Internet Protocol) sensor networks, by using emerging patterns for IoT. In light of this, in this study, an attempt has been made to set out and describe the results achieved by SENDI (System for dEtecting and forecasting Natural Disasters based on IoT). SENDI is a fault-tolerant system based on IoT, ML and WSN for the detection and forecasting of natural disasters and the issuing of alerts. The system was modeled by means of ns-3 and data collected by a real-world WSN installed in the town of São Carlos - Brazil, which carries out the data collection from rivers in the region. The fault-tolerance is embedded in the system by anticipating the risk of communication breakdowns and the destruction of the nodes during disasters. It operates by adding intelligence to the nodes to carry out the data distribution and forecasting, even in extreme situations. A case study is also included for flash flood forecasting and this makes use of the ns-3 SENDI model and data collected by WSN.

  16. How to Improve Fault Tolerance in Disaster Predictions: A Case Study about Flash Floods Using IoT, ML and Real Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furquim, Gustavo; Filho, Geraldo P. R.; Pessin, Gustavo; Pazzi, Richard W.

    2018-01-01

    The rise in the number and intensity of natural disasters is a serious problem that affects the whole world. The consequences of these disasters are significantly worse when they occur in urban districts because of the casualties and extent of the damage to goods and property that is caused. Until now feasible methods of dealing with this have included the use of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for data collection and machine-learning (ML) techniques for forecasting natural disasters. However, there have recently been some promising new innovations in technology which have supplemented the task of monitoring the environment and carrying out the forecasting. One of these schemes involves adopting IP-based (Internet Protocol) sensor networks, by using emerging patterns for IoT. In light of this, in this study, an attempt has been made to set out and describe the results achieved by SENDI (System for dEtecting and forecasting Natural Disasters based on IoT). SENDI is a fault-tolerant system based on IoT, ML and WSN for the detection and forecasting of natural disasters and the issuing of alerts. The system was modeled by means of ns-3 and data collected by a real-world WSN installed in the town of São Carlos - Brazil, which carries out the data collection from rivers in the region. The fault-tolerance is embedded in the system by anticipating the risk of communication breakdowns and the destruction of the nodes during disasters. It operates by adding intelligence to the nodes to carry out the data distribution and forecasting, even in extreme situations. A case study is also included for flash flood forecasting and this makes use of the ns-3 SENDI model and data collected by WSN. PMID:29562657

  17. How to Improve Fault Tolerance in Disaster Predictions: A Case Study about Flash Floods Using IoT, ML and Real Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Furquim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The rise in the number and intensity of natural disasters is a serious problem that affects the whole world. The consequences of these disasters are significantly worse when they occur in urban districts because of the casualties and extent of the damage to goods and property that is caused. Until now feasible methods of dealing with this have included the use of wireless sensor networks (WSNs for data collection and machine-learning (ML techniques for forecasting natural disasters. However, there have recently been some promising new innovations in technology which have supplemented the task of monitoring the environment and carrying out the forecasting. One of these schemes involves adopting IP-based (Internet Protocol sensor networks, by using emerging patterns for IoT. In light of this, in this study, an attempt has been made to set out and describe the results achieved by SENDI (System for dEtecting and forecasting Natural Disasters based on IoT. SENDI is a fault-tolerant system based on IoT, ML and WSN for the detection and forecasting of natural disasters and the issuing of alerts. The system was modeled by means of ns-3 and data collected by a real-world WSN installed in the town of São Carlos - Brazil, which carries out the data collection from rivers in the region. The fault-tolerance is embedded in the system by anticipating the risk of communication breakdowns and the destruction of the nodes during disasters. It operates by adding intelligence to the nodes to carry out the data distribution and forecasting, even in extreme situations. A case study is also included for flash flood forecasting and this makes use of the ns-3 SENDI model and data collected by WSN.

  18. Prognostic and predictive value of liver volume on colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Young Suk; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prognostic and predictive value of liver volume in colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases. Sixteen patients received whole liver radiotherapy (WLRT) between January 1997 and June 2013. A total dose of 21 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions. The median survival time after WLRT was 9 weeks. In univariate analysis, performance status, serum albumin and total bilirubin level, liver volume and extrahepatic metastases were associated with survival. The mean liver volume was significantly different between subgroups with and without pain relief (3,097 and 4,739 mL, respectively; p = 0.002). A larger liver volume is a poor prognostic factor for survival and also a negative predictive factor for response to WLRT. If patients who are referred for WLRT have large liver volume, they should be informed of the poor prognosis and should be closely observed during and after WLRT.

  19. Prognostic and predictive value of liver volume on colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Young Suk; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To determine the prognostic and predictive value of liver volume in colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases. Sixteen patients received whole liver radiotherapy (WLRT) between January 1997 and June 2013. A total dose of 21 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions. The median survival time after WLRT was 9 weeks. In univariate analysis, performance status, serum albumin and total bilirubin level, liver volume and extrahepatic metastases were associated with survival. The mean liver volume was significantly different between subgroups with and without pain relief (3,097 and 4,739 mL, respectively; p = 0.002). A larger liver volume is a poor prognostic factor for survival and also a negative predictive factor for response to WLRT. If patients who are referred for WLRT have large liver volume, they should be informed of the poor prognosis and should be closely observed during and after WLRT.

  20. Increasing preload volume with water reduces rated appetite but not food intake in healthy men even with minimum delay between preload and test meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard W; French, Stephen J; Robinson, Tristan M; Yeomans, Martin R

    2003-02-01

    The role of gastric volume in the short-term control of eating in humans remains unclear, with some studies reporting that food volume alone can reduce appetite but others finding no such effect. A recent study in our laboratory, found effects of preload volume on subjective appetite (hunger, fullness) but not intake, and found effects of preload energy on intake but not appetite. That study used an interval of 30 min between serving preloads and the test meal, and the present study attempted to maximise the effects of the volume manipulation by removing the delay between the preload and test meal. We administered four soup-based preloads varying in volume (150 and 450 ml) using water, and energy density (1.4 and 4.2 kJ/ml) using maltodextrin, producing three energy levels (209, 629, 629 and 1886 kJ; repeated measures). These were followed immediately by an unlimited hot pasta lunch, during which food weight was monitored continuously by computer. Increasing soup volume at constant energy (629 kJ) reduced appetite ratings, but not intake. In contrast, increasing soup energy at constant volume (450 ml) reduced intake, without affecting appetite. The discrepancies between our results and other reported studies suggest that volume is more influential when intakes are large, or that there may be a threshold concentration for nutrients in the GI tract before volume alone is tangibly expressed in subsequent eating.

  1. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  2. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  3. Minimum Effective Volume of Lidocaine for Ultrasound-Guided Costoclavicular Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotthisopha, Thitipan; Elgueta, Maria Francisca; Samerchua, Artid; Leurcharusmee, Prangmalee; Tiyaprasertkul, Worakamol; Gordon, Aida; Finlayson, Roderick J; Tran, De Q

    This dose-finding study aimed to determine the minimum effective volume in 90% of patients (MEV90) of lidocaine 1.5% with epinephrine 5 μg/mL for ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block. Using an in-plane technique and a lateral-to-medial direction, the block needle was positioned in the middle of the 3 cords of the brachial plexus in the costoclavicular space. The entire volume of lidocaine was deposited in this location. Dose assignment was carried out using a biased-coin-design up-and-down sequential method, where the total volume of local anesthetic administered to each patient depended on the response of the previous one. In case of failure, the next subject received a higher volume (defined as the previous volume with an increment of 2.5 mL). If the previous patient had a successful block, the next subject was randomized to a lower volume (defined as the previous volume with a decrement of 2.5 mL), with a probability of b = 0.11, or the same volume, with a probability of 1 - b = 0.89. Success was defined, at 30 minutes, as a minimal score of 14 of 16 points using a sensorimotor composite scale. Patients undergoing surgery of the elbow, forearm, wrist, or hand were prospectively enrolled until 45 successful blocks were obtained. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (ID NCT02932670). Fifty-seven patients were included in the study. Using isotonic regression and bootstrap confidence interval, the MEV90 for ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block was estimated to be 34.0 mL (95% confidence interval, 33.4-34.4 mL). All patients with a minimal composite score of 14 points at 30 minutes achieved surgical anesthesia intraoperatively. For ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block, the MEV90 of lidocaine 1.5% with epinephrine 5 μg/mL is 34 mL. Further dose-finding studies are required for other concentrations of lidocaine, other local anesthetic agents, and multiple-injection techniques.

  4. Minimal invasive treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction in low volume pelvis: A comparative study of endopyelotomy and laparoscopic nondismembered pyeloplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Pratipal; Jain, Paresh; Dharaskar, Anand; Mandhani, Anil; Dubey, Deepak; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Anant; Srivastava, Aneesh

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of nondismembered laparoscopic pyeloplasty and percutaneous endopyelotomy for ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) with low volume renal pelvis. Material and Methods: Retrospective acquired data of 34 patients of laparoscopic nondismembered pyeloplasty was compared with 26 patients of UPJO with pelvic volume less than 50 ml undergoing antegrade endopyelotomy and analyzed for clinical parameters, operative outcomes and success of procedures. All patient...

  5. Dual Energy CT Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Disease: Feasibility of Using Lower Contrast Medium Volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Almutairi

    Full Text Available One of the main drawbacks associated with Dual Energy Computed Tomography Angiography (DECTA is the risk of developing contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN. The aim of the present study was firstly, to design an optimal CT imaging protocol by determining the feasibility of using a reduced contrast medium volume in peripheral arterial DECTA, and secondly, to compare the results with those obtained from using routine contrast medium volume.Thirty four patients underwent DECTA for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease. They were randomly divided into two groups: Group 1 (routine contrast volume group with n = 17, injection rate 4-5 ml/s, and 1.5 ml/kg of contrast medium, and Group 2 ((low contrast volume group, with n = 17, injection rate 4-5ml/s, and contrast medium volume 0.75 ml/kg. A fast kilovoltage-switching 64-slice CT scanner in the dual-energy mode was employed for the study. A total of 6 datasets of monochromatic images at 50, 55, 60, 65, 70 and 75 keV levels were reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR at 50%. A 4-point scale was the tool for qualitative analysis of results. The two groups were compared and assessed quantitatively for image quality on the basis of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR. Radiation and contrast medium doses were also compared.The overall mean CT attenuation and mean noise for all lower extremity body parts was significantly lower for the low volume contrast group (p<0.001, and varied significantly between groups (p = 0.001, body parts (p<0.001 and keVs (p<0.001. The interaction between group body parts was significant with CT attenuation and CNR (p = 0.002 and 0.003 respectively, and marginally significant with SNR (p = 0.047, with minimal changes noticed between the two groups. Group 2 (low contrast volume group displayed the lowest image noise between 65 and 70 keV, recorded the highest SNR and CNR at 65 keV, and produced significantly lower

  6. Three-Dimensional Eyeball and Orbit Volume Modification After LeFort III Midface Distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smektala, Tomasz; Nysjö, Johan; Thor, Andreas; Homik, Aleksandra; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Safranow, Krzysztof; Dowgierd, Krzysztof; Olszewski, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate orbital volume modification with LeFort III midface distraction in patients with craniosynostosis and its influence on eyeball volume and axial diameter modification. Orbital volume was assessed by the semiautomatic segmentation method based on deformable surface models and on 3-dimensional (3D) interaction with haptics. The eyeball volumes and diameters were automatically calculated after manual segmentation of computed tomographic scans with 3D slicer software. The mean, minimal, and maximal differences as well as the standard deviation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for intraobserver and interobserver measurements reliability were calculated. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare measured values before and after surgery. P eyeball volume were 0.87 and 0.86, respectively. The orbital volume increased significantly after surgery: 30.32% (mean, 5.96  mL) for the left orbit and 31.04% (mean, 6.31  mL) for the right orbit. The mean increase in eyeball volume was 12.3%. The mean increases in the eyeball axial dimensions were 7.3%, 9.3%, and 4.4% for the X-, Y-, and Z-axes, respectively. The Wilcoxon signed rank test showed that preoperative and postoperative eyeball volumes, as well as the diameters along the X- and Y-axes, were statistically significant. Midface distraction in patients with syndromic craniostenosis results in a significant increase (P eyeball volumes. The 2 methods (haptic-aided semiautomatic segmentation and manual 3D slicer segmentation) are reproducible techniques for orbit and eyeball volume measurements.

  7. Dissociation of the effects of preload volume and energy content on subjective appetite and food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard; French, Stephen; Robinson, Tristan; Yeomans, Martin

    2002-05-01

    Previous research suggests that enhancing the volume of a food preload without altering energy content can result in reduced appetite, although the limited evidence means that the conditions under which this effect will occur are not yet clear. In the present study, we used a Universal Eating Monitor (UEM) to record test meal intake constantly, in parallel with appetite ratings, following soup-based preloads that varied both in volume (150 vs. 450 ml) and energy density (1.4 vs. 4.2 kJ/ml). Healthy young men (n=20) received four different preload conditions (repeated measures) followed by unlimited hot pasta test meals (interval 30 min). They completed appetite ratings during and after each laboratory session, and food diaries for the afternoon and evening following each session. Subjective appetite after the preloads was reduced by the high-volume preloads relative to low-volume preloads, with no difference between the two at each volume level. This indicates an effect of volume, but no effect of energy. Test meal intake in the high-volume, high-energy-density condition was reduced relative to the other conditions, which did not differ from one another. This indicates an effect of total energy, but no effect of volume. The dissociation between these different measures of appetite might be explained in terms of largely cognitive influences on subjective appetite between preload and test meal, contrasted with stronger physiological influences on actual intake during the test meal. With regard to previous studies, it is argued that food volume is more influential under circumstances where gastric volume is closer to its normal limits.

  8. PENERAPAN METODA TAGUCHI SEBAGAI USULAN PERBAIKAN KUALITAS DALAM MENGHADAPI PERMASALAHAN CACAT PADA PRODUK BOTOL MORNING FRESH (LIME) ISI 1000 ML DI CV. TUNGGAL JAYA PLASTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Adianto, Hari; Agustin, Yeny; Wibisono, Yogi Yusuf

    2017-01-01

    One of the company efforts in increasing the sales volume of a product is with maintaining and increasing the quality of a product that have been produce by the company. Therefore, it is very important for the company to analyze and identify the problems that have been caused during the production process so the company can increase the quality of the product and productivity. Problems that cause during analyzing the defect product in production is how to arrange the optimal setting from each...

  9. Quantum volume hologram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, Denis V.; Sokolov, Ivan V.; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scheme for parallel spatially multimode quantum memory for light. The scheme is based on a counterpropagating quantum signal wave and a strong classical reference wave as in a classical volume hologram and therefore can be called a quantum volume hologram. The medium for the hologram consists of a spatially extended ensemble of atoms placed in a magnetic field. The write-in and readout of this quantum hologram is as simple as that of its classical counterpart and consists of a single-pass illumination. In addition, we show that the present scheme for a quantum hologram is less sensitive to diffraction and therefore is capable of achieving a higher density of storage of spatial modes as compared to previous proposals. We present a feasibility study and show that experimental implementation is possible with available cold atomic samples. A quantum hologram capable of storing entangled images can become an important ingredient in quantum information processing and quantum imaging.

  10. Effect of body position on respiratory system volumes in anesthetized red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) as measured via computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Shachar; Hawkins, Michelle G; Jones, James H; Pascoe, Peter J; Kass, Philip H; Wisner, Erik R

    2009-09-01

    To determine the effects of body position on lung and air-sac volumes in anesthetized and spontaneously breathing red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). 6 adult red-tailed hawks (sex unknown). A crossover study design was used for quantitative estimation of lung and air-sac volumes in anesthetized hawks in 3 body positions: dorsal, right lateral, and sternal recumbency. Lung volume, lung density, and air-sac volume were calculated from helical computed tomographic (CT) images by use of software designed for volumetric analysis of CT data. Effects of body position were compared by use of repeated-measures ANOVA and a paired Student t test. Results for all pairs of body positions were significantly different from each other. Mean +/- SD lung density was lowest when hawks were in sternal recumbency (-677 +/- 28 CT units), followed by right lateral (-647 +/- 23 CT units) and dorsal (-630 +/- 19 CT units) recumbency. Mean lung volume was largest in sternal recumbency (28.6 +/- 1.5 mL), followed by right lateral (27.6 +/- 1.7 mL) and dorsal (27.0 +/- 1.5 mL) recumbency. Mean partial air-sac volume was largest in sternal recumbency (27.0 +/- 19.3 mL), followed by right lateral (21.9 +/- 16.1 mL) and dorsal (19.3 +/- 16.9 mL) recumbency. In anesthetized red-tailed hawks, positioning in sternal recumbency resulted in the greatest lung and air-sac volumes and lowest lung density, compared with positioning in right lateral and dorsal recumbency. Additional studies are necessary to determine the physiologic effects of body position on the avian respira