WorldWideScience

Sample records for volts flares observed

  1. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  2. Multi-spectral observations of flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarello, F.

    2016-11-01

    Observations show that during solar flares radiation can be emitted across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, spanning from gamma rays to radio waves. These emissions, related to the conversion of magnetic energy into other forms of energy (kinetic, thermal, waves) through magnetic reconnection, are due to different physical processes that can occur in different layers of the Sun. This means that flare observations need to be carried out using instruments operating in different wave-bands in order to achieve a complete scenario of the processes going on. Taking into account that most of the radiative energy is emitted at optical and UV wavelengths, observations carried out from space, need to be complemented by observations carried out from ground-based telescopes. Nowadays, the possibility to carry on high temporal, spatial and spectral resolution from ground-based telescopes in coordinated campaigns with space-borne instruments (like, i.e., IRIS and HINODE) gives the opportunity to investigate the details of the flare emission at different wavelengths and can provide useful hints to understand these phenomena and compare observations with models. However, it is undoubted that sometimes the pointing to the flaring region is not an easy task, due to the necessity to provide the target coordinates to satellites with some hours in advance. Some problems arising from this issue will be discussed. Moreover, new projects related to flare catalogues and archives will be presented.

  3. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  4. MOST Observations of Our Nearest Neighbor: Flares on Proxima Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Kipping, David M.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Cameron, Chris

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of white-light flares from the active M5.5 dwarf Proxima Centauri using the Canadian microsatellite Microvariability and Oscillations of STars. Using 37.6 days of monitoring data from 2014 to 2015, we have detected 66 individual flare events, the largest number of white-light flares observed to date on Proxima Cen. Flare energies in our sample range from 1029 to 1031.5 erg. The flare rate is lower than that of other classic flare stars of a similar spectral type, such as UV Ceti, which may indicate Proxima Cen had a higher flare rate in its youth. Proxima Cen does have an unusually high flare rate given its slow rotation period, however. Extending the observed power-law occurrence distribution down to 1028 erg, we show that flares with flux amplitudes of 0.5% occur 63 times per day, while superflares with energies of 1033 erg occur ∼8 times per year. Small flares may therefore pose a great difficulty in searches for transits from the recently announced 1.27 M ⊕ Proxima b, while frequent large flares could have significant impact on the planetary atmosphere.

  5. MOST Observations of our Nearest Neighbor: Flares on Proxima Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A; Sasselov, Dimitar; Matthews, Jaymie M; Cameron, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of white light flares from the active M5.5 dwarf Proxima Centauri using the Canadian microsatellite MOST. Using 37.6 days of monitoring data from 2014 and 2015, we have detected 66 individual flare events, the largest number of white light flares observed to date on Proxima Cen. Flare energies in our sample range from $10^{29}$-$10^{31.5}$ erg, with complex, multi-peaked structure found in 22% of these events. The flare rate is lower than that of other classic flare stars of similar spectral type, such as UV Ceti, which may indicate Proxima Cen had a higher flare rate in its youth. Proxima Cen does have an unusually high flare rate given the slow reported rotation period, however. Extending the observed power-law occurrence distribution down to $10^{28}$ erg, we show that flares with flux amplitudes of 0.5% occur 63 times per day, while superflares with energies of $10^{33}$ erg occur ~8 times per year. Small flares may therefore pose a great difficulty in searches for transits from the rec...

  6. Modern observations and models of Solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    As well known, that fast particles propagating along flare loop generate bremsstrahlung hard x-ray emission and gyro-synchrotron microwave emission. We present the self-consistent kinetic description of propagation accelerated particles. The key point of this approach is taking into account the effect of reverse current. In our two-dimensional model the electric field of reverse current has the strong influence to the beam of accelerated particles. It decelerates part of the electrons in the beam and turns back other part of them without significant energy loss. The exact analytical solution for the appropriate kinetic equation with Landau collision integral was found. Using derived distribution function of electrons we’ve calculated evolution of their energy spectrum and plasma heating, coronal microwave emission and characteristics of hard x-ray emission in the corona and in the chromosphere. All results were compared with modern high precision space observations.

  7. Using Two-Ribbon Flare Observations and MHD Simulations to Constrain Flare Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 363 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from June 2010 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes, reconnection flux rates and vertical currents with the properties from MHD simulations.

  8. Study of white-light flares observed by Hinode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Min Wang

    2009-01-01

    White-light flares are considered to be the most energetic flaring events that are observable in the optical broad-band continuum of the solar spectrum. They have not been commonly observed. Observations of white-light flares with sub-arcsecond resolution have been very rare. The continuous high resolution observations of Hinode provide a unique opportunity to systematically study the white-light flares with a spatial resolution around 0.2 arcsec. We surveyed all the flares above GOES magnitude C5.0 since the launch of Hinode in 2006 October. 13 of these kinds of flares were covered by the Hinode G-band observations. We analyzed the peak contrasts and equivalent areas (calculated via integrated excess emission contrast) of these flares as a function of the GOES X-ray flux, and found that the cut-off visibility is likely around M1 flares under the observing limit of Hinode. Many other observational and physical factors should affect the visibility of white-light flares; as the observing conditions are improved, smaller flares are likely to have detectable white-light emissions. We are cautious that this limiting visibility is an overestimate, because G-band observations contain emissions from the upper atmosphere.Among the 13 events analyzed, only the M8.7 flare of 2007 June 4 had near-simultaneous observations in both the G-band and the blue continuum. The blue continuum had a peak contrast of 94% vs. 175% in G-band for this event. The equivalent area in the blue continuum is an order of magnitude lower than that in the G-band. Very recently, Jess et al.studied a C2.0 flare with a peak contrast of 300% in the blue continuum. Compared to the events presented in this letter, that event is probably an unusual white-light flare: a very small kernel with a large contrast that can be detected in high resolution observations.

  9. Implications of RHESSI Flare Observations for Magnetic Reconnection Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of the 2002 April 15 solar flare and related flares provide compelling evidence for the formation of a large-scale, reconnecting current sheet in at least some flares. We describe the observed evolution of the April 15 flare in terms of magnetic reconnection models. We argue that the flare most likely evolved through magnetic geometries associated with super-slow reconnection (early rise phase), fast reconnection (impulsive phase), and slow reconnection (gradual phase). We also provide evidence for X-ray brightenings within the evolving current sheet, possibly induced by the tearing mode instability. This work was supported in part by the RHESSI Program and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Program. This work would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the entire RHESSI team.

  10. The Relation between Solar Eruption Topologies and Observed Flare Features I: Flare Ribbons

    CERN Document Server

    Savcheva, A; McKillop, S; McCauley, P; Hanson, E; Su, Y; Werner, E; DeLuca, E E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a topological magnetic field investigation of seven two-ribbon flares in sigmoidal active regions observed with Hinode, STEREO, and SDO. We first derive the 3D coronal magnetic field structure of all regions using marginally unstable 3D coronal magnetic field models created with the flux rope insertion method. The unstable models have been shown to be a good model of the flaring magnetic field configurations. Regions are selected based on their pre-flare configurations along with the appearance and observational coverage of flare ribbons, and the model is constrained using pre-flare features observed in extreme ultraviolet and X-ray passbands. We perform a topology analysis of the models by computing the squashing factor, Q, in order to determine the locations of prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). QSLs from these maps are compared to flare ribbons at their full extents. We show that in all cases the straight segments of the two J-shaped ribbons are matched very well by the flux...

  11. Flare energetics: analysis of a large flare on YZ Canis Minoris observed simultaneously in the ultraviolet, optical and radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Oord, G. H. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Rodono, M.; Gary, D. E.; Henry, G. W.; Byrne, P. B.; Linsky, J. L.; Haisch, B. M.; Pagano, I.; Leto, G.

    1996-06-01

    The results of coordinated observations of the dMe star YZ CMi at optical, UV and radio wavelengths during 3-7 February 1983 are presented. YZ CMi showed repeated optical flaring with the largest flare having a magnitude of 3.8 in the U-band. This flare coincided with an IUE exposure which permits a comparison of the emission measure curves of YZ CMi in its flaring and quiescent state. During the flare a downward shift of the transition zone is observed while the radiative losses in the range 10^4^-10^7^K strongly increase. The optical flare is accompanied with a radio flare at 6cm, while at 20cm no emission is detected. The flare is interpreted in terms of optically thick synchrotron emission. We present a combined interpretation of the optical/radio flare and show that the flare can be interpreted within the context of solar two-ribbon/white-light flares. Special attention is paid to the bombardment of dMe atmospheres by particle beams. We show that the characteristic temperature of the heated atmosphere is almost independent of the beam flux and lies within the range of solar white-light flare temperatures. We also show that it is unlikely that stellar flares emit black-body spectra. The fraction of accelerated particles, as follows from our combined optical/radio interpretation is in good agreement with the fraction determined by two-ribbon flare reconnection models.

  12. Dual frequency observations of flares with the VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.; Bastian, T. S.; Hurford, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Observations are presented of two subflares near the limb on 21 and 22 November 1981 and an M7.7 flare on 8 May 1981 made at 5 and 15 GHz using the VLA. One of the November flares produced no 5 GHz radiation, while the 15 GHz radiation in the other flare emanated from a source which was smaller, lower, and displaced from the 5 GHz source. The flare occurring on 8 May was intense and complex, and contained two or more sources at both 5 and 15 GHz. Prior to the peak of the flare, the sources were found to grow in size, after which time only weak subsources were visible to the VLA. These subsources were found to be located between or at the edge of the H-alpha ribbons and the two hard X-ray sources imaged by the Hinotori satellite. Highly polarized, bursty radiation was observed at 1 and 2 GHz, which indicated that an electron-cyclotron maser operated during the flare. The maximum field strength in flaring loops is estimated to be 360-600 gauss.

  13. Observation of acceleration and deceleration in gigaelectron-volt-per-metre gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, B D; Andonian, G; Barber, S K; Fitzmorris, K L; Hakimi, S; Harrison, J; Hoang, P D; Hogan, M J; Naranjo, B; Williams, O B; Yakimenko, V; Rosenzweig, J B

    2016-09-14

    There is urgent need to develop new acceleration techniques capable of exceeding gigaelectron-volt-per-metre (GeV m(-1)) gradients in order to enable future generations of both light sources and high-energy physics experiments. To address this need, short wavelength accelerators based on wakefields, where an intense relativistic electron beam radiates the demanded fields directly into the accelerator structure or medium, are currently under intense investigation. One such wakefield based accelerator, the dielectric wakefield accelerator, uses a dielectric lined-waveguide to support a wakefield used for acceleration. Here we show gradients of 1.347±0.020 GeV m(-1) using a dielectric wakefield accelerator of 15 cm length, with sub-millimetre transverse aperture, by measuring changes of the kinetic state of relativistic electron beams. We follow this measurement by demonstrating accelerating gradients of 320±17 MeV m(-1). Both measurements improve on previous measurements by and order of magnitude and show promise for dielectric wakefield accelerators as sources of high-energy electrons.

  14. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  15. Dark Post-Flare Loops Observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Qiao; Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Solar post-flare loops (PFLs) are arcade-like loop systems that appear during the gradual phases of eruptive flares. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) allow us to investigate the fine structures in PFLs. In this work, we focus on studying the dark post-flare loops (DPFLs) during X-class flares, which are more evident in SDO/AIA data than in previous EUV data. We identify and analyze the DPFLs observed by SDO and find that: (1) the DPFLs of an X5.4 flare have an average lifetime of 10.0 $\\pm$ 5.5 minutes, an average width of 1022 $\\pm$ 339 km, and an average maximum length of 33 $\\pm$ 10 Mm, (2) blob-like falling features with a size close to the resolution of SDO/AIA are identified in the DPFLs and they have an average velocity of 76 $\\pm$ 19 km s$^{-1}$, and (3) the average widths of the DPFLs slightly increase with the characteristic temperatures in AIA 304, 171, 193, and 211 {\\AA} channels. Our investigation ...

  16. Analysis of Enhanced Velocity Signals Observed during Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brajesh Kumar; B. Ravindra

    2006-12-01

    Solar flares are known to release a large amount of energy. It is believed that the flares can excite velocity oscillations in active regions. We report here the changes in velocity signals in three active regions which have produced large X-class flares. The enhanced velocity signals appeared during the rise time of the GOES soft X-ray flux. These signals are located close to the vicinity of the hard X-ray source regions as observed with RHESSI. The power maps of the active region show enhancement in the frequency regime 5–6.5 mHz, while there is feeble or no enhancement of these signals in 2–4 mHz frequency band. High energy particles with sufficient momentum seem to be the cause for these observed enhanced velocity signals.

  17. Observations of electrons from the decay of solar flare neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dröge, W; Klecker, B

    1996-01-01

    We have found evidence for fluxes of energetic electrons in interplanetary space on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft which we interpret as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1980 June 21. The decay electrons arrived at the s/c shortly before the electrons from the flare and can be distinguished from the latter by their distinctive energy spectrum. The time profile of the decay electrons is in good agreement with the results from a simulation based on a scattering mean free path derived from a fit to the flare electron data. The comparison with simultaneously observed decay protons and a published direct measurement of high-energy neutrons places important constraints on the parent neutron spectrum.

  18. LAMOST Observations of Flaring M Dwarfs in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, H -Y; Luo, A -L; Huang, L -C; Ip, W -H; Fu, J -N; Zhang, Y; Hou, Y -H; Cao, Z -H; Wang, Y -F

    2016-01-01

    A sample of the LAMOST spectra of the early type M0-M3 dwarfs is compared with the Kepler observations. It is found that M dwarfs with strong chromospheric emission in $H_{\\alpha}$ have large flare activity in general. The rotational periods derived from the Kepler measurements have close correlations with the sizes of the flares, the power-law distribution index and the equivalent widths of the $H_{\\alpha}$ emission. A clear trend exists for higher magnetic activities being detected in faster rotating M dwarfs (rotation periods $<$ 20 day).

  19. LAMOST Observations of Flaring M Dwarfs in the Kepler Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.-Y.; Song, Y.-H.; Luo, A.-L.; Huang, L.-C.; Ip, W.-H.; Fu, J.-N.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Cao, Z.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.

    2017-01-01

    A sample of the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope spectra of early-type M0–M3 dwarfs is compared with Kepler observations. It is found that M dwarfs with strong chromospheric emission in {{{H}}}α have large flare activity in general. The rotational periods derived from the Kepler measurements have close correlations with the sizes of the flares, the power-law distribution index, and the equivalent widths of the {{{H}}}α emission. A clear trend exists for higher magnetic activities being detected in faster-rotating M dwarfs (rotation periods < 20 days).

  20. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares Determined by Solar Neutron Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Solar Neutron Observation Group

    2013-05-01

    Large amounts of particles can be accelerated to relativistic energy in association with solar flares and/or accompanying phenomena (e.g., CME-driven shocks), and they sometimes reach very near the Earth and penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. These particles are observed by ground-based detectors (e.g., neutron monitors) as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Some of the GLEs originate from high energy solar neutrons which are produced in association with solar flares. These neutrons are also observed by ground-based neutron monitors and solar neutron telescopes. Recently, some of the solar neutron detectors have also been operating in space. By observing these solar neutrons, we can obtain information about ion acceleration in solar flares. Such neutrons were observed in association with some X-class flares in solar cycle 23, and sometimes they were observed by two different types of detectors. For example, on 2005 September 7, large solar neutron signals were observed by the neutron monitor at Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescopes at Chacaltaya and Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico in association with an X17.0 flare. The neutron signal continued for more than 20 minutes with high statistical significance. Intense gamma-ray emission was also registered by INTEGRAL, and by RHESSI during the decay phase. We analyzed these data using the solar-flare magnetic-loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002), and found that the model could successfully fit the data with intermediate values of loop magnetic convergence and pitch angle scattering parameters. These results indicate that solar neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray line emission and that ions were continuously accelerated at the emission site. In this paper, we introduce some of the solar neutron observations in solar cycle 23, and discuss the tendencies of the physical parameters of solar neutron GLEs, and the energy spectrum and population of the

  1. Simultaneous optical and radio observations of flare stars in the Pleiades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovmassian, H.M.; Haro, G.; Webber, J.C.; Swenson, G.W. Jr.; Yang, K.S.; Yoss, K.M.; Deming, D.; Green, R.F.

    1974-01-01

    Simultaneous optical (at Tonantzintla, Palomar, and Prairie Observatories) and radio (at the Vermilion River and Owens Valley Radio Observatories) observations of the flare stars in the Pleiades cluster were made from October 1 to 6, 1972. Eleven optical flare-ups were detected. One large flare-up (greater than 8/sup m/ in U) was accompanied by radio flare at 170 MHz. The ratio of optical to radio energy output of this flare is about 6 . 10/sup 2/.

  2. Observations and Modelling of the Pre-flare Period of the 29 March 2014 X1 Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, M. M.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Mackay, D. H.; Dacie, S.; Long, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    On 29 March 2014, NOAA Active Region (AR) 12017 produced an X1 flare that was simultaneously observed by an unprecedented number of observatories. We have investigated the pre-flare period of this flare from 14:00 UT until 19:00 UT using joint observations made by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and the Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Spectral lines providing coverage of the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the corona were analysed to investigate pre-flare activity within the AR. The results of the investigation have revealed evidence of strongly blue-shifted plasma flows, with velocities up to 200 km s^{-1}, being observed 40 minutes prior to flaring. These flows are located along the filament present in the active region and are both spatially discrete and transient. In order to constrain the possible explanations for this activity, we undertake non-potential magnetic field modelling of the active region. This modelling indicates the existence of a weakly twisted flux rope along the polarity inversion line in the region where a filament and the strong pre-flare flows are observed. We then discuss how these observations relate to the current models of flare triggering. We conclude that the most likely drivers of the observed activity are internal reconnection in the flux rope, early onset of the flare reconnection, or tether-cutting reconnection along the filament.

  3. A comparison between magnetic shear and flare shear in a well-observed M-class flare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuan-Hui Zhou; Hai-Sheng Ji

    2009-01-01

    We give an extensive multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive M1.0/1N class solar flare, which occurred in the active region NOAA 10044 on 2002 July 26. Our empha-sis is on the relationship between magnetic shear and flare shear. Flare shear is defined as the angle formed between the line connecting the centroids of the two ribbons of the flare and the line perpendicular to the magnetic neutral line. The magnetic shear is computed from vector magnetograms observed at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), while the flare shear is computed from Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 1700A images. By a detailed comparison, we find that: 1) The magnetic shear and the flare shear of this event are basically consistent, as judged from the directions of the transverse mag-netic field and the line connecting the two ribbons' centroids. 2) During the period of the enhancement of magnetic shear, flare shear had a fast increase followed by a fluctuated decrease. 3) When the magnetic shear stopped its enhancement, the fluctuated decreasing behavior of the flare shear became very smooth. 4) Hard X-ray (HXR) spikes are well correlated with the unshearing peaks on the time profile of the rate of change of the flare shear. We give a discussion of the above phenomena.

  4. High-Energy Aspects of Solar Flares: Observations and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-21

    The paper begins by describing the structure of the Sun, with emphasis on the corona. The Sun is a unique plasma laboratory, which can be probed by Sun-grazing comets, and is the driver of space weather. Energization and particle acceleration mechanisms in solar flares is presented; magnetic reconnection is key is understanding stochastic acceleration mechanisms. Then coupling between kinetic and fluid aspects is taken up; the next step is feedback of atmospheric response to the acceleration process – rapid quenching of acceleration. Future challenges include applications of stochastic acceleration to solar energetic particles (SEPs), Fermi γ-rays observations, fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains in a funnel-shaped wave guide associated with flare pulsations, and the new SMEX mission IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph),

  5. Observations of solar flares with IRIS and SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Innes, D. E.; Ning, Z. J.

    2016-03-01

    Flare kernels brighten simultaneously in all Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) channels making it difficult to determine their temperature structure. The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is able to spectrally resolve Fe xxi emission from cold chromospheric brightenings, so it can be used to infer the amount of Fe xxi emission in the 131 Å AIA channel. We use observations of two small solar flares seen by IRIS and SDO to compare the emission measures (EMs) deduced from the IRIS Fe xxi line and the AIA 131 Å channel to determine the fraction of Fe xxi emission in flare kernels in the 131 Å channel of AIA. Cotemporal and cospatial pseudo-raster AIA images are compared with the IRIS results. We use multi-Gaussian line fitting to separate the blending chromospheric emission so as to derive Fe xxi intensities and Doppler shifts in IRIS spectra. We define loop and kernel regions based on the brightness of the 131 Å and 1600 Å intensities. In the loop regions the Fe xxi EMs are typically 80% of the 131 Å values, and range from 67% to 92%. Much of the scatter is due to small misalignments, but the largest site with low Fe xxi contributions was probably affected by a recent injection of cool plasma into the loop. In flare kernels the contribution of Fe xxi increases from less than 10% at the low-intensity 131 Å sites to 40-80% in the brighter kernels. Here the Fe xxi is superimposed on bright chromospheric emission and the Fe xxi line shows blueshifts, sometimes extending up to the edge of the spectral window, 200 km s-1. The AIA 131 Å emission in flare loops is due to Fe xxi emission with a 10-20% contribution from continuum, Fe xxiii, and cooler background plasma emission. In bright flare kernels up to 52% of the 131 Å is from cooler plasma. The wide range seen in the kernels is caused by significant structure in the kernels, which is seen as sharp gradients in Fe xxi EM at sites of molecular and transition region

  6. FUV Continuum in Flare Kernels Observed by IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, Adrian N.; Kowalski, Adam; Allred, Joel C.; Cauzzi, Gianna

    2016-05-01

    Fits to Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spectra observed from bright kernels during the impulsive phase of solar flares are providing long-sought constraints on the UV/white-light continuum emission. Results of fits of continua plus numerous atomic and molecular emission lines to IRIS far ultraviolet (FUV) spectra of bright kernels are presented. Constraints on beam energy and cross sectional area are provided by cotemporaneous RHESSI, FERMI, ROSA/DST, IRIS slit-jaw and SDO/AIA observations, allowing for comparison of the observed IRIS continuum to calculations of non-thermal electron beam heating using the RADYN radiative-hydrodynamic loop model.

  7. The first observed stellar X-ray flare oscillation: Constraints on the flare loop length and the magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra-Kraev, U; Williams, D R; Kraev, E

    2005-01-01

    We present the first X-ray observation of an oscillation during a stellar flare. The flare occurred on the active M-type dwarf AT Mic and was observed with XMM-Newton. The soft X-ray light curve (0.2-12 keV) is investigated with wavelet analysis. The flare's extended, flat peak shows clear evidence for a damped oscillation with a period of around 750 s, an exponential damping time of around 2000 s, and an initial, relative peak-to-peak amplitude of around 15%. We suggest that the oscillation is a standing magneto-acoustic wave tied to the flare loop, and find that the most likely interpretation is a longitudinal, slow-mode wave, with a resulting loop length of (2.5 +- 0.2) e10 cm. The local magnetic field strength is found to be (105 +- 50) G. These values are consistent with (oscillation-independent) flare cooling time models and pressure balance scaling laws. Such a flare oscillation provides an excellent opportunity to obtain coronal properties like the size of a flare loop or the local magnetic field stre...

  8. Observing the formation of flare-driven coronal rain

    CERN Document Server

    Scullion, E; Antolin, P; Wedemeyer, S; Vissers, G; Kontar, E P; Gallagher, P

    2016-01-01

    Flare-driven coronal rain can manifest from rapidly cooled plasma condensations near coronal loop-tops in thermally unstable post-flare arcades. We detect 5 phases that characterise the post-flare decay: heating, evaporation, conductive cooling dominance for ~120 s, radiative / enthalpy cooling dominance for ~4700 s and finally catastrophic cooling occurring within 35-124 s leading to rain strands with s periodicity of 55-70 s. We find an excellent agreement between the observations and model predictions of the dominant cooling timescales and the onset of catastrophic cooling. At the rain formation site we detect co-moving, multi-thermal rain clumps that undergo catastrophic cooling from ~1 MK to ~22000 K. During catastrophic cooling the plasma cools at a maximum rate of 22700 K s-1 in multiple loop-top sources. We calculated the density of the EUV plasma from the DEM of the multi-thermal source employing regularised inversion. Assuming a pressure balance, we estimate the density of the chromospheric componen...

  9. Further observations of protons resulting from the decay of neutrons ejected by solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, P. A.; Kroeger, R.; Meyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The solar flare of 1984 April 24 produced a large gamma ray fluence with energy 2MeV. The time profile of the interplanetary flux from this flare indicates the presence of decaying solar neutrons. This makes a total of three neutron flares so far observed by this method. The three flares are used to place constraints on the fluence and spectra of neutrons emitted by the Sun.

  10. High-sensitivity observations of solar flare decimeter radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Benz, Arnold O; Monstein, C; Benz, Arnold O.; Messmer, Peter; Monstein, Christian

    2000-01-01

    A new acousto-optic radio spectrometer has observed the 1 - 2 GHz radio emission of solar flares with unprecedented sensitivity. The number of detected decimeter type III bursts is greatly enhanced compared to observations by conventional spectrometers observing only one frequency at the time. The observations indicate a large number of electron beams propagating in dense plasmas. For the first time, we report weak, reversed drifting type III bursts at frequencies above simultaneous narrowband decimeter spikes. The type III bursts are reliable signatures of electron beams propagating downward in the corona, apparently away from the source of the spikes. The observations contradict the most popular spike model that places the spike sources at the footpoints of loops. Conspicuous also was an apparent bidirectional type U burst forming a fish-like pattern. It occurs simultaneously with an intense U-burst at 600-370 MHz observed in Tremsdorf. We suggest that it intermodulated with strong terrestrial interference ...

  11. MAGNETIC AND DYNAMICAL PHOTOSPHERIC DISTURBANCES OBSERVED DURING AN M3.2 SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuckein, C. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482, Potsdam (Germany); Collados, M.; Sainz, R. Manso, E-mail: ckuckein@aip.de [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-02-01

    This Letter reports on a set of full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations in the near-infrared He i 10830 Å spectral region covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare phases of an M3.2 class solar flare. The flare originated on 2013 May 17 and belonged to active region NOAA 11748. We detected strong He i 10830 Å emission in the flare. The red component of the He i triplet peaks at an intensity ratio to the continuum of about 1.86. During the flare, He i Stokes V is substantially larger and appears reversed compared to the usually larger Si i Stokes V profile. The photospheric Si i inversions of the four Stokes profiles reveal the following: (1) the magnetic field strength in the photosphere decreases or is even absent during the flare phase, as compared to the pre-flare phase. However, this decrease is not permanent. After the flare, the magnetic field recovers its pre-flare configuration in a short time (i.e., 30 minutes after the flare). (2) In the photosphere, the line of sight velocities show a regular granular up- and downflow pattern before the flare erupts. During the flare, upflows (blueshifts) dominate the area where the flare is produced. Evaporation rates of ∼10{sup −3} and ∼10{sup −4} g cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} have been derived in the deep and high photosphere, respectively, capable of increasing the chromospheric density by a factor of two in about 400 s.

  12. Observations of the 12.3 micron Mg I emission line during a major solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Osherovich, Vladimir; Wiedemann, Gunter; Hewagama, Tilak

    1990-01-01

    The extremely Zeeman-sensitive 12.32 micron Mg I solar emission line was observed during a 3B/X5.7 solar flare on October 24, 1989. When compared to postflare values, Mg I emission-line intensity in the penumbral flare ribbon was 20 percent greater at the peak of the flare in soft X-rays, and the 12 micron continuum intensity was 7 percent greater. The flare also excited the emission line in the umbra where it is normally absent. The umbral flare emission exhibits a Zeeman splitting 200 G less than the adjacent penumbra, suggesting that it is excited at higher altitude. The absolute penumbral magnetic field strength did not change by more than 100 G between the flare peak and postflare period. However, a change in the inclination of the field lines, probably related to the formation and development of the flare loop system, was seen.

  13. Magnetic and dynamical photospheric disturbances observed during an M3.2 solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Sainz, R Manso

    2015-01-01

    This letter reports on a set of full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations in the near infrared He I 10830 A spectral region covering the pre-, flare, and post-flare phases of an M3.2 class solar flare. The flare originated on 2013 May 17 and belonged to active region NOAA 11748. We detected strong He I 10830 A emission in the flare. The red component of the He I triplet peaks at an intensity ratio to the continuum of about 1.86. During the flare, He I Stokes V is substantially larger and appears reversed compared to the usually larger Si I Stokes V profile. The photospheric Si I inversions of the four Stokes profiles reveal the following: (1) the magnetic field strength in the photosphere decreases or is even absent during the flare phase, as compared to the pre-flare phase. However, this decrease is not permanent. After the flare the magnetic field recovers its pre-flare configuration in a short time (i.e., in 30 minutes after the flare). (2) In the photosphere, the line-of-sight velocities show a regular...

  14. Observational Progress in Identifying and Characterizing Tidal Disruption Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenko, S. Bradley

    I present an overview of observational efforts across the electromagnetic spectrum to identify and study tidal disruption flares (TDFs), when a star wanders too close to a super-massive black hole and is torn apart by tidal forces. In particular I will focus on four unexpected surprises that challenge the most basic analytic picture of these events: 1) large inferred radii for the optical/UV-emitting material; 2) the ubiquity of outflows, detected at radio, X-ray, and UV wavelengths, ranging from speeds of 100 km/s to near the speed of light; 3) the peculiar atomic abundances observed in the UV and optical spectra of these objects; and, 4) the preference for these events to occur in post-starburst galaxies.

  15. Observations and modelling of Helium lines in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Labrosse, Nicolas; Kerr, Graham S

    2015-01-01

    We explore the response of the He II 304 {\\AA} and He I 584 {\\AA} line intensities to electron beam heating in solar flares using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Comparing different electron beams parameters, we found that the intensities of both He lines are very sensitive to the energy flux deposited in the chromosphere, or more specifically to the heating rate, with He II 304 {\\AA} being more sensitive to the heating than He I 584 {\\AA}. Therefore, the He line ratio increases for larger heating rates in the chromosphere. A similar trend is found in observations, using SDO/EVE He irradiance ratios and estimates of the electron beam energy rate obtained from hard X-ray data. From the simulations, we also found that spectral index of the electrons can affect the He ratio but a similar effect was not found in the observations.

  16. Flare-CME Models: An Observational Perspective (Invited Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.; Vršnak, B.

    2015-12-01

    Eruptions, flares, and coronal mass ejection (CMEs) are due to physical phenomena mainly driven by an initially force-free current-carrying magnetic field. We review some key observations relevant to the current theoretical trigger mechanisms of the eruption and to the energy release via reconnection. Sigmoids observed in X-rays and UV, as well as the pattern (double J-shaped) of electric currents in the photosphere show clear evidence of the existence of currents parallel to the magnetic field and can be the signature of a flux rope that is detectable in CMEs. The magnetic helicity of filaments and active regions is an interesting indirectly measurable parameter because it can quantify the twist of the flux rope. On the other hand, the magnetic helicity of the solar structures allows us to associate solar eruptions and magnetic clouds in the heliosphere. The magnetic topology analysis based on the 3D magnetic field extrapolated from vector magnetograms is a good tool for identifying the reconnection locations (null points and/or the 3D large volumes - hyperbolic flux tube, HFT). Flares are associated more with quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) and HFTs than with a single null point, which is a relatively rare case. We review various mechanisms that have been proposed to trigger CMEs and their observable signatures: by "breaking" the field lines overlying the flux rope or by reconnection below the flux rope to reduce the magnetic tension, or by letting the flux rope to expand until it reaches a minimum threshold height (loss of equilibrium or torus instability). Additional mechanisms are commonly operating in the solar atmosphere. Examples of observations are presented throughout the article and are discussed in this framework.

  17. Observing the formation of flare-driven coronal rain

    OpenAIRE

    Scullion, E.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Antolin, P.; Wedemeyer, S.; Vissers, G.; E. P. Kontar; Gallagher, P

    2016-01-01

    PA. GV are funded by the European Research Council under the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement nr. 291058 Flare-driven coronal rain can manifest from rapidly cooled plasma condensations near coronal loop-tops in thermally unstable post-flare arcades. We detect 5 phases that characterise the post-flare decay:heating, evaporation, conductive cooling dominance for ~120 s, radiative/ enthalpy cooling dominance for ~4700 s and finally catastrophic ...

  18. Analysis and modeling of high temporal resolution spectroscopic observations of flares on AD Leo

    CERN Document Server

    Crespo-Chacon, I; Foing, B H; García-Álvarez, D; López-Santiago, J; Montes, D

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of a high temporal resolution spectroscopic monitoring of the flare star AD Leo. During 4 nights, more than 600 spectra were taken in the optical range using the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) and the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph (IDS). We have observed a large number of short and weak flares occurring very frequently (flare activity > 0.71 hours-1). This is in favour of the very important role that flares can play in stellar coronal heating. The detected flares are non white-light flares and, though most of solar flares belong to this kind, very few such events had been previously observed on stars. The behaviour of different chromospheric lines (Balmer series from H_alpha to H_11, Ca II H & K, Na I D_1 & D_2, He I 4026 AA and He I D_3) has been studied in detail for a total of 14 flares. We have also estimated the physical parameters of the flaring plasma by using a procedure which assumes a simplified slab model of flares. All the obtained physical parameters are consist...

  19. The white-light flare of 1982 June 15 - Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauas, P.J.D. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents spectral observations of the continuum as well as the profiles of 29 selected atomic lines for the two continuum-emitting kernels of the June 15 1982 white-light flare, and for the neighboring quiet sun. It is found that one of the kernels does not show enhanced emission in chromospheric lines, particularly in H-alpha, although it presents the same level of white-light emission as the other kernel. This suggests that both kernels have the same thermal structure in the continuum-emitting region, but a different structure in the chromosphere, thus supporting the hypothesis that the continuum emission is of photospheric origin, and due to H(-). 11 refs.

  20. The white-light flare of 1982 June 15 - Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents spectral observations of the continuum as well as the profiles of 29 selected atomic lines for the two continuum-emitting kernels of the June 15 1982 white-light flare, and for the neighboring quiet sun. It is found that one of the kernels does not show enhanced emission in chromospheric lines, particularly in H-alpha, although it presents the same level of white-light emission as the other kernel. This suggests that both kernels have the same thermal structure in the continuum-emitting region, but a different structure in the chromosphere, thus supporting the hypothesis that the continuum emission is of photospheric origin, and due to H(-).

  1. Analysis of ultraviolet and X-ray observations of three homologous solar flares from SMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Pallavicini, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    Three homologous flares observed in the UV lines of Fe XXI and O V and in X-rays from the SMM were studied. It was found that: (1) the homology of the flares was most noticeable in Fe XXI and soft X-ray emissions; (2) the three flares shared many of the same loop footprints which were located in O V bright kernals associated with hard X-ray bursts; and (3) in spite of the strong spatial homology, the temporal evolution in UV and X-ray emissions varied from flare to flare. A comparison between the UV observations and photospheric magnetograms revealed that the basic flare configuration was a complex loop system consisting of many loops or bundles of loops.

  2. High-sensitivity observations of solar flare decimeter radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, A. O.; Messmer, P.; Monstein, C.

    2001-01-01

    A new acousto-optic radio spectrometer has observed the 1-2 GHz radio emission of solar flares with unprecedented sensitivity. The number of detected decimeter type III bursts is greatly enhanced compared to observations by conventional spectrometers observing only one frequency at the time. The observations indicate a large number of electron beams propagating in dense plasmas. For the first time, we report weak, reversed drifting type III bursts at frequencies above simultaneous narrowband decimeter spikes. The type III bursts are reliable signatures of electron beams propagating downward in the corona, apparently away from the source of the spikes. The observations contradict the most popular spike model that places the spike sources at the footpoints of loops. Conspicuous also was an apparent bidirectional type U burst forming a fish-like pattern. It occurs simultaneously with an intense U-burst at 600-370 MHz observed in Tremsdorf. We suggest that it intermodulated with strong terrestrial interference(cellular phones) causing a spurious symmetric pattern in the spectrogram at 1.4 GHz. Symmetric features in the 1-2 GHz range, some already reported in the literature, therefore must be considered with utmost caution.

  3. Optical flare observed in the flaring gamma-ray blazar S5 1044+71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Blay, Pere; Telting, John; Ojha, Roopesh

    2017-01-01

    We report optical photometry of the blazar S5 1044+71, obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma, to look for any enhanced optical activity associated with a recent flare in the daily averaged gamma-ray flux (ATel#9928).

  4. High-resolution Observations of Photospheric Structural Evolution Associated with a Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Ahn, Kwangsu; Jing, Ju; Deng, Na; Cao, Wenda; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    The structural evolution of the photosphere not only play an important role in contributing to the accumulation of free energy in the corona that powers solar flares, but also may response to the restructuring of coronal field as a result of flare energy release. A better understanding of these issues may be achieved by high-resolution observations of the photospheric structure covering the entire flaring period, which are, however, still rare. Here we present photospheric vector magnetograms and TiO images (at 0.2" and 0.09" resolution, respectively) from before to after a major flare, taken by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. In the pre-flare state, a small-scale magnetic structure of opposite-polarity configuration is seen near the footpoints of sheared magnetic loops; its magnetic fluxes and currents enhance till the flare start time and decline afterwards. During the main phase, as one flare ribbon sweeps across a sunspot, its different portions accelerate at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. We suggest that the small-scale flux emergence between the two sheared flux systems triggers the flare reconnection, and that the sunspot rotation is driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the coronal back reaction.

  5. Three Solar Gamma-Ray Flares Observed by Yohkoh In Autumn of 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M. A. Mosalam

    The Japanese mission Yohkoh (sun-beam) observed three solar gamma-ray flares of October, November and December 1991, on the declining phase of solar cycle 22. Each flare has different spectral characteristics, strong narrow line flare, broad line flare and continuum gamma-ray flare.The solar gamma-ray flares of October, November and December 1991 are produced from the three solar active regions NOAA/USAF 6891, 6919 and 6952 respectively. The aim of the present work is to study the general characteristics of these three active regions, and perform an evolution for the sunspots and their magnetic fields which lead to releasing highly energetic impulsive flares associated with gamma-ray emissions.The method of cumulative summation curves for X-ray bursts and Hα flares produced from the active regions and also, cumulative summation curves for sunspots area and count number for the same active regions are applied to show any steep increase in the trend in the curves for few days prior to the γ-ray flare occurrences

  6. Observable quasi-periodic oscillations produced by steep pulse profiles in magnetar flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.R. d' Angelo; A.L. Watts

    2012-01-01

    Strong quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the tails of the giant gamma-ray flares seen in SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 are thought to be produced by starquakes in the flaring magnetar. However, the large fractional amplitudes (up to ~20%) observed are difficult to reconcile with predicted amplitud

  7. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  8. The Energetics of White-light Flares Observed by SDO/HMI and RHESSI

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Nengyi; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    White-light (WL) flares have been observed and studied more than a century since the first discovery. However, some fundamental physics behind the brilliant emission remains highly controversial. One of the important facts in addressing the flare energetics is the spatialtemporal correlation between the white-light emission and the hard X-ray radiation, presumably suggesting that the energetic electrons are the energy sources. In this study, we present a statistical analysis of 25 strong flares (?greater than or equal to M5) observed simultaneously by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Among these events, WL emission was detected by SDO/HMI in 13 flares, associated with HXR emission. To quantitatively describe the strength of WL emission, equivalent area (EA) is defined as the integrated contrast enhancement over the entire flaring area. Our results show that the equivalent area is inve...

  9. The Energetics of White-light Flares Observed by SDO/HMI and RHESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Neng-Yi; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2016-11-01

    White-light (WL) flares have been observed and studied for more than a century since their first discovery. However, some fundamental physics behind the brilliant emission remains highly controversial. One of the important facts in addressing the flare energetics is the spatio-temporal correlation between the WL emission and the hard X-ray (HXR) radiation, presumably suggesting that energetic electrons are the energy sources. In this study, we present a statistical analysis of 25 strong flares (≥M5) observed simultaneously by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Among these events, WL emission was detected by SDO/HMI in 13 flares, associated with HXR emission. To quantitatively describe the strength of WL emission, equivalent area (EA) is defined as the integrated contrast enhancement over the entire flaring area. Our results show that the EA is inversely proportional to the HXR power-law index, indicating that stronger WL emission tends to be associated with a larger population of high energy electrons. However, no obvious correlation is found between WL emission and flux of non-thermal electrons at 50 keV. For the other group of 13 flares without detectable WL emission, the HXR spectra are softer (larger power-law index) than those flares with WL emission, especially for the X-class flares in this group.

  10. Coordinated soft X-ray and H-alpha observation of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarro, D. M.; Canfield, R. C.; Metcalf, T. R.; Lemen, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Soft X-ray, Ca XIX, and H-alpha observations obtained for a set of four solar flares in the impulsive phase are analyzed. A blue asymmetry was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft-Xray rise phase in all of the events. A red asymmetry was observed simultaneously in chromospheric H-alpha at spatial locations associated with enhanced flare heating. It is shown that the impulsive phase momentum of upflowing soft X-ray plasma equalled that of the downflowing H-alpha plasma to within an order of magnitude. This supports the explosive chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares.

  11. The Thermal Properties of Solar Flares Over Three Solar Cycles Using GOES X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Daniel F; Gallagher, Peter T; Dennis, Brian R; Tolbert, A Kim; Schwartz, Richard A; Young, C Alex

    2012-01-01

    Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated temperature and emission measure-based background subtraction method (TEBBS), which builds on the methods of Bornmann (1990). Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. (2005). TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,...

  12. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from Solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce Rollins, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the active Sun provide the largest sample of detected solar flares with emission greater than 30 MeV to date. These include detections of impulsive and sustained emission, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the 2012 March 7 X-class flares. These high-energy flares are coincident with GOES X-ray flares of X, M and C classes as well as very fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CME). We will present results from the First Fermi-LAT solar flare catalog covering the majority of Solar Cycle 24 including correlation studies with the associated Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and CMEs.

  13. Comprehensive study of the X-ray flares from gamma-ray bursts observed by Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Yu, Hai; Wang, F Y; Mu, Hui-Jun; Lv, Lian-Zhong; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-01-01

    X-ray flares are generally supposed to be produced by the later central engine activities, and may share the similar physical origin with prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, we have analyzed all significant X-ray flares from the GRBs observed by {\\em Swift} from April 2005 to March 2015. The catalog contains 468 bright X-ray flares, including 200 flares with redshifts. We obtain the fitting results of X-ray flares, such as start time, peak time, duration, peak flux, fluence, peak luminosity, and mean luminosity. The peak luminosity decreases with peak time, following a power-law behavior $L_p \\propto T_{peak,z}^{-1.27}$. The flare duration increases with peak time. The 0.3-10 keV isotropic energy of X-ray flares distribution is a lognormal peaked at $10^{51.2}$ erg. We also study the frequency distributions of flare parameters, including energies, durations, peak fluxes, rise times, decay times and waiting times. Power-law distributions of energies, durations, peak fluxes, and waiting t...

  14. Observations of Electrons from the Decay of Solar Flare Neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Dröge, W.; Ruffolo, D.; Klecker, B.

    1996-01-01

    We have found evidence for fluxes of energetic electrons in interplanetary space on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft which we interpret as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1980 June 21. The decay electrons arrived at the s/c shortly before the electrons from the flare and can be distinguished from the latter by their distinctive energy spectrum. The time profile of the decay electrons is in good agreement with the results from a simulation based on a scattering mean fre...

  15. Stereoscopic observations of hard x ray sources in solar flares made with GRO and other spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. R.; Hurley, K.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the launch of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) in Apr. 1991, the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument on GRO has recorded a large number of solar flares. Some of these flares have also been observed by the Gamma-Ray Burst Detector on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and/or by the Solar X-Ray/Cosmic Gamma-Ray Burst Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft. A preliminary list of common flares observed during the period May-Jun. 1991 is presented and the possible joint studies are indicated.

  16. The flare of November 29, 1996 observed by SOHO/CDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaykowska, A.; Rank, G.; Ruedi, I.; Solanki, S. K.; de Pontieu, B.

    We present flare and post-flare observations obtained with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) on November 29, 1996. On this day at around 20:40 UT, an M 1.0/1F flare occurred in the solar active region NOAA 7999 and was accidentally observed by the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), one of the two spectrometers of CDS (Harrison et al., 1995). The data consist of two rasters lasting for 135 minutes each and both cover an area of 4 times 4 arcminutes. The first raster is pointed at the northern part of the active region during the flare whereas the second one covers the southern part of the active region after the main phase of the flare. The observations were part of the Joint Observing Program (JOP) 54 which is aimed at the investigation of scaling laws in coronal loops. Consequently the details of observations such as line list and exposure time weren't convenient for flare observations. In addition a flare can lead to over-exposures, i.e., saturation of the CCD detector pixels, and a burn-in degeneration of the detector in bright lines. Therefore observations of flares with CDS are avoided and the flare from November 29, 1996, is so far the only noteworthy flare observed by CDS. In our case we have remarkable saturation in the chromospheric He I line at 584 AA and the coronal Fe XVI lines at 335 AA and 361 AA, which are formed at an equilibrium temperature of about 2.5 cdot 10^6 K. Another effect of illumination on the CCD detector being too high is that the electron well of each pixel may fill and hence bleed to adjacent pixels. This effect is clearly seen in our data. As the flare occurred, the 2 times 240 arcseconds slit was being rastered across the active region from west to east. We thus have a convolution of spatial and temporal effects which are not easy to separate. However, we have spectral information of each pixel in all lines and exposures which are not saturated. Hence, line parameters

  17. The Impulsive Phase in Solar Flares: Recent Multi-wavelength Results and their Implications for Microwave Modeling and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2013-01-01

    This short paper reviews several recent key observations of the processes occurring in the lower atmosphere (chromosphere and photosphere) during flares. These are: evidence for compact and fragmentary structure in the flare chromosphere, the conditions in optical flare footpoints, step-like variations in the magnetic field during the flare impulsive phase, and hot, dense 'chromospheric' footpoints. The implications of these observations for microwaves are also discussed.

  18. Spectral lags of flaring events in LS I+61°303 from RXTE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Tamal; Sarkar, Samir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-07-01

    This work reports the first discovery of (negative) spectral lags in X-ray emission below 10keV from the gamma ray binary LS I+61° 303 during large flaring episodes using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations. It is found from the RXTE data that during the flares, low energy (3–5 keV) variations lead the higher energy (8–10 keV) variations by a few tens of seconds whereas no significant time lag is observed during the non-flaring states. The observed spectral lag features for flaring events suggest that inverse Compton scattering may be operating, at least in some part of the system. Another possibility is that the sites of particle acceleration may be different for flaring and non-flaring events such as in the microquasar model, in which the flaring radiation may come from hot spots sitting above the black hole while steady state emissions are due to the jets.

  19. Theoretical aspects related to plasma flows observed in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somov, Boris

    I review the current state of affairs in the magnetohydrodynamic theories and models for large-scale high-speed plasma flows in solar flares. Main attension is payed to the coronal signatures and their relation to the photosphere and the heliosphere.The large-scale structure and dynamics of coronal plasma flows, as seen in EUV and soft X-rays, can be explained in terms of the three-dimensional reconnection at magnetic separators in the corona. More specifically, this reconnection is determined by the large-scale photospheric flows mainly of two types. First, the shear flows, which are parallel to the photospheric neutral line, increase the length of field lines in the corona an excess of magnetic energy. Second, the converging flows, directed to the neutral line, create the preflare slowly-reconnecting current layers in the corona and provide an excess of energy sufficient to produce a large flare. During the flare, both excesses of energy are released mainly as fast flows of coronal plasma as well as powerful heat fluxes and accelerated particles. The impulsive heating of the upper chromosphere creates a fast expansion of high-temperature plasma upwards into the corona, called the chromospheric `evaporation'. Basic properties of such flows are also reviewed together with draining with cooling. Ref.: Somov B.V., Plasma Astrophysics, Part II, Reconnection and Flares. Second Edition. Springer SBM, New York, 2013.

  20. High-resolution observations of flare precursors in the low solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Ahn, Kwangsu; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Deng, Na; Huang, Nengyi; Liu, Rui; Kusano, Kanya; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Gary, Dale E.; Cao, Wenda

    2017-03-01

    Solar flares are generally believed to be powered by free magnetic energy stored in the corona1, but the build up of coronal energy alone may be insufficient to trigger the flare to occur2. The flare onset mechanism is a critical but poorly understood problem, insights into which could be gained from small-scale energy releases known as precursors. These precursors are observed as small pre-flare brightenings in various wavelengths3-13 and also from certain small-scale magnetic configurations such as opposite-polarity fluxes14-16, where the magnetic orientation of small bipoles is opposite to that of the ambient main polarities. However, high-resolution observations of flare precursors together with the associated photospheric magnetic field dynamics are lacking. Here we study precursors of a flare using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope, complemented by new microwave data. Two episodes of precursor brightenings are initiated at a small-scale magnetic channel17-20 (a form of opposite-polarity flux) with multiple polarity inversions and enhanced magnetic fluxes and currents, lying near the footpoints of sheared magnetic loops. Microwave spectra corroborate that these precursor emissions originate in the atmosphere. These results provide evidence of low-atmospheric small-scale energy release, possibly linked to the onset of the main flare.

  1. Observed characteristics of flare energy release. I. Magnetic structure at the energy release site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, M.E.; Moore, R.L.; Hagyard, M.J.; Hernandez, A.M.; Rovira, M.G.

    1988-03-01

    It is shown that flaring activity as seen in X-rays usually encompasses two or more interacting magnetic bipoles within an active region. Soft and hard X-ray spatiotemporal evolution is considered as well as the time dependence of the thermal energy content in different magnetic bipoles participating in the flare, the hardness and impulsivity of the hard X-ray emission, and the relationship between the X-ray behavior and the strength and observable shear of the magnetic field. It is found that the basic structure of a flare usually consists of an initiating closed bipole plus one or more adjacent closed bipoles impacted against it. 119 references.

  2. Evidence for Magnetic Reconnection in Three Homologous Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Lin-Hui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    We present RHESSI observF5oss of three homologous flares, which occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002. We find that the RHESSI images of all three flares at energies between 6 and 25 keV had some common features: (1) A. separate coronal source up to approx. 30 deg. above the flare loop appeared in the early impulsive phase and stayed stationary for several minutes. (2) Before the flare loop moved upward; previously reported by others, the flare loop-top centroid moved downward for 2-4 minutes during the early impulsive phase of the Ears: falling by 13 - 30% of its initial height with a speed between 8 and 23 km/s. We conclude that these features are associated with the formation and development of a current sheet between the loop-top and the coronal source. In the April 14-15 flare, we find that the hard X-ray flux (greater than 25 keV) is correlated with the rate at which the flare loop moves upward, indicating that the faster the loop grows, the faster the reconnection rate, and therefore, the greater the flux of accelerated electrons. Subject headings: Sun: L'iaies-Sun: X-1-ay-s -

  3. COMPTEL gamma-ray observations of the C4 solar flare on 20 January 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. A.; Arndt, M. B.; Bennett, K.; Connors, A.; Debrunner, H.; Diehl, R.; McConnell, M.; Miller, R. S.; Rank, G.; Ryan, J. M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Winkler, C.

    2001-10-01

    The ``Pre-SMM'' (Vestrand and Miller 1998) picture of gamma-ray line (GRL) flares was that they are relatively rare events. This picture was quickly put in question with the launch of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). Over 100 GRL flares were seen with sizes ranging from very large GOES class events (X12) down to moderately small events (M2). It was argued by some (Bai 1986) that this was still consistent with the idea that GRL events are rare. Others, however, argued the opposite (Vestrand 1988; Cliver, Crosby and Dennis 1994), stating that the lower end of this distribution was just a function of SMM's sensitivity. They stated that the launch of the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) would in fact continue this distribution to show even smaller GRL flares. In response to a BACODINE cosmic gamma-ray burst alert, COMPtonTELescope on the CGRO recorded gamma rays above 1 MeV from the C4 flare at 0221 UT 20 January 2000. This event, though at the limits of COMPTEL's sensitivity, clearly shows a nuclear line excess above the continuum. Using new spectroscopy techniques we were able to resolve individual lines. This has allowed us to make a basic comparison of this event with the GRL flare distribution from SMM and also compare this flare with a well-observed large GRL flare seen by OSSE. .

  4. SWIFT AND FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF X-RAY FLARES: THE CASE OF LATE INTERNAL SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troja, E. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Piro, L. [INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Vasileiou, V. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, and CNRS/IN2P3, Montpellier (France); Omodei, N. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Cutini, S. [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); McEnery, J. E., E-mail: eleonora.troja@nasa.gov, E-mail: luigi.piro@iaps.inaf.it, E-mail: Vlasios.Vasileiou@lupm.in2p3.fr [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-04-10

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (Γ > 50) outflow at radii R ∼ 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  5. Radiative hydrodynamic modelling and observations of the X-class solar flare on 2011 March 9

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Michael B; Allred, Joel C; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the response of the solar atmosphere to non-thermal electron beam heating using the radiative transfer and hydrodynamics modelling code RADYN. The temporal evolution of the parameters that describe the non-thermal electron energy distribution were derived from hard X-ray observations of a particular flare, and we compared the modelled and observed parameters. The evolution of the non-thermal electron beam parameters during the X1.5 solar flare on 2011 March 9 were obtained from analysis of RHESSI X-ray spectra. The RADYN flare model was allowed to evolve for 110 seconds, after which the electron beam heating was ended, and was then allowed to continue evolving for a further 300s. The modelled flare parameters were compared to the observed parameters determined from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy. The model produced a hotter and denser flare loop than that observed and also cooled more rapidly, suggesting that additional energy input in the decay phase of the flare is required. In the explosi...

  6. Swift and Fermi Observations of X-Ray Flares: The Case of Late Internal Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Omodei, N.; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (gamma greater than 50) outflow at radii R approximately 10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14) cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  7. Swift and Fermi Observations of X-Ray Flares: The Case of Late Internal Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Omodei, N.; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (gamma greater than 50) outflow at radii R approximately 10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14) cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  8. THE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR FLARES OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES USING GOES X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Milligan, Ryan O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kim Tolbert, A.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Alex Young, C. [Solar Physics Laboratory (Code 671), Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated Temperature and Emission measure-Based Background Subtraction method (TEBBS), that builds on the methods of Bornmann. Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,000 solar flares occurring over nearly three solar cycles (1980-2007), and used to create an extensive catalog of the solar flare thermal properties. We confirm that the peak emission measure and total radiative losses scale with background subtracted GOES X-ray flux as power laws, while the peak temperature scales logarithmically. As expected, the peak emission measure shows an increasing trend with peak temperature, although the total radiative losses do not. While these results are comparable to previous studies, we find that flares of a given GOES class have lower peak temperatures and higher peak emission measures than previously reported. The TEBBS database of flare thermal plasma properties is publicly available at http://www.SolarMonitor.org/TEBBS/.

  9. High spatial resolution observations of solar flares at 3.3 mm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M. R.; White, S. M.; Welch, W. J.; Bieging, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    The first high-spatial-resolution interferometric observations of solar flares at millimeter wavelengths are presented. They are of high sensitivity, and events ranging from subflares to X-class flares were detected. One to three baselines with fringe spacings of 2 to 5 arcsec were available, which demonstrated that generally source sizes were in excess of 2 arcsec, but in some events the sources may be about 1 arcsec.

  10. VLBI observations of a flared optical quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341

    CERN Document Server

    An, Tao; Paragi, Zsolt; Frey, Sandor; Gurvits, Leonid I; Gabanyi, Krisztina E

    2016-01-01

    A bright optical flare was detected in the high-redshift ($z=2.133$) quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341 on 2014 April 13. The absolute magnitude of the object reached $-30.0$ during the flare, making it the brightest one (in flaring stage) among all known quasars so far. The 15 GHz flux density of CGRaBS J0809+5341 monitored in the period from 2008 to 2016 also reached its peak at the same time. To reveal any structural change possibly associated with the flare in the innermost radio structure of the quasar, we conducted a pilot very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observation of CGRaBS J0809+5341 using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz on 2014 November 18, about seven months after the prominent optical flare. Three epochs of follow-up KaVA (Korean VLBI Network and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry Array) observations were carried out at 22 and 43 GHz frequencies from 2015 February 25 to June 4, with the intention of exploring a possibly emerging new radio jet component associated with the optical flare. ...

  11. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  12. X-ray flaring in PDS 456 observed in a high-flux state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzeu, G. A.; Reeves, J. N.; Nardini, E.; Braito, V.; Turner, T. J.; Costa, M. T.

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis of a 190 ks (net exposure) Suzaku observation, carried out in 2007, of the nearby (z = 0.184) luminous (Lbol ∼ 1047 erg s-1) quasar PDS 456. In this observation, the intrinsically steep bare continuum is revealed compared to subsequent observations, carried out in 2011 and 2013, where the source is fainter, harder and more absorbed. We detected two pairs of prominent hard and soft flares, restricted to the first and second halves of the observation, respectively. The flares occur on time-scales of the order of ∼50 ks, which is equivalent to a light-crossing distance of ∼10 Rg in PDS 456. From the spectral variability observed during the flares, we find that the continuum changes appear to be dominated by two components: (i) a variable soft component (2 keV). The photon index of the latter power-law component appears to respond to changes in the soft band flux, increasing during the soft X-ray flares. Here, the softening of the spectra, observed during the flares, may be due to Compton cooling of the disc corona induced by the increased soft X-ray photon seed flux. In contrast, we rule out partial covering absorption as the physical mechanism behind the observed short time-scale spectral variability, as the time-scales are likely too short to be accounted for by absorption variability.

  13. Hinode magnetic-field observations of solar flares for exploring the energy storage and trigger mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawabata, Yusuke

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares abruptly release the free energy stored as a non-potential magnetic field in the corona and may be accompanied by eruptions of the coronal plasma. Magnetic reconnection is considered as a physical process in which the magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy, thermal energy, and particle acceleration, but the location of magnetic reconnection is difficult to identify directly because of low emission measure at the reconnection region. We are still lack of observational knowledge on the 3D magnetic configuration and physical conditions for leading to flare trigger. Accurate measurements of vector magnetic fields at the solar photosphere, provided by the Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode, help us in exploring how the free energy is stored in the solar atmosphere and how the release of the energy is triggered. This presentation will review the magnetic field configuration and possible candidates for flare trigger primarily based on Hinode observations of some large flare events, which may include X5.4/X1.3 flares on 7 March 2012, X1.2 flare on 7 January 2014 and two M-class flares on 2 February 2014. The 7 March 2012 events were observed in an active region with delta-type sunspots, showing a strong shear in the entire magnetic system. For the sheared magnetic structure, the inclusion of a small-scale trigger field was identified near the polarity inversion line with excitation of a high-speed material flow in the horizontally oriented magnetic field formed nearly in parallel to the polarity inversion line. The observations suggest that gas dynamics at the solar surface play a vital role of leading to the onset of flares. The 7 January 2014 event is an exceptional event which most scientists would not be able to predict its occurrence. The flare unexpectedly happened apart from the sheared magnetic field region. The M-class flares on 2 February 2014 were observed in the magnetic field configuration, in which four magnetic domains were

  14. High-Resolution Observations of Flares in an Arch Filament System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingna; Liu, Rui; Li, Shangwei; Cao, Wenda; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-08-01

    We present high-resolution observations of five sequential solar flares occurring in NOAA Active Region (AR) 12396 taken with the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory, complemented by IRIS and SDO observations. The main flaring region is an arch filament system (AFS) consisting of multiple bundles of dark filament threads enclosed by scattered flare brightenings. We study the magnetic configuration and evolution of the active region by constructing coronal magnetic field models based on SDO/HMI magnetograms using two independent methods, i.e., the nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation and the flux rope insertion method. We are able to identify multiple flux ropes based on magnetic twist derived from the extrapolated NLFFF, which is consistent with the NST observations of multiple filaments. Both models suggest that the filament bundles may posses mixed signs of helicity, i.e., positive (negative) in the north (south). The footprints of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) derived from the extrapolated NLFFF compare favorably with the observed flare ribbons. Moreover, magnetic field lines traced along the semi-circular footprint of a dome-like QSL surrounding the flaring region are connected to the regions of significant helicity and Poynting flux injection. An interesting double-ribbon fine structure located at the east border of the AFS is consistent with the fine structure of the QSL's footprint. The maps of magnetic twist show that positive twist became dominant as time progressed, which is consistent with the injection of positive helicity during a 26 hour interval before the flares. The trigger mechanisms and detailed dynamics of the observed flares are also discussed.

  15. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-energy Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Ciprini, S.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kashapova, L.; Krucker, S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Liu, W.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Pal’shin, V.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, O.; Rubio da Costa, F.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the Fermi-LAT detection of high-energy emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares that occurred on 2013 October 11, and 2014 January 6 and September 1. The Fermi-LAT observations are associated with flares from active regions originating behind both the eastern and western limbs, as determined by STEREO. All three flares are associated with very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and strong solar energetic particle events. We present updated localizations of the >100 MeV photon emission, hard X-ray (HXR) and EUV images, and broadband spectra from 10 keV to 10 GeV, as well as microwave spectra. We also provide a comparison of the BTL flares detected by Fermi-LAT with three on-disk flares and present a study of some of the significant quantities of these flares as an attempt to better understand the acceleration mechanisms at work during these occulted flares. We interpret the HXR emission to be due to electron bremsstrahlung from a coronal thin-target loop top with the accelerated electron spectra steepening at semirelativistic energies. The >100 MeV gamma-rays are best described by a pion-decay model resulting from the interaction of protons (and other ions) in a thick-target photospheric source. The protons are believed to have been accelerated (to energies >10 GeV) in the CME environment and precipitate down to the photosphere from the downstream side of the CME shock and landed on the front side of the Sun, away from the original flare site and the HXR emission.

  16. Five years of gas flaring by country, oil field or flare observed by the Suomi NPP satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhizhin, M. N.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.; Hsu, F. C.

    2016-12-01

    We will present a new methodology and the resulting interactive map and statistical estimates of flared gas volumes in 2012-2016 using multispectral infrared images from VIIRS radiometer at the Suomi NPP satellite. The high temperature gas flares are detected at the night side of the Earth with the Nightfire algorithm. Gas flares are distinct from biomass burning and industrial heat sources because they have higher temperatures. Sums of the radiative heat from the detected flares are calibrated with country-level flared volumes reported by CEDIGAZ. Statistical analysis of the database with accumulated 5 years of the Nightfire detections makes it possible to estimate instant flow rate for an individual flare, as well as integral flared volumes and long term trends for all the countries or oil and gas fields.

  17. Stereoscopic Observation of Slipping Reconnection in A Double Candle-Flame-Shaped Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Gou, Tingyu; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Zhuang, Bin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    The 2011 January 28 M1.4 flare exhibits two side-by-side candle-flame-shaped flare loop systems underneath a larger cusp-shaped structure during the decay phase, as observed at the northwestern solar limb by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The northern loop system brightens following the initiation of the flare within the southern loop system, but all three cusp-shaped structures are characterized by ~ 10 MK temperatures, hotter than the arch-shaped loops underneath. The "Ahead" satellite of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) provides a top view, in which the post-flare loops brighten sequentially, with one end fixed while the other apparently slipping eastward. By performing stereoscopic reconstruction of the post-flare loops in EUV and mapping out magnetic connectivities, we found that the footpoints of the post-flare loops are slipping along the footprint of a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) separating the two loop systems, and that the reconstructed loops share similarity with the magne...

  18. Photospheric and Coronal Observations of Abrupt Magnetic Restructuring in Two Flaring Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    For two major X-class flares observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft when they were close to quadrature, we compare major, abrupt changes in the photospheric magnetic vector field to changes in the observed coronal magnetic structure during the two flares. The Lorentz force changes in strong photospheric fields within active regions are estimated from time series of SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms. These show that the major changes occurred in each case near the main neutral line of the region and in two neighboring twisted opposite-polarity sunspots. In each case the horizontal parallel field strengthened significantly near the neutral line while the azimuthal field in the sunspots decreased, suggesting that a flux rope joining the two sunspots collapsed across the neutral line with reduced magnetic pressure because of a reduced field twist component. At the same time, the coronal extreme ultraviolet (EUV) loop structure was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard SDO and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) on STEREO-A to decrease significantly in height during each eruption, discontinuous changes signifying ejection of magnetized plasma, and outward-propagating continuous but abrupt changes consistent with loop contraction. An asymmetry in the observed EUV loop changes during one of the flares matches an asymmetry in the photospheric magnetic changes associated with that flare. The observations are discussed in terms of the well-known tether-cutting and breakout flare initiation models.

  19. Observation and analysis of ballistic downflows in a M-class flare using IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean

    2016-05-01

    Despite significant advances in instrumentation, there remain no studies that analyze observations of on-disk flare loop plasma flows covering the entire evolution from chromospheric evaporation, through plasma cooling, to draining downflows. We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the SOL2015-03-12T11:50:00 M-class flare, at high spatial resolution and time cadence. Our analysis of this event reveals initial plasma evaporation at flare temperatures indicated by 100-200 km/s blueshifts in the Fe XXI line. We subsequently observe plasma cooling into chromospheric lines (Si IV and O IV) with ~11 minute delay, followed by loop draining at ~40 km/s as indicated by a ``C''-shaped redshift structure and significant (~60 km/s) non-thermal broadening. We use density sensitive lines to calculate a plasma density for the flare loops, and estimate a theoretical cooling time approximately equal to the observed delay. Finally, we use a simple elliptical free-fall draining model to construct synthetic spectra, and perform what we believe to be the first direct comparison of such synthetic spectra to observations of draining downflows in flare loops.

  20. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Krucker, Säm [Also at Institute of 4-D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch, Switzerland. (Switzerland); Lin, Robert P., E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Also at Physics Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  1. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  2. PROPERTIES OF CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION AND PLASMA DYNAMICS OF A SOLAR FLARE FROM IRIS OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Sharykin, Ivan N.; Struminsky, Alexei B.; Zimovets, Ivan [Space Research Institute (IKI) of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of hot chromospheric plasma of solar flares is a key to understanding the mechanisms of flare energy release and particle acceleration. A moderate M1.0 class flare of 2014 June 12, (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) was simultaneously observed by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and other spacecraft, and also by the New Solar Telescope at the BBSO. This paper presents the first part of our investigation focused on analysis of the IRIS data. Our analysis of the IRIS data in different spectral lines reveals a strong redshifted jet-like flow with a speed of ∼100 km s{sup −1} of the chromospheric material before the flare. Strong nonthermal emission of the C ii k 1334.5 Å line, formed in the chromosphere–corona transition region, is observed at the beginning of the impulsive phase in several small (with a size of ∼1″) points. It is also found that the C ii k line is redshifted across the flaring region before, during, and after the impulsive phase. A peak of integrated emission of the hot (1.1 · 10{sup 7} K) plasma in the Fe xxi 1354.1 Å line is detected approximately five minutes after the integrated emission peak of the lower temperature C ii k. A strong blueshift of the Fe xxi line across the flaring region corresponds to evaporation flows of the hot chromospheric plasma with a speed of 50 km s{sup −1}. Additional analysis of the RHESSI data supports the idea that the upper chromospheric dynamics observed by IRIS has features of “gentle” evaporation driven by heating of the solar chromosphere by accelerated electrons and by a heat flux from the flare energy release site.

  3. Observation and numerical modeling of chromospheric evaporation during the impulsive phase of a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Imada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the chromospheric evaporation flow during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the Hinode/EIS observation and 1D hydrodynamic numerical simulation coupled to the time-dependent ionization. The observation clearly shows that the strong redshift can be observed at the base of the flaring loop only during the impulsive phase. We performed two different numerical simulations to reproduce the strong downflows in FeXII and FeXV during the impulsive phase. By changing the thermal conduction coefficient, we carried out the numerical calculation of chromospheric evaporation in the thermal conduction dominant regime (conductivity coefficient kappa0 = classical value) and the enthalpy flux dominant regime (kappa0 = 0.1 x classical value). The chromospheric evaporation calculation in the enthalpy flux dominant regime could reproduce the strong redshift at the base of the flare during the impulsive phase. This result might indicate that the thermal conduction can be strongly suppressed in some cases o...

  4. IRIS Observations of the Mg II h & k Lines During a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Graham S; Qiu, Jiong; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of the radiative output of a solar flare is emitted from the chromosphere, which produces enhancements in the optical and UV continuum, and in many lines, both optically thick and thin. We have, until very recently, lacked observations of two of the strongest of these lines: the Mg II h & k resonance lines. We present a detailed study of the response of these lines to a solar flare. The spatial and temporal behaviour of the integrated intensities, k/h line ratios, line of sight velocities, line widths and line asymmetries were investigated during an M class flare (SOL2014-02-13T01:40). Very intense, spatially localised energy input at the outer edge of the ribbon is observed, resulting in redshifts equivalent to velocities of ~15-26km/s, line broadenings, and a blue asymmetry in the most intense sources. The characteristic central reversal feature that is ubiquitous in quiet Sun observations is absent in flaring profiles, indicating that the source function increases with height during the flare....

  5. Simultaneous NIR/sub-mm observation of flare emission from SgrA*

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, A; García-Marín, M; Witzel, G; Weiss, A; Baganoff, F K; Morris, M R; Bertram, T; Dovciak, M; Duschl, W J; Karas, V; König, S; Krichbaum, T P; Krips, M; Kunneriath, D; Lu, R S; Markoff, S; Mauerhan, J; Meyer, L; Moultaka, J; Muzic, K; Najarro, F; Pott, J U; Schuster, K F; Sjouwerman, L O; Straubmeier, C; Thum, C; Vogel, S N; Wiesemeyer, H; Zamaninasab, M; Zensus, J A

    2008-01-01

    We report on a successful, simultaneous observation and modeling of the sub-millimeter to near-infrared flare emission of the Sgr A* counterpart associated with the super-massive black hole at the Galactic center. Our modeling is based on simultaneous observations that have been carried out on 03 June, 2008 using the NACO adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the ESO VLT and the LABOCA bolometer at the APEX telescope. Inspection and modeling of the light curves show that the sub-mm follows the NIR emission with a delay of 1.5+/-0.5 hours. We explain the flare emission delay by an adiabatic expansion of the source components.

  6. VERITAS Observations of day-scale flaring of M87 in 2010 April

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nunez, P D; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Şentürk, G D; Skole, C; Staszak, D; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2011-01-01

    VERITAS has been monitoring the very-high-energy (VHE; >100GeV) gamma-ray activity of the radio galaxy M87 since 2007. During 2008, flaring activity on a timescale of a few days was observed with a peak flux of (0.70 +- 0.16) X 10^{-11} cm^{-2} s^{-1} at energies above 350GeV. In 2010 April, VERITAS detected a flare from M87 with peak flux of (2.71 +- 0.68) X 10^{-11} cm^{-2} s^{-1} for E>350GeV. The source was observed for six consecutive nights during the flare, resulting in a total of 21 hr of good quality data. The most rapid flux variation occurred on the trailing edge of the flare with an exponential flux decay time of 0.90^{+0.22}_{-0.15} days. The shortest detected exponential rise time is three times as long, at 2.87^{+1.65}_{-0.99} days. The quality of the data sample is such that spectral analysis can be performed for three periods: rising flux, peak flux, and falling flux. The spectra obtained are consistent with power-law forms. The spectral index at the peak of the flare is equal to 2.19 +- 0.07...

  7. Stellar Variability and Flare Rates from Dome A, Antarctica using 2009 and 2010 CSTAR Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Oelkers, Ryan J; Wang, Lifan; Ashley, Michael C B; Cui, Xiangqun; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Lawrence, Jon S; Qiang, Liu; Luong-Van, Daniel; Pennypacker, Carl R; Yuan, Xiangyan; York, Donald G; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Zhenxi

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR) carried out high-cadence time-series observations of 20.1 square degrees centered on the South Celestial Pole during the 2008, 2009 & 2010 winter seasons from Dome A in Antarctica. The nearly-continuous 6 months of dark conditions during each observing season allowed for >10^6 images to be collected through gri and clear filters, resulting in the detection of >10^4 sources over the course of 3 years of operation. The nearly space-like conditions in the Antarctic plateau are an ideal testbed for the suitability of very small-aperture (<20 cm) telescopes to detect transient events, variable stars and stellar flares. We present the results of a robust search for such objects using difference image analysis of the data obtained during the 2009 & 2010 winter seasons. While no transients were found, we detected 29 flaring events and find a normalized flaring rate of 5+\\-4x10^-7 flare/hour for late-K dwarfs, 1+\\-1x10^-6 flare/hour for M dwarfs and 7+\\-1x10^-7 flar...

  8. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from behind-the-limb solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Allafort, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Fermi-LAT >30 MeV observations have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. These sample both the impulsive and long duration phases of GOES M and X class flares. Of particular interest is the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources and implications for the particle acceleration mechanisms.

  9. Multiwavelength Observations of a Dramatic High Energy Flare in the Blazar 3C 279

    CERN Document Server

    Wehrle, A E; Urry, C M; Maraschi, L; Ghisellini, G; Hartman, R C

    1997-01-01

    The blazar 3C 279, one of the brightest identified extragalactic objects in the gamma-ray sky, underwent a flare of a factor 10 amplitude in gamma-rays towards the end of a 3-week pointing by CGRO, in 1996 January-February. The flare peak represents the highest gamma-ray intensity ever recorded for this object. During the high state, extremely rapid gamma-ray variability was seen. Coordinated multifrequency observations were carried out with RXTE, ASCA, ROSAT and IUE and from many ground-based observatories, covering most accessible wavelengths. The well-sampled, simultaneous RXTE light curve shows an outburst of lower amplitude (factor of ~3) well correlated with the gamma-ray flare without any apparent lag. The optical-UV light curves, which are not well sampled during the high energy flare, exhibit more modest variations (factor of ~2) and a lower degree of correlation. The flux at millimetric wavelengths was near an historical maximum during the gamma-ray flare peak, with suggestion of a correlated decay....

  10. Electric current in flares ribbons: from the standard model in 3D to observations

    CERN Document Server

    Janvier, Miho; Bommier, V; Schmieder, B; Démoulin, P; Pariat, E

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents for the first time a quantification of the photospheric electric current ribbon evolutions during an eruptive flare, accurately predicted by the standard 3D flare model. The standard flare model in 3D has been developed with the MHD code OHM, which models the evolution of an unstable flux rope. Through a series of paper, the model has been successful in explaining observational characteristics of eruptive flares, as well as the intrinsic 3D reconnection mechanism. Such a model also explains the increase of the photospheric currents as a consequence of the evolution of the coronal current layer where reconnection takes place. The photospheric footprints of the 3D current layer reveal a ribbon shape structure. In the present paper, the evolution of the current density is analyzed for the X-class flare that occurred on 15/02/2011 in AR 11158. We first describe the structural evolution of the high vertical current density regions derived with the UNNOFIT inversion code from magnetograms (HMI, e...

  11. He I D3 Observation of the 1984 May 22 M6.3 Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Zhang, Jifeng; Choudhary, Debi Prasad; Wang, Haimin

    2013-01-01

    He I D3 line has a unique response to the flare impact on the low solar atmosphere and can be a powerful diagnostic tool for energy transport processes. Using images obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report D3 observation of the M6.3 flare on 1984 May 22, which occurred in an active region with a circular magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL). The impulsive phase of the flare starts with a main elongated source that darkens in D3, inside of which bright emission kernels appear at the time of the initial small peak in hard X-rays (HXRs). These flare cores subsequently evolve into a sharp emission strand lying within the dark halo simultaneously with the main peak in HXRs, reversing the overall source contrast from -5% to 5%. The radiated energy in D3 during the main peak is estimated to be about 10^30 ergs, which is comparable to that carried by nonthermal electrons above 20 keV. Afterwards the flare proceeds along the circular PIL in the counterclockwise direction t...

  12. X-ray flaring in PDS 456 observed in a high-flux state

    CERN Document Server

    Matzeu, G A; Nardini, E; Braito, V; Turner, T J; Costa, M T

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of a $190$\\,ks (net exposure) \\textit{Suzaku} observation, carried out in 2007, of the nearby ($z=0.184$) luminous (L$_{\\rm bol}\\sim10^{47}$\\,erg\\,s$^{-1}$) quasar PDS\\,456. In this observation, the intrinsically steep bare continuum is revealed compared to subsequent observations, carried out in 2011 and 2013, where the source is fainter, harder and more absorbed. We detected two pairs of prominent hard and soft flares, restricted to the first and second half of the observation respectively. The flares occur on timescales of the order of $\\sim50$\\,ks, which is equivalent to a light-crossing distance of $\\sim10\\,R_{\\rm g}$ in PDS\\,456. From the spectral variability observed during the flares, we find that the continuum changes appear to be dominated by two components: (i) a variable soft component ($2$\\,keV). The photon index of the latter power-law component appears to respond to changes in the soft band flux, increasing during the soft X-ray flares. Here the softening of the spectra, ...

  13. EUV Irradiance Observations from SDO/EVE as a Diagnostic of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Milligan, Ryan O

    2016-01-01

    For the past six years, the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has been monitoring changes in the Sun's extreme ultraviolet output over a range of timescales. Its primary function is to provide measurements of the solar spectral irradiance that is responsible for driving fluctuations in Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. However, despite its modest spectral resolution and lack of spatial information, the EVE spectral range contains many lines and continua that have become invaluable for diagnosing the response of the lower solar atmosphere itself to an injection of energy, particularly during a flare's impulsive phase. In addition, high temperature emission lines can also be used to track changes in temperature and density of flaring plasma in the corona. The high precision of EVE observations are therefore crucial in helping us understand particle acceleration and energy transport mechanisms during solar flares, as well as the origins of the Sun's most geoeffective emis...

  14. Observation of a reversal of rotation in a sunspot during a solar flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Xu, Zhe

    2016-12-13

    The abrupt motion of the photospheric flux during a solar flare is thought to be a back reaction caused by the coronal field reconfiguration. However, the type of motion pattern and the physical mechanism responsible for the back reaction has been uncertain. Here we show that the direction of a sunspot's rotation is reversed during an X1.6 flare using observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A magnetic field extrapolation model shows that the corresponding coronal magnetic field shrinks with increasing magnetic twist density. This suggests that the abrupt reversal of rotation in the sunspot may be driven by a Lorentz torque that is produced by the gradient of twist density from the solar corona to the solar interior. These results support the view that the abrupt reversal in the rotation of the sunspot is a dynamic process responding to shrinkage of the coronal magnetic field during the flare.

  15. First Flare-related Rapid Change of Photospheric Magnetic Field Observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shuo; Liu, Rui; Deng, Na; Liu, Yang; Wang, Haimin

    2011-01-01

    Photospheric magnetic field not only plays important roles in building up free energy and triggering solar eruptions, but also has been observed to change rapidly and permanently responding to the coronal magnetic field restructuring due to coronal transients. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument (HMI) on board the newly launched Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) produces seeing-free full-disk vector magnetograms at consistently high resolution and high cadence, which finally makes possible an unambiguous and comprehensive study of this important back-reaction process. In this study, we present a near disk-center, GOES-class X2.2 flare occurred at NOAA AR 11158 on 2011 February 15 using the magnetic field measurements made by HMI. We obtained the first solid evidence of an enhancement in the transverse magnetic field at the flaring magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) by a magnitude of 70%. This rapid and irreversible field evolution is unequivocally associated with the flare occurrence, with the ...

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Cool Flare Loops Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuła, K.; Heinzel, P.; Liu, W.; Berlicki, A.

    2017-08-01

    Flare loops were well observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) during the gradual phase of two solar flares on 2014 March 29 and 2015 June 22. Cool flare loops are visible in various spectral lines formed at chromospheric and transition-region temperatures and exhibit large downflows which correspond to the standard scenario. The principal aim of this work is to analyze the structure and dynamics of cool flare loops observed in Mg ii lines. Synthetic profiles of the Mg ii h line are computed using the classical cloud model and assuming a uniform background intensity. In this paper, we study novel IRIS NUV observations of such loops in Mg ii h and k lines and also show the behavior of hotter lines detected in the FUV channel. We obtained the spatial evolution of the velocities: near the loop top, the flow velocities are small and they are increasing toward the loop legs. Moreover, from slit-jaw image (SJI) movies, we observe some plasma upflows into the loops, which are also detectable in Mg ii spectra. The brightness of the loops systematically decreases with increasing flow velocity, and we ascribe this to the effect of Doppler dimming, which works for Mg ii lines. Emission profiles of Mg ii were found to be extremely broad, and we explain this through the large unresolved non-thermal motions.

  17. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH THE HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez Oliveros, Juan-Carlos; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lindsey, Charles [North West Research Associates, CORA Division, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Bogart, Rick; Couvidat, Sebastien; Scherrer, Phil [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Schou, Jesper [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    We report observations of white-light ejecta in the low corona, for two X-class flares on 2013 May 13, using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory. At least two distinct kinds of sources appeared (chromospheric and coronal), in the early and later phases of flare development, in addition to the white-light footpoint sources commonly observed in the lower atmosphere. The gradual emissions have a clear identification with the classical loop-prominence system, but are brighter than expected and possibly seen here in the continuum rather than line emission. We find the HMI flux exceeds the radio/X-ray interpolation of the bremsstrahlung produced in the flare soft X-ray sources by at least one order of magnitude. This implies the participation of cooler sources that can produce free-bound continua and possibly line emission detectable by HMI. One of the early sources dynamically resembles {sup c}oronal rain{sup ,} appearing at a maximum apparent height and moving toward the photosphere at an apparent constant projected speed of 134 ± 8 km s{sup –1}. Not much literature exists on the detection of optical continuum sources above the limb of the Sun by non-coronagraphic instruments and these observations have potential implications for our basic understanding of flare development, since visible observations can in principle provide high spatial and temporal resolution.

  18. Observations of Post-flare Plasma Dynamics during an M1.0 Flare in AR11093 by SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Abhishek K

    2011-01-01

    We observe the motion of cool and hot plasma in a multi-stranded post flare loop system that evolved in the decay phase of a two ribbon M1.0 class flare in AR 11093 on 7 August 2010 using SDO/AIA 304 \\AA\\ and 171 \\AA\\ filters. The moving intensity feature and its reflected counterpart are observed in the loop system at multi-temperature. The observed hot counterpart of the plasma that probably envelopes the cool confined plasma, moves comparatively faster ($\\sim$34 km s$^{-1}$) to the later (29 km s$^{-1}$) in form of the spreaded intensity feature. The propagating plasma and intensity reflect from the region of another footpoint of the loop. The subsonic speed of the moving plasma and associated intensity feature may be most likely evolved in the post flare loop system through impulsive flare heating processes. Complementing our observations of moving multi-temperature intensity features in the post flare loop system and its reflection, we also attempt to solve two-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equat...

  19. Simultaneous Chandra, CSO and VLA Observations of Sgr A*: The Nature of Flaring Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Heinke, C; Dowell, C D; Roberts, D; Baganoff, F K; Bower, G C

    2007-01-01

    Sgr A*, the massive black hole at the center of the Galaxy, varies in radio through X-ray emission on hourly time scales. The flare activity is thought to arise from the innermost region of an accretion flow onto Sgr A*. We present simultaneous light curves of Sgr A* in radio, sub-mm and X-rays that show a possible time delay of 110$\\pm17$ minutes between X-ray and 850 $\\mu$m suggesting that the sub-mm flare emission is optically thick. At radio wavelengths, we detect time lags of of $20.4\\pm6.8, 30\\pm12$ and 20$\\pm6$ minutes between the flare peaks observed at 13 and 7 mm in three different epochs using the VLA. Linear polarization of 1$\\pm0.2$% and 0.7$\\pm0.1$% is detected at 7 and 13 mm, respectively, when averaged over the entire observation on 2006 July 17. A simple picture of an expanding bubble of synchrotron emitting hot plasma can explain the time delay between various wavelengths, the asymmetric shape of the light curves, and the observed polarization of the flare emission at 43 and 22 GHz. The deri...

  20. Multi-wavelength observations and modelling of a canonical solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Raftery, Claire L; Milligan, Ryan O; Klimchuk, James A

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the temporal evolution of temperature, emission measure, energy loss and velocity in a C-class solar flare from both an observational and theoretical perspective. The properties of the flare were derived by following the systematic cooling of the plasma through the response functions of a number of instruments -- RHESSI (>5 MK), GOES-12 (5-30 MK), TRACE 171 A (1 MK) and SOHO/CDS (~0.03-8 MK). These measurements were studied in combination with simulations from the 0-D EBTEL model. At the flare on-set, upflows of ~90 km s-1 and low level emission were observed in Fe XIX, consistent with pre-flare heating and gentle chromospheric evaporation. During the impulsive phase, upflows of ~80 km s-1 in Fe XIX and simultaneous downflows of 20 km s-1 in He I and O V were observed, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. The plasma was subsequently found to reach a peak temperature of ~13 MK in approximately 10 minutes. Using EBTEL, conduction was found to be the dominant loss mechanism dur...

  1. Observation and numerical modeling of chromospheric evaporation during the impulsive phase of a solar flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imada, Shinsuke, E-mail: shinimada@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Murakami, Izumi, E-mail: murakami.izumi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University of Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: watanabe.tetsuya@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Department of Astronomical Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University of Advanced Studies), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    We have studied the chromospheric evaporation flow during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observation and 1D hydrodynamic numerical simulation coupled to the time-dependent ionization. The observation clearly shows that the strong redshift can be observed at the base of the flaring loop only during the impulsive phase. We performed two different numerical simulations to reproduce the strong downflows in FeXII and FeXV during the impulsive phase. By changing the thermal conduction coefficient, we carried out the numerical calculation of chromospheric evaporation in the thermal conduction dominant regime (conductivity coefficient κ{sub 0} = classical value) and the enthalpy flux dominant regime (κ{sub 0} = 0.1 × classical value). The chromospheric evaporation calculation in the enthalpy flux dominant regime could reproduce the strong redshift at the base of the flare during the impulsive phase. This result might indicate that the thermal conduction can be strongly suppressed in some cases of flare. We also find that time-dependent ionization effect is important to reproduce the strong downflows in Fe XII and Fe XV.

  2. Imaging Observations of Quasi-Periodic Pulsatory Non-Thermal Emission in Ribbon Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Zimovets, I V

    2008-01-01

    Using RHESSI and some auxiliary observations we examine possible connections between spatial and temporal morphology of the sources of non-thermal hard X-ray (HXR) emission which revealed minute quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the two-ribbon flares on 2003 May 29 and 2005 January 19. Microwave emission also reveals the same quasi-periodicity. The sources of non-thermal HXR emission are situated mainly inside the footpoints of the flare arcade loops observed by the TRACE and SOHO instruments. At least one of the sources moves systematically both during the QPP-phase and after it in each flare that allows to examine the sources velocities and the energy release rate via the process of magnetic reconnection. The sources move predominantly parallel to the magnetic inversion line or the appropriate flare ribbon during the QPP-phase whereas the movement slightly changes to more perpendicular regime after the QPPs. Each QPP is emitted from its own position. It is also seen that the velocity and the energy re...

  3. Statistical Properties of Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in White-Light Flares Observed With Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Pugh, C E; Nakariakov, V M; Broomhall, A -M

    2016-01-01

    We embark on a study of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the decay phase of white-light stellar flares observed by Kepler. Out of the 1439 flares on 216 different stars detected in the short-cadence data using an automated search, 56 flares are found to have pronounced QPP-like signatures in the light curve, of which 11 have stable decaying oscillations. No correlation is found between the QPP period and the stellar temperature, radius, rotation period and surface gravity, suggesting that the QPPs are independent of global stellar parameters. Hence they are likely to be the result of processes occurring in the local environment. There is also no significant correlation between the QPP period and flare energy, however there is evidence that the period scales with the QPP decay time for the Gaussian damping scenario, but not to a significant degree for the exponentially damped case. This same scaling has been observed for MHD oscillations on the Sun, suggesting that they could be the cause of the QPPs in tho...

  4. FLARE FOOTPOINT REGIONS AND A SURGE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS, RHESSI, AND SDO/AIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Dennis, B. R. [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Caspi, A. [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft observed flare footpoint regions coincident with a surge for an M3.7 flare observed on 2011 September 25 at N12 E33 in active region 11302. The flare was observed in spectral lines of O vi, Fe x, Fe xii, Fe xiv, Fe xv, Fe xvi, Fe xvii, Fe xxiii, and Fe xxiv. The EIS observations were made coincident with hard X-ray bursts observed by RHESSI. Overlays of the RHESSI images on the EIS raster images at different wavelengths show a spatial coincidence of features in the RHESSI images with the EIS upflow and downflow regions, as well as loop-top or near-loop-top regions. A complex array of phenomena were observed, including multiple evaporation regions and the surge, which was also observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly telescopes. The slit of the EIS spectrometer covered several flare footpoint regions from which evaporative upflows in Fe xxiii and Fe xxiv lines were observed with Doppler speeds greater than 500 km s{sup −1}. For ions such as Fe xv both evaporative outflows (∼200 km s{sup −1}) and downflows (∼30–50 km s{sup −1}) were observed. Nonthermal motions from 120 to 300 km s{sup −1} were measured in flare lines. In the surge, Doppler speeds are found from about 0 to over 250 km s{sup −1} in lines from ions such as Fe xiv. The nonthermal motions could be due to multiple sources slightly Doppler-shifted from each other or turbulence in the evaporating plasma. We estimate the energetics of the hard X-ray burst and obtain a total flare energy in accelerated electrons of ≥7 × 10{sup 28} erg. This is a lower limit because only an upper limit can be determined for the low-energy cutoff to the electron spectrum. We find that detailed modeling of this event would require a multithreaded model owing to its complexity.

  5. Full Stokes observations in the He I 1083 nm spectral region covering an M3.2 flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Sainz, R Manso; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01

    We present an exceptional data set acquired with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife, Spain) covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare stages of an M3.2 flare. The full Stokes spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter in the He I 1083.0 nm spectral region. The object under study was active region NOAA 11748 on 2013 May 17. During the flare the chomospheric He I 1083.0 nm intensity goes strongly into emission. However, the nearby photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm spectral line profile only gets shallower and stays in absorption. Linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) is detected in all lines of the He I triplet during the flare. Moreover, the circular polarization (Stokes V) is dominant during the flare, being the blue component of the He I triplet much stronger than the red component, and both are stronger than the Si I Stokes V profile. The Si I inversions reveal enormous changes of the photospheric magnetic field during the flare. Before the flare magnetic field conc...

  6. Solar Chromospheric Flares: Observations in Ly-lpha and Hlpha and Radiative Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima

    2011-03-01

    This thesis is divided into two main parts: a multiwavelength observational study of solar flares, focusing mainly in the chromosphere in Ly-α and Hα, and an application of a radiative transfer code and a radiative hydrodynamic code, to compare the results obtained by observations with the simulated ones. The Ly-α emission is a very interesting line because it is a natural tracer of the solar activity in the chromosphere. The Transition Region And Coronal Explorer satellite observed a small number of flares in the Ly-α passband, but apart from this, these events have not often been observed in this strong chromospheric line. Because TRACE has a broad Ly-α channel, in order to estimate the "pure" Lyα emission, we had to apply an empirical correction. We found that there is a reasonable coverage in TRACE 1216 A and the TRACE 1600 A for two different flares: on 8 September 1999 and on 28 February 1999. Studying them we estimated, for the first time, the pure Ly-α flare signature, being on the order of 10^25 erg/s at the flare peak. The study of the first flare gave us the possibility to calculate the electron energy budget using the X-ray data from Yohkoh/HXT in the context of the collisional thick target model, finding that the Ly-α power is less than 10% of the power inferred by the electrons. The morphology and evolution of the second flare were described in different wavelengths by using imaging data acquired by TRACE and by BBSO in white light and in Hα. We studied the magnetic topology using the magnetic field provided by SOHO/MDI, extrapolating the photospheric magnetic field lines, assuming a potential field. We found different morphologies in the magnetic configuration before and after the flare, confirming the occurrence of a reconnection process. The Hα line is the most important line in the chromosphere. We studied the Hα emission of a flare which occurred on 3 July 2002 using some spectroscopical observations from the Ondrejov Observatory

  7. New Observations of Balmer Continuum Flux in Solar Flares, Instrument Description and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Kotrč, P; Heinzel, P

    2016-01-01

    Increase in the Balmer continuum radiation during solar flares was predicted by various authors but never firmly confirmed observationally using ground-based slit spectrographs. Here we describe a new post-focal instrument - Image Selector - enabling to measure the Balmer continuum flux from the whole flare area, in analogy of successful detections of flaring dMe stars. The system was developed and put into operation at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA-2 of the Ond\\v{r}ejov Observatory. We measure the total flux by a fast spectrometer from a limited but well defined region on the solar disk. Using a system of diaphragms, the disturbing contribution of a bright solar disk can be eliminated as much as possible. Light curves of the measured flux in the spectral range 350 - 440 nm are processed, together with the H{\\alpha} images of the flaring area delimited by the appropriate diaphragm. The spectral flux data are flat-fielded, calibrated and processed to be compared with model predictions. Our analysis of th...

  8. Periodicity in the most violent solar eruptions: recent observations of coronal mass ejections and flares revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Xin Gao; Jing-Lan Xie; Hong-Fei Liang

    2012-01-01

    Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform method,we investigate the periodicity in the monthly occurrence numbers and monthly mean energy of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment on board the Solar and Heliographic Observatory from 1999 March to 2009 December.We also investigate the periodicity in the monthly occurrence numbers of Hα flares and monthly mean flare indices from 1996 January to 2008 December.The results show the following.(1) The period of 5.66 yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly occurrence numbers of CMEs; the period of 10.5 yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly mean energy of CMEs.(2) The periods of 3.05 and 8.70 yr are found to be statistically significant in the monthly occurrence numbers of Hα flares; the period of 9.14yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly mean flare indices.

  9. The largest white light flare ever observed: 25 April 1984, 0001 UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidig, D. F.; Grosser, H.; Kiplinger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The X13/3B flare of 25 April 1984, 0001 UT, was accompanied by intense white light emission that reached a peak power output approx 2x10 to the 29 erg/sec in the optical/near UV continuum; the total energy radiated in the continuum alone reached 10 to the 32 power ergs. This was the most powerful white light flare yet recorded, exceeding the peak output of the largest previously known event by more than one order of magnitude. The flare was a two-ribbon type with intense embedded kernels as observed in both Balmer-alpha line and Balmer continuum, and each of these flare ribbons covered separate umbrae shortly after the maximum of the event. The onset and peak of the white light emission coincided with the onset and peak of the associated E greater than 100 KeV hard X-ray burst, while the 1-8 angstrom soft X-ray emission reached its maximum 4 minutes after the peak in white light.

  10. Spectral and Imaging Observations of a White-light Solar Flare in the Mid-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Matt; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh; Jhabvala, Murzy; Jennings, Don; Lunsford, Allen; Kaufmann, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    We report high-resolution observations at mid-infrared wavelengths of a minor solar flare, SOL2014-09-24T17:50 (C7.0), using Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector cameras at an auxiliary of the McMath-Pierce telescope. The flare emissions, the first simultaneous observations in two mid-infrared bands at 5.2 and 8.2 μ {{m}} with white-light and hard X-ray coverage, revealed impulsive time variability with increases on timescales of ˜4 s followed by exponential decay at ˜10 s in two bright regions separated by about 13\\prime\\prime . The brightest source is compact, unresolved spatially at the diffraction limit (1\\_\\_AMP\\_\\_farcs;72 at 5.2 μ {{m}}). We identify the IR sources as flare ribbons also seen in white-light emission at 6173 Å observed by SDO/HMI, with twin hard X-ray sources observed by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and with EUV sources (e.g., 94 Å) observed by SDO/AIA. The two infrared points have nearly the same flux density (fν, W m-2 Hz) and extrapolate to a level of about an order of magnitude below that observed in the visible band by HMI, but with a flux of more than two orders of magnitude above the free-free continuum from the hot (˜15 MK) coronal flare loop observed in the X-ray range. The observations suggest that the IR emission is optically thin; this constraint and others suggest major contributions from a density less than about 4× {10}13 cm-3. We tentatively interpret this emission mechanism as predominantly free-free emission in a highly ionized but cool and rather dense chromospheric region.

  11. SAS-3 observations of an X-ray flare from Cygnus X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canizares, C. R.; Bradt, H.; Buff, J.; Laufer, B.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the SAS-3 observation of an X-ray flare from Cygnus X-1. The 1.5 to 6 keV intensity rose by a factor of four and exhibited variability on several time scales from seconds to hours. The 6 to 15 keV intensity showed less activity. The event is similar to that observed by ANS and Ariel 5, but lasted less than two weeks.

  12. Reconciliation of Waiting Time Statistics of Solar Flares Observed in Hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; McTiernan, James M.

    2010-07-01

    We study the waiting time distributions of solar flares observed in hard X-rays with ISEE-3/ICE, HXRBS/SMM, WATCH/GRANAT, BATSE/CGRO, and RHESSI. Although discordant results and interpretations have been published earlier, based on relatively small ranges (<2 decades) of waiting times, we find that all observed distributions, spanning over 6 decades of waiting times (Δt ≈ 10-3-103 hr), can be reconciled with a single distribution function, N(Δt) vprop λ0(1 + λ0Δt)-2, which has a power-law slope of p ≈ 2.0 at large waiting times (Δt ≈ 1-1000 hr) and flattens out at short waiting times Δt <~ Δt 0 = 1/λ0. We find a consistent breakpoint at Δt 0 = 1/λ0 = 0.80 ± 0.14 hr from the WATCH, HXRBS, BATSE, and RHESSI data. The distribution of waiting times is invariant for sampling with different flux thresholds, while the mean waiting time scales reciprocically with the number of detected events, Δt 0 vprop 1/n det. This waiting time distribution can be modeled with a nonstationary Poisson process with a flare rate λ = 1/Δt that varies as f(λ) vprop λ-1exp - (λ/λ0). This flare rate distribution requires a highly intermittent flare productivity in short clusters with high rates, separated by relatively long quiescent intervals with very low flare rates.

  13. EBL effect on the observation of multi-TeV flaring of 2009 from Markarian 501

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, Sarira; Miranda, Luis Salvador; de León, Alberto Rosales; Gupta, Virendra

    2016-01-01

    Markarian 501 is a high-peaked BL Lacertae object and has undergone many major outburst since its discovery in 1996. As a part of the multiwavelength campaign, in the year 2009 this blazar was observed for 4.5 months from March 9 to August 1 and during the period April 17 to May 5 it was observed by both space and ground based observatories covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum. A very strong high energy $\\gamma$-ray flare was observed on May 1 by Whipple telescope in the energy range 317 GeV to 5 TeV and the flux was about 10 times higher than the baseline flux. We use the photohadronic model complimented by the extragalactic background radiation (EBL) correction to this very high state flare and have shown that the EBL plays an important role in attenuating the very high energy flux even though Markarian 501 is in the local Universe.

  14. Multiwavelength Observations of a Flare from Markarian 501

    CERN Document Server

    Catanese, M; Breslin, A C; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Cawley, M F; Dermer, C D; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Hillas, A M; Johnson, W N; Krennrich, F; Lamb, R C; Lessard, R W; Macomb, D J; McEnery, J E; Moriarty, P; Quinn, J; Rodgers, A J; Rose, H J; Samuelson, F W; Sembroski, G H; Srinivasan, R; Weekes, T C; Zweerink, J A

    1997-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the BL Lacertae object Markarian 501 (Mrk 501) in 1997 between April 8 and April 19. Evidence of correlated variability is seen in very high energy (VHE, E > 350 GeV) gamma-ray observations taken with the Whipple Observatory gamma-ray telescope, data from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, and quicklook results from the All-Sky Monitor of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer while the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope did not detect Mrk 501. Short term optical correlations are not conclusive but the U-band flux observed with the 1.2m telescope of the Whipple Observatory was 10% higher than in March. The average energy output of Mrk 501 appears to peak in the 2 keV to 100 keV range suggesting an extension of the synchrotron emission to at least 100 keV, the highest observed in a blazar and ~100 times higher than that seen in the other TeV-emitting BL Lac object, Mrk 421. The VHE gamma-ray flux observed during thi...

  15. Spectral and Imaging Observations of a White-light Flare in the Mid-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Penn, M; Hudson, H; Jhabvala, M; Jennings, D; Lunsford, A; Kaufmann, P

    2015-01-01

    We report high-resolution observations at mid-infrared wavelengths of a minor solar flare, SOL2014-09-24T17T17:50 (C7.0), using Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) cameras at an auxiliary of the McMath-Pierce telescope. The flare emissions, the first simultaneous observations in two mid-infrared bands at $5\\ \\mu$m and $8\\ \\mu$m with white-light and hard X-ray coverage, revealed impulsive time variability with increases on time scales of $\\sim 4$~s followed by exponential decay at $\\sim$10 s in two bright regions separated by about 13$"$. The brightest source is compact, unresolved spatially at the diffraction limit ($1.3"$ at $5\\ \\mu$m). We identify the IR sources as flare ribbons also seen in white-light emission at 6173~\\AA~observed by SDO/HMI, with twin hard X-ray sources observed by RHESSI, and with EUV sources (e.g., 94~\\AA) observed by SDO/AIA. The two infrared points have closely the same flux density ($f_\

  16. Testing MHD models of prominences and flares with observations of solar plasma electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukal, Peter V.; Behr, Bradford B.

    1995-02-01

    We present measurements of electric fields in quiescent prominences and in a small flare surge, obtained with CRI electrograph at the NSO/SP 40 cm coronagraph, in 1993 and 1994. Our results on the 9 brightest quiescent prominences enable us to place r.m.s. upper limits of Et less than 2 - 5 V/cm on the component of E transverse to the line of sight. We show that these upper limits may be difficult to reconcile with non-ideal MHD models of quiescent prominences formed in extended neutral sheets, whethere or not the tearing mode instability is present. They do, however, seem consistent with ideal MHD models of prominence support. We point out also that these upper limits are within a factor 4 of the minimum value of anistropic electric field that exists due to motional Stark effect in any thermal plasma permeated by a directed magnetic field. Our data on the flare surge suggest and electric field of intensity E approximately 35 V/cm, oriented approximately parallel to the inferred magnetic field. This detection of Eparallel needs to be verified in other flares. But we note that a detectable Eparallel would not be expected in the current interruption flare mechanism, if only a single double layer is present. We show further that the observed relatively narrow, approximately-Gaussian, and only slightly Doppler-shifted Paschen lines, seem inconsistent with the multiple double layers invoked in other models based on the current interruption mechanism. Our detection of Eparallel does seem consistent with reconnection (including tearing-mode) models of flares, provided the field-aligned electrical conductivity is anomalous over substantial volumes of the plasma circuit joining the reconnecting domain to the photosphere.

  17. Multifrequency observations of the flaring quasar 1156+295

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Bregman, J. N.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.; Pica, A. J.; Pollock, J. T.; Leacock, R. J.; Smith, A. G.; Webb, J. R.; Wisniewski, W. Z.

    1983-01-01

    A report is presented on the optically violent variable quasar 1156+295, known also as 4C 29.45 and Ton 599. A large outburst of this quasar was discovered in April 1981 in the course of a program to obtain simultaneous multifrequency spectra of variable quasars. Ultraviolet observations taken with the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite were coordinated with ground-based observations at radio, infrared, and optical wavelengths. Measurements were made at four epochs starting immediately after the outburst was discovered, when the B-magnitude was 14.0, and at intervals of 4 days, 60 days and 1 year. The luminosity integrated only over observed wavelength bands was approximately 3 x 10 to the 48th ergs/sec on the first epoch of observation. Modeling of the source with a synchrotron self-Compton model suggests that the core of the source has a linear dimension of 0.01 pc, a magnetic field strength in the range 0.1-30 gauss, and a bulk relativistic motion in the quasar rest frame characterized by a Lorentz factor in the range 2-8.

  18. Coronal Seismology of Flare-Excited Standing Slow-Mode Waves Observed by SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.

    2016-05-01

    Flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 Å bandpasses. Based on the interpretation in terms of a slow-mode wave, quantitative evidence of thermal conduction suppression in hot (>9 MK) loops has been obtained for the first time from measurements of the polytropic index and phase shift between the temperature and density perturbations (Wang et al. 2015, ApJL, 811, L13). This result has significant implications in two aspects. One is that the thermal conduction suppression suggests the need of greatly enhanced compressive viscosity to interpret the observed strong wave damping. The other is that the conduction suppression provides a reasonable mechanism for explaining the long-duration events where the thermal plasma is sustained well beyond the duration of impulsive hard X-ray bursts in many flares, for a time much longer than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. In this study, we model the observed standing slow-mode wave in Wang et al. (2015) using a 1D nonlinear MHD code. With the seismology-derived transport coefficients for thermal conduction and compressive viscosity, we successfully simulate the oscillation period and damping time of the observed waves. Based on the parametric study of the effect of thermal conduction suppression and viscosity enhancement on the observables, we discuss the inversion scheme for determining the energy transport coefficients by coronal seismology.

  19. VERITAS observations of exceptionally bright TeV flares from LS I +61$^\\circ$ 303

    CERN Document Server

    de Bhroithe, Anna O'Faolain

    2015-01-01

    The very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray experiment, VERITAS, detected exceptionally bright flares from the high-mass X-ray binary LS I +61$^\\circ$ 303 during the period October-December 2014. LS I +61$^\\circ$ 303 is a known VHE gamma-ray source, the flux from which varies strongly with the orbital period of ~26.5 days. The maximum VHE flux is found around apastron (orbital phase ~0.6) at a level typically corresponding to 10-15% of the Crab Nebula flux (>300 GeV). During these most recent observations, relatively short (day scale), bright TeV flares were observed from the source around apastron in two orbital cycles (October and November). Both cases exhibited peak fluxes above 25% of the Crab Nebula flux (>300 GeV), making these the brightest VHE flares ever detected from this source. In the last orbital cycle observed (December), the source had returned to its historical level of activity. The results of these VERITAS observations from 2014 will be presented.

  20. Observational Investigation of Energy Release in the Lower Solar Atmosphere of a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Sharykin, I N; Kosovichev, A G; Vargas-Dominguez, S; Zimovets, I V

    2016-01-01

    We study flare processes in the lower solar atmosphere using observational data for a M1-class flare of June 12, 2014, obtained by New Solar Telescope (NST/BBSO) and Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI/SDO). The main goal is to understand triggers and manifestations of the flare energy release in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere (the photosphere and chromosphere) using high-resolution optical observations and magnetic field measurements. We analyze optical images, HMI Dopplergrams and vector magnetograms, and use Non-Linear Force-Free Field (NLFFF) extrapolations for reconstruction of the magnetic topology. The NLFFF modelling reveals interaction of oppositely directed magnetic flux-tubes in the PIL. These two interacting magnetic flux tubes are observed as a compact sheared arcade along the PIL in the high-resolution broad-band continuum images from NST. In the vicinity of the PIL, the NST H alpha observations reveal formation of a thin three-ribbon structure corresponding to the small-scale photospher...

  1. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN A SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K.; Raymond, John C.; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Li, Gang [Department of Physics and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Liu, Wei, E-mail: hui.tian@cfa.harvard.edu [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfvén speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of a greatly redshifted (∼125 km s{sup –1} along the line of sight) Fe XXI 1354.08 Å emission line with a ∼100 km s{sup –1} nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe XXI feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-ray source observed by RHESSI. We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory also reveal the eruption and reconnection processes. Fast downward-propagating blobs along these loops are also found from cool emission lines (e.g., Si IV, O IV, C II, Mg II) and images of AIA and IRIS. Furthermore, the entire Fe XXI line is blueshifted by ∼260 km s{sup –1} at the loop footpoints, where the cool lines mentioned above all exhibit obvious redshift, a result that is consistent with the scenario of chromospheric evaporation induced by downward-propagating nonthermal electrons from the reconnection site.

  2. Evidence For Reconnection In A Flare Observed With The X-ray Telescope On Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Kathy; Metcalf, T.; Ishibashi, B.; Weber, M.

    2007-05-01

    A long duration flare observed at the limb on December 17th with the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode exhibits many features characteristic of reconnection. Cusp-shaped loops are clearly resolved by XRT, and these loops show convincing evidence of field line shrinkage. In addition, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) detects a hard X-ray loop top source that extends into the cusp structure visible in the XRT images. The implications of these observations for reconnection theories of solar flares will be discussed. The US XRT team is supported by a contract from NASA to SAO. Hinode is an international project supported by JAXA, NASA, PPARC and ESA. We are grateful to the Hinode team for all their efforts in the design, development and operation of the mission.

  3. Characteristics of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Emissions: Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei

    2007-05-01

    The main theme of this dissertation is the investigation of the physics of acceleration and transport of particles in solar flares and their radiative signatures. The observational studies, using hard X-rays (HXRs) observed by RHESSI, concentrate on four flares, which support the classical magnetic reconnection model of flares in various ways. In the 11/03/2003 X3.9 flare, there is an upward motion of the loop-top source, accompanied by a systematic increase in the separation of the foot-point sources at a comparable speed. This is consistent with the reconnection model with an inverted-Y geometry. The 04/30/2002 M1.3 event exhibits rarely observed two coronal sources, with very similar spectra and their higher-energy emission being close together. This suggests that reconnection occurs between the two sources. In the 10/29/2003 X10 flare, the logarithmic total HXR flux of the two foot-points correlates with their mean magnetic field. The foot-points show asymmetric HXR fluxes, qualitatively consistent with the magnetic mirroring effect. The 11/13/2003 M1.7 flare reveals evidence of chromospheric evaporation directly imaged by RHESSI for the first time. The emission centroids move toward the loop-top, indicating a density increase in the loop. The theoretical modeling of this work combines the Stanford stochastic acceleration model with the NRL hydrodynamic model to study the interplay of the particle acceleration, transport, and radiation effects and the atmospheric response to the energy deposition by electrons. I find that low-energy electrons in the quasi-thermal portion of the spectrum affects the hydrodynamics by producing more heating in the corona than the previous models that used a power-law spectrum with a low-energy cutoff. The Neupert effect is found to be present and effects of suppression of thermal conduction are tested in the presence of hydrodynamic flows. I gratefully thank my adviser, Prof. Vahe' Petrosian, my collaborators, and funding support

  4. Constraints on Stochastic Electron Acceleration Process from RHESSI Solar Flare Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Petrosian, V.

    2011-12-01

    Bremsstrahlung hard X-ray (HXR) emission provides the most direct information for diagnosing the electron acceleration and transport processes in solar flares. HXR observations have indicated that the majority of nonthermal electrons are accelerated near the top of the flaring loop, as evidenced by the distinct coronal loop top (LT) source, and move downward along the loop to the footpoints (FPs). This can be naturally accounted for by the model of stochastic acceleration, in which electrons are scattered and accelerated near the LT region by plasma waves or turbulence. In this work, we aim to better understand the role of turbulence in scattering and accelerating electrons in solar flares based on imaging spectroscopic observations from the RHESSI satellite and theoretical modeling of the process of stochastic acceleration by turbulence. We show how the RHESSI observations can constrain some important characteristics of turbulence. In particular, we obtain the accelerated electron spectra from the LT source in the regularized electron maps, which is determined by the turbulence acceleration rate, and also obtain the escape time from the LT and FP spectral difference, which is related to the pitch angle scattering rate of electrons by turbulence. Furthermore, comparison of the electron spectra obtained from solution of the Fokker-Planck equation describing the acceleration process with the directly observed LT electron spectra in principle allows us to determine whether the required acceleration rate by turbulence is consistent with the scattering rate. We will present results from several RHESSI flares with different LT spectral hardness relative to the FPs and discuss the physical implication for the electron acceleration and transport processes.

  5. STACEE Observations of Mrk 421 During the 2001 Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Boone, L M; Chae, E; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Müller, C; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A

    2003-01-01

    STACEE is a ground based gamma-ray observatory that uses a heliostat array, built for solar energy research, to detect atmospheric Cherenkov radiation from gamma-ray initiated extensive air showers. During the first half of 2001, a prototype detector, STACEE-48, was used to detect the blazar Markarian 421, which was in an extremely active state. Observations from March to May of 2001 yielded an integral flux of (8.0+/-0.7_{stat}+/-1.5_{sys})x 10^-10 1/cm^2/s at energies above 140+/-20 GeV, and provide some evidence of correlated trends on time scales of a week or more in the GeV and X-ray bands.

  6. Unusual ionospheric effects observed during the intense 28 October 2003 solar flare in the Brazilian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sahai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The 28 October 2003 solar flare (X-ray Class X17.2 was one of the most intense solar flares observed in the recent past. In the present investigation we show the unusual ionospheric effects observed in the Brazilian sector during this solar flare, using both the ionospheric sounding observations obtained at the UNIVAP stations: Palmas (7–10.2° S, 48.2° W, dip lat. 5.5° S and Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W, dip lat. 17.6° S, Brazil; and ground-based global positioning system (GPS data obtained at the "Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística" (IBGE stations: Imperatriz (5.5° S, 47.5° W, dip lat. 2.9° S, Brasilia (15.9° S, 47.9° W, dip lat. 11.7° S, Presidente Prudente (22.3° S, 51.4° W, dip lat. 14.9° S, and Porto Alegre (30.1° S, 51.1° W, dip lat. 20.7° S, Brazil; on two consecutive days, viz., 27 (without solar flare and 28 (with solar flare October 2003. It should be mentioned that the vertical total electron content (VTEC from the GPS observations obtained during the solar flare showed an unusual simultaneous increase in the VTEC values at about 11:00 UT at all four stations associated with the solar flare EUV enhancements and lasted for about 3 h. However, no ionograms were obtained at any of the two UNIVAP stations for a period of about 1 h between about 11:00 to 12:00 UT. Before 11:00 UT (from about 10:45 UT and after 12:00 UT (to about 16:00 UT, the ionograms were only partial, with the low frequency end missing. During this intense solar flare, hard X-rays (1 to 10 A, as observed by the GOES 12 satellite, were ejected by the Sun during a long period (several hours, with peak radiation at about 11:10 UT. These hard X-ray radiations can penetrate further into the ionosphere, causing an increase in ionization in the lower part of ionosphere (D-region. In this way, the lack of ionograms or partial ionograms, which indicates no echoes or partial echoes of the transmitted digital ionosonde signals, are

  7. Gamma-Ray Flares from Mrk421 in 2008 observed with the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, G

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the blazar Mrk421 entered in a very active phase and was one of the brightest sources in the sky at TeV energies, showing strong and frequent flaring. We searched for gamma-ray emission at energies E > 0.8 TeV during the whole 2008 with the ARGO-YBJ experiment, a full coverage air shower detector located at Yangbajing (4300 m a.s.l., Tibet, P.R. China). The observed signal is not constant and in correlation with X-ray measurements. The average emission, during the active period of the source, was about twice the Crab Nebula level, with an integral flux of (4.9$\\pm 2.0$)x 10$^{-11}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ for E$_{\\gamma}$ >1 TeV. This paper concentrates on 2008 June when the Mrk421 flaring activity has been studied from optical to 100 MeV gamma rays, and only partially up to TeV energies, since the moonlight hampered the Cherenkov telescope observations after 8 June. Our data complete these observations, with the detection of a second flare of intensity of about 7 Crab units on June 11-13, with a ...

  8. Slipping reconnection in a solar flare observed in high resolution with the GREGOR solar telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Sobotka, M; Denker, C; Balthasar, H; Jurčák, J; Liu, W; Berkefeld, T; Vera, M Collados; Feller, A; Hofmann, A; Kneer, F; Kuckein, C; Lagg, A; Louis, R E; von der Lühe, O; Nicklas, H; Schlichenmaier, R; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, W; Sigwarth, M; Solanki, S K; Soltau, D; Staude, J; Strassmeier, K G; Volkmer, R; Waldmann, T

    2016-01-01

    A small flare ribbon above a sunspot umbra in active region 12205 was observed on November 7, 2014, at 12:00 UT in the blue imaging channel of the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope, using a 1 A Ca II H interference filter. Context observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard Hinode, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) show that this ribbon is part of a larger one that extends through the neighboring positive polarities and also participates in several other flares within the active region. We reconstructed a time series of 140 seconds of Ca II H images by means of the multiframe blind deconvolution method, which resulted in spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.1 arcsec and 1 s. Light curves and horizontal velocities of small-scale bright knots in the observed flare ribbon were measured. Some knots are stationary, but three move along the ribbon with speeds of 7-11 km/s. Two of them move in the opposite d...

  9. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of High-Energy Gamma-ray Emission From Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Golenetskii, Sergei; Kashapova, Larisa; Krucker, Sam; Palshin, Valentin; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fermi LAT >30 MeV observations of the active Sun have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. Of particular interest are the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. These observations sample flares from active regions originating from behind both the eastern and western limbs and include an event associated with the second ground level enhancement event (GLE) of the 24th Solar Cycle. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. These detections present an unique opportunity to diagnose the mechanisms of high-energy emission and particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources.

  10. NST and IRIS multi-wavelength observations of an M1.0 class solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Kosovichev, Alexander; Sharykin, Ivan; Struminsky, Alexei; Zimovets, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Although solar flares are the most energetic events in the Solar System and have direct impact in the interplanetary space and ultimately in our planet, there are still many unresolved issues concerning their generation, the underlying processes of particle acceleration involved, the effect at different layer in the solar atmosphere, among others. This work presents new coordinated observations from the New Solar Telescope (NST) and the space telescope IRIS that acquired simultaneous observations of an M1.0 class flare occurred on 12 June, 2014 in active region NOAA 12087. NST filtergrams using the TiO filter, together with chromospheric data from the Halpha line allow us to study the evolution of the event from the first signs of the intensification of the intensity in the region. We focused on a small portion where the intensity enhancement in Halpha (blue and red wings) seems to be triggered, and discovered a rapid expansion of a flux-rope structure near the magnetic neutral line, in the sequence of high-resolution photospheric images. IRIS observations evidenced strong emission of the chromospheric and transition region lines during the flare. Jet-like structures are detected before the initiation of the flare in chromospheric lines and strong non-thermal emission in the transition region at the beginning of the impulsive phase. Evaporation flows with velocities up to 50 km/s occurred in the hot chromospheric plasma. We interpreted the result in terms of the “gentle” evaporation that occurs after accelerated particles heat the chromosphere.

  11. Solar Flare Chromospheric Line Emission: Comparison Between IBIS High-resolution Observations and Radiative Hydrodynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vahé; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation in a broad spectral and at a wide height range. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere (lower atmosphere) can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results can be extremely valuable, but has not been attempted so far. We present in this paper such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope's (DST) Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 that we have modeled with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN (Carlsson & Stein 1992, 1997; Abbett & Hawley 1999; Allred et al. 2005). We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in H$\\alpha$ 6563 \\AA\\ and Ca II 8542 \\AA, and with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in X-rays. The latter was used to infer the non-thermal elect...

  12. Gamma ray flares from Mrk421 in 2008 observed with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    CERN Document Server

    al., G Aielli et

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 the blazar Markarian 421 entered a very active phase and was one of the brightest sources in the sky at TeV energies, showing frequent flaring episodes. Using the data of ARGO-YBJ, a full coverage air shower detector located at Yangbajing (4300 m a.s.l., Tibet, China), we monitored the source at gamma ray energies E > 0.3 TeV during the whole year. The observed flux was variable, with the strongest flares in March and June, in correlation with X-ray enhanced activity. While during specific episodes the TeV flux could be several times larger than the Crab Nebula one, the average emission from day 41 to 180 was almost twice the Crab level, with an integral flux of (3.6 +-0.6) 10^-11 photons cm^-2 s^-1 for energies E > 1 TeV, and decreased afterwards. This paper concentrates on the flares occurred in the first half of June. This period has been deeply studied from optical to 100 MeV gamma rays, and partially up to TeV energies, since the moonlight hampered the Cherenkov telescope observations during the ...

  13. Electron Distribution Functions in Solar Flares from combined X-ray and EUV Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous solar flare observations with SDO and RHESSI provide spatially resolved information about hot plasma and energetic particles in flares. RHESSI allows the properties of both hot (> 8 MK) thermal plasma and nonthermal electron distributions to be inferred, while SDO/AIA is more sensitive to lower temperatures. We present and implement a new method to reconstruct electron distribution functions from SDO/AIA data. The combined analysis of RHESSI and AIA data allows the electron distribution function to be inferred over the broad energy range from ~0.1 keV up to a few tens of keV. The analysis of two well observed flares suggests that the distributions in general agree to within a factor of three when the RHESSI values are extrapolated into the intermediate range 1-3 keV, with AIA systematically predicting lower electron distributions. Possible instrumental and numerical effects, as well as potential physical origins for this discrepancy are discussed. The inferred electron distribution functions in g...

  14. Observations and modeling of ionospheric scintillations at South Pole during six X‐class solar flares in 2013

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Priyadarshi, S; Zhang, Q.‐H; Ma, Y.‐Z; Wang, Y; Xing, Z.‐Y

    2016-01-01

    ...‐class solar flares have been studied during the summer and winter months, using the produced scintillation indices based on the observations from the GPS receiver at South Pole and the in situ plasma...

  15. Flare-induced changes of the photospheric magnetic field in a δ-spot deduced from ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gömöry, P.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; Koza, J.; Veronig, A. M.; González Manrique, S. J.; Kučera, A.; Schwartz, P.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: Changes of the magnetic field and the line-of-sight velocities in the photosphere are being reported for an M-class flare that originated at a δ-spot belonging to active region NOAA 11865. Methods: High-resolution ground-based near-infrared spectropolarimetric observations were acquired simultaneously in two photospheric spectral lines, Fe i 10783 Å and Si i 10786 Å, with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) in Tenerife on 2013 October 15. The observations covered several stages of the M-class flare. Inversions of the full-Stokes vector of both lines were carried out and the results were put into context using (extreme)-ultraviolet filtergrams from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results: The active region showed high flaring activity during the whole observing period. After the M-class flare, the longitudinal magnetic field did not show significant changes along the polarity inversion line (PIL). However, an enhancement of the transverse magnetic field of approximately 550 G was found that bridges the PIL and connects umbrae of opposite polarities in the δ-spot. At the same time, a newly formed system of loops appeared co-spatially in the corona as seen in 171 Å filtergrams of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board SDO. However, we cannot exclude that the magnetic connection between the umbrae already existed in the upper atmosphere before the M-class flare and became visible only later when it was filled with hot plasma. The photospheric Doppler velocities show a persistent upflow pattern along the PIL without significant changes due to the flare. Conclusions: The increase of the transverse component of the magnetic field after the flare together with the newly formed loop system in the corona support recent predictions of flare models and flare observations. The movie associated to Figs. 4 and 5 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Quantitative modeling of multiwavelength observations of the behind the limb solar flares observed by Fermi and other instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2017-08-01

    During the current solar cycle of the Sun the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected more than 40 flares up to GeV energies, some lasting many hours contemporaneous with Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) and three that originate from active regions (AR) located behind the limb (BTL) as viewed from the Earth and detected by STEREO observations. Almost all are associated with fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). I will give a brief overview of the observations with focus on two of the three BTL flares that show RHESSI hard X-ray and SDO EUV emission coming from the top of a relatively large flare loop peeking over the limb. Radio emission with similar light curves is also attributed to this looptop source, while the centroids of the LAT gamma-rays are some distances away. This multiwavelength coverage of the well isolated looptop (presumably near the coronal acceleration site) combined with Fermi observations provides a unique opportunity to investigate possible mechanisms and sites of acceleration of particles (corona and/or CME shock), their transport and radiative signatures (leptonic or hadronic). I will present some quantitative result on accelerated particle spectra, magnetic field values at the looptop and its structure connecting the AR to the CME and back to the LAT source.

  17. RHESSI Line and Continuum Observations of Super-hot Flare Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, A; 10.1088/2041-8205/725/2/L161

    2011-01-01

    We use RHESSI high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy observations from ~5 to 100 keV to characterize the hot thermal plasma during the 2002 July 23 X4.8 flare. These measurements of the steeply falling thermal X-ray continuum are well fit throughout the flare by two distinct isothermal components: a super-hot (T > 30 MK) component that peaks at ~44 MK and a lower-altitude hot (T < 25 MK) component whose temperature and emission measure closely track those derived from GOES measurements. The two components appear to be spatially distinct, and their evolution suggests that the super-hot plasma originates in the corona, while the GOES plasma results from chromospheric evaporation. Throughout the flare, the measured fluxes and ratio of the Fe and Fe-Ni excitation line complexes at ~6.7 and ~8 keV show a close dependence on the super-hot continuum temperature. During the pre-impulsive phase, when the coronal thermal and non-thermal continua overlap both spectrally and spatially, we use this relationship to ob...

  18. Thermal characteristics of a B8.3 flare observed on July 04, 2009

    CERN Document Server

    Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Sylwester, Janusz; Jain, Rajmal

    2016-01-01

    We explore the temporal evolution of flare plasma parameters including temperature (T) - differential emission measure (DEM) relationship by analyzing high spectral and temporal cadence of X-ray emission in 1.6-8.0 keV energy band, recorded by SphinX (Polish) and Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS; Indian) instruments, during a B8.3 flare which occurred on July 04, 2009. SphinX records X-ray emission in 1.2-15.0 keV energy band with the temporal and spectral cadence as good as 6 microsecond and 0.4 keV, respectively. On the other hand, SOXS provides X-ray observations in 4-25 keV energy band with the temporal and spectral resolution of 3 second and 0.7 keV, respectively. We derive the thermal plasma parameters during impulsive phase of the flare employing well-established Withbroe-Sylwester DEM inversion algorithm.

  19. Spectroscopic observations of evolving flare ribbon substructure suggesting origin in current sheet waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean R.; Longcope, Dana; Qiu, Jiong

    2015-04-01

    A flare ribbon is the chromospheric image of reconnection at a coronal current sheet. The dynamics and structure of the ribbon can thus reveal properties of the current sheet, including motion of the reconnecting flare loops. We present imaging and spectroscopic observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the evolution of a flare ribbon at high spatial resolution and time cadence. These reveal small-scale substructure in the ribbon, which manifest as oscillations in both position and Doppler velocities. We consider various alternative explanations for these oscillations, including modulation of chromospheric evaporation flows. Among these we find the best support for some form of elliptical wave localized to the coronal current sheet, such as a tearing mode or Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.IRIS is a NASA Small Explorer mission developed and operated by Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory. This work is supported by contract 8100002702 from Lockheed Martin to Montana State University, a Montana Space Grant Consortium fellowship, and by NASA through HSR.

  20. Observations of post-flare supra-arcades: instabilities at the head of reconnection jets

    CERN Document Server

    Innes, Davina; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Huang, Yi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Supra-arcades are bright fans of emission that develop after eruptive flares, above post-flare arcades. The underlying flare arcades are thought to be a consequence of magnetic reconnection along a current sheet in the corona. At the same time, theory predicts plasma jets from the reconnection site which, because of their low density, are extremely difficult to observe directly. It has been suggested, however, that the dark supra-arcade downflows (SADs) seen falling through supra-arcade fans may be low-density jet plasma. The head of a low density jet directed towards higher density plasma would be Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, and lead to the development of rapidly growing low and high density fingers along the interface. Here we show details of SADs forming at the top of bright supra-arcade fans, as seen in Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131A images. The SADs often formed near the top of fan spikes. Some of the SADs were seen to split at their heads. Most SADs did not show enhanced emis...

  1. Observed L-alpha profiles for two solar flares - 14:12 UT 15 June, 1973 and 23:16 UT 21 January, 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, R. C.; van Hoosier, M. E.

    1980-09-01

    Photographic observations of the time development of the profile of the L-alpha line of hydrogen during flares were obtained with the NRL spectrograph on ATM. The profiles for the June 15, 1973 and Jan. 21, 1974 flares cover both core and wings of the line. The time sequences begin before flare maximum, and continue well into the decay phase. Careful attention has been given to photometry and absolute calibration. In the case of the June 15 flare, data are presented both first-order corrected and uncorrected for incomplete filling of the spectrograph slit by flaring material. Correction of the January 21 flare was not possible. Core symmetry and shift are discussed, and it is shown that the observations imply integrated flare L-alpha/H-alpha intensity ratios within a factor of two of unity for these two flares.

  2. CHANDRA, KECK, AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB NEBULA DURING THE 2011-APRIL GAMMA-RAY FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; O' Dell, Stephen L. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Office (ZP12), Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Arons, Jonathan [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Blandford, Roger; Funk, Stefan; Romani, Roger W. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Buehler, Rolf [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Caraveo, Patrizia; De Luca, Andrea [INAF-IASF Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cheung, Chi C. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Costa, Enrico [INFN Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Ferrigno, Carlo [ISDC, Data Center for Astrophysics of the University of Geneva, chemin d' cogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Fu, Hai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Habermehl, Moritz; Horns, Dieter [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Linford, Justin D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Lobanov, Andrei [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Max, Claire [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Mignani, Roberto [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-03-01

    We present results from our analysis of Chandra X-Ray Observatory, W. M. Keck Observatory, and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) images of the Crab Nebula that were contemporaneous with the {gamma}-ray flare of 2011 April. Despite hints in the X-ray data, we find no evidence for statistically significant variations that pinpoint the specific location of the flares within the Nebula. The Keck observations extend this conclusion to the 'inner knot', i.e., the feature within an arcsecond of the pulsar. The VLA observations support this conclusion. We also discuss theoretical implications of the {gamma}-ray flares and suggest that the most dramatic {gamma}-ray flares are due to radiation-reaction-limited synchrotron emission associated with sudden, dissipative changes in the current system sustained by the central pulsar.

  3. EBL effect on the observation of multi-TeV flaring of 2009 from Markarian 501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sarira; Lemus Yanez, Marco Vladimir; Salvador Miranda, Luis; Rosales de Leon, Alberto [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares (Mexico); Gupta, Virendra [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzandos del IPN Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2017-01-15

    Markarian 501 is a high-peaked BL Lacertae object and has undergone many major outbursts since its discovery in 1996. As a part of the multiwavelength campaign, in the year 2009 this blazar was observed for 4.5 months from March 9 to August 1 and during the period April 17 to May 5 it was observed by both space and ground based observatories covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum. A very strong high energy γ-ray flare was observed on May 1 by Whipple telescope in the energy range 317 GeV to 5 TeV and the flux was about 10 times higher than the average baseline flux. Previously during 1997 Markarian 501 had undergone another long outburst, which was observed by HEGRA telescopes and the energy spectrum was well beyond 10 TeV. The photohadronic model complemented by the extragalactic background radiation (EBL) correction fits well with the flares data observed by both Whipple and HEGRA. Our model predicts a steeper slope of the energy spectrum beyond 10 TeV, which is compatible with the improved analysis of the HEGRA data. (orig.)

  4. EBL effect on the observation of multi-TeV flaring of 2009 from Markarian 501

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sarira; Yáñez, Marco Vladimir Lemus; Miranda, Luis Salvador; de León, Alberto Rosales; Gupta, Virendra

    2017-01-01

    Markarian 501 is a high-peaked BL Lacertae object and has undergone many major outbursts since its discovery in 1996. As a part of the multiwavelength campaign, in the year 2009 this blazar was observed for 4.5 months from March 9 to August 1 and during the period April 17 to May 5 it was observed by both space and ground based observatories covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum. A very strong high energy γ -ray flare was observed on May 1 by Whipple telescope in the energy range 317 GeV to 5 TeV and the flux was about 10 times higher than the average baseline flux. Previously during 1997 Markarian 501 had undergone another long outburst, which was observed by HEGRA telescopes and the energy spectrum was well beyond 10 TeV. The photohadronic model complemented by the extragalactic background radiation (EBL) correction fits well with the flares data observed by both Whipple and HEGRA. Our model predicts a steeper slope of the energy spectrum beyond 10 TeV, which is compatible with the improved analysis of the HEGRA data.

  5. Observations of an X-shaped Ribbon Flare and Its Three-dimensional Magnetic Reconnection with IRIS and SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana; Ding, Mingde

    2016-05-01

    We report evolution of an atypical X-shaped flare ribbon which provides novel observational evidence of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection at a separator. The flare occurred on 2014 November 9, and high-resolution slit-jaw 1330 images from IRIS reveal four chromospheric flare ribbons that converge and form an X-shape. These four ribbons are located in a quadrupolar magnetic field. Reconstruction of magnetic topology in the active region suggests the presence of a separator connecting to the X-point outlined by the ribbons. The inward motion of flare ribbons, as well as coronal loops observed by the SDO/AIA, indicates 3D magnetic reconnection between two sets of non-coplanar loops that approach laterally, and the reconnection proceeds downward to a very low height. We also study spectra of Si IV, C II, and Mg II observed with the IRIS slit, which cuts across the flare ribbons near the X-point. We have found two distinct types of line profiles. At the flare ribbon, all the lines show evident redshifts with a velocity up to 50 km/s, and the redshifts are well correlated with the line intensity and width. These redshifts suggest chromospheric condensation caused by impulsive energy deposition from the separator reconnection. While right outside the flare ribbon, the lines exhibit unshifted, symmetric, yet broadened profiles; in particular, the Si IV line is significantly broadened at the far wing. The line broadening persists for 20 minutes till after the end of the flare. The distinct spectral features near the X-point indicate different dynamics associated with the separator reconnection.

  6. ERRATIC FLARING OF BL LAC IN 2012–2013: MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehrle, Ann E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Grupe, Dirk [Space Science Center, Morehead State University, 235 Martindale Drive, Morehead, KY 40351 (United States); Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Gurwell, Mark [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA-02138 (United States); Baloković, Mislav; Hovatta, Talvikki; Harrison, Fiona H. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: awehrle@spacescience.org [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    BL Lac, the eponymous blazar, flared to historically high levels at millimeter, infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths in 2012. We present observations made with Herschel, Swift, NuSTAR, Fermi, the Submillimeter Array, CARMA, and the VLBA in 2012–2013, including three months with nearly daily sampling at several wavebands. We have also conducted an intensive campaign of 30 hr with every-orbit observations by Swift and NuSTAR, accompanied by Herschel, and Fermi observations. The source was highly variable at all bands. Time lags, correlations between bands, and the changing shapes of the spectral energy distributions can be explained by synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton emission from nonthermal seed photons originating from within the jet. The passage of four new superluminal very long baseline interferometry knots through the core and two stationary knots about 4 pc downstream accompanied the high flaring in 2012–2013. The seed photons for inverse Compton scattering may arise from the stationary knots and from a Mach disk near the core where relatively slow-moving plasma generates intense nonthermal radiation. The 95 spectral energy distributions obtained on consecutive days form the most densely sampled, broad wavelength coverage for any blazar. The observed spectral energy distributions and multi-waveband light curves are similar to simulated spectral energy distributions and light curves generated with a model in which turbulent plasma crosses a conical shock with a Mach disk.

  7. STEREO Observations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms during the 5 December 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms emitted during the X9 solar event of December 5, 2006. Beginning 1 hour following the onset of this E79 flare, the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on both the STEREO A and B spacecraft observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons beginning hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within 10 of the Sun, consistent with the measurement resolution. The derived emission profile at the Sun had onset and peak times remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile and continued for more than an hour. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events less than 5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs). To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. Possible origins for the production of ENAs in a large solar event are considered. We conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona and that charge-transfer reactions between accelerated protons and partially-stripped coronal ions are an important source of ENAs in solar events.

  8. Isotopic micro generators 1 volt; Les microgenerateurs radioisotopiques 1 volt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomal, R.; Devin, B.; Delaquaize, Ph. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Various configurations for electrical isotopic generators in the milliwatt range are investigated; these generators are not of the classical thermoelectric type. The four following energy conversion method are examined : thermionic, thermo-photovoltaic, radio-voltaic, wired thermoelectric. The calculus has been conducted having in view not the best energy conversion efficiency, but the need to attain directly 1 volt output voltage. High temperature {sup 238}Pu sources (T above 1000 ) are isolated by multi layer thermal insulation material of the Moly/Alumina type. Optimised application is given for number 1 and 2 here above. Thermionic is interesting by its compactness and Wired-thermoelectric is cheap, simple and rugged. Both method do not allow to extend output voltage range far above 1 volt. TPV and RV, can be designed for multi volt application. Radio-voltaic is 1 per cent efficient but irradiation defects in the semiconductor induced by high energy radiations can strongly limit the lifetime of the generator. Isotope sources technology is the determining factor for these micro generators. (author) [French] Cette etude examine les types de generateurs electriques realisables a partir de sources isotopiques en dehors du procede thermoelectrique classique. Les quatre procedes suivants sont examines: thermoionique, thermophoto-voltaique, radiovoltaique, thermoelectrique a fils. Les calculs sont conduits sans souci exagere du rendement de conversion pour aboutir a une puissance electrique delivree de 0,2 a 1 mW sous une tension au moins egale a 1 volt. Le probleme des sources thermiques de {sup 238}Pu a haute temperature (T > 1000 C) est resolu avec une isolation a structure multi-couche moly-alumine. L'optimalisation est calculee en vue d'une utilisation dans les procedes 1 et 2. Le procede 1 est interessant par sa compacite et le procede 4 par sa simplicite, sa robustesse et son prix de revient; mais avec ces deux generateurs on ne peut obtenir plus d

  9. Ultra-Narrow Negative Flare Front Observed in Helium-10830 Å Using the1.6m New Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Ding, Mingde; Kleint, Lucia; Su, Jiangtao; Liu, Chang; Ji, Haisheng; Chae, Jongchul; Jing, Ju; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles that have adverse effects on the near-Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to as bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, we show a striking “negative” flare with a narrow but unambiguous “dark” moving front observed in He I 10830 Å, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in Hα and Mg II lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He I 10830 Å can be produced under special circumstances by nonthermal electron collisions or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in solar flares.

  10. Observations and Simulations of the Na i D1 Line Profiles in an M-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Christian, D. J.; Kowalski, A. F.; Jess, D. B.; Grant, S. D. T.; Kawate, T.; Simões, P. J. A.; Allred, J. C.; Keenan, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the Na i D1 line profiles in the M3.9 flare SOL2014-06-11T21:03 UT, using observations at high spectral resolution obtained with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope combined with radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Our results show a significant increase in the intensities of the line core and wings during the flare. The analysis of the line profiles from the flare ribbons reveals that the Na i D1 line has a central reversal with excess emission in the blue wing (blue asymmetry). We combine RADYN and RH simulations to synthesize Na i D1 line profiles of the flaring atmosphere and find good agreement with the observations. Heating with a beam of electrons modifies the radiation field in the flaring atmosphere and excites electrons from the ground state 3s 2S to the first excited state 3p 2P, which in turn modifies the relative population of the two states. The change in temperature and the population density of the energy states make the sodium line profile revert from absorption into emission. Furthermore, the rapid changes in temperature break the pressure balance between the different layers of the lower atmosphere, generating upflow/downflow patterns. Analysis of the simulated spectra reveals that the asymmetries of the Na i D1 flare profile are produced by the velocity gradients in the lower solar atmosphere.

  11. Initiation of CME and Associated Flare Caused by Helical Kink Instability Observed by SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pankaj; Bong, S -C; Park, Sung-Hong; Kim, Y H

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiwavelength observations of helical kink instability as a trigger of a CME which occurred in AR NOAA 11163 on 24 February 2011. The CME was associated with a M3.5 limb flare. High resolution observations from SDO/AIA suggest the development of helical kink instability in the erupting prominence, which implies a flux rope structure of the magnetic field. A brightening starts below the apex of the prominence with its slow rising motion (~100 km/s) during the activation phase. A bright structure, indicative of a helix with ~3-4 turns, was transiently formed at this position. The corresponding twist of ~$6\\pi-8\\pi$ is sufficient to generate the helical kink instability in a flux rope according to recently developed models. A slowly rising blob structure was subsequently formed at the apex of the prominence, and a flaring loop was observed near the footpoints. Within two minutes, a second blob was formed in the northern prominence leg. The second blob erupts (like a plasmoid ejection)...

  12. Observation of Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances over Istanbul in Response to X-Ray Flare Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, Emine; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul

    2016-07-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are the enhanced electron density structures in the D region ionosphere which occur in response to the increase in X-ray flares and EUV flux. SIDs can be monitored using Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signals (3-30 kHz) which travel between the D-region and the surface of the Earth. In this study, we use SID monitors obtained from the Stanford University Solar Center and two antennas which were built at the Istanbul Technical University to track the ionospheric disturbances in the VLF range. Our antennas are capable of capturing signals from several VLF transmitting stations. In this work, we focus on the variations in the signal strength of the closest VLF transmitting station 'TBB' which is operating at 26.7 kHz frequency at BAFA, Turkey (37.43N, 27.15E). We present ITU SID observations from both antennas; show the daily variation, general structure and the typical patterns we observe as well as case studies of significant events. Our initial analysis shows close relationship between observed X-ray flares from geosynchronous GOES 13 and GOES 15 satellites and VLF station signal strength received by the monitors.

  13. First high spatial resolution interferometric observations of solar flares at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M. R.; White, S. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Bieging, J. H.; Hurford, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    The first high spatial resolution interferometric observations of solar flares at millimeter wavelengths, carried out with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Array are presented. The observations were made at 3.3 mm wavelength during the very active periods of March 1989, using one or three baselines with fringe spacings of 2-5 arcsec. The observations represent an improvement of an order of magnitude in both sensitivity and spatial resolution compared with previous solar observations at these wavelengths. It appears that millimeter burst sources are not much smaller than microwave sources. The most intense bursts imply brightness temperatures of over 10 to the 6th K and are due to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission or possibly thermal free-free emission. If the emission in the flash phase is predominantly due to gyrosynchrotron emission, thermal gyrosynchrotron models can be ruled out for the radio emission because the flux at millimeter wavelengths is too high.

  14. IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN SOLAR FLARE LOOPS WITH SDO/AIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, J. T.; Mao, X. J. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physical Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with periods from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to {gamma}-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging observations of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with periods of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest period of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s{sup -1}, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial periodical distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be {approx}10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial periodic distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is suggested that the short QPPs with periods P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with periods P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  15. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Qiu, Jiong [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  16. Stereoscopic observations of a solar flare hard X-ray source in the high corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. R.; Mctiernan, J.; Loran, J.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    The vertical structure of the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray sources in high coronae and the characteristics of the impulsive soft X-ray emission are investigated on the basis of PVE, ICE, and GOES observations of the energetic flare on February 16, 1984. The average photon spectra observed by these instruments during the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray bursts are summarized. A comparison of these unocculted and partially occulted spectra shows that the sources of the impulsive hard X-ray (greater than about 25 keV) and impulsive soft X-ray (2-5 keV) emissions in this flare extended to coronal altitudes greater than about 200,000 km above the photosphere. At about 100 keV, the ratio of the coronal source brightness to the total source brightness was 0.001 during the impulsive phase and less than about 0.01 during the gradual hard X-ray burst. The sources of the gradual hard X-ray burst and gradual soft X-ray burst were almost completely occulted, indicating that these sources were located at heights less than 200,000 km above the photosphere.

  17. Derivation of Stochastic Acceleration Model Characteristics for Solar Flares from RHESSI Hard X-ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosian, Vahé; Chen, Qingrong

    2010-04-01

    The model of stochastic acceleration of particles by turbulence has been successful in explaining many observed features of solar flares. Here, we demonstrate a new method to obtain the accelerated electron spectrum and important acceleration model parameters from the high-resolution hard X-ray (HXR) observations provided by RHESSI. In our model, electrons accelerated at or very near the loop top (LT) produce thin target bremsstrahlung emission there and then escape downward producing thick target emission at the loop footpoints (FPs). Based on the electron flux spectral images obtained by the regularized spectral inversion of the RHESSI count visibilities, we derive several important parameters for the acceleration model. We apply this procedure to the 2003 November 3 solar flare, which shows an LT source up to 100-150 keV in HXR with a relatively flat spectrum in addition to two FP sources. The results imply the presence of strong scattering and a high density of turbulence energy with a steep spectrum in the acceleration region.

  18. UV and EUV Emissions at the Flare Foot-points Observed by AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W; James,; Klimchuk, A; Wen-Juan,; Liu,

    2013-01-01

    A solar flare is composed of impulsive energy release events by magnetic reconnection, which forms and heats flare loops. Recent studies have revealed a two-phase evolution pattern of UV 1600\\AA\\ emission at the feet of these loops: a rapid pulse lasting for a few seconds to a few minutes, followed by a gradual decay on timescales of a few tens of minutes. Multiple band EUV observations by AIA further reveal very similar signatures. These two phases represent different but related signatures of an impulsive energy release in the corona. The rapid pulse is an immediate response of the lower atmosphere to an intense thermal conduction flux resulting from the sudden heating of the corona to high temperatures (we rule out energetic particles due to a lack of significant hard X-ray emission). The gradual phase is associated with the cooling of hot plasma that has been evaporated into the corona. The observed footpoint emission is again powered by thermal conduction (and enthalpy), but now during a period when appr...

  19. The Compatibility of Flare Temperatures Observed with AIA, GOES, and RHESSI

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Daniel F; Aschwanden, Markus J; Gallagher, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    We test the compatibility and biases of multi-thermal flare DEM (differential emission measure) peak temperatures determined with AIA with those determined by GOES and RHESSI using the isothermal assumption. In a set of 149 M- and X-class flares observed during the first two years of the SDO mission, AIA finds DEM peak temperatures at the time of the peak GOES 1-8 A flux to have an average of Tp = 12.0+/-2.9 MK and Gaussian DEM widths of log10(sigma_T) = 0.50+/-0.13. From GOES observations of the same 149 events, a mean temperature of Tp = 15.6+/-2.4 MK is inferred, which is systematically higher by a factor of TGOES/TAIA = 1.4+/-0.4. We demonstrate that this discrepancy results from the isothermal assumption in the inversion of the GOES filter ratio. From isothermal fits to photon spectra at energies of E ~ 6-12 keV of 61 of these events, RHESSI finds the temperature to be higher still by a factor of TRHESSI/TAIA = 1.9+/-1.0. We find that this is partly a consequence of the isothermal assumption. However, RH...

  20. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATION OF RECONNECTION INFLOW AND OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2010 AUGUST 18 SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Asai, Ayumi; Isobe, Hiroaki, E-mail: takasao@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2012-01-20

    We report the simultaneous extreme-ultraviolet observation of magnetic reconnection inflow and outflow in a flare on 2010 August 18 observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We found that during the rise phase of the flare, some plasma blobs appeared in the sheet structure above the hot loops. The plasma blobs were ejected bidirectionally along the sheet structure (outflow), at the same time as the threads visible in extreme-ultraviolet images moved toward the sheet structure (inflow). The upward and downward ejection velocities are 220-460 km s{sup -1} and 250-280 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The inflow speed changed from 90 km s{sup -1} to 12 km s{sup -1} in 5 minutes. By using these velocities, we estimated the nondimensional reconnection rate, which we found to vary during this period from 0.20 to 0.055. We also found that the plasma blobs in the sheet structure collided or merged with each other before they were ejected from the sheet structure. We hypothesize that the sheet structure is the current sheet and that these plasma blobs are plasmoids or magnetic islands, which could be important for understanding the dynamics of the reconnection region.

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF A SERIES OF FLARES AND ASSOCIATED JET-LIKE ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY THE EMERGENCE OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Kim, Sujin; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kumar, Pankaj; Kim, Yeon-Han [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung-Hong [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing (IAASARS), National Observatory of Athens, Penteli 15236 (Greece); Chae, Jongchul; Yang, Heesu; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Song, Donguk, E-mail: eklim@kasi.re.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-20

    We studied temporal changes of morphological and magnetic properties of a succession of four confined flares followed by an eruptive flare using the high-resolution New Solar Telescope (NST) operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetograms and Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) EUV images provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). From the NST/Hα and the SDO/AIA 304 Å observations we found that each flare developed a jet structure that evolved in a manner similar to evolution of the blowout jet: (1) an inverted-Y-shaped jet appeared and drifted away from its initial position; (2) jets formed a curtain-like structure that consisted of many fine threads accompanied by subsequent brightenings near the footpoints of the fine threads; and finally, (3) the jet showed a twisted structure visible near the flare maximum. Analysis of the HMI data showed that both the negative magnetic flux and the magnetic helicity have been gradually increasing in the positive-polarity region, indicating the continuous injection of magnetic twist before and during the series of flares. Based on these results, we suggest that the continuous emergence of twisted magnetic flux played an important role in producing successive flares and developing a series of blowout jets.

  2. Observation and Analysis of Ballistic Downflows in an M-class Flare with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean R.

    2016-12-01

    Despite significant advances in instrumentation, there remain no studies that analyze observations of on-disk flare loop plasma flows covering the entire evolution from chromospheric evaporation, through plasma cooling, to draining downflows. We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the SOL2015-03-12T11:50:00 M-class flare, at high spatial resolution and time cadence. Our analysis of this event reveals initial plasma evaporation at flare temperatures indicated by 100-200 km s-1 blueshifts in the Fe xxi line. We subsequently observe plasma cooling into chromospheric lines (Si iv and O iv) with ˜11 minute delay, followed by loop draining at ˜40 km s-1 as indicated by a “C”-shaped redshift structure and significant (˜60 km s-1) non-thermal broadening. We use density-sensitive lines to calculate a plasma density for the flare loops, and estimate a theoretical cooling time approximately equal to the observed delay. Finally, we use a simple elliptical free-fall draining model to construct synthetic spectra, and perform what we believe to be the first direct comparison of such synthetic spectra to observations of draining downflows in flare loops.

  3. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2016-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  4. Radio follow-up observations of stellar tidal disruption flares: Constraints on off-axis jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Körding E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN and X-ray binaries have shown that relativistic jets are ubiquitous when compact objects accrete. One could therefore anticipate the launch of a jet after a star is disrupted and accreted by a massive black hole. This birth of a relativistic jet may have been observed recently in two stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs, which were discovered in gamma-rays by Swift. Yet no transient radio emission has been detected from the tens of TDF candidates that were discovered at optical to soft X-ray frequencies. Because the sample that was followed-up at radio frequencies is small, the non-detections can be explained by Doppler boosting, which reduces the jet flux for off-axis observers. Plus, the existing followup observation are mostly within ∼ 10 months of the discovery, so the non-detections can also be due to a delay of the radio emission with respect to the time of disruption. To test the conjecture that all TDFs launch jets, we obtained 5 GHz follow-up observations with the Jansky VLA of six known TDFs. To avoid missing delayed jet emission, our observations probe 1–8 years since the estimated time of disruption. None of the sources are detected, with very deep upper limits at the 10 micro Jansky level. These observations rule out the hypothesis that these TDFs launched jets similar to radio-loud quasars. We also constrain the possibility that the flares hosted a jet identical to Sw 1644+57.

  5. Heating and dynamics of two flare loop systems observed by AIA and EIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Qiu, J., E-mail: yingli@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We investigate heating and evolution of flare loops in a C4.7 two-ribbon flare on 2011 February 13. From Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) imaging observations, we can identify two sets of loops. Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) spectroscopic observations reveal blueshifts at the feet of both sets of loops. The evolution and dynamics of the two sets are quite different. The first set of loops exhibits blueshifts for about 25 minutes followed by redshifts, while the second set shows stronger blueshifts, which are maintained for about one hour. The UV 1600 observation by AIA also shows that the feet of the second set of loops brighten twice. These suggest that continuous heating may be present in the second set of loops. We use spatially resolved UV light curves to infer heating rates in the few tens of individual loops comprising the two loop systems. With these heating rates, we then compute plasma evolution in these loops with the 'enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops' model. The results show that, for the first set of loops, the synthetic EUV light curves from the model compare favorably with the observed light curves in six AIA channels and eight EIS spectral lines, and the computed mean enthalpy flow velocities also agree with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS. For the second set of loops modeled with twice-heating, there are some discrepancies between modeled and observed EUV light curves in low-temperature bands, and the model does not fully produce the prolonged blueshift signatures as observed. We discuss possible causes for the discrepancies.

  6. Multiwavelength observations of a TeV-Flare from W Comae

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Böttcher, M; Boltuch, D; Buckley, J H; Bradbury, S M; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, Philip; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vasilev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Vercellone, S; Donnarumma, I; D'Ammando, F; Bulgarelli, A; Chen, A W; Giuliani, A; Longo, F; Pacciani, L; Pucella, G; Vittorini, V; Tavani, M; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Cocco, V; Costa, E; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Fiorini, M; Froysland, T; Frutti, M; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Marisaldi, M; Mastropietro, M; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Porrovecchio, G; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rubini, A; Soffitta, S Sabatini P; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallazza, E; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Salotti, L; Villata, M; Raiteri, C M; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Arkharov, A A; Efimova, N V; Larionov, V M; Leto, P; Ligustri, R; Lindfors, E; Pasanen, M; Kurtanidze, O M; Tetradze, S D; Lahteenmaki, A; Kotiranta, M; Cucchiara, A; Romano, P; Nesci, R; Pursimo, T; Heidt, J; Benítez, E; Hiriart, D; Nilsson, K; Berdyugin, A; Mujica, R; Dultzin, D; López, J M; Mommert, M; Sorcia, M; Perez, I de la Calle

    2009-01-01

    We report results from an intensive multiwavelength campaign on the intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae object W Com (z=0.102) during a strong outburst of very high energy gamma-ray emission in June 2008. The very high energy gamma-ray signal was detected by VERITAS on 2008 June 7-8 with a flux F(>200 GeV) = (5.7+-0.6)x10^-11 cm-2s-1, about three times brighter than during the discovery of gamma-ray emission from W Com by VERITAS in 2008 March. The initial detection of this flare by VERITAS at energies above 200 GeV was followed by observations in high energy gamma-rays (AGILE, E>100 MeV), and X-rays (Swift and XMM-Newton), and at UV, and ground-based optical and radio monitoring through the GASP-WEBT consortium and other observatories. Here we describe the multiwavelength data and derive the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source from contemporaneous data taken throughout the flare.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope observations of an extraordinary flare in the M87 jet

    CERN Document Server

    Madrid, Juan P

    2009-01-01

    HST-1, a knot along the M87 jet located 0.85 arcsec from the nucleus of the galaxy has experienced dramatic and unexpected flaring activity since early 2000. We present analysis of Hubble Space Telescope Near-Ultraviolet (NUV) imaging of the M87 jet from 1999 May to 2006 December that reveals that the NUV intensity of HST-1 has increased 90 times over its quiescent level and outshines the core of the galaxy. The NUV light curve that we derive is synchronous with the light curves derived in other wavebands. The correlation of X-ray and NUV light curves during the HST-1 flare confirms the synchrotron origin of the X-ray emission in the M87 jet. The outburst observed in HST-1 is at odds with the common definition of AGN variability usually linked to blazars and originating in close proximity of the central black hole. In fact, the M87 jet is not aligned with our line of sight and HST-1 is located at one million Schwarzchild radii from the super-massive black hole in the core of the galaxy.

  8. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallilar, Yigit; Casella, Piergiorgio; Marsh, Tom; Gandhi, Poshak; Fender, Rob; Littlefair, Stuart; Eikenberry, Steve; Garner, Alan; Stelter, Deno; Dhillon, Vik; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-07-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  9. The Flare Activity of SgrA*; New Coordinated mm to X-Ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, A; Bautz, M W; Bower, G C; Brandt, W N; Garmire, G P; Genzel, R; Marrone, D; Moran, J M; Morris, M; Ott, T; Rao, R; Ricker, G R; Roberts, D A; Schödel, R; Straubmeier, C; Trippe, S; Viehmann, T; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Zhao, J H

    2005-01-01

    We report new simultaneous near-infrared/sub-millimeter/X-ray observations of the SgrA* counterpart associated with the massive 3-4x10**6 solar mass black hole at the Galactic Center. The main aim is to investigate the physical processes responsible for the variable emission from SgrA*. The observations have been carried out using the NACO adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope and the ACIS-I instrument aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as the Submillimeter Array SMA on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and the Very Large Array in New Mexico. We detected one moderately bright flare event in the X-ray domain and 5 events at infrared wavelengths.

  10. Observation of Reconstructable Radio Waveforms from Solar Flares with the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian; Askaryan Radio Array Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is an ultra-high energy (>1017 eV) neutrino detector in phased construction at the South Pole. The full detector will consist of 37 autonomous stations of antennas which search for the radio pulses produced by neutrino interactions in the Antarctic ice. Three of the proposed detectors have been installed at up to 200m depth, with an additional two slated for deployment in Austral summer 2017. A prototype of the detector was deployed in January 2011, in time to serendipitously observe the relatively active solar month of February. In this talk, we will present preliminary results from an analysis of radio waveforms associated with an X-class solar flare observed in this prototype station. These are the first reconstructable events of natural origin seen by ARA, and could potentially be a powerful calibration source for the array.

  11. The first observation of an intermediate flare from SGR 1935+2154

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, A. V.; Israel, G. L.; Svinkin, D. S.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Hurley, K.; Goldsten, J.; Golovin, D. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Zhang, X.-L.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the bright burst detected by four Interplanetary network (IPN) spacecraft on 2015 April 12. The IPN localization of the source is consistent with the position of the recently discovered soft gamma-repeater SGR 1935+2154. From the Konus-Wind (KW) observation, we derive temporal and spectral parameters of the emission, and the burst energetics. The rather long duration of the burst (˜1.7 s) and the large measured energy fluence (˜2.5 × 10-5 erg cm-2) put it in the class of rare `intermediate' soft gamma-repeater (SGR) flares, and this is the first one observed from SGR 1935+2154. A search for quasi-periodic oscillations in the KW light curve yields no statistically significant signal. Of four spectral models tested, optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung and a single blackbody (BB) function can be rejected on statistical grounds; two more complex models, a cutoff power law (CPL) and a sum of two BB functions (2BB), fit the burst spectra well and neither of them may be ruled out by the KW observation. The CPL and 2BB model parameters we report for this bright flare are typical of SGRs; they are also consistent with those obtained from observations of much weaker and shorter SGR 1935+2154 bursts with other instruments. From the distribution of 2BB spectral fit parameters we estimate the SGR 1935+2154 distance to be <10.0 kpc, in agreement with that of the Galactic supernova remnant G57.2+0.8 at 9.1 kpc.

  12. Observations and simulations of the Na I D1 line profiles in an M-class solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D; Christian, D J; Kowalski, A F; Jess, D B; Grant, S D T; Kawate, T; Simões, P J A; Allred, J C; Keenan, F P

    2016-01-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the Na I D1 line profiles in the M3.9 flare SOL2014-06-11T21:03 UT, using high spectral resolution observations obtained with the IBIS instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope combined with radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Our results show a significant increase in line core and wing intensities during the flare. The analysis of the line profiles from the flare ribbons reveal that the Na I D1 line has a central reversal with excess emission in the blue wing (blue asymmetry). We combine RADYN and RH simulations to synthesise Na I D1 line profiles of the flaring atmosphere and find good agreement with the observations. Heating with a beam of electrons modifies the radiation field in the flaring atmosphere and excites electrons from the ground state $\\mathrm{3s~^2S}$ to the first excited state $\\mathrm{3p~^2P}$, which in turn modifies relative population of the two states. The change in temperature and the population density of the energy states make the sodium line profile re...

  13. Observations of an X-shaped Ribbon Flare in the Sun and Its Three-dimensional Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Qiu, J.; Longcope, D. W.; Ding, M. D.; Yang, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report evolution of an atypical X-shaped flare ribbon that provides novel observational evidence of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection at a separator. The flare occurred on 2014 November 9. High-resolution slit-jaw 1330 Å images from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal four chromospheric flare ribbons that converge and form an X-shape. Flare brightening in the upper chromosphere spreads along the ribbons toward the center of the “X” (the X-point), and then spreads outward in a direction more perpendicular to the ribbons. These four ribbons are located in a quadrupolar magnetic field. Reconstruction of magnetic topology in the active region suggests the presence of a separator connecting to the X-point outlined by the ribbons. The inward motion of flare ribbons in the early stage therefore indicates 3D magnetic reconnection between two sets of non-coplanar loops that approach laterally, and reconnection proceeds downward along a section of vertical current sheet. Coronal loops are also observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory confirming the reconnection morphology illustrated by ribbon evolution.

  14. Flare Footpoint Regions and a Surge Observed by the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), RHESSI, and SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Doschek, George A; Dennis, Brian R; Reep, Jeffrey W; Caspi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft observed flare footpoint regions coincident with a surge for a M3.7 flare observed on 25 September 2011 at N12 E33 in active region 11302. The flare was observed in spectral lines of O VI, Fe X, Fe XII, Fe XIV, Fe XV, Fe XVI, Fe XVII, Fe XXIII and Fe XXIV. The EIS observations were made coincident with hard X-ray bursts observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Overlays of the RHESSI images on the EIS raster images at different wavelengths show a spatial coincidence of features in the RHESSI images with the EIS upflow and downflow regions, as well as loop-top or near-loop-top regions. A complex array of phenomena was observed including multiple evaporation regions and the surge, which was also observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescopes. The slit of the EIS spectrometer covered several flare footpoint regions from which evaporative upflows in Fe XX...

  15. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Seaton, Daniel B; Darnel, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    We present AIA observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014~February~25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand km thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between $8-10\\,\\mathrm{MK}$. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was $M_{A} \\approx 0.004-0.007$, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  16. Observations of the Formation, Development, and Structure of a Current Sheet in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; Bartz, Allison E.; Darnel, Jonathan M.

    2017-02-01

    We present Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of a structure we interpret as a current sheet associated with an X4.9 flare and coronal mass ejection that occurred on 2014 February 25 in NOAA Active Region 11990. We characterize the properties of the current sheet, finding that the sheet remains on the order of a few thousand kilometers thick for much of the duration of the event and that its temperature generally ranged between 8 and 10 MK. We also note the presence of other phenomena believed to be associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets, including supra-arcade downflows and shrinking loops. We estimate that the rate of reconnection during the event was MA ≈ 0.004–0.007, a value consistent with model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this event for reconnection-based eruption models.

  17. Multi-wavelength study of Mrk 421 TeV flare observed with \\emph{TACTIC} telescope in February 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, K K; Chandra, P; Sahayanathan, S; Bhatt, N; Rannot, R C; Tickoo, A K; Koul, R

    2014-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength study of intense flaring activity from a high frequency peaked BL Lac object Mrk 421. The source was observed in its flaring state on February 16, 2010 with the $TACTIC$ at energies above 1.5 TeV. Near simultaneous multi-wavelength data were obtained from high energy (MeV-GeV) $\\gamma$--ray observations with \\emph{Fermi}--LAT, X--ray observations by the \\emph{Swift} and \\emph{MAXI} satellites, optical V-band observation by SPOL at \\emph{Steward Observatory} and radio 15 GHz observation at OVRO 40 meter-telescope. We have performed a detailed spectral and temporal analysis of $TACTIC$, \\emph{Fermi}--LAT and \\emph{Swift}--XRT observations of Mrk 421 during February 10--23, 2010 (MJD 55237-55250). The flaring activity of the source is studied by investigating the properties of daily light curves from radio to $TeV$ energy range and we present the correlation and variability analysis in each energy band. The $TeV$ flare detected by $TACTIC$ on February 16, 2010 is well cor...

  18. Observations of an X-shaped Ribbon Flare in the Sun and Its Three-dimensional Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Longcope, D W; Ding, M D; Yang, K

    2016-01-01

    We report evolution of an atypical X-shaped flare ribbon which provides novel observational evidence of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection at a separator. The flare occurred on 2014 November 9. High-resolution slit-jaw 1330 A images from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal four chromospheric flare ribbons that converge and form an X-shape. Flare brightening in the upper chromosphere spreads along the ribbons toward the center of the "X" (the X-point), and then spreads outward in a direction more perpendicular to the ribbons. These four ribbons are located in a quadrupolar magnetic field. Reconstruction of magnetic topology in the active region suggests the presence of a separator connecting to the X-point outlined by the ribbons. The inward motion of flare ribbons in the early stage therefore indicates 3D magnetic reconnection between two sets of non-coplanar loops that approach laterally, and reconnection proceeds downward along a section of vertical current sheet. Coronal loops are al...

  19. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C

    2015-01-01

    SDO/EVE provide rich information of the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly of solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. Reading from the charts, we are able to easily recognize if there is a late phase following a main phase of a flare, and able to learn the begin, peak and end times of the flare as well as the drift of the temperature, i.e., the cooling rate, of the heated plasma during the flare. Through four M-class flares of different types, we illustrate which thermodynamic information can be revealed from the TDS charts. Further, we investigate the TDS charts of all the flares greater than M5.0, and some interesting results are achieved. First, there are two distinct drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperture, whereas for Type II flares, the drift is somewhat reversed, suggesting a more violent and durable heating during Type I...

  20. Ultra-narrow Negative Flare Front Observed in Helium-10830~\\AA\\ using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yan; Ding, Mingde; Kleint, Lucia; Su, Jiangtao; Liu, Chang; Ji, Haisheng; Chae, Jongchul; Jing, Ju; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Cho, Kyungsuk; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles which have adverse effects in the near Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6~m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, here we show a striking "negative" flare with a narrow, but unambiguous "dark" moving front observed in He I 10830 \\AA, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in H-alpha and Mg II lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He I 10830 \\AA\\ can be produced under special circumstances, by nonthermal-electron collisions, or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in astronomi...

  1. THERMODYNAMIC SPECTRUM OF SOLAR FLARES BASED ON SDO/EVE OBSERVATIONS: TECHNIQUES AND FIRST RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Jie [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Chamberlin, Phillip C., E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  2. Observations of Magnetic Evolution and Network Flares Driven by Photospheric Flows in the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attie, Raphael; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2017-08-01

    The quiet Sun may be the biggest laboratory to study physical elementary processes of fundamental importance to space plasma. The advantage is the continuous availability of small-scale events, carrying the hidden microphysics that is responsible for larger-scale phenomena. By small-scale events, we mean spatial dimensions of a few Mm at most, and durations of less than an hour. I present here an attempt to describe and understand the coupling between the photospheric flows, the photospheric magnetic flux, and small-scale energetic transient events. By adapting and improving the highly efficient Balltracking technique for Hinode/SOT data, we relate the fine structures of the supergranular flow fields with the magnetic flux evolution. For studying the dynamics of the latter, and more precisely, the magnetic flux cancellation at sites of energy releases, we applied a new feature tracking algorithm called "Magnetic Balltracking" -- which tracks photospheric magnetic elements -- to high-resolution magnetograms from Hinode/SOT.Using observations of the low corona in soft X-rays with Hinode/XRT, we analyse the triggering mechanism of small-scale network flares. By tracking both the flow fields on the one hand, and the magnetic motions on the other hand, we relate the flows with cancelling magnetic flux. We identify two patterns of horizontal flows that act as catalysts for efficient magnetic reconnection: (i) Funnel-shaped streamlines in which the magnetic flux is carried, and (ii) large-scale vortices (~10 Mm and above) at the network intersections, in which distant magnetic features of opposite polarities seem to be sucked in and ultimately vanish. The excess energy stored in the stressed magnetic field of the vortices is sufficient to power network flares.Prospects for determining the magnetic energy budget in the quiet sun are discussed.

  3. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: first results from SCUBA-2 observations of the Cepheus Flare region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattle, K.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Kirk, J. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Kirk, H.; Mottram, J. C.; Keown, J.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coudé, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that if modelled as thermally supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible to them. We estimate the external pressures on our cores using archival 13CO velocity dispersion measurements and find that our cores are typically pressure confined, rather than gravitationally bound. We perform a virial analysis on our cores, and find that they typically cannot be supported against collapse by internal thermal energy alone, due primarily to the measured external pressures. This suggests that the dominant mode of internal support in starless cores in the Cepheus Flare is either non-thermal motions or internal magnetic fields.

  4. Flares and variability from Sagittarius A*: five nights of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations

    CERN Document Server

    Haubois, X; Weiss, A; Paumard, T; Perrin, G; Clénet, Y; Gillessen, S; Kervella, P; Eisenhauer, F; Genzel, R; Rouan, D; 10.1051/0004-6361/201117725

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We report on simultaneous observations and modeling of mid-infrared (MIR), near-infrared (NIR), and submillimeter (submm) emission of the source Sgr A* associated with the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy. Our goal was to monitor the activity of Sgr A* at different wavelengths in order to constrain the emitting processes and gain insight into the nature of the close environment of Sgr A*. Methods. We used the MIR instrument VISIR in the BURST imaging mode, the adaptive optics assisted NIR camera NACO, and the sub-mm antenna APEX to monitor Sgr A* over several nights in July 2007. Results. The observations reveal remarkable variability in the NIR and sub-mm during the five nights of observation. No source was detected in the MIR, but we derived the lowest upper limit for a flare at 8.59 microns (22.4 mJy with A_8.59mu = 1.6+/- 0.5). This observational constraint makes us discard the observed NIR emission as coming from a thermal component emitting at sub-mm frequencies. Moreover, compa...

  5. Spectroscopic far ultraviolet observations of transition zone instabilities and their possible role in a pre-flare energy build-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Patterson, N. P.; Scherrer, V. E.

    1976-01-01

    Highly flare-productive newly emerging active regions are characterized by numerous small low-lying loops which frequently show a chaotic pattern. Flare activity in such a region subsides as the chaotic loop structures relax and expand into a bipolar configuration. The transition zone in such an active region is highly unstable, as shown by broadened and shifted nonthermal line profiles of medium-ionized elements like Si III, Si IV, and C IV. These transition-zone instabilities, which occur as isolated events in active regions of low flare productivity, are often observed prior to flares. Transition-zone instabilities can be traced to the footpoints of active loops and seem to be accompanied by heating of the loop. The loops vary in size and show differing degrees of activity, with the brightest and most compact ones seemingly being in a pre-flare state which results in the catastrophic energy release along the loop during a flare.

  6. Evidence of significant energy input in the late phase of a solar flare from NuSTAR x-ray observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain G.

    2017-01-01

    are consistent with the derived NuSTAR temperature range, favoring temperature values in the range of 4.0–4.3 MK. By examining the post-flare loops’ cooling times and energy content, we estimate that at least 12 sets of post-flare loops were formed and subsequently cooled between the onset of the flare and Nu......STAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value....

  7. A study of flare buildup from simultaneous observations in microwave, H-alpha, and UV wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M. R.; Schmahl, E. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Woodgate, B. E.; Shine, R.; Jones, H. P.

    1985-01-01

    The results of high-resolution observations of the solar preflare activity of June 25, 1980 are analyzed. The observations were carried out simultaneously in the UV microwave, and H-alpha wavelengths using the VLA, the Ottawa River photoheliograph, and the Solar Max spectrometer and polarimeter instruments. Increases were observed in the intensitiy and polarization of compact sources at a wavelength of 6-cm during the preflare hour. The increases were associated with rising and twisting motions in the magnetic loops near the sight of the subsequent flare. Consistent with this process, analysis of the transverse and Doppler motions observed in the H-alpha filament before disruption showed that the filament was activated internally by the motions of evolving magnetic flux patterns. Ultraviolet data for C IV brightenings and upflows at the first appearance of the H-alpha filament indicated the presence of rising magnetic loops and material rising within the loops. The complete VLA, microwave and H-alpha data sets are given.

  8. X-ray observations of the impulsive phase of solar flares with the Yohkoh satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew

    This thesis starts with an overview of the physics of the solar corona, concentrating on X-ray emission and the plasma dynamics associated with the impulsive or rise phase of solar flares. The Yohkoh satellite is described, with a section on each major instrument on board. Analysis techniques used in the thesis are then introduced, with a section of soft X-ray spectroscopy and on the application of the Maximum Entropy Method image reconstruction technique to data from the Hard X-ray Telescope on Yohkoh. The instrumental effect known as fixed pattern noise is described, leading to a numerical model of the BCS digitisation process, which is used both to understand the limits of the detector, and to correct the data in a limited way. Alternative methods for the avoidance of fixed pattern noise are evaluated. The analysis of a solar flare with unusually large soft X-ray blue shifts is then performed. Physical parameters of the plasma during the initial stages of the flare are derived, which are used in an energy balance calculation. Agreement is found between the energy in nonthermal electrons and that contained in the coronal plasma, supporting the nonthermal beam driven chromospheric evaporation theory of impulsive flares. The location of superhot plasma in two impulsive flares and one hot thermal flare is then investigated. Superhot plasma is found to be located close to the chromosphere, and related to the nonthermal burst in the two impulsive flares. Superhot plasma in the hot thermal flare is distributed uniformly throughout the loop. The differences are explained as being due to the different energy transport processes active in each type of flare.

  9. X-ray Flares Observed from Six Young Stars Located in the Region of Star Clusters NGC 869 and IC 2602

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Himali Bhatt; J. C. Pandey; K. P. Singh; Ram Sagar; Brijesh Kumar

    2014-03-01

    We present, for the first time, an analysis of seven intense X-ray flares observed from six stars (LAV 796, LAV 1174, SHM2002 3734, 2MASS 02191082+5707324, V553 Car, V557 Car). These stars are located in the region of young open star clusters NGC 869 and IC 2602. These flares detected in the XMM-Newton data show a rapid rise (10–40 min) and a slow decay (20–90 min). The X-ray luminosities during the flares in the energy band 0.3–7.5 keV are in the range of 1029.9 to 1031.7 erg s-1. The strongest flare was observed with the ratio ∼ 13 for count rates at peak of the flare to the quiescent intensity. The maximum temperature during the flares has been found to be ∼ 100 MK. The semi-loop lengths for the flaring loops are estimated to be of the order of 1010 cm. The physical parameters of the flaring structure, the peak density, pressure and minimum magnetic field required to confine the plasma have been derived and found to be consistent with flares from pre-main sequence stars in the Orion and the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus region.

  10. The first observation of an intermediate flare from SGR 1935+2154

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlova, A V; Svinkin, D S; Frederiks, D D; Pal'shin, V D; Tsvetkova, A E; Hurley, K; Goldsten, J; Golovin, D V; Mitrofanov, I G; Zhang, X -L

    2016-01-01

    We report on the bright burst detected by four Interplanetary network (IPN) spacecraft on 2015 April 12. The IPN localization of the source is consistent with the position of the recently discovered soft gamma-repeater SGR 1935+2154. From the Konus-Wind (KW) observation, we derive temporal and spectral parameters of the emission, and the burst energetics. The rather long duration of the burst ($\\sim$1.7 s) and the large measured energy fluence ($\\sim2.5\\times10^{-5}$ erg cm$^{-2}$) put it in the class of rare "intermediate" SGR flares, and this is the first one observed from SGR 1935+2154. A search for quasi-periodic oscillations in the KW light curve yields no statistically significant signal. Of four spectral models tested, optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung and a single blackbody (BB) function can be rejected on statistical grounds; two more complex models, a cutoff power law (CPL) and a sum of two BB functions (2BB), fit the burst spectra well and neither of them may be ruled out by the KW observation....

  11. Quasi periodic oscillations of solar active regions in connection with their flare activity - NoRH observations

    CERN Document Server

    Abramov-Maximov, Vladimir E; Shibasaki, Kiyoto

    2011-01-01

    The sunspot-associated sources at the frequency of 17 GHz give information on plasma parameters in the regions of magnetic field about B=2000 G at the level of the chromosphere-corona transition region. The observations of short period (from 1 to 10 minutes) oscillations in sunspots reflect propagation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the magnetic flux tubes of the sunspots. We investigate the oscillation parameters in active regions in connection with their flare activity. We confirm the existence of a link between the oscillation spectrum and flare activity. We find differences in the oscillations between pre-flare and post-flare phases. In particular, we demonstrate a case of powerful three-minute oscillations that start just before the burst. This event is similar to the cases of the precursors investigated by Sych, R. et al. (Astron. Astrophys., vol.505, p.791, 2009). We also found well-defined eight-minute oscillations of microwave emission from sunspot. We interpret our observations in terms of a ...

  12. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A SLOW-RISE, MULTISTEP X1.6 FLARE AND THE ASSOCIATED ERUPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurchyshyn, V. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Kumar, P.; Cho, K.-S.; Lim, E.-K. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Abramenko, V. I. [Central Astronomical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences at Pulkovo, 196140, Pulkovskoye chaussee 65, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-20

    Using multiwavelength observations, we studied a slow-rise, multistep X1.6 flare that began on 2014 November 7 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region (AR). This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and IRIS spacecraft, along with the ground-based data from the New Solar Telescope, present evidence that (i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ-sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; (ii) this event represented an example of the formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94 Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; (iii) the global PEA spanned the entire AR and was due to global-scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radius, indicating the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  13. Diagnostics of non-thermal distributions in solar flare spectra observed by RESIK and RHESSI

    CERN Document Server

    Kulinova, A; Dzifcakova, E; Sylwester, J; Sylwester, B; Karlicky, M

    2011-01-01

    We focus on the non-thermal components of the electron distribution in the keV range and analyse high-energy resolution X-ray spectra detected by RESIK and RHESSI for three solar flares.In the 2-4 keV range we assume that the electron distribution can be modelled by an n-distribution. Using a method of line-intensity ratios, we analyse allowed and satellite lines of Si observed by RESIK and estimate the parameters of this n-distribution. At higher energies we explore RHESSI bremsstrahlung spectra. Adopting a forward-fitting approach and thick-target approximation, we determine the characteristics of injected electron beams. RHESSI non-thermal component associated with the electron beam is correlated well with presence of the non-thermal n-distribution obtained from the RESIK spectra. In addition, such an n-distribution occurs during radio bursts observed in the 0.61-15.4 GHz range. Furthermore, we show that the n-distribution could also explain RHESSI emission below ~5 keV. Therefore, two independent diagnost...

  14. Reconciliation of Waiting Time Statistics of Solar Flares Observed in Hard X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2010-01-01

    We study the waiting time distributions of solar flares observed in hard X-rays with ISEE-3/ICE, HXRBS/SMM, WATCH/GRANAT, BATSE/CGRO, and RHESSI. Although discordant results and interpretations have been published earlier, based on relatively small ranges ($< 2$ decades) of waiting times, we find that all observed distributions, spanning over 6 decades of waiting times ($\\Delta t \\approx 10^{-3}- 10^3$ hrs), can be reconciled with a single distribution function, $N(\\Delta t) \\propto \\lambda_0 (1 + \\lambda_0 \\Delta t)^{-2}$, which has a powerlaw slope of $p \\approx 2.0$ at large waiting times ($\\Delta t \\approx 1-1000$ hrs) and flattens out at short waiting times $\\Delta t \\lapprox \\Delta t_0 = 1/\\lambda_0$. We find a consistent breakpoint at $\\Delta t_0 = 1/\\lambda_0 = 0.80\\pm0.14$ hours from the WATCH, HXRBS, BATSE, and RHESSI data. The distribution of waiting times is invariant for sampling with different flux thresholds, while the mean waiting time scales reciprocically with the number of detected event...

  15. Implications of X-ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Gordon D; Aurass, Henry; Battaglia, Marina; Grigis, Paolo C; Kontar, Eduard P; Liu, Wei; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Zharkova, Valentina V

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general fla...

  16. Observations of a Series of Flares and Associated Jet-like Eruptions Driven by the Emergence of Twisted Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Park, Sung-Hong; Kim, Sujin; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kumar, Pankaj; Chae, Jongchul; Yang, Heesu; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Song, Donguk; Kim, Yeon-Han

    2015-01-01

    We studied temporal changes of morphological and magnetic properties of a succession of four confined flares followed by an eruptive flare using the high-resolution New Solar Telescope (NST) operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetograms and Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) EUV images provided by Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). From the NST/Halpha and the SDO/AIA~304 A observations we found that each flare developed a jet structure that evolved in a manner similar to evolution of the blowout jet : 1) an inverted-Y shape jet appeared and drifted away from its initial position; 2) jets formed a curtain-like structure that consisted of many fine threads accompanied with subsequent brightenings near the footpoints of the fine threads; and finally 3) the jet showed a twisted structure visible near the flare maximum. Analysis of the HMI data showed that both the negative magnetic flux and the magnetic helicity have been gradually increasing in the positive ...

  17. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: First results from SCUBA-2 observations of the Cepheus Flare Region

    CERN Document Server

    Pattle, Kate; Kirk, Jason M; Di Francesco, James; Kirk, Helen; Mottram, Joseph C; Keown, Jared; Buckle, Jane; Beaulieu, Sylvie F; Berry, David S; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Currie, Malcolm J; Fich, Michel; Hatchell, Jenny; Jenness, Tim; Johnstone, Doug; Nutter, David; Pineda, Jaime E; Quinn, Ciera; Salji, Carl; Tisi, Sam; Walker-Smith, Samantha; Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Bastien, Pierre; Bresnahan, David; Butner, Harold; Chen, Mike; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Coudé, Simon; Davis, Chris J; Drabek-Maunder, Emily; Duarte-Cabral, Ana; Fiege, Jason; Friberg, Per; Friesen, Rachel; Fuller, Gary A; Graves, Sarah; Greaves, Jane; Gregson, Jonathan; Holland, Wayne; Joncas, Gilles; Knee, Lewis B G; Mairs, Steve; Marsh, Ken; Matthews, Brenda C; Moriarty-Schieven, Gerald; Mowat, Chris; Rawlings, Jonathan; Richer, John; Robertson, Damien; Rosolowsky, Erik; Rumble, Damian; Sadavoy, Sarah; Thomas, Holly; Tothill, Nick; Viti, Serena; White, Glenn J; Wouterloot, Jan; Yates, Jeremy; Zhu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that, if modelled as thermally-supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible...

  18. A Flare Observed in Coronal, Transition Region and Helium I 10830 \\AA\\ Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda; Judge, Philip G

    2014-01-01

    On June 17, 2012, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broad-band TiO at 706 nm (bandpass:10 \\AA) and He I 10830 \\AA\\ narrow-band (bandpass: 0.5 \\AA, centered 0.25 \\AA\\ to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 \\AA\\ data, which were obtained over a 90" X 90" field of view with a cadence of 10 sec. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the "0D" Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops model (EBTEL: Klimchuk...

  19. Capability of Cherenkov Telescopes to Observe Ultra-fast Optical Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Deil, C; Hermann, G; Clapson, A -C; Förster, A; Van Eldik, C; Hofmann, W

    2008-01-01

    The large optical reflector (~ 100 m^2) of a H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescope was used to search for very fast optical transients of astrophysical origin. 43 hours of observations targeting stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars were obtained using a dedicated photometer with microsecond time resolution. The photometer consists of seven photomultiplier tube pixels: a central one to monitor the target and a surrounding ring of six pixels to veto background events. The light curves of all pixels were recorded continuously and were searched offline with a matched-filtering technique for flares with a duration of 2 us to 100 ms. As expected, many unresolved (500 us) background events originating in the earth's atmosphere were detected. In the time range 3 to 500 us the measurement is essentially background-free, with only eight events detected in 43 h; five from lightning and three presumably from a piece of space debris. The detection of flashes of brightness ~ 0.1 Jy and only 20 us duration from the space debri...

  20. The 2010 Very High Energy γ-Ray Flare and 10 Years of Multi-wavelength Observations of M 87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gast, H.; Gérard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Göring, D.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hampf, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Keogh, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, D.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sheidaei, F.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar, P.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thom, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huan, H.; Hui, C. M.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nuñez, P. D.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Ruppel, J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Şentürk, G. D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vivier, M.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS Collaboration; Barres de Almeida, U.; Cara, M.; Casadio, C.; Cheung, C. C.; McConville, W.; Davies, F.; Doi, A.; Giovannini, G.; Giroletti, M.; Hada, K.; Hardee, P.; Harris, D. E.; Junor, W.; Kino, M.; Lee, N. P.; Ly, C.; Madrid, J.; Massaro, F.; Mundell, C. G.; Nagai, H.; Perlman, E. S.; Steele, I. A.; Walker, R. C.; Wood, D. L.

    2012-02-01

    The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (16 Mpc), famous jet, and very massive black hole ((3 - 6) × 109 M ⊙) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of supermassive black holes. M 87 has been established as a VHE γ-ray emitter since 2006. The VHE γ-ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, results from a joint VHE monitoring campaign on M 87 by the MAGIC and VERITAS instruments in 2010 are reported. During the campaign, a flare at VHE was detected triggering further observations at VHE (H.E.S.S.), X-rays (Chandra), and radio (43 GHz Very Long Baseline Array, VLBA). The excellent sampling of the VHE γ-ray light curve enables one to derive a precise temporal characterization of the flare: the single, isolated flare is well described by a two-sided exponential function with significantly different flux rise and decay times of τrise d = (1.69 ± 0.30) days and τdecay d = (0.611 ± 0.080) days, respectively. While the overall variability pattern of the 2010 flare appears somewhat different from that of previous VHE flares in 2005 and 2008, they share very similar timescales (~day), peak fluxes (Φ>0.35 TeV ~= (1-3) × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1), and VHE spectra. VLBA radio observations of 43 GHz of the inner jet regions indicate no enhanced flux in 2010 in contrast to observations in 2008, where an increase of the radio flux of the innermost core regions coincided with a VHE flare. On the other hand, Chandra X-ray observations taken ~3 days after the peak of the VHE γ-ray emission reveal an enhanced flux from the core (flux increased by factor ~2; variability timescale <2 days). The long-term (2001-2010) multi-wavelength (MWL) light curve of M 87, spanning from radio to VHE and including data from Hubble Space Telescope, Liverpool Telescope, Very Large Array, and European VLBI Network

  1. Gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Cannon, A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Çelik, Ö; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashi, K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Horan, D; Itoh, R; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Khangulyan, D; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Ziegler, M

    2011-02-11

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (10(15) electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 × 10(-2) parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory.

  2. Observational Evidences for Multi-component Magnetic Field Structure in Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. G. Lozitsky; J. Staude

    2008-09-01

    Two solar flares of 25 July 1981 and 5 November 2004 of importance 2 and M4.1/1B, respectively, were investigated using observational data obtained with the Echelle spectrograph of the Kyiv University Astronomical Observatory. Stokes and profiles of the FeI lines 5233, 5247.1, 5250.2, 5250.6, 5576.1 and of CrI 5247.6 Å have been analyzed. We found several evidences for the existence of spatially unresolved magnetic field structures with kG strengths. In particular, the values of the measured average longitudinal field ∥ depend on the Lande factors of the lines: in general, ∥ increases with increasing factor . Analogously, the observed line ratio ∥ (5250.2)/∥(5247.1) is increasing with increasing distance from the line center. The observed Stokes profiles show some deviations from that of an assumed homogeneous field, presented by the Stokes gradient, /. A comparison with the non-split line FeI 5576.1 Å shows that some of these deviations are real and indicate the presence of subtelescopic magnetic elements with discrete field strengths of several kG. The lines with large Lande factors have considerable broadenings of the Stokes profiles, indicating a strong background magnetic field of mixed polarity. On the basis of all these data we conclude that a four-component magnetic field structure is a possible explanation. The field strengths are about ±1.05 kG in the background field, and 1.3–1.5, 3.9–4.0, and 7.4–7.8 kG at level of middle photosphere (ℎ ≈ 300 km) in the spatially unresolved, small-scale magnetic elements.

  3. Incidence of pain flare following palliative radiotherapy for symptomatic bone metastases: multicenter prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Iturriaga, Alfonso; Cacicedo, Jon; Navarro, Arturo; Morillo, Virginia; Willisch, Patricia; Carvajal, Claudia; Hortelano, Eduardo; Lopez-Guerra, Jose Luis; Illescas, Ana; Casquero, Francisco; Del Hoyo, Olga; Ciervide, Raquel; Irasarri, Ana; Pijoan, Jose Ignacio; Bilbao, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    Palliative radiotherapy (RT) is an effective treatment for symptomatic bone metastases. Pain flare, a transient worsening of the bone pain after RT, has been described in previous reports with different incidence rates. The aim of the study was to prospectively evaluate the incidence of pain flare following RT for painful bone metastases and evaluate its effects on pain control and functionality of the patients. Between June 2010 and June 2014, 204 patients were enrolled in this study and 135 patients with complete data were evaluable. Pain flare was defined as a 2- point increase in worst pain score as compared with baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake or a 25% increase in analgesic intake as compared with baseline with no decrease in worst pain score. All pain medications and worst pain scores were collected before, daily during, and for 10 days after RT. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was filled out on the pretreatment and at the 4 weeks follow-up visit. There were 90 men (66.7%) and 45 women (33.3%). Mean age was 66 years (SD 9.8). The most common primary cancer site was lung in 42 patients (31.1%), followed by prostate in 27 patients (20.0%). Forty-two patients (31.1%) patients received a single fraction of 8 Gy and 83 (61.5%) received 20 Gy in five fractions. The overall pain flare incidence across all centers was 51/135 (37.7%). The majority of pain flares occurred on days 1-5 (88.2%). The mean duration of the pain flare was 3 days (SD: 3). There were no significant relationships between the occurrence of pain flare and collected variables. All BPI items measured four weeks after end of RT showed significant improvement as compared with pretreatment scores (p < 0.001). No significant differences in BPI time trends were found between patients with and without flare pain. Pain flare is a common event, occurring in nearly 40% of the patients that receive palliative RT for symptomatic bone metastases. This phenomenon is not a predictor for pain

  4. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF ELECTRON-DRIVEN EVAPORATION IN TWO SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Zhang, Q. M., E-mail: lidong@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2015-11-01

    We have explored the relationship between hard X-ray (HXR) emissions and Doppler velocities caused by the chromospheric evaporation in two X1.6 class solar flares on 2014 September 10 and October 22, respectively. Both events display double ribbons and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit is fixed on one of their ribbons from the flare onset. The explosive evaporations are detected in these two flares. The coronal line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å shows blueshifts, but the chromospheric line of C i 1354.29 Å shows redshifts during the impulsive phase. The chromospheric evaporation tends to appear at the front of the flare ribbon. Both Fe xxi and C i display their Doppler velocities with an “increase-peak-decrease” pattern that is well related to the “rising-maximum-decay” phase of HXR emissions. Such anti-correlation between HXR emissions and Fe xxi Doppler shifts and correlation with C i Doppler shifts indicate the electron-driven evaporation in these two flares.

  5. Zero Volt Paper Spray Ionization and Its Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wleklinski, Michael; Li, Yafeng; Bag, Soumabha; Sarkar, Depanjan; Narayanan, Rahul; Pradeep, T; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-07-07

    The analytical performance and a suggested mechanism for zero volt paper spray using chromatography paper are presented. A spray is generated by the action of the pneumatic force of the mass spectrometer (MS) vacuum at the inlet. Positive and negative ion signals are observed, and comparisons are made with standard kV paper spray (PS) ionization and nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI). While the range of analytes to which zero volt PS is applicable is very similar to kV PS and nESI, differences in the mass spectra of mixtures are interpreted in terms of the more significant effects of analyte surface activity in the gentler zero volt experiment than in the other methods due to the significantly lower charge. The signal intensity of zero volt PS is also lower than in the other methods. A Monte Carlo simulation based on statistical fluctuation of positive and negative ions in solution has been implemented to explain the production of ions from initially uncharged droplets. Uncharged droplets first break up due to aerodynamics forces until they are in the 2-4 μm size range and then undergo Coulombic fission. A model involving statistical charge fluctuations in both phases predicts detection limits similar to those observed experimentally and explains the effects of binary mixture components on relative ionization efficiencies. The proposed mechanism may also play a role in ionization by other voltage-free methods.

  6. Transient artifacts in a flare observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveros, J C Martínez; Hudson, H S; Casas, J C Buitrago

    2013-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) provides a new tool for the systematic observation of white-light flares, including Doppler and magnetic information as well as continuum. In our initial analysis of the highly impulsive \\gamma-ray flare SOL2010-06-12T00:57 (Mart'{\\i}nez Oliveros et al., Solar Phys., 269, 269, 2011), we reported the signature of a strong blueshift in the two footpoint sources. Concerned that this might be an artifact due to aliasing peculiar to the HMI instrument, we undertook a comparative analysis of Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG++) observations of the same flare, using the PArametric Smearing Correction ALgorithm (PASCAL) algorithm to correct for artifacts caused by variations in atmospheric smearing. This analysis confirms the artifactual nature of the apparent blueshift in the HMI observations, finding weak redshifts at the footpoints instead. We describe the use of PASCAL with GONG++ observations as a complement to the SDO ...

  7. The exceptional flare of Mrk 501 in 2014 combined observations with H.E.S.S. and FACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologna, G.; Chakraborty, N.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lorentz, M.; Mohamed, M.; Perennes, C.; Romoli, C.; Wagner, S. J.; Wierzcholska, A.; H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Dorner, D.; FACT Collaboration; Kurtanidze, O.

    2017-01-01

    The BL Lac type object Mrk 501 was observed at very high energies (E>100 GeV) in 2014 with the upgraded H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System) phase 2 array. The data collected with the central 28 m telescope allow for a broader energy range extending to lower energies when compared to the one obtained with the four small telescopes alone. A strong flaring event with a flux level comparable to the 1997 historical maximum has been detected as a consequence of target of opportunity observations triggered by alerts from the FACT collaboration. The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) is continuously monitoring bright blazars at TeV energies providing important pre-and post-flare information. For the first time, the data and lightcurves from H.E.S.S. and FACT are compared. These contemporaneous observations allow for a better characterization of the source emission. In a multiwavelength context, more precise correlation studies between VHE and lower energies are possible thanks to the dense sampling of the FACT observations. The hard intrinsic spectrum detected by H.E.S.S. during the flare allows the derivation of strong constraints on the scale of Lorentz invariance violation via the non-detection of EBL opacity modifications and from time-of-flight studies.

  8. Time delays in the nonthermal radiation of solar flares according to observations of the CORONAS-F satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kopylova, Yu. G.; Goldvarg, T. B.

    2016-07-01

    In 2001-2003, the X-ray and microwave observations of ten solar flares of M- and X-classes were carried out by the CORONAS-F orbital station, the RSTN Sun service, and Nobeyama radio polarimeters. Based on these observations, a correlation analysis of time profiles of nonthermal radiation was performed. On average, hard X-ray radiation outstrips the microwave radiation in 9 events, i.e., time delays are positive. The appearance of negative delays is associated with effective scattering of accelerated electrons in pitch angles, where the length of the free path of a particle is less than the half-length of a flare loop. The additional indications are obtained in favor of the need to account for the effect of magnetic mirrors on the dynamics of energetic particles in the coronal arches.

  9. Evidence of Significant Energy Input in the Late Phase of A Solar Flare from NuSTAR X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain G.; Glesener, Lindsay; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/ AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at approximately 18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused by the continuous formation of new post-flare loops that arch higher and higher in the solar corona. The spectral fitting of NuSTAR observations yields an isothermal source, with temperature 3.8-4.6 MK, emission measure (0.3-1.8) × 1046 cm-3, and density estimated at (2.5-6.0) × 108 cm-3. The observed AIA fluxes are consistent with the derived NuSTAR temperature range, favoring temperature values in the range of 4.0-4.3 MK. By examining the post-flare loops' cooling times and energy content, we estimate that at least 12 sets of post-flare loops were formed and subsequently cooled between the onset of the flare and NuSTAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value.

  10. Evidence of Significant Energy Input in the Late Phase of a Solar Flare from NuSTAR X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain G.; Glesener, Lindsay; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J.; Wright, Paul J.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at ∼18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused by the continuous formation of new post-flare loops that arch higher and higher in the solar corona. The spectral fitting of NuSTAR observations yields an isothermal source, with temperature 3.8–4.6 MK, emission measure (0.3–1.8) × 1046 cm‑3, and density estimated at (2.5–6.0) × 108 cm‑3. The observed AIA fluxes are consistent with the derived NuSTAR temperature range, favoring temperature values in the range of 4.0–4.3 MK. By examining the post-flare loops’ cooling times and energy content, we estimate that at least 12 sets of post-flare loops were formed and subsequently cooled between the onset of the flare and NuSTAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value.

  11. H.E.S.S. Observations of the Crab during its March 2013 GeV Gamma-Ray Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zabalza, V; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Context. On March 4, 2013, the Fermi-LAT and AGILE reported a flare from the direction of the Crab Nebula in which the high-energy (HE; E > 100 MeV) flux was six times above its quiescent level. Simultaneous observations in other energy bands give us hints about the emission processes during the flare episode and the physics of pulsar wind nebulae in general. Aims. We search for variability of the emission of the Crab Nebula at very-high energies (VHE; E > 100 GeV), using contemporaneous data taken with the H.E.S.S. array of Cherenkov telescopes. Methods. Observational data taken with the H.E.S.S. instrument on five consecutive days during the flare were analysed concerning the flux and spectral shape of the emission from the Crab Nebula. Night-wise light curves are presented with energy thresholds of 1 TeV and 5 TeV. Results. The observations conducted with H.E.S.S. on 2013 March 6 to March 10 show no significant changes in the flux. They limit the variation on the integral flux above 1 TeV to less than 63% ...

  12. Simultaneous IRIS and Hinode/EIS observations and modelling of the 27 October 2014 X 2.0 class flare

    CERN Document Server

    Polito, V; Reeves, K K; Simões, P J A; Dudík, J; Del Zanna, G; Mason, H E; Golub, L

    2015-01-01

    We present the study of the X2-class flare which occurred on the 27 October 2014 and was observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode satellite. Thanks to the high cadence and spatial resolution of the IRIS and EIS instruments, we are able to compare simultaneous observations of the \\xxi~1354.08~\\AA~and \\xxiii~263.77~\\AA~high temperature emission ($\\gtrsim$ 10~MK) in the flare ribbon during the chromospheric evaporation phase. We find that IRIS observes completely blue-shifted \\xxi~line profiles, up to 200 km s$^{-1}$ during the rise phase of the flare, indicating that the site of the plasma upflows is resolved by IRIS. In contrast, the \\xxiii~line is often asymmetric, which we interpret as being due to the lower spatial resolution of EIS. Temperature estimates from SDO/AIA and Hinode/XRT show that hot emission (log($T$)[K] $>$ 7.2) is first concentrated at the footpoints before filling the loops. Density sensitive lines from IRIS an...

  13. Living on a Flare: Relativistic Reflection in V404 Cyg Observed by NuSTAR During its Summer 2015 Outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Walton, D J; King, A L; Tomsick, J A; Miller, J M; Dauser, T; Garcia, J; Bachetti, M; Brightman, M; Fabian, A C; Forster, K; Fuerst, F; Gandhi, P; Grefenstette, B W; Harrison, F A; Madsen, K K; Meier, D L; Middleton, M J; Natalucci, L; Rahoui, F; Rana, V; Stern, D

    2016-01-01

    We present first results from a series of $NuSTAR$ observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg obtained during its summer 2015 ourburst. This work primarily focuses on observations coinciding with the height of this outburst activity. The $NuSTAR$ data show extreme variability in both the flux and spectral properties of the source. These variations are driven in part by strong and variable line-of-sight absorption, similar to previous outbursts from this source. The latter stages of this observation are dominated by strong flares, reaching luminosities close to Eddington in the $NuSTAR$ bandpass. During these flares, the central source appears to be relatively unobscured, and the data show clear evidence for a strong contributon from relativistic reflection, which provides a means to probe the geometry of the innermost accretion flow. Based on the combination of the flare properties, analogy with other Galactic black hole binaries, and also the simultaneous onset of radio activity with the period of ...

  14. THE 2014 MARCH 29 X-FLARE: SUBARCSECOND RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF Fe XXI λ1354.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Peter R. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Tian, Hui [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jaeggli, Sarah [Department of Physics, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173840, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) is the first solar instrument to observe ∼10 MK plasma at subarcsecond spatial resolution through imaging spectroscopy of the Fe XXI λ1354.1 forbidden line. IRIS observations of the X1 class flare that occurred on 2014 March 29 at 17:48 UT reveal Fe XXI emission from both the flare ribbons and the post-flare loop arcade. Fe XXI appears at all of the chromospheric ribbon sites, although typically with a delay of one raster (75 s) and sometimes offset by up to 1''. 100-200 km s{sup –1} blue-shifts are found at the brightest ribbons, suggesting hot plasma upflow into the corona. The Fe XXI ribbon emission is compact with a spatial extent of <2'', and can extend beyond the chromospheric ribbon locations. Examples are found of both decreasing and increasing blue-shift in the direction away from the ribbon locations, and blue-shifts were present for at least six minutes after the flare peak. The post-flare loop arcade, seen in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131 Å filtergram images that are dominated by Fe XXI, exhibited bright loop-tops with an asymmetric intensity distribution. The sizes of the loop-tops are resolved by IRIS at ≥1'', and line widths in the loop-tops are not broader than in the loop-legs suggesting the loop-tops are not sites of enhanced turbulence. Line-of-sight speeds in the loop arcade are typically <10 km s{sup –1}, and mean non-thermal motions fall from 43 km s{sup –1} at the flare peak to 26 km s{sup –1} six minutes later. If the average velocity in the loop arcade is assumed to be at rest, then it implies a new reference wavelength for the Fe XXI line of 1354.106 ± 0.023 Å.

  15. Miocrowave spectral imaging, H-alpha and hard X-ray observations of a solar limb flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Gary, D. E.; Lim, J.; Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    We compare the microwave, H-alpha, and hard X-ray observations for a west limb C7.3 flare that occurred at 17:10 UT, 1992 June 26. H-alpha movies were obtained at Big Bear Solar Observatory. Before the onset of the flare, overexposed H-alpha images show the complicated flux loop structure above the limb. Material was observed to descend along the loops toward the site where the flare occurred hours later. Using the five-antenna solar array at Owens Valley Radio Observatory, we obtain two-dimensional maps of flare emission from 1.4 to 14 GHz. In all three temporal peaks of the microwave bursts, the maps show the same characteristics. The peak low-frequency emission comes from the top of one bundle of the H-alpha loops and gradually shifts to the foot-point of the loops (the location of H-alpha flare) as the frequency increases. The location of the emission peak shifts 88 sec between 1 and 14 GHz. Seventy percent of the shift occurs between 1 and 5 GHz. The locus of the shift of the emission peak follows the shape of an H-alpha surge that occurred after the flare. For each point along the locus, we create the microwave brightness temperature spectrum and compare the radio-derived electron distribution with that derived from the high-resolution hard X-ray spectra measured with Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). We find that the peak frequency changes from approximately 3 GHz at the loop top to approximately 7 GHz at the footprint, presumably due to the increase of the magnetic field from approximately 160 GHz at the loop top to approximately 300 G at the footpoint. The high-frequency slope of the microwave power-law spectrum decreases from approximately 10 at the loop top to approximately 5 at the footprint due to a change in the energy distribution of the dominant electrons. The microwave brightness temperature spectral index predicted by the BATSE power-law hard X-ray spectra agrees with the measured

  16. CORONAS-F observation of gamma-ray emission from the solar flare on 2003 October 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Victoria G.; Yushkov, Boris Yu.; Galkin, Vladimir I.; Kudela, Karel; Kashapova, Larisa K.

    2017-10-01

    Appreciable hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray emissions in the 0.04-150 MeV energy range associated with the 2003 October 29 solar flare (X10/3B) were observed at 20:38-20:58 UT by the SONG instrument onboard the CORONAS-F mission. To restore flare gamma-ray spectra we fitted the SONG energy loss spectra with a three-component model of the incident spectrum: (1) a power law in energy, assumed to be due to electron bremsstrahlung; (2) a broad continuum produced by prompt nuclear de-excitation gamma-lines; and (3) a broad gamma-line generated from pion-decay. We also restored spectra from the RHESSI data, compared them with the SONG spectra and found a reasonable agreement between these spectra in the 0.1-10 MeV energy range. The pion-decay emission was observed from 20:44:20 UT and had its maximum at 20:48-20:51 UT. The power-law spectral index of accelerated protons estimated from the ratio between intensities of different components of gamma rays changed with time. The hardest spectrum with a power-law index S = -3.5 - 3.6 was observed at 20:48-20:51 UT. Time histories of the pion-decay emission and proton spectrum were compared with changes of the locations of flare energy release as shown by RHESSI hard X-ray images and remote and remote Hα brightenings. An apparent temporal correlation between processes of particle acceleration and restructuring of flare magnetic field was found. In particular, the protons were accelerated to subrelativistic energies after radical change of the character of footpoint motion from a converging motion to a separation motion.

  17. Observations of the Crab Nebula with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory During the Gamma-Ray Flare of 2011 April

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, using the AGILE and Fermi satellites, gamma-ray flares have been discovered from the direction of the Crab Nebula (Tavani et al. 2011, Abdo et al. 2011). We have been using the Chandra X-Ray observatory to monitor the Crab on a monthly cadence since just after the 2010 September gamma-ray flare. We were fortunate to trigger series of pre-planned target of opportunity observations during the 2011 April flare. We present the results of these observations and address some implications both for now and for the future.

  18. Spatial and temporal characteristics of flare energy release determined from X-ray and radio imaging observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, A. M.; Machado, M. E.; Vilmer, N.; Trottet, G.

    1986-01-01

    Using the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) from the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite, the morphological aspects and temporal evolution of three major flares which occurred on June 29, 1980 are studied. One of these events, observed at 10:40 UT, is analyzed in particular detail, including Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) data and metric wavelength data from the Nancay radioheliograph. The flares occurred during the interaction of two distinct magnetic structures. There is an early onset phase during which there is a weak level of particle acceleration, perhaps accompanied by strong heating within the magnetic interaction region. The impulsive phase of high power energy release is associated with a major interaction between the two structures and accompanied by strong acceleration and heating.

  19. Probing quantum gravity using photons from a flare of the active galactic nucleus Markarian 501 observed by the MAGIC telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea del Pozo, E; Delgado Mendez, C; de los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; García-López, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Göbel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R; Pérez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saitô, T; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Mavromatos, N E; Nanopoulos, D V; Sakharov, Alexander S; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E

    2008-01-01

    We use the timing of photons observed by the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope during a flare of the active galaxy Markarian 501 to probe a vacuum refractive index ~ 1-(E/M_QGn)^n, n = 1,2, that might be induced by quantum gravity. The peaking of the flare is found to maximize for quantum-gravity mass scales M_QG1 ~ 0.4x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 ~ 0.6x10^11 GeV, and we establish lower limits M_QG1 > 0.26x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 > 0.39x10^11 GeV at the 95% C.L. Monte Carlo studies confirm the MAGIC sensitivity to propagation effects at these levels. Thermal plasma effects in the source are negligible, but we cannot exclude the importance of some other source effect.

  20. Observation of 2011-02-15 X2.2 flare in Hard X-ray and Microwave

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Natsuha; Gary, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the energy release mechanism of some solar flares follow the Standard magnetic-reconnection model, but the detailed properties of high-energy electrons produced in the flare are still not well understood. We conducted a unique, multi-wavelength study that discloses the spatial, temporal and energy distributions of the accelerated electrons in the X2.2 solar flare on 2011, Feb. 15. We studied the source locations of seven distinct temporal peaks observed in hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) lightcurves using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in 50 to 75 keV channels and Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) in 34 GHz, respectively. We found that the seven emission peaks did not come from seven spatially distinct sites in HXR and MW, but rather in HXR we observed a sudden change in location only between the second and the third peak, with the same pattern occurring, but evolving more slowly in MW. Comparison between the HXR lightcurve and the temporal...

  1. MAGIC observations of the February 2014 flare of 1ES 1011+496 and ensuing constraint of the EBL density

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Bil, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de O na; Mendez, C Delgado; Di Pierro, F; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinovic, N; Muñoz, A González; Guberman, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Mira, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prini, E; Puljak, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpaa, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzic, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R

    2016-01-01

    In February-March 2014, the MAGIC telescopes observed the high-frequency peaked BL Lac 1ES 1011+496 (z=0.212) in flaring state at very-high energy (VHE, E>100GeV). The flux reached a level more than 10 times higher than any previously recorded flaring state of the source. We present the description of the characteristics of the flare presenting the light curve and the spectral parameters of the night-wise spectra and the average spectrum of the whole period. From these data we aim at detecting the imprint of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) in the VHE spectrum of the source, in order to constrain its intensity in the optical band. For this we implement the method developed by the H.E.S.S. collaboration in which the intrinsic energy spectrum of the source is modeled with a simple function, and the EBL-induced optical depth is calculated using a template EBL model. The likelihood of the observed spectrum is then maximized, including a normalization factor for the EBL opacity among the free parameters. F...

  2. INTEGRAL/IBIS observations of the Galactic center region at the epoch of the short Fermi/LAT flare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiocchi, M.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Natalucci, L.;

    2011-01-01

    was reported. SAX J1747.0-2853 was not detected in the IBIS/ISGRI images produced in the range 20-60 keV and we find 3 sigma upper limits of 6 mCrab for period (a) and 4 mCrab for period (b). Conversely, during a 10.4 ks period including the XRT observation, we have an indication of faint activity......The Galactic Center was in the IBIS/ISGRI field-of-view during the epoch of the gamma-ray flare observed recently by Fermi/LAT (ATEL#3162). During the 20s interval of the flare IBIS/ISGRI did not detect any emission from SAX J1747.0-2853, located at ~10degrees off-axis, with a 3sigma upper limit...... of ~250mCrab in the 20-60 keV band. We have also analyzed two separate time slots of 6 and 7 pointings, respectively: (a) 2011 Feb. 10, 11:41-18:41 UT, and (b) 2011 Feb. 12, 04:09-10:09 UT. The retrieved data belong to the near-real time INTEGRAL archive. The first period includes the gamma-ray flare...

  3. A study of solar flare energy transport based on coordinated H-alpha and X-ray observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Wulser, Jean-Pierre; Zarro, Dominic M.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the ratio between H-alpha to nonthermal hard X-ray emission was investigated using coordinated H-alpha and hard- and soft-X-ray observations of five solar flares (on May 7, June 23, June 24, and June 25, 1980 and on April 30, 1985). These observations were used to estimate the emitted flare energy flux F(H-alpha) in H-alpha, the flux of F(2O) energy deposited by nonthermal electrons with energies above 20 keV, and the pressure p(c) of soft X-ray-emitting plasma as functions of time during the impulsive phase of each flare. It was found that the F(H-alpha)/F(2O) ratio shows a power-law dependence on F(2O), with a slope that differs slightly from that predicted by the static thick-target model of solar transport. Results also indicate that the power-law dependence is modified by hydrostatic pressure effects.

  4. Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, D.

    2005-03-09

    Magnetars comprise two classes of rotating neutron stars (Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars), whose X-ray emission is powered by an ultrastrong magnetic field, B {approx} 10{sup 15} G. Occasionally SGRs enter into active episodes producing many short X-ray bursts; extremely rarely (about once per 50 years per source), SGRs emit a giant flare, an event with total energy at least 103 higher than their typical bursts. Here we report that, on 2004 December 27, SGR 1806-20 emitted the brightest extra-solar transient event ever recorded, even surpassing the full moon brightness for 0.2 seconds. The total (isotropic) flare energy is 2 x 10{sup 46} erg, {approx}100 times higher than the only two previous events, making this flare a once in a century event. This colossal energy release likely occurred during a catastrophic reconfiguration of the magnetar's magnetic field. Such an event would have resembled a short, hard Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) if it had occurred within 40 Mpc, suggesting that extragalactic SGR flares may indeed form a subclass of GRBs.

  5. Observation of quasi-periodic pulsations in the solar flare SF 900610

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.V.; Shevchenko, A.V.; Kuz'min, A.G.;

    2002-01-01

    A quasi-periodic component was found at the maximum of the X-ray light curve for the June 10, 1990 solar flare detected by the Granat observatory. The pulsation period was 143.2 +/- 0.8 s. The intensity of the pulsing component is not constant; the maximum amplitude of the pulsations is similar t...

  6. Discovery of powerful gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, M; Bulgarelli, A; Vittorini, V; Pellizzoni, A; Striani, E; Caraveo, P; Weisskopf, M C; Tennant, A; Pucella, G; Trois, A; Costa, E; Evangelista, Y; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Del Monte, E; Campana, R; Pilia, M; De Luca, A; Donnarumma, I; Horns, D; Ferrigno, C; Heinke, C O; Trifoglio, M; Gianotti, F; Vercellone, S; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A W; Contessi, T; D'Ammando, F; DePris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Galli, M; Giuliani, A; Giusti, M; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Fuschino, F; Marisaldi, M; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Vallazza, E; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Lucarelli, F; Santolamazza, P; Giommi, P; Salotti, L; Bignami, G F

    2011-02-11

    The well-known Crab Nebula is at the center of the SN1054 supernova remnant. It consists of a rotationally powered pulsar interacting with a surrounding nebula through a relativistic particle wind. The emissions originating from the pulsar and nebula have been considered to be essentially stable. Here, we report the detection of strong gamma-ray (100 mega-electron volts to 10 giga-electron volts) flares observed by the AGILE satellite in September 2010 and October 2007. In both cases, the total gamma-ray flux increased by a factor of three compared with the non-flaring flux. The flare luminosity and short time scale favor an origin near the pulsar, and we discuss Chandra Observatory x-ray and Hubble Space Telescope optical follow-up observations of the nebula. Our observations challenge standard models of nebular emission and require power-law acceleration by shock-driven plasma wave turbulence within an approximately 1-day time scale.

  7. Predictability of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Peter; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2009-05-01

    Solar flares are significant drivers of space weather. With the availability of high cadence solar chromospheric and photospheric data from the USAF's Optical Solar PAtrol Network (OSPAN; photosphere and chromosphere imaging) Telescope and the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG; photosphere magnetic imaging), at the National Solar Observatory, we have gained insights into potential uses of the data for solar flare prediction. We apply the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to parameterize the flaring system and extract consistent observables at solar chromospheric and photospheric layers that indicate a viable recognition of flaring activity. Rather than limiting ourselves to a few known indicators of solar activity, PCA helps us to characterize the entire system using several tens of variables for each observed layer. The components of the Eigen vectors derived from PCA help us recognize and quantify innate characteristics of solar flares and compare them. We will present an analysis of these results to explore the viability of PCA to assist in predicting solar flares.

  8. The 2010 very high energy gamma-ray flare & 10 years of multi-wavelength observations of M 87

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; de Almeida, U Barres; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gallant, Y A; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hampf, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Keogh, D; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Cañellas, A; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido, D; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Huber, B; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar, P; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Pardo, S; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pauss, F; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thom, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Treves, A; Vankov, H; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hui, C M; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nuñez, P D; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Şentürk, G D; Telezhinsky, I; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; de Almeida, U Barres; Cara, M; Casadio, C; Cheung, C C; McConville, W; Davies, F; Doi, A; Giovannini, G; Giroletti, M; Hada, K; Hardee, P; Harris, D E; Junor, W; Kino, M; Lee, N P; Ly, C; Madrid, J; Massaro, F; Mundell, C G; Nagai, H; Perlman, E S; Steele, I A; Walker, R C; Wood, D L

    2011-01-01

    Abridged: The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity, famous jet, and very massive black hole provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of super-massive black holes. M 87 has been established as a VHE gamma-ray emitter since 2006. The VHE gamma-ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, results from a joint VHE monitoring campaign on M 87 by the MAGIC and VERITAS instruments in 2010 are reported. During the campaign, a flare at VHE was detected triggering further observations at VHE (H.E.S.S.), X-rays (Chandra), and radio (43 GHz VLBA). The excellent sampling of the VHE gamma-ray light curve enables one to derive a precise temporal characterization of the flare: the single, isolated flare is well described by a two-sided exponential function with significantly different flux rise and decay times. While the overall variability pattern of...

  9. Evidence of the Relationship between the Emerging Magnetic Fields, Electric Currents, and Solar Flares Observed on May 10, 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Livshits, M A; Myshyakov, I I; Rudenko, G V

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed multi-wavelength observations and magnetic-field data for the solar flare of May 10, 2012 (04:18 UT) and have detected a sign inversion of the signal in the line-of-sight magnetic measurements in the umbra of a small spot. This effect is associated, at least partly, with the emergence of a new magnetic field. Almost at the same time, a burst of hard X-rays was recorded, and a wave in the vacuum ultraviolet (EUV) range (a "sunquake") was generated due to the impact of the disturbance in the energy release range on the photosphere. At the beginning of the event, a sigmoid flare was recorded, but it did not spread, as it usually does, along the polarity inversion (neutral) line. SDO/HMI full-vector measurements were used to extrapolate the AR 11476 magnetic field to the corona, and the distribution of vertical currents $j_z$ in the photosphere was obtained. The distribution of currents in the active region shows that the relationship between them and the occurrence of flares is very intricate. W...

  10. On the power-law distributions of X-ray fluxes from solar flares observed with GOES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You-Ping; Feng, Li; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Si-Ming; Gan, Wei-Qun

    2016-10-01

    The power-law frequency distributions of the peak flux of solar flare X-ray emission have been studied extensively and attributed to a system having self-organized criticality (SOC). In this paper, we first show that, so long as the shape of the normalized light curve is not correlated with the peak flux, the flux histogram of solar flares also follows a power-law distribution with the same spectral index as the power-law frequency distribution of the peak flux, which may partially explain why power-law distributions are ubiquitous in the Universe. We then show that the spectral indexes of the histograms of soft X-ray fluxes observed by GOES satellites in two different energy channels are different: the higher energy channel has a harder distribution than the lower energy channel, which challenges the universal power-law distribution predicted by SOC models and implies a very soft distribution of thermal energy content of plasmas probed by the GOES satellites. The temperature (T) distribution, on the other hand, approaches a power-law distribution with an index of 2 for high values of T. Hence the application of SOC models to the statistical properties of solar flares needs to be revisited.

  11. ULTRA-NARROW NEGATIVE FLARE FRONT OBSERVED IN HELIUM-10830 Å USING THE 1.6 m NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yan; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Cao, Wenda; Gary, Dale [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Ding, Mingde [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Kleint, Lucia [Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz (FHNW), Institute of 4D technologies Bahnhofstr. 6, CH-5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Su, Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ji, Haisheng [Purple Mountain Observatory, 2 Beijing Xi Lu, Nanjing, 210008 (China); Chae, Jongchul; Cho, Kyuhyoun [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyungsuk [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daedeokdae-ro 776, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-10

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles that have adverse effects on the near-Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to as bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, we show a striking “negative” flare with a narrow but unambiguous “dark” moving front observed in He i 10830 Å, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in Hα and Mg ii lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He i 10830 Å can be produced under special circumstances by nonthermal electron collisions or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in astronomical objects.

  12. High speed photospheric material flow observed at the polarity inversion line of a delta-type sunspot producing an X5.4 flare on 7 March 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Bamba, Yumi

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares abruptly release the free energy stored as a non-potential magnetic field in the corona and may be accompanied by eruptions of the coronal plasma. Formation of a non-potential magnetic field and the mechanisms for triggering the onset of flares are still poorly understood. In particular, photospheric dynamics observed near those polarity inversion lines that are sites of major flare production have not been well observed with high spatial resolution spectro-polarimetry. This paper reports on a remarkable high-speed material flow observed along the polarity inversion line located between flare ribbons at the main energy release side of an X5.4 flare on 7 March 2012. Observations were carried out by the spectro-polarimeter of the Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode. The high-speed material flow was observed in the horizontally-oriented magnetic field formed nearly parallel to the polarity inversion line. This flow persisted from at least 6 hours before the onset of the flare, and continued for a...

  13. The 26 December 2001 Solar Event Responsible for GLE63. I. Observations of a Major Long-Duration Flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V

    2016-01-01

    Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) of cosmic-ray intensity occur, on average, once a year. Due to their rareness, studying the solar sources of GLEs is especially important to approach understanding their origin. The SOL2001-12-26 eruptive-flare event responsible for GLE63 seems to be challenging in some aspects. Deficient observations limited its understanding. Analysis of extra observations found for this event provided new results shading light on the flare. This article addresses the observations of this flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT). Taking advantage of its instrumental characteristics, we analyze the detailed SSRT observations of a major long-duration flare at 5.7 GHz without cleaning the images. The analysis confirms that the source of GLE63 was associated with an event in active region 9742 that comprised two flares. The first flare (04:30-05:03 UT) reached a GOES importance of about M1.6. Two microwave sources were observed, whose brightness temperatures at 5.7 GHz exceeded 10 MK...

  14. X-ray and microwave emissions from the July 19, 2012 solar flare: Highly accurate observations and kinetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsyk, P. A.; Somov, B. V.

    2016-08-01

    The M7.7 solar flare of July 19, 2012, at 05:58 UT was observed with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions in the hard X-ray and optical ranges. The flare occurred at the solar limb, which allowed us to see the relative positions of the coronal and chromospheric X-ray sources and to determine their spectra. To explain the observations of the coronal source and the chromospheric one unocculted by the solar limb, we apply an accurate analytical model for the kinetic behavior of accelerated electrons in a flare. We interpret the chromospheric hard X-ray source in the thick-target approximation with a reverse current and the coronal one in the thin-target approximation. Our estimates of the slopes of the hard X-ray spectra for both sources are consistent with the observations. However, the calculated intensity of the coronal source is lower than the observed one by several times. Allowance for the acceleration of fast electrons in a collapsing magnetic trap has enabled us to remove this contradiction. As a result of our modeling, we have estimated the flux density of the energy transferred by electrons with energies above 15 keV to be ˜5 × 1010 erg cm-2 s-1, which exceeds the values typical of the thick-target model without a reverse current by a factor of ˜5. To independently test the model, we have calculated the microwave spectrum in the range 1-50 GHz that corresponds to the available radio observations.

  15. FLUCTUATIONS AND FLARES IN THE ULTRAVIOLET LINE EMISSION OF COOL STARS: IMPLICATIONS FOR EXOPLANET TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyd, R. O. Parke [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); France, Kevin, E-mail: robert.loyd@colorado.edu [NASA Nancy Grace Roman Fellow. (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Variations in stellar flux can potentially overwhelm the photometric signal of a transiting planet. Such variability has not previously been well-characterized in the ultraviolet lines used to probe the inflated atmospheres surrounding hot Jupiters. Therefore, we surveyed 38 F-M stars for intensity variations in four narrow spectroscopic bands: two enclosing strong lines from species known to inhabit hot Jupiter atmospheres, C II λλ1334, 1335 and Si III λ1206; one enclosing Si IV λλ1393, 1402; and 36.5 Å of interspersed continuum. For each star/band combination, we generated 60 s cadence lightcurves from archival Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph time-tagged photon data. Within these lightcurves, we characterized flares and stochastic fluctuations as separate forms of variability. Flares: we used a cross-correlation approach to detect 116 flares. These events occur in the time-series an average of once per 2.5 hr, over 50% last 4 minutes or less, and most produce the strongest response in Si IV. If the flare occurred during a transit measurement integrated for 60 minutes, 90/116 would destroy the signal of an Earth, 27/116 Neptune, and 7/116 Jupiter, with the upward bias in flux ranging from 1% to 109% of quiescent levels. Fluctuations: photon noise and underlying stellar fluctuations produce scatter in the quiescent data. We model the stellar fluctuations as Gaussian white noise with standard deviation σ {sub x}. Maximum likelihood values of σ {sub x} range from 1% to 41% for 60 s measurements. These values suggest that many cool stars will only permit a transit detection to high confidence in ultraviolet resonance lines if the radius of the occulting disk is ≳1 R{sub J} . However, for some M dwarfs this limit can be as low as several R {sub ⊕}.

  16. Fluctuations and Flares in the Ultraviolet Line Emission of Cool Stars: Implications for Exoplanet Transit Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, R. O. Parke; France, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Variations in stellar flux can potentially overwhelm the photometric signal of a transiting planet. Such variability has not previously been well-characterized in the ultraviolet lines used to probe the inflated atmospheres surrounding hot Jupiters. Therefore, we surveyed 38 F-M stars for intensity variations in four narrow spectroscopic bands: two enclosing strong lines from species known to inhabit hot Jupiter atmospheres, C II λλ1334, 1335 and Si III λ1206 one enclosing Si IV λλ1393, 1402; and 36.5 Å of interspersed continuum. For each star/band combination, we generated 60 s cadence lightcurves from archival Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph time-tagged photon data. Within these lightcurves, we characterized flares and stochastic fluctuations as separate forms of variability. Flares: we used a cross-correlation approach to detect 116 flares. These events occur in the time-series an average of once per 2.5 hr, over 50% last 4 minutes or less, and most produce the strongest response in Si IV. If the flare occurred during a transit measurement integrated for 60 minutes, 90/116 would destroy the signal of an Earth, 27/116 Neptune, and 7/116 Jupiter, with the upward bias in flux ranging from 1% to 109% of quiescent levels. Fluctuations: photon noise and underlying stellar fluctuations produce scatter in the quiescent data. We model the stellar fluctuations as Gaussian white noise with standard deviation σ x . Maximum likelihood values of σ x range from 1% to 41% for 60 s measurements. These values suggest that many cool stars will only permit a transit detection to high confidence in ultraviolet resonance lines if the radius of the occulting disk is gsim1 RJ . However, for some M dwarfs this limit can be as low as several R ⊕.

  17. Fluctuations and Flares in the Ultraviolet Line Emission of Cool Stars: Implications for Exoplanet Transit Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Loyd, R O Parke

    2014-01-01

    Variations in stellar flux can potentially overwhelm the photometric signal of a transiting planet. Such variability has not previously been well-characterized in the ultraviolet lines used to probe the inflated atmospheres surrounding hot Jupiters. Therefore, we surveyed 38 F-M stars for intensity variations in four narrow spectroscopic bands: two enclosing strong lines from species known to inhabit hot Jupiter atmospheres, CII $\\lambda\\lambda$1334,1335 and SiIII $\\lambda$1206; one enclosing SiIV $\\lambda\\lambda$1393,1402; and 36.5 \\AA\\ of interspersed continuum. For each star/band combination, we generated 60 s cadence lightcurves from archival HST COS and STIS time-tagged photon data. Within these lightcurves, we characterized flares and stochastic fluctuations as separate forms of variability. Flares: We used a cross-correlation approach to detect 116 flares. These events occur in the time-series an average of once per 2.5 h, over 50% last 4 min or less, and most produce the strongest response in SiIV. If...

  18. Observations of quasi-periodic solar X-ray emission as a result of MHD oscillations in a system of multiple flare loops

    CERN Document Server

    Zimovets, I V

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the solar flare of 20 October 2002. The flare was accompanied by quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) of both thermal and nonthermal hard X-ray emissions (HXR) observed by RHESSI in the 3-50 keV energy range. Analysis of the HXR time profiles in different energy channels made with the Lomb periodogram indicates two statistically significant time periods of about 16 and 36 seconds. The 36-second QPP were observed only in the nonthermal HXR emission in the impulsive phase of the flare. The 16-second QPP were more pronounced in the thermal HXR emission and were observed both in the impulsive and in the decay phases of the flare. Imaging analysis of the flare region, the determined time periods of the QPP and the estimated physical parameters of magnetic loops in the flare region allow us to interpret the observations as follows. 1) In the impulsive phase energy was released and electrons were accelerated by successive acts with the average time period of about 36 seconds in different parts of two spati...

  19. Pre-flare Coronal Jet and Evolutionary Phases of a Solar Eruptive Prominence Associated with the M1.8 Flare: SDO and RHESSI Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Kushwaha, Upendra; Veronig, Astrid M.; Cho, K.-S.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the triggering, activation, and ejection of a solar eruptive prominence that occurred in a multi-polar flux system of active region NOAA 11548 on 2012 August 18 by analyzing data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager/Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation on board the Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory. Prior to the prominence activation, we observed striking coronal activities in the form of a blowout jet, which is associated with the rapid eruption of a cool flux rope. Furthermore, the jet-associated flux rope eruption underwent splitting and rotation during its outward expansion. These coronal activities are followed by the prominence activation during which it slowly rises with a speed of ˜12 km s-1 while the region below the prominence emits gradually varying EUV and thermal X-ray emissions. From these observations, we propose that the prominence eruption is a complex, multi-step phenomenon in which a combination of internal (tether-cutting reconnection) and external (i.e., pre-eruption coronal activities) processes are involved. The prominence underwent catastrophic loss of equilibrium with the onset of the impulsive phase of an M1.8 flare, suggesting large-scale energy release by coronal magnetic reconnection. We obtained signatures of particle acceleration in the form of power-law spectra with hard electron spectral index (δ ˜ 3) and strong HXR footpoint sources. During the impulsive phase, a hot EUV plasmoid was observed below the apex of the erupting prominence that ejected in the direction of the prominence with a speed of ˜177 km s-1. The temporal, spatial, and kinematic correlations between the erupting prominence and the plasmoid imply that the magnetic reconnection supported the fast ejection of prominence in the lower corona.

  20. GAMMA-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY FROM THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED BLAZAR PKS 1830–211 OBSERVED BY Fermi LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Amin, M. A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmology and Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Bregeon, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, Montpellier (France); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica " M. Merlin" dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bulmash, D., E-mail: sara.buson@pd.infn.it, E-mail: stefano.ciprini@asdc.asi.it, E-mail: justin.finke@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it, E-mail: stefano.ciprini@asdc.asi.it, E-mail: sara.buson@pd.infn.it, E-mail: justin.finke@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830–211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ∼3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 10{sup 50} erg s{sup –1}, makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830–211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  1. Gamma-Ray Flaring Activity from the Gravitationally Lensed Blazar PKS 1830-211 Observed by Fermi LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; et al.

    2015-01-23

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830–211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ~3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 10(50) erg s(–)(1), makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830–211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  2. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunari Shibata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence, local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet, and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely, while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  3. Multiwavelength observations of the γ-ray flaring quasar S4 1030+61 in 2009-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, E. V.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Hovatta, T.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the parsec-scale multifrequency properties of the quasar S4 1030+61 during a prolonged radio and γ-ray activity. Observations were performed within Fermi γ-ray telescope, Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40-m telescope and MOJAVE Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring programmes, covering five years from 2009. The data are supplemented by four-epoch VLBA observations at 5, 8, 15, 24 and 43 GHz, which were triggered by the bright γ-ray flare, registered in the quasar in 2010. The S4 1030+61 jet exhibits an apparent superluminal velocity of (6.4 ± 0.4)c and does not show ejections of new components in the observed period, while decomposition of the radio light curve reveals nine prominent flares. The measured variability parameters of the source show values typical for Fermi-detected quasars. Combined analysis of radio and γ-ray emission implies a spatial separation between emitting regions at these bands of about 12 pc and locates the γ-ray emission within a parsec from the central engine. We detected changes in the value and direction of the linear polarization and the Faraday rotation measure. The value of the intrinsic brightness temperature of the core is above the equipartition state, while its value as a function of distance from the core is well approximated by the power law. Altogether these results show that the radio flaring activity of the quasar is accompanied by injection of relativistic particles and energy losses at the jet base, while S4 1030+61 has a stable, straight jet well described by standard conical jet theories.

  4. TIME DELAYS IN QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS OBSERVED DURING THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolla, L.; Marque, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Dominique, M.; Berghmans, D.; Cabanas, C.; De Groof, A.; Verdini, A.; West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N. [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centrum voor Plasma-Astrofysica, Department of Mathematics, KULeuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schmutz, W. [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Zender, J., E-mail: dolla@sidc.be [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2012-04-10

    We report observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on timescale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The zirconium and aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy satellite and the soft X-ray (SXR) channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, where the channel at 1-8 A leads the 0.5-4 A channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to Almost-Equal-To 9 s. We identified at least two distinct time intervals during the flare impulsive phase, during which the QPPs were associated with two different sources in the Nobeyama RadioHeliograph at 17 GHz. The radio as well as the hard X-ray channels showed different lags during these two intervals. To our knowledge, this is the first time that time lags are reported between EUV and SXR fluctuations on these timescales. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and interpretations, including flare electron trapping.

  5. Gamma-ray flaring activity from the gravitationally lensed blazar PKS 1830-211 observed by Fermi LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Amin, M A; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Buehler, R; Bulmash, D; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Corbet, R H D; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Inoue, Y; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Jòhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reyes, L C; Ritz, S; Romoli, C; Roth, M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Takahashi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Tronconi, V; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S

    2014-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the highly dust-absorbed, reddened, and MeV-peaked flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830-211 (z=2.507). Its apparent isotropic gamma-ray luminosity (E>100 MeV) averaged over $\\sim$ 3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 X 10^{50} erg s^{-1}, makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor 1.5 less. Two large gamma-ray flares of PKS 1830-211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the gamma rays flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program ...

  6. VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF THE JET IN M 87 DURING THE VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY FLARE IN 2010 APRIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Doi, Akihiro [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Honma, Mareki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki [Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-11-20

    We report on the detailed radio status of the M 87 jet during the very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray flaring event in 2010 April, obtained from high-resolution, multi-frequency, phase-referencing Very Long Baseline Array observations. We especially focus on the properties of the jet base (the radio core) and the peculiar knot HST-1, which are currently favored as the {gamma}-ray emitting sites. During the VHE flaring event, the HST-1 region remains stable in terms of its structure and flux density in the optically thin regime above 2 GHz, being consistent with no signs of enhanced activities reported at X-ray for this feature. The radio core shows an inverted spectrum at least up to 43 GHz during this event. Astrometry of the core position, which is specified as {approx}20 R {sub s} from the central engine in our previous study, shows that the core position is stable on a level of 4 R {sub s}. The core at 43 and 22 GHz tends to show slightly ({approx}10%) higher flux level near the date of the VHE flux peak compared with the epochs before/after the event. The size of the 43 GHz core is estimated to be {approx}17 R {sub s}, which is close to the size of the emitting region suggested from the observed timescale of rapid variability at VHE. These results tend to favor the scenario that the VHE {gamma}-ray flare in 2010 April is associated with the radio core.

  7. A return to strong radio flaring by Circinus X-1 observed with the Karoo Array Telescope test array KAT-7

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, R P; Nicolson, G D; Ratcliffe, S; Linares, M; Horrell, J; Richter, L; Schurch, M P E; Coriat, M; Woudt, P; Jonas, J; Booth, R; Fanaroff, B

    2013-01-01

    Circinus X-1 is a bright and highly variable X-ray binary which displays strong and rapid evolution in all wavebands. Radio flaring, associated with the production of a relativistic jet, occurs periodically on a ~17-day timescale. A longer-term envelope modulates the peak radio fluxes in flares, ranging from peaks in excess of a Jansky in the 1970s to an historic low of milliJanskys during the years 1994 to 2007. Here we report first observations of this source with the MeerKAT test array, KAT-7, part of the pathfinder development for the African dish component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), demonstrating successful scientific operation for variable and transient sources with the test array. The KAT-7 observations at 1.9 GHz during the period 13 December 2011 to 16 January 2012 reveal in temporal detail the return to the Jansky-level events observed in the 1970s. We compare these data to contemporaneous single-dish measurements at 4.8 and 8.5 GHz with the HartRAO 26-m telescope and X-ray monitoring from...

  8. SWAP Observations of Post-flare Giant Arches in the Long-Duration 14 October 2014 Solar Eruption

    CERN Document Server

    West, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    On 14 October 2014 the Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV solar telescope on-board the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 (PROBA2) spacecraft observed an eruption that led to the formation of perhaps the largest post-eruptive loop system seen in the solar corona in solar cycle 24. The initial eruption occurred at about 18:30 UT on 14 October, behind the East Solar limb, and was observed as a a coronal mass ejection and an M2.2 solar flare. In the 48 hours following the eruption, the associated post-eruptive loops grew to a height of approximately 400000 km (>0.5 solar-radii) at rates between 2-6 km/s. We conclude from our observations of this event that ordinary post-eruptive loops and so-called post-flare giant arches are fundamentally the same and are formed by the same magnetic reconnection mechanism.

  9. The Exceptional Flare of Mrk 501 in 2014: Combined Observations with H.E.S.S. and FACT

    CERN Document Server

    Cologna, Gabriele; Jacholkowska, Agnieszka; Lorentz, Matthias; Mohamed, Mahmoud; Perennes, Cedric; Romoli, Carlo; Wagner, Stefan J; Kurtanidze, Omar

    2016-01-01

    The BL Lac type object Mrk 501 was observed at very high energies (E > 100 GeV) in 2014 with the upgraded H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System) phase 2 array. The data collected with the central 28m telescope allow for a broader energy range extending to lower energies when compared to the one obtained with the four small telescopes alone. A strong flaring event with a flux level comparable to the 1997 historical maximum has been detected as a consequence of target of opportunity observations triggered by alerts from the FACT collaboration. The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) is continuously monitoring bright blazars at TeV energies providing important pre- and post-flare information. For the first time, the data and lightcurves from H.E.S.S. and FACT are compared. These contemporaneous observations allow for a better characterization of the source emission. In a multiwavelength context, more precise correlation studies between VHE and lower energies are possible thanks to the dense sampling of th...

  10. Multi-wavelength observations of the gamma-ray flaring quasar S4 1030+61 in 2009-2014

    CERN Document Server

    Kravchenko, E V; Hovatta, T; Ramakrishnan, V

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the parsec-scale multi-frequency properties of the quasar S4 1030+61 during a prolonged radio and gamma-ray activity. Observations were performed within Fermi gamma-ray telescope, OVRO 40-m telescope and MOJAVE VLBA monitoring programs, covering five years from 2009. The data are supplemented by four-epoch VLBA observations at 5, 8, 15, 24, and 43 GHz, which were triggered by the bright gamma-ray flare, registered in the quasar in 2010. The S4 1030+61 jet exhibits an apparent superluminal velocity of (6.4+-0.4)c and does not show ejections of new components in the observed period, while decomposition of the radio light curve reveals nine prominent flares. The measured variability parameters of the source show values typical for Fermi-detected quasars. Combined analysis of radio and gamma-ray emission implies a spatial separation between emitting regions at these bands of about 12 pc and locates the gamma-ray emission within a parsec from the central engine. We detected changes in the val...

  11. SMM observations of K-alpha radiation from fluorescence of photospheric iron by solar flare X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, A. N.; Culhane, J. L.; Rapley, C. G.; Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution Fe K-alpha spectra near 1.94 A observed during solar flares with the Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission are presented. The evidence for two possible excitation mechanisms, electron impact and fluorescence, is examined. It is found that the fluorescence mechanism satisfactorily describes the results, while the observations do not support electron collisional excitation of the Fe K-alpha transitions in low ionization stages (II-XII) of iron. Using Bai's model of the fluorescent excitation process, the photospheric iron abundance relative to that of hydrogen is estimated to be 5-6 x 10 to the -5th. The mean height of the soft X-ray source producing the K-alpha fluorescence is calculated on the basis of this model for about 40 large flares. The solar K-alpha lines are found to be about 25 percent wider than those measured in the laboratory. Weak line features observed at wavelengths shorter than that of the K-alpha lines are discussed.

  12. SDO and STEREO Observations of Prominence Dynamics During a Series of Eight Homologous Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Innes, Davina E.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous flares are eruptive events that occur repetitively in the same active region, with similar structure and morphology. A series of at least eight homologous flares occurred in active region NOAA 11237 over 16 - 17 June 2011. A filament is rooted in the active region with an overlying coronal cavity. The active region appears on the southeast solar limb as seen from SDO/AIA, and on the disk as viewed from STEREO-B/EUVI; the dual perspective allows us to study in detail behavior of prominence/filament material entrained in the magnetic field of the repeatedly-erupting system. Each of the eruptions was mainly confined, with active-region prominence material being ejected from the core of the erupting region onto outer-lobe loops of the active region. The eruption series repeatedly disrupted material of a quiet-Sun extension of the prominence, and that material became suspended at progressively higher heights above the surface. Two final eruptions from the core region destabilized the field holding that material, instigating a coronal mass ejection (CME).

  13. Multi-wavelength Observation of M-class Flare associated with Filament eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl B.; Jiang, Chaowei; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-08-01

    We have investigated a M-class flare associated with filament eruption which developed into a Halo CME. The M-class flare occurred in 2011 August 4. For this study, we used the Nobryama Radioheliograph (NoRH) 17 and 34 GHz, RHESSI Hard X-ray satellite, and Atmo- spheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Heliospheric Magentic Imager(HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). During the pre-eruption phase, clear nonthermal emission was detected in microwaves of NoRH and hard-X-ray of RHESSI. At the moment that the nonthermal emission start, the nonthermal sources appeared at the one edge of the filament structure on a polarity inversion line, and the slowing rising filament structure in AIA 94A underwent a sudden acceleration on its ascendance. Magnetograms showed converging motion of magnetic elements at the source position of HXR and MW. Based on the results, we conjecture that the plausible trigger of the filament eruption is magnetic reconnections at the HXR source position by converging motion of magnetic elements. In addition, we will discuss on the magnetic flux variation before and after the eruption based on the result of Nonlinear force-free field model.

  14. Development of a high-speed H-alpha camera system for the observation of rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.; Dennis, Brian R.; Orwig, Larry E.; Chen, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    A solid-state digital camera was developed for obtaining H alpha images of solar flares with 0.1 s time resolution. Beginning in the summer of 1988, this system will be operated in conjunction with SMM's hard X-ray burst spectrometer (HXRBS). Important electron time-of-flight effects that are crucial for determining the flare energy release processes should be detectable with these combined H alpha and hard X-ray observations. Charge-injection device (CID) cameras provide 128 x 128 pixel images simultaneously in the H alpha blue wing, line center, and red wing, or other wavelength of interest. The data recording system employs a microprocessor-controlled, electronic interface between each camera and a digital processor board that encodes the data into a serial bitstream for continuous recording by a standard video cassette recorder. Only a small fraction of the data will be permanently archived through utilization of a direct memory access interface onto a VAX-750 computer. In addition to correlations with hard X-ray data, observations from the high speed H alpha camera will also be correlated and optical and microwave data and data from future MAX 1991 campaigns. Whether the recorded optical flashes are simultaneous with X-ray peaks to within 0.1 s, are delayed by tenths of seconds or are even undetectable, the results will have implications on the validity of both thermal and nonthermal models of hard X-ray production.

  15. INTEGRAL/IBIS observations of the Galactic center region at the epoch of the short Fermi/LAT flare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiocchi, M.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Natalucci, L.

    2011-01-01

    The Galactic Center was in the IBIS/ISGRI field-of-view during the epoch of the gamma-ray flare observed recently by Fermi/LAT (ATEL#3162). During the 20s interval of the flare IBIS/ISGRI did not detect any emission from SAX J1747.0-2853, located at ~10degrees off-axis, with a 3sigma upper limit......, the second one was selected because the source position was most optimal, i.e., about 6-8 degrees off-axis, the closest to the Galactic center region. The second slot is only a few hours apart from the Swift/XRT observation of SAX J1747.0-2853 (ATEL #3163), during which very bright emission from this source...... of the source found by comparing with the images taken with periods (a) and (b). However, since the source is blended and located only 9.5 arcmin from 1E1743.1-2852, we cannot claim for a clear detection. We note that in both periods IBIS/ISGRI detects emission from a region consistent with the position...

  16. Herschel-SPIRE observations of the Polaris flare : structure of the diffuse interstellar medium at the sub-parsec scale

    CERN Document Server

    Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Abergel, A; Bernard, J -P; Boulanger, F; Lagache, G; Anderson, L D; André, P; Arab, H; Baluteau, J -P; Blagrave, K; Cohen, M; Compiegne, M; Cox, P; Dartois, E; Davis, G; Emery, R; Fulton, T; Gry, C; Habart, E; Huang, M; Joblin, C; Jones, S C; Kirk, J; Lim, T; Madden, S; Makiwa, G; Menshchikov, A; Molinari, S; Moseley, H; Motte, F; Naylor, D A; Okumura, K; Gocalvez, D Pinheiro; Polehampton, E; Rodón, J A; Russei, D; Saraceno, P; Sidher, S; Spencer, L; Swinyard, B; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G J; Zavagno, A

    2010-01-01

    We present a power spectrum analysis of the Herschel-SPIRE observations of the Polaris flare, a high Galactic latitude cirrus cloud midway between the diffuse and molecular phases. The SPIRE images of the Polaris flare reveal for the first time the structure of the diffuse interstellar medium down to 0.01 parsec over a 10 square degrees region. These exceptional observations highlight the highly filamentary and clumpy structure of the interstellar medium even in diffuse regions of the map. The power spectrum analysis shows that the structure of the interstellar medium is well described by a single power law with an exponent of -2.7 +- 0.1 at all scales from 30'' to 8 degrees. That the power spectrum slope of the dust emission is constant down to the SPIRE angular resolution is an indication that the inertial range of turbulence extends down to the 0.01 pc scale. The power spectrum analysis also allows the identification of a Poissonian component at sub-arcminute scales in agreement with predictions of the cos...

  17. Rotational modulation and flares on RS canum Venaticorum and BY Draconis stars. XVI - IUE spectroscopy and VLA observations of Gl 182( = V 1005 Orionis) in October 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, M.; Doyle, J. G.; Byrne, P. B.; Rodono, M.; Gibson, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A large flare was detected simultaneously with IUE and VLA on Gl 182 on October 5, 1983, this event showing the largest C IV flare enhancement yet observed by IUE. A smaller flare was also detected on October 4, although only with the IUE satellite. Line ratio and emission measure techniques are used to derive various physical parameters of the flares. The radiative losses in the temperature region log T(e) = 4.3-5.4 in the two flares are 2.9 x 10 to the 33rd and 8.4 x 10 to the 32nd ergs, respectively. Total radiative losses over the whole temperature range log T(e) = 4.0-8.0 are estimated to be of the order of 6.4 x 10 to the 34th and 1.1 x 10 to the 34th ergs, respectively. In the October 5, flare, a very strong ultraviolet continuum is present with a total energy of 1.9 x 10 to the 33rd ergs over the wavelength range 1250-1950 A.

  18. Limiting Superluminal Electron and Neutrino Velocities Using the 2010 Crab Nebula Flare and the IceCube PeV Neutrino Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of two PetaelectronVolt (PeV)-scale neutrino events reported by Ice Cube allows one to place constraints on Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) in the neutrino sector. After first arguing that at least one of the PetaelectronVolt IceCube events was of extragalactic origin, I derive an upper limit for the difference between putative superluminal neutrino and electron velocities of less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19) in units where c = 1, confirming that the observed PetaelectronVolt neutrinos could have reached Earth from extragalactic sources. I further derive a new constraint on the superluminal electron velocity, obtained from the observation of synchrotron radiation from the Crab Nebula flare of September, 2010. The inference that the greater than 1 GigaelectronVolt gamma-rays from synchrotron emission in the flare were produced by electrons of energy up to approx. 5.1 PetaelectronVolt indicates the nonoccurrence of vacuum Cerenkov radiation by these electrons. This implies a new, strong constraint on superluminal electron velocities delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 5 x 10(exp -21). It immediately follows that one then obtains an upper limit on the superluminal neutrino velocity alone of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19), many orders of magnitude better than the time-of-flight constraint from the SN1987A neutrino burst. However, if the electrons are subluminal the constraint on the absolute value of delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17), obtained from the Crab Nebula gamma-ray spectrum, places a weaker constraint on superluminal neutrino velocity of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17).

  19. Simultaneous Observation of Solar Neutrons from the ISS and High Mountain Observatories in association with a flare on July 8, 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Muraki, Y; Koga, K; Kakimoto, F; Goka, T; Gonzalez, L X; Masuda, S; Matsubara, Y; Matsumoto, H; Miranda, P; Okudaira, O; Obara, T; Salinas, J; Sako, T; Shibata, S; Ticona, R; Tsunesada, Y; Valdes-Galicia, J F; Watanabe, K; Yamamoto, T

    2015-01-01

    An M6.5-class flare was observed at N12E56 of the solar surface at 16:06 UT on July 8, 2014. In association with this flare, solar neutron detectors located on two high mountains, Mt. Sierra Negra and Chacaltaya and at the space station observed enhancements in the neutral channel. The authors analysed these data and a possible scenario of enhancements produced by high-energy protons and neutrons is proposed, using the data from continuous observation of a solar surface by the ultraviolet telescope onboard the Solar Dynamical Observatory (SDO).

  20. Dual voltage power supply with 48 volt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froeschl, Joachim; Proebstle, Hartmut; Sirch, Ottmar [BMW Group, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Automotive electrics/electronics have just reached a period of tremendous change. High voltage systems for Hybrid, Plug-In Hybrid or Battery Electric Vehicles with high power electric motors, high energy accumulators and electric climate compressors will be introduced in order to achieve the challenging targets for CO{sub 2} emissions and energy efficiency and to anticipate the mobility of the future. Additionally, innovations and the continuous increase of functionality for comfort, safety, driver assistance and infotainment systems require more and more electrical power of the vehicle power supply at all. On the one hand side electrified vehicles will certainly achieve a significant market share, on the other hand side they will increase the pressure to conventional vehicles with combustion engines for fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. These vehicles will be enabled to keep their competitiveness by new functions and the optimization of their electric systems. A dual voltage power supply with 48 Volt and 12 Volt will be one of the key technologies to realize these requirements. The power capability of the existing 12 Volt power supply has reached its limits. Further potentials can only be admitted by the introduction of 48 Volt. For this reason the car manufacturers Audi, BMW, Daimler, Porsche and Volkswagen started very early on this item and developed a common specification of the new voltage range. Now, it is necessary to identify the probable systems at this voltage range and to start the developments. (orig.)

  1. Satellite observation of pollutant emissions from gas flaring activities near the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Hsu, N. Christina; Sayer, Andrew M.; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Fu, Joshua S.; Lamsal, Lok N.; Lee, Jaehwa; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2016-05-01

    Gas flaring is a common practice in the oil industry that can have significant environmental impacts, but has until recently been largely overlooked in terms of relevance to climate change. We utilize data from various satellite sensors to examine pollutant emissions from oil exploitation activities in four areas near the Arctic. Despite the remoteness of these sparsely populated areas, tropospheric NO2 retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is substantial at ˜1 × 1015 molecules cm-2, suggesting sizeable emissions from these industrial activities. Statistically significant (at the 95% confidence level, corresponding uncertainties in parentheses) increasing trends of 0.017 (±0.01) × 1015 and 0.015 (±0.006) × 1015 molecules cm-2 year-1 over 2004-2015 were found for Bakken (USA) and Athabasca (Canada), two areas having recently experienced fast expansion in the oil industry. This rapid change has implications for emission inventories, which are updated less frequently. No significant trend was found for the North Sea (Europe), where oil production has been declining since the 1990s. For northern Russia, the trend was just under the 95% significance threshold at 0.0057 (±0.006) × 1015 molecules cm-2 year-1. This raises an interesting inconsistency as prior studies have suggested that, in contrast to the continued, albeit slow, expansion of Russian oil/gas production, gas flaring in Russia has decreased in recent years. However, only a fraction of oil fields in Russia were covered in our analysis. Satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) data revealed similar tendencies, albeit at a weaker level of statistical significance, due to the longer lifetime of aerosols and contributions from other sources. This study demonstrates that synergetic use of data from multiple satellite sensors can provide valuable information on pollutant emission sources that is otherwise difficult to acquire.

  2. The Radiated Energy Budget of Chromospheric Plasma in a Major Solar Flare Deduced From Multi-Wavelength Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Milligan, Ryan O; Dennis, Brian R; Hudson, Hugh S; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Allred, Joel C; Chamberlin, Phillip C; Ireland, Jack; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of the energy radiated by the lower solar atmosphere, at optical, UV, and EUV wavelengths, during an X-class solar flare (SOL2011-02-15T01:56) in response to an injection of energy assumed to be in the form of nonthermal electrons. Hard X-ray observations from RHESSI were used to track the evolution of the parameters of the nonthermal electron distribution to reveal the total power contained in flare accelerated electrons. By integrating over the duration of the impulsive phase, the total energy contained in the nonthermal electrons was found to be $>2\\times10^{31}$ erg. The response of the lower solar atmosphere was measured in the free-bound EUV continua of H I (Lyman), He I, and He II, plus the emission lines of He II at 304\\AA\\ and H I (Ly$\\alpha$) at 1216\\AA\\ by SDO/EVE, the UV continua at 1600\\AA\\ and 1700\\AA\\ by SDO/AIA, and the WL continuum at 4504\\AA, 5550\\AA, and 6684\\AA, along with the Ca II H line at 3968\\AA\\ using Hinode/SOT. The summed energy detected by these in...

  3. On the Power-Law Distributions of X-ray Fluxes from Solar Flares Observed with GOES

    CERN Document Server

    Li, You-ping; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Siming; Gan, Weiqun

    2016-01-01

    Power-law frequency distributions of the peak flux of solar flare X-ray emission have been studied extensively and attributed to a system of self-organized criticality (SOC). In this paper, we first show that, so long as the shape of the normalized light curve is not correlated with the peak flux, the flux histogram of solar flares also follows a power-law distribution with the same spectral index as the power-law frequency distribution of the peak flux, which may partially explain why power-law distributions are ubiquitous in the Universe. We then show that the spectral indexes of the histograms of soft X-ray fluxes observed by GOES satellites in two different energy channels are different: the higher energy channel has a harder distribution than the lower energy channel, which challenges the universal power-law distribution predicted by SOC models and implies a very soft distribution of thermal energy content of plasmas probed by the GOES. The temperature ($T$) distribution, on the other hand, approaches a ...

  4. Observations of the limb solar flare on 1980 April 30 with the SMM X-ray polychromator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, A.H.; Acton, L.W.; Culhane, J.L.; Phillips, K.J.H.; Wolfson, C.J.; Rapley, C.G.; Antonucci, E.; Bentley, R.D.; Jordan, C.; Kayat, M.A.; Leibacher, J.W.; Levay, M.; Sherman, J.C.; Strong, K.T.; Veck, N.J.

    1981-03-15

    Soft X-ray observations of the limb event on 1980 April 30 are summarized. These consist of maps made with the Flat Crystal Spectrometer and calcium and iron spectra obtained with the Bent Crystal Spectrometer. The physical conditions, e.g., temperature, density, and energy fluxes, are estimated. The conductive losses exceed the radiative flux during the flare by a factor of about 100. Spectral lines were observed to have enhanced broadening, probably indicating turbulence, for several minutes, coincident with the hard X-ray burst. Since the estimated cooling time is less than the duration of the hot plasma, continuous heating is likely. An estimate is derived for the energy required of 3 x 10/sup 30/ ergs.

  5. MAGIC observations of the February 2014 flare of 1ES 1011+496 and ensuing constraint of the EBL density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Di Pierro, F.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Guberman, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. During February-March 2014, the MAGIC telescopes observed the high-frequency peaked BL Lac 1ES 1011+496 (z = 0.212) in flaring state at very-high energy (VHE, E> 100 GeV). The flux reached a level of more than ten times higher than any previously recorded flaring state of the source. Aims: To describe the characteristics of the flare presenting the light curve and the spectral parameters of the night-wise spectra and the average spectrum of the whole period. From these data we aim to detect the imprint of the extragalactic background light (EBL) in the VHE spectrum of the source, to constrain its intensity in the optical band. Methods: We analyzed the gamma-ray data from the MAGIC telescopes using the standard MAGIC software for the production of the light curve and the spectra. To constrain the EBL, we implement the method developed by the H.E.S.S. collaboration, in which the intrinsic energy spectrum of the source is modeled with a simple function (≤4 parameters), and the EBL-induced optical depth is calculated using a template EBL model. The likelihood of the observed spectrum is then maximized, including a normalization factor for the EBL opacity among the free parameters. Results: The collected data allowed us to describe the night-wise flux changes and also to produce differential energy spectra for all nights in the observed period. The estimated intrinsic spectra of all the nights could be fitted by power-law functions. Evaluating the changes in the fit parameters, we conclude that the spectral shape for most of the nights were compatible, regardless of the flux level, which enabled us to produce an average spectrum from which the EBL imprint could be constrained. The likelihood ratio test shows that the model with an EBL density 1.07 (-0.20, +0.24)stat+sys, relative to the one in the tested EBL template, is preferred at the 4.6σ level to the no-EBL hypothesis, with the assumption that the intrinsic source spectrum can be modeled as a log

  6. A Simple Way to Estimate the Soft X-ray Class of Far-Side Solar Flares Observed with STEREO/EUVI

    CERN Document Server

    Chertok, I M; Grechnev, V V

    2015-01-01

    Around the peaks of substantial flares, bright artifact nearly horizontal saturation streaks (B-streaks) corresponding to the brightest parts of the flare sources appear in the STEREO/EUVI 195 \\AA\\ images. We show that the length of such B-streaks can be used for the solution of an actual problem of evaluating the soft X-ray flux and class of far-side flares registered with double STEREO spacecraft but invisible from Earth. For this purpose from data on about 350 flares observed from January 2007 to July 2014 (mainly exceeding the GOES M1.0 level) both with GOES and STEREO, an empirical relation is established correlating the GOES 1-8 \\AA\\ peak flux and the B-streak length. This allowed us for the same years to estimate the soft X-ray classes for approximately 65 strong far-side flares observed by STEREO. The results of this simple and prompt method are consistent with the estimations of Nitta et al. (Solar Phys., 288, 241, 2013) based on the calculations of the EUVI full-disk digital number output. In additi...

  7. Form and formation of flares and parabolae based on new observations of the internal shell structure in lytoceratid and perisphinctid ammonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Radtke

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of pristine shells of Jurassic and Cretaceous lytoceratid and perisphinctid ammonoids indicates that flares and parabolae represent homologous structures. Both mark an interruption of shell growth. We dismiss earlier interpretations of parabolae as actual aperture, relics of resorbed apophyses or superstructure of the musculature associated to a semi-internal shell. Instead we propose an episodic growth model including several growth stops at the aperture during the formation of a frill-like aperture for parabolae and flares. Such an aperture is composed of the outer prismatic layer, the nacreous layer and an apertural prismatic coating. Here, we observed the apertural prismatic coating for the first time as an integral part of flares and parabolae. The apertural prismatic coating covers only the inner surface of the frill and was secreted by a permanent mantle cover indicating a prolonged period without the production of new shell material. Parabolae differ from flares by their general shape and the presence of ventro-lateral parabolic notches and nodes. The notches were formed by folding of the frill and had the potential to form semi-open spines. The corresponding parabolic nodes are caused by an outward swelling of the shell-secreting mantle tissue producing new shell material at the position of the folding. New shell material that belongs to the conch tube is attached to the base of flares and parabolae after withdrawal of the mantle edge representing the continuation of shell growth. Usually, the frilled aperture associated with flares and parabolae were removed during lifetime. This study reports on flares in Argonauticeras for the first time. In this genus they are typically associated with varices.

  8. Flare-associated type III radio bursts and dynamics of the EUV jet from SDO/AIA and RHESSI observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Naihwa; Innes, Davina

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed description of the interrelation between the Type III radio bursts and energetic phenomena associated with the flare activities in Active region AR 11158 at 07:58 UT on 2011, Feb. 15. The timing of the Type-III radio burst measured by the radio wave experiment on the Wind/WAVE and an array of ground-based radio telescopes, coincided with an EUV jet and hard X-ray emission observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI., respectively. There is clear evidence that the EUV jet shares the same source region as the hard X-ray emission. The temperature of the jet, as determined by multiwavelength measurements of AIA, suggests that type III emission is associated with hot, 7 MK, plasma at the jet's footpoint.

  9. Flare Heating in Stellar Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, V L; Güdel, M; Audard, M; Kashyap, Vinay; Drake, Jeremy; Guedel, Manuel; Audard, Marc

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of very weak flares to the coronal luminosity of low-mass active stars. We analyze EUVE/DS events data from FK Aqr, V1054 Oph, and AD Leo and conclude that in all these cases the coronal emission is dominated by flares to such an extent that in some cases the entire emission may be ascribed to flare heating. We have developed a new method to directly model for the first time stochastically produced flare emission, including undetectable flares, and their effects on the observed photon arrival times. We find that the index of the power-law distribution of flare energies (dN/dE ~ E^{-alpha}) is 2.6+-0.34, 2.74+-0.35, and 2.03-2.32 for FK Aqr, V1054 Oph, and AD Leo respectively. We also find that the flare component accounts for a large fraction (generally >50 percent) of the total flux.

  10. The search for short-term flares in extended VHE Crab Nebula observations with the Whipple 10m telescope

    CERN Document Server

    de Bhroithe, Anna O'Faolain

    2015-01-01

    In 1989, the Whipple 10m telescope achieved the first indisputable detection of a TeV gamma-ray source, the Crab Nebula. Until its decommissioning in 2011, the Whipple telescope took regular measurements of the nebula. With the recent discovery of GeV gamma-ray flaring activity in the Crab Nebula, it is an opportune time to return to the Whipple telescope data set and search its extensive archive for evidence of TeV flares. A data set on the Crab Nebula spanning ten years, 2000 - 2010, is compiled and searched for day-scale flaring activity using a Bayesian-block binning algorithm. No evidence for significant flaring activity is found. Monte Carlo simulations show that low levels of flux increase on short timescales are difficult to detect. Assuming a flare duration of seven days, 99% confidence level upper limits are calculated for the possible frequency of five-fold, two-fold and 1.5-fold flares in the data set. An upper limit of 0.02 flares per year is found for the five-fold flare, and a limit of 0.27 fla...

  11. Richard Wollheim 1923-2003 / Marek Volt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Volt, Marek

    2004-01-01

    Järelehüüe anglo-ameerika filosoofile Richard Wollheimile (5. V 1923-4. XI 2003), kes huvitus maalist ja psühhoanalüüsist ning kuulub XX sajandi analüütilist kunstifilosoofiat enim kujundanud filosoofide hulka. Tema peamised tööd: "Art and Its Objects" (1968), "Painting As an Art" (1987), "On Painting and the Self" (1992). Ilmunud ka raamatus: Volt, Marek. Esteetikast. Tallinn : Sirp, 2006

  12. AGILE and Swift simultaneous observations of the blazar S50716+714 during the bright flare of October 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, P; Cutini, S; Marchegiani, P; Perri, M; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Bulgarelli, A; Chen, A; D'Ammando, F; Donnarumma, I; Giuliani, A; Longo, F; Pacciani, L; Pucella, G; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Tavani, M

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a series of optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the BL Lac object S50716+714 carried out by the Swift and AGILE satellites in late 2007 when this blazar was flaring close to its historical maximum at optical frequencies. We have found that the optical through soft X-ray emission, likely due to Synchrotron radiation, was highly variable and displayed a different behavior in the optical UV and soft X-ray bands. The 4-10 keV flux, most probably dominated by the inverse Compton component, remained instead constant. The counting statistics in the relatively short AGILE GRID observation was low and consistent with a constant gamma-ray flux at a level similar to the maximum observed by EGRET. An estimate of the gamma-ray spectral slope gives a value of the photon index that is close to 2 suggesting that the peak of the inverse Compton component in the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) is within the AGILE energy band. The different variability behavior observed in different par...

  13. Constraining Hot Plasma in a Non-flaring Solar Active Region with FOXSI Hard X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Christe, Steven; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Brooks, David H; Williams, David R; Shimojo, Masumi; Sako, Nobuharu; Krucker, Sam

    2015-01-01

    We present new constraints on the high-temperature emission measure of a non-flaring solar active region using observations from the recently flown Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager sounding rocket payload. FOXSI has performed the first focused hard X-ray (HXR) observation of the Sun in its first successful flight on 2012 November 2. Focusing optics, combined with small strip detectors, enable high-sensitivity observations with respect to previous indirect imagers. This capability, along with the sensitivity of the HXR regime to high-temperature emission, offers the potential to better characterize high-temperature plasma in the corona as predicted by nanoflare heating models. We present a joint analysis of the differential emission measure (DEM) of active region 11602 using coordinated observations by FOXSI, Hinode/XRT and Hinode/EIS. The Hinode-derived DEM predicts significant emission measure between 1 MK and 3 MK, with a peak in the DEM predicted at 2.0-2.5 MK. The combined XRT and EIS DEM also shows emi...

  14. A Quantitative Analysis of Solar Flare Characteristics as Observed in the Solar Observing Optical Network and the Global Oscillation Network Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    suppress the underlying convection. 4 During a solar flare, the plasma is heated to tens of millions of degrees and elementary particles are...seen in the Sun on September 1, 1859, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20, 13-15. Foukal, P. V. (2004). Solar Astrophysics . Wiley...Flares, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Temmer, M, et al. (2001). Statistical Analysis of Solar Hα Flares, Astronomy and Astrophysics , 375

  15. Study of a solar flare on 2005 August 22 observed in hard X-rays and microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Yin; Li, You-Ping; Gan, Wei-Qun; Firoz, Kazi A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the 2005 August 22 flare event (00:54 UT) exploiting hard X-ray (HXR) observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and microwave (MW) observations from the Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory. The HXR time profile exposes well-damped quasi-periodic pulsations with four sequential peaks, and the MW time profile follows the corresponding peaks. Based on this feature, we derive the time relationship of HXRs and MWs with multi-frequency data from the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, and the spatially resolvable data from RHESSI and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph. We find that both frequency dependent delays in MWs and energy dependent delays in HXRs are significant. Furthermore, MW emissions from the south source are delayed with respect to those from the north source at both 17 GHz and 34 GHz, but no significant delays are found in HXR emissions from the different sources at the same energies. To better understand all these long time delays, we derive the electron fluxes of different energies by fitting the observed HXR spectra with a single power-law thick-target model, and speculate that these delays might be related to an extended acceleration process. We further compare the time profile of a MW spectral index derived from 17 and 34 GHz fluxes with the flux densities, and find that the spectral index shows a strong anti-correlation with the HXR fluxes.

  16. Time delays in quasi-periodic pulsations observed during the X2.2 solar flare on 2011 February 15

    CERN Document Server

    Dolla, L; Seaton, D B; Van Doorsselaere, T; Dominique, M; Berghmans, D; Cabanas, C; De Groof, A; Schmutz, W; Verdini, A; West, M J; Zender, J; Zhukov, A N

    2012-01-01

    We report observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on time scale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The Zirconium and Aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA) onboard the Project for On-Board Autonomy (PROBA2) satellite and the SXR channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), where the channel at 1-8 {\\AA} leads the 0.5-4 {\\AA} channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to 9 ...

  17. H-alpha spectra of dynamic chromospheric processes in five well-observed X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Penn, Matthew J.; Wulser, Jean-Pierre; Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous H-alpha and hard X-ray (HXR) spectra were obtained for five solar flares to determine the relationship of H-alpha profiles and the nonthermal part of the flare represented by the hard X-ray burst. All five flares exhibited impulsive-phase redshifted H-alpha in emission, which was temporarily and spatially associated with intense HXR emission and broad impulsive-phase H-alpha wings. A few small regions within two flares showed a blueshifted H-alpha emission which appeared only early in the impulsive phase and was temporally correlated with the HXR emission but not with broad H-alpha wings. Finally, there were both redshifted and blueshifted absorption spectra with properties fully consistent with those known for erupting and untwisting filaments.

  18. A time dependent approach to model X-ray and γ-ray light curves of Mrk 421 observed during the flare in February 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K. K.; Sahayanathan, S.; Sinha, A.; Bhatt, N.; Tickoo, A. K.; Yadav, K. K.; Rannot, R. C.; Chandra, P.; Venugopal, K.; Marandi, P.; Kumar, N.; Goyal, H. C.; Goyal, A.; Agarwal, N. K.; Kothari, M.; Chanchalani, K.; Dhar, V. K.; Chouhan, N.; Bhat, C. K.; Koul, M. K.; Koul, R.

    2017-07-01

    Strong X-ray and γ-ray flares have been detected in February 2010 from the high synchrotron peaked blazar Mrk 421 (z = 0.031). With the motivation of understanding the physics involved in this flaring activity, we study the variability of the source in X-ray and γ-ray energy bands during the period February 10-23, 2010 (MJD 55237-55250). We use near simultaneous X-ray data collected by MAXI, Swift-XRT and γ-ray data collected by Fermi-LAT and TACTIC along with the optical V-band observations by SPOLat Steward Observatory. We observe that the variation in the one day averaged flux from the source during the flare is characterized by fast rise and slow decay. Besides, the TeV γ-ray flux shows a strong correlation with the X-ray flux, suggesting the former to be an outcome of synchrotron self Compton emission process. To model the observed X-ray and γ-ray light curves, we numerically solve the kinetic equation describing the evolution of particle distribution in the emission region. The injection of particle distribution into the emission region, from the putative acceleration region, is assumed to be a time dependent power law. The synchrotron and synchrotron self Compton emission from the evolving particle distribution in the emission region are used to reproduce the X-ray and γ-ray flares successfully. Our study suggests that the flaring activity of Mrk 421 can be an outcome of an efficient acceleration process associated with the increase in underlying non-thermal particle distribution.

  19. Multi-wavelength observations of blazar AO 0235+164 in the 2008-2009 flaring state

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fuhrmann, L; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Itoh, R; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knodlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Lee, S -H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nishino, S; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Pelassa, V; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Raino, S; Rando, R; Rastawicki, D; Razzano, M; Readhead, A; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reyes, L C; Richards, J L; Sbarra, C; Sgro, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Szostek, A; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; Moderski, R; Nalewajko, K; Sikora, M; Villata, M; Raiteri, C M; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Arkharov, A A; Benitez, E; Berdyugin, A; Blinov, D A; Boettcher, M; Calle, O J A Bravo; Buemi, C S; Carosati, D; Chen, W P; Diltz, C; Di Paola, A; Dolci, M; Efimova, N V; Forn\\', E; Gurwell, M A; Heidt, J; Hiriart, D; Jordan, B; Kimeridze, G; Konstantinova, T S; Kopatskaya, E N; Koptelova, E; Kurtanidze, O M; Lahteenmaki, A; Larionova, E G; Larionova, L V; Larionov, V M; Leto, P; Lindfors, E; Lin, H C; Morozova, D A; Nikolashvili, M G; Nilsson, K; Oksman, M; Roustazadeh, P; Sievers, A; Sigua, L A; Sillanpaa, A; Takahashi, T; Takalo, L O; Tornikoski, M; Trigilio, C; Troitsky, I S; Umana, G; Angelakis, E; Krichbaum, T P; Nestoras, I; Riquelme, D; Krips, M; Trippe, S; Arai, A; Kawabata, K S; Sakimoto, K; Sasada, M; Sato, S; Uemura, M; Yamanaka, M; Yoshida, M; Belloni, T; Tagliaferri, G; Bonning, E W; Isler, J; Urry, C M; Hoversten, E; Falcone, A; Pagani, C; Stroh, M

    2012-01-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to {\\gamma} -ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP- WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the {\\gamma} -ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of th...

  20. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR AO 0235+164 IN THE 2008-2009 FLARING STATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J. M. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Caliandro, G. A. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caraveo, P. A., E-mail: eduardo@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: madejski@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: fabio.gargano@ba.infn.it, E-mail: silvia.raino@ba.infn.it, E-mail: lreyes04@calpoly.edu, E-mail: knalew@colorado.edu, E-mail: sikora@camk.edu.pl [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Collaboration: Fermi-LAT Collaboration; GASP-WEBT consortium; F-GAMMA; Iram-PdBI; Kanata; RXTE; SMARTS; Swift-XRT; and others

    2012-06-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to {gamma}-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the {gamma}-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R{sub g}. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  1. Chandra Examines a Quadrillion-Volt Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The high-voltage environment of one of the most energetic and strongly magnetized pulsars known has been surveyed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. A team of astronomers found a powerful jet of high-energy particles extending over a distance of 20 light years and bright arcs believed to be due to particles of matter and anti-matter generated by the pulsar. The team of US, Canadian, and Japanese scientists pointed Chandra at the rapidly spinning neutron star B1509-58, located 19,000 light years away in the constellation of Circinus, for over five hours. These results were announced at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium in Washington, DC. "Jets and arcs on this vast scale have never been seen in any other pulsar," said Bryan Gaensler of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. "The spectacular images we have obtained of this source are letting us test theories as to how pulsars unleash so much energy." The features seen with Chandra give the scientists insight into the process by which voltages of more than 7000 trillion volts are created around rotating neutron stars (the dense remnants of supernova explosions) and how these extreme voltages affect their environment. B1509-58 is of particular interest because it has a much stronger magnetic field than the Crab Nebula pulsar, which exhibits similar features on a much smaller scale. The general picture emerging from these results is that high-energy particles of matter and antimatter are streaming away from the neutron star along its poles and near its equator. The particles leaving the poles produce the jets; astronomers speculate that only one side of the jet is apparent in B1509-58, indicating that this one side is beamed in our direction, while the other is rushing away. "Until this observation, no one knew for sure whether such tremendous voltages and energy outputs were a trademark of all pulsars, or if the Crab was an oddball," said Vicky Kaspi of McGill University in Montreal. "Now thanks

  2. Multi-Wavelength Observations of the Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Solar Flares with AIA/SDO: II. Hydrodynamic Scaling Laws and Thermal Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    In this study we measure physical parameters of the same set of 155 M and X-class solar flares observed with AIA/SDO as analyzed in Paper I, by performing a {\\sl differential emission measure (DEM)} analysis to determine the flare peak emission measure $EM_p$, peak temperature $T_p$, electron density $n_p$, and thermal energy $E_{th}$, in addition to the spatial scales $L$, areas $A$, and volumes $V$ measured in Paper I. The parameter ranges for M and X-class flares are: $\\log(EM_p)=47.0-50.5$, $T_p=5.0-17.8$ MK, $n_p=4 \\times 10^9-9 \\times 10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$, and thermal energies of $E_{th}=1.6 \\times 10^{28}-1.1 \\times 10^{32}$ erg. We find that these parameters obey the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) scaling law $T_p^2 \\propto n_p L$ and $H \\propto T^{7/2} L^{-2}$ during the peak time $t_p$ of the flare density $n_p$, when energy balance between the heating rate $H$ and the conductive and radiative loss rates is achieved for a short instant, and thus enables the applicability of the RTV scaling law. The applic...

  3. Multi-Wavelength Observations of the Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Solar Flares with AIA/SDO: I. Universal Scaling Laws of Space and Time Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Liu, Kai

    2013-01-01

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO (Aschwanden 2012) to all 7 coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, 335 \\ang) to test the wavelength-dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 \\ang\\ wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths $L$, flare areas $A$, volumes $V$, fractal dimension $D_2$), temporal (flare durations $T$), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient $\\kappa$, spreading exponent $\\beta$, and maximum expansion velocities $v_{max}$) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly-driven self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., $N(L) \\propto L^{-3}$, $N(A) \\propto A^{-2}$, $N(V) \\propto V^{-5/3}$, $N(T) \\propto T^{-2}$, $D_2=3/2$, for a Euclidean dimension $d=3$. Empirical...

  4. Multi-Epoch VLBA Observations of EGRET-Detected Quasars and BL Lac Objects Connection between Superluminal Ejections and Gamma-Ray Flares in Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Jorstad, S G; Mattox, J R; Aller, M F; Aller, H D; Wehrle, A E; Bloom, S D; Jorstad, Svetlana G; Marscher, Alan P; Mattox, John R; Aller, Margo F; Aller, Hugh D; Wehrle, Ann E; Bloom, Steven D

    2001-01-01

    We examine the coincidence of times of high $\\gamma$-ray flux and ejections of superluminal components from the core in EGRET blazars based on a VLBA monitoring program at 22 and 43 GHz from November 1993 to July 1997. In 23 cases of $\\gamma$-ray flares for which sufficient VLBA data exist, 16 of the flares (in 14 objects) fall within 3$\\sigma$ and 9 of these within 1$\\sigma$ uncertainties of the extrapolated epoch of zero separation from the core of a superluminal radio component. In each of two sources (0528+134 and 1730-130) two successive $\\gamma$-ray flares were followed by the appearance of new superluminal components. We carried out statistical simulations which show that if the number of coincidences $\\ge$ 7 the radio and $\\gamma$-ray events are associated with each other at >99.999% confidence. Our analysis of the observed behavior, including variability of the polarized radio flux, of the sources before, during, and after the $\\gamma$-ray flares suggests that the $\\gamma$-ray events occur in the sup...

  5. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, PL-30-244 Krakow (Poland); Liakos, A. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, University of Athens, GR 157 84 Zografos, Athens, Hellas (Greece); Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W. [Mount Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, PL-30-084 Krakow (Poland); Provencal, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Santangelo, M. M. M. [O.A.C. Osservatorio Astronomico di Capannori, Via di Valle, I-55060 Vorno, Capannori (Italy); Salo, H. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S., E-mail: popiha@utu.fi [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  6. Multi-wave band SMM-VLA observations of an M2 flare and an associated coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.; Schmelz, Joan T.; Gonzalez, Raymond D.; Smith, Kermit L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of observations of an M2 flare and an associated coronal mass ejection CME by instruments on the SMM as well as by the VLA and other ground-based observatories on September 30, 1988. The multiwave band data show a gradual slowly changing event which lasted several hours. The microwave burst emission was found to originate in compact moderately circularly polarized sources located near the sites of bright H-alpha and soft X-ray emission. These data are combined with estimates of an electron temperature of 1.5 x 10 to the 7th K and an emission measure of about 2.0 x 10 to the 49th/cu cm obtained from Ca XIX and Fe XXV spectra to show that the microwave emission can be attributed to thermal gyrosynchrotron radiation in regions where the magnetic field strength is 425-650 G. The CME acceleration at low altitudes is measured on the basis of ground- and space-based coronagraphs.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the X2.2 Solar Flare on 2011 February 15: I. Comparison with the Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, S; Magara, T; Choe, G S; Park, Y D

    2014-01-01

    We performed a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation using a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) in solar active region 11158 to clarify the dynamics of an X2.2-class solar flare. We found that the NLFFF never shows the drastic dynamics seen in observations, i.e., it is in stable state against the perturbations. On the other hand, the MHD simulation shows that when the strongly twisted lines are formed at close to the neutral line, which are produced via tether-cutting reconnection in the twisted lines of the NLFFF, consequently they erupt away from the solar surface via the complicated reconnection. This result supports the argument that the strongly twisted lines formed in NLFFF via tether-cutting reconnection are responsible for breaking the force balance condition of the magnetic fields in the lower solar corona. In addition to this the dynamical evolution of these field lines reveals that at the initial stage the spatial pattern of the footpoints caused by the reconnection of the twisted lines appropriatel...

  8. Nasal flaring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be caused by any of the following: Asthma flare-up Blocked airway (any cause) Swelling and mucus ... Tests that may be done include: Arterial blood gas analysis Complete blood count (CBC) ECG to check ...

  9. Multiwavelength observation from radio through very-high-energy Gamma-ray of OJ 287 during the 12-year cycle flare in 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Seta, H; Tashiro, M S; Nakanishi, K; Sasada, M; Shimajiri, Y; Uemura, M

    2009-01-01

    We performed simultaneous multiwavelength observations of OJ 287 with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array for radio, the KANATA telescope and the KVA telescope for optical, the Suzaku satellite for X-ray and the MAGIC telescope for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray in 2007. The observations were conducted for a quiescent state in April and in a flaring state in November-December. We clearly observed increase of fluxes from radio to X-ray bands during the flaring state while MAGIC could not detect significant VHE gamma-ray emission from the source. We could derive an upper limit (95% confidence level) of 1.7% of the Crab Nebula flux above 150 GeV from about 41.2 hours of the MAGIC observation. A simple SSC model suggests that the observed flaring activity could be caused by evolutions in the distribution of the electron population rather than changes of the magnetic field strength or Doppler beaming factor in the jet.

  10. INTEGRAL/OMC optical photometric observations of multiple flaring from V404 Cyg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, A.; Alfonso-Garzon, J.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Rodriguez, J.; Cadolle Bel, M.

    2015-06-01

    A target of opportunity INTEGRAL observation (PI Rodriguez, ATel #7702) of the black-hole candidate V 404 Cyg, currently in outburst phase (ATel #7646) and showing large variability at different wavelengths, was executed in revolutions 1555 (20-22 June 2015) and 1556 (23-25 June 2015).

  11. NUSTAR, SWIFT, and GROND Observations of the Flaring MEV Blazar PMN J0641-0320

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajello, M.; Ghisellini, G.; Paliya, V. S.;

    2016-01-01

    Area Telescope and subsequent follow-up observations with NuSTAR, Swift, and GROND of a new member of the MeV blazar family: PMN J0641-0320. Our optical spectroscopy provides confirmation that this is a flat-spectrum radio quasar located at a redshift of z = 1.196. Its very hard NuSTAR spectrum (power...

  12. Observation of kink instability during small B5.0 solar flare on 04 June, 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, A K; Kumar, Pankaj; Khodachenko, M L

    2010-01-01

    Using multi-wavelength observations of SoHO/MDI, SOT-Hinode/blue-continuum (4504 \\AA), G-band (4305 \\AA), Ca II H (3968 \\AA) and TRACE 171 \\AA, we present the observational signature of highly twisted magnetic loop in AR 10960 during the period 04:43 UT-04:52 UT at 4 June, 2007. SOT-Hinode/blue-continuum (4504 \\AA) observations show that penumbral filaments of positive polarity sunspot have counter-clock wise twist, which may be caused by the clock-wise rotation of the spot umbrae. The coronal loop, whose one footpoint is anchored in this sunspot, shows strong right-handed twist in chromospheric SOT-Hinode/Ca II H (3968 \\AA) and coronal TRACE 171 \\AA\\, images. The length and the radius of the loop are $L\\sim$80 Mm and $a\\sim$4.0 Mm respectively. The distance between neighboring turns of magnetic field lines (i.e. pitch) is estimated as $\\approx$ 10 Mm. The total twist angle, $\\Phi\\sim$12$\\pi$ (estimated for the homogeneous distribution of the twist along the loop), is much larger than the Kruskal -Shafranov i...

  13. Chandra observation of an unusually long and intense X-ray flare from a young solar-like star in M78

    CERN Document Server

    Grosso, N; Feigelson, E D; Forbes, T G

    2004-01-01

    LkHA312 has been observed serendipitously with the ACIS-I detector on board Chandra with 26h continuous exposure. This H_alpha emission line star belongs to the star-forming region M78 (NGC2068). From the optical and NIR data, we show that it is a pre-main sequence (PMS) low-mass star with a weak NIR excess. This genuine T Tauri star displayed an X-ray flare with an unusual long rise phase (~8h). The X-ray emission was nearly constant during the first 18h of the observation, and then increased by a factor of 13 during a fast rise phase (~2h), and reached a factor of 16 above the quiescent X-ray level at the end of a gradual phase (~6h) showing a slower rise. To our knowledge this flare, with \\~0.4-~0.5 cts/s, has the highest count rate observed so far with Chandra from a PMS low-mass star. By chance, the source position, 8.2' off-axis, protected this observation from pile-up. We make a spectral analysis of the X-ray emission versus time, showing that the plasma temperature of the quiescent phase and the flare...

  14. Simultaneous Observation of Solar Neutrons from the International Space Station and High Mountain Observatories in Association with a Flare on July 8, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Y.; Lopez, D.; Koga, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Goka, T.; González, L. X.; Masuda, S.; Matsubara, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Miranda, P.; Okudaira, O.; Obara, T.; Salinas, J.; Sako, T.; Shibata, S.; Ticona, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-04-01

    An M6.5-class flare was observed at N12E56 on the solar surface at 16:06 UT on July 8, 2014. In association with the flare, two neutron detectors located at high mountains, Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico and Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, recorded two neutron pulses, separated approximately by 30 min. Moreover, enhancements were also observed by the solar neutron detector onboard the International Space Station. We analyzed these data combined with solar images from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. From these we noticed that the production mechanism of neutrons cannot be explained by a single model; at least one of the enhancements may be explained by an electric field generated by the collision of magnetic loops and the other by the shock acceleration mechanism at the front side of the CME.

  15. Observations of bubbles in natural seep flares at MC 118 and GC 600 using in situ quantitative imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binbin; Socolofsky, Scott A.; Breier, John A.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the results of quantitative imaging using a stereoscopic, high-speed camera system at two natural gas seep sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the Gulf Integrated Spill Research G07 cruise in July 2014. The cruise was conducted on the E/V Nautilus using the ROV Hercules for in situ observation of the seeps as surrogates for the behavior of hydrocarbon bubbles in subsea blowouts. The seeps originated between 890 and 1190 m depth in Mississippi Canyon block 118 and Green Canyon block 600. The imaging system provided qualitative assessment of bubble behavior (e.g., breakup and coalescence) and verified the formation of clathrate hydrate skins on all bubbles above 1.3 m altitude. Quantitative image analysis yielded the bubble size distributions, rise velocity, total gas flux, and void fraction, with most measurements conducted from the seafloor to an altitude of 200 m. Bubble size distributions fit well to lognormal distributions, with median bubble sizes between 3 and 4.5 mm. Measurements of rise velocity fluctuated between two ranges: fast-rising bubbles following helical-type trajectories and bubbles rising about 40% slower following a zig-zag pattern. Rise speed was uncorrelated with hydrate formation, and bubbles following both speeds were observed at both sites. Ship-mounted multibeam sonar provided the flare rise heights, which corresponded closely with the boundary of the hydrate stability zone for the measured gas compositions. The evolution of bubble size with height agreed well with mass transfer rates predicted by equations for dirty bubbles.

  16. The crab pulsar at tera-electron-volts energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreto Fidalgo, David [Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Galindo, Daniel; Zanin, Roberta [Universitat de Barcelona, ICC IEEC-UB, Barcelona (Spain); Ona Wilhelmi, Emma de [Institute of Space Sciences, Barcelona (Spain); Rodriguez Garcia, Jezabel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Inst. de Astrofisica de Canarias, La Laguna Tenerife (Spain); Dazzi, Francesco [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: MAGIC-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    MAGIC is a system of two 17 m-diameter Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) located at the Roque de los Muchachos observatory (ORM, 28.8 N, 17.8 W, 2200 m a.s.l.) on the Canary island of La Palma. This system has observed the most energetic ever detected pulsed gamma-ray from an astrophysical source, 2 Tera-electron-Volt emission from the Crab pulsar. Such measurements shed light on the particle acceleration mechanism of pulsars, pointing to Inverse Compton scattering of IR-X-ray photons at a distance bigger than 25 stellar radii from the neutron star. These are highly relevant results, since they challenge all the existing theoretical models as none of them can reproduce all the constrains that this observation has imposed.

  17. NUSTAR, SWIFT, and GROND Observations of the Flaring MEV Blazar PMN J0641-0320

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajello, M.; Ghisellini, G.; Paliya, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Area Telescope and subsequent follow-up observations with NuSTAR, Swift, and GROND of a new member of the MeV blazar family: PMN J0641-0320. Our optical spectroscopy provides confirmation that this is a flat-spectrum radio quasar located at a redshift of z = 1.196. Its very hard NuSTAR spectrum (power......-law photon index of similar to 1 up to similar to 80 keV) indicates that the emission is produced via inverse Compton scattering off of photons coming from outside the jet. The overall spectral energy distribution of PMN J0641-0320 is typical of powerful blazars and, using a simple one-zone leptonic emission...... model, we infer that the emission region is located either inside the broad line region or within the dusty torus....

  18. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  19. Multiwavelength observations of a VHE gamma-ray flare from PKS 1510-089 in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Arcaro, C; Babić, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Berti, A; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carosi, R; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Cumani, P; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Di Pierro, F; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Engelkemeier, M; Ramazani, V Fallah; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinović, N; Gora, D; Guberman, D; Hadasch, D; Hahn, A; Hassan, T; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Ishio, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; Kuveždić, D; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Nogués, L; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Pedaletti, G; Peresano, M; Perri, L; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Garcia, J R; Reichardt, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schroeder, S; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Šnidarić, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Strzys, M; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Torres-Albà, N; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vanzo, G; Acosta, M Vazquez; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zarić, D; Desiante, R; González, J Becerra; D'Ammando, F; Larsson, S; Raiteri, C M; Reinthal, R; Lähteenmäki, A; Järvelä, E; Tornikoski, M; Ramakrishnan, V; Jorstad, S G; Marscher, A P; Bala, V; MacDonald, N R; Kaur, N; Sameer,; Baliyan, K; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Lazaro, C; Martínez-Lombilla, C; Grinon-Marin, A B; Yabar, A Pastor; Protasio, C; Carnerero, M I; Jermak, H; Steele, I A; Larionov, V M; Borman, G A; Grishina, T S

    2016-01-01

    Context. PKS 1510-089 is one of only a few flat spectrum radio quasars detected in the VHE (very-high-energy, > 100 GeV) gamma-ray band. Aims. We study the broadband spectral and temporal properties of the PKS 1510-089 emission during a high gamma-ray state. Methods. We performed VHE gamma-ray observations of PKS 1510-089 with the MAGIC telescopes during a high gamma-ray state in May 2015. In order to perform broad-band modelling of the source, we have also gathered contemporaneous multiwavelength data in radio, IR, optical photometry and polarization, UV, X-ray and GeV gamma-ray ranges. We construct a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) in two periods, selected according to VHE gamma-ray state. Results. PKS 1510-089 has been detected in a high optical and gamma-ray state, showing for the first time a significant VHE gamma-ray variability. Similarly to the optical and gamma-ray high state of the source detected in 2012, it was accompanied by a rotation of the optical polarization angle and the emissi...

  20. Actual Versus Estimated Utility Factor of a Large Set of Privately Owned Chevrolet Volts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Smart; Thomas Bradley; Stephen Schey

    2014-04-01

    In order to determine the overall fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the amount of operation in charge depleting (CD) versus charge sustaining modes must be determined. Mode of operation is predominantly dependent on customer usage of the vehicle and is therefore highly variable. The utility factor (UF) concept was developed to quantify the distance a group of vehicles has traveled or may travel in CD mode. SAE J2841 presents a UF calculation method based on data collected from travel surveys of conventional vehicles. UF estimates have been used in a variety of areas, including the calculation of window sticker fuel economy, policy decisions, and vehicle design determination. The EV Project, a plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure demonstration being conducted across the United States, provides the opportunity to determine the real-world UF of a large group of privately owned Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicles. Using data collected from Volts enrolled in The EV Project, this paper compares the real-world UF of two groups of Chevrolet Volts to estimated UF's based on J2841. The actual observed fleet utility factors (FUF) for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups studied were observed to be 72% and 74%, respectively. Using the EPA CD ranges, the method prescribed by J2841 estimates a FUF of 65% and 68% for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups, respectively. Volt drivers achieved higher percentages of distance traveled in EV mode for two reasons. First, they had fewer long-distance travel days than drivers in the national travel survey referenced by J2841. Second, they charged more frequently than the J2841 assumption of once per day - drivers of Volts in this study averaged over 1.4 charging events per day. Although actual CD range varied widely as driving conditions varied, the average CD ranges for the two Volt groups studied matched the EPA CD range estimates, so CD range variation did not affect FUF results.

  1. Reconnection in Solar Flares: Outstanding Questions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hiroaki Isobe; Kazunari Shibata

    2009-06-01

    Space observations of solar flares such as those from Yohkoh, SOHO,TRACE, and RHESSI have revealed a lot of observational evidence of magnetic reconnection in solar flares: cusp-shaped arcades, reconnection inflows, plasmoids, etc. Thus it has been established, at least phenomenologically, that magnetic reconnection does occur in solar flares. However, a number of fundamental questions and puzzles still remain in the physics of reconnection in solar flares. In this paper, we discuss the recent progresses and future prospects in the study of magnetic reconnection in solar flares from both theoretical and observational points of view.

  2. X-ray and H-alpha observations of a filament-disappearance flare - An empirical analysis of the magnetic field configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Webb, D. F.; Moore, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    On August, 29, 1973, a flare event occurred that involved the disappearance of a filament near central meridian. The event, well-observed in X-rays on Skylab and in H-alpha, was a four-ribbon flare involving both new and old magnetic inversion lines which were roughly parallel. The H-alpha, X-ray, and magnetic field data are used to deduce the magnetic polarities of the H-alpha brightening at the footpoints of the brightest X-ray loops. It is suggested that the event involved a reconnection of magnetic field lines rather than a brightening in place of preexisting loops. The simultaneity of the H-alpha brightening onsets in the four ribbons and the apparent lack of an eruption of the filament are consistent with this interpretation.

  3. Chandra Observation of an X-ray Flare at Saturn: Evidence for Direct Solar Control on Saturn's Disk X-ray Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A; Elsner, R F; Ford, P G; Gladstone, G R; Bhardwaj, Anil; Cravens, Thomas E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    Saturn was observed by Chandra ACIS-S on 20 and 26-27 January 2004 for one full Saturn rotation (10.7 hr) at each epoch. We report here the first observation of an X-ray flare from Saturn's non-auroral (low-latitude) disk, which is seen in direct response to an M6-class flare emanating from a sunspot that was clearly visible from both Saturn and Earth. Saturn's disk X-ray emissions are found to be variable on time scales of hours to weeks to months, and correlated with solar F10.7 cm flux. Unlike Jupiter, X-rays from Saturn's polar (auroral) region have characteristics similar to those from its disk. This report, combined with earlier studies, establishes that disk X-ray emissions of the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter are directly regulated by processes happening on the Sun. We suggest that these emissions could be monitored to study X-ray flaring from solar active regions when they are on the far side and not visible to Near-Earth space weather satellites.

  4. Diagnose Physical Conditions Near the Flare Energy-release Sites from Observations of Solar Microwave Type III Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin; Meszarosova, Hana; Huang, Guangli

    2015-01-01

    In the physics of solar flares, it is crucial to diagnose the physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites. However, so far it is unclear how do diagnose these physical conditions. Solar microwave type III burst is believed to be a sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in solar flares. This work takes into account the effect of magnetic field on the plasma density and developed s set of formulas which can be used to estimate the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field near the magnetic reconnection site and particle acceleration region, and the velocity and energy of electron beams. We applied these formulas to three groups of microwave type III pairs in a X-class flare, and obtained some reasonable and interesting results. This method can be applied to other microwave type III bursts to diagnose the physical conditions of source regions, and provide some basic information to understand the intrinsic nature and fundamental processes occurring near the flar...

  5. Solar Magnetic Field Studies Using the 12-Micron Emission Lines. IV. Observations of a Delta-Region Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Jennings, D E; McCabe, G; Sada, P; Moran, T; Jennings, Donald E.; Deming, Drake; Sada, Pedro; Moran, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    We have recently developed the capability to make solar vector (Stokes IQUV) magnetograms using the infrared line of MgI at 12.32 microns. On 24 April 2001, we obtained a vector magnetic map of solar active region NOAA 9433, fortuitously just prior to the occurrence of an M2 flare. Examination of a sequence of SOHO/MDI magnetograms, and comparison with ground-based H-alpha images, shows that the flare was produced by the cancellation of newly emergent magnetic flux outside of the main sunspot. The very high Zeeman-sensitivity of the 12-micron data allowed us to measure field strengths on a spatial scale which was not directly resolvable. At the flare trigger site, opposite polarity fields of 2700 and 1000 Gauss occurred within a single 2 arc-sec resolution element, as revealed by two resolved Zeeman splittings in a single spectrum. Our results imply an extremely high horizontal field strength gradient (5 G/km) prior to the flare, significantly greater than seen in previous studies. We also find that the magne...

  6. Flaring variability of Microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trushkin, Sergei A; Nizhelskij, Nikolaj A

    2008-01-01

    We discuss flaring variability of radio emission of microquasars, measured in monitoring programs with the RATAN-600 radio telescope. We carried out a multi-frequency (1-30 GHz) daily monitoring of the radio flux variability of the microquasars SS433, GRS1915+105, and Cyg X-3 during the recent sets in 2005-2007. A lot of bright short-time flares were detected from GRS 1915+105 and they could be associated with active X-ray events. In January 2006 we detected a drop down of the quiescent fluxes from Cyg X-3 (from 100 to $\\sim$20 mJy), then the 1 Jy-flare was detected on 2 February 2006 after 18 days of quenched radio emission. The daily spectra of the flare in the maximum were flat from 2 to 110 GHz, using the quasi-simultaneous observations at 110 GHz with the RT45m telescope and the NMA millimeter array of NRO in Japan. Several bright radio flaring events (1-15 Jy) followed during the continuing state of very variable and intensive 1-12 keV X-ray emission ($\\sim$0.5 Crab), which was monitored in the RXTE ASM...

  7. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  8. Relationship of Non-potentiality and Flaring: Intercomparison for an M-class Flare

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Ambastha; Shibu K. Mathew

    2000-09-01

    We have made an attempt to obtain relationship of magnetic shear and vertical currents in NOAA AR7321. Intercomparison of changes observed at several flaring and non-flaring sites associated with an M4/2B flare observed on October 26, 1992 is reported.

  9. GRB Flares: UV/Optical Flaring (Paper I)

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, C A; De Pasquale, M; Oates, S R

    2013-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this algorithm to detect flares in the UV/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional `breaks' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T_start, T_stop, and T_peak. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 seconds of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10...

  10. Evidence for collapsing fields in corona and photosphere during the 15 February 2011 X2.2 flare: SDO AIA and HMI Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gosain, S

    2012-01-01

    We use high-resolution images of the sun obtained by the SDO/AIA instrument to study the evolution of the coronal loops in a flaring solar active region. During 15 February 2011 a X-2.2 class flare occurred in NOAA 11158, a $\\beta\\gamma\\delta$ sunspot complex. We identify three distinct phases of the coronal loop dynamics during this event: (i) {\\it Slow rise phase}: slow rising motion of the loop-tops prior to the flare in response to slow rise of the underlying flux rope, (ii) {\\it Collapse phase}: sudden contraction of the loop-tops with lower loops collapsing earlier than the higher loops, and (iii) {\\it Oscillation phase}: the loops exhibit global kink oscillations after the collapse phase at different periods, with period decreasing with decreasing height of the loops. The period of these loop oscillations is used to estimate the field strength in the coronal loops of different loop lengths in this active region. Further, we also use SDO/HMI observations to study the photospheric changes close to the po...

  11. An assessment of Fe xx-Fe xxii emission lines in SDO/EVE data as diagnostics for high-density solar flare plasmas using EUVE stellar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, F. P.; Milligan, R. O.; Mathioudakis, M.; Christian, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory obtains extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectra of the full-disc Sun at a spectral resolution of ˜1 Å and cadence of 10 s. Such a spectral resolution would normally be considered to be too low for the reliable determination of electron density (Ne) sensitive emission line intensity ratios, due to blending. However, previous work has shown that a limited number of Fe xxi features in the 90-160 Å wavelength region of EVE do provide useful Ne-diagnostics at relatively low flare densities (Ne ≃ 1011-1012 cm-3). Here, we investigate if additional highly ionized Fe line ratios in the EVE 90-160 Å range may be reliably employed as Ne-diagnostics. In particular, the potential for such diagnostics to provide density estimates for high Ne (˜1013 cm-3) flare plasmas is assessed. Our study employs EVE spectra for X-class flares, combined with observations of highly active late-type stars from the EUVE satellite plus experimental data for well-diagnosed tokamak plasmas, both of which are similar in wavelength coverage and spectral resolution to those from EVE. Several ratios are identified in EVE data, which yield consistent values of electron density, including Fe xx 113.35/121.85 and Fe xxii 114.41/135.79, with confidence in their reliability as Ne-diagnostics provided by the EUVE and tokamak results. These ratios also allow the determination of density in solar flare plasmas up to values of ˜1013 cm-3.

  12. Fast electrons in small solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    This review summarizes both the direct spacecraft observations of nonrelativistic solar electrons, and observations of the X-ray and radio emission generated by these particles at the sun and in the interplanetary medium. These observations bear on the basic astrophysical process of particle acceleration in tenuous plasmas. We find that in many small solar flares, the nearly 5-100 keV electrons accelerated during flash phase constitute the bulk of the total flare energy. Thus the basic flare mechanism in these flares essentially converts the available flare energy into fast electrons. These electrons may produce the other flare electromagnetic emissions through their interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large proton flares these electrons may provide the energy to eject material from the sun and to create a shock wave which could accelerate nuclei and electrons to much higher energies.

  13. Prediction soft-X-ray spectrum of solar flares from Very Low Frequency observations: an inverse problem in ionospheric science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    Earth's lower ionosphere and upper atmosphere absorb X-rays and gamma-rays from astronomical sources such as solar flares, Short Gamma ray Repeaters (SGRs) or Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The electron-ion production rates due to the ionization of such energetic photons at different heights depend on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectrum and hence vary from one source to another. Obviously the ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. In this paper, we examine the possibility of inverting the electron density-height profiles uniquely by deconvolution of the VLF amplitude signal to obtain information on the injected spectrum. We have been able to reproduce the soft-X-ray part of the injected spectra from two different classes of solar flares with satisfactory accuracy. With the possibilities of probing even lower parts of the atmosphere, the method presented here is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the higher energy part of solar flare spectra and spectra of more energetic events such as the GRBs, SGRs etc. We show that to a certain accuracy, the Earth's atmosphere may be used as a gigantic detector of relatively strong ionizing extra-terrestrial events.

  14. Volt-Ampere Characteristics of Acupoint Neiguan (PC 6) on Patients with Hyperthyroidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏建子; 沈雪勇; 毛慧娟; 王霆

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To observe volt-ampere characteristic of Acupoint Neiguan (PC 6) on patients with hyper-thyroidism for probing into the actions of acupoints and change of qi and blood of human body as well as the relationship between the action of acupoint and the metabolism of energy. Methods:A self-made high-sensitive apparatus was applied to detect volt-ampere curves of Acupoint Neiguan(PC 6)and its control point on 33 patients with hyperthyroidism and 30 healthy people.Results:In patients,the volt-ampere areas (VAA)of both ampere.Increasing scan(AIS)and ampere—decreasing Scan(ADS)as well as the inertia areas (IS) of both side Neiguan(PC 6)were significantly smaller than the control points(P0.05).Conclusion:The volt-ampere characteristics of the right and left Neiguan(PC 61 on patients with hyperthyroidism are in imbalance.Hyperthyroidism exerts certaininfluenceontheheartfunction.

  15. Pre-flare coronal jet and evolutionary phases of a solar eruptive prominence associated with M1.8 flare: SDO and RHESSI observations

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Veronig, Astrid; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-01-01

    We investigate triggering, activation, and ejection of a solar eruptive prominence that occurred in a multi-polar flux system of active region NOAA 11548 on 2012 August 18 by analyzing data from AIA on board SDO, RHESSI, and EUVI/SECCHI on board STEREO. Prior to the prominence activation, we observed striking coronal activities in the form of a blowout jet which is associated with rapid eruption of a cool flux rope. Further, the jet-associated flux rope eruption underwent splitting and rotation during its outward expansion. These coronal activities are followed by the prominence activation during which it slowly rises with a speed of ~12 km/s while the region below the prominence emits gradually varying EUV and thermal X-ray emissions. From these observations, we propose that the prominence eruption is a complex, multi-step phenomenon in which a combination of internal (tether-cutting reconnection) and external (i.e., pre-eruption coronal activities) processes are involved. The prominence underwent catastroph...

  16. Pre-Flare Flows in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares take place in regions of strong magnetic fields and are generally accepted to be the result of a resistive instability leading to magnetic reconnection. When new flux emerges into a pre-existing active region it can act as a flare and coronal mass ejection trigger. In this study we observed active region 10955 after the emergence of small-scale additional flux at the magnetic inversion line. We found that flaring began when additional positive flux levels exceeded 1.38×1020 Mx (maxwell), approximately 7 h after the initial flux emergence. We focussed on the pre-flare activity of one B-class flare that occurred on the following day. The earliest indication of activity was a rise in the non-thermal velocity one hour before the flare. 40 min before flaring began, brightenings and pre-flare flows were observed along two loop systems in the corona, involving the new flux and the pre-existing active region loops. We discuss the possibility that reconnection between the new flux and pre-existing loops before the flare drives the flows by either generating slow mode magnetoacoustic waves or a pressure gradient between the newly reconnected loops. The subsequent B-class flare originated from fast reconnection of the same loop systems as the pre-flare flows.

  17. VERITAS detection of $\\gamma$-ray flaring activity from the BL Lac object 1ES 1727+502 during bright moonlight observations

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, S; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Bouvier, A; Bugaev, V; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Dumm, J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Håkansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Hughes, Z D

    2015-01-01

    During moonlit nights, observations with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes at very high energies (VHE, $E>100$ GeV) are constrained since the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in the telescope camera are extremely sensitive to the background moonlight. Observations with the VERITAS telescopes in the standard configuration are performed only with a moon illumination less than 35$\\%$ of full moon. Since 2012, the VERITAS collaboration has implemented a new observing mode under bright moonlight, by either reducing the voltage applied to the PMTs (reduced-high-voltage configuration, RHV), or by utilizing UV-transparent filters. While these operating modes result in lower sensitivity and increased energy thresholds, the extension of the available observing time is useful for monitoring variable sources such as blazars and sources requiring spectral measurements at the highest energies. In this paper we report the detection of $\\gamma$-ray flaring activity from the BL Lac object 1ES 1727+502 during RHV observations. Thi...

  18. A Study of Halo Coronal Mass Ejections and Related Flare and Radio Burst Observations in Solar Cycle 23

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiou, M; Pothitakis, G; Hillaris, A; Preka-Papadema, P; Moussas, X; 10.1063/1.2347981

    2010-01-01

    We present a statistical study of dynamical and kinetic characteristics of CMEs which show temporal and spatial association with flares and type II radio bursts or complex radio events of type II bursts and type IV continua. This study is based on a set of earth-directed full halo CMEs occurring during the present solar cycle, with data from the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraphs (LASCO) and Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission and the Magnetic Fields Investigation (MFI) and 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle Analyzer Investigation experiment on board the WIND spacecraft.

  19. Simultaneous Observation of Solar Neutrons at the ISS and High Mountain Observatories as Evidence for two Different Acceleration Mechanisms Associated to a Flare on July 8,2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Galicia, J. F.; González, L. X.; Watanabe, K.; Muraki, Y.; Matsubara, Y.; Lopez, D.; Koga, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Sako, T.; Salinas, J., Sr.; Ticona, R.; Shibata, S.; Masuda, S.; Tunesada, S.

    2016-12-01

    An M 6.5-class flare was observed at N12E56 of the solar surface at 16:06 UT on July 8, 2014. In association with the flare, two neutron detectors located at high mountains: Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico (4600m asl) and Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia (5200m asl) recorded two neutron pulses, separated approximately 30 minutes. Enhancements were also observed in the neutral channel detector onboard the International Space Station. We analyzed these data combined with solar images from the Atompspheric ImagingAssembly (AIA) onboard the SolarDynamicalObservatory (SDO). From our analysis we conclude that the production mechanism of neutrons cannot be explained by a single model: one of the enhancements may be explained by an electric field generated by the collision of magnetic loops, and the other by a shock acceleration mechanism at the front side of the observed CME. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that evidence is found for two different mechanisms present in a solar eruption leading to energetic solar neutron production.

  20. Direct observation of the energy release site in a solar flare by SDO/AIA, Hinode/EIS and RHESSI

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    We present direct evidence for the detection of the main energy release site in a non-eruptive solar flare, SOL2013-11-09T06:38UT. This GOES C2.7 event was characterised by two flaring ribbons and a compact, bright coronal source located between them, which is the focus of our study. We use imaging from SDO/AIA, and imaging spectroscopy from RHESSI to characterise the thermal and non-thermal emission from the coronal source, and EUV spectroscopy from the Hinode/EIS, which scanned the coronal source during the impulsive peak, to analyse Doppler shifts in Fe XII and Fe XXIV emission lines, and determine the source density. The coronal source exhibited an impulsive emission lightcurve in all AIA filters during the impulsive phase. RHESSI hard X-ray images indicate both thermal and non-thermal emission at the coronal source, and its plasma temperature derived from RHESSI imaging spectroscopy shows an impulsive rise, reaching a maximum at 12-13 MK about 10 seconds prior to the hard X-ray peak. High redshifts assoc...

  1. The Statistical Analyses of the White-Light Flares: Two Main Results About Flare Behaviours

    CERN Document Server

    Dal, H A

    2012-01-01

    We present two main results, based on the models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviours of the white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with the flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti type stars, we examine the behaviour of optical flare processes along the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data,to analyse the flare time-scales in respect to some results obtained from the X-ray observations. Using the SPSS V17.0 and the GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function and analysed with t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of the white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that the white-light flares behave in a similar way as th...

  2. Monitoring of FR Cnc Flaring Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Golovin, A; Pavlenko, E; Kuznyetsova, Yu; Krushevska, V; Sergeev, A

    2007-01-01

    Being excited by the detection of the first ever-observed optical flare in FR Cnc, we decided to continue photometrical monitoring of this object. The observations were carried out at Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (Crimea, Ukraine; CrAO - hereafter) and at the Terskol Observatory (Russia, Northern Caucasus). The obtained lightcurves are presented and discussed. No distinguishable flares were detected that could imply that flares on FR Cnc are very rare event.

  3. VERITAS Detection of γ-Ray Flaring Activity From the BL Lac Object 1ES 1727+502 During Bright Moonlight Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Bouvier, A.; Bugaev, V.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; Veritas Collaboration; Hughes, Z. D.

    2015-08-01

    During moonlit nights, observations with ground-based Cherenkov telescopes at very high energies (VHEs, E\\gt 100 GeV) are constrained since the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in the telescope camera are extremely sensitive to the background moonlight. Observations with the VERITAS telescopes in the standard configuration are performed only with a moon illumination less than 35% of full moon. Since 2012, the VERITAS collaboration has implemented a new observing mode under bright moonlight, by either reducing the voltage applied to the PMTs (reduced-high-voltage; RHV configuration), or by utilizing UV-transparent filters. While these operating modes result in lower sensitivity and increased energy thresholds, the extension of the available observing time is useful for monitoring variable sources such as blazars and sources requiring spectral measurements at the highest energies. In this paper we report the detection of γ-ray flaring activity from the BL Lac object 1ES 1727+502 during RHV observations. This detection represents the first evidence of VHE variability from this blazar. The integral flux is (1.1+/- 0.2)× {10}-11 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 above 250 GeV, which is about five times higher than the low-flux state. The detection triggered additional VERITAS observations during standard dark-time. Multiwavelength observations with the FLWO 48″ telescope, and the Swift and Fermi satellites are presented and used to produce the first spectral energy distribution (SED) of this object during γ-ray flaring activity. The SED is then fitted with a standard synchrotron-self-Compton model, placing constraints on the properties of the emitting region and of the acceleration mechanism at the origin of the relativistic particle population in the jet.

  4. Within the International Collaboration CHAIN: a Summary of Events Observed with Flare Monitoring Telescope (FMT) in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, J.; Asai, A.; Morita, S.; Terrazas, R.; Cabezas, D.; Gutierrez, V.; Martinez, L.; Buleje, Y.; Loayza, R.; Nakamura, N.; Takasao, S.; Yoshinaga, Y.; Hillier, A.; Otsuji, K.; Shibata, K.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ueno, S.; Kitai, R.; Ishii, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Nagata, S.; Narukage, N.

    2014-02-01

    In 2008 we inaugurated the new Solar Observatory in collaboration with Faculty of Sciences of San Luis Gonzaga de Ica National University, 300 km south of Lima. In March of 2010 a Flare Monitoring Telescope of Hida Observatory of Kyoto University arrived to Ica, part of CHAIN Project (Continuous H-alpha Imaging Network). In October of the same year we hosted the First FMT Workshop in Ica, then in July of 2011 the Second FMT Workshop was opened. Since that we are focused on two events registered by FMT in Peru to publish results. FMT is a good tool to introduce young people from universities into scientific knowledge; it is good also for education in Solar Physics and outreach. Details of this successful collaboration will be explained in this presentation.

  5. VLBI Observations of the Jet in M87 During the Very-High-Energy Gamma-ray Flare in April 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Hada, Kazuhiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Doi, Akihiro; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Honma, Mareki; Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, Gabriele; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    We report on the detailed radio status of the M87 jet during the Very-High-Energy (VHE) gamma-ray flaring event in April 2010, obtained from high-resolution, multi-frequency, phase-referencing VLBA observations. We especially focus on the properties for the jet base (the radio core) and the peculiar knot HST-1, which are currently favored as the gamma-ray emitting sites. During the VHE flaring event, the HST-1 region remains stable in terms of its structure and flux density in the optically thin regime above 2GHz, being consistent with no signs of enhanced activities reported at X-ray for this feature. The radio core shows an inverted spectrum at least up to 43GHz during this event. Astrometry of the core position, which is specified as ~20Rs from the central engine in our previous study, shows that the core position is stable on a level of 4Rs. The core at 43 and 22GHz tends to show slightly (~10%) higher flux level near the date of the VHE flux peak compared with the epochs before/after the event. The size ...

  6. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  7. X-ray Studies of Flaring Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Sylwester; J. Sylwester; K. J. H. Phillips

    2008-03-01

    We present some methods of X-ray data analysis employed in our laboratory for deducing the physical parameters of flaring plasma. For example, we have used a flare well observed with Polish instrument RESIK aboard Russian CORONAS-F satellite. Based on a careful instrument calibration, the absolute fluxes in a number of individual spectral lines have been obtained. The analysis of these lines allows us to follow the evolution of important thermodynamic parameters characterizing the emitting plasma throughout this flare evolution.

  8. Statistical and theoretical studies of flares from Sagittarius A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Q. Daniel; Chen, P. F.; Neilsen, Joseph; Fang, Taotao; Zhang, Shuo; Dexter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wavelength flares have routinely been observed from the supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), at our Galactic center. The nature of these flares remains largely unclear, despite many theoretical models. We study the statistical properties of the Sgr A* X-ray flares and find that they are consistent with the theoretical prediction of the self-organized criticality system with the spatial dimension S = 3. We suggest that the X-ray flares represent plasmoid ejections driven by magnetic reconnection (similar to solar flares) in the accretion flow onto the black hole. Motivated by the statistical results, we further develop a time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model for the multi-band flares from Sgr A* by analogy with models of solar flares/coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We calculate the X-ray, infrared flare light curves, and the spectra, and find that our model can explain the main features of the flares.

  9. A Statistical Approach to a Better Understanding of the Conditions that Produce White-Light Enhancements in Solar Flares Observed by Hinode/SOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Masuda, S.

    2015-12-01

    After Hinode was launched in 2006, the observing program designed to catch rare white-light (WL) events has steadily been improved. So we now have a large enough number of WL events to make a statistical study. To understand the conditions that produce enhancements of WL in solar flares, we performed a statistical analysis of Hinode/SOT WL data. From the analysis of data obtained between January 2011 and August 2013, we found that the precipitation of large amounts of accelerated electrons into a compact area within a short time plays a key role in generating a WL event (Kitagawa et al., submitted to ApJ). And we also found that the coronal magnetic field strength in the flare region is one of the important factors that can distinguish between WL and non-WL (NWL) events. In this paper, we present the results derived from a new statistical study from the observing period extended to December 2014. In this study, we use not only the Hinode/SOT WL (G-band, Blue, Green, Red) data, but we also SDO/HMI continuum data. The total number of events is now about two times larger than that of Kitagawa's previous study. We compared the white-light emission data with GOES soft X-rays, RHESSI hard X-rays and/or the strength of the photospheric magnetic fields, and investigated the relationships between many physical parameters. For example, from scatter plots of the start-to-peak time-scale in X-rays and the energy of nonthermal electrons, one can easily find a clear boundary between WL and NWL events. WL events show a relatively shorter time-scale among events with almost the same nonthermal energy. Most of the results in this study show the same characteristics as in the previous study, but they are more clearly seen thanks to the larger number of events. We also report some statistical results on WL and NWL events from Nobeyama Radio Heliograph (NoRH) and Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) data, which give information on the magnetic field of the flare loop.

  10. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q M; Ji, H S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) aboard SOHO.} {About 96 minutes before the onset of flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8$-$9 Mm) nearly kept constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fanlike ...

  11. The Giant Flare of 1998 August 27 from SGR 1900+14. I. An Interpretive Study of BeppoSAX and Ulysses Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feroci, M.; Hurley, K.; Duncan, R. C.; Thompson, C.

    2001-03-01

    The giant flare of 1998 August 27 from SGR 1900+14 was extraordinary in many ways: it was the most intense flux of gamma rays ever detected from a source outside our solar system; it was longer than any previously detected burst from a soft gamma repeater (SGR) in our Galaxy by more than an order of magnitude; and it showed a remarkable four-peaked, periodic pattern in hard X-rays with the same rotation period that was found modulating soft X-rays from the star in quiescence. The event was detected by several gamma-ray experiments in space, including the Ulysses gamma-ray burst detector and the BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor. These instruments operate in different energy ranges, and comparisons of their measurements reveal complex patterns of spectral evolution as the intensity varies. In this paper, we present a joint analysis of the BeppoSAX and Ulysses data and discuss some implications of these results for the SGRs. We also present newly analyzed Venera/SIGNE and ISEE-3 data on the 1979 March 5 giant flare from an SGR in the Large Magellanic Cloud (SGR 0526-66) and compare them with the August 27 event. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that giant flares are due to catastrophic magnetic instabilities in highly magnetized neutron stars, or ``magnetars.'' In particular, observations indicate that the initial hard spike involved a relativistic outflow of pairs and hard gamma rays, plausibly triggered by a large propagating fracture in the crust of a neutron star with a field exceeding 1014 G. Later stages in the light curve are accurately fitted by a model for emission from the envelope of a magnetically confined pair-photon fireball, anchored to the surface of the rotating star, which contracts as it emits X-rays and then evaporates completely in a finite time. The complex four-peaked shape of the light curve likely provides the most direct evidence known for a multipolar geometry in the magnetic field of a neutron star.

  12. Simultaneous Optical and X-ray Observations of Flares and Rotational Modulation on the RS CVn Binary HR 1099 (V711 Tau) from the MUSICOS 1998 Campaign

    CERN Document Server

    García-Álvarez, D; Montes, D; Oliveira, J M; Doyle, J G

    2003-01-01

    We present simultaneous and continuous observations of the H$\\alpha$, H$\\beta$, He {\\sc i} D$_{3}$, Na {\\sc i} D$_{1}$,D$_{2}$ doublet and the Ca {\\sc ii} H & K lines for the RS CVn system HR 1099. The spectroscopic observations were obtained during the MUSICOS 1998 campaign involving several observatories and instruments, both echelle and long-slit spectrographs. During this campaign, HR 1099 was observed almost continuously for more than 8 orbits of $2\\fd8$. Two large optical flares were observed, both showing an increase in the emission of H$\\alpha$, Ca {\\sc ii} H & K, H$\\beta$ and He {\\sc i} D$_{3}$ and a strong filling-in of the Na {\\sc i} D$_{1}$,D$_{2}$ doublet. {Contemporary photometric observations were carried out with the robotic telescopes APT-80 of Catania and Phoenix-25 of Fairborn Observatories. Maps of the distribution of the spotted regions on the photosphere of the binary components were derived using the Maximum Entropy and Tikhonov photometric regularization criteria}. Rotational m...

  13. The Origin of the Solar Flare Waiting-Time Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatland, M S

    2000-01-01

    It was recently pointed out that the distribution of times between solar flares (the flare waiting-time distribution) follows a power law, for long waiting times. Based on 25 years of soft X-ray flares observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) instruments it is shown that 1. the waiting-time distribution of flares is consistent with a time-dependent Poisson process, and 2. the fraction of time the Sun spends with different flaring rates approximately follows an exponential distribution. The second result is a new phenomenological law for flares. It is shown analytically how the observed power-law behavior of the waiting times originates in the exponential distribution of flaring rates. These results are argued to be consistent with a non-stationary avalanche model for flares.

  14. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Martinez-Oliveros, J. C., E-mail: wgfajardom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: oliveros@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  15. Global Properties of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh S

    2011-01-01

    This article broadly reviews our knowledge of solar flares. There is a particular focus on their global properties, as opposed to the microphysics such as that needed for magnetic reconnection or particle acceleration as such. Indeed solar flares will always remain in the domain of remote sensing, so we cannot observe the microscales directly and must understand the basic physics entirely via the global properties plus theoretical inference. The global observables include the general energetics -radiation in flares and mass loss in coronal mass ejections (CMEs) - and the formation of different kinds of ejection and global wave disturbance: the type II radio-burst exciter, the Moreton wave, the EIT "wave," and the "sunquake" acoustic waves in the solar interior. Flare radiation and CME kinetic energy can have comparable magnitudes, of order 10^32 erg each for an X-class event, with the bulk of the radiant energy in the visible-UV continuum. We argue that the impulsive phase of the flare dominates the energetic...

  16. Flares in the X-ray source EXO 2030 + 375

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apparao, Krishna M. V.

    1991-01-01

    Six X-ray flares were observed in the source EXO 2030 + 375 with an average time interval of about 4 hr between the flares. It is shown here that the flares can be due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities near the magnetospheric boundary of the neutron star when it reaches the equilibrium period.

  17. MWA targeted campaign of nearby, flaring M dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C.; Murphy, T.; Kaplan, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Flaring activity is a common characteristic of magnetically active stellar systems. Flare events produce emission throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, implying a range of physical processes. Early 100 - 200 MHz observations of M dwarf flare stars detected bright (>100 mJy) flares with occurrence rates between 0.06 - 0.8 flares per hour. These rates imply that observing 100 - 200 MHz flares from M dwarf stars is fairly easy with many detections expected for modern low-frequency telescopes. However, long observational campaigns using these modern telescopes have not reproduced these early detections. This could be because the rates are over estimated and contaminated by radio frequency interference. Recently Lynch et al. (submitted) detected four flares from UV Ceti at 154 MHz using the Murchison Widefield Array. The flares have flux densities between 10-65 mJy -- a factor of 100 fainter than most flares in the literature at these frequencies -- and are only detected in circular polarization. The flare rates for these newly detected flares are roughly consistent with earlier rates however the uncertainties are large. Building off this result we propose a 102 hour survey of the closet six M dwarf stars with observed magnetic activity traced in X-rays and 100 - 200 MHz emission. The rates measured from this survey would inform the duration required for future blind surveys for flares from M dwarf stars.

  18. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hebb, Leslie, E-mail: slhawley@uw.edu [Department of Physics, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  19. Analysis of the 9th November 1990 flare

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Joshi; Wahab Uddin

    2000-09-01

    In this paper we present complete two-dimensional measurements of the observed brightness of the 9th November 1990 flare, using a PDS microdensitometer scanner and image processing software MIDAS. The resulting isophotal contour maps, were used to describe morphological-cum-temporal behaviour of the flare and also the kernels of the flare. Correlation of the flare with SXR and MW radiations were also studied.

  20. Flare Ribbon Expansion and Energy Release

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ayumi Asai; Takaaki Yokoyama; Masumi Shimojo; Satoshi Masuda; Kazunari Shibata

    2006-06-01

    We report a detailed examination about the relationship between the evolution of the H flare ribbons and the released magnetic energy during the April 10 2001 flare. In the H images, several bright kernels are observed in the flare ribbons. We identified the conjugated footpoints, by analyzing the lightcurves at each H kernels, and showed their connectivities during the flare. Then, based on the magnetic reconnection model, we calculated quantitatively the released energy by using the photospheric magnetic field strengths and separation speeds of the H flare ribbons. Finally, we examined the downward motions which are observed at the H kernels. We found that the stronger the red-asymmetry tends to be associated with the brighter the H kernel.

  1. Chasing White-Light Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this memoir I describe my life in research, mostly in the area of solar physics. The recurring theme is "white-light flares," and several sections of this paper deal with this and related phenomena; I wind up describing how I see the state of the art in this still-interesting and crucially important (as it has been since 1859) area of flare research. I also describe my participation in two long-lived satellite programs dedicated to solar observations ( Yohkoh and RHESSI) and elaborate on their discoveries. These have both helped with white-light flares both directly and also with closely related X-ray and γ-ray emissions), with the result that this article leans heavily in that direction.

  2. EMISSION HEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-LIGHT EMISSION OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOT FROM THE 2012 JANUARY 27 X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimizu, Toshifumi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Masuda, Satoshi [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Ohno, Masanori, E-mail: watanabe.kyoko@isas.jaxa.jp [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8516 (Japan)

    2013-10-20

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 2012 January 27, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in the locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penetrated down to near the photosphere, and deposited heat into the ambient lower layers of the atmosphere.

  3. Emission Height and Temperature Distribution of White-Light Emission Observed by Hinode/SOT from the 2012 January 27 X-class Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Masuda, Satoshi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 27 January 2012, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penet...

  4. Whether solar flares can trigger earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R.

    2007-05-01

    We present the study of 682 earthquakes of ¡Ý4.0 magnitude observed during January 1991 to January 2007 in the light of solar flares observed by GOES and SOXS missions in order to explore the possibility of any association between solar flares and earthquakes. Our investigation preliminarily shows that each earthquake under study was preceded by a solar flare of GOES importance B to X class by 10-100 hrs. However, each flare was not found followed by earthquake of magnitude ¡Ý4.0. We classified the earthquake events with respect to their magnitude and further attempted to look for their correlation with GOES importance class and delay time. We found that with the increasing importance of flares the delay in the onset of earthquake reduces. The critical X-ray intensity of the flare to be associated with earthquake is found to be ~10-6 Watts/m2. On the other hand no clear evidence could be established that higher importance flares precede high magnitude earthquakes. Our detailed study of 50 earthquakes associated with solar flares observed by SOXS mission and other wavebands revealed many interesting results such as the location of the flare on the Sun and the delay time in the earthquake and its magnitude. We propose a model explaining the charged particles accelerated during the solar flare and released in the space that undergone further acceleration by interplanetary shocks and produce the ring current in the earth's magnetosphere, which may enhance the process of tectonics plates motion abruptly at fault zones. It is further proposed that such sudden enhancement in the process of tectonic motion of plates in fault zones may increase abruptly the heat gradients on spatial (dT/dx) and temporal (dT/dt) scales responsible for earthquakes.

  5. The local Poisson hypothesis for solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatland, M S

    2001-01-01

    The question of whether flares occur as a Poisson process has important consequences for flare physics. Recently Lepreti et al. presented evidence for local departure from Poisson statistics in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray flare catalog. Here it is argued that this effect arises from a selection effect inherent in the soft X-ray observations; namely that the slow decay of enhanced flux following a large flare makes detection of subsequent flares less likely. It is also shown that the power-law tail of the GOES waiting-time distribution varies with the solar cycle. This counts against any intrinsic significance to the appearance of a power law, or to the value of its index.

  6. Ultraviolet and radio flares from UX Arietis and HR 1099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of the RS CVn systems UX Ari and HR 1099 with the IUE satellite and the VLA are presented. Flaring activity is observed at ultraviolet wavelengths with the IUE when none is detected at radio wavelengths with the VLA. Radio flares with no detectable ultraviolet activity have also been observed. Thus, flares in the two spectral regions are either uncorrelated or weakly correlated. The flaring emission probably originates in different regions at the two wavelengths. Radio flares from RS CVn stars may originate in sources that are larger than, or comparable to, a star in size. This is in sharp contrast to compact, coherent radio flares from dwarf M stars. The ultraviolet flares from RS CVn stars probably originate in sources that are smaller than a component star.

  7. Flare emission from Sagittarius A*

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, A; Vogel, S N; Teuben, P; Morris, M R; Baganoff, F; Dexter, J; Schoedel, R; Witzel, G; Valencia-S., M; Karas, V; Kunneriath, D; Bremer, M; Straubmeier, C; Moser, L; Sabha, N; Buchholz, R; Zamaninasab, M; Muzic, K; Moultaka, J; Zensus, J A

    2012-01-01

    Based on Bremer et al. (2011) and Eckart et al. (2012) we report on simultaneous observations and modeling of the millimeter, near-infrared, and X-ray flare emission of the source Sagittarius A* (SgrA*) associated with the super-massive black hole at the Galactic Center. We study physical processes giving rise to the variable emission of SgrA* from the radio to the X-ray domain. To explain the statistics of the observed variability of the (sub-)mm spectrum of SgrA*, we use a sample of simultaneous NIR/X-ray flare peaks and model the flares using a synchrotron and SSC mechanism. The observations reveal flaring activity in all wavelength bands that can be modeled as the signal from adiabatically expanding synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) components. The model parameters suggest that either the adiabatically expanding source components have a bulk motion larger than v_exp or the expanding material contributes to a corona or disk, confined to the immediate surroundings of SgrA*. For the bulk of the synchrotron and ...

  8. Flare Characteristics from X-ray Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryciuk, M.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, J.; Gburek, S.; Podgorski, P.; Kepa, A.; Sylwester, B.; Mrozek, T.

    2017-06-01

    A new methodology is given to determine basic parameters of flares from their X-ray light curves. Algorithms are developed from the analysis of small X-ray flares occurring during the deep solar minimum of 2009, between Solar Cycles 23 and 24, observed by the Polish Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) on the Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun-Photon (CORONAS- Photon) spacecraft. One is a semi-automatic flare detection procedure that gives start, peak, and end times for single ("elementary") flare events under the assumption that the light curve is a simple convolution of a Gaussian and exponential decay functions. More complex flares with multiple peaks can generally be described by a sum of such elementary flares. Flare time profiles in the two energy ranges of SphinX (1.16 - 1.51 keV, 1.51 - 15 keV) are used to derive temperature and emission measure as a function of time during each flare. The result is a comprehensive catalogue - the SphinX Flare Catalogue - which contains 1600 flares or flare-like events and is made available for general use. The methods described here can be applied to observations made by Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and other broad-band spectrometers.

  9. A New Paradigm for Flare Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission and its spectra in solar flares is not well understood. Here, we propose a first-principle-based model of particle acceleration that produces energy spectra that closely resemble those derived from hard X-ray observations. Our mechanism uses contracting magnetic islands formed during fast reconnection in solar flares to accelerate electrons, as first proposed by Drake et al. (2006) for kinetic-scale plasmoids. We apply these ideas to MHD-scale islands formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model based on the particles’ adiabatic invariants is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting field lines in our ultrahigh-resolution, 2.5D, MHD numerical simulation of a solar eruption (flare + coronal mass ejection). Then, we analytically model electrons visiting multiple contracting islands to account for the observed high-energy flare emission. Our acceleration mechanism inherently produces sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each macroscopic island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare current sheet is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions. This work was supported in part by the NASA LWS and H-SR programs..

  10. VERITAS Observations of a Very High Energy Gamma-ray Flare from the Blazar 3C 66A

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Böttcher, M; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Butt, Y; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Chow, Y C; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Dickherber, R; Ergin, T; Falcone, A; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nagai, T; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Petry, D; Pizlo, F; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Toner, J A; Varlotta, A; Vasilev, V V; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2009-01-01

    The intermediate-frequency peaked BL Lacertae (IBL) object 3C 66A is detected during 2007 - 2008 in VHE (very high energy: E > 100 GeV) gamma-rays with the VERITAS stereoscopic array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. An excess of 1791 events is detected, corresponding to a significance of 21.2 standard deviations (sigma), in these observations (32.8 hours live time). The observed integral flux above 200 GeV is 6% of the Crab Nebula's flux and shows evidence for variability on the time-scale of days. The measured energy spectrum is characterized by a soft power law with photon index Gamma = 4.1 +- 0.4_stat +- 0.6_sys. The radio galaxy 3C 66B is excluded as a possible source of the VHE emission.

  11. MAGIC observation of an exceptional TeV gamma-ray flare in the active galaxy IC 310

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glawion, Dorit; Mannheim, Karl; Elsaesser, Dominik; Kadler, Matthias; Schulz, Robert [ITPA Wuerzburg (Germany); Sitarek, Julian [IFAE Barcelona (Spain); Ros, Eduardo; Bach, Uwe [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn (Germany); Krauss, Felicia; Wilms, Joern [ECAP Erlangen, Dr. Karl Remeis-Sternwarte, Bamberg (Germany); Collaboration: MAGIC-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The AGN IC 310 has been identified as a gamma-ray emitter based on observations at very high energies (VHE,E>100 GeV) with the MAGIC telescopes. Despite IC 310 having been classified as a radio galaxy with the jet observed at an angle>10 degrees, it exhibits a mixture of multiwavelength properties of a radio galaxy and a blazar, possibly making it a transitional object. On the night of 12/13th of November 2012 the MAGIC telescopes observed a series of strong outbursts from the direction of IC 310 with flux-doubling time scales faster than 5 min and a peculiar spectrum spreading over two orders of magnitude. Such fast variability constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole. In fact, the measurement challenges the shock acceleration models, commonly used in explanation of gamma-ray radiation from active galaxies. We show that this emission can be associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the jet.

  12. Line 400000 volts Marlenheim-Vigy: step of summary draft; Liaison 400000 volts marlenheim-vigy: etape d'avant projet sommaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The rebuilding of the line 225000 volts by a 400000 volts line, between Marlenheim and Vigy, will allow to reinforce energy exchanges between Alsace and Lorraine, to reassure the city of Strasbourg and at long dated, assure the european train TGV-east alimentation. (A.L.B.)

  13. Impulsivity Parameter for Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W G; Alvarado-Gómez, J D; Calvo-Mozo, B

    2016-01-01

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30-40 keV and 25-50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify...

  14. The Crab Nebula flaring activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Montani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery made by AGILE and Fermi of a short time scale flaring activity in the gamma-ray energy emission of the Crab Nebula is a puzzling and unexpected feature, challenging particle acceleration theory. In the present work we propose the shock-induced magnetic reconnection as a viable mechanism to explain the Crab flares. We postulate that the emitting region is located at ∼1015 cm from the central pulsar, well inside the termination shock, which is exactly the emitting region size as estimated by the overall duration of the phenomenon ∼1 day. We find that this location corresponds to the radial distance at which the shock-induced magnetic reconnection process is able to accelerate the electrons up to a Lorentz factor ∼109, as required by the spectral fit of the observed Crab flare spectrum. The main merit of the present analysis is to highlight the relation between the observational constraints to the flare emission and the radius at which the reconnection can trigger the required Lorentz factor. We also discuss different scenarios that can induce the reconnection. We conclude that the existence of a plasma instability affecting the wind itself as the Weibel instability is the privileged scenario in our framework.

  15. The Crab Nebula flaring activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montani, G., E-mail: giovanni.montani@frascati.enea.it [ENEA – C.R, UTFUS-MAG, via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “Sapienza”, p.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Bernardini, M.G. [INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2014-12-12

    The discovery made by AGILE and Fermi of a short time scale flaring activity in the gamma-ray energy emission of the Crab Nebula is a puzzling and unexpected feature, challenging particle acceleration theory. In the present work we propose the shock-induced magnetic reconnection as a viable mechanism to explain the Crab flares. We postulate that the emitting region is located at ∼10{sup 15} cm from the central pulsar, well inside the termination shock, which is exactly the emitting region size as estimated by the overall duration of the phenomenon ∼1 day. We find that this location corresponds to the radial distance at which the shock-induced magnetic reconnection process is able to accelerate the electrons up to a Lorentz factor ∼10{sup 9}, as required by the spectral fit of the observed Crab flare spectrum. The main merit of the present analysis is to highlight the relation between the observational constraints to the flare emission and the radius at which the reconnection can trigger the required Lorentz factor. We also discuss different scenarios that can induce the reconnection. We conclude that the existence of a plasma instability affecting the wind itself as the Weibel instability is the privileged scenario in our framework.

  16. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D. F.; Dominique, M.; Seaton, D.; Stegen, K.; White, A.

    2016-08-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) event list and Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are artificially steep and clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction. This means that PROBA2/LYRA should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However, it can be used to study variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  17. Advances In Understanding Solar And Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.

    2016-07-01

    Flares result from the sudden reconnection and relaxation of magnetic fields in the coronae of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. New high resolution data of solar flares have revealed the intrinsic spatial properties of the flaring chromosphere, which is thought to be where the majority of the flare energy is released as radiation in the optical and near-UV continua and emission lines. New data of stellar flares have revealed the detailed properties of the broadband (white-light) continuum emission, which provides straightforward constraints for models of the transformation of stored magnetic energy in the corona into thermal energy of the lower atmosphere. In this talk, we discuss the physical processes that produce several important spectral phenomena in the near-ultraviolet and optical as revealed from new radiative-hydrodynamic models of flares on the Sun and low mass stars. We present recent progress with high-flux nonthermal electron beams in reproducing the observed optical continuum color temperature of T 10,000 K and the Balmer jump properties in the near-ultraviolet. These beams produce dense, heated chromospheric condensations, which can explain the shape and strength of the continuum emission in M dwarf flares and the red-wing asymmetries in the chromospheric emission lines in recent observations of solar flares from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Current theoretical challenges and future modeling directions will be discussed, as well as observational synergies between solar and stellar flares.

  18. Fine structure of flare ribbons and evolution of electric currents

    CERN Document Server

    Sharykin, I N

    2014-01-01

    Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains the flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of C2.1 flare of August 15, 2013, observed with New Solar Telescope (NST) of Big Bear Solar Observatory, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), GOES and FERMI spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of the flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe red-blue asymmetry of H alpha flare ribbons with a width as small as 100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be r...

  19. The CME - Flare Relationship During The Present Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.; Mahrous, A.; Youssef, M.; Mawad, R.; El-Naway, M.

    The relation between the Coronal mass Ejection CME and the solar flare is statistically studied More than ten thousand CME events observed by SOHO LASCO during the period 1996-2005 have been analyzed The soft x-ray flux measurements provided by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite GEOS recorded more than twenty thousand flares in the same time period The data have been filtered under certain temporal and spatial conditions to select the CME-flare associated events The results show that the lift-off time of CME-flare associated events having a time interval within the range 0 4 sim 0 6 hour after the occurrence time of associated flares The CME events have been classified into a certain categories according to its energy E CME and the classes of the associated flares In addition we found a good linear correlation between the E CME and the x-ray flux of associated flare events

  20. Battery Test Manual For 48 Volt Mild Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Lee Kenneth [Idaho National Laboratory

    2017-03-01

    This manual details the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium and U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program goals, test methods, and analysis techniques for a 48 Volt Mild Hybrid Electric Vehicle system. The test methods are outlined stating with characterization tests, followed by life tests. The final section details standardized analysis techniques for 48 V systems that allow for the comparison of different programs that use this manual. An example test plan is included, along with guidance to filling in gap table numbers.

  1. Fermi-LAT and multi-wavelength observations of the flaring activity of PKS 1510-089 between September 2008 and June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Andrea; Massaro, Enrico

    We report on the MW observations of PKS 1510-089 (z=0.361) during a period of about 11 months, when the source exhibited a relevant evolution of its broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED), characterized by a complex variability both at Optical/UV and gamma-ray energies, with time scales detected down to the level of 6/12 hours. The brightest gamma-ray isotropic luminosity, recorded on 2009-03-26, was of about 2 x 1048 erg s-1 . The spectrum, in the Fermi-LAT energy range, shows a mild curvature well described by a log-parabolic law, and can be understood as signature of the Klein-Nishina effect. The gamma-ray flux has a complex correlation with the other wavelengths. There is no correlation at all with the X-ray band, a week correlation with the UV, and a relevant correlation with the optical flux. Moreover, the gamma-ray flux seems to lead the optical one of about 13 days. Using UV data we estimated a black hole mass of about 5.6 x 108 solar masses, and an accretion rate of about 0.5 solar masses/year. Although the power in the thermal and non-thermal outputs is smaller if compared to the very luminous and distant flat spectrum radio quasars (FSQR), PKS 1510-089 exhibits a quite large Compton dominance and prominent a big blue bump (BBB) signature, as observed in the most powerful gamma-ray quasars. This objects could be a representative of an aged FSQR, hence the analysis here presented is relevant in order to understand the evolution of these objects. We remark the puzzling feature of the BBB UV shape. Indeed, we note that the BBB was still prominent during the historical maximum optical state in May 2009, although the optical/UV spectral index was softer compared to that in quiescent state. This seems to be not fully compatible with a pure BBB emission, with the BBB supposed to be completely dominated by the synchrotron emission during the highest optical state. We model the broadband spectrum assuming a leptonic scenario in which the high energy bump is

  2. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  3. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  4. Multithread Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2006-01-01

    Past hydrodynamic simulations have been able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities characteristic of solar flares. These simulations, however, have not been able to account for the slow decay of the observed flare emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles. Recent work has suggested that modeling a flare as a sequence of independently heated threads instead of as a single loop may resolve the discrepancies between the simulations and observations. In this paper, we present a method for computing multithread, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares and apply it to observations of the Masuda flare of 1992 January 13. We show that it is possible to reproduce the temporal evolution of high temperature thermal flare plasma observed with the instruments on the GOES and Yohkoh satellites. The results from these simulations suggest that the heating timescale for a individual thread is on the order of 200 s. Significantly shorter heating timescales (20 s) lead to very high temperatures and are inconsistent with the emission observed by Yohkoh.

  5. Diurnal Variation of Anterior Chamber Flare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Adam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the ideal time and reproducibility of anterior chamber flare measurements. Materials and Methods: Anterior chamber flare measurements were performed with laser flaremetre device at 8 am to 45 volunteers and these measurements were repeated on the same day at 12 pm and 4 pm. Results: Twenty-five (55.5% of the volunteers were women and 20 (44.5% were men; mean age was 28.67±7.40 (18-49 years. The mean anterior chamber flare measurements taken following the ophthalmologic examination were 5.94±1.41 foton/msn at 8 am, 5.65±1.45 foton/msn at 12 pm, and 5.79±1.20 foton/msn at 4 pm. No statistical difference was found between the measurements (p=0.08. Subgroup analysis according to eye color, revealed no significant difference between flare measurements in brown, hazel, and green eyes (p=0.21. Correlation analysis demonstrated association between age and all flare measurements within the day (r=0.24, p=0.03; r=0.41, p=0.01, r=0.27, p=0.01. Conclusion: No significant diurnal change was detected in the flare measurements of our study subjects but positive correlation with age was observed. Hence, all flare measurements within a day are reliable and have high repeatability in healthy subjects. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 52-5

  6. The brightest gamma-ray flaring blazar in the sky: AGILE and multi-wavelength observations of 3C 454.3 during November 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Donnarumma, I; Pacciani, L; Pucella, G; Tavani, M; Raiteri, C M; Villata, M; Romano, P; Fiocchi, M; Bazzano, A; Bianchin, V; Ferrigno, C; Maraschi, L; Pian, E; Türler, M; Ubertini, P; Bulgarelli, A; Chen, A W; Giuliani, A; Longo, F; Barbiellini, G; Cardillo, M; Cattaneo, P W; Del Monte, E; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fuschino, F; Gianotti, F; Giusti, M; Lazzarotto, F; Pellizzoni, A; Piano, G; Pilia, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Giommi, P; Lucarelli, F; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Agudo, I; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Arkharov, A A; Bach, U; Berdyugin, A; Borman, G A; Chigladze, R; Efimov, Yu S; Efimova, N V; Gómez, J L; Gurwell, M A; McHardy, I M; Joshi, M; Kimeridze, G N; Krajci, T; Kurtanidze, O M; Kurtanidze, S O; Larionov, V M; Lindfors, E; Molina, S N; Morozova, D A; Nazarov, S V; Nikolashvili, M G; Nilsson, K; Pasanen, M; Reinthal, R; Ros, J A; Sadun, A C; Sakamoto, T; Sallum, S; Sergeev, S G; Schwartz, R D; Sigua, L A; Sillanpää, A; Sokolovsky, K V; Strelnitski, V; Takalo, L; Taylor, B; Walker, G

    2011-01-01

    Since 2005, the blazar 3C 454.3 has shown remarkable flaring activity at all frequencies, and during the last four years it has exhibited more than one gamma-ray flare per year, becoming the most active gamma-ray blazar in the sky. We present for the first time the multi-wavelength AGILE, SWIFT, INTEGRAL, and GASP-WEBT data collected in order to explain the extraordinary gamma-ray flare of 3C 454.3 which occurred in November 2010. On 2010 November 20 (MJD 55520), 3C 454.3 reached a peak flux (E>100 MeV) of F_gamma(p) = (6.8+-1.0)E-5 ph/cm2/s on a time scale of about 12 hours, more than a factor of 6 higher than the flux of the brightest steady gamma-ray source, the Vela pulsar, and more than a factor of 3 brighter than its previous super-flare on 2009 December 2-3. The multi-wavelength data make a thorough study of the present event possible: the comparison with the previous outbursts indicates a close similarity to the one that occurred in 2009. By comparing the broadband emission before, during, and after t...

  7. Active Longitude and Solar Flare Occurrences

    CERN Document Server

    Gyenge, N; Baranyi, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to specify the spatio-temporal characteristics of flare activity observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) satellites in connection with the behaviour of the longitudinal domain of enhanced sunspot activity known as active longitude (AL). By using our method developed for this purpose, we identified the AL in every Carrington Rotation provided by the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD). The spatial probability of flare occurrence has been estimated depending on the longitudinal distance from AL in the northern and southern hemispheres separately. We have found that more than the 60\\% of the RHESSI and GOES flares is located within $\\pm 36^{\\circ}$ from the active longitude. Hence, the most flare-productive active regions tend to be located in or close to the active longitudinal belt. This observed feature may allow predicting the geo-effective position of the domain of enhanced fla...

  8. Solar Flare Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George

    2012-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the dynamics and diagnostics of solar magnetic fields and plasmas in the Sun’s atmosphere. Five broad areas of current research in Solar Physics are presented: (1) New techniques for incorporating radiation transfer effects into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar interior and atmosphere, (2) The connection between observed radiation processes occurring during flares and the underlying flare energy release and transport mechanisms, (3) The global balance of forces and momenta that occur during flares, (4) The data-analysis and theoretical tools needed to understand and assimilate vector magnetogram observations and (5) Connecting flare and CME phenomena to the topological properties of the magnetic field in the Solar Atmosphere. The role of the Sun’s magnetic field is a major emphasis of this book, which was inspired by a workshop honoring Richard C. (Dick) Canfield.  Dick has been making profound contributions to these areas of research over a long and pro...

  9. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2008-03-01

    Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors capable of observing the full disk Sun in X-ray energy range of 4–56 keV. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the Si detector in the 4–25 keV range show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. The evolution of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes reveals increase with increasing flare plasma temperature. Small scale flare activities observed by both the detectors are found to be suitable to heat the active region corona; however their location appears to be in the transition region.

  10. Impulse Volt-Time Characteristics of Oil and OIP Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Venkatesan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of insulation strength of transformer oil and Oil Impregnated Paper (OIP insulation, which constitutes major portion of insulation in power transformer, is an important task. Also, it is often necessary to evaluate the breakdown strength of oil and OIP under non-standard impulse voltages, since the oil and OIP insulation is subjected to non-standard waveshapes between inter-disc and inter-turn insulation. This necessitates for a generalized model to estimate the insulation strength of it. In this study impulse strength of transformer oil and OIP insulation have been extensively analysed for very small electrode gap distances ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 mm, which represents the inter-turn and inter-disc thickness of the insulation. The statistical mean volt-time characteristics for uniform and highly non-uniform electrode configurations are obtained experimentally for few gap distances. A Hyperbolic model is developed based on the Disruptive Effect (DE model parameters, namely onset voltage (Uo and Critical Disruptive Effect Area (DE * to predict the volt-time characteristics. The DE parameters are also utilised to predict the impulse breakdown characteristics of oil and OIP under non-standard impulse voltages of standard and unidirectional oscillatory impulse waveshapes for all the gap distances and the errors are found to be less than 10%.

  11. Multi-wavelength view of an M2.2 Solar Flare on 26 November 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, R; Rani, S; Maurya, R A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a study of an M2.2 class solar flare of 26 November 2000 from NOAA AR 9236. The flare was well observed by various ground based observatories (ARIES, Learmonths Solar Observatory) and space borne instruments (SOHO, HXRS, GOES) in time interval between 02:30 UT to 04:00 UT. The flare started with long arc-shape outer flare ribbon. Afterwards the main flare starts with two main ribbons. Initially the outer ribbons start to expand with an average speed ($\\sim$ 20 km s$^{-1}$) and later it shows contraction. The flare was associated with partial halo coronal mass ejection (CMEs) which has average speed of 495 km s$^{-1}$. The SOHO/MDI observations show that the active region was in quadrupolar magnetic configuration. The flux cancellation was observed before the flare onset close to flare site. Our analysis indicate the flare was initiated by the magnetic breakout mechanism.

  12. Multi-wavelength view of an M2.2 solar flare on 26 november 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, R.; Verma, V. K.; Rani, S.; Maurya, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present a study of an M2.2 class solar flare of 26 November 2000 from NOAA AR 9236. The flare was well observed by various ground based observatories (ARIES, Learmonths Solar Observatory) and space borne instruments (SOHO, HXRS, GOES) in time interval between 02:30 UT to 04:00 UT. The flare started with long arc-shape outer flare ribbon. Afterwards the main flare starts with two main ribbons. Initially the outer ribbons start to expand with an average speed (∼20 km s-1) and later it shows contraction. The flare was associated with partial halo coronal mass ejection (CMEs) which has average speed of 495 km s-1. The SOHO/MDI observations show that the active region was in quadrupolar magnetic configuration. The flux cancellation was observed before the flare onset close to flare site. Our analysis indicate the flare was initiated by the magnetic breakout mechanism.

  13. Fast variability of tera-electron volt gamma rays from the radio galaxy M87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brown, A M; Bühler, R; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L-M; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Drury, L O'c; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Ferrero, E; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Füssling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khélifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J-P; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moulin, E; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Saugé, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schröder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Spanier, F; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M

    2006-12-01

    The detection of fast variations of the tera-electron volt (TeV) (10(12) eV) gamma-ray flux, on time scales of days, from the nearby radio galaxy M87 is reported. These variations are about 10 times as fast as those observed in any other wave band and imply a very compact emission region with a dimension similar to the Schwarzschild radius of the central black hole. We thus can exclude several other sites and processes of the gamma-ray production. The observations confirm that TeV gamma rays are emitted by extragalactic sources other than blazars, where jets are not relativistically beamed toward the observer.

  14. Prácticas de Física: Resistencia de un voltímetro

    OpenAIRE

    Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto; Bernabeu Pastor, José Guillermo; Vera Guarinos, Jenaro; Pastor Antón, Carlos; Martín García, Agapito

    1988-01-01

    El objetivo de esta práctica es determinar la resistencia interna de un voltímetro. Para ello se utilizan varias resistencias de valor conocido. El voltímetro es un aparato que sirve para medir la diferencia de potencial entre dos puntos de un circuito. Los voltímetros de aguja se basan en el mismo principio que el amperímetro de aguja, pues ambos se pueden construir mediante un galvanómetro de cuadro móvil, pero en el caso del voltímetro se monta en serie con el galvanómetro una resistencia ...

  15. Tähenduslik vorm ja esteetiline emotsioon : formalism analüütilises perspektiivis / Marek Volt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Volt, Marek

    2004-01-01

    Inglise kunstikriitiku Clive Belli (1881-1964) seisukohtadest raamatus "Kunst", mida peetakse formalismi teoreetiliseks õigustuseks. Ilmunud ka raamatus: Volt, Marek. Esteetikast. Tallinn : Sirp, 2006

  16. Tähenduslik vorm ja esteetiline emotsioon : formalism analüütilises perspektiivis / Marek Volt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Volt, Marek

    2004-01-01

    Inglise kunstikriitiku Clive Belli (1881-1964) seisukohtadest raamatus "Kunst", mida peetakse formalismi teoreetiliseks õigustuseks. Ilmunud ka raamatus: Volt, Marek. Esteetikast. Tallinn : Sirp, 2006

  17. Central Africa Energy: Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Explore Flared Gas as an Energy Source Alternative to Biomass in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amber; White, Charles; Castillo, Christopher; Hitimana, Emmanuel; Nguyen, Kenny; Mishra, Shikher; Clark, Walt

    2014-01-01

    Much of Central Africa's economy is centered on oil production. Oil deposits lie below vast amounts of compressed natural gas. The latter is often flared off during oil extraction due to a lack of the infrastructure needed to utilize it for productive energy generation. Though gas flaring is discouraged by many due to its contributions to greenhouse emissions, it represents a waste process and is rarely tracked or recorded in this region. In contrast to this energy waste, roughly 80% of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and in turn uses biomass such as wood for heat and light. In addition to the dangers incurred from collecting and using biomass, the practice commonly leads to ecological change through the acquisition of wood from forests surrounding urban areas. The objective of this project was to gain insight on domestic energy usage in Central Africa, specifically Angola, Gabon, and the Republic of Congo. This was done through an analysis of deforestation, an estimation of gas flared, and a suitability study for the infrastructure needed to realize the natural gas resources. The energy from potential natural gas production was compared to the energy equivalent of the biomass being harvested. A site suitability study for natural gas pipeline routes from flare sites to populous locations was conducted to assess the feasibility of utilizing natural gas for domestic energy needs. Analyses and results were shared with project partners, as well as this project's open source approach to assessing the energy sector. Ultimately, Africa's growth demands energy for its people, and natural gas is already being produced by the flourishing petroleum industry in numerous African countries. By utilizing this gas, Africa could reduce flaring, recuperate the financial and environmental loss that flaring accounts for, and unlock a plentiful domestic energy source for its people. II. Introduction Background Africa is home to numerous burgeoning economies; a

  18. Magnetic Fields in Limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozitsky, V. G.; Lozitska, N. I.; Botygina, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    Two limb solar flares, of 14 July 2005 and 19 July 2012, of importance X1.2 and M7.7, are analyzed at present work. Magnetic field strength in named flares are investigated by Stokes I±V profiles of Hα and D3 HeI lines. There are direct evidences to the magnetic field inhomogeneity in flares, in particular, non-paralelism of bisectors in I+V and I-V profiles. In some flare places, the local maximums of bisectors splitting were found in both lines. If these bisector splittings are interpreted as Zeeman effect manifestation, the following magnetic field strengths reach up to 2200 G in Hα and 1300 G in D3. According to calculations, the observed peculiarities of line profiles may indicate the existence of optically thick emissive small-scale elements with strong magnetic fields and lowered temperature.

  19. Nuclear processes and neutrino production in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of flare neutrino flux is approached from the standpoint of recent observations and theoretical results on the nuclear processes in solar flares. Attention is given to the energy spectra and total numbers of accelerated particles in flares, as well as their resulting production of beta(+)-emitting radionuclei and pions; these should be the primary sources of neutrinos. The observed 0.511 MeV line flux for the June 21, 1980 flare is compared with the expected from the number and spectrum of accelerated particles.

  20. Analysis of Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is one of the key processes of solar flares. Properties of chromospheric evaporation are thought to be closely connected to the energy release rates and energy transport mechanisms. Previous investigations revealed that in addition to electron-beam heating the chromospheric evaporation can be driven by heat fluxes and, probably, by other mechanisms. In this work, we present a study of flare events simultaneously observed by IRIS, SDO and RHESSI, focusing on spatio-temporal characteristics of the flare dynamics and its relation to the magnetic field topology. Event selection is performed using the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF) recently developed by the Center for Computational Heliophysics (CCH) at NJIT. The selection of IRIS observations was restricted to the fast-scanning regimes (coarse-raster or sparse-raster modes with ≥ 4 slit positions, ≥ 6`` spatial coverage, and ≤ 60 sec loop time). We have chosen 14 events, and estimated the spatially-resolved intensities and Doppler shifts of the chromospheric (Mg II), transition region (C II) and hot coronal (Fe XXI) lines reflecting the dynamics of the chromospheric evaporation. The correlations among the derived line profile properties, flare morphology, magnetic topology and hard X-ray characteristics will be presented, and compared with the RADYN flare models and other scenarios of chromospheric evaporations.

  1. LC/MS bestemmelse af aminosyrer med 0 volts elektrospray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budde Sørensen, Morten; Aaslo, Per Hersom; Egsgaard, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Vi har udviklet en LC/ESI-MS3 metode til at adskille og detektere D- og L-asparaginsyre (Asp) for at kunne bestemme alderen af pattedyrs tænder. Under metodeudviklingen blev vi overrasket ved at opdage, at en spænding på elektrospray nålen på 0 V gav en 40 gange forbedring i signal støjforholdet...... med en detektionsgrænse på 0.2 ng for asparaginsyre til følge. Dannelsen af gasfaseioner ved 0-volts ESI metoden foregår formentlig på samme måde som ved sonic spray ionisering (SSI)....

  2. H$\\mathbf{\\alpha}$ Intensity Oscillations in Large Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Ajor Maurya; Ashok Ambastha

    2008-03-01

    We reinvestigate the problem of Hα intensity oscillations in large flares, particularly those classified as X-class flares. We have used high spatial and temporal resolution digital observations obtained from Udaipur Solar Observatory during the period 1998–2006 and selected several events. Normalized Lomb–Scargle periodogram method for spectral analysis was used to study the oscillatory power in quiet and active chromospheric locations, including the flare ribbons.

  3. The Study of Flare Stars in Byurakan Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikian, N. D.

    2016-09-01

    A brief description of the observations and the study of flare stars in Byurakan observatory is presented. In particular it is shown that there is a real dependence between flare activity and the distance between components of UV Ceti. The spectral study of a flare on WX Uma indicated on strong influence of the continuous emission, which is operated from 6000Å and rapidly growing to the short wavelength.

  4. High Energy Neutrinos from Recent Blazar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    The energy density of cosmic neutrinos measured by IceCube matches the one observed by Fermi in extragalactic photons that predominantly originate in blazars. This has inspired attempts to match Fermi sources with IceCube neutrinos. A spatial association combined with a coincidence in time with a flaring source may represent a smoking gun for the origin of the IceCube flux. In June 2015, the Fermi Large Area Telescope observed an intense flare from blazar 3C 279 that exceeded the steady flux of the source by a factor of forty for the duration of a day. We show that IceCube is likely to observe neutrinos, if indeed hadronic in origin, in data that are still blinded at this time. We also discuss other opportunities for coincident observations that include a recent flare from blazar 1ES 1959+650 that previously produced an intriguing coincidence with AMANDA observations.

  5. 33 CFR 183.435 - Conductors in circuits of 50 volts or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conductors in circuits of 50... Requirements § 183.435 Conductors in circuits of 50 volts or more. (a) Each conductor in a circuit that has a nominal voltage of 50 volts or more must be: (1) A conductor that has insulation listed and...

  6. X-ray Emission Characteristics of Flares Associated with CMEs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malini Aggarwal; Rajmal Jain; A. P. Mishra; P. G. Kulkarni; Chintan Vyas; R. Sharma; Meera Gupta

    2008-03-01

    We present the study of 20 solar flares observed by ``Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)” mission during November 2003 to December 2006 and found associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) seen by LASCO/SOHO mission. In this investigation, X-ray emission characteristics of solar flares and their relationship with the dynamics of CMEs have been presented.We found that the fast moving CMEs, i.e., positive acceleration are better associated with short rise time (< 150 s) flares. However, the velocity of CMEs increases as a function of duration of the flares in both 4.1–10 and 10–20 keV bands. This indicates that the possibility of association of CMEs with larger speeds exists with long duration flare events. We observed that CMEs decelerate with increasing rise time, decay time and duration of the associated X-ray flares. A total 10 out of 20 CMEs under current investigation showed positive acceleration, and 5 of them whose speed did not exceed 589 km/s were associated with short rise time (< 150 s) and short duration (< 1300 s) flares. The other 5 CMEs were associated with long duration or large rise time flare events. The unusual feature of all these positive accelerating CMEs was their low linear speed ranging between 176 and 775 km/s. We do not find any significant correlation between X-ray peak intensity of the flares with linear speed as well as acceleration of the associated CMEs. Based on the onset time of flares and associated CMEs within the observing cadence of CMEs by LASCO, we found that in 16 cases CME preceded the flare by 23 to 1786 s, while in 4 cases flare occurred before the CME by 47 to 685 s. We argue that both events are closely associated with each other and are integral parts of one energy release system.

  7. Investigation of the Relationship between Solar Flares and Sunspot Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, S.; Kilcik, A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the relationship between X-Ray flare numbers (C, M, and, X class flares) and sunspot counts in four categories (Simple (A + B), Medium (C), Large (D + E + F), and End (H)). All data sets cover the whole Solar Cycle 23 and the ascending and maximum phases of Cycle 24 (1996-2014). Pearson correlation analysis method was used to investigate the degree of relationship between monthly solar flare numbers and sunspot counts observed in different sunspot categories. We found that the C, M, and X class flares have highest correlation with the large group sunspot counts, while the small category does not any meaningful correlation. Obtained correlation coefficients between large groups and C, M, and X class flare numbers are 0.79, 0.74, and 0.4, respectively. Thus, we conclude that the main sources of X-Ray solar flares are the complex/large sunspot groups.

  8. CME-flare association during the 23rd solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrous, A.; Shaltout, M.; Beheary, M. M.; Mawad, R.; Youssef, M.

    2009-04-01

    The relation between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are statistically studied. More than 10,000 CME events observed by SOHO/LASCO during the period 1996-2005 have been analyzed. The soft X-ray flux measurements provided by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), recorded more than 20,000 flares in the same time period. The data is filtered under certain temporal and spatial conditions to select the CME-flare associated events. The results show that CME-flare associated events are triggered with a lift-off time within the range 0.4-1.0 h. We list a set of 41 CME-flare associated events satisfying the temporal and spatial conditions. The listed events show a good correlation between the CME energy and the X-ray flux of the CME-flare associated events with correlation coefficient of 0.76.

  9. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  10. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  11. A Database of Flare Ribbon Properties From Solar Dynamics Observatory: Reconnection Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Welsch, Brian; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Sun, Xudong

    2017-08-01

    We present a database of 3137 solar flare ribbon events corresponding to every flare of GOES class C1.0 and greater within 45 degrees from the disk center, from April 2010 until April 2016, observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. For every event in the database, we compare the GOES peak X-ray flux with corresponding active-region and flare-ribbon properties. We find that while the peak X-ray flux is not correlated with the AR unsigned magnetic flux, it is strongly correlated with the flare ribbon reconnection flux, flare ribbon area, and the fraction of active region flux that undergoes reconnection. We find the relationship between the peak X-ray flux and the flare ribbon reconnection flux to be I_{X,peak} ~ \\Phi_{ribbon}^{1.3} for flares >M1 and I_{X,peak} ~ \\Phi_{ribbon}^{1.5} over the entire flare set (>C1). This scaling law is consistent with earlier hydrodynamic simulations of impulsively heated flare loops. Using the flare reconnection flux as a proxy for the total released flare energy E, we find that the occurrence frequency of flare energies follows a power-law dependence: dN/dE ~ E^{-1.6} for E within 10^{31} to 10^{33} erg, consistent with earlier studies of solar and stellar flares. This database is available online and can be used for future quantitative studies of flares.

  12. Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Nita, Gelu M.; Oria, Vincent; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares represent a complicated physical phenomenon observed in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radiowaves to gamma-rays. For a complete understanding of the flares it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For efficient data search, integration of different flare lists and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely-identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and availability of observations of a particular set of instruments. Currently, data from three primary flare lists (GOES, RHESSI and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-Wind, OVSA flare catalogs, CACTus CME catalog, Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage), are integrated. An additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) along with observing summary, data links and multi-wavelength light curves is provided for each flare event since January 2002. Results of an initial statistical analysis will be presented.

  13. An Interactive Multi-instrument Database of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Oria, Vincent; Nita, Gelu M.

    2017-07-01

    Solar flares are complicated physical phenomena that are observable in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ-rays. For a more comprehensive understanding of flares, it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For an efficient data search, integration of different flare lists, and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF, https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web-accessible database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and the availability of observations by a particular set of instruments. Currently, the data from three primary flare lists (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, RHESSI, and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-W IND, the OVSA flare catalogs, the CACTus CME catalog, the Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage) are integrated, and an additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) is provided along with an observing summary, data links, and multi-wavelength light curves for each flare event since 2002 January. We envision that this new tool will allow researchers to significantly speed up the search of events of interest for statistical and case studies.

  14. Spectral Hardening and Geoeffectiveness of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R.; Kumar, S.; Dave, H.; Deshpande, M. R.

    We present the results of a few typical flares that observed by the first space borne solar astronomy experiment of India namely "Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)" mission, which has completed one year of its successful operation in geostationary orbit. The SOXS mission onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft was launched successfully by GSLV-D2 rocket on 08 May 2003 to study the energy release and particle acceleration in solar flares. The SOXS is composed of two independent payloads viz. SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload, and SOXS High Energy Detector (SHD) payload. We restrict our presentation to SLD payload that designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in collaboration with Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). We briefly present the scientific objectives and instrumentation of the SLD payload. The SLD payload employs the state-of-art solid state detectors viz. Si PIN and CZT detectors, which reveal sub-keV spectral and 100ms temporal resolution characteristics that are necessary to study the spectral response of the flare components. The dynamic range of Si and CZT detectors is 4-25 and 4-56 keV respectively. The SLD has observed more than 140 flares of C and M class since its commissioning in the orbit. We present the X-ray emission characteristics of a few typical flares in view of their spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. We extend our study of these flares to optical and radio waveband observations in order to improve the relationship of X-ray spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. The flares with harder spectra and associated with small or large CME, and radio emission at frequencies above 10 GHz are found geo-effective.

  15. White-light flares on cool stars in the Kepler Quarter 1 Data

    CERN Document Server

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Batalha, Natalie; Gilliland, Ronald L; Jenkins, Jon; Borucki, William J; Koch, David; Caldwell, Doug; Dupree, Andrea K; Latham, David W; Meibom, Soeren; Howell, Steve; Brown, Tim; Bryson, Steve

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a search for white light flares on the ~23,000 cool dwarfs in the Kepler Quarter 1 long cadence data. We have identified 373 flaring stars, some of which flare multiple times during the observation period. We calculate relative flare energies, flare rates and durations, and compare these with the quiescent photometric variability of our sample. We find that M dwarfs tend to flare more frequently but for shorter durations than K dwarfs, and that they emit more energy relative to their quiescent luminosity in a given flare than K dwarfs. Stars that are more photometrically variable in quiescence tend to emit relatively more energy during flares, but variability is only weakly correlated with flare frequency. We estimate distances for our sample of flare stars and find that the flaring fraction agrees well with other observations of flare statistics for stars within 300 pc above the Galactic Plane. These observations provide a more rounded view of stellar flares by sampling stars that h...

  16. GRB Flares: A New Detection Algorithm, Previously Undetected Flares, and Implications on GRB Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, C A

    2013-01-01

    Flares in GRB light curves have been observed since shortly after the discovery of the first GRB afterglow. However, it was not until the launch of the Swift satellite that it was realized how common flares are, appearing in nearly 50% of all X-ray afterglows as observed by the XRT instrument. The majority of these observed X-ray flares are easily distinguishable by eye and have been measured to have up to as much fluence as the original prompt emission. Through studying large numbers of these X-ray flares it has been determined that they likely result from a distinct emission source different than that powering the GRB afterglow. These findings could be confirmed if similar results were found using flares in other energy ranges. However, until now, the UVOT instrument on Swift seemed to have observed far fewer flares in the UV/optical than were seen in the X-ray. This was primarily due to poor sampling and data being spread across multiple filters, but a new optimal co-addition and normalization of the UVOT ...

  17. Modeling High Resolution Flare Spectra Using Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry; Doschek, G.

    2006-06-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic response of the solar atmosphere to the release of energy during a flare has been a long standing problem in solar physics. Early time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations were able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities observed in solar flares, but were not able to model the observations in any detail. For example, these simulations could not account for the relatively slow decay of the observed emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles at flare onset. We have found that by representing the flare as a succession of independently heated filaments it is possible to reproduce both the evolution of line intensity and the shape of the line profile using hydrodynamic simulations. Here we present detailed comparisons between our simulation results and several flares observed with the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). Comparisons with 3D MHD simulations will also be discussed.

  18. Rapid Variability of Blazar 3C 279 during Flaring States in 2013-2014 with Joint Fermi-LAT, NuSTAR, Swift, and Ground-Based Multi-wavelength Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashida, M; Madejski, G M; Sikora, M; Itoh, R; Ajello, M; Blandford, R D; Buson, S; Chiang, J; Fukazawa, Y; Furniss, A K; Urry, C M; Hasan, I; Harrison, F A; Alexander, D M; Baloković, M; Barret, D; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Forster, K; Giommi, P; Grefenstette, B; Hailey, C; Hornstrup, A; Kitaguchi, T; Koglin, J E; Madsen, K K; Mao, P H; Miyasaka, H; Mori, K; Perri, M; Pivovaroff, M J; Puccetti, S; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tagliaferri, G; Westergaard, N J; Zhang, W W; Zoglauer, A; Gurwell, M A; Uemura, M; Akitaya, H; Kawabata, K S; Kawaguch, K; Kanda, Y; Moritani, Y; Takaki, K; Ui, T; Yoshida, M; Agarwal, A; Gupta, A C

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a multi-band observing campaign on the famous blazer 3C 279 conducted during a phase of increased activity from 2013 December to 2014 April, including first observations of it with NuSTAR. The $\\gamma$-ray emission of the source measured by Fermi-LAT showed multiple distinct flares reaching the highest flux level measured in this object since the beginning of the Fermi mission, with $F(E > 100\\,{\\rm MeV})$ of $10^{-5}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, and with a flux doubling time scale as short as 2 hours. The $\\gamma$-ray spectrum during one of the flares was very hard, with an index of $\\Gamma_\\gamma = 1.7 \\pm 0.1$, which is rarely seen in flat spectrum radio quasars. The lack of concurrent optical variability implies a very high Compton dominance parameter $L_\\gamma/L_{\\rm syn} > 300$. Two 1-day NuSTAR observations with accompanying Swift pointings were separated by 2 weeks, probing different levels of source activity. While the 0.5$-$70 keV X-ray spectrum obtained during the first poi...

  19. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias ($f$). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is $...

  20. Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements during the X2.6 flare on 2005 January 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Wang, Jing-Xiu; Matthews, Sarah; Ming-DeDing; Zhao, Hui; Jin, Chun-Lan

    2009-07-01

    Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements which were manifested as apparent polarity reversal in magnetograms have been reported since 1981. We are motivated to further quantify the phenomenon by asking two questions: can we distinguish the flare-induced signals from real magnetic changes during flares, and what we can learn about flare energy release from the flare-induced signals? We select the X2.6 flare that occurred on 2005 January 15, for further study. The flare took place in NOAA active region (AR) 10720 at approximately the central meridian, which makes the interpretation of the vector magnetograms less ambiguous. We have identified that flare-induced signals during this flare appeared in six zones. The zones are located within an average distance of 5 Mm from their weight center to the main magnetic neutral line, have an average size of (0.6±0.4)×1017 cm2, duration of 13±4 min, and flux density change of 181±125 G in the area of reversed polarity. The following new facts have been revealed by this study: (1) the flare-induced signal is also seen in the transverse magnetograms but with smaller magnitude, e.g., about 50 G; (2) the flare-induced signal mainly manifests itself as apparent polarity reversal, but the signal starts and ends as a weakening of flux density; (3) The flare-induced signals appear in phase with the peaks of hard X-ray emission as observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and mostly trace the position of RHESSI hard X-ray footpoint sources. (4) in four zones, it takes place co-temporally with real magnetic changes which persist after the flare. Only for the other two zones does the flux density recover to the pre-flare level immediately after the flare. The physical implications of the flare-induced signal are discussed in view of its relevance to the non-thermal electron precipitation and primary energy release in the flare.

  1. Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements during the X2.6 flare on 2005 January 15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Zhao; Jing-Xiu Wang; Sarah Matthews; Ming-De Ding; Hui Zhao; Chun-Lan Jin

    2009-01-01

    Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements which were manifested as apparent polarity reversal in magnetograms have been reported since 1981. We are motivated to further quantify the phenomenon by asking two questions: can we distinguish the flare-induced signals from real magnetic changes during flares, and what we can learn about flare energy release from the flare-induced signals? We select the X2.6 flare that occurred on 2005 January 15, for further study. The flare took place in NOAA active re-gion (AR) 10720 at approximately the central meridian, which makes the interpretation of the vector magnetograms less ambiguous. We have identified that flare-induced signals during this flare appeared in six zones. The zones are located within an average distance of 5 Mm from their weight center to the main magnetic neutral line, have an average size of (0.6±0.4)×1017 cm2, duration of 13±4 min, and flux density change of 181±125 G in the area of reversed polarity. The following new facts have been revealed by this study: (1) the flare-induced signal is also seen in the transverse magnetograms but with smaller magnitude, e.g., about 50 G; (2) the flare-induced signal mainly manifests itself as apparent polarity reversal, but the signal starts and ends as a weakening of flux density; (3) The flare-induced signals appear in phase with the peaks of hard X-ray emission as observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic lmager (RHESSI), and mostly trace the position of RHESSI hard X-ray footpoint sources. (4) in four zones, it takes place cotemporally with real magnetic changes which persist after the flare. Only for the other two zones does the flux density recover to the pre-flare level immediately after the flare.The physical implications of the flare-induced signal are discussed in view of its relevance to the non-thermal electron precipitation and primary energy release in the flare.

  2. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Radio-band Linear Polarization Observations as a Probe of the Physical Conditions in the Jets of Gamma-ray Flaring Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Aller, Margo F; Aller, Hugh D; Hovatta, Talvikki; Ramakrishnan, Venkatessh

    2016-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s the shock-in-jet model has been the preferred paradigm to explain radio-band flaring in blazar jets. We describe our radiative transfer model incorporating relativistically-propagating shocks, and illustrate how the 4.8, 8, and 14.5 GHz linear polarization and total flux density data from the University of Michigan monitoring program, in combination with the model, constrain jet flow conditions and shock attributes. Results from strong Fermi-era flares in 4 blazars with widely-ranging properties are presented. Additionally, to investigate jet evolution on decadal time scales we analyze 3 outbursts in OT 081 spanning nearly 3 decades and find intrinsic changes attributable to flow changes at a common spatial location, or, alternatively, to a change in the jet segment viewed. The model's success in reproducing these data supports a scenario in which relativistic shocks compress a plasma with an embedded passive, initially-turbulent magnetic field, with additional ordered magnetic field compo...

  3. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...... to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...

  4. Hα Line Profile Asymmetries and the Chromospheric Flare Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Simões, P. J. A.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Kennedy, M.; Fletcher, L.; Graham, D.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-11-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  5. The ExaVolt Antenna: Concept and Development Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfendner, Carl

    2017-03-01

    A flux of ultrahigh energy neutrinos is expected both directly from sources and from interactions between ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and the cosmic microwave background. Using the cost-effective radio Cherenkov technique to search for these neutrinos, the ExaVolt Antenna (EVA) is a mission concept that aims to build on the capabilities of earlier radio-based balloon-borne neutrino detectors and increase the sensitivity to lower energies and fluxes. The novel EVA design exploits the surface of the balloon to provide a focusing reflector that aims to provide a signal gain of 30 dBi (compared to 10 dBi on ANITA). This increase in gain when combined with a large instantaneous viewing angle will yield a 10-fold increase in sensitivity and will allow this balloon-borne experiment to probe the expected low neutrino fluxes even at energies greater than 1019 eV. This contribution will present an overview of the mission concept, recent technology developments, and the results of a hang test of a 1:20-scale model which demonstrates the effectiveness of the design.

  6. The ExaVolt Antenna: Concept and Development Updates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfendner Carl

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A flux of ultrahigh energy neutrinos is expected both directly from sources and from interactions between ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and the cosmic microwave background. Using the cost-effective radio Cherenkov technique to search for these neutrinos, the ExaVolt Antenna (EVA is a mission concept that aims to build on the capabilities of earlier radio-based balloon-borne neutrino detectors and increase the sensitivity to lower energies and fluxes. The novel EVA design exploits the surface of the balloon to provide a focusing reflector that aims to provide a signal gain of ~ 30 dBi (compared to 10 dBi on ANITA. This increase in gain when combined with a large instantaneous viewing angle will yield a 10-fold increase in sensitivity and will allow this balloon-borne experiment to probe the expected low neutrino fluxes even at energies greater than 1019 eV. This contribution will present an overview of the mission concept, recent technology developments, and the results of a hang test of a 1:20-scale model which demonstrates the effectiveness of the design.

  7. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  8. An MHD model for magnetar giant flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Y.; Lin, J.; Zhang, Q. S. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Zhang, L. [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming, Yunnan 650091 (China); Reeves, K. K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yuan, F., E-mail: mengy@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: jlin@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2014-04-10

    Giant flares on soft gamma-ray repeaters that are thought to take place on magnetars release enormous energy in a short time interval. Their power can be explained by catastrophic instabilities occurring in the magnetic field configuration and the subsequent magnetic reconnection. By analogy with the coronal mass ejection events on the Sun, we develop a theoretical model via an analytic approach for magnetar giant flares. In this model, the rotation and/or displacement of the crust causes the field to twist and deform, leading to flux rope formation in the magnetosphere and energy accumulation in the related configuration. When the energy and helicity stored in the configuration reach a threshold, the system loses its equilibrium, the flux rope is ejected outward in a catastrophic way, and magnetic reconnection helps the catastrophe develop to a plausible eruption. By taking SGR 1806–20 as an example, we calculate the free magnetic energy released in such an eruptive process and find that it is more than 10{sup 47} erg, which is enough to power a giant flare. The released free magnetic energy is converted into radiative energy, kinetic energy, and gravitational energy of the flux rope. We calculated the light curves of the eruptive processes for the giant flares of SGR 1806–20, SGR 0526–66, and SGR 1900+14, and compared them with the observational data. The calculated light curves are in good agreement with the observed light curves of giant flares.

  9. Safe and efficient flare gas recovery; Safety flaring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross-Petersen, Joergen; Wills, Martin; Johnston, Ian

    2010-07-01

    Flaring of gas in connection with the production of hydrocarbons represents both an undesirable emission to the atmosphere and a loss of valuable resource. As part of the efforts further to reduce flaring Maersk Oil consider installation of Flare Gas Recovery (FGR) where appropriate, significant efforts have therefor been made by Maersk Oil as operator for Danish Underground Consortium (DUC) to reduce the flaring from the facilities operated in the Danish North Sea. (Author)

  10. Magnetic Field Amplification and Blazar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuhui; Fossati, Giovanni; Pohl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Recent multiwavelength observations of PKS 0208-512 by SMARTS, Fermi, and Swift revealed that gamma-ray and optical light curves of this flat spectrum radio quasars are highly correlated, but with an exception of one large optical flare having no corresponding gamma-ray activity or even detection. On the other hand, recent advances in SNRs observations and plasma simulations both reveal that magnetic field downstream of astrophysical shocks can be largely amplified beyond simple shock compression. These amplifications, along with their associated particle acceleration, might contribute to blazar flares, including the peculiar flare of PKS 0208-512. Using our time dependent multizone blazar emission code, we evaluate several scenarios that may represent such phenomena. This code combines Monte Carlo method that tracks the radiative processes including inverse Compton scattering, and Fokker-Planck equation that follows the cooling and acceleration of particles. It is a comprehensive time dependent code that ful...

  11. Optical flares and flaring oscillations on the M-type eclipsing binary CU Cnc

    CERN Document Server

    -B., Qian S; Zhu, L -Y; Liu, L; Liao, W -P; Zhao, E -G; He, J -J; Li, L -J; Li, K; Dai, Z -B

    2012-01-01

    We report here the discovery of an optical flare observed in R band from the red-dwarf eclipsing binary CU Cnc whose component stars are at the upper boundary of full convection (M1=0.43 and M2=0.4M0, M0 is the solar mass). The amplitude of the flare is the largest among those detected in R band (~0.52mag) and the duration time is about 73 minutes. As those observed on the Sun, quasi-periodic oscillations were seen during and after the flare. Three more R-band flares were found by follow up monitoring. In total, this binary was monitored photometrically by using R filter for 79.9 hours, which reveals a R-band flare rate about 0.05 flares per hour. These detections together with other strong chromospheric and coronal activities, i.e., very strong H_alpha and H_beta emission features and an EUV and X-ray source, indicate that it has very strong magnetic activity. Therefore, the apparent faintness (~1.4 magnitude in V) of CU Cnc compared with other single red dwarfs of the same mass can be plausibly explained by...

  12. EUV Flare Activity in Late-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Audard, M; Drake, J J; Kashyap, V L; Audard, Marc; Guedel, Manuel; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2000-01-01

    \\textit{Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer} Deep Survey observations of cool stars (spectral type F to M) have been used to investigate the distribution of coronal flare rates in energy and its relation to activity indicators and rotation parameters. Cumulative and differential flare rate distributions were constructed and fitted with different methods. Power laws are found to approximately describe the distributions. A trend toward flatter distributions for later-type stars is suggested in our sample. Assuming that the power laws continue below the detection limit, we have estimated that the superposition of flares with radiated energies of about $10^{29}-10^{31}$ergs could explain the observed radiative power loss of these coronae, while the detected flares are contributing only $\\approx 10$%. While the power-law index is not correlated with rotation parameters (rotation period, projected rotational velocity, Rossby number) and only marginally with the X-ray luminosity, the flare occurrence rate is correlated wit...

  13. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, NM 88003 (United States); Liu, Rui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Alexander, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, TX 77005 (United States); Sun, Xudong, E-mail: czhu@nmsu.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  14. Rapid variability of blazar 3C 279 during flaring states in 2013-2014 with joint FERMI-LAT, NuSTAR, swift, and ground-based multi-wavelength observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashida, M.; Nalewajko, K.; Madejski, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    with the standard synchrotron plus inverse-Compton model requires: (1) the location of the'y-ray emitting region is comparable with the broad-line region radius, (2) a very hard electron energy distribution index p ≃ 1, (3) total jet power significantly exceeding the accretion-disk luminosity Lj/Ld ≳ 10, and (4...... reaching the highest flux level measured in this object since the beginning of the Fermi mission, with F (E> 100 MeV) of 10-5 photons cm-2 s-1, and with a flux-doubling time scale as short as 2 hr. The y-ray spectrum during one of the flares was very hard, with an index of Γγ = 1.7 ± 0.1, which is rarely......-ray spectrum obtained during the first pointing, and fitted jointly with Swift-XRT is well-described by a simple power law, the second joint observation showed an unusual spectral structure: the spectrum softens by ΔΓX ≃ 0.4 at ~4 keV. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution during this flare...

  15. Precursor flares in OJ 287

    OpenAIRE

    Pihajoki, P.; Valtonen, M.; Zola, S.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Provencal, J.; Nilsson, K.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpää, A.; Takalo, L.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black...

  16. Short-term predictions of solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, V. A.

    1990-02-01

    A review of present-day theoretical investigations of the problem of the accumulation and release of energy in solar flares permits advancing the opinion that only individual flare events are described by a concrete model and that a single model alone does not describe the entire diversity of flares. Consideration of the observational data does not permit claiming the existence of a single universal mechanism known today of flare events. It appears possible to treat the problem of prediction in terms of the algebra of logic (Boolean logic) and to compare the truth table with the often-used contingency table. The introduction of a number of very general assumptions permits forming a general approach to the development of predictive schemes and selection of the individual elements of the models and informative criteria. Experimental results are given on the testing of some prediction procedures. The author's procedure of routine short-term prediction of flares on the basis of the methods of instruction on pattern recognition implemented in the form of a set of programs is outlined. The results of the application of this procedure in 1986 - 1988 are presented.

  17. Radio-flaring Ultracool Dwarf Population Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Route, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    Over a dozen ultracool dwarfs (UCDs), low-mass objects of spectral types ≥M7, are known to be sources of radio flares. These typically several-minutes-long radio bursts can be up to 100% circularly polarized and have high brightness temperatures, consistent with coherent emission via the electron cyclotron maser operating in approximately kilogauss magnetic fields. Recently, the statistical properties of the bulk physical parameters that describe these UCDs have become described adequately enough to permit synthesis of the population of radio-flaring objects. For the first time, I construct a Monte Carlo simulator to model the population of these radio-flaring UCDs. This simulator is powered by Intel Secure Key (ISK), a new processor technology that uses a local entropy source to improve random number generation that has heretofore been used to improve cryptography. The results from this simulator indicate that only ∼5% of radio-flaring UCDs within the local interstellar neighborhood (radio-flaring fraction and suggest that the observed behavior is likely a result of several factors. The performance of ISK as compared to other pseudorandom number generators is also evaluated, and its potential utility for other astrophysical codes is briefly described.

  18. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-08-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick-slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy-loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small-scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global statistics of flare energy release, this latter behavior may be relevant to recurrent flaring in individual coronal loops. This class of models could provide a basis for the prediction of large solar flares.

  19. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ~50° h-1) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  20. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to 50 deg per hr) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related p...

  1. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    CERN Document Server

    van Putten, T; Baring, M G; Wijers, R A M J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  2. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  3. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-10

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ∼50° h(-1)) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  4. Blazar Alerts with the HAWC Online Flare Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Weisgarber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory monitors the gamma-ray sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range with > 95% uptime and unprecedented sensitivity for a survey instrument. The HAWC Collaboration has implemented an online flare monitor that detects episodes of rapid flaring activity from extragalactic very high energy (VHE) sources in the declination band from -26 to 64 degrees. This allows timely alerts to be sent to multiwavelength instruments without human intervention. The preliminary configuration of the online flare monitor achieves sensitivity to flares of at least 1 hour duration that attain an average flux of 10 times that of the Crab Nebula. While flares of this magnitude are not common, several flares reaching the level of 10 Crab have been observed in the VHE band within the past decade. With its survey capabilities and high duty cycle, HAWC will expand the observational data set on these particularly extreme flares. We characterize the sensitivity of the online flare monitor an...

  5. Diagnostics of solar flare reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karlický

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present new diagnostics of the solar flare reconnection, mainly based on the plasma radio emission. We propose that the high-frequency (600-2000 MHz slowly drifting pulsating structures map the flare magnetic field reconnection. These structures correspond to the radio emission from plasmoids which are formed in the extended current sheet due to tearing and coalescence processes. An increase of the frequency drift of the drifting structures is interpreted as an increase of the reconnection rate. Using this model, time scales of slowly drifting pulsating structure observed during the 12 April 2001 flare by the Trieste radiopolarimeter with high time resolution (1 ms are interpreted as a radio manifestation of electron beams accelerated in the multi-scale reconnection process. For short periods Fourier spectra of the observed structure have a power-law form with power-law indices in the 1.3-1.6 range. For comparison the 2-D MHD numerical modeling of the multi-scale reconnection is made and it is shown that Fourier spectrum of the reconnection dissipation power has also a power-law form, but with power-law index 2. Furthermore, we compute a time evolution of plasma parameters (density, magnetic field etc in the 2-D MHD model of the reconnection. Then assuming a plasma radio emission from locations, where the 'double-resonance' instability generates the upper-hybrid waves due to unstable distribution function of suprathermal electrons, we model radio spectra. Effects of the MHD turbulence are included. The resulting spectra are compared with those observed. It is found, that depending on model parameters the lace bursts and the decimetric spikes can be reproduced. Thus, it is shown that the model can be used for diagnostics of the flare reconnection process. We also point out possible radio signatures of reconnection outflow termination shocks. They are detected as type II-like herringbone structures in the 200-700 MHz frequency range. Finally

  6. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    CERN Document Server

    Panesar, N K; Tiwari, S K; Low, B C

    2012-01-01

    Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures mainly observed as a prominence activity. We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303), and their EUV waves, with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195\\AA\\ are analyzed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171\\AA. Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within 10 hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with acceleration of tornado motion after the ...

  7. Universality in solar flare and earthquake occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, L; Godano, C; Lippiello, E; Nicodemi, M

    2006-02-10

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism.

  8. The investigation of the Neupert effect in two solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The Neupert effect suggests a flare model in which the nonthermal emissions are produced by energetic electrons which heat lower corona and chromosphere to produce the thermal emissions. Based on this concept, we investigate the Neupert effect to test the correlation between the hard X-ray spectral index and the time rate of the UV flare area at 1600 or 171 . Using the T RACE and RHESSI observations, we explore these quantities for two solar flares, one on March 14, 2002 and the other on November 1, 2003. The negative dependence between the spectral index and the time rate of the UV flare area is found, especially during the hard X-ray sub-peaks. This finding indicates that the electron-beam-driven heating plays a prominent role in the UV emission of these two flares.

  9. Kepler Flares I. Active and Inactive M dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Hawley, Suzanne L; Kowalski, Adam F; Wisniewski, John P; Hebb, Leslie; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the ARC 3.5m telescope identify magnetically active (H$\\alpha$ in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early-M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of H$\\alpha$. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy dist...

  10. Halpha line profile asymmetries and the chromospheric flare velocity field

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D; Simões, P J A; van der Voort, L Rouppe; Carlsson, M; Jafarzadeh, S; Allred, J C; Kowalski, A F; Kennedy, M; Fletcher, L; Graham, D; Keenan, F P

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Halpha and Ca II 8542 {\\AA} lines are studied using high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Halpha line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum, and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesise spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Halpha is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, w...

  11. Evolution of flare ribbons, electric currents, and quasi-separatrix layers during an X-class flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, M.; Savcheva, A.; Pariat, E.; Tassev, S.; Millholland, S.; Bommier, V.; McCauley, P.; McKillop, S.; Dougan, F.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The standard model for eruptive flares has been extended to three dimensions (3D) in the past few years. This model predicts typical J-shaped photospheric footprints of the coronal current layer, forming at similar locations as the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). Such a morphology is also found for flare ribbons observed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) band, and in nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic field extrapolations and models. Aims: We study the evolution of the photospheric traces of the current density and flare ribbons, both obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory instruments. We aim to compare their morphology and their time evolution, before and during the flare, with the topological features found in a NLFFF model. Methods: We investigated the photospheric current evolution during the 06 September 2011 X-class flare (SOL2011-09-06T22:20) occurring in NOAA AR 11283 from observational data of the magnetic field obtained with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We compared this evolution with that of the flare ribbons observed in the EUV filters of the Atmospheric Imager Assembly. We also compared the observed electric current density and the flare ribbon morphology with that of the QSLs computed from the flux rope insertion method-NLFFF model. Results: The NLFFF model shows the presence of a fan-spine configuration of overlying field lines, due to the presence of a parasitic polarity, embedding an elongated flux rope that appears in the observations as two parts of a filament. The QSL signatures of the fan configuration appear as a circular flare ribbon that encircles the J-shaped ribbons related to the filament ejection. The QSLs, evolved via a magnetofrictional method, also show similar morphology and evolution as both the current ribbons and the EUV flare ribbons obtained several times during the flare. Conclusions: For the first time, we propose a combined analysis of the photospheric

  12. The Giant Flare of 1998 August 27 from SGR 1900+14 I. An Interpretive Study of BeppoSAX and Ulysses Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Feroci, M; Duncan, R; Thompson, C

    2001-01-01

    The giant flare of 1998 August 27 from SGR 1900+14 was extraordinary in many ways: it was the most intense flux of gamma rays ever detected from a source outside our solar system; it was longer than any previously detected burst from a soft gamma repeater (SGR) in our Galaxy by more than an order of magnitude; and it showed a remarkable four-peaked, periodic pattern in hard X-rays with the same rotation period that was found modulating soft X-rays from the star in quiescence. The event was detected by several gamma-ray experiments in space, including the Ulysses gamma-ray burst detector and the BeppoSAX Gamma Ray Burst Monitor. These instruments operate in different energy ranges, and comparisons of their measurements reveal complex patterns of spectral evolution as the intensity varies. In this paper, we present a joint analysis of the BeppoSAX and Ulysses data and discuss some implications of these results for the SGRs. We also present newly-analyzed Venera/SIGNE and ISEE-3 data on the 1979 March 5 giant fl...

  13. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  14. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  15. Solar and Stellar Flares and Their Effects on Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Recent space observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of explosions, such as flares and flare-like phenomena. These flares generate not only strong electromagnetic emissions but also nonthermal particles and bulk plasma ejections, which sometimes lead to geomagnetic storms and affect terrestrial environment and our civilization, damaging satellite, power-grids, radio communication etc. Solar flares are prototype of various explosions in our universe, and hence are important not only for geophysics and environmental science but also for astrophysics. The energy source of solar flares is now established to be magnetic energy stored near sunspots. There is now increasing observational evidence that solar flares are caused by magnetic reconnection, merging of anti-parallel magnetic field lines and associated magneto-plasma dynamics (Shibata and Magara 2011, Living Review). It has also been known that many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and often such stellar flares are much more energetic than solar flares. The total energy of a solar flare is typically 10^29 - 10^32 erg. On the other hand, there are much more energetic flares (10^33 - 10^38 erg) in stars, especially in young stars. These are called superflares. We argue that these superflares on stars can also be understood in a unified way based on the reconnection mechanism. Finally we show evidence of occurrence of superflares on Sun-like stars according to recent stellar observations (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature, Shibayama et al. 2013), which revealed that superflares with energy of 10^34 - 10^35 erg (100 - 1000 times of the largest solar flares) occur with frequency of once in 800 - 5000 years on Sun-like stars which are very similar to our Sun. Against the previous belief, these new observations as well as theory (Shibata et al. 2013) suggest that we cannot deny the possibility of superflares on the present Sun. Finally, we shall discuss possible impacts of these superflares

  16. Nonlocal thermal transport in solar flares. II - Spectroscopic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Doschek, George A.; Devore, C. Richard

    1989-01-01

    Physical parameters obtained for a flaring solar atmosphere in an earlier paper are used here to predict time-dependent emission-line profiles and integrated intensities as a function of position for two spectral lines commonly observed during solar flares: the X-ray resonance lines of Ca XIX and Mg XI. Considerations of ionization nonequilibrium during the rise phase of the flare are addressed, and the effects on the predicted spectral-line characteristics are discussed. It is concluded that some spectroscopic diagnostics favor the nonlocal model, but other long-standing discrepancies between the numerical models and the observations remain unresolved.

  17. Study of the change of surface magnetic field associated with flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yixuan; Jing, Ju; Fan, Yuhong; Wang, Haimin

    2011-08-01

    How magnetic field structure changes with eruptive events (e.g., flares and CMEs) has been a long-standing problem in solar physics. Here we present the analysis of eruption-associated changes in the magnetic inclination angle, the transverse component of magnetic field and the Lorentz force. The analysis is based on an observation of the X3.4 flare on Dec.13 2006 and a numerical simulation of a solar eruption made by Yuhong Fan. Both observation and simulation show that (1) the magnetic inclination angle in the decayed peripheral penumbra increases, while that in the central area close to flaring polarity inversion line (PIL) deceases after the flare; (2) the transverse component of magnetic field increases at the lower altitude near flaring PIL after the flare. The result suggests that the field lines at flaring neutral line turn to more horizontal near the surface, that is in agreement with the prediction of Hudson, Fisher & Welsch (2008).

  18. Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose here to develop the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS), the next-generation instrument for high-energy solar observations. GRIPS will...

  19. Do all Flares have White Light Emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Crockett, P J; Keenan, F P

    2008-01-01

    High-cadence, multiwavelength optical observations of a solar active region (NOAA 10969), obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope, are presented. Difference imaging of white light continuum data reveals a white light brightening, 2 min in duration, linked to a co-temporal and co-spatial C2.0 flare event. The flare kernel observed in the white light images has a diameter of 300 km, thus rendering it below the resolution limit of most space-based telescopes. Continuum emission is present only during the impulsive stage of the flare, with the effects of chromospheric emission subsequently delayed by approximately 2 min. The localized flare emission peaks at 300% above the quiescent flux. This large, yet tightly confined, increase in emission is only resolvable due to the high spatial resolution of the Swedish Solar Telescope. An investigation of the line-of-sight magnetic field derived from simultaneous MDI data shows that the continuum brightening is located very close to a magnetic polarity inversion line. A...

  20. Electron and proton kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkova, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    This timely book presents new research results on high-energy particle physics related to solar flares, covering the theory and applications of the reconnection process in a clear and comprehensible way. It investigates particle kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres and their diagnostics from spectral observations, while providing an analysis of the observation data and techniques and comparing various models. Written by an internationally acclaimed expert, this is vital reading for all solar, astro-, and plasma physicists working in the field.

  1. "Magnetar Hyper-Flares: Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' on"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2008-01-01

    The giant flares produced by highly magnetized neutron stars, "magnetars," are the brightest sources of high energy radiation outside our solar system. High frequency oscillations have been discovered during portions of the two most recently observed giant flares which may represent the first detection of global oscillation modes of neutron stars. I will give an observational and theoretical overview of these oscillations and describe how they might allow us to probe neutron star interiors and dense matter physics.

  2. Fast X-Ray Oscillations during Magnetar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer Tod E.

    2009-01-01

    The giant flares produced by highly magnetized neutron stars, "magnetars," are the brightest sources of high energy radiation outside our solar system. High frequency oscillations have been discovered during portions of the two most recently observed giant flares which may represent the first detection of global oscillation modes of neutron stars. I will give an observational and theoretical overview of these oscillations and describe how they might allow us to probe neutron star interiors and dense matter physics.

  3. Predictions of reconnected flux, energy and helicity in eruptive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Maria Dmitiyevna

    2010-12-01

    In order to better understand the solar genesis of interplanetary magnetic clouds, I model the magnetic and topological properties of several large eruptive solar flares and relate them to observations. My main hypothesis is that the flux ropes ejected during eruptive solar flares are the result of a sequence of magnetic reconnections. To test this hypothesis, I use the three-dimensional Minimum Current Corona model of flare energy storage (Longcope, 1996) together with pre-flare photospheric magnetic field and flare ribbon observations to predict the basic flare properties: reconnected magnetic flux, free energy, and flux rope helicity. Initially, the MCC model was able to quantify the properties of the flares that occur in active regions with only photospheric shearing motions. Since rotating motions may also play a key role in the flare energetics, I develop a method for including both shearing and rotating motions into the MCC model. I use this modified method to predict the model flare properties and then compare them to the observed quantities. Firstly, for two flares in active regions with fast rotating sunspots, I find that the relative importance of shearing and rotation to those flares depends critically on their location within the parent active region topology. Secondly, for four flares analyzed with the MCC model (three flares described here and one flare described in Longcope et al. (2007)), I find that the modeled flare properties agree with the observed properties within the uncertainties of the methods used. This agreement compels me to believe that the magnetic clouds associated with these four solar flares are formed by low-corona magnetic reconnection during the eruption as modeled by the MCC model, rather than eruption of pre-existing structures in the corona or formation in the upper corona with participation of the global magnetic field. I note that since all four flares occurred in active regions without significant pre-flare flux emergence

  4. Soft X-ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2014-01-01

    The soft X-ray emissions of solar flares come mainly from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. (2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. We analyze the suitability of the GOES data for this kind of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after Sept. 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend Dolla et al. results to a list of X-class flares from Cycle 24, and show that most of them display QPP in the impulsive phase. During the impulsive phase the footpoints of the newly-forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations. The QPP show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES dat...

  5. Gamma-ray Burst Flares: X-ray Flaring. II

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, C A

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of 497 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online XRT GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. The method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional `breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 310 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10^5 s. Only ~50% of the detected flares follow the `classical' definition of \\Delta t/t << 1, with many of the largest ...

  6. Blazar flares powered by plasmoids in relativistic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, Maria; Giannios, Dimitrios; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Powerful flares from blazars with short (˜min) variability time-scales are challenging for current models of blazar emission. Here, we present a physically motivated ab initio model for blazar flares based on the results of recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic magnetic reconnection. PIC simulations demonstrate that quasi-spherical plasmoids filled with high-energy particles and magnetic fields are a self-consistent by-product of the reconnection process. By coupling our PIC-based results (i.e. plasmoid growth, acceleration profile, particle and magnetic content) with a kinetic equation for the evolution of the electron distribution function we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection in blazar jets can produce powerful flares whose temporal and spectral properties are consistent with the observations. In particular, our model predicts correlated synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton flares of duration of several hours-days powered by the largest and slowest moving plasmoids that form in the reconnection layer. Smaller and faster plasmoids produce flares of sub-hour duration with higher peak luminosities than those powered by the largest plasmoids. Yet, the observed fluence in both types of flares is similar. Multiple flares with a range of flux-doubling time-scales (minutes to several hours) observed over a longer period of flaring activity (days or longer) may be used as a probe of the reconnection layer's orientation and the jet's magnetization. Our model shows that blazar flares are naturally expected as a result of magnetic reconnection in a magnetically dominated jet.

  7. X-ray flares of γ-ray bursts: Quakes of solid quark stars?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU RenXin; LIANG EnWei

    2009-01-01

    A star-quake model is proposed to understand X-ray flares of both long and short γ-ray bursts (GRBs) in a solid quark star regime. Two kinds of central engines for GRBs are available if pulsar-like stars are actually (solid) quark stars, I.e., the SNE-type GRBs and the SGR-type GRBs. It is found that a quark star could be solidified about 103 to 106 s later after its birth if the critical temperature of phase transi-tion is a few Metga-electron-volts, and then s new source of free energy (I.e., elastic and gravitational ones, rather than rotational or magnetic energy) could be possible to power GRB X-ray flares.

  8. X-ray flares of γ-ray bursts: Quakes of solid quark stars?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A star-quake model is proposed to understand X-ray flares of both long and short γ-ray bursts (GRBs) in a solid quark star regime. Two kinds of central engines for GRBs are available if pulsar-like stars are actually (solid) quark stars, i.e., the SNE-type GRBs and the SGR-type GRBs. It is found that a quark star could be solidified about 103 to 106 s later after its birth if the critical temperature of phase transi- tion is a few Metga-electron-volts, and then a new source of free energy (i.e., elastic and gravitational ones, rather than rotational or magnetic energy) could be possible to power GRB X-ray flares.

  9. Imaging coronal magnetic-field reconnection in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yang; Holman, Gordon D; Dennis, Brian R; Wang, Tongjiang; Temmer, Manuela; Gan, Weiqun

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic-field reconnection is believed to play a fundamental role in magnetized plasma systems throughout the Universe1, including planetary magnetospheres, magnetars and accretion disks around black holes. This letter present extreme ultraviolet and X-ray observations of a solar flare showing magnetic reconnection with a level of clarity not previously achieved. The multi-wavelength extreme ultraviolet observations from SDO/AIA show inflowing cool loops and newly formed, outflowing hot loops, as predicted. RHESSI X-ray spectra and images simultaneously show the appearance of plasma heated to >10 MK at the expected locations. These two data sets provide solid visual evidence of magnetic reconnection producing a solar flare, validating the basic physical mechanism of popular flare models. However, new features are also observed that need to be included in reconnection and flare studies, such as three-dimensional non-uniform, non-steady and asymmetric evolution.

  10. Flares in Gamma Ray Bursts: Disc Fragmentation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Dall'Osso, Simone; Tanaka, Takamitsu L; Margutti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Flaring activity following gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), observed in both long and short GRBs, signals a long-term activity of the central engine. However, its production mechanism has remained elusive. Here we develop a quantitative model of the idea proposed by Perna et al. of a disc whose outer regions fragment due to the onset of gravitational instability. The self-gravitating clumps migrate through the disc and begin to evolve viscously when tidal and shearing torques break them apart. Our model consists of two ingredients: theoretical bolometric flare lightcurves whose shape (width, skewness) is largely insensitive to the model parameters, and a spectral correction to match the bandpass of the available observations, that is calibrated using the observed spectra of the flares. This simple model reproduces, with excellent agreement, the empirical statistical properties of the flares as measured by their width-to-arrival time ratio and skewness (ratio between decay and rise time). We present model fits to the ...

  11. A model for the recurrent flares in EXO 2030 + 375

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, Ronald E.; Brown, D. A.; Fryxell, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that nonsteady hydrodynamical flows associated with mass and angular momentum capture by a neutron star during a mass ejection phase from a Be star can produce flares with remarkable resemblance to those observed during an outburst from the X-ray transient pulsar EXO 2030 + 375. To reproduce the recurrent time scale of the flares, the velocity of the outflowing matter is estimated to be about 550 km/s. Since the theoretical model requires that a transient disk circulating in one direction is followed by a transient disk circulating in the opposite direction, the time derivative of the pulse period is expected to change sign after each flare event.

  12. On the triggering of a spotless double-ribbon flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausaria, R. R.; Aleem, S. M.; Sundara Raman, K.

    1992-11-01

    We have studied the evolution of the double-ribbon, spotless flare of 21 February, 1992, using Kodaikanal H-alpha and Kfl observations. The analysis of the data shows that the H-alpha filament underwent a large change in shear prior to the day of the onset of the flare. We find considerable rotation of the plage region before the emergence of a small magnetic pore. It is concluded that shear plays an important role in the triggering of a spotless flare.

  13. Slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons during an X-class solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and there appeared three FRs. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edge, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in 3D standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that complex structures of the flare is likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least...

  14. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of white-light flare kernels in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kawate, Tomoko; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Asai, Ayumi; Morita, Satoshi; Masuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    On 2011 September 6, we observed an X2.1-class flare in continuum and H$\\alpha$ with a frame rate of about 30~Hz. After processing images of the event by using a speckle-masking image reconstruction, we identified white-light (WL) flare ribbons on opposite sides of the magnetic neutral line. We derive the lightcurve decay times of the WL flare kernels at each resolution element by assuming that the kernels consist of one or two components that decay exponentially, starting from the peak time. As a result, 42% of the pixels have two decay-time components with average decay times of 15.6 and 587 s, whereas the average decay time is 254 s for WL kernels with only one decay-time component. The peak intensities of the shorter decay-time component exhibit good spatial correlation with the WL intensity, whereas the peak intensities of the long decay-time components tend to be larger in the early phase of the flare at the inner part of the flare ribbons, close to the magnetic neutral line. The average intensity of th...

  15. The Power-Law Distribution of Flare Kernels and Fractal Current Sheets in a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizuka, N; Takasaki, H; Kurokawa, H; Shibata, K; 10.1088/0004-637X/694/1/L74

    2013-01-01

    We report a detailed examination of the fine structure inside flare ribbons and the temporal evolution of this fine structure during the X2.5 solar flare that occurred on 2004 November 10. We examine elementary bursts of the C IV (1550{\\AA}) emission lines seen as local transient brightenings inside the flare ribbons in the ultraviolet (1600{\\AA}) images taken with Transition Region and Coronal Explorer, and we call them C IV kernels. This flare was also observed in Ha with the Sartorius 18 cm Refractor telescope at Kwasan observatory, Kyoto University, and in hard X-rays (HXR) with Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. Many C IV kernels, whose sizes were comparable to or less than 2", were found to brighten successively during the evolution of the flare ribbon. The majority of them were well correlated with the Ha kernels in both space and time, while some of them were associated with the HXR emission. These kernels were thought to be caused by the precipitation of nonthermal particles at the...

  16. A search for very high-energy flares from the microquasars GRS 1915+105, Circinus X-1, and V4641 Sgr using contemporaneous H.E.S.S. and \\textit{RXTE} observations

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, H; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E O; Arrieta, M; Aubert, P; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Barnard, M; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Capasso, M; Carr, J; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chevalier, J; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Condon, B; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J -P; Eschbach, S; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Funk, S; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, A; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Hahn, J; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jingo, M; Jogler, T; Jouvin, L; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; King, J; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Kraus, M; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; -P., J; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Leser, E; Lohse, T; Lorentz, M; Liu, R; Lypova, I; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niederwanger, F; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Öttl, S; Ohm, S; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Padovani, M; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Seyffert, A S; Shafi, N; Shilon, I; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tuffs, R; van der Walt, J; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Völk, H J; Vuillaume, T; Wadiasingh, Z; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Ziegler, A; Żywucka, N

    2016-01-01

    Microquasars are potential $\\gamma$-ray emitters. Indications of transient episodes of $\\gamma$-ray emission were recently reported in at least two systems: Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3. The identification of additional $\\gamma$-ray-emitting microquasars is required to better understand how $\\gamma$-ray emission can be produced in these systems. Theoretical models have predicted very high-energy (VHE) $\\gamma$-ray emission from microquasars during periods of transient outburst. Observations reported herein were undertaken with the objective of observing a broadband flaring event in the $\\gamma$-ray and X-ray bands. Contemporaneous observations of three microquasars, GRS 1915+105, Circinus X-1, and V4641 Sgr, were obtained using the High Energy Spectroscopic System (H.E.S.S.) telescope array and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite. X-ray analyses for each microquasar were performed and VHE $\\gamma$-ray upper limits from contemporaneous H.E.S.S. observations were derived. No significant $\\gamma$-ray signal ...

  17. Two-Step Coronal Transport of Solar Flare Particles from Magnetic Multipolarity Sources in a Flare Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Nian; WANG Shi-Jin

    2001-01-01

    The transport of solar flare particles in the corona is studied. Considering the problems in terms of the character istics of a sunspot group producing solar cosmic rays and solar flare processes, we find that formation of the fast propagation process is associated with annihilation of sunspots in the group with magnetic multipolarity. The slower propagation process depends on magnetic irregularities in the corona, and the evolution of the transport is related to the flare processes. Equations for the coronal transport are proposed and their initial and boundary conditions are given. The predicted results agree with the main observational features.

  18. Solar Flare Measurements with STIX and MiSolFA

    CERN Document Server

    Casadei, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares are the most powerful events in the solar system and the brightest sources of X-rays, often associated with emission of particles reaching the Earth and causing geomagnetic storms, giving problems to communication, airplanes and even black-outs. X-rays emitted by accelerated electrons are the most direct probe of solar flare phenomena. The Micro Solar-Flare Apparatus (MiSolFA) is a proposed compact X-ray detector which will address the two biggest issues in solar flare modeling. Dynamic range limitations prevent simultaneous spectroscopy with a single instrument of all X-ray emitting regions of a flare. In addition, most X-ray observations so far are inconsistent with the high anisotropy predicted by the models usually adopted for solar flares. Operated at the same time as the STIX instrument of the ESA Solar Orbiter mission, at the next solar maximum (2020), they will have the unique opportunity to look at the same flare from two different directions: Solar Orbiter gets very close to the Sun wit...

  19. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  20. Modelling pesticide volatilization after soil application using the mechanistic model Volt'Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedos, Carole; Génermont, Sophie; Le Cadre, Edith; Garcia, Lucas; Barriuso, Enrique; Cellier, Pierre

    Volatilization of pesticides participates in atmospheric contamination and affects environmental ecosystems including human welfare. Modelling at relevant time and spatial scales is needed to better understand the complex processes involved in pesticide volatilization. Volt'Air-Pesticides has been developed following a two-step procedure to study pesticide volatilization at the field scale and at a quarter time step. Firstly, Volt'Air-NH 3 was adapted by extending the initial transfer of solutes to pesticides and by adding specific calculations for physico-chemical equilibriums as well as for the degradation of pesticides in soil. Secondly, the model was evaluated in terms of 3 pesticides applied on bare soil (atrazine, alachlor, and trifluralin) which display a wide range of volatilization rates. A sensitivity analysis confirmed the relevance of tuning to K h. Then, using Volt'Air-Pesticides, environmental conditions and emission fluxes of the pesticides were compared to fluxes measured under 2 environmental conditions. The model fairly well described water temporal dynamics, soil surface temperature, and energy budget. Overall, Volt'Air-Pesticides estimates of the order of magnitude of the volatilization flux of all three compounds were in good agreement with the field measurements. The model also satisfactorily simulated the decrease in the volatilization rate of the three pesticides during night-time as well as the decrease in the soil surface residue of trifluralin before and after incorporation. However, the timing of the maximum flux rate during the day was not correctly described, thought to be linked to an increased adsorption under dry soil conditions. Thanks to Volt'Air's capacity to deal with pedo-climatic conditions, several existing parameterizations describing adsorption as a function of soil water content could be tested. However, this point requires further investigation. Practically speaking, Volt'Air-Pesticides can be a useful tool to make

  1. Gravitational fragmentation of the Carina Flare supershell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We study the gravitational fragmentation of a thick shell comparing the analytical theory to 3D hydrodynamic simulations and to observations of the Carina Flare supershell. We use both grid-based (AMR) and particle-based (SPH) codes to follow the idealised model of the fragmenting shell and found an excellent agreement between the two codes. Growth rates of fragments at different wavelength are well described by the pressure assisted gravitational instability (PAGI) - a new theory of the thick shell fragmentation. Using the APEX telescope we observe a part of the surface of the Carina Flare supershell (GSH287+04-17) in the 13CO(2-1) line. We apply a new clump-finding algorithm DENDROFIND to identify 50 clumps. We determine the clump mass function and we construct the minimum spanning tree connecting clumps positions to estimate the typical distance among clumps. We conclude that the observed masses and distances correspond well to the prediction of PAGI.

  2. Particle Acceleration by a Solar Flare Termination Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Bin; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Sam; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares - the most powerful explosions in the solar system - are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well-reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares.

  3. Battery Test Manual For 12 Volt Start/Stop Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belt, Jeffrey R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This manual was prepared by and for the United Stated Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) Electrochemical Energy Storage Team. It is based on the targets established for 12 Volt Start/Stop energy storage development and is similar (with some important changes) to an earlier manual for the former FreedomCAR program. The specific procedures were developed primarily to characterize the performance of energy storage devices relative to the USABC requirements. However, it is anticipated that these procedures will have some utility for characterizing 12 Volt Start/Stop hybrid energy storage device behavior in general.

  4. Probing the jet base of the blazar PKS1830-211 from the chromatic variability of its lensed images. Serendipitous ALMA observations of a strong gamma-ray flare

    CERN Document Server

    Marti-Vidal, I; Combes, F; Aalto, S; Beelen, A; Darling, J; Guelin, M; Henkel, C; Horellou, C; Marcaide, J M; Martin, S; Menten, K M; Dinh-V-Trung,; Zwaan, M

    2013-01-01

    The launching mechanism of the jets of active galactic nuclei is observationally poorly constrained, due to the large distances to these objects and the very small scales (sub-parsec) involved. In order to better constrain theoretical models, it is especially important to get information from the region close to the physical base of the jet, where the plasma acceleration takes place. In this paper, we report multi-epoch and multi-frequency continuum observations of the z=2.5 blazar PKS1830-211 with ALMA, serendipitously coincident with a strong $\\gamma$-ray flare reported by Fermi-LAT. The blazar is lensed by a foreground z=0.89 galaxy, with two bright images of the compact core separated by 1". Our ALMA observations individually resolve these two images (although not any of their substructures), and we study the change of their relative flux ratio with time (four epochs spread over nearly three times the time delay between the two lensed images) and frequency (between 350 and 1050 GHz, rest-frame of the blaz...

  5. Multiwavelength study of the flaring activity of Sgr A* in 2014 February-April

    CERN Document Server

    Mossoux, E; Bushouse, H; Eckart, A; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Plambeck, R L; Peissker, F; Valencia-S., M; Porquet, D; Cotton, W D; Roberts, D A

    2016-01-01

    The supermassive black hole Sgr A* is located at the Milky Way center. We studied its flaring activity close to the DSO/G2 pericenter passage to constrain the physical properties and origin of the flares. Simultaneous/coordinated observations were made in 2014 Feb-Apr with XMM-Newton, HST/WFC3, VLT/SINFONI, VLA and CARMA. We detected 2 X-ray and 3 NIR flares on Mar. 10 and Apr. 2 with XMM-Newton and HST and 2 NIR flares on Apr. 3 and 4 with VLT. The Mar. 10 X-ray flare has a long rise and a rapid decay. Its NIR counterpart peaked 4320s before the X-ray peak implying a variation in the X-ray-to-NIR flux ratio. This flare may be a single flare where change in the flux ratio is explained by the adiabatic compression of a plasmon or 2 close flares with simultaneous X-ray/NIR peaks. We observed an increase in the rising radio flux density on Mar. 10 with the VLA. It could be the delayed emission from a NIR/X-ray flare preceding our observation. The Apr. 2 X-ray flare occurred for HST in the Earth occultation of Sg...

  6. Flares in gamma-ray bursts: disc fragmentation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osso, Simone; Perna, Rosalba; Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-02-01

    Flaring activity following gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), observed in both long and short GRBs, signals a long-term activity of the central engine. However, its production mechanism has remained elusive. Here, we develop a quantitative model of the idea proposed by Perna et al. of a disc whose outer regions fragment due to the onset of gravitational instability. The self-gravitating clumps migrate through the disc and begin to evolve viscously when tidal and shearing torques break them apart. Our model consists of two ingredients: theoretical bolometric flare light curves whose shape (width, skewness) is largely insensitive to the model parameters, and a spectral correction to match the bandpass of the available observations, that is calibrated using the observed spectra of the flares. This simple model reproduces, with excellent agreement, the empirical statistical properties of the flares as measured by their width-to-arrival time ratio and skewness (ratio between decay and rise time). We present model fits to the observed light curves of two well-monitored flares, GRB 060418 and GRB 060904B. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative model able to reproduce the flare light curves and explain their global statistical properties.

  7. Multi-Thread Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, H P

    2006-01-01

    Past hydrodynamic simulations have been able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities characteristic of solar flares. These simulations, however, have not been able to account for the slow decay of the observed flare emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles. Recent work has suggested that modeling a flare as an sequence of independently heated threads instead of as a single loop may resolve the discrepancies between the simulations and observations. In this paper we present a method for computing multi-thread, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares and apply it to observations of the Masuda flare of 1992 January 13. We show that it is possible to reproduce the temporal evolution of high temperature thermal flare plasma observed with the instruments on the \\textit{GOES} and \\textit{Yohkoh} satellites. The results from these simulations suggest that the heating time-scale for a individual thread is on the order of 200 s. Significantly shorter heati...

  8. Magnetic Topology of the 29 October 2003 X10 flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jardins, Angela C.; Canfield, R.; Longcope, D.

    2006-06-01

    In order to improve the understanding of both flare initiation and evolution, we take advantage of powerful new topological methods and the high spatial resolution of RHESSI to examine where magnetic reconnection takes place in flare-producing solar active regions. Up to this time, such studies have been carried out on a very small number of active regions. According to present ideas, reconnection is expected to occur at either a separatrix or separator topological feature. We use the powerful X10 flare on 29 October 2003 (peak: 20:49 UT, location: (80'', 275'')) as a test of the ability to interpret the topological location of reconnection. The 29 October 2003 flare was well observed by RHESSI and MDI, occurred near the sun's central meridian, and thus is thus a prime candidate for a study on the topological location of magnetic reconnection. In this flare study, we use the MPOLE (http://solar.physics.montana.edu/dana/mpole/) software to extrapolate from the photospheric magnetic field, as observed by MDI, to a coronal field. MPOLE is a suite of IDL programs implementing the Minimum Current Corona Model (Longcope 1996) and currently includes a new method that uses a hierarchy of topological features (Beveridge 2006). The extrapolation gives the location of topological features such as poles, nulls, separatricies, separators, and spine lines. We examine the flare emission observed by RHESSI in the context of these topological features. In the case of the 29 October 2003 flare, we find a relationship between the spine lines and the temporal evolution of the HXR flare footpoints. In this poster, we present observations supporting the relationship, explore uncertainties in the consistency between MPOLE and RHESSI data, and survey possible results.This work is supported by NASA.

  9. Models for Flare Statistics and the Waiting-time Distribution of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatland, M. S.; Edney, S. D.

    1999-12-01

    In a previous study (Wheatland, Sturrock, McTiernan 1998), a waiting-time distribution was constructed for solar flare hard X-ray bursts observed by the ICE/ISEE-3 spacecraft. A comparison of the observed distribution with that of a time-dependent Poisson process indicated an overabundance of short waiting times (10~s -- 10~min), implying that the hard X-ray bursts are not independent events. Models for flare statistics assume or predict that flares are independent events -- in particular the avalanche model makes this specific prediction. The results of the previous study may be reconciled with the avalanche picture if individual flares produce several distinct bursts of hard X-ray emission. A detailed comparison of the avalanche model and the ICE/ISEE-3 waiting-time distribution is presented here.

  10. A ``perfect'' Late Phase Flare Loop: X-ray And Radio Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Hazel; Fletcher, L.

    2009-05-01

    We present observations of a GOES X3.1 class flare which occurred on the 24th August 2002. The event was observed by a number of instruments including RHESSI, TRACE and NoRH. This flare is particularly interesting due to its position and orientation on the west limb of the Sun. The flare appears to be perpendicular to the line of sight making it possible to ascertain the geometrical parameters of the post flare arcade loops. We investigate the decay phase of the flare by comparing X-ray and radio observations of the post flare arcade loops with models of soft x-ray and thermal gyrosynchrotron emission to characterise the electron distribution present within the loop. HMB gratefully acknowledges the support of an SPD and STFC studentship. LF gratefully acknowledges the support of an STFC Rolling Grant, and financial support by the European Commission through the SOLAIRE Network (MTRN-CT_2006-035484)

  11. Optical flare activity in the low-mass eclipsing binary GJ 3236

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parimucha, Š.; Dubovský, P.; Vaňko, M.; Čokina, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present our observations of the low-mass eclipsing binary GJ 3236. We have analyzed a phased RC light-curve and confirmed previously determined fundamental parameters of the components. We detected evolution of the spot(s) and found that there exists a large spot near a polar region of the primary component and another spot either on the primary or the secondary component. We also observed 7 flare events and determined a flare rate of about 0.1 flares per hour. We observed two high energy, long-term flares with a complex light curve and possibly four weak short-term flaring events. A majority of the flares was detected in the RC filter, which indicate their high energy.

  12. Optical flare activity in the low-mass eclipsing binary GJ~3236

    CERN Document Server

    Parimucha, S; Vanko, M; Cokina, M

    2016-01-01

    We present our observations of the low-mass eclipsing binary GJ~3236. We have analyzed a phased $R_C$ light-curve and confirmed previously determined fundamental parameters of the components. We detected evolution of the spot(s) and found that there exists a large spot near a polar region of the primary component and another spot either on the primary or the secondary component. We also observed 7 flare events and determined a flare rate of about 0.1 flares per hour. We observed two high energy, long-term flares with a complex light curve and possibly four weak short-term flaring events. A majority of the flares was detected in the $R_C$ filter, which indicate their high energy.

  13. Above-the-loop-top Oscillation and Quasi-periodic Coronal Wave Generation in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Takasao, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    Observations revealed that various kinds of oscillations are excited in solar flare regions. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the flare emissions are commonly observed in a wide range of wavelengths. Recent observations have found that fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are quasi-periodically emitted from some flaring sites (quasi-periodic propagating fast-mode magnetoacoustic waves; QPFs). Both of QPPs and QPFs imply a cyclic disturbance originating from the flaring sites. However, the physical mechanisms remain puzzling. By performing a set of two-dimensional MHD simulations of a solar flare, we discovered the local oscillation above the loops filled with evaporated plasma (above-the-loop-top region) and the generation of QPFs from such oscillating regions. Unlike all previous models for QPFs, our model includes essential physics for solar flares, such as magnetic reconnection, heat conduction, and chromospheric evaporation. We revealed that QPFs can be spontaneously excited by the above-the-loop-...

  14. Data Mining Solar X-Ray Flares Triggered by Emerging Magnetic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Kaitlyn; Saar, Steven H.; Schanche, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the association between emerging magnetic flux and solar X-ray flares to identify, and if possible quantify, distinguishing physical properties of flares triggered by flux emergence versus those triggered by other sources. Our study uses as its basis GOES-classified solar flares from March 2011 through June 2016 that have been identified by the Space Weather Prediction Center’s flare detection algorithm. The basic X-ray flare data is then enriched with data about related EUV-spectrum flares, emerging fluxes, active regions, eruptions, and sigmoids, which are all characterized by event-specific keywords, identified via SDO feature finding tools, and archived in the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase (HEK). Using appropriate spatial and temporal parameters for each event type to determine association, we create a catalogue of solar events associated with each GOES-classified flare. After accounting for the primitive state of many of these event detection algorithms, we statistically analyze the compiled dataset to determine the effects of an emerging flux trigger on flare properties. A two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test confirms with 99.9% confidence that flares triggered by emerging flux have a different peak flux distribution than non-emerging-flux-associated flares. We observe no linear or logarithmic correlations between flares’ and their associated emerging fluxes’ individual properties and find flares triggered by emerging flux are ~ 10% more likely to cause an eruption inside an active region while outside of an active region, the flare’s association with emerging flux has no effect on its likeliness to cause an eruption. We also compare the morphologies of the flares triggered by emerging flux and flares not via a superposed epoch analysis of lightcurves. Our results will be of interest for predicting flare behavior as a function of magnetic activity (where we can use enhanced rates of emerging flux as a proxy for heightened stellar

  15. Evolution of Flare Ribbons, Electric Currents and Quasi-separatrix Layers During an X-class Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Janvier, M; Pariat, E; Tassev, S; Millholland, S; Bommier, V; McCauley, P; McKillop, S; Dougan, F

    2016-01-01

    The standard model for eruptive flares has in the past few years been extended to 3D. It predicts typical J-shaped photospheric footprints of the coronal current layer, forming at similar locations as the Quasi-Separatrix Layers (QSLs). Such a morphology is also found for flare ribbons observed in the EUV band, as well as in non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic field extrapolations and models. We study the evolution of the photospheric traces of the current density and flare ribbons, both obtained with the SDO instruments. We investigate the photospheric current evolution during the 6 September 2011 X-class flare (SOL2011-09-06T22:20) from observational data of the magnetic field obtained with HMI. This evolution is compared with that of the flare ribbons observed in the EUV filters of the AIA. We also compare the observed electric current density and the flare ribbon morphology with that of the QSLs computed from the flux rope insertion method/NLFFF model. The NLFFF model shows the presence of a fan-...

  16. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    energy, and produce X-rays, microwaves and a shock wave that heats the solar surface. Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that predicts the nature and magnitude of the shock waves that this beam of energetic electrons should create when they slam down into the solar atmosphere. Although their theory directed them to the right area to search for the seismic waves, the waves that they found were 10 times stronger than they had predicted. "They were so strong that you can see them in the raw data," Kosovichev says. The solar seismic waves appear to be compression waves like the "P" waves generated by an earthquake. They travel throughout the Sun's interior. In fact, the waves should recombine on the opposite side of the Sun from the location of the flare to create a faint duplicate of the original ripple pattern, Kosovichev predicts. Now that they know how to find them, the SOHO scientists say that the seismic waves generated by solar flares should allow them to verify independently some of the conditions in the solar interior that they have inferred from studying the pattern of waves that are continually ruffling the Sun's surface. SOHO is part of the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program, a global effort to observe and understand our star and its effects on our environment. The ISTP mission includes more than 20 satellites, coupled with with ground-based observatories and modeling centers, that allow scientists to study the Sun, the Earth, and the space between them in unprecedented detail. ISTP is a joint program of NASA, ESA, Japan's Institute for Astronautical Science, and Russia's Space Research Institute. Still images of the solar quake can be found at the following internet address: FTP://PAO.GSFC.NASA.GOV/newsmedia/QUAKE/ For further information, please contact : ESA Public Relations Division Tel:+33(0)1.53.69.71.55 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69.76.90 3

  17. An experimental and theoretical study of the aeroacoustics of external-Coanda gas flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Caroline

    Experimental and theoretical means have been used to investigate the fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics of both stepped and unstepped external Coanda flares. Flow visualization techniques have been used to observe the one-eight scale model flare flow fields whilst simultaneously carrying out various sound measurements in the hope of being able to relate observed flow features to specific types of aerodynamic noise. Particular attention has been paid to the stepped model flare in the present work, for comparison with previous work on the unstepped model flare. Test have been carried out on two full-scale flares of different sizes which confirm that the previously assumed inverse-length scaling law does indeed hold in the case of flare noise frequency. Comparisons can therefore be made between the results of model and full-size flare tests, and these indicate that although the full-size flare also emits discrete tones, the nature of these tones are very different from those emitted by the model flares. Several possible reasons for the differences in the two sets of results are discussed. A theoretical study of the high-frequency turbulent mixing noise associated with a model Indair flare jet has been carried out. Because of the complicated nature of such a curved radial wall-jet, the theory has first been developed for a plane two-dimensional wall-jet.

  18. Search for neutrinos from flaring blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreter, Michael [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Emil-Fischer-Strasse 31, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); ECAP, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Eberl, Thomas; James, Clancy [ECAP, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Kadler, Matthias [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Emil-Fischer-Strasse 31, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Collaboration: ANTARES-KM3NeT-Erlangen-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Jets from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are among the best candidates for the recently detected extraterrestrial neutrino flux. Hadronic AGN jet-emission models predict a tight correlation between the neutrino flux and the time-variable gamma-ray emission. At the same time, the atmospheric-background (noise) signal, which often dominates in neutrino-astronomical observations, can be substantially reduced by rejecting long-lasting periods of low flux. For these reasons, short high-amplitude gamma-ray flares, as often observed in blazars, can be used to substantially increase the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes in point-source searches. We develop a strategy to search for TeV neutrinos from flaring blazar jets from the TANAMI sample using the ANTARES telescope and Fermi gamma-ray light curves. An unbinned maximum-likelihood method is applied to optimize the probability of a neutrino detection from TANAMI sources.

  19. The COMPTEL solar flare catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J.; Varendorff, M.; McConnell, M.; Forrest, D.; Schoenfelder, V.; Lichti, G.; Diehl, R.; Rank, G.; Bennett, K.; Hanlon, L.; Winkler, W.; Swanenburg, B.; Bloemen, H. Hermsen, W.

    1993-01-01

    COMPTEL, the Imaging Compton Telescope on the Compton Gamm