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Sample records for voltage-sensitive spectroscopic probe

  1. Electric Field Modulation of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Photoluminescence: Insights Into the Design of Robust Voltage-Sensitive Cellular Imaging Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Clare E; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Efros, Alexander L; Huston, Alan L; Delehanty, James B

    2015-10-14

    The intrinsic properties of quantum dots (QDs) and the growing ability to interface them controllably with living cells has far-reaching potential applications in probing cellular processes such as membrane action potential. We demonstrate that an electric field typical of those found in neuronal membranes results in suppression of the QD photoluminescence (PL) and, for the first time, that QD PL is able to track the action potential profile of a firing neuron with millisecond time resolution. This effect is shown to be connected with electric-field-driven QD ionization and consequent QD PL quenching, in contradiction with conventional wisdom that suppression of the QD PL is attributable to the quantum confined Stark effect.

  2. Site-directed spectroscopic probes of actomyosin structural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David D; Kast, David; Korman, Vicci L

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopy of myosin and actin has entered a golden age. High-resolution crystal structures of isolated actin and myosin have been used to construct detailed models for the dynamic actomyosin interactions that move muscle. Improved protein mutagenesis and expression technologies have facilitated site-directed labeling with fluorescent and spin probes. Spectroscopic instrumentation has achieved impressive advances in sensitivity and resolution. Here we highlight the contributions of site-directed spectroscopic probes to understanding the structural dynamics of myosin II and its actin complexes in solution and muscle fibers. We emphasize studies that probe directly the movements of structural elements within the myosin catalytic and light-chain domains, and changes in the dynamics of both actin and myosin due to their alternating strong and weak interactions in the ATPase cycle. A moving picture emerges in which single biochemical states produce multiple structural states, and transitions between states of order and dynamic disorder power the actomyosin engine.

  3. Spectral Properties and Orientation of Voltage-Sensitive Dyes in Lipid Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Matson, Maria

    2012-07-24

    Voltage-sensitive dyes are frequently used for probing variations in the electric potential across cell membranes. The dyes respond by changing their spectral properties: measured as shifts of wavelength of absorption or emission maxima or as changes of absorption or fluorescence intensity. Although such probes have been studied and used for decades, the mechanism behind their voltage sensitivity is still obscure. We ask whether the voltage response is due to electrochromism as a result of direct field interaction on the chromophore or to solvatochromism, which is the focus of this study, as result of changed environment or molecular alignment in the membrane. The spectral properties of three styryl dyes, di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, and RH421, were investigated in solvents of varying polarity and in model membranes using spectroscopy. Using quantum mechanical calculations, the spectral dependence of monomer and dimer ANEPPS on solvent properties was modeled. Also, the kinetics of binding to lipid membranes and the binding geometry of the probe molecules were found relevant to address. The spectral properties of all three probes were found to be highly sensitive to the local environment, and the probes are oriented nearly parallel with the membrane normal. Slow binding kinetics and scattering in absorption spectra indicate, especially for di-8-ANEPPS, involvement of aggregation. On the basis of the experimental spectra and time-dependent density functional theory calculations, we find that aggregate formation may contribute to the blue-shifts seen for the dyes in decanol and when bound to membrane models. In conclusion, solvatochromic and other intermolecular interactions effects also need to be included when considering electrochromic response voltage-sensitive dyes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  5. Dual-probe spectroscopic fingerprints of defects in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    (e.g., an extended graphene sheet). Applying this method, we study the transport anisotropies in pristine graphene sheets, and analyze the spectroscopic fingerprints arising from quantum interference around single-site defects, such as vacancies and adatoms. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the dual...

  6. SPECTROSCOPIC PROBING OF POTENTIAL SURFACES IN REACTIVE COLLISIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Telle, H.

    1985-01-01

    For the investigation of unstable intermediates, ABC*, which constitute the "transition states" in some simple reactive collisions, spectroscopic methods are beginning to provide valuable results. In a (relatively) simple approach molecules are photodissociated, and the interaction potentials during the process of separation (half-collision) are mapped in either absorption or emission ; the method will be described exemplary for the photolysis of NaI, giving rise to emission from NaI≠*. For r...

  7. Voltage-sensitive rhodol with enhanced two-photon brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh U; Kramer, Daniel J; Pourmandi, Narges; Karbasi, Kaveh; Bateup, Helen S; Miller, Evan W

    2017-03-14

    We have designed, synthesized, and applied a rhodol-based chromophore to a molecular wire-based platform for voltage sensing to achieve fast, sensitive, and bright voltage sensing using two-photon (2P) illumination. Rhodol VoltageFluor-5 (RVF5) is a voltage-sensitive dye with improved 2P cross-section for use in thick tissue or brain samples. RVF5 features a dichlororhodol core with pyrrolidyl substitution at the nitrogen center. In mammalian cells under one-photon (1P) illumination, RVF5 demonstrates high voltage sensitivity (28% ΔF/F per 100 mV) and improved photostability relative to first-generation voltage sensors. This photostability enables multisite optical recordings from neurons lacking tuberous sclerosis complex 1, Tsc1, in a mouse model of genetic epilepsy. Using RVF5, we show that Tsc1 KO neurons exhibit increased activity relative to wild-type neurons and additionally show that the proportion of active neurons in the network increases with the loss of Tsc1. The high photostability and voltage sensitivity of RVF5 is recapitulated under 2P illumination. Finally, the ability to chemically tune the 2P absorption profile through the use of rhodol scaffolds affords the unique opportunity to image neuronal voltage changes in acutely prepared mouse brain slices using 2P illumination. Stimulation of the mouse hippocampus evoked spiking activity that was readily discerned with bath-applied RVF5, demonstrating the utility of RVF5 and molecular wire-based voltage sensors with 2P-optimized fluorophores for imaging voltage in intact brain tissue.

  8. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  9. Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels Biophysics of Molecular Excitability

    CERN Document Server

    Leuchtag, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive ion channels are macromolecules embedded in the membranes of nerve and muscle fibers of animals. Because of their physiological functions, biochemical structures and electrical switching properties, they are at an intersection of biology, chemistry and physics. Despite decades of intensive research under the traditional approach of gated structural pores, the relation between the structure of these molecules and their function remains enigmatic. This book critically examines physically oriented approaches not covered in other ion-channel books. It looks at optical and thermal as well as electrical data, and at studies in the frequency domain as well as in the time domain. Rather than presenting the reader with only an option of mechanistic models at an inappropriate pseudo-macroscopic scale, it emphasizes concepts established in organic chemistry and condensed state physics. The book’s approach to the understanding of these unique structures breaks with the unproven view of ion channels as...

  10. Location, Tilt, and Binding : A Molecular Dynamics Study of Voltage-Sensitive Dyes in Biomembranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinner, Marlon J.; Marrink, Siewert-J.; de Vries, Alex H.

    2009-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study on the interaction of styryl-type voltage-sensitive dyes with a lipid membrane. In this work, voltage-sensitive dyes are proposed as interesting model amphiphiles for biomolecular simulation, due to the wealth of biophysical and thermodynamical data available on

  11. Dipodal quinoline-tethered fluorescent probe synthesis and investigation of spectroscopic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obalı, Aslıhan Yılmaz; Yilmaz, Menzeher Serkan; Uçan, Halil İsmet

    2017-10-01

    Novel quinoline-tethered fluorescent probe was designed and synthesized as multidentate ligand. Their sensing actions were confirmed by UV-Vis absorbance and emission spectroscopic studies in presence of perchlorate salts of Co2+, Li+, Fe2+, K+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Hg2+, Ag+ cations in acetonitrile (1 × 10-5 M for absorption studies, 1 × 10-7 M for fluorescence studies). It was found that the dipodal compounds can selectively bind to Cu2+ and Ag+ metal ions with a significant quenching in their emissions. The capture of Cu2+ and Ag+ by the probe resulted in deprotonation of the secondary amine conjugated to the quinoline-tethered probe, so that the electron-donation ability of the 'N' atom would be greatly enhanced and the probe (2) showed blue-shift in emission and exhibited an on-off fluorescent response. The binding study was explored by using fluorescence spectroscopy with Job plot method.

  12. Archaerhodopsin variants with enhanced voltage-sensitive fluorescence in mammalian and Caenorhabditis elegans neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C; Bedbrook, Claire N; Chiu, Hui; Engqvist, Martin K M; Xiao, Cheng; Chan, Ken Y; Sternberg, Paul W; Arnold, Frances H; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2014-09-15

    Probing the neural circuit dynamics underlying behaviour would benefit greatly from improved genetically encoded voltage indicators. The proton pump Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), an optogenetic tool commonly used for neuronal inhibition, has been shown to emit voltage-sensitive fluorescence. Here we report two Arch variants with enhanced radiance (Archers) that in response to 655 nm light have 3-5 times increased fluorescence and 55-99 times reduced photocurrents compared with Arch WT. The most fluorescent variant, Archer1, has 25-40% fluorescence change in response to action potentials while using 9 times lower light intensity compared with other Arch-based voltage sensors. Archer1 is capable of wavelength-specific functionality as a voltage sensor under red light and as an inhibitory actuator under green light. As a proof-of-concept for the application of Arch-based sensors in vivo, we show fluorescence voltage sensing in behaving Caenorhabditis elegans. Archer1's characteristics contribute to the goal of all-optical detection and modulation of activity in neuronal networks in vivo.

  13. Archaerhodopsin Variants with Enhanced Voltage Sensitive Fluorescence in Mammalian and Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Bedbrook, Claire N.; Chiu, Hui; Engqvist, Martin K. M.; Xiao, Cheng; Chan, Ken Y.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Arnold, Frances H.; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    Probing the neural circuit dynamics underlying behavior would benefit greatly from improved genetically encoded voltage indicators. The proton pump Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), an optogenetic tool commonly used for neuronal inhibition, has been shown to emit voltage sensitive fluorescence. Here we report two Arch variants that in response to 655 nm light have 3–5 times increased fluorescence and 55–99 times reduced photocurrents compared to Arch WT. The most fluorescent variant, Archer1, has 25–40% fluorescence change in response to action potentials while using 9 times lower light intensity compared to other Arch-based voltage sensors. Archer1 is capable of wavelength specific functionality as a voltage sensor under red-light and as an inhibitory actuator under green-light. As a proof-of-concept for the application of Arch-based sensors in vivo, we show fluorescence voltage sensing in behaving C. elegans. Archer1’s characteristics contribute to the goal of all-optical detection and modulation of activity in neuronal networks in vivo. PMID:25222271

  14. Pr(Ⅲ) and Nd(Ⅲ) Absorption Spectroscopic Probe to Investigate Interaction with Lysozyme (HEW)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Pr(Ⅲ) and Nd(Ⅲ) can be utilized as absorption spectroscopic probes to investigate the interaction of biomolecules like Lysozyme (HEW) with Ca(Ⅱ) in-vitro; the most abundant metal ion in the human body system. The spectroscopic techniques involving comparative absorption, absorption difference, and quantitative intensity analysis using 4f-4f transitions are utilized for changes in the inner sphere coordination pattern of Pr(Ⅲ) and Nd(Ⅲ) in solution as well as in solid state. The present study deals with an important biomolecule in human metabolism, that is, Lysozyme (HEW). The absorption spectral parameters such as the oscillator strength (P), the Judd-Ofelt (Tλ) intensity parameters, and the Slater-Condon inter electronic parameters are calculated using chi square methods. The obtained results are used to determine the probable geometry of the complex in the solution, the nature of the bond between Pr(Ⅲ)/Nd(Ⅲ) with lysozyme, and the inner sphere coordination environment of f-f transitions. The results obtained from various experimental conditions are utilized to investigate the coordination changes in the Pr(Ⅲ)/Nd(Ⅲ) complexes caused by different coordinating sites of lysozyme, normalized bite, denticity, the solvent nature, the coordination number, the nature of bond and other parameters to mimic the interaction of the Ca(Ⅱ) ion with such biomolecule.

  15. Probing initial-stages of ALD growth with dynamic in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muneshwar, Triratna, E-mail: muneshwa@ualberta.ca; Cadien, Ken

    2015-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Dynamic in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry to study ALD growth initiation. • Sub-monolayer ALD growth is modeled as diffusive film growth mode. • Bruggeman's EMA model used to analyze d-iSE data. • Plasma enhanced ALD of ZrN is presented as example. • Surface coverage of ZrN film is calculated after every ALD cycle. - Abstract: The initial stages of ALD surface reactions are probed using dynamic in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (d-iSE) technique during plasma-enhanced ALD of zirconium nitride (ZrN) thin films in spectral range of 0.73–6.4 eV. The measured change in the ellipsometry parameter Δ, with every precursor (TDMAZr) and reactant (forming gas plasma) exposure is interpreted as the combined effect of film growth and change in surface chemistry during ALD. We present application of Bruggeman's effective-medium approximation (B-EMA) in the analysis of d-iSE data to determine fractional surface coverage (θ) of ALD grown film at the end of every deposition cycle. During the deposition of first few ZrN monolayers, d-iSE datasets are analyzed on the basis of surface diffusion enhanced ALD growth, where the surface adsorbed precursor molecules can diffuse over substrate surface to occupy energetically favorable surface sites. The determined surface coverage of ZrN films highlights the effects of substrate enhanced ALD growth.

  16. The Biophysical Probes 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine: Spectroscopic Signatures and Molecular Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Ellis, Jonathan M.; Bann, James G.; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorinated amino acids serve as valuable biological probes, by reporting on local protein structure and dynamics through 19F NMR chemical shifts. 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine, studied here with DFT methods, have even more capabilities for biophysical studies, as their altered pKa values, relative to histidine, allow for studies of the role of proton transfer and tautomeric state in enzymatic mechanisms. Considering the two tautomeric forms of histidine, it was found that 2-fluorohistidine primarily forms the common (for histidine) τ-tautomer at neutral pH, while 4-fluorohistidine exclusively forms the less common π-tautomer. This suggests the two isomers of fluorohistidine can also serve as probes of tautomeric form within biomolecules, both by monitoring NMR chemical shifts and by potential perturbation of the tautomeric equilibrium within biomolecules. Fluorine also enables assignment of tautomeric states in crystal structures. The differences in experimental pKa values between the isomers was found to arise from solvation effects, providing insight into the polarization and molecular properties of each isomer. Results also encompass 13C and 19F NMR chemical shifts, from both tautomers of 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine in a number of different environments. This work can serve as a guide for interpretation of spectroscopic results in biophysical studies employing 2-fluorohistidine and 4-fluorohistidine.

  17. Complex Coacervate Core Micelles with Spectroscopic Labels for Diffusometric Probing of Biopolymer Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourouina, Nadia; de Kort, Daan W; Hoeben, Freek J M; Janssen, Henk M; Van As, Henk; Hohlbein, Johannes; van Duynhoven, John P M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2015-11-24

    We present the design, preparation, and characterization of two types of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) with cross-linked cores and spectroscopic labels and demonstrate their use as diffusional probes to investigate the microstructure of percolating biopolymer networks. The first type consists of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEO-b-PMAA), labeled with ATTO 488 fluorescent dyes. We show that the size of these probes can be tuned by choosing the length of the PEO-PMAA chains. ATTO 488-labeled PEO113-PMAA15 micelles are very bright with 18 dye molecules incorporated into their cores. The second type is a (19)F-labeled micelle, for which we used PAH and a (19)F-labeled diblock copolymer tailor-made from poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(acrylic acid) (mPEO79-b-PAA14). These micelles contain approximately 4 wt % of (19)F and can be detected by (19)F NMR. The (19)F labels are placed at the end of a small spacer to allow for the necessary rotational mobility. We used these ATTO- and (19)F-labeled micelles to probe the microstructures of a transient gel (xanthan gum) and a cross-linked, heterogeneous gel (κ-carrageenan). For the transient gel, sensitive optical diffusometry methods, including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and super-resolution single nanoparticle tracking, allowed us to measure the diffusion coefficient in networks with increasing density. From these measurements, we determined the diameters of the constituent xanthan fibers. In the heterogeneous κ-carrageenan gels, bimodal nanoparticle diffusion was observed, which is a signpost of microstructural heterogeneity of the network.

  18. Towards a wearable near infrared spectroscopic probe for monitoring concentrations of multiple chromophores in biological tissue in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, Danial; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Highton, David; Williams, Rhys; Phan, Phong; Giagka, Vasiliki; Powell, Samuel; Cooper, Robert J.; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Everdell, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    The first wearable multi-wavelength technology for functional near-infrared spectroscopy has been developed, based on a custom-built 8-wavelength light emitting diode (LED) source. A lightweight fibreless probe is designed to monitor changes in the concentrations of multiple absorbers (chromophores) in biological tissue, the most dominant of which at near-infrared wavelengths are oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. The use of multiple wavelengths enables signals due to the less dominant chromophores to be more easily distinguished from those due to hemoglobin and thus provides more complete and accurate information about tissue oxygenation, hemodynamics, and metabolism. The spectroscopic probe employs four photodiode detectors coupled to a four-channel charge-to-digital converter which includes a charge integration amplifier and an analogue-to-digital converter (ADC). Use of two parallel charge integrators per detector enables one to accumulate charge while the other is being read out by the ADC, thus facilitating continuous operation without dead time. The detector system has a dynamic range of about 80 dB. The customized source consists of eight LED dies attached to a 2 mm × 2 mm substrate and encapsulated in UV-cured epoxy resin. Switching between dies is performed every 20 ms, synchronized to the detector integration period to within 100 ns. The spectroscopic probe has been designed to be fully compatible with simultaneous electroencephalography measurements. Results are presented from measurements on a phantom and a functional brain activation study on an adult volunteer, and the performance of the spectroscopic probe is shown to be very similar to that of a benchtop broadband spectroscopy system. The multi-wavelength capabilities and portability of this spectroscopic probe will create significant opportunities for in vivo studies in a range of clinical and life science applications.

  19. Vanadyl ion (VO sup 2+ ) as a spectroscopic probe of metal binding to nitrohumic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangrich, A.S.; Vugman, N.V. (Universidad Federal do Parana, Parana (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica)

    1990-07-01

    A coal nitrohumic acid (CNHA) of high nitrogen content (compared with natural humic acid) was obtained by extraction from nitric acid oxidation products of a mineral coal. It was studied by e.s.r. and i.r. spectroscopies, using VO{sup 2+} as a probe of metal ion complexation sites. Spectroscopic data and a LCAO-MO ligand field calculation were used to evaluate the bond parameters of vanadyl-coal nitrohumic acid complex (VO-CNHA). In spite of the high nitrogen content of CNHA, plots of hyperfine coupling constants {lt}A{gt} versus isotropic {lt}g{gt} values indicate that nitrogen is not a donor atom in the complexation sites of these materials. The bond parameter values, {lt}A{gt} and {lt}g{gt}, and i.r. data suggest that VO{sup 2+} groups (in the CNHA molecules) are at sites with C{sub 4}{sub V}, symmetry having o-hydroxycarboxylic aromatic (salicylic) acids as equatorial ligands. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Probing initial-stages of ALD growth with dynamic in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2015-02-01

    The initial stages of ALD surface reactions are probed using dynamic in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (d-iSE) technique during plasma-enhanced ALD of zirconium nitride (ZrN) thin films in spectral range of 0.73-6.4 eV. The measured change in the ellipsometry parameter Δ, with every precursor (TDMAZr) and reactant (forming gas plasma) exposure is interpreted as the combined effect of film growth and change in surface chemistry during ALD. We present application of Bruggeman's effective-medium approximation (B-EMA) in the analysis of d-iSE data to determine fractional surface coverage (θ) of ALD grown film at the end of every deposition cycle. During the deposition of first few ZrN monolayers, d-iSE datasets are analyzed on the basis of surface diffusion enhanced ALD growth, where the surface adsorbed precursor molecules can diffuse over substrate surface to occupy energetically favorable surface sites. The determined surface coverage of ZrN films highlights the effects of substrate enhanced ALD growth.

  1. Investigation of a shock wave in an arcjet He plasma by using an electric probe and emission spectroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagawa, G.; Kozue, K.; Fujino, S.; Matsuoka, L.; Endo, T.; Namba, S. [Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Tamura, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Ezumi, N. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    We developed an arcjet plasma device having a converging and diverging supersonic conical nozzle. Bright and dark emission structures were formed, depending on the gas pressure in the expansion section. In order to understand the mechanism for the formation of the structures, we evaluated the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature) by using a single probe and a visible emission spectroscope. The analysis of the probe measurements showed no temperature variation around the bright emission region. The plasma density increased significantly by a factor of two. Similar trends were also observed in the spectroscopic measurements. Moreover, the cell width (wavelength) of the shock wave calculated from the compressible fluid dynamics was in good agreement with the experimental value, indicating that this emission structure was caused by a shock cell that could be described by using compressible flow dynamics.

  2. 6-Nitro-L-tryptophan: a novel spectroscopic probe of trp aporepressor and human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R S; Marmorstein, R Q

    1988-04-01

    The binding of 6-nitro-L-tryptophan to trp aporepressor and human serum albumin has been examined by visible difference spectroscopy and circular dichroism. 6-Nitro-L-tryptophan, prepared by nitration of L-tryptophan with nitric acid in glacial acetic acid, exhibits a visible and near-uv absorption spectrum with lambda max at about 330 nm (epsilon = 7 X 10(3) M-1 cm-1) and a shoulder near 380 nm in H2O. In the presence of trp aporepressor, the visible absorption intensity is sharply diminished. Visible difference spectral titration data give KD = 1.27 X 10(-4) M and n = 0.95 per subunit at 25 degrees C. While 6-nitro-L-tryptophan exhibits no significant circular dichroism between 300 and 500 nm, the complex with trp aporepressor exhibits strong circular dichroism signals, with a negative maximum at 386 nm (delta epsilon = -7.5 M-1 cm-1) and a positive maximum at 310 nm (delta epsilon = +6 M-1 cm-1). Circular dichroism titration data give KD = 1.69 X 10(-4) M and n = 0.90 per subunit at 25 degrees C. The KD values determined spectroscopically are in excellent agreement with that determined by equilibrium dialysis, KD = 1.5 X 10(-4) M at 25 degrees C. In the presence of human serum albumin, the spectrum of 6-nitro-L-tryptophan exhibits a blue shift and an increase in absorption intensity; similar changes are observed in solvents of low dielectric contrast such as 80% aqueous dioxane. Visible difference spectral titration data give KD = 8.0 X 10(-5) M and n = 0.95 for human serum albumin. The complex of 6-nitro-L-tryptophan with human serum albumin exhibits a strong positive circular dichroism maximum at 380 nm (delta epsilon = +9.8 M-1 cm-1) with a shoulder at 310-320 nm. Circular dichroism titration data give KD = 6.4 X 10(-5) M and n = 0.83, in good agreement with the visible difference spectral results. Taken together, our results demonstrate the utility of 6-nitro-L-tryptophan as a spectroscopic probe for tryptophan-binding proteins.

  3. Voltage-sensitive dye recording from axons, dendrites and dendritic spines of individual neurons in brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Marko; Gao, Xin; Zecevic, Dejan

    2012-11-29

    Understanding the biophysical properties and functional organization of single neurons and how they process information is fundamental for understanding how the brain works. The primary function of any nerve cell is to process electrical signals, usually from multiple sources. Electrical properties of neuronal processes are extraordinarily complex, dynamic, and, in the general case, impossible to predict in the absence of detailed measurements. To obtain such a measurement one would, ideally, like to be able to monitor, at multiple sites, subthreshold events as they travel from the sites of origin on neuronal processes and summate at particular locations to influence action potential initiation. This goal has not been achieved in any neuron due to technical limitations of measurements that employ electrodes. To overcome this drawback, it is highly desirable to complement the patch-electrode approach with imaging techniques that permit extensive parallel recordings from all parts of a neuron. Here, we describe such a technique - optical recording of membrane potential transients with organic voltage-sensitive dyes (V(m)-imaging) - characterized by sub-millisecond and sub-micrometer resolution. Our method is based on pioneering work on voltage-sensitive molecular probes (2). Many aspects of the initial technology have been continuously improved over several decades (3, 5, 11). Additionally, previous work documented two essential characteristics of V(m)-imaging. Firstly, fluorescence signals are linearly proportional to membrane potential over the entire physiological range (-100 mV to +100 mV; (10, 14, 16)). Secondly, loading neurons with the voltage-sensitive dye used here (JPW 3028) does not have detectable pharmacological effects. The recorded broadening of the spike during dye loading is completely reversible (4, 7). Additionally, experimental evidence shows that it is possible to obtain a significant number (up to hundreds) of recordings prior to any detectable

  4. Probing the resonance potential in the F atom reaction with hydrogen deuteride with spectroscopic accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zefeng; Che, Li; Qiu, Minghui; Wang, Xingan; Dong, Wenrui; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Xiuyan; Yang, Xueming; Sun, Zhigang; Fu, Bina; Lee, Soo-Y.; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Dong H.

    2008-01-01

    Reaction resonances are transiently trapped quantum states along the reaction coordinate in the transition state region of a chemical reaction that could have profound effects on the dynamics of the reaction. Obtaining an accurate reaction potential that holds these reaction resonance states and eventually modeling quantitatively the reaction resonance dynamics is still a great challenge. Up to now, the only viable way to obtain a resonance potential is through high-level ab initio calculations. Through highly accurate crossed-beam reactive scattering studies on isotope-substituted reactions, the accuracy of the resonance potential could be rigorously tested. Here we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the resonance-mediated F + HD → HF + D reaction at the full quantum state resolved level, to probe the resonance potential in this benchmark system. The experimental result shows that isotope substitution has a dramatic effect on the resonance picture of this important system. Theoretical analyses suggest that the full-dimensional FH2 ground potential surface, which was believed to be accurate in describing the resonance picture of the F + H2 reaction, is found to be insufficiently accurate in predicting quantitatively the resonance picture for the F + HD → HF + D reaction. We constructed a global potential energy surface by using the CCSD(T) method that could predict the correct resonance peak positions as well as the dynamics for both F + H2 → HF + H and F + HD → HF + D, providing an accurate resonance potential for this benchmark system with spectroscopic accuracy. PMID:18687888

  5. Near infrared two-photon excitation cross-sections of voltage-sensitive dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jonathan A N; Salzberg, Brian M; Yodh, Arjun G

    2005-10-15

    Microscopy based on voltage-sensitive dyes has proven effective for revealing spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal activity in vivo and in vitro. Two-photon microscopy using voltage-sensitive dyes offers the possibility of wide-field visualization of membrane potential on sub-cellular length scales, hundreds of microns below the tissue surface. Very little information is available, however, about the utility of voltage-sensitive dyes for two-photon imaging purposes. Here we report on measurements of two-photon fluorescence excitation cross-sections for nine voltage-sensitive dyes in a solvent, octanol, intended to simulate the membrane environment. Ultrashort light pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser were used for excitation from 790 to 960 nm, and fluorescein dye was used as a calibration standard. Overall, dyes RH795, RH421, RH414, di-8-ANEPPS, and di-8-ANEPPDHQ had the largest two-photon excitation cross-sections ( approximately 15 x 10(-50)cm4 s photon(-1)) in this wavelength region and are therefore potentially useful for two-photon microscopy. Interestingly, di-8-ANEPPDHQ, a chimera constructed from the potentiometric dyes RH795 and di-8-ANEPPS, exhibited larger cross-sections than either of its constituents.

  6. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    sodium inhibitory effect of ethanol on channel - mediated sodium influx channels ...Exprnmantal Trherpeutics Ped in I.SA. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels : Effects on Neurotoxin Binding1 MICHAEL J. MULLIN 2 and... sodium channels . This indirect allosteric mechanism for inhibition of [H]BTX-B binding. effect orethanol was concentration-dependent and was

  7. Spectroscopic probing of location and dynamics of an environment-sensitive intramolecular charge transfer probe within liposome membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2011-11-15

    The present work demonstrates the interaction of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) probe 5-(4-dimethylamino-phenyl)-penta-2,4-dienoic acid methyl ester (DPDAME) with liposome membranes of dimyristoyl-L-α-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoyl-L-α-phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) studied by steady-state absorption, emission and time-resolved emission techniques. A huge hypsochromic shift together with remarkable enhancement of fluorescence quantum yield of the polarity sensitive ICT emission of DPDAME upon interaction with the lipids has been rationalized in terms of incorporation of the probe into hydrophobic interior of the lipids. Compelling evidences for penetration of the probe into the hydrocarbon interior of the lipids have been deduced from intertwining different experimental results e.g., micropolarity in the immediate vicinity of the probe in lipid environments, steady-state anisotropy, red-edge excitation shift (REES), fluorescence quenching experiments and time-resolved measurements. The rotational relaxation dynamics study of the membrane-bound probe unveils the impartation of high degree of motional rigidity. Wavelength-selective emission behaviour paves way for monitoring of solvent-relaxation in the membranes. Overall, the ICT probe DPDAME displays its commendable sensitivity in deciphering the microheterogeneous environments of liposomal membranes of DMPC and DMPG and promises a new membrane-polarity sensitizing probe.

  8. Combined Optogenetics and Voltage Sensitive Dye Imaging at Single Cell Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eWilladt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Information processing in the central nervous system makes use of densely woven networks of neurons with complex dendritic and axonal arborizations. Studying signaling in such a network requires precise control over the activity of specific neurons and an understanding how the synaptic signals are integrated. We established a system using a recently published red-shifted voltage sensitive dye in slices from mice expressing channelrhodopsin in GABAergic neurons. Using a focused 473 nm laser for channelrhodopsin activation and 635 nm laser wide field illumination for voltage sensitive dye excitation we were able to simultaneously measure dendritic voltage transients and stimulate inhibitory synaptic connections. The combination of these techniques provides excellent spatiotemporal control over neuron activation and high resolution information on dendritic signal processing.

  9. Optical Imaging of Neurons in the Crab Stomatogastric Ganglion with Voltage-sensitive Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Wolfgang; Städele, Carola; Andras, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive dye imaging of neurons is a key methodology for the understanding of how neuronal networks are organised and how the simultaneous activity of participating neurons leads to the emergence of the integral functionality of the network. Here we present the methodology of application of this technique to identified pattern generating neurons in the crab stomatogastric ganglion. We demonstrate the loading of these neurons with the fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye Di-8-ANEPPQ and we show how to image the activity of dye loaded neurons using the MiCAM02 high speed and high resolution CCD camera imaging system. We demonstrate the analysis of the recorded imaging data using the BVAna imaging software associated with the MiCAM02 imaging system. The simultaneous voltage-sensitive dye imaging of the detailed activity of multiple neurons in the crab stomatogastric ganglion applied together with traditional electrophysiology techniques (intracellular and extracellular recordings) opens radically new opportunities for the understanding of how central pattern generator neural networks work. PMID:21490564

  10. Deltamethrin Inhibits the Human T-type Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channel (Cav3.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B. Symington

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine the effect of deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, on CaV3.2, a human T-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel expressed in Xenopus laevis (X.laevis oocytes. Cav3.2 cDNA was transcribed into cRNA; the cRNA was then injected into X.laevis oocytes and electrophysiologically characterized using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique with Ba2+ as a charge carrier. Deltamethrin (10-7 M reduced peak current in a nonreversible manner compared to the untreated control, but had no effect on the voltagedependent activation and inactivation kinetics. These findings confirm that human CaV3.2 is a target for deltamethrin and quite possibly other pyrethroid insecticides. These studies provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of the effect that pyrethroids have on voltage-sensitive calcium channels in general. This information will allow a more complete understanding of the molecular and cellular nature of pyrethroid-induced toxicity and expand our knowledge of the structure-activity relationships of pyrethroids with regard to their action on voltage-sensitive calcium channels.

  11. Electrophysiology of lead intoxication: effects on voltage-sensitive ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G

    1993-01-01

    Neuronal function depends on the activity of a variety of voltage-sensitive, ion-specific membrane channels, including channels permeable chiefly to sodium, potassium, and calcium. The plasma membranes of many neurons contain several types of each class of channel. In general, heavy metal ions exert little effect on voltage-sensitive sodium or potassium channels, but inhibit ion flow through voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC). The literature abounds with descriptions of different types of calcium channels in vertebrate neurons. These descriptions suggest that there are many physiologically and pharmacologically distinct calcium channels, some of them possibly cell-type specific. Among the heavy metals, Pb2+ is one of the most potent inhibitors of VSCC in both vertebrate and invertebrate neurons. Some heavy metals, including Ni2+ and Cd2+, are fairly selective against certain types of calcium channels. Limited evidence suggests that Pb2+ inhibits all calcium channel types within a given cell, with only minor differences in potency. However, there appear to be substantial differences among cell types in the concentration dependence of calcium channel inhibition by Pb2+. Therefore, to appreciate the range of effects of Pb2+ on calcium channels throughout the nervous system, it will be important to examine a large number of cell types. Pb2+ is highly permeable through at least some types of VSCC. Entry of Pb2+ into the neuronal cytoplasm through VSCC, followed by disturbance of intracellular functions, may be a major mechanism of Pb2+ neurotoxicity.

  12. Diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging: A multidimensional approach for probing microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeun; Doyle, Eamon K; Wisnowski, Jessica L; Kim, Joong Hee; Haldar, Justin P

    2017-03-19

    To propose and evaluate a novel multidimensional approach for imaging subvoxel tissue compartments called Diffusion-Relaxation Correlation Spectroscopic Imaging. Multiexponential modeling of MR diffusion or relaxation data is commonly used to infer the many different microscopic tissue compartments that contribute signal to macroscopic MR imaging voxels. However, multiexponential estimation is known to be difficult and ill-posed. Observing that this ill-posedness is theoretically reduced in higher dimensions, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging uses a novel multidimensional imaging experiment that jointly encodes diffusion and relaxation information, and then uses a novel constrained reconstruction technique to generate a multidimensional diffusion-relaxation correlation spectrum for every voxel. The peaks of the multidimensional spectrum are expected to correspond to the distinct tissue microenvironments that are present within each macroscopic imaging voxel. Using numerical simulations, experiment data from a custom-built phantom, and experiment data from a mouse model of traumatic spinal cord injury, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging is demonstrated to provide substantially better multicompartment resolving power compared to conventional diffusion- and relaxation-based methods. The diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging approach provides powerful new capabilities for resolving the different components of multicompartment tissue models, and can be leveraged to significantly expand the insights provided by MRI in studies of tissue microstructure. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC PROBES OF CHEMICAL DYNAMICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HALL, G.E.

    2006-05-30

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics group program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopic tools are developed and applied to problems in chemical dynamics. Recent topics have included the state-resolved studies of collision-induced electronic energy transfer, dynamics of barrierless unimolecular reactions, and the kinetics and spectroscopy of transient species.

  14. The Far Infrared Spectroscopic Explorer (FIRSPEX): probing the lifecycle of the ISM in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulou, D.; Caldwell, M.; Ellison, B.; Pearson, C.; Caux, E.; Cooray, A.; Gallego, J. D.; Gerin, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Goldsmith, P.; Kramer, C.; Lis, D. C.; Molinari, S.; Ossenkopf-Okada, V.; Savini, G.; Tan, B. K.; Tielens, X.; Viti, S.; Wiedner, M.; Yassin, G.

    2016-07-01

    The Far Infrared Spectroscopic Explorer (FIRSPEX) is a novel European-led astronomy mission concept developed to enable large area ultra high spectroscopic resolution surveys in the THz regime. FIRSPEX opens up a relatively unexplored spectral and spatial parameter space that will produce an enormously significant scientific legacy by focusing on the properties of the multi-phase ISM, the assembly of molecular clouds in our Galaxy and the onset of star formation; topics which are fundamental to our understanding of galaxy evolution. The mission uses a heterodyne instrument and a ~1.2 m primary antenna to scan large areas of the sky in a number of discreet spectroscopic channels from L2. The FIRSPEX bands centered at [CI] 809 GHz, [NII]1460 GHz, [CII]1900 GHz and [OI]4700 GHz have been carefully selected to target key atomic and ionic fine structure transitions difficult or impossible to access from the ground but fundamental to the study of the multi-phase ISM in the Universe. The need for state-of-the-art sensitivity dictates the use of superconducting mixers configured either as tunnel junctions or hot electron bolometers. This technology requires cooling to low temperatures, approaching 4K, in order to operate. The receivers will operate in double sideband configuration providing a total of 7 pixels on the sky. FIRSPEX will operate from L2 in both survey and pointed mode enabling velocity resolved spectroscopy of large areas of sky as well as targeted observations.

  15. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels. Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in Synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    concentration in the nonaqueuus (membrane) phase (Lyon et aL, 1981). Concentration- effect summarized in table 1 . When sodium channels were activated curves were...Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels : Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in DT (7 Synaptosomes E L C MICHAEL J. MULLIN’ and WALTER A. HUNT...1984). At the present time, the 8 1 structural and functional properties of the voltage-sensitive sodium channels are understood most completely

  16. Instrument for near infrared emission spectroscopic probing of human fingertips in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiken, J.; Deng, Bin; Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Shaheen, George; Rice, David; Stehlik, Dave; Fayos, John

    2010-03-01

    We present instrumentation for probing of volar side fingertip capillary beds with free space coupled near infrared light while collecting Raman, Rayleigh, and Mie scattered light as well as fluorescence. Fingertip skin capillary beds are highly vascularized relative to other tissues and present a desirable target for noninvasive probing of blood. But human hands and fingers in particular are also highly idiosyncratic body parts requiring specific apparatus to allow careful and methodical spectoscopic probing. The apparatus includes means for precise and reproducible placement of the tissues relative to the optical aperture. Appropriate means are provided for applying and maintaining pressure to keep surface tissues immobile during experiments while obtaining the desired blood content and flow. Soft matter, e.g., skin, extrudes into the aperture in response to any applied pressure, e.g., to keep the tissue in registration with the optical system, so the position, contact area, pressure, and force are continuously measured and recorded to produce feedback for an actuator applying force and to discern the compliance of the test subject. The compliance strongly affects the reliability of the measurement and human factors must be adequately managed in the case of in vivo probing. The apparatus produces reproducible observations and measurements that allow consistent probing of the tissues of a wide range of skin types.

  17. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction mechanisms of safranin T with herring sperm DNA using acridine orange as a fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jun; Wang, Xing-ming; Xu, Dong-ling; Ding, Li-sheng

    2014-03-01

    Under the condition of physiological pH environment (pH = 7.40), the interactions of safranin T (ST) with herring sperm DNA were studied by means of spectral methods using acridine orange (AO) as a fluorescence probe. The spectroscopic characteristics of DNA-AO in the case of ST (along with the increase of concentration) were observed in an aqueous medium. The binding constants for ST stranded DNA and competitive bindings of ST interacting with DNA-AO systems were examined by fluorescence spectra, and the binding mechanism of ST with DNA was researched via viscosity measurements. All the testimony manifested that bonding modes between ST and DNA were evidenced to be intercalative binding and electrostatic binding, and the combining constant of ST with DNA was obtained. The binding of ST to DNA was driven by entropy and enthalpy through the calculated thermodynamic parameters (Δr Hm (Ө), Δr Sm and Δr Gm (Ө)).

  18. Portable optical fiber probe-based spectroscopic scanner for rapid cancer diagnosis: a new tool for intraoperative margin assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Kang, Jeon Woong; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Feld, Michael S; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2012-01-01

    There continues to be a significant clinical need for rapid and reliable intraoperative margin assessment during cancer surgery. Here we describe a portable, quantitative, optical fiber probe-based, spectroscopic tissue scanner designed for intraoperative diagnostic imaging of surgical margins, which we tested in a proof of concept study in human tissue for breast cancer diagnosis. The tissue scanner combines both diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS), and has hyperspectral imaging capability, acquiring full DRS and IFS spectra for each scanned image pixel. Modeling of the DRS and IFS spectra yields quantitative parameters that reflect the metabolic, biochemical and morphological state of tissue, which are translated into disease diagnosis. The tissue scanner has high spatial resolution (0.25 mm) over a wide field of view (10 cm × 10 cm), and both high spectral resolution (2 nm) and high spectral contrast, readily distinguishing tissues with widely varying optical properties (bone, skeletal muscle, fat and connective tissue). Tissue-simulating phantom experiments confirm that the tissue scanner can quantitatively measure spectral parameters, such as hemoglobin concentration, in a physiologically relevant range with a high degree of accuracy (tissues showed that the tissue scanner can detect small foci of breast cancer in a background of normal breast tissue. This tissue scanner is simpler in design, images a larger field of view at higher resolution and provides a more physically meaningful tissue diagnosis than other spectroscopic imaging systems currently reported in literatures. We believe this spectroscopic tissue scanner can provide real-time, comprehensive diagnostic imaging of surgical margins in excised tissues, overcoming the sampling limitation in current histopathology margin assessment. As such it is a significant step in the development of a platform technology for intraoperative management of cancer, a

  19. Portable optical fiber probe-based spectroscopic scanner for rapid cancer diagnosis: a new tool for intraoperative margin assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyom Lue

    Full Text Available There continues to be a significant clinical need for rapid and reliable intraoperative margin assessment during cancer surgery. Here we describe a portable, quantitative, optical fiber probe-based, spectroscopic tissue scanner designed for intraoperative diagnostic imaging of surgical margins, which we tested in a proof of concept study in human tissue for breast cancer diagnosis. The tissue scanner combines both diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS, and has hyperspectral imaging capability, acquiring full DRS and IFS spectra for each scanned image pixel. Modeling of the DRS and IFS spectra yields quantitative parameters that reflect the metabolic, biochemical and morphological state of tissue, which are translated into disease diagnosis. The tissue scanner has high spatial resolution (0.25 mm over a wide field of view (10 cm × 10 cm, and both high spectral resolution (2 nm and high spectral contrast, readily distinguishing tissues with widely varying optical properties (bone, skeletal muscle, fat and connective tissue. Tissue-simulating phantom experiments confirm that the tissue scanner can quantitatively measure spectral parameters, such as hemoglobin concentration, in a physiologically relevant range with a high degree of accuracy (<5% error. Finally, studies using human breast tissues showed that the tissue scanner can detect small foci of breast cancer in a background of normal breast tissue. This tissue scanner is simpler in design, images a larger field of view at higher resolution and provides a more physically meaningful tissue diagnosis than other spectroscopic imaging systems currently reported in literatures. We believe this spectroscopic tissue scanner can provide real-time, comprehensive diagnostic imaging of surgical margins in excised tissues, overcoming the sampling limitation in current histopathology margin assessment. As such it is a significant step in the development of a

  20. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  1. Synchronization analysis of voltage-sensitive dye imaging during focal seizures in the rat neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Daisuke; Bahar, Sonya

    2011-12-01

    Seizures are often assumed to result from an excess of synchronized neural activity. However, various recent studies have suggested that this is not necessarily the case. We investigate synchronization during focal neocortical seizures induced by injection of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) in the rat neocortex in vivo. Neocortical activity is monitored by field potential recording and by the fluorescence of the voltage-sensitive dye RH-1691. After removal of artifacts, the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) signal is analyzed using the nonlinear dynamics-based technique of stochastic phase synchronization in order to determine the degree of synchronization within the neocortex during the development and spread of each seizure event. Results show a large, statistically significant increase in synchronization during seizure activity. Synchrony is typically greater between closer pixel pairs during a seizure event; the entire seizure region is synchronized almost exactly in phase. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first application of synchronization analysis methods to mammalian VSD imaging in vivo. Our observations indicate a clear increase in synchronization in this model of focal neocortical seizures across a large area of the neocortex; a sharp increase in synchronization during seizure events was observed in all 37 seizures imaged. The results are consistent with a recent computational study which simulates the effect of 4AP in a neocortical neuron model.

  2. Optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang-Lin

    2014-11-17

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to characterize the complex refractive index of chemical-vapor-deposited monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). The extraordinary large value of the refractive index in the visible frequency range is obtained. The absorption response shows a strong correlation between the magnitude of the exciton binding energy and band gap energy. Together with the observed giant spin-orbit splitting, these findings advance the fundamental understanding of their novel electronic structures and the development of monolayer TMDs-based optoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  3. Optical properties of nitrogen-doped graphene thin films probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, C.C. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Tseng, C.C.; Lin, C.T.; Li, L.J. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Liu, H.L., E-mail: hliu@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-28

    Nitrogen-doped graphene thin films were prepared by either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or electrochemical exfoliation (ECE). Their optical properties were determined in the spectral region of 0.73–6.42 eV and at temperatures between 200 and 350 K by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The parameters of the dispersive structures were derived by numerical fitting of the experimental data to the stacked layer model. The optical absorption spectrum of the CVD-grown thin films is characterized by an asymmetric Fano resonance in the ultraviolet frequency region. In contrast, the line shape of the ECE-grown thin films displays less asymmetric. The excitonic resonance of the nitrogen-doped thin films is overall blue shifted by ∼ 0.2–0.3 eV compared with that of undoped analog. We interpret these results in terms of the exothermic nature of triazine molecule adsorption due to binding to graphene's surface via electron rich nitrogen. - Highlights: • Optical properties of N-doped graphene films determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry • Fano resonance in the ultraviolet frequency region of all graphene film absorption spectra • Blueshift in the excitonic resonance of N-doped graphene thin films is observed.

  4. SPECTROSCOPIC INFRARED EXTINCTION MAPPING AS A PROBE OF GRAIN GROWTH IN IRDCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Wanggi [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Carey, Sean J. [Infrared Processing Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tan, Jonathan C. [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    We present spectroscopic tests of MIR to FIR extinction laws in IRDC G028.36+00.07, a potential site of massive star and star cluster formation. Lim and Tan developed methods of FIR extinction mapping of this source using Spitzer-MIPS 24 μm and Herschel-PACS 70 μm images, and by comparing to MIR Spitzer-IRAC 3–8 μm extinction maps, found tentative evidence for grain growth in the highest mass surface density regions. Here we present results of spectroscopic infrared extinction mapping using Spitzer-IRS (14–38 μm) data of the same Infrared dark cloud (IRDC). These methods allow us to first measure the SED of the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium that is in the foreground of the IRDC. We then carry out our primary investigation of measuring the MIR to FIR opacity law and searching for potential variations as a function of mass surface density within the IRDC. We find relatively flat, featureless MIR–FIR opacity laws that lack the ∼12 and ∼35 μm features associated with the thick water ice mantle models of Ossenkopf and Henning. Their thin ice mantle models and the coagulating aggregate dust models of Ormel et al. are a generally better match to the observed opacity laws. We also find evidence for generally flatter MIR to FIR extinction laws as mass surface density increases, strengthening the evidence for grain and ice mantle growth in higher density regions.

  5. Spectroscopic infrared extinction mapping as a probe of grain growth in IRDCs

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Wanggi; Tan, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    We present spectroscopic tests of MIR to FIR extinction laws in IRDC G028.36+00.07, a potential site of massive star and star cluster formation. Lim & Tan (2014) developed methods of FIR extinction mapping of this source using ${\\it Spitzer}$-MIPS ${\\rm 24\\mu m}$ and ${\\it Herschel}$-PACS ${\\rm 70\\mu m}$ images, and by comparing to MIR ${\\it Spitzer}$-IRAC $3$--${\\rm 8\\mu m}$ extinction maps, found tentative evidence for grain growth in the highest mass surface density regions. Here we present results of spectroscopic infrared extinction (SIREX) mapping using ${\\it Spitzer}$-IRS (14 to ${\\rm 38\\mu m}$) data of the same IRDC. These methods allow us to first measure the SED of the diffuse Galactic ISM that is in the foreground of the IRDC. We then carry out our primary investigation of measuring the MIR to FIR opacity law and searching for potential variations as a function of mass surface density within the IRDC. We find relatively flat, featureless MIR-FIR opacity laws that lack the $\\sim{\\rm 12\\mu m}$ an...

  6. Spectroscopic infrared extinction mapping as a probe of grain growth in IRDCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wanggi; Carey, Sean J.

    2014-07-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic tests of MIR to FIR extinction laws toward IRDC G028.36+00.07, a potential site of massive star formation. Lim & Tan (2014, hereafter LT14) developed methods of FIR extinction mapping of this source using Spitzer-MIPS 24 micron and Herschel-PACS 70 micron images, and extending the MIR 8 micron mapping methods of (Butler & Tan 2012, hereafter BT12), finding evidence for grain growth in the highest mass surface density regions. Here we present initial results of spectroscopic infrared extinction (SIREX) mapping using Spitzer-IRS (14 to 38 micron) data of the same IRDC. These methods allow us to measure the SED of the diffuse Galactic ISM, which we compare to theoretical models of Draine & Li (2007), as well as to search for opacity law variations with mass surface density within the IRDC. By comparison with theoretical dust models, e.g., Ossenkopf & Henning (1994) and Ormel et al. (2011), we are able to search for compositional signatures of the grain ices, such as water and methanol. We find evidence for generally flatter MIR to FIR extinction laws as mass surface density increases, strengthening the evidence for grain and ice mantle growth in higher density regions.

  7. Spectroscopic probe of the competitive binding of ethidium bromide and neomycin to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Medini Kanta; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    1995-03-01

    The three spectroscopic changes of ethidium bromide (EB) on its binding to DNA, namely red-shift of the νmax, enhancement of fluorescence and induced dichroism are utilized to study the competitive binding of neomycin (NMC) and EB to DNA. Reversion of νmax, decrease in fluorescence and reduction of dichroism of DNA-EB on addition of NMC shows that the binding of NMC and EB to DNA is competitive in nature, over a limited concentration of the polymer. The binding constant of EB-DNA falls from 4.00 × 10 6 to 2.27 × 10 4 1 mol -1 in the presence of added NMC.

  8. Laser spectroscopic probing of coexisting superfluid and insulating states of an atomic Bose-Hubbard system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinya; Inaba, Kensuke; Sugawa, Seiji; Shibata, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Ryuta; Yamashita, Makoto; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-04-01

    A system of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice has been regarded as an ideal quantum simulator for a Hubbard model with extremely high controllability of the system parameters. While making use of the controllability, a comprehensive measurement across the weakly to strongly interacting regimes in the Hubbard model to discuss the quantum many-body state is still limited. Here we observe a great change in the excitation energy spectra across the two regimes in an atomic Bose-Hubbard system by using a spectroscopic technique, which can resolve the site occupancy in the lattice. By quantitatively comparing the observed spectra and numerical simulations based on sum rule relations and a binary fluid treatment under a finite temperature Gutzwiller approximation, we show that the spectra reflect the coexistence of a delocalized superfluid state and a localized insulating state across the two regimes.

  9. Probing the carrier concentration profiles in phosphorus-implanted germanium using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry with photon energy in the 0.045-0.65 eV range was used to investigate germanium samples implanted with 30 keV phosphorus ions and annealed at 700 °C. The infrared response of implanted layers is dominated by free carrier absorption which is modeled using a Drude oscillator. The carrier concentration profiles were modeled using an error function, and compared with those obtained by electrochemical capacitance-voltage profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry. In the flat region of the carrier concentration profile, average carrier concentration and mobility of 1.40 × 1019 cm-3 and 336 cm2V-1s-1, respectively, were obtained. A phosphorus diffusivity of ˜1.2 × 10-13 cm2/s was obtained. The mobility versus carrier concentration relationships obtained for the implanted samples are close to the empirical relationship for bulk Ge.

  10. Analysis of Antimicrobial-Triggered Membrane Depolarisation Using Voltage Sensitive Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Derk te Winkel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial cytoplasmic membrane is a major inhibitory target for antimicrobial compounds. Commonly, although not exclusively, these compounds unfold their antimicrobial activity by disrupting the essential barrier function of the cell membrane. As a consequence, membrane permeability assays are central for mode of action studies analysing membrane-targeting antimicrobial compounds. The most frequently used in vivo methods detect changes in membrane permeability by following internalization of normally membrane impermeable and relatively large fluorescent dyes. Unfortunately, these assays are not sensitive to changes in membrane ion permeability which are sufficient to inhibit and kill bacteria by membrane depolarization. In this manuscript, we provide experimental advice how membrane potential, and its changes triggered by membrane-targeting antimicrobials can be accurately assessed in vivo. Optimized protocols are provided for both qualitative and quantitative kinetic measurements of membrane potential. At last, single cell analyses using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with fluorescence microscopy are introduced and discussed.

  11. Voltage-Sensitive Load Controllers for Voltage Regulation and Increased Load Factor in Distribution Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglass, Philip James; Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo; Østergaard, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    consumption which can be mapped to temperature setpoint offsets of thermostat controlled loads. In networks where a lower voltage level corresponds to high system load (and vice versa), this controller acts to regulate voltage and increase the load factor. Simulations are conducted on low- and medium-voltage......This paper presents a novel controller design for controlling appliances based on local measurements of voltage. The controller finds the normalized voltage deviation accounting for the sensitivity of voltage measurements to appliance state. The controller produces a signal indicating desired power...... distribution systems with residential loads including voltage-sensitive water heaters. In low-voltage systems, the results of the simulations show the controller to be effective at reducing the extremes of voltage and increasing the load factor while respecting end-use temperature constraints. In medium-voltage...

  12. Properties of new, long-wavelength, voltage-sensitive dyes in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, G; Choi, B-R; Azour, G; Lavasani, M; Tumbev, V; Salzberg, B M; Patrick, M J; Ernst, L A; Waggoner, A S

    2005-11-01

    Membrane potential measurements using voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) have made important contributions to our understanding of electrophysiological properties of multi-cellular systems. Here, we report the development of long wavelength VSDs designed to record cardiac action potentials (APs) from deeper layers in the heart. The emission spectrum of styryl VSDs was red-shifted by incorporating a thienyl group in the polymethine bridge to lengthen and retain the rigidity of the chromophore. Seven dyes, Pittsburgh I to IV and VI to VIII (PGH I-VIII) were synthesized and characterized with respect to their spectral properties in organic solvents and heart muscles. PGH VSDs exhibited 2 absorption, 2 excitation and 2 voltage-sensitive emission peaks, with large Stokes shifts (> 100 nm). Hearts (rabbit, guinea pig and Rana pipiens) and neurohypophyses (CD-1 mice) were effectively stained by injecting a bolus (10-50 microl) of stock solution of VSD (2-5 mM) dissolved in in dimethylsulfoxide plus low molecular weight Pluronic (16% of L64). Other preparations were better stained with a bolus of VSD (2-5 mM) Tyrode's solution at pH 6.0. Action spectra measured with a fast CCD camera showed that PGH I exhibited an increase in fractional fluorescence, DeltaF/F = 17.5 % per AP at 720 nm with 550 nm excitation and DeltaF/F = - 6% per AP at 830 nm with 670 nm excitation. In frog hearts, PGH1 was stable with approximately 30% decrease in fluorescence and AP amplitude during 3 h of intermittent excitation or 1 h of continuous high intensity excitation (300 W Xe-Hg Arc lamp), which was attributed to a combination of dye wash out > photobleaching > dynamic damage > run down of the preparation. The long wavelengths, large Stokes shifts, high DeltaF/F and low baseline fluorescence make PGH dyes a valuable tool in optical mapping and for simultaneous mapping of APs and intracellular Ca(2+).

  13. Probing the interaction of troxerutin with transfer RNA by spectroscopic and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subastri, A; Ramamurthy, C H; Suyavaran, A; Lokeswara Rao, P; Preedia Babu, E; Hari Krishna, K; Suresh Kumar, M; Thirunavukkarasu, C

    2015-12-01

    The studies on the interaction between tRNA (transfer RNA) and small molecules are an area of remarkable recent attention. For this notion a fundamental knowledge of the molecular features involving the interaction of small molecules with tRNA is crucial. Hence, in the present study we have investigated the interaction of TXER (troxerutin), natural bioflavonoid rutin derivative with yeast tRNA by using various spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking studies. The UV absorption and fluorescence emission studies demonstrated external binding of TXER on tRNA with low binding constant values as compared to strong binders. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy study revealed that TXER did not show any significant modification on native conformation of tRNA. Furthermore in electrochemical study, the complex of TXER-tRNA did not expose any noticeable positive potential peak shift which indicated an interaction of TXER with tRNA by electrostatic or external binding mode. The docking study showed that the hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions were involved in binding of TXER-tRNA with docking score -7.0 kcal/mol. These findings led us to confirm the interaction of TXER on tRNA through external binding with low binding affinity, indicating its potential bioapplication in the future.

  14. Comprehensive spectroscopic probing the interaction and conformation impairment of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by herbicide butachlor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Ling, Zhaoxing; Zhou, Xing; Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Butachlor is an effective herbicide to deal with undesired weeds selectively and is used at high levels in Asian countries. However, its interaction and impairment effect on BSA was still not clear. In this study, we investigated the interaction between butachlor and bovine serum albumin (BSA) by multi-spectroscopic methods including UV absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and fluorescence spectra under physiological conditions (pH=7.4). The results revealed that there was a static quenching of BSA induced by butachlor stemmed from the formation of complex. Based on thermodynamic data, the interaction of butachlor with BSA was due to happen, and van der Waals force as well as hydrogen bond were the major forces contributed to the interaction. The binding constant Kb and number of binding site of butachlor with BSA were 5.158×10(5) and 1.372 at 303K, respectively. The distance r between donor (BSA) and acceptor (butachlor) was 0.113nm, obtained according to the Förster theory. The results revealed that butachlor induced conformational changes in BSA but the secondary structure of BSA was still retained. In addition, the microenvironment around chromophore residues of BSA, for example, tryptophan, changed as well, resulting from the formation of more hydrogen bonds.

  15. Spectroscopic confirmation of z~7 LBGs: probing the earliest galaxies and the epoch of reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Pentericci, L; Vanzella, E; Castellano, M; Grazian, A; Dijkstra, M; Boutsia, K; Cristiani, S; Dickinson, M; Giallongo, E; Giavalisco, M; Maiolino, R; Moorwood, A; Santini, P

    2011-01-01

    We present the final results from our ultra-deep spectroscopic campaign with FORS2 at the ESO/VLT for the confirmation of z~7 "z--band dropout" candidates selected from our VLT/Hawk-I imaging survey over three independent fields. In particular we report on two newly discovered galaxies at redshift ~6.7 in the NTT deep field: both galaxies show a Ly-alpha emission line with rest-frame EWs of the order 15-20 A and luminosities of 2-4 X 10^{42} erg/s. We also present the results of ultra-deep observations of a sample of i-dropout galaxies, from which we set a solid upper limit on the fraction of interlopers. Out of the 20 z-dropouts observed we confirm 5 galaxies at 6.7 < z < 7.1. This is systematically below the expectations drawn on the basis of lower redshift observations: in particular there is a significant lack of objects with intermediate Ly-alpha EWs (between 20 and 55 A). We conclude that the trend for the fraction of Ly-alpha emission in LBGs that is constantly increasing from z~3 to z~6 is most ...

  16. Nanoscale structure and spectroscopic probing of Aβ1-40 fibril bundle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psonka-Antonczyk, Katarzyna; Hammarström, Per; Johansson, Leif; Lindgren, Mikael; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Nilsson, Peter; Nyström, Sofie

    2016-11-01

    Amyloid plaques composed of fibrillar Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. However, Aβ fibrils are morphologically heterogeneous. Conformation sensitive luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) are versatile tools for monitoring such fibril polymorphism in vivo and in vitro. Biophysical methods applied on in vitro generated Aβ fibrils, stained with LCOs with different binding and fluorescence properties, can be used to characterize the Aβ fibrillation in depth, far beyond that possible for in vivo generated amyloid plaques. In this study, in vitro fibrillation of the Aβ1-40 peptide was monitored by time-lapse transmission electron microscopy, LCO fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. Differences in the LCO binding in combination with nanoscale imaging revealed that spectral variation correlated with fibrils transforming from solitary filaments (Ø 2.5 nm) into higher order bundled structures (Ø 5 nm). These detailed in vitro experiments can be used to derive data that reflects the heterogeneity of in vivo generated Aβ plaques observed by LCO fluorescence. Our work provides new structural basis for targeted drug design and molecular probe development for amyloid imaging.

  17. A Novel Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Isoniazid Using Cu(Ⅱ)as Spectroscopic Probe Ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Hua; ZHANG,Yan; WEI,Xianjun; DU,Xinzhen; LI,Quanmin

    2009-01-01

    A novel method to determine isoniazid with high sensitivity and good selectivity has been established by using Cu(Ⅱ)as a spectroscopic probe ion.The experiment indicated that Cu(Ⅱ)Was reduced to Cu(Ⅰ)by isoniazid at pH 6.0,then the resulting Cu(Ⅰ)was precipitated with SCN- to form CuSCN that could be stayed upon the surface of water phase in the presence of NaN03.By determining the residual amount of Cu(Ⅱ)in the water phase,the indirect determination of isoniazid could be achieved.Good linear relationship between the amount of the reacted Cu(Ⅱ)and the concentration of isoniazid Was observed.with the linear range being 0.050-4.50μg·mL-1,and the detec-tion limit being 0.048μg·mL-1.This method has been successfully applied to determining isoniazid among phar-maceutical samples and patient urine samples.

  18. Conformers of β-aminoisobutyric acid probed by jet-cooled microwave and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuş, N.; Sharma, A.; Peña, I.; Bermúdez, M. C.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L.; Fausto, R.

    2013-04-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) has been studied in isolation conditions: in the gas phase and trapped into a cryogenic N2 matrix. A solid sample of the compound was vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through their rotational spectra in a supersonic expansion using two different spectroscopic techniques: broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and conventional molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Four conformers with structures of two types could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically: type A, bearing an OH⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond and its carboxylic group in the trans geometry (H-O-C=O dihedral ˜180°), and type B, having an NH⋯O bond and the cis arrangement of the carboxylic group. These two types of conformers could also be trapped from the gas phase into a cryogenic N2 matrix and probed by Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In situ irradiation of BAIBA isolated in N2 matrix of type B conformers using near-IR radiation tuned at the frequency of the O-H stretching 1st overtone (˜6930 cm-1) of these forms allowed to selectively convert them into type A conformers and into a new type of conformers of higher energy (type D) bearing an NH⋯O=C bond and a O-H "free" trans carboxylic group.

  19. A new combined nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopic probe applied to in situ investigations of catalysts and catalytic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, Jules C. J.; Mantle, Michael D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); York, Andrew P. E. [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Blounts Court, Sonning Common, Reading RG4 9NH (United Kingdom); McGregor, James, E-mail: james.mcgregor@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Both Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies are valuable analytical techniques capable of providing mechanistic information and thereby providing insights into chemical processes, including catalytic reactions. Since both techniques are chemically sensitive, they yield not only structural information but also quantitative analysis. In this work, for the first time, the combination of the two techniques in a single experimental apparatus is reported. This entailed the design of a new experimental probe capable of recording simultaneous measurements on the same sample and/or system of interest. The individual datasets acquired by each spectroscopic method are compared to their unmodified, stand-alone equivalents on a single sample as a means to benchmark this novel piece of equipment. The application towards monitoring reaction progress is demonstrated through the evolution of the homogeneous catalysed metathesis of 1‑hexene, with both experimental techniques able to detect reactant consumption and product evolution. This is extended by inclusion of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capabilities with a custom made MAS 7 mm rotor capable of spinning speeds up to 1600 Hz, quantified by analysis of the spinning sidebands of a sample of KBr. The value of this is demonstrated through an application involving heterogeneous catalysis, namely the metathesis of 2-pentene and ethene. This provides the added benefit of being able to monitor both the reaction progress (by NMR spectroscopy) and also the structure of the catalyst (by Raman spectroscopy) on the very same sample, facilitating the development of structure-performance relationships.

  20. Emission-Line Galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) Grism Survey. II: The Complete Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Pirzkal, Nor; Ly, Chun; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E; Grogin, Norman A; Dahlen, Tomas; Meurer, Gerhardt R; Walsh, Jeremy R; Hathi, Nimish P; Cohen, Seth H; Bellini, Andrea; Holwerda, Benne W; Straughn, Amber N; Mechtley, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on HST. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations to support the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data we are able to identify star forming galaxies within the redshift volume 0 1e9} M_sun decreases by an order of magnitude at z<0.5 relative to the number at 0.5

  1. Normalization of voltage-sensitive dye signal with functional activity measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaroh Takagaki

    Full Text Available In general, signal amplitude in optical imaging is normalized using the well-established DeltaF/F method, where functional activity is divided by the total fluorescent light flux. This measure is used both directly, as a measure of population activity, and indirectly, to quantify spatial and spatiotemporal activity patterns. Despite its ubiquitous use, the stability and accuracy of this measure has not been validated for voltage-sensitive dye imaging of mammalian neocortex in vivo. In this report, we find that this normalization can introduce dynamic biases. In particular, the DeltaF/F is influenced by dye staining quality, and the ratio is also unstable over the course of experiments. As methods to record and analyze optical imaging signals become more precise, such biases can have an increasingly pernicious impact on the accuracy of findings, especially in the comparison of cytoarchitechtonic areas, in area-of-activation measurements, and in plasticity or developmental experiments. These dynamic biases of the DeltaF/F method may, to an extent, be mitigated by a novel method of normalization, DeltaF/DeltaF(epileptiform. This normalization uses as a reference the measured activity of epileptiform spikes elicited by global disinhibition with bicuculline methiodide. Since this normalization is based on a functional measure, i.e. the signal amplitude of "hypersynchronized" bursts of activity in the cortical network, it is less influenced by staining of non-functional elements. We demonstrate that such a functional measure can better represent the amplitude of population mass action, and discuss alternative functional normalizations based on the amplitude of synchronized spontaneous sleep-like activity. These findings demonstrate that the traditional DeltaF/F normalization of voltage-sensitive dye signals can introduce pernicious inaccuracies in the quantification of neural population activity. They further suggest that normalization

  2. Langmuir Probe and Mass Spectroscopic Measurements in Inductively Coupled CF4 Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Electron and ion energy distribution functions and other plasma parameters such as plasma potential (V(sub p)) , electron temperature (T(sub e)), and electron and ion number densities (n (sub e) and n(sub i)) in low pressure CF4 plasmas have been measured. The experiments were conducted in a GEC cell using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) device powered by a 13.56 MHz radio-frequency (rf) power source. The measurements were made at 300 W of input rf power at 10, 30 and 50 mTorr gas pressures. Langmuir probe measurements suggest that n(sub e), n(sub i) and V(sub p) remain constant over 60% of the central electrode area, beyond which they decrease. Within the limits of experimental error (+/- 0.25 eV), T(sub e) remains nearly constant over the electrode area. T(sub e) and V(sub p) increase with a decrease in pressure. n(sub e) and n(sub i) are not affected as significantly as T(sub e) or V(sub p) by variation in the gas pressure. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurements indicate a highly non-Maxwellian plasma. CF3+ is the most dominant ion product of the plasma, followed by CF2+ and CF+. The concentrations of CF2+ and CF+ are much larger than that is possible from direct electron impact ionization of the parent gas. The cross-section data suggest that the direct electron impact ionization of fragment neutrals and negative ion production by electron attachment may be responsible for increase of the minor ions.

  3. Linear and Nonlinear Spectroscopic Probing of Solute Interactions with Chemically Modified Silica Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Mary J

    2011-02-09

    Solar energy conversion through biology would provide a renewable and nonpolluting abundance of energy. The bacterium Halobacterium salinarum converts solar to electrical energy by virtue of a transmembrane protein, bacteriorhodopsin. This transmembrane protein pumps protons across a nonconducting bilayer upon irradiation with green light. The bacterium evolved to perform this function inefficiently. If we were able to understand this process to engineer this protein for efficiency, then inexpensive energy production could be achieved. There are tens of thousands of different types of halobacteria, giving the opportunity to study different efficiencies and relating these to the protein structures. Technology does not yet exist to perform such screening. The goal of this research is to generate new separation technology that can ultimately enable such screening. This involves creating a method for separating oriented and functional transmembrane proteins that remain in an electrically insulating lipid bilayer, with aqueous solutions on either side of the bilayer. A pH change across the lipid bilayer upon irradiation of a known concentration of proteins would probe function. Differences in proton pumping efficiency for different proteins variants would provide structure-function information for engineering the proteins. A schematic diagram from the original proposal is shown here. The idea is that (a) a lipid bilayer supported on a hydrophilic polymer film will make the bilayer fluid, and (b) applying an electric field will cause electrophoretic migration of the transmembrane proteins. We demonstrated this concept experimentally in a paper that was published just after this new grant period started (Lipid Bilayers on Polyacrylamide Brushes for Inclusion of Membrane Proteins, Emily A. Smith, Jason W. Coym, Scott M. Cowell, Victor J. Hruby, Henry I. Yamamura, Mary J. Wirth, Langmuir, 21, 9644-9650, 2005). The electrophoretic mobility was slow (10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}/Vs

  4. Membrane potential measurements of isolated neurons using a voltage-sensitive dye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Fairless

    Full Text Available The ability to monitor changes in membrane potential is a useful tool for studying neuronal function, but there are only limited options available at present. Here, we have investigated the potential of a commercially available FLIPR membrane potential (FMP dye, developed originally for high throughput screening using a plate reader, for imaging the membrane potential of cultured cells using an epifluorescence-based single cell imaging system. We found that the properties of the FMP dye make it highly suitable for such imaging since 1 its fluorescence displayed a high signal-to-noise ratio, 2 robust signals meant only minimal exposure times of around 5 ms were necessary, and 3 bidirectional changes in fluorescence were detectable resulting from hyper- or depolarising conditions, reaching equilibrium with a time constant of 4-8 s. Measurements were possible independently of whether membrane potential changes were induced by voltage clamping, or manipulating the ionic distribution of either Na(+ or K(+. Since FMP behaves as a charged molecule which accumulates in the cytosol, equations based on the Boltzmann distribution were developed determining that the apparent charge of FMP which represents a measure of the voltage sensitivity of the dye, is between -0.62 and -0.72. Finally, we demonstrated that FMP is suitable for use in a variety of neuronal cell types and detects membrane potential changes arising from spontaneous firing of action potentials and through stimulation with a variety of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters.

  5. Voltage sensitive phosphatases: emerging kinship to protein tyrosine phosphatases from structure-function research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin eHobiger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The transmembrane protein Ci-VSP from the ascidian Ciona intestinalis was described as first member of a fascinating family of enzymes, the voltage sensitive phosphatases (VSPs. Ci-VSP and its voltage-activated homologs from other species are stimulated by positive membrane potentials and dephosphorylate the head groups of negatively charged phosphoinositide phosphates (PIPs. In doing so, VSPs act as control centers at the cytosolic membrane surface, because they intervene in signaling cascades that are mediated by PIP lipids. The characteristic motif CX5RT/S in the active site classifies VSPs as members of the huge family of cysteine-based protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs. Although PTPs have already been well characterized regarding both, structure and function, their relationship to VSPs has drawn only limited attention so far. Therefore, the intention of this review is to give a short overview about the extensive knowledge about PTPs in relation to the facts known about VSPs. Here, we concentrate on the structural features of the catalytic domain which are similar between both classes of phosphatases and their consequences for the enzymatic function. By discussing results obtained from crystal structures, molecular dynamics simulations, and mutagenesis studies, a possible mechanism for the catalytic cycle of VSPs is presented based on that one proposed for PTPs. In this way, we want to link the knowledge about the catalytic activity of VSPs and PTPs.

  6. Voltage-sensitive styryl dyes as singlet oxygen targets on the surface of bilayer lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, V S; Gavrilchik, A N; Kulagina, A O; Meshkov, I N; Pohl, P; Gorbunova, Yu G

    2016-08-01

    Photosensitizers are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic agents killing cancer cells by photooxidation of their components. Development of new effective photosensitive molecules requires profound knowledge of possible targets for reactive oxygen species, especially for its singlet form. Here we studied photooxidation of voltage-sensitive styryl dyes (di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, RH-421 and RH-237) by singlet oxygen on the surface of bilayer lipid membranes commonly used as cell membrane models. Oxidation was induced by irradiation of a photosensitizer (aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate) and monitored by the change of dipole potential on the surface of the membrane. We studied the drop of the dipole potential both in the case when the dye molecules were adsorbed on the same side of the lipid bilayer as the photosensitizer (cis-configuration) and in the case when they were adsorbed on the opposite side (trans-configuration). Based on a simple model, we determined the rate of oxidation of the dyes from the kinetics of change of the potential during and after irradiation. This rate is proportional to steady-state concentration of singlet oxygen in the membrane under irradiation. Comparison of the oxidation rates of various dyes reveals that compounds of ANEPPS series are more sensitive to singlet oxygen than RH type dyes, indicating that naphthalene group is primarily responsible for their oxidation.

  7. New Conotoxin SO-3 Targeting N-type Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective blockers of the N-type voltage-sensitive calcium (CaV channels are useful in the management of severe chronic pain. Here, the structure and function characteristics of a novel N-type CaV channel blocker, SO-3, are reviewed. SO-3 is a 25-amino acid conopeptide originally derived from the venom of Conus striatus, and contains the same 4-loop, 6-cysteine framework (C-C-CC-C-C as O-superfamily conotoxins. The synthetic SO-3 has high analgesic activity similar to ω-conotoxin MVIIA (MVIIA, a selective N-type CaV channel blocker approved in the USA and Europe for the alleviation of persistent pain states. In electrophysiological studies, SO-3 shows more selectivity towards the N-type CaV channels than MVIIA. The dissimilarity between SO-3 and MVIIA in the primary and tertiary structures is further discussed in an attempt to illustrate the difference in selectivity of SO-3 and MVIIA towards N-type CaV channels.

  8. Action of insecticidal N-alkylamides at site 2 of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottea, J.A.; Payne, G.T.; Soderlund, D.M. (Cornell Univ., Geneva, NY (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Nine synthetic N-alkylamides were examined as inhibitors of the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)batrachotoxinin A 20{alpha}-benzoate (({sup 3}H)BTX-B) to sodium channels and as activators of sodium uptake in mouse brain synaptoneurosomes. In the presence of scorpion (Leiurus quinquestriatus) venom, the six insecticidal analogues were active as both inhibitors of ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding and stimulators of sodium uptake. These findings are consistent with an action of these compounds at the alkaloid activator recognition site (site 2) of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel. The three noninsecticidal N-alkylamides also inhibited ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding but were ineffective as activators of sodium uptake. Concentration-response studies revealed that some of the insecticidal amides also enhanced sodium uptake through a second, high-affinity interaction that does not involve site 2, but this secondary effect does not appear to be correlated with insecticidal activity. The activities of N-alkylamides as sodium channel activators were influenced by the length of the alkenyl chain and the location of unsaturation within the molecule. These results further define the actions of N-alkylamides on sodium channels and illustrate the significance of the multiple binding domains of the sodium channel as target sites for insect control agents.

  9. Probing the mechanism of interaction of metoprolol succinate with human serum albumin by spectroscopic and molecular docking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Suma K; Jaldappagari, Seetharamappa

    2017-02-24

    In the present work, the mechanism of the interaction between a β1 receptor blocker, metoprolol succinate (MS) and human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological conditions was investigated by spectroscopic techniques, namely fluorescence, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR), fluorescence lifetime decay and circular dichroism (CD) as well as molecular docking and cyclic voltammetric methods. The fluorescence and lifetime decay results indicated that MS quenched the intrinsic intensity of HSA through a static quenching mechanism. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and binding constants for the MS-HSA system at 293, 298 and 303 K were obtained from the Stern-Volmer plot. Thermodynamic parameters for the interaction of MS with HSA were evaluated; negative values of entropy change (ΔG°) indicated the spontaneity of the MS and HSA interaction. Thermodynamic parameters such as negative ΔH° and positive ΔS° values revealed that hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic forces played a major role in MS-HSA interaction and stabilized the complex. The binding site for MS in HSA was identified by competitive site probe experiments and molecular docking studies. These results indicated that MS was bound to HSA at Sudlow's site I. The efficiency of energy transfer and the distance between the donor (HSA) and acceptor (MS) was calculated based on the theory of Fosters' resonance energy transfer (FRET). Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and CD results revealed that the binding of MS to HSA resulted in an obvious change in the conformation of HSA. Cyclic voltammograms of the MS-HSA system also confirmed the interaction between MS and HSA. Furthermore, the effects of metal ions on the binding of MS to HSA were also studied.

  10. Developmental regulation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The developmental regulation of the voltage-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel in rat skeletal muscle was studied in vivo and in vitro. In triceps surae muscle developing in vivo the development of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel occurred primarily during the first three postnatal weeks as determined by the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)saxitoxin. This development proceeded in two separate phases. The first phase occurs independently of continuing motor neuron innervation and accounts for 60% of the adult density of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels. The second phase, which begins about day 11, requires innervation. Muscle cells in primary culture were found to have both TTX-sensitive and insensitive Na/sup +/ channels. The development of the TTX-sensitive channel, in vitro, paralleled the initial innervation-independent phase of development observed in vivo. The density of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels in cultured muscle cells was regulated by electrical activity and cytosolic Ca/sup + +/ levels. Pharmacological blockade of the spontaneous electrical activity present in these cells lead to a nearly 2-fold increase in the surface density of TTX-sensitive channels. The turnover time of the TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel was measured by blocking the incorporation of newly synthesized channels with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked protein glycosylation. The regulation of channel density by electrical activity, cytosolic Ca/sup + +/levels, and agents affecting cyclic neucleotide levels had no effect on the turnover time of the TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel, indicating that these regulatory agents instead affect the synthesis of the channel.

  11. Allosteric modulation of neurotoxin binding to voltage-sensitive sodium channels by Ptychodiscus brevis toxin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, R G; Jover, E; Couraud, F; Baden, D G; Catterall, W A

    1987-03-01

    The effects of Ptychodiscus brevis toxin 2 (PbTx-2) on the binding of neurotoxins at four different neurotoxin receptor sites on voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes were examined. Binding of saxitoxin at neurotoxin receptor site 1 and Leiurus quinquestriatus alpha-scorpion toxin (LqTx) at neurotoxin receptor site 3 was unaffected. PbTx-2 enhanced binding of batrachotoxinin A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B) to neurotoxin receptor site 2 and Centruroides suffusus suffusus beta-scorpion toxin (CsTx II) to site 4 on sodium channels. These results support the proposal that PbTx-2 and related toxins act at a new receptor site (site 5) that has not been previously analyzed in binding experiments. Half-maximal effects of PbTx-2 were observed in the range of 20-50 nM PbTx-2. The enhancement of BTX-B binding was reduced by depolarization. Saturating concentrations of PbTx-2 reduced KD values for binding of BTX-B and CsTx-II 2.9-fold and 2.6-fold, respectively. The effects of PbTx-2 and LqTx in enhancing BTX-B binding were synergistic. A model involving both preferential binding of BTX-B, PbTx-2, LqTx, and CsTx II to active states of sodium channels and allosteric interactions among the four receptor sites at which these toxins act accommodates these and previous results.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of membrane potential changes in multiple pattern generating neurons using voltage sensitive dye imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Städele, Carola; Andras, Peter; Stein, Wolfgang

    2012-01-15

    Optical imaging using voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) is a promising technique for the simultaneous activity recording of many individual neurons. While such simultaneous recordings are critical for the understanding of the integral functionality of neural systems, functional interpretations on a single neuron level are difficult without knowledge of the connectivity of the underlying circuit. Central pattern generating circuits, such as the pyloric and gastric mill circuits in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of crustaceans, allow such investigations due to their well-known connectivities and have already contributed much to our understanding of general neuronal mechanisms. Here we present for the first time simultaneous optical recordings of the pattern generating neurons in the STG of two crustacean species using bulk loading of the VSD di-4-ANEPPS. We demonstrate the recording of firing activities and synaptic interactions of the circuit neurons as well as inter-circuit interactions in their functional context, i.e. without artificial stimulation. Neurons could be uniquely identified using simple event-triggered averaging. We tested this technique in two different species of crustaceans (lobsters and crabs), since several crustacean species are used for studying motor pattern generation. The signal-to-noise ratio of the optical signal was high enough in both species to derive phase-relationship between the network neurons, as well as action potentials and excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. We argue that imaging of neural networks with identifiable neurons with well-known connectivity, like in the STG, is crucial for the understanding of emergence of network functionality.

  13. Differential sensitivity of rat voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms to pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2006-07-15

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides are potent inhibitors of insect and mammalian voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In mammals, there are nine sodium channel alpha subunit isoforms that have unique distributions and pharmacological properties, but no published data exist that compare the relative sensitivity of these different mammalian sodium channel isoforms to inhibition by pyrazoline-type insecticides. This study employed the Xenopus oocyte expression system to examine the relative sensitivity of rat Na(v)1.2a, Na(v)1.4, Na(v)1.5, and Na(v)1.8 sodium channel alpha subunit isoforms to the pyrazoline-type insecticides indoxacarb, DCJW, and RH 3421. Additionally, we assessed the effect of coexpression with the rat beta1 auxiliary subunit on the sensitivity of the Na(v)1.2a and Na(v)1.4 isoforms to these compounds. The relative sensitivity of the four sodium channel alpha subunits differed for each of the three compounds we examined. With DCJW, the order of sensitivity was Na(v)1.4 > Na(v)1.2a > Na(v)1.5 > Na(v)1.8. In contrast, the relative sensitivity of these isoforms to indoxacarb differed from that to DCJW: the Na(v)1.8 isoform was most sensitive, the Na(v)1.4 isoform was completely insensitive, and the sensitivities of the Na(v)1.5 and Na(v)1.2a isoforms were intermediate between these two extremes. Moreover, the pattern of sensitivity to RH 3421 among these four isoforms was different from that for either indoxacarb or DCJW: the Na(v)1.4 isoform was most sensitive to RH 3421, whereas the sensitivities of the remaining three isoforms were substantially less than that of the Na(v)1.4 isoform and were approximately equivalent. The only statistically significant effect of coexpression of either the Na(v)1.2a or Na(v)1.4 isoforms with the beta1 subunit was the modest reduction in the sensitivity of the Na(v)1.2a isoform to RH 3421. These results demonstrate that mammalian sodium channel isoforms differ in their sensitivities to pyrazoline-type insecticides.

  14. Dynamical co-existence of excitons and free carriers in perovskite probed by density-resolved fluorescent spectroscopic method

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiangyuan; Lv, Yanping; Wang, Shufeng; Wang, Kai; Shi, Yantao; Xiao, Lixin; Chen, Zhijian; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Using transient fluorescent spectra at time-zero, we develop a density-resolved fluorescent spectroscopic method for investigating photoproducts in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite and related photophysics. The density dependent dynamical co-existence of excitons and free carriers over a wide density range is experimentally observed for the first time. The exciton binding energy (EB) and the effective mass of electron-hole pair can be estimated based on such co-existence. No ionic polarization is found contributing to photophysical behavior. It also solves the conflict between the large experimentally measured EB and the small predicted values. The spectroscopic method also helps to detect the true free carrier density under continuous illumination without the interference of ionic conductivity. Our methods and results profoundly enrich the study and understanding of the photophysics in perovskite materials for photovoltaic applications.

  15. A Rationally Designed, General Strategy for Membrane Orientation of Photoinduced Electron Transfer-Based Voltage-Sensitive Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh U; Yin, Hang; Pourmandi, Narges; James, Feroz; Adil, Maroof M; Schaffer, David V; Wang, Yi; Miller, Evan W

    2017-02-17

    Voltage imaging with fluorescent dyes offers promise for interrogating the complex roles of membrane potential in coordinating the activity of neurons in the brain. Yet, low sensitivity often limits the broad applicability of optical voltage indicators. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to guide the design of new, ultrasensitive fluorescent voltage indicators that use photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) as a voltage-sensing switch. MD simulations predict an approximately 16% increase in voltage sensitivity resulting purely from improved alignment of dye with the membrane. We confirm this theoretical finding by synthesizing 9 new voltage-sensitive (VoltageFluor, or VF) dyes and establishing that all of them display the expected improvement of approximately 19%. This synergistic outworking of theory and experiment enabled computational and theoretical estimation of VF dye orientation in lipid bilayers and has yielded the most sensitive PeT-based VF dye to date. We use this new voltage indicator to monitor voltage spikes in neurons from rat hippocampus and human pluripotent-stem-cell-derived dopaminergic neurons.

  16. Fine-tuning of voltage sensitivity of the Kv1.2 potassium channel by interhelix loop dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Rheanna; Sharmin, Nazlee; Morgan, Carla; Gallin, Warren J

    2013-04-01

    Many proteins function by changing conformation in response to ligand binding or changes in other factors in their environment. Any change in the sequence of a protein, for example during evolution, which alters the relative free energies of the different functional conformations changes the conditions under which the protein will function. Voltage-gated ion channels are membrane proteins that open and close an ion-selective pore in response to changes in transmembrane voltage. The charged S4 transmembrane helix transduces changes in transmembrane voltage into a change in protein internal energy by interacting with the rest of the channel protein through a combination of non-covalent interactions between adjacent helices and covalent interactions along the peptide backbone. However, the structural basis for the wide variation in the V50 value between different voltage-gated potassium channels is not well defined. To test the role of the loop linking the S3 helix and the S4 helix in voltage sensitivity, we have constructed a set of mutants of the rat Kv1.2 channel that vary solely in the length and composition of the extracellular loop that connects S4 to S3. We evaluated the effect of these different loop substitutions on the voltage sensitivity of the channel and compared these experimental results with molecular dynamics simulations of the loop structures. Here, we show that this loop has a significant role in setting the precise V50 of activation in Kv1 family channels.

  17. Fast calcium and voltage-sensitive dye imaging in enteric neurones reveal calcium peaks associated with single action potential discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, K; Michaelis, M; Mazzuoli, G; Mueller, K; Vanden Berghe, P; Schemann, M

    2011-12-15

    Slow changes in [Ca(2+)](i) reflect increased neuronal activity. Our study demonstrates that single-trial fast [Ca(2+)](i) imaging (≥200 Hz sampling rate) revealed peaks each of which are associated with single spike discharge recorded by consecutive voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging in enteric neurones and nerve fibres. Fast [Ca(2+)](i) imaging also revealed subthreshold fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Nicotine-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) peaks were reduced by -conotoxin and blocked by ruthenium red or tetrodotoxin. Fast [Ca(2+)](i) imaging can be used to directly record single action potentials in enteric neurones. [Ca(2+)](i) peaks required opening of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels as well as Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores.

  18. Cortical long-range interactions embed statistical knowledge of natural sensory input: a voltage-sensitive dye imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, Selim; Jancke, Dirk; König, Peter

    2013-01-01

    How is contextual processing as demonstrated with simplified stimuli, cortically enacted in response to ecologically relevant complex and dynamic stimuli? Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we captured mesoscopic population dynamics across several square millimeters of cat primary visual cortex. By presenting natural movies locally through either one or two adjacent apertures, we show that simultaneous presentation leads to mutual facilitation of activity. These synergistic effects were most effective when both movie patches originated from the same natural movie, thus forming a coherent stimulus in which the inherent spatio-temporal structure of natural movies were preserved in accord with Gestalt principles of perceptual organization. These results suggest that natural sensory input triggers cooperative mechanisms that are imprinted into the cortical functional architecture as early as in primary visual cortex.

  19. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA using boric acid-functionalized nano-microsphere fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Yan; Wei, Jing-Ru; Pan, Jiong-Xiu; Zhang, Wei; Dang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-15

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is the sixth base of DNA. It is involved in active DNA demethylation and can be a marker of diseases such as cancer. In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate (PBAQA-PGMA) fluorescent probe to detect the 5hmC content of genomic DNA based on T4 β-glucosyltransferase-catalyzed glucosylation of 5hmC. The fluorescence-enhanced intensity recorded from the DNA sample was proportional to its 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content and could be quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The developed probe showed good detection sensitivity and selectivity and a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of 5 hmC within a 0-100nM range. Compared with other fluorescence detection methods, this method not only could determine trace amounts of 5 hmC from genomic DNA but also could eliminate the interference of fluorescent dyes and the need for purification. It also could avoid multiple labeling. Because the PBAQA-PGMA probe could enrich the content of glycosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxycytidine from a complex ground substance, it will broaden the linear detection range and improve sensitivity. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.167nM after enrichment. Furthermore, the method was successfully used to detect 5-hydroxymethylcytosine from mouse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Comprehensive Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation to Probe the Interaction of Antineoplastic Drug Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid with Serum Albumins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Nusrat

    Full Text Available Exogenous drugs that are used as antidote against chemotheray, inflammation or viral infection, gets absorbed and interacts reversibly to the major serum transport protein i.e. albumins, upon entering the circulatory system. To have a structural guideline in the rational drug designing and in the synthesis of drugs with greater efficacy, the binding mechanism of an antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory drug Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA with human and bovine serum albumins (HSA & BSA were examined by spectroscopic and computational methods. NDGA binds to site II of HSA with binding constant (Kb ~105 M-1 and free energy (ΔG ~ -7.5 kcal.mol-1. It also binds at site II of BSA but with lesser binding affinity (Kb ~105 M-1 and ΔG ~ -6.5 kcal.mol-1. The negative value of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS for both the albumins at three different temperatures confirmed that the complex formation process between albumins and NDGA is spontaneous and exothermic. Furthermore, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions are the main forces involved in complex formation of NDGA with both the albumins as evaluated from fluorescence and molecular docking results. Binding of NDGA to both the albumins alter the conformation and causes minor change in the secondary structure of proteins as indicated by the CD spectra.

  1. Probing the interaction of a therapeutic flavonoid, pinostrobin with human serum albumin: multiple spectroscopic and molecular modeling investigations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevin R Feroz

    Full Text Available Interaction of a pharmacologically important flavonoid, pinostrobin (PS with the major transport protein of human blood circulation, human serum albumin (HSA has been examined using a multitude of spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking studies. Analysis of the fluorescence quenching data showed a moderate binding affinity (1.03 × 10(5 M(-1 at 25°C between PS and HSA with a 1∶1 stoichiometry. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data (ΔS = +44.06 J mol(-1 K(-1 and ΔH = -15.48 kJ mol(-1 and molecular simulation results suggested the involvement of hydrophobic and van der Waals forces, as well as hydrogen bonding in the complex formation. Both secondary and tertiary structural perturbations in HSA were observed upon PS binding, as revealed by intrinsic, synchronous, and three-dimensional fluorescence results. Far-UV circular dichroism data revealed increased thermal stability of the protein upon complexation with PS. Competitive drug displacement results suggested the binding site of PS on HSA as Sudlow's site I, located at subdomain IIA, and was well supported by the molecular modelling data.

  2. Spectroscopic diagnostics of active screen plasma nitriding processes: on the interplay of active screen and model probe plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-09-01

    In a reactor used for active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) the interplay of two plasma types, (i) the plasma of the cylindrical active screen driven in a pulsed dc mode (f = 1 kHz, 60% duty cycle) and (ii) the plasma at an internal model probe driven in a cw dc mode, ignited in a low pressure H2-N2 gas mixture (p = 3 mbar) containing small amounts of CH4 and CO2 have been studied by tunable diode laser infrared absorption (TDLAS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. Applying in situ TDLAS the evolution of the carbon containing precursors, CH4 and CO2, and of the reaction products, NH3, HCN, CO and H2O, has been monitored. The degree of dissociation of the carbon containing precursor molecules varied between 70% and 92%. The concentrations of the reaction products were found to be in the range 1012…1015 molecules cm-3. By analyzing the development of the molecular concentrations at changes of gas mixtures and plasma power values, it was found that (i) HCN and NH3 are the main products of plasma conversion in the case of methane admixture and (ii) CO, HCN and NH3 in the carbon dioxide case. The fragmentation efficiencies of methane and carbon dioxide (RF(CH4)  ≈  1…2   ×   1015 molecules J-1, RF(CO2)  ≈  0.5…1.0   ×   1016 molecules J-1) and the respective conversion efficiencies to the product molecules (R C(product) ≈ 1013-1015 molecules J-1) have been determined for different gas mixtures and plasma power values, while the influence of probe and screen plasmas, i.e. the phenomena caused by the interplay of both plasma sources, was analyzed. The additional usage of the plasma at the model probe has a sensitive influence on the generation of the reaction products, in particular that of NH3 and HCN. With the help of OES the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined, which increases with power from 770 K to 950 K. Also with power the ionic component of nitrogen molecules, i

  3. Probing of possible olanzapine binding site on human serum albumin: Combination of spectroscopic methods and molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahlaei, Mohsen, E-mail: mohsenshahlaei@yahoo.com [Nano drug delivery research Center, Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, Behnoosh [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Student research committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadrjavadi, Komail [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodarahmi, Reza, E-mail: rkhodarahmi@mbrc.ac.ir [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-drug binding affinity is one of the major factors that determine the pharmacokinetics, halftime and bioavailability of drugs in various tissues. In the present study, the interaction of olanzapine (OLZ), a thienobenzodiazepine drug, administered for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with HSA has been studied using spectroscopic methods such as ultraviolet absorbance, fluorescence and FTIR combined with computational procedures. Analyzing of the Stern–Volmer quenching data showed only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at 298 K. Thermodynamic analyses showed enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°) were 28.03±3.42 kJ mol{sup −1} and −25.52±11.52 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}, respectively. Molecular docking results suggested the hydrophobic residues such as Val{sub 216}, Leu{sub 327}, Ala{sub 350} and polar residues such as Glu{sub 354} play an important role in the drug binding. Decrement in α-helix content of the protein upon OLZ binding was also confirmed by evidences provided by molecular dynamics simulation as well as FTIR spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Leu{sub 327}, Ala{sub 350} as well as hydrophilic residues of HSA play an important role in the binding reaction. • The drug has only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at 298 K. • The drug binds near to site I.

  4. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF z {approx} 7 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES: PROBING THE EARLIEST GALAXIES AND THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentericci, L.; Fontana, A.; Castellano, M.; Grazian, A.; Boutsia, K.; Giallongo, E.; Maiolino, R.; Paris, D.; Santini, P. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33,00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Vanzella, E.; Cristiani, S. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); Dijkstra, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany); Dickinson, M. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Giavalisco, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Moorwood, A., E-mail: laura.pentericci@oa-roma.inaf.it [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-12-20

    We present the final results from our ultra-deep spectroscopic campaign with FORS2 at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) for the confirmation of z {approx_equal} 7 'z-band dropout' candidates selected from our VLT/Hawk-I imaging survey over three independent fields. In particular, we report on two newly discovered galaxies at redshift {approx}6.7 in the New Technology Telescope Deep Field. Both galaxies show an Ly{alpha} emission line with rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) of the order of 15-20 A and luminosities of (2-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. We also present the results of ultra-deep observations of a sample of i-dropout galaxies, from which we set a solid upper limit on the fraction of interlopers. Out of the 20 z-dropouts observed we confirm 5 galaxies at 6.6 < z < 7.1. This is systematically below the expectations drawn on the basis of lower redshift observations: in particular, there is a significant lack of objects with intermediate Ly{alpha} EWs (between 20 and 55 A). We conclude that the observed trend for the rising fraction of Ly{alpha} emission in Lyman break galaxies from z {approx} 3 to z {approx} 6 is most probably reversed from z {approx} 6 to z {approx} 7. Explaining the observed rapid change in the Ly{alpha} emitter fraction among the dropout population with reionization requires a fast evolution of the neutral fraction of hydrogen in the universe. Assuming that the universe is completely ionized at z = 6 and adopting a set of semi-analytical models, we find that our data require a change of the neutral hydrogen fraction of the order of {Delta}{chi}{sub H{sub i}}{approx}0.6 in a time {Delta}z {approx} 1, provided that the escape fraction does not increase dramatically over the same redshift interval.

  5. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging reveals shifting spatiotemporal spread of whisker-induced activity in rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Brian R; Friedman, Robert M; Winberry, Jeremy E; Ebner, Ford F; Roe, Anna W

    2013-05-01

    In rats, navigating through an environment requires continuous information about objects near the head. Sensory information such as object location and surface texture are encoded by spike firing patterns of single neurons within rat barrel cortex. Although there are many studies using single-unit electrophysiology, much less is known regarding the spatiotemporal pattern of activity of populations of neurons in barrel cortex in response to whisker stimulation. To examine cortical response at the population level, we used voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging to examine ensemble spatiotemporal dynamics of barrel cortex in response to stimulation of single or two adjacent whiskers in urethane-anesthetized rats. Single whisker stimulation produced a poststimulus fluorescence response peak within 12-16 ms in the barrel corresponding to the stimulated whisker (principal whisker). This fluorescence subsequently propagated throughout the barrel field, spreading anisotropically preferentially along a barrel row. After paired whisker stimulation, the VSD signal showed sublinear summation (less than the sum of 2 single whisker stimulations), consistent with previous electrophysiological and imaging studies. Surprisingly, we observed a spatial shift in the center of activation occurring over a 10- to 20-ms period with shift magnitudes of 1-2 barrels. This shift occurred predominantly in the posteromedial direction within the barrel field. Our data thus reveal previously unreported spatiotemporal patterns of barrel cortex activation. We suggest that this nontopographical shift is consistent with known functional and anatomic asymmetries in barrel cortex and that it may provide an important insight for understanding barrel field activation during whisking behavior.

  6. Affinity purification of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel from electroplax with resins selective for sialic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, W.M.; Emerick, M.C.; Agnew, W.S. (Yale Univ. School of medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1989-07-11

    The voltage-sensitive sodium channel present in the eel (Electrophorus electricus) has an unusually high content of sialic acid, including {alpha}-(2{yields}8)-linked polysialic acid, not found in other electroplax membrane glycopeptides. Lectins from Limax flavus (LFA) and wheat germ (WGA) proved the most effective of 11 lectin resins tried. The most selective resin was prepared from IgM antibodies against Neisseria meningitidis {alpha}-(2{yields}8)-polysialic acid which were affinity purified and coupled to Sepharose 4B. The sodium channel was found to bind to WGA, LFA, and IgM resins and was readily eluted with the appropriate soluble carbohydrates. Experiments with LFA and IgM resins demonstrated binding and unbinding rates and displacement kinetics, which suggest highly specific binding at multiple sites on the sodium channel protein. In preparative-scale purification of protein previously fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography, without stabilizing TTX, high yields were reproducibly obtained. Further, when detergent extracts were prepared from electroplax membranes fractionated by low-speed sedimentation, a single step over the IgM resin provided a 70-fold purification, yielding specific activities of 3,200 pmol of ({sup 3}H)TTX-binding sites/mg of protein and a single polypeptide of {approximately}285,000 Da on SDS-acrylamide gels. No small peptides were observed after this 5-h isolation. The authors describe a cation-dependent stabilization with millimolar levels of monovalent and micromolar levels of divalent species.

  7. Purification of binding protein for Tityus gamma toxin identified with the gating component of the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, R I; Schmid, A; Lombet, A; Barhanin, J; Lazdunski, M

    1983-01-01

    The gating component associated with the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel from electroplax membranes of Electrophorus electricus has been purified by using toxin gamma from the venom of the scorpion Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. The toxin-binding site was efficiently solubilized with Lubrol PX, resulting in an extract of high initial specific activity. Purification was achieved by adsorption of the toxin-binding component to DEAE-Sephadex A-25 followed by desorption at high ionic strength and chromatography on either wheat germ agglutinin-Ultrogel or Sepharose 6B. Maximal final specific activities were at least 42% of the specific activity expected for a pure toxin-binding component. The purified material exhibited a Stokes radius of 85 A, and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated a single polypeptide component of Mr 270,000. Furthermore, tetrodotoxin binding activity and Tityus gamma toxin binding activity copurified, suggesting that the selectivity filter and the gating component of the Na+ channel are carried by the same polypeptide chain. Images PMID:6306665

  8. Purification of the tetrodotoxin-binding component associated with the voltage-sensitive sodium channel from Electrophorus electricus electroplax membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, W S; Levinson, S R; Brabson, J S; Raftery, M A

    1978-01-01

    The tetrodotoxin-binding component associated with the voltage-sensitive sodium channel from electroplax membranes of Electrophorus electricus has been purified. The toxin-binding site could be efficiently solubilized with Lubrol-PX, resulting in an extract of high initial specific activity. Purification was facilitated by the development of a rapid, quantitative binding assay. The binding component was stabilized during purification by the use of mixed lipid/detergent micelles of defined composition, and by the saturation of the site with tetrodotoxin. The purification was achieved by means of a highly selective adsorption of the toxin-binding component to DEASE-Sephadex A-25, followed by desorption at high ionic strength and chromatography over Sepharose 6B. Final peak specific activities were at least 50% of the specific activity expected for a pure, undenatured toxin-binding componenet of 230,000 molecular weight. The purified material exhibited a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 8 S and an unusual Stokes radius of 95 A. Purified material showed a relatively simple pattern on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, being comprised of only three polypeptides. PMID:275831

  9. Reconstituted voltage-sensitive sodium channel from Electrophorus electricus: chemical modifications that alter regulation of ion permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, E C; Tomiko, S A; Agnew, W S

    1987-01-01

    At equilibrium, voltage-sensitive sodium channels normally are closed at all potentials. They open transiently in response to changes in membrane voltage or chronically under the influence of certain neurotoxins. Covalent modifications that result in chronic opening may help identify molecular domains involved in conductance regulation. Here, the purified sodium channel from electric eel electroplax, reconstituted in artificial liposomes, has been used to screen for such modifications. When the liposomes were treated with the alkaloid neurotoxin batrachotoxin, sodium-selective ion fluxes were produced, with permeability ratios PNa greater than PTl greater than PK greater than PRb greater than PCs. When the liposomes were treated with either of two oxidizing reagents (N-bromoacetamide or N-bromosuccinimide), or with Pronase or trypsin, ion-selective fluxes also were stimulated. These were blocked by tetrodotoxin and the anesthetic QX-314 in a manner suggesting that only modification of the cytoplasmic protein surface resulted in stimulation. Limited exposure to trypsin resulted in strong flux activation, with the concomitant appearance of peptide fragments with masses of approximately equal to 130, 70, and 38 kDa and fragments with masses of 45 and 24 kDa appearing later. We propose that characterization of these fragments may allow identification of channel domains important for inactivation gating. Images PMID:2442755

  10. Long-Term Spatiotemporal Reconfiguration of Neuronal Activity Revealed by Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging in the Cerebellar Granular Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gandolfi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the spatiotemporal organization of long-term synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks demands techniques capable of monitoring changes in synaptic responsiveness over extended multineuronal structures. Among these techniques, voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD imaging is of particular interest due to its good spatial resolution. However, improvements of the technique are needed in order to overcome limits imposed by its low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we show that VSD imaging can detect long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD in acute cerebellar slices. Combined VSD imaging and patch-clamp recordings revealed that the most excited regions were predominantly associated with granule cells (GrCs generating EPSP-spike complexes, while poorly responding regions were associated with GrCs generating EPSPs only. The correspondence with cellular changes occurring during LTP and LTD was highlighted by a vector representation obtained by combining amplitude with time-to-peak of VSD signals. This showed that LTP occurred in the most excited regions lying in the core of activated areas and increased the number of EPSP-spike complexes, while LTD occurred in the less excited regions lying in the surround. VSD imaging appears to be an efficient tool for investigating how synaptic plasticity contributes to the reorganization of multineuronal activity in neuronal circuits.

  11. Probing the reactivity of photoinitiators for free radical polymerization: time-resolved infrared spectroscopic study of benzoyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Christopher S; Grills, David C; Besley, Nicholas A; Jockusch, Steffen; Matousek, Pavel; Parker, Anthony W; Towrie, Michael; Turro, Nicholas J; Gill, Peter M W; George, Michael W

    2002-12-18

    A series of substituted benzoyl radicals has been generated by laser flash photolysis of alpha-hydroxy ketones, alpha-amino ketones, and acyl and bis(acyl)phosphine oxides, all of which are used commercially as photoinitiators in free radical polymerizations. The benzoyl radicals have been studied by fast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. The absolute rate constants for their reaction with n-butylacrylate, thiophenol, bromotrichloromethane and oxygen were measured in acetonitrile solution. The rate constants of benzoyl radical addition to n-butylacrylate range from 1.3 x 10(5) to 5.5 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and are about 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the n-butylacrylate addition to the counterradicals that are produced by alpha-cleavage of the investigated ketones. Density functional theoretical calculations have been performed in order to rationalize the observed reactivities of the initiating radicals. Calculations of the phosphorus-centered radicals generated by photolysis of an acyl and bis(acyl)phosphine oxide suggest that P atom Mulliken spin populations are an indicator of the relative reactivities of the phosphorus-centered radicals. The alpha-cleavage of (2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phosphine oxide was studied by picosecond pump-probe and nanosecond step-scan time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. The results support a mechanism in which the alpha-cleavage occurs from the triplet excited state that has a lifetime less than or equal to the singlet excited state.

  12. PROBING THE FERMI BUBBLES IN ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION: A SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S BICONICAL NUCLEAR OUTFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lockman, Felix J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Rt. 28/92, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Jenkins, Edward B.; Bowen, David V. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bland-Hawthorn, Joss [Institute of Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kim, Tae-Sun [Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Benjamin, Robert A., E-mail: afox@stsci.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 800 West Main Street, Whitewater, WI 53190 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    Giant lobes of plasma extend ≈55° above and below the Galactic center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (ℓ, b = 10.°4, +11.°2). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v {sub LSR} = –235 and +250 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain the observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ≳900 km s{sup –1} and a full opening angle of ≈110° (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic center activity over the last ≈2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.

  13. Immobilization of oligonucleotide probes on silicon surfaces using biotin–streptavidin system examined with microscopic and spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awsiuk, K., E-mail: kamil.awsiuk@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Rysz, J. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Petrou, P. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Budkowski, A. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Bernasik, A. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Kakabakos, S. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Marzec, M.M. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Raptis, I. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Physicochemical Processes, Nanotechnology and Microsystems, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece)

    2014-01-30

    To immobilize effectively oligonucleotide probes on SiO{sub 2} modified with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, four procedures based on streptavidin–biotin system are compared with Atomic Force Microscopy, Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The first approach involves: adsorption of biotinylated Bovine Serum Albumin, blocking free surface sites with BSA, binding of streptavidin and biotinylated oligonucleotide (b-oligo). Final steps are exchanged in the second procedure with immobilization of preformed streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate. The third approach consists of streptavidin adsorption, blocking with BSA and b-oligo binding. Finally, streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate is immobilized directly within the fourth method. Surface coverage with biomolecules, determined from ARXPS, accords with average AFM height, and is anti-correlated with the intensity of Si+ ions. Higher biomolecular coverage was achieved during the last steps of the first (2.45(±0.38) mg/m{sup 2}) and second (1.31(±0.22) mg/m{sup 2}) approach, as compared to lower surface density resulting from the third (0.58(±0.20) mg/m{sup 2}) and fourth (0.41(±0.11) mg/m{sup 2}) method. Phosphorus atomic concentration indicates effectiveness of oligonucleotide immobilization. Secondary ions intensities, characteristic for oligonucleotides, streptavidin, BSA, and proteins, allow additional insight into overlayer composition. These measurements verify the ARXPS results and show the superiority of the first two immobilization approaches in terms of streptavidin and oligonucleotide density achieved onto the surface.

  14. Comparison of two voltage-sensitive dyes and their suitability for long-term imaging of neuronal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Preuss

    Full Text Available One of the key approaches for studying neural network function is the simultaneous measurement of the activity of many neurons. Voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs simultaneously report the membrane potential of multiple neurons, but often have pharmacological and phototoxic effects on neuronal cells. Yet, to study the homeostatic processes that regulate neural network function long-term recordings of neuronal activities are required. This study aims to test the suitability of the VSDs RH795 and Di-4-ANEPPS for optically recording pattern generating neurons in the stomatogastric nervous system of crustaceans with an emphasis on long-term recordings of the pyloric central pattern generator. We demonstrate that both dyes stain pyloric neurons and determined an optimal concentration and light intensity for optical imaging. Although both dyes provided sufficient signal-to-noise ratio for measuring membrane potentials, Di-4-ANEPPS displayed a higher signal quality indicating an advantage of this dye over RH795 when small neuronal signals need to be recorded. For Di-4-ANEPPS, higher dye concentrations resulted in faster and brighter staining. Signal quality, however, only depended on excitation light strength, but not on dye concentration. RH795 showed weak and slowly developing phototoxic effects on the pyloric motor pattern as well as slow bleaching of the staining and is thus the better choice for long-term experiments. Low concentrations and low excitation intensities can be used as, in contrast to Di-4-ANEPPS, the signal-to-noise ratio was independent of excitation light strength. In summary, RH795 and Di-4-ANEPPS are suitable for optical imaging in the stomatogastric nervous system of crustaceans. They allow simultaneous recording of the membrane potential of multiple neurons with high signal quality. While Di-4-ANEPPS is better suited for short-term experiments that require high signal quality, RH795 is a better candidate for long-term experiments

  15. Functional interactions within the parahippocampal region revealed by voltage-sensitive dye imaging in the isolated guinea pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biella, Gerardo; Spaiardi, Paolo; Toselli, Mauro; de Curtis, Marco; Gnatkovsky, Vadym

    2010-02-01

    The massive transfer of information from the neocortex to the entorhinal cortex (and vice versa) is hindered by a powerful inhibitory control generated in the perirhinal cortex. In vivo and in vitro experiments performed in rodents and cats support this conclusion, further extended in the present study to the analysis of the interaction between the entorhinal cortex and other parahippocampal areas, such as the postrhinal and the retrosplenial cortices. The experiments were performed in the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain by a combined approach based on electrophysiological recordings and fast imaging of optical signals generated by voltage-sensitive dyes applied to the entire brain by arterial perfusion. Local stimuli delivered in different portions of the perirhinal, postrhinal, and retrosplenial cortex evoked local responses that did not propagate to the entorhinal cortex. Neither high- and low-frequency-patterned stimulation nor paired associative stimuli facilitated the propagation of activity to the entorhinal region. Similar stimulations performed during cholinergic neuromodulation with carbachol were also ineffective in overcoming the inhibitory network that controls propagation to the entorhinal cortex. The pharmacological inactivation of GABAergic transmission by local application of bicuculline (1 mM) in area 36 of the perirhinal cortex facilitated the longitudinal (rostrocaudal) propagation of activity into the perirhinal/postrhinal cortices but did not cause propagation into the entorhinal cortex. Bicuculline injection in both area 35 and medial entorhinal cortex released the inhibitory control and allowed the propagation of the neural activity to the entorhinal cortex. These results demonstrate that, as for the perirhinal-entorhinal reciprocal interactions, also the connections between the postrhinal/retrosplenial cortices and the entorhinal region are subject to a powerful inhibitory control.

  16. The effects of inorganic lead on voltage-sensitive calcium channels differ among cell types and among channel subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T

    1993-01-01

    The whole-cell version of patch clamping was used to compare the effects of acute in vitro exposure to inorganic lead (Pb2+) on voltage-sensitive calcium channels in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and E18 rat hippocampal neurons. Free Pb2+ concentrations in salines with a high lead-buffering capacity were measured with a calibrated Pb(2+)-selective electrode. Previously, we found that N1E-115 neurons contain low voltage activated, rapidly inactivating (T) channels and high voltage activated, slowly inactivating (L) channels. Pb2+ inhibits both channel subtypes in N1E-115 cells, with some selectivity against L-type channels (IC50 approximately 700 nM free Pb2+ for L-type channels, 1300 nM free Pb2+ for T-type channels; Audesirk and Audesirk, 1991). In addition to T-type and L-type channels, cultured E18 rat hippocampal neurons have been reported to contain high voltage-activated, rapidly inactivating (N) channels. In our experiments with 5 to 20 day old cultures, almost all neurons showed substantial L-type current, approximately half showed significant N-type current, and fewer than 5% showed significant T-type current. We found that Pb2+ is somewhat selective against L-type channels (IC50 approximately 30 nM free Pb2+ in 10 mM Ba2+ as the charge carrier, 55 nM in 50 mM Ba2+) compared to N-channels (IC50 approximately 80 nM free Pb2+ in 10 mM Ba2+, 200 nM in 50 mM Ba2+). These results suggest that the effects of Pb2+ on calcium channels of vertebrate neurons vary both among cell types and among channel subtypes.

  17. Effects of inorganic lead on voltage-sensitive calcium channels in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T

    1991-01-01

    N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells have been reported to possess two types of voltage-sensitive calcium channels: Low voltage activated, rapidly inactivating T-type (type I) and high voltage activated, slowly inactivating L-type (type II). We studied the effects of acute in vitro exposure to inorganic lead on these calcium channels, using the whole-cell variant of patch clamping. Using salines with a high lead-buffering capacity, we found that both T-type and L-type channels are reversibly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner at free Pb2+ concentrations ranging from 20 nM to 14 microM. L-type channels are somewhat more sensitive to Pb2+ than T-type channels are (L-type: IC50 approx. 0.7 microM; T-type: IC50 approx. 1.3 microM). Both channels show small but significant inhibition (approx. 10%) at 20 nM free Pb2+. Pb2+ affects neither activation nor inactivation of T-type channels, but enhances inactivation of L-type channels at holding potentials around -60 to -40 mV. A peculiar phenomenon was observed in cells exposed to 2.3 microM free Pb2+. T-type channels were inhibited in all 20 cells studied. In 15 cells, L-type channels were also inhibited, but in the remaining 5 cells, current flow through L-type channels was enhanced by Pb2+ exposure.

  18. Two distinct voltage-sensing domains control voltage sensitivity and kinetics of current activation in CaV1.1 calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuluc, Petronel; Benedetti, Bruno; Coste de Bagneaux, Pierre; Grabner, Manfred; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2016-06-01

    Alternative splicing of the skeletal muscle CaV1.1 voltage-gated calcium channel gives rise to two channel variants with very different gating properties. The currents of both channels activate slowly; however, insertion of exon 29 in the adult splice variant CaV1.1a causes an ∼30-mV right shift in the voltage dependence of activation. Existing evidence suggests that the S3-S4 linker in repeat IV (containing exon 29) regulates voltage sensitivity in this voltage-sensing domain (VSD) by modulating interactions between the adjacent transmembrane segments IVS3 and IVS4. However, activation kinetics are thought to be determined by corresponding structures in repeat I. Here, we use patch-clamp analysis of dysgenic (CaV1.1 null) myotubes reconstituted with CaV1.1 mutants and chimeras to identify the specific roles of these regions in regulating channel gating properties. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the structure and/or hydrophobicity of the IVS3-S4 linker is critical for regulating voltage sensitivity in the IV VSD, but by itself cannot modulate voltage sensitivity in the I VSD. Swapping sequence domains between the I and the IV VSDs reveals that IVS4 plus the IVS3-S4 linker is sufficient to confer CaV1.1a-like voltage dependence to the I VSD and that the IS3-S4 linker plus IS4 is sufficient to transfer CaV1.1e-like voltage dependence to the IV VSD. Any mismatch of transmembrane helices S3 and S4 from the I and IV VSDs causes a right shift of voltage sensitivity, indicating that regulation of voltage sensitivity by the IVS3-S4 linker requires specific interaction of IVS4 with its corresponding IVS3 segment. In contrast, slow current kinetics are perturbed by any heterologous sequences inserted into the I VSD and cannot be transferred by moving VSD I sequences to VSD IV. Thus, CaV1.1 calcium channels are organized in a modular manner, and control of voltage sensitivity and activation kinetics is accomplished by specific molecular mechanisms

  19. Effects of in vitro lead exposure on voltage-sensitive calcium channels differ among cell types in central neurons of Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T

    1989-01-01

    The effects of acute in vitro lead exposure on slowly inactivating voltage-sensitive calcium channels in central neurons of the freshwater pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis were studied under voltage clamp. Three physiologically distinct cell types were used: two subsets of the B cell cluster (Bpos and Bneg) and the pedal giant neuron (RPeD1). In Bpos neurons, 5 nM free Pb2+ irreversibly inhibited current flow through calcium channels by 38 +/- 10%. In Bneg neurons, 5 nM free Pb2+ slightly inhibited inward currents (12 +/- 6%) and may have shifted their voltage dependence to more depolarized voltages. The inhibition and voltage shift were irreversible. In RPeD1 neurons, Pb2+ caused a small, statistically insignificant inhibition of inward current (5 nM free Pb2+; 18 +/- 19%; 30 nM free Pb2+: 31 +/- 23%). The effects of Pb2+ were fully reversible. These data indicate that (1) voltage-sensitive calcium channels in Lymnaea neurons are inhibited by nanomolar concentrations of free Pb2+; (2) there are multiple types of calcium channels in Lymnaea neurons; and (3) the effects of in vitro lead exposure differ qualitatively among channel types.

  20. Spectroscopic detections of CIII]1909 at z~6-7: A new probe of early star forming galaxies and cosmic reionisation

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Daniel P; Charlot, Stephane; Clement, Benjamin; Ellis, Richard; Siana, Brian; Robertson, Brant; Schenker, Matthew; Gutkin, Julia; Wofford, Aida

    2014-01-01

    Deep spectroscopic observations of z~6.5 galaxies have revealed a marked decline with increasing redshift in the detectability of Lyman-alpha emission. While this may offer valuable insight into the end of the reionisation process, it presents a fundamental challenge to the detailed spectroscopic study of the many hundreds of photometrically-selected distant sources now being found via deep HST imaging, and particularly those bright sources viewed through foreground lensing clusters. In this paper we demonstrate the validity of a new way forward via the convincing detection of an alternative diagnostic line, CIII]1909, seen in spectroscopic exposures of two star forming galaxies at z=6.029 and 7.213. The former detection is based on a 3.5 hour X-shooter spectrum of a bright (J=25.2) gravitationally-lensed galaxy behind the cluster Abell 383. The latter detection is based on a 4.2 hour MOSFIRE spectra of one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxies, GN-108036, with J=25.2. Both targets were cho...

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic, physicochemical properties and binding site analysis of 4-(1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]-imidazol-2-yl)-benzaldehyde fluorescent probe for imaging in cell biology: Experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Przemysław; Jędrzejewska, Beata; Pietrzak, Marek; Janek, Tomasz

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the 4-(1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]-imidazol-2-yl)-benzaldehyde (PB1) was investigated as a fluorescent dye. For this reason, the spectroscopic properties in different solvents were thoroughly studied. The experimental data were supported by quantum-chemical calculations using density functional theory. Measurements and theoretical calculations showed that PB1 dye is characterized by the non-monotonic solvatochromism, strongly polar charge transfer excited state, large Stokes' shift, high fluorescence quantum yield and high fluorescence lifetime. Simulations using AutoDock presented in this study, showed that after conjugation with Concanavalin A in the active site with LYS116, the PB1 possesses the highest probability of binding affinity. The interaction between the PB1 dye and the Concanavalin A lectin has been investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Conventional fluorescence microscopy imaging of Candida albicans and Yarrowia lipolytica cells, incubated with the PB1-Concanavalin A, was demonstrated. Results show that the PB1 dye is a photostable low molecular weight fluorescent probe, which emits a blue fluorescence. The results of this study have implications for designing PB1-protein conjugate as a valuable alternative to commercial probes designed for cellular labeling in biological and biomedical research. Calculated LogP value together with LogBCF show that PB1-protein conjugate is a valuable alternative to commercial probes designed for cellular labeling in biological and biomedical research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Spitzer Spectroscopic Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (S4MC): Probing the Physical State of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Low-Metallicity Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Sandstrom, Karin M; Bot, Caroline; Draine, B T; Ingalls, James G; Israel, Frank P; Jackson, James M; Leroy, Adam K; Li, Aigen; Rubio, Mónica; Simon, Joshua D; Smith, J D T; Stanimirović, Snežana; Tielens, A G G M; van Loon, Jacco Th

    2011-01-01

    We present results of mid-infrared spectroscopic mapping observations of six star-forming regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud from the Spitzer Spectroscopic Survey of the SMC (S4MC). We detect the mid-IR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in all of the mapped regions, greatly increasing the range of environments where PAHs have been spectroscopically detected in the SMC. We investigate the variations of the mid-IR bands in each region and compare our results to studies of the PAH bands in the SINGS sample and in a sample of low-metallicity starburst galaxies. PAH emission in the SMC is characterized by low ratios of the 6-9 micron features relative to the 11.3 micron feature and weak 8.6 and 17.0 micron features. Interpreting these band ratios in the light of laboratory and theoretical studies, we find that PAHs in the SMC tend to be smaller and less ionized than those in higher metallicity galaxies. Based on studies of PAH destruction, we argue that a size distribution shifted towards sm...

  3. Voltage sensitivity based reactive power control on VSC-HVDC in a wind farm connected hybrid multi-infeed HVDC system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    With increasing application of both Line Commutated Converter based High Voltage Direct Current (LCC-HVDC) systems and Voltage Source Converter based HVDC (VSC-HVDC) links, a new type of system structure named Hybrid Multi-Infeed HVDC (HMIDC) system is formed in the modern power systems. This paper...... presents the operation and control method of the wind farm connected HMIDC system. The wind power fluctuation takes large influence to the system voltages. In order to reduce the voltage fluctuation of LCC-HVDC infeed bus caused by the wind power variation, a voltage sensitivity-based reactive power...... control method is proposed in the paper. According to the calculated sensitivity factors, a reactive power increment is added in the control loop of VSC-HVDC so as to regulate the voltage of the target bus. Dynamic simulations in PSCAD/EMTDC and MATLAB are presented to assess the performance...

  4. Polarity-dependent conformational switching of a peptide mimicking the S4-S5 linker of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helluin, O; Breed, J; Duclohier, H

    1996-02-21

    The S4-S5 linker (or S45) in voltage-sensitive sodium channels was previously shown to be involved in the permeation pathway. The secondary structure, investigated by circular dichroism, of a S4-S45 peptide from domain IV and its fragments (including S45) is reported here and compared with that of the homologous peptide from domain II as a function of the solvent dielectric constant. The reduction in helicity seen for S4-S45 (II) in polar media is cancelled in membrane-like environment. The most striking result-- a sharp alpha-helix --> beta-sheet transition upon exposure of the S45 moiety to aqueous solvents-- is discussed as regards channel activation and selectivity.

  5. Note: Wide-range and high-resolution on-chip delay measurement circuit with low supply-voltage sensitivity for SoC applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Duo; Hung, Yu-Chan

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an on-chip delay measurement (OCDM) circuit with a wide delay-measurement range, a high delay-measurement resolution and low supply-voltage sensitivity for efficient detection, and diagnosis in the high-performance system-on-chip (SoC). The proposed cascade-stage measurement structure can simultaneously achieve a delay-measurement range of several nanoseconds and a quantization resolution of several picoseconds. The proposed delay-measurement circuit has a high immunity to supply voltage variations without any additional calibration or self-biasing circuit. The delay-measurement range is 5.25 ns with 6 ps resolution; and the average delay resolution variation is 0.41% with ±10% supply voltage variations.

  6. THE SPITZER SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD (S{sup 4}MC): PROBING THE PHYSICAL STATE OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN A LOW-METALLICITY ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Karin M. [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bolatto, Alberto D. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bot, Caroline [Universite de Strasbourg, Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Draine, B. T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ingalls, James G. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Israel, Frank P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Jackson, James M. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Li, Aigen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65213 (United States); Rubio, Monica [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Smith, J. D. T. [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43603 (United States); Stanimirovic, Snezana [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI 53703 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th., E-mail: sandstrom@mpia.de [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-01

    We present results of mid-infrared spectroscopic mapping observations of six star-forming regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) from the Spitzer Spectroscopic Survey of the SMC (S{sup 4}MC). We detect the mid-IR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in all of the mapped regions, greatly increasing the range of environments where PAHs have been spectroscopically detected in the SMC. We investigate the variations of the mid-IR bands in each region and compare our results to studies of the PAH bands in the SINGS sample and in a sample of low-metallicity starburst galaxies. PAH emission in the SMC is characterized by low ratios of the 6-9 {mu}m features relative to the 11.3 {mu}m feature and weak 8.6 and 17.0 {mu}m features. Interpreting these band ratios in the light of laboratory and theoretical studies, we find that PAHs in the SMC tend to be smaller and less ionized than those in higher metallicity galaxies. Based on studies of PAH destruction, we argue that a size distribution shifted toward smaller PAHs cannot be the result of processing in the interstellar medium, but instead reflects differences in the formation of PAHs at low metallicity. Finally, we discuss the implications of our observations for our understanding of the PAH life-cycle in low-metallicity galaxies-namely that the observed deficit of PAHs may be a consequence of PAHs forming with smaller average sizes and therefore being more susceptible to destruction under typical interstellar medium conditions.

  7. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from CMASS and LOWZ anisotropic galaxy clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Escoffier, Stephanie; Ho, Shirley; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Manera, Marc; Nuza, Sebastian E; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Weaver, Benjamin A; Brownstein, Joel R; Dawson, Kyle S; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    With the largest spectroscopic galaxy survey volume drawn from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we can extract cosmological constraints from the measurements of redshift and geometric distortions at quasi-linear scales (e.g. above 50 Mpc/h), which can be modeled by perturbation theory. We analyze the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 11 (DR11) CMASS galaxy sample, at the effective redshift z=0.57, to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular-diameter distance D_A(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)\\sigma_8(z), and the physical matter density \\Omega_mh^2. We provide accurate measurements on {H^{-1}R_{fid}^{-1.0}, D_A R_{fid}^{-0.96}, f\\sigma_8(\\Omega_m h^2)^{0.45}}, where R_{fid}\\equiv r_s/r_{s,fid}, r_s is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch, and r_{s,fid} is the sound scale of the fiducial cosmology used in this study. We also extract cosmological constraints from BOSS DR11 LOWZ sample, ...

  8. Angle-integrated measurements of the {sup 26}Al(d, n){sup 27}Si reaction cross section: a probe of spectroscopic factors and astrophysical resonance strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankainen, A.; Woods, P.J.; Doherty, D.T.; Estrade, A.; Lotay, G. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Nunes, F.; Schatz, H.; Brown, B.A.; Browne, J.; Meisel, Z.; Zegers, R. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Langer, C.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Stevens, J. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bader, V.; Gade, A.; Stroberg, R.; Scott, M. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Kontos, A.; Noji, S.; Recchia, F.; Weisshaar, D. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Perdikakis, G. [Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Redpath, T.; Wimmer, K. [Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Seweryniak, D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Measurements of angle-integrated cross sections to discrete states in {sup 27}Si have been performed studying the {sup 26}Al(d, n) reaction in inverse kinematics by tagging states by their characteristic γ-decays using the GRETINA array. Transfer reaction theory has been applied to derive spectroscopic factors for strong single-particle states below the proton threshold, and astrophysical resonances in the {sup 26}Al(p, γ){sup 27}Si reaction. Comparisons are made between predictions of the shell model and known characteristics of the resonances. Overall very good agreement is obtained, indicating this method can be used to make estimates of resonance strengths for key reactions currently largely unconstrained by experiment. (orig.)

  9. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from CMASS anisotropic galaxy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Beutler, Florian; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Manera, Marc; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongbo; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Maraston, Claudia; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    With the largest spectroscopic galaxy survey volume drawn from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we can extract cosmological constraints from the measurements of redshift and geometric distortions at quasi-linear scales (e.g. above 50 h-1 Mpc). We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS galaxy sample, at the effective redshift z = 0.59, to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular- diameter distance DA(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)σ8(z), and the physical matter density Ωm h2. We obtain robust measurements by including a polynomial as the model for the systematic errors, and find it works very well against the systematic effects, e.g. ones induced by stars and seeing. We provide accurate measurements {DA(0.59)rs,fid/rs, H(0.59)rs/rs,fid, f(0.59)σ8(0.59), Ωm h2} = {1427 ± 26 Mpc, 97.3 ± 3.3 km s-1 Mpc-1, 0.488 ± 0.060, 0.135 ± 0.016}, where rs is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch and rs,fid = 147.66 Mpc is the sound scale of the fiducial cosmology used in this study. The parameters which are not well constrained by our galaxy clustering analysis are marginalized over with wide flat priors. Since no priors from other data sets, e.g. cosmic microwave background (CMB), are adopted and no dark energy models are assumed, our results from BOSS CMASS galaxy clustering alone may be combined with other data sets, i.e. CMB, SNe, lensing or other galaxy clustering data to constrain the parameters of a given cosmological model. The uncertainty on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, from CMB+CMASS is about 8 per cent. The uncertainty on the curvature fraction, Ωk, is 0.3 per cent. We do not find deviation from flat ΛCDM.

  10. Spectroscopic probing of the effect of alkanols on the properties of the head group region in reverse micelles of AOT-heptane-water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuin, Elsa; Lissi, Eduardo; Cerón, Angela; Rubio, María Angélica

    2003-02-15

    The effects of addition of alkanols (ethanol, n-hexanol, and 3-ethyl-3-pentanol) on the micropolarity and microviscosity of the head group region in reverse micelles of AOT-heptane-water have been investigated by fluorescence probing methods (ANS fluorescence yield and TMADPH fluorescence anisotropy), complemented by the use of the solvatochromic probe E(T)(30) in absorption spectroscopy. For all the alkanols considered, ANS fluorescence in AOT reverse micelles (at W=3) is quenched by additive incorporation, being the effect elicited almost independent of the alkanol chain length and topology. As sensed by the E(T)(30) parameter, the micropolarity of the micelle surface increases, remains unmodified, and decreases upon addition of ethanol, 3-ethyl-3-pentanol, and hexanol, respectively. While ethanol barely modifies the fluorescence anisotropy of TMADPH, 3-ethyl-3-pentanol and n-hexanol addition strongly decrease it. The similarity of the tendencies of ANS data to TMADPH anisotropies and the differences between ANS data and E(T)(30) values would indicate that, at least for 3-ethyl-3-pentanol and n-hexanol, microviscosity, rather than micropolarity, must be considered to interpret the effect of the alkanols upon the fluorescent behavior of ANS.

  11. Probing the Physics of Narrow Line Regions in Active Galaxies II: The Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7)

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, Michael A; Davies, Rebecca; Kewley, Lisa; Hampton, Elise; Scharwächter, Julia; Sutherland, Ralph; Kharb, Preeti; Jose, Jessy; Bhatt, Harish; Ramya, S; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; Juneau, Stéphanie; James, Bethan; Srivastava, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the \\emph{Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey} (S7) and present results on 64 galaxies drawn from the first data release. The S7 uses the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) mounted on the ANU 2.3m telescope located at the Siding Spring Observatory to deliver an integral field of $38\\times25$~ arcsec at a spectral resolution of $R=7000$ in the red ($530-710$nm), and $R=3000$ in the blue ($340-560$nm). {From these data cubes we have extracted the Narrow Line Region (NLR) spectra from a 4 arc sec aperture centred on the nucleus. We also determine the H$\\beta$ and [OIII]~$\\lambda$5007 fluxes in the narrow lines, the nuclear reddening, the reddening-corrected relative intensities of the observed emission lines, and the H$\\beta$ and \\lOIII\\ luminosities {determined from spectra for which the stellar continuum has been removed.} We present a set of images of the galaxies in [OIII]~$\\lambda$5007, [NII]~$\\lambda$6584 and H$\\alpha$ which serve to delineate the spatial extent of th...

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic, and analyte-responsive behavior of a polymerizable naphthalimide-based carboxylate probe and molecularly imprinted polymers prepared thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ricarda; Wan, Wei; Biyikal, Mustafa; Benito-Peña, Elena; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Lazraq, Issam; Rurack, Knut; Sellergren, Börje

    2013-02-15

    A naphthalimide-based fluorescent indicator monomer 1 for the integration into chromo- and fluorogenic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was synthesized and characterized. The monomer was equipped with a urea binding site to respond to carboxylate-containing guests with absorption and fluorescence changes, namely a bathochromic shift in absorption and fluorescence quenching. Detailed spectroscopic analyses of the title compound and various models revealed the signaling mechanism. Titration studies employing benzoate and Z-L-phenylalanine (Z-L-Phe) suggest that indicator monomers such as the title compound undergo a mixture of deprotonation and complex formation in the presence of benzoate but yield hydrogen-bonded complexes, which are desirable for the molecular imprinting process, with weakly basic guests like Z-l-Phe. Compound 1 could be successfully employed in the synthesis of monolithic and thin-film MIPs against Z-L-Phe, Z-L-glutamic acid, and penicillin G. Chromatographic assessment of the selectivity features of the monoliths revealed enantioselective discrimination and clear imprinting effects. Immobilized on glass coverslips, the thin-film MIPs of 1 displayed a clear signaling behavior with a pronounced enantioselective fluorescence quenching dependence and a promising discrimination against cross-analytes.

  13. PROBING THE PHYSICS OF NARROW LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES. II. THE SIDING SPRING SOUTHERN SEYFERT SPECTROSCOPIC SNAPSHOT SURVEY (S7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Davies, Rebecca; Kewley, Lisa; Hampton, Elise; Sutherland, Ralph [RSAA, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Shastri, Prajval; Kharb, Preeti; Jose, Jessy; Bhatt, Harish; Ramya, S. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala 2 B Block, Bangalore 560034 (India); Scharwächter, Julia [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UMR 8112, 61 Avenue de l’Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Jin, Chichuan [Qian Xuesen Laboratory for Space Technology, Beijing (China); Banfield, Julie [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW, 1710 Australia (Australia); Zaw, Ingyin [New York University (Abu Dhabi), 70 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Juneau, Stéphanie [CEA-Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); James, Bethan [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Srivastava, Shweta, E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Here we describe the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7) and present results on 64 galaxies drawn from the first data release. The S7 uses the Wide Field Spectrograph mounted on the ANU 2.3 m telescope located at the Siding Spring Observatory to deliver an integral field of 38 × 25 arcsec at a spectral resolution of R = 7000 in the red (530–710 nm), and R = 3000 in the blue (340–560 nm). From these data cubes we have extracted the narrow-line region spectra from a 4 arcsec aperture centered on the nucleus. We also determine the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 fluxes in the narrow lines, the nuclear reddening, the reddening-corrected relative intensities of the observed emission lines, and the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 luminosities determined from spectra for which the stellar continuum has been removed. We present a set of images of the galaxies in [O iii] λ5007, [N ii] λ6584, and Hα, which serve to delineate the spatial extent of the extended narrow-line region and also to reveal the structure and morphology of the surrounding H ii regions. Finally, we provide a preliminary discussion of those Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies that display coronal emission lines in order to explore the origin of these lines.

  14. Dithieno[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine-based Chemical Probe for Anions: A Spectroscopic Study of Binding

    KAUST Repository

    El-Assaad, Tarek H.

    2015-04-27

    The synthesis of a new anion-responsive molecule N,N\\'-(2,5-bis(4-(tert-butyl)phenyl)dithieno[3,2-a:2\\',3\\'-c]phenazine-9,10-diyl)bis(4-methylbenzenesulfonamide) (1) is reported. The sensitivities of the spectroscopic properties of 1 in the presence of various anions were examined using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence and 1H NMR titration experiments. Strong binding of 1 to carboxylate, cyanide, fluoride and dihydrogen phosphate anions results in an increase in quantum yield for emission of 1, and changes in its 1H NMR chemical shifts. A significant electrostatic interaction of the tetrabutylammonium cation with 1, upon strong binding with the counter anion, was also indicated by the chemical shifts observed in the 1H NMR titrations. Binding constants of 1 to anions are also calculated based on the binding isotherms derived from NMR and UV-Vis titrations. DFT calculations show that the anion does not significantly impact the HOMO/LUMO levels (and subsequently the S0 -> S1 transition), but rather changes the strength of the S0 -> S2 transition, which accounts for the observed changes in the UV-vis spectra.

  15. A single crossing-over event in voltage-sensitive Na+ channel genes may cause critical failure of dengue mosquito control by insecticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Hirata

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-sensitive sodium (Na+ channel (Vssc is the target site of pyrethroid insecticides. Pest insects develop resistance to this class of insecticide by acquisition of one or multiple amino acid substitution(s in this channel. In Southeast Asia, two major Vssc types confer pyrethroid resistance in the dengue mosquito vector Aedes aegypti, namely, S989P+V1016G and F1534C. We expressed several types of Vssc in Xenopus oocytes and examined the effect of amino acid substitutions in Vssc on pyrethroid susceptibilities. S989P+V1016G and F1534C haplotypes reduced the channel sensitivity to permethrin by 100- and 25-fold, respectively, while S989P+V1016G+F1534C triple mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to permethrin by 1100-fold. S989P+V1016G and F1534C haplotypes reduced the channel sensitivity to deltamethrin by 10- and 1-fold (no reduction, respectively, but S989P+V1016G+F1534C triple mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to deltamethrin by 90-fold. These results imply that pyrethroid insecticides are highly likely to lose their effectiveness against A. aegypti if such a Vssc haplotype emerges as the result of a single crossing-over event; thus, this may cause failure to control this key mosquito vector. Here, we strongly emphasize the importance of monitoring the occurrence of triple mutations in Vssc in the field population of A. aegypti.

  16. Identification of the alternative spliced form of the alpha 2/delta subunit of voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels expressed in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, B; Shenkar, N; Halevi, S; Trus, M; Atlas, D

    1995-07-07

    The alpha 2/delta subunit of voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels expressed in PC12 has been cloned and partially sequenced. The message observed in Northern blot analysis displays a 7.5 kb transcript, identical in size to mRNA of rabbit skeletal muscle and rat brain. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned alpha 2 subunit of the PC12 specific cDNA is > 99% identical to rat brain sequence and 85% to skeletal muscle. Reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of the alternative splicing region identifies two deleted regions of 57 bp and 21 bp in PC12 expressed alpha 2/delta transcript. The alternative variant alpha 2e of alpha 2/delta subunit which is expressed in PC12 cells was previously identified in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. RT-PCR analysis show two different sized alternative PCR fragments in rat lung and none in rat spleen, kidney and intestine. Antibodies prepared against a 19 amino acid peptide within the alternative spliced region effectively inhibits [3H]dopamine release in PC12 cells. This implies that the alternatively spliced region is positioned extracellularly and is involved in regulation of the L-type Ca2+ channel-mediated transmitter release.

  17. Magnolol inhibits colonic motility through down-regulation of voltage-sensitive L-type Ca2+ channels of colonic smooth muscle cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man; Zang, Kai-Hong; Luo, Jia-Lie; Leung, Fung-Ping; Huang, Yu; Lin, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Ai-Ping; Tang, Xu-Dong; Xu, Hong-Xi; Sung, Joseph Jao-yiu; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2013-11-15

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of magnolol (5,5'-diallyl-2,2'-biphenyldiol) on contraction in distal colonic segments of rats and the underlying mechanisms. Colonic segments were mounted in organ baths for isometric force measurement. Whole-cell voltage-sensitive L-type Ca(2+) currents were recorded on isolated single colonic smooth muscle cells using patch-clamp technique. The spontaneous contractions and acetylcholine (ACh)- and Bay K 8644-induced contractions were inhibited by magnolol (3-100 μM). In the presence of Bay K8644 (100 nM), magnolol (10-100 μM) inhibited the contraction induced by 10 μM ACh. By contrast, tetrodotoxin (100 nM) and Nώ-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME 100 μM) did not change the inhibitory effect of magnolol (10 μM). In addition, magnolol (3-100 μM) inhibited the L-type Ca(2+) currents. The present results suggest that magnolol inhibits colonic smooth muscle contraction through downregulating L-type Ca(2+) channel activity.

  18. Eu3+ as a dual probe for the determination of IL anion donor power: A combined luminescence spectroscopic and electrochemical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babai, Arash; Kopiec, Gabriel; Lackmann, Anastasia; Mallick, Bert; Pitula, Slawomir; Tang, Sifu; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-04-01

    This work is aimed at giving proof that Eu(Tf2N)(3) (Tf2N = bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide) can act as both an optical and electrochemical probe for the determination of the Lewis acidity of an ionic liquid anion. For that reason the luminescence spectra and cyclic voltammograms of dilute solutions of Eu(Tf2N)(3) in various ionic liquids were investigated. The Eu2+/3+ redox potential in the investigated ILs can be related to the Lewis basicity of the IL anion. The IL cation had little influence. The lower the determined halfwave potential, the higher the IL anion basicity. The obtained ranking can be confirmed by luminescence spectroscopy where a bathochromic shift of the D-5(0) -> F-7(4) transition indicates a stronger Lewis basicity of the IL anion. (C) 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Lanthanide paramagnetic probes for NMR spectroscopic studies of fast molecular conformational dynamics and temperature control. Effective six-site proton exchange in 18-crown-6 by exchange spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babailov, Sergey P

    2012-02-06

    (1)H and (13)C NMR measurements are reported for the CDCl(3) and CD(2)Cl(2) solutions of [La(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (I), [Pr(18-crown-6) (NO(3))(3)] (II), [Ce(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (III), and [Nd(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (IV) complexes. Temperature dependencies of the (1)H NMR spectra of paramagnetic II-IV have been analyzed using the dynamic NMR (DNMR) methods for six-site exchange. Two types of conformational dynamic processes were identified (the first one is conditioned by interconversion of complex enantiomeric forms and pseudorotation of a macrocycle molecule upon the C(2) symmetry axis; the second one is conditioned by macrocycle molecule inversion). Application of exchange spectroscopy (2D-EXSY) of DNMR for investigation of this dynamic system (II-IV) simplifies the assignment of the NMR signals and represents the first experimental study of multisite exchange. In the present work, the methodology of paramagnetic 4f (Ce, Pr, and Nd) probe applications for the study of free-energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes in chemical exchange processes, as well as the advantages of this method in a comparison with DNMR studies of diamagnetic substances, is discussed. In particular, as a result of paramagnetic chemical shifts in 4f complexes, the range of measurable rate constants expands considerably compared to the analogous range in diamagnetic compounds. Coordination compounds investigated in the paper represent new types of thermometric NMR sensors and lanthanide paramagnetic probes for in situ temperature control in solution.

  20. Probing the biological evaluations of a new designed Pt(II) complex using spectroscopic and theoretical approaches: human hemoglobin as a target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Omid; Shafaei, Zahra; Divsalar, Adeleh; Eslami-Moghadam, Mahbubeh; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, using heavy metal compounds such as platinum as anticancer agent is one of the common ways in chemical therapy. In this study, a new anticancer compound of glycine derivatives of Pt(II) complex (amyl-glycine1, 10-phenanthroline Platinum nitrate) was designed, and the biological effects of this novel compound on the alterations in the function and structure of human hemoglobin (Hb) at different temperatures of 25 and 37°C were assessed by applying various spectroscopic (fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD)) and theoretical methods. Fluorescence data indicated the strong ability of Pt(II) complex to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of Hb. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters at two temperatures were calculated, and the results indicated the major possibility of occurring van der Waals force or hydrogen bond interactions in the Pt(II) complex-Hb interaction. For evaluating the alteration of secondary structure of Hb upon interaction with various concentrations of complex, far-UV CD spectra were used and it was observed that in high dose of complex, significant changes were occurred which is indicative of some side effects in overdosing of this complex. On the other hand, the molecular docking results illustrate that are well in agreement in obtaining data with spectroscopy. Above results suggested that using Pt(II) complex as an anticancer agent, model drug in high-dose usage might cause some disordering in structure and function of Hb as well as improve understanding of the side effects of newly designed metal anticancer drugs undergoing.

  1. Probing the Physics of Narrow-line Regions in Active Galaxies. IV. Full Data Release of the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Adam D.; Dopita, Michael A.; Shastri, Prajval; Davies, Rebecca; Hampton, Elise; Kewley, Lisa; Banfield, Julie; Groves, Brent; James, Bethan L.; Jin, Chichuan; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kharb, Preeti; Sairam, Lalitha; Scharwächter, Julia; Shalima, P.; Sundar, M. N.; Sutherland, Ralph; Zaw, Ingyin

    2017-09-01

    We present the second and final data release of the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7). Data are presented for 63 new galaxies not included in the first data release, and we provide 2D emission-line fitting products for the full S7 sample of 131 galaxies. The S7 uses the WiFeS instrument on the ANU 2.3 m telescope to obtain spectra with a spectral resolution of R = 7000 in the red (540–700 nm) and R = 3000 in the blue (350–570 nm), over an integral field of 25 × 38 arcsec2 with 1 × 1 arcsec2 spatial pixels. The S7 contains both the largest sample of active galaxies and the highest spectral resolution of any comparable integral field survey to date. The emission-line fitting products include line fluxes, velocities, and velocity dispersions across the WiFeS field of view, and an artificial neural network has been used to determine the optimal number of Gaussian kinematic components for emission-lines in each spaxel. Broad Balmer lines are subtracted from the spectra of nuclear spatial pixels in Seyfert 1 galaxies before fitting the narrow lines. We bin nuclear spectra and measure reddening-corrected nuclear fluxes of strong narrow lines for each galaxy. The nuclear spectra are classified on optical diagnostic diagrams, where the strength of the coronal line [Fe vii] λ6087 is shown to be correlated with [O iii]/Hβ. Maps revealing gas excitation and kinematics are included for the entire sample, and we provide notes on the newly observed objects.

  2. Probing the interaction of a new synthesized CdTe quantum dots with human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade; Hooshyar, Zari

    2016-05-01

    A novel CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were prepared in aqueous phase via a facile method. At first, poly (acrylic amide) grafted onto sodium alginate (PAAm-g-SA) were successfully synthesized and then TGA capped CdTe QDs (CdTe-TGA QDs) were embed into it. The prepared CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs were optimized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The characterization results indicated that CdTe-TGA QDs, with particles size of 2.90 nm, were uniformly dispersed on the chains of PAAm-g-SA biopolymer. CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs also exhibited excellent UV-vis absorption and high fluorescence intensity. To explore biological behavior of CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs, the interactions between CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs and human serum albumin (HSA) (or bovine serum albumin (BSA)) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, FT-IR, UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopic. The results confirmed the formation of CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs-HSA (or BSA) complex with high binding affinities. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔGCdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs-HSA (or BSA) complexes. The binding distance between CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs and HSA (or BSA)) was calculated about 1.37 nm and 1.27 nm, respectively, according to Forster non-radiative energy transfer theory (FRET). Analyzing FT-IR spectra showed that the formation of QDs-HSA and QDs-BSA complexes led to conformational changes of the HSA and BSA proteins. All these experimental results clarified the effective transportation and elimination of CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs in the body by binding to HSA and BSA, which could be a useful guideline for the estimation of QDs as a drug carrier.

  3. Probing the interaction of a new synthesized CdTe quantum dots with human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade, E-mail: rezanejad@pnu.ac.ir; Hooshyar, Zari

    2016-05-01

    A novel CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were prepared in aqueous phase via a facile method. At first, poly (acrylic amide) grafted onto sodium alginate (PAAm-g-SA) were successfully synthesized and then TGA capped CdTe QDs (CdTe-TGA QDs) were embed into it. The prepared CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs were optimized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The characterization results indicated that CdTe-TGA QDs, with particles size of 2.90 nm, were uniformly dispersed on the chains of PAAm-g-SA biopolymer. CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs also exhibited excellent UV–vis absorption and high fluorescence intensity. To explore biological behavior of CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs, the interactions between CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs and human serum albumin (HSA) (or bovine serum albumin (BSA)) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, FT-IR, UV–vis, and fluorescence spectroscopic. The results confirmed the formation of CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs-HSA (or BSA) complex with high binding affinities. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG < 0, ΔH < 0 and ΔS < 0) were indicated that binding reaction was spontaneous and van der Waals interactions and hydrogen-bond interactions played a major role in stabilizing the CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs-HSA (or BSA) complexes. The binding distance between CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs and HSA (or BSA)) was calculated about 1.37 nm and 1.27 nm, respectively, according to Forster non-radiative energy transfer theory (FRET). Analyzing FT-IR spectra showed that the formation of QDs-HSA and QDs-BSA complexes led to conformational changes of the HSA and BSA proteins. All these experimental results clarified the effective transportation and elimination of CdTe-PAAm-g-SA QDs in the body by binding to HSA and BSA, which could be a useful guideline for the estimation of QDs as a drug carrier. - Highlights: • The CdTe quantum dots coated with polyacrylamide grafted onto sodium alginate. • The

  4. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from DR12 galaxy clustering -- towards an accurate model

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J; Zhao, Gong-bo; Wang, Yuting; Cuesta, Antonio J; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Prada, Francisco; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G; Satpathy, Siddharth; Slosar, Anže; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A; Brownstein, Joel R; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS and LOWZ galaxy sample to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate $H(z)$, the angular-diameter distance $D_A(z)$, the normalised growth rate $f(z)\\sigma_8(z)$, and the physical matter density $\\Omega_mh^2$. We adopt wide and flat priors on all model parameters in order to ensure the results are those of a `single-probe' galaxy clustering analysis. We also marginalise over three nuisance terms that account for potential observational systematics affecting the measured monopole. However, such Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis is computationally expensive for advanced theoretical models, thus we develop a new methodology to speed up our analysis. We obtain $\\{D_A(z)r_{s,fid}/r_s$Mpc, $H(z)r_s/r_{s,fid}$kms$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-1}$, $f(z)\\sigma_8(z)$, $\\Omega_m h^2\\}$ = $\\{956\\pm28$ , $75.0\\pm4.0$ , $0.397 \\pm 0.073$, $0.143\\pm0.017\\}$ at $z=0.32$ and $\\{1421\\pm23$, $96.7\\pm2.7$ , $0.497 ...

  5. Early stage phase separation in pharmaceutical solid dispersion thin films under high humidity: improved spatial understanding using probe-based thermal and spectroscopic nanocharacterization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Sheng; Moffat, Jonathan G; Yang, Ziyi

    2013-03-04

    Phase separation in pharmaceutical solid dispersion thin films under high humidity is still poorly understood on the submicrometer scale. This study investigated the phase separation of a model solid dispersion thin film, felodipine-PVP K29/32, prepared by spin-coating and analyzed using probe-based methods including atomic force microscopy, nanothermal analysis, and photothermal infrared microspectroscopy. The combined use of these techniques revealed that the phase separation process occurring in the thin films under high humidity is different from that in dry conditions reported previously. The initial stage of phase separation is primarily initiated in the bulk of the films as amorphous drug domains. Drug migration toward the surface of the solid dispersion film was then observed to occur under exposure to increased humidity. PVP cannot prevent phase separation of felodipine under high humidity but can minimize the crystallization of amorphous felodipine domains in the solid dispersion thin films. This study demonstrates the unique abilities of these nanocharacterization methods for studying, in three dimensions, the phase separation of thin films for pharmaceutical applications.

  6. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods to investigate the interaction between 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural and calf thymus DNA using ethidium bromide as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinhua; Chen, Lanlan; Dong, Yingying; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Xiuhua

    2014-04-24

    In this work, the interaction of 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) under simulated physiological conditions (Tris-HCl buffer of pH 7.40), was explored by UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling method, using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe of DNA. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of EB-ctDNA by 5-HMF was confirmed to be a static quenching, which derived from the formation of a new complex. The binding constants of 5-HMF with DNA in the presence of EB were calculated to be 2.17×10(3), 4.24×10(3) and 6.95×10(3) L mol(-1) at 300, 305 and 310 K, respectively. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change ΔH and entropy change ΔS, suggested that both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds played a predominant role in the binding of 5-HMF to DNA. According to the UV absorption spectroscopy and melting temperature (Tm) curve results, the binding mode of 5-HMF with DNA was indicative of a non-intercalative binding, which was supposed to be a groove binding. The molecular modeling results showed that 5-HMF could bind into the hydrophobic region of ctDNA and supported the conclusions obtained from the above experiments.

  7. In Situ Raman Spectroscopic Studies on Concentration of Electrolyte Salt in Lithium-Ion Batteries by Using Ultrafine Multifiber Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Toshiro; Nakagawa, Hiroe; Tsubouchi, Shigetaka; Domi, Yasuhiro; Doi, Takayuki; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-03-09

    Lithium-ion batteries have attracted considerable attention due to their high power density. The change in concentration of salt in the electrolyte solution in lithium-ion batteries during operation causes serious degradation of battery performance. Herein, a new method of in situ Raman spectroscopy with ultrafine multifiber probes was developed to simultaneously study the concentrations of ions at several different positions in the electrolyte solution in deep narrow spaces between the electrodes in batteries. The total amount of ions in the electrolyte solution clearly changed during operation due to the low permeability of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) at the anode for Li(+) permeation. The permeability, which is a key factor to achieve high battery performance, was improved (enhanced) by adding film-forming additives to the electrolyte solution to modify the properties of the SEI. The results provide important information for understanding and predicting phenomena occurring in a battery and for designing a superior battery. The present method is useful for analysis in deep narrow spaces in other electrochemical devices, such as capacitors. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: double-probe measurements from BOSS galaxy clustering \\& Planck data -- towards an analysis without informative priors

    CERN Document Server

    Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Cuesta, Antonio J; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo; Ross, Ashley J; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Prada, Francisco; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose A; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G; Satpathy, Siddharth; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Brownstein, Joel R; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    We develop a new methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors in the estimation of cosmological parameters. We extract the dark-energy-model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurement. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of $\\{R$, $l_a$, $\\Omega_b h^2$, $n_s$, $log(A_s)$, $\\Omega_k$, $H(z)$, $D_A(z)$, $f(z)\\sigma_8(z)\\}$, which give an efficient summary of Planck data and 2-point statistics from BOSS galaxy sample, where $R=\\sqrt{\\Omega_m H_0^2}\\,r(z_*)$, and $l_a=\\pi r(z_*)/r_s(z_*)$, $z_*$ is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and $r(z_*)$ and $r_s(z_*)$ denote our comoving distance to $z_*$ and sound horizon at $z_*$ respectively. The advantage of this method is that we do not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is not able to constrain well, i.e. $\\Omega_b...

  9. Transition metal (Cr{sup 3+}) and rare earth (Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}) ions used as a spectroscopic probe in compositional-dependent lead borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarski, W.A., E-mail: Wojciech.Pisarski@us.edu.p [University of Silesia, Institute of Chemistry, Szkolna 9, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Pisarska, J. [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Krasinskiego 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland); Dominiak-Dzik, G.; Ryba-Romanowski, W. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Okolna 2, 50-422 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2009-09-18

    Compositional-dependent lead borate glasses doped with transition metal and rare earth ions were studied using absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. The trivalent Cr{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} ions were used as a spectroscopic probe in glass samples with various PbO/B{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios. Spectral analysis indicates that Cr{sup 3+} ions occupy intermediate field sites; the both sites coexist and emit from the {sup 4}T{sub 2} (low-field) and the {sup 2}E (high-field) states, respectively. The R and Y/B values due to {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 2}/{sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}-{sup 6}H{sub 15/2}/{sup 4}F{sub 9/2}-{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} luminescence intensity ratios of Eu{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} ions, respectively, increase with increasing heavy metal (PbO) content, suggesting higher asymmetry and more covalent bonding character between rare earth and oxygen ions.

  10. Parathyroid hormone enhances fluid shear-induced [Ca2+]i signaling in osteoblastic cells through activation of mechanosensitive and voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, K. D.; Duncan, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Osteoblasts respond to both fluid shear and parathyroid hormone (PTH) with a rapid increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Because both stimuli modulate the kinetics of the mechanosensitive cation channel (MSCC), we postulated PTH would enhance the [Ca2+]i response to fluid shear by increasing the sensitivity of MSCCs. After a 3-minute preflow at 1 dyne/cm2, MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to various levels of shear and changes in [Ca2+]i were assessed using Fura-2. Pretreatment with 50 nM bovine PTH(1-34) [bPTH(1-34)] significantly enhanced the shear magnitude-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i. Gadolinium (Gd3+), an MSCC blocker, significantly inhibited the mean peak [Ca2+]i response to shear and shear + bPTH(1-34). Nifedipine (Nif), an L-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel (VSCC) blocker, also significantly reduced the [Ca2+]i response to shear + bPTH(1-34), but not to shear alone, suggesting VSCC activation plays an interactive role in the action of these stimuli together. Activation of either the protein kinase C (PKC) or protein kinase A (PKA) pathways with specific agonists indicated that PKC activation did not alter the Ca2+ response to shear, whereas PKA activation significantly increased the [Ca2+]i response to lower magnitudes of shear. bPTH(1-34), which activates both pathways, induced the greatest [Ca2+]i response at each level of shear, suggesting an interaction of these pathways in this response. These data indicate that PTH significantly enhances the [Ca2+]i response to shear primarily via PKA modulation of the MSCC and VSCC.

  11. Identification of phosphorylation sites for adenosine 3',5'-cyclic phosphate dependent protein kinase on the voltage-sensitive sodium channel from Electrophorus electricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerick, M C; Agnew, W S

    1989-10-17

    The voltage-sensitive sodium channel from the electroplax of Electrophorus electricus is selectively phosphorylated by the catalytic subunit of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) but not by protein kinase C. Under identical limiting conditions, the protein was phosphorylated 20% as rapidly as the synthetic model substrate kemptamide. A maximum of 1.7 +/- 0.6 equiv of phosphate is incorporated per mole. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed labeled phosphoserine and phosphothreonine at a constant ratio of 3.3:1. Seven distinct phosphopeptides were identified among tryptic fragments prepared from radiolabeled, affinity-purified protein and resolved by HPLC. The three most rapidly labeled fragments were further purified and sequenced. Four phosphorylated amino acids were identified deriving from three consensus phosphorylation sites. These were serine 6, serine 7, and threonine 17 from the amino terminus and a residue within 47 amino acids of the carboxyl terminus, apparently serine 1776. The alpha-subunits of brain sodium channels, like the electroplax protein, are readily phosphorylated by protein kinase A. However, these are also phosphorylated by protein kinase C and exhibit a markedly different pattern of incorporation. Each of three brain alpha-subunits displays an approximately 200 amino acid segment between homologous repeat domains I and II, which is missing from the electroplax and skeletal muscle proteins [Noda et al. (1986) Nature (London) 320, 188; Kayano et al. (1988) FEBS Lett. 228, 1878; Trimmer et al. (1989) Neuron 3, 33]. Most of the phosphorylation of the brain proteins occurs on a cluster of consensus phosphorylation sites located in this segment. This contrasts with the pattern of highly active sites on the amino and carboxyl termini of the electroplax protein. The detection of seven labeled tryptic phosphopeptides compared to the maximal labeling stoichiometry of approximately 2 suggests that many of the acceptor sites on the

  12. A voltage-sensitive dye-based assay for the identification of differentiated neurons derived from embryonic neural stem cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson N Leão

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pluripotent and multipotent stem cells hold great therapeutical promise for the replacement of degenerated tissue in neurological diseases. To fulfill that promise we have to understand the mechanisms underlying the differentiation of multipotent cells into specific types of neurons. Embryonic stem cell (ESC and embryonic neural stem cell (NSC cultures provide a valuable tool to study the processes of neural differentiation, which can be assessed using immunohistochemistry, gene expression, Ca(2+-imaging or electrophysiology. However, indirect methods such as protein and gene analysis cannot provide direct evidence of neuronal functionality. In contrast, direct methods such as electrophysiological techniques are well suited to produce direct evidence of neural functionality but are limited to the study of a few cells on a culture plate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we describe a novel method for the detection of action potential-capable neurons differentiated from embryonic NSC cultures using fast voltage-sensitive dyes (VSD. We found that the use of extracellularly applied VSD resulted in a more detailed labeling of cellular processes compared to calcium indicators. In addition, VSD changes in fluorescence translated precisely to action potential kinetics as assessed by the injection of simulated slow and fast sodium currents using the dynamic clamp technique. We further demonstrate the use of a finite element model of the NSC culture cover slip for optimizing electrical stimulation parameters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our method allows for a repeatable fast and accurate stimulation of neurons derived from stem cell cultures to assess their differentiation state, which is capable of monitoring large amounts of cells without harming the overall culture.

  13. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Study of Lateral Spreading of Cortical Activity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex Induced by a Current Impulse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Dávid Fehérvári

    Full Text Available In the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1, lateral spreading of excitatory potentials is believed to be involved in spatial integrative functions, but the underlying cortical mechanism is not well understood. Visually-evoked population-level responses have been shown to propagate beyond the V1 initial activation site in mouse, similar to higher mammals. Visually-evoked responses are, however, affected by neuronal circuits prior to V1 (retina, LGN, making the separate analysis of V1 difficult. Intracortical stimulation eliminates these initial processing steps. We used in vivo RH1691 voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging and intracortical microstimulation in adult C57BL/6 mice to elucidate the spatiotemporal properties of population-level signal spreading in V1 cortical circuits. The evoked response was qualitatively similar to that measured in single-cell electrophysiological experiments in rodents: a fast transient fluorescence peak followed by a fast and a slow decrease or hyperpolarization, similar to EPSP and fast and slow IPSPs in single cells. The early cortical response expanded at speeds commensurate with long horizontal projections (at 5% of the peak maximum, 0.08-0.15 m/s however, the bulk of the VSD signal propagated slowly (at half-peak maximum, 0.05-0.08 m/s suggesting an important role of regenerative multisynaptic transmission through short horizontal connections in V1 spatial integrative functions. We also found a tendency for a widespread and fast cortical response suppression in V1, which was eliminated by GABAA-antagonists gabazine and bicuculline methiodide. Our results help understand the neuronal circuitry involved in lateral spreading in V1.

  14. Inhibition of T-Type Voltage Sensitive Calcium Channel Reduces Load-Induced OA in Mice and Suppresses the Catabolic Effect of Bone Mechanical Stress on Chondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma P Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC regulate cellular calcium influx, one of the earliest responses to mechanical stimulation in osteoblasts. Here, we postulate that T-type VSCCs play an essential role in bone mechanical response to load and participate in events leading to the pathology of load-induced OA. Repetitive mechanical insult was used to induce OA in Cav3.2 T-VSCC null and wild-type control mouse knees. Osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 and chondrocytes were treated with a selective T-VSCC inhibitor and subjected to fluid shear stress to determine how blocking of T-VSCCs alters the expression profile of each cell type upon mechanical stimulation. Conditioned-media (CM obtained from static and sheared MC3T3-E1 was used to assess the effect of osteoblast-derived factors on the chondrocyte phenotype. T-VSCC null knees exhibited significantly lower focal articular cartilage damage than age-matched controls. In vitro inhibition of T-VSCC significantly reduced the expression of both early and late mechanoresponsive genes in osteoblasts but had no effect on gene expression in chondrocytes. Furthermore, treatment of chondrocytes with CM obtained from sheared osteoblasts induced expression of markers of hypertrophy in chondrocytes and this was nearly abolished when osteoblasts were pre-treated with the T-VSCC-specific inhibitor. These results indicate that T-VSCC plays a role in signaling events associated with induction of OA and is essential to the release of osteoblast-derived factors that promote an early OA phenotype in chondrocytes. Further, these findings suggest that local inhibition of T-VSCC may serve as a therapy for blocking load-induced bone formation that results in cartilage degeneration.

  15. Cocaine disinhibits dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area via use-dependent blockade of GABA neuron voltage-sensitive sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Scott C; Taylor, Seth R; Horton, Malia L; Barber, Elise N; Lyle, Laura T; Stobbs, Sarah H; Allison, David W

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cocaine on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Utilizing single-unit recordings in vivo, microelectrophoretic administration of DA enhanced the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons via D2/D3 DA receptor activation. Lower doses of intravenous cocaine (0.25-0.5 mg/kg), or the DA transporter (DAT) blocker methamphetamine, enhanced VTA GABA neuron firing rate via D2/D3 receptor activation. Higher doses of cocaine (1.0-2.0 mg/kg) inhibited their firing rate, which was not sensitive to the D2/D3 antagonist eticlopride. The voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) blocker lidocaine inhibited the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons at all doses tested (0.25-2.0 mg/kg). Cocaine or lidocaine reduced VTA GABA neuron spike discharges induced by stimulation of the internal capsule (ICPSDs) at dose levels 0.25-2 mg/kg (IC(50) 1.2 mg/kg). There was no effect of DA or methamphetamine on ICPSDs, or of DA antagonists on cocaine inhibition of ICPSDs. In VTA GABA neurons in vitro, cocaine reduced (IC(50) 13 microm) current-evoked spikes and TTX-sensitive sodium currents in a use-dependent manner. In VTA DA neurons, cocaine reduced IPSCs (IC(50) 13 microm), increased IPSC paired-pulse facilitation and decreased spontaneous IPSC frequency, without affecting miniature IPSC frequency or amplitude. These findings suggest that cocaine acts on GABA neurons to reduce activity-dependent GABA release on DA neurons in the VTA, and that cocaine's use-dependent blockade of VTA GABA neuron VSSCs may synergize with its DAT inhibiting properties to enhance mesolimbic DA transmission implicated in cocaine reinforcement.

  16. Giant magnetoimpedance intrinsic impedance and voltage sensitivity of rapidly solidified Co66Fe2Cr4Si13B15 amorphous wire for highly sensitive sensors applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tarun K.; Banerji, Pallab; Mandal, Sushil K.

    2016-11-01

    We report a systematic study of the influence of wire length, L, dependence of giant magneto-impedance (GMI) sensitivity of Co66Fe2Cr4Si13B15 soft magnetic amorphous wire of diameter ~100 µm developed by in-water quenching technique. The magnetization behaviour (hysteresis loops) of the wire with different length ( L = 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 and 10 cm) has been evaluated by fuxmetric induction method. It was observed that the behaviour of the hysteresis loops change drastically with the wire length, being attributed to the existence of a critical length, L C, found to be around 3 cm. GMI measurements have been taken using automated GMI measurement system and the GMI sensitivities in terms of intrinsic impedance sensitivity ( S Ω/Am -1) and voltage sensitivity ( S V/Am -1) of the wire have been evaluated under optimal bias field and excitation current. It was found that the maximum ( S Ω/Am -1) max ≈ 0.63 Ω/kAm-1/cm and ( S V/Am -1) max ≈ 3.10 V/kAm-1/cm were achieved at a critical length L C ~ 3 cm of the wire for an AC current of 5 mA and a frequency of 5 MHz. These findings provide crucial insights for optimization of the geometrical dimensions of magnetic sensing elements and important practical guidance for designing high sensitive GMI sensors. The relevant combinations of magnetic material parameters and operating conditions that optimize the sensitivity are highlighted.

  17. Spectroscopic analysis of optoelectronic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with standard spectroscopic techniques which can be used to analyze semiconductor samples or devices, in both, bulk, micrometer and submicrometer scale. The book aims helping experimental physicists and engineers to choose the right analytical spectroscopic technique in order to get specific information about their specific demands. For this purpose, the techniques including technical details such as apparatus and probed sample region are described. More important, also the expected outcome from experiments is provided. This involves also the link to theory, that is not subject of this book, and the link to current experimental results in the literature which are presented in a review-like style. Many special spectroscopic techniques are introduced and their relationship to the standard techniques is revealed. Thus the book works also as a type of guide or reference book for people researching in optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  18. Spectroscopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, J

    1976-01-01

    During the preparation of this compilation, many people contributed; the compilers wish to thank all of them. In particular they appreciate the efforts of V. Gilbertson, the manuscript typist, and those of K. C. Bregand, J. A. Kiley, and W. H. McPherson, who gave editorial assistance. They would like to thank Dr. J. R. Schwartz for his cooperation and encouragement. In addition, they extend their grati­ tude to Dr. L. Wilson of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, who gave the initial impetus to this project. v Contents I. I ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Organization ofthe Spectroscopic Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methods of Production and Experimental Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Band Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...

  19. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  20. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  1. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  2. Cortical long-range interactions embed statistical knowledge of natural sensory input: a voltage-sensitive dye imaging study [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1if

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Onat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available How is contextual processing as demonstrated with simplified stimuli, cortically enacted in response to ecologically relevant complex and dynamic stimuli? Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we captured mesoscopic population dynamics across several square millimeters of cat primary visual cortex. By presenting natural movies locally through either one or two adjacent apertures, we show that simultaneous presentation leads to mutual facilitation of activity. These synergistic effects were most effective when both movie patches originated from the same natural movie, thus forming a coherent stimulus in which the inherent spatio-temporal structure of natural movies were preserved in accord with Gestalt principles of perceptual organization. These results suggest that natural sensory input triggers cooperative mechanisms that are imprinted into the cortical functional architecture as early as in primary visual cortex.

  3. Cortical long-range interactions embed statistical knowledge of natural sensory input: a voltage-sensitive dye imaging study [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/wr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Onat

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How is contextual processing as demonstrated with simplified stimuli, cortically enacted in response to ecologically relevant complex and dynamic stimuli? Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we captured mesoscopic population dynamics across several square millimeters of cat primary visual cortex. By presenting natural movies locally through either one or two adjacent apertures, we show that simultaneous presentation leads to mutual facilitation of activity. These synergistic effects were most effective when both movie patches originated from the same natural movie, thus forming a coherent stimulus in which the inherent spatio-temporal structure of natural movies were preserved in accord with Gestalt principles of perceptual organization. These results suggest that natural sensory input triggers cooperative mechanisms that are imprinted into the cortical functional architecture as early as in primary visual cortex.

  4. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  5. Spectroscopic probe to contribution of physicochemical transformations in the toxicity of aged ZnO NPs to Chlorella vulgaris: new insight into the variation of toxicity of ZnO NPs under aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Huang, Qing; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun

    2016-10-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are one of the most abundantly applied nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based industries and they may cause unexpected environmental and health risks with their physicochemical transformations in the environment. Currently, there is still a lack of the in-depth understanding of the toxicity of aged ZnO NPs to aquatic organisms, particularly demanding quantitative analysis of the physicochemical transformations to distinguish their contributions in the toxicity assessment. For this purpose, therefore, we initiated the study of the toxicity of aged ZnO NPs to the model aquatic microalga, i.e. Chlorella vulgaris, and with the aid of spectroscopic tools for characterization and quantification of the physicochemical transformations, we scrutinized the toxicity variations for ZnO NPs with different aging times. As a result, we found that the toxicity altered in an abnormal manner with the aging time, i.e. the toxicity of aged ZnO NPs for 30 days showed the higher toxicity to the green alga than the fresh ZnO NPs or the ZnO NPs aged for longer time (e.g. 120 and 210 days). Through spectroscopic tools such as XRD, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, we made both the qualitative and quantitative assessments of the physicochemical changes of the ZnO NPs, and confirmed that in the early stage, the toxicity mainly stemmed from the release of zinc ions, but with longer aging time, the neoformation of the nanoparticles played the critical role, leading to the overall reduced toxicity due to the less toxic hydrozincite and zinc hydroxide in the transformed compounds.

  6. Spectroscopic analysis and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate; , James D.; Reed, Christopher J.; Domke, Christopher H.; Le, Linh; Seasholtz, Mary Beth; Weber, Andy; Lipp, Charles

    2017-04-18

    Apparatus for spectroscopic analysis which includes a tunable diode laser spectrometer having a digital output signal and a digital computer for receiving the digital output signal from the spectrometer, the digital computer programmed to process the digital output signal using a multivariate regression algorithm. In addition, a spectroscopic method of analysis using such apparatus. Finally, a method for controlling an ethylene cracker hydrogenator.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation of the binding interactions of a membrane potential molecule in various supramolecular confined environments: contrasting behavior of surfactant molecules in relocation or release of the probe between nanocarriers and DNA surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Surajit; Banik, Debasis; Roy, Arpita; Kundu, Niloy; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-12-01

    The fluorescence and optical properties of membrane potential probes are widely used to measure cellular transmembrane potentials. Hemicyanine dyes are also able to bind to membranes. The spectral properties of these molecules depend upon the charge shift from the donor moiety to the acceptor moiety. Changes in their spectral properties, i.e. absorption and emission maxima or intensities, are helpful in characterizing model membranes, microheterogeneous media, etc. In this article, we have demonstrated the binding interaction of a membrane potential probe, 1-ethyl-2-(4-(p-dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3-butadienyl)-pyridinium perchlorate (LDS 698), with various supramolecular confined environments. The larger dipole moment in the ground state compared to the excited state is a unique feature of hemicyanine dyes. Due to this unique feature, red shifts in the absorption maxima are observed in hydrophobic environments, compared with bulk solvent. On addition of surfactants and CT DNA to an aqueous solution containing LDS 698, significant increase in the emission intensity along with the quantum yield and lifetime indicate partition of the probe molecules into organized assemblies. In the case of the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-water system, due to interactions between the cationic LDS 698 and the anionic dodecyl sulfate moiety, the fluorescence intensity at ∼666 nm decreases and an additional peak at ∼590 nm appears at premicellar concentration (∼0.20 mM-4.50 mM). But at ∼5.50 mM SDS concentration, the absorbance in the higher wavelength region increases again, indicating encapsulation of the probe in micellar aggregates. This observation indicates that the premicellar aggregation behavior of SDS can also be judged by observing the changes in the UV-vis and fluorescence spectral patterns. The temperature dependent study also indicates that non-radiative deactivation of the dye molecules is highly restricted in the DNA micro-environment, compared with micelles

  8. Spectroscopic signatures of quantum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Juliane; Bennett, Robert; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a formula for the spectroscopically accessible level shifts and decay rates of an atom moving at an arbitrary angle relative to a surface. Our Markov formulation leads to an intuitive analytic description whereby the shifts and rates are obtained from the coefficients of the Heisenberg equation of motion for the atomic flip operators but with complex Doppler-shifted (velocity-dependent) transition frequencies. Our results conclusively demonstrate that for the limiting case of parallel motion the shifts and rates are quadratic or higher in the atomic velocity. We show that a stronger, linear velocity dependence is exhibited by the rates and shifts for perpendicular motion, thus opening the prospect of experimentally probing the Markovian approach to the phenomenon of quantum friction.

  9. Development of a new analysis method evaluating adsorption energies for the respective ion-exchanged sites on alkali-metal ion-exchanged ZSM-5 utilizing CO as a probe molecule: IR-spectroscopic and calorimetric studies combined with a DFT method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumashiro, Ryotaro; Fujie, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Aki; Mori, Toshinori; Nagao, Mahiko; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2009-07-07

    For alkali-metal ion-exchanged ZSM-5 zeolites (MZSM-5; M: Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) the analysis of ion-exchangeable sites was performed by means of a combined method based on IR spectroscopic and calorimetric measurements using CO as the probe molecule. The heat of adsorption of CO was found to be correlated with an IR frequency of stretching vibration of C-O in the adsorbed species. It was revealed that there exists at least two types of sites capable of ion-exchanging; for the lithium ion-exchanged ZSM-5 (LiZSM-5) CO adsorption on each type of site is evaluated to give a set of IR bands and heats of adsorption, 2195 cm(-1) and 49 kJ mol(-1), 2185 cm(-1) and 39 kJ mol(-1) with the aid of the newly developed method utilizing the data obtained from a combined microcalorimetric and IR-spectroscopic study. Such types of data were also obtained for Na- and K-ion-exchanged ZSM-5 samples. Furthermore, a linear relationship between the differential heat of adsorption (q(diff)) evaluated and the shift of wavenumber of the C-O stretching vibration from that of a gaseous CO molecule (Deltanu) was established for the systems of MZSM-5-CO, and the bonding nature of the CO molecule with each site can be explained in terms of the electrostatic force. The model of each adsorption site was also examined by the quantum calculation method (density functional theory: DFT). The trends obtained from the experimental data may be substantially supported by the calculation method even adopting a model as simple as the ZSM-5-type zeolite: the composition of MAlSi(4)O(4)H(12).

  10. Optical investigations of La0.7Ca0.3-xKxMnO3 (x = 0.00, 0.05 and 0.10 probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sdiri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Using spectroscopic ellipsometry, we have studied the optical properties of doped manganites at the paramagnetic state in polycrystalline La0.7Ca0.3-xKxMnO3 samples for (x = 0.00, 0.05 and 0.10 in the energy range of 3.2-5.5 eV at room temperature. The surface morphology of the samples was obtained by using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Refractive indices, extinction coefficients, the transmission ellipsometric parameters Ψ and Δ are investigated at different wavelengths. The study of the optical conductivity σ reveals that optical behaviour and the activated transport in the paramagnetic state of these materials are consistent with Jahn-Teller small polaron. In addition, the spectrum of the complex dielectric constant ε reveals peaks for all samples, the results may be explained by the presence of space charges from the strongly dipole-allowed O(2p−Mn(3d transition.

  11. Dual pathways of calcium entry in spike and plateau phases of luteinizing hormone release from chicken pituitary cells: sequential activation of receptor-operated and voltage-sensitive calcium channels by gonadotropin-releasing hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J.S.; Wakefield, I.K.; King, J.A.; Mulligan, G.P.; Millar, R.P.

    1988-04-01

    It has previously been shown that, in pituitary gonadotrope cells, the initial rise in cytosolic Ca2+ induced by GnRH is due to a Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores. This raises the possibility that the initial transient spike phase of LH release might be fully or partially independent of extracellular Ca2+. We have therefore characterized the extracellular Ca2+ requirements, and the sensitivity to Ca2+ channel blockers, of the spike and plateau phases of secretion separately. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+ the spike and plateau phases were inhibited by 65 +/- 4% and 106 +/- 3%, respectively. Both phases exhibited a similar dependence on concentration of extracellular Ca2+. However, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel blockers D600 and nifedipine had a negligible effect on the spike phase, while inhibiting the plateau phase by approximately 50%. In contrast, ruthenium red, Gd3+ ions, and Co2+ ions inhibited both spike and plateau phases to a similar extent as removal of extracellular Ca2+. A fraction (35 +/- 4%) of spike phase release was resistant to removal of extracellular Ca2+. This fraction was abolished after calcium depletion of the cells by preincubation with EGTA in the presence of calcium ionophore A23187, indicating that it depends on intracellular Ca2+ stores. Neither absence of extracellular Ca2+, nor the presence of ruthenium red or Gd3+ prevented mobilization of 45Ca2+ from intracellular stores by GnRH. We conclude that mobilization of intracellular stored Ca2+ is insufficient by itself to account for full spike phase LH release.

  12. Giant magnetoimpedance intrinsic impedance and voltage sensitivity of rapidly solidified Co{sub 66}Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 4}Si{sub 13}B{sub 15} amorphous wire for highly sensitive sensors applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Tarun K.; Mandal, Sushil K. [CSIR - National Metallurgical Laboratory, NDE and Magnetic Materials Group, MST Division, Jamshedpur (India); Banerji, Pallab [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Materials Science Centre, Kharagpur (India)

    2016-11-15

    We report a systematic study of the influence of wire length, L, dependence of giant magneto-impedance (GMI) sensitivity of Co{sub 66}Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 4}Si{sub 13}B{sub 15} soft magnetic amorphous wire of diameter ∝ 100 μm developed by in-water quenching technique. The magnetization behaviour (hysteresis loops) of the wire with different length (L = 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 and 10 cm) has been evaluated by fuxmetric induction method. It was observed that the behaviour of the hysteresis loops change drastically with the wire length, being attributed to the existence of a critical length, L{sub C}, found to be around 3 cm. GMI measurements have been taken using automated GMI measurement system and the GMI sensitivities in terms of intrinsic impedance sensitivity (S{sub Ω/Am}{sup -1}) and voltage sensitivity (S{sub V/Am}{sup -1}) of the wire have been evaluated under optimal bias field and excitation current. It was found that the maximum (S{sub Ω/Am}{sup -1}){sub max} ∼ 0.63 Ω/kAm{sup -1}/cm and (S{sub V/Am}{sup -1}){sub max} ∼ 3.10 V/kAm{sup -1}/cm were achieved at a critical length L{sub C} ∝ 3 cm of the wire for an AC current of 5 mA and a frequency of 5 MHz. These findings provide crucial insights for optimization of the geometrical dimensions of magnetic sensing elements and important practical guidance for designing high sensitive GMI sensors. The relevant combinations of magnetic material parameters and operating conditions that optimize the sensitivity are highlighted. (orig.)

  13. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Mechanism of Photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Nosaka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reaction mechanisms of various kinds of photocatalysts have been reviewed based on the recent reports, in which various spectroscopic techniques including luminol chemiluminescence photometry, fluorescence probe method, electron spin resonance (ESR, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy were applied. The reaction mechanisms elucidated for bare and modified TiO2 were described individually. The modified visible light responsive TiO2 photocatalysts, i.e., Fe(III-deposited metal-doped TiO2 and platinum complex-deposited TiO2, were studied by detecting paramagnetic species with ESR, •O2− (or H2O2 with chemiluminescence photometry, and OH radicals with a fluorescence probe method. For bare TiO2, the difference in the oxidation mechanism for the different crystalline form was investigated by the fluorescence probe method, while the adsorption and decomposition behaviors of several amino acids and peptides were investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy.

  14. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling study on the separate and simultaneous bindings of alprazolam and fluoxetine hydrochloride to human serum albumin (HSA): With the aim of the drug interactions probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangkoob, Faeze; Housaindokht, Mohmmad Reza; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Rajabi, Omid; Rouhbakhsh Zaeri, Zeinab; Verdian Doghaei, Asma

    2015-02-01

    The objective of the present research is to study the interaction of separate and simultaneous of alprazolam (ALP) and fluoxetine hydrochloride (FLX) with human serum albumin (HSA) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) using different kinds of spectroscopic, cyclic voltammetry and molecular modeling techniques. The absorbance spectra of protein, drugs and protein-drug showed complex formation between the drugs and HSA. Fluorescence analysis demonstrated that ALP and FLX could quench the fluorescence spectrum of HSA and demonstrated the conformational change of HSA in the presence of both drugs. Also, fluorescence quenching mechanism of HSA-drug complexes both separately and simultaneously was suggested as static quenching. The analysis of UV absorption data and the fluorescence quenching of HSA in the binary and ternary systems showed that FLX decreased the binding affinity between ALP and HSA. On the contrary, ALP increased the binding affinity of FLX and HSA. The results of synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra indicated that the binding of drugs to HSA would modify the microenvironment around the Trp and Tyr residues and the conformation of HSA. The distances between Trp residue and the binding sites of the drugs were estimated according to the Förster theory, and it was demonstrated that non-radiative energy transfer from HSA to the drugs occurred with a high probability. Moreover, according to CV measurements, the decrease of peak current in the cyclic voltammogram of the both drugs in the presence of HSA revealed that they interacted with albumin and binding constants were calculated for binary systems which were in agreement with the binding constants obtained from UV absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The prediction of the best binding sites of ALP and FLX in binary and ternary systems in molecular modeling approach was done using of Gibbs free energy.

  15. Probing the interaction of human serum albumin with vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahaki, Hanie, E-mail: hanieh.mahaki@gmail.com [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of Riboflavin (RB) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) with human serum albumin (HSA) using different spectroscopic, zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques under imitated physiological conditions. The resonance light scattering (RLS) method determined the critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in the presence and absence of L-Arg which confirmed the zeta potential results. The binding constants (K{sub a}) of HSA–RB were 2.5×10{sup 4} and 9.7×10{sup 3} M{sup −1}, respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 280 nm, also were 7.5×10{sup 3} and 7.3×10{sup 3}, respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 295 nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that in the presence of L-Arg, the binding constant of HSA–RB was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to results in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The binding distances between HSA and RB in two- and three-component systems were estimated by the Forster theory which revealed that nonradiative energy transfer from HSA to RB occurred with a high probability. The effect of RB on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) in both systems. Docking studies demonstrated a reduction in the binding affinity between RB and HSA in the presence of L-Arg. -- Highlights: ► We studied the interaction of riboflavin with HSA in presence and absence of L-Arg. ► Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. ► We compared the binding mechanism of riboflavin (RB) to HSA in both systems. ► We determined critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in both systems. ► The binding site of RB on HSA in both systems has been determined.

  16. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johan B.C.; Khatib, Mohammed G.; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data chan

  17. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  18. Spectroscopic Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analysis of Phase I test data demonstrates that the Photogenics Spectroscopic Dosimeter will detect neutron energies from 0.8 up to 600 MeV. The detector...

  19. The Use of Ratiometric Fluorescence Measurements of the Voltage Sensitive Dye Di-4-ANEPPS to Examine Action Potential Characteristics and Drug Effects on Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortigon-Vinagre, M. P.; Zamora, V.; Burton, F. L.; Green, J.; Gintant, G. A.; Smith, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) and higher throughput platforms have emerged as potential tools to advance cardiac drug safety screening. This study evaluated the use of high bandwidth photometry applied to voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes (VSDs) to assess drug-induced changes in action potential characteristics of spontaneously active hiPSC-CM. Human iPSC-CM from 2 commercial sources (Cor.4U and iCell Cardiomyocytes) were stained with the VSD di-4-ANEPPS and placed in a specialized photometry system that simultaneously monitors 2 wavebands of emitted fluorescence, allowing ratiometric measurement of membrane voltage. Signals were acquired at 10 kHz and analyzed using custom software. Action potential duration (APD) values were normally distributed in cardiomyocytes (CMC) from both sources though the mean and variance differed significantly (APD90: 229 ± 15 ms vs 427 ± 49 ms [mean ± SD, P < 0.01]; average spontaneous cycle length: 0.99 ± 0.02 s vs 1.47 ± 0.35 s [mean ± SD, P < 0.01], Cor.4U vs iCell CMC, respectively). The 10–90% rise time of the AP (Trise) was ∼6 ms and was normally distributed when expressed as 1/Trise2 in both cell preparations. Both cell types showed a rate dependence analogous to that of adult human cardiac cells. Furthermore, nifedipine, ranolazine, and E4031 had similar effects on cardiomyocyte electrophysiology in both cell types. However, ranolazine and E4031 induced early after depolarization-like events and high intrinsic firing rates at lower concentrations in iCell CMC. These data show that VSDs provide a minimally invasive, quantitative, and accurate method to assess hiPSC-CM electrophysiology and detect subtle drug-induced effects for drug safety screening while highlighting a need to standardize experimental protocols across preparations. PMID:27621282

  20. Spectroscopic Imaging of Strongly Correlated Electronic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Ali; da Silva Neto, Eduardo H.; Aynajian, Pegor

    2016-03-01

    The study of correlated electronic systems from high-Tc cuprates to heavy-fermion systems continues to motivate the development of experimental tools to probe electronic phenomena in new ways and with increasing precision. In the past two decades, spectroscopic imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a powerful experimental technique. The combination of high energy and spatial resolutions provided by this technique reveals unprecedented detail of the electronic properties of strongly correlated metals and superconductors. This review examines specific experiments, theoretical concepts, and measurement methods that have established the application of these techniques to correlated materials. A wide range of applications, such as the study of collective responses to single atomic impurities, the characterization of quasiparticle-like excitations through their interference, and the identification of competing electronic phases using spectroscopic imaging, are discussed.

  1. Structural and spectroscopic studies of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Laitenberger, P

    1996-01-01

    and on a 10ML thick Ar spacer layer, a remarkable substrate dependence is revealed. A new STM-based technique for fabricating simple metal-structures with dimensions in the 10-100nm regime which are partially electrically isolated from their environment was developed in collaboration with Dr. L. A. Silva. This technique employs the STM tip as a mechanical nanofabrication tool to machine gaps into a thin metallic film deposited on an insulating substrate, which laterally confine and electrically isolate the desired metal regions. Several metal structures, such as nanoscale wires and pads, were successfully created. Finally, the conceptual basis and present stage of construction of a new surface analytical tool, the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS), is discussed. The SPELS offers the exciting prospect of collecting structural as well as spectroscopic information with a spatial resolution of a few nanometres. Once successfully developed, it will be ideally suited for spectroscopic studies of nanos...

  2. Thin film metal coated fiber optic hydrophone probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath Minasamudram, Rupa; Arora, Piyush; Gandhi, Gaurav; Daryoush, Afshin S; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A; Lewin, Peter A

    2009-11-01

    Our purpose is to improve the performance sensitivity of a fiber sensor used as a fiber optic hydrophone probe (FOHP) by the addition of nanoscale thin film gold coating. The fiber is designed to provide a uniform and spatial averaging free response up to 100 MHz by etching down to an active diameter of approximately 9 mum. The performance sensitivity of straight cleaved (i.e., full size core and cladding) uncoated, tapered uncoated, and tapered thin film gold-coated fiber sensors was compared in the frequency range from 1.5 to 20 MHz in the presence of acoustic amplitude pressure levels as high as 6 MPa. An unprecedented voltage sensitivity of -245 dB relative to 1 V/muPa (560 mV/MPa) was measured for a thin film gold-coated FOHP by optimizing the gold coating thickness.

  3. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed to in an inter......A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  4. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Shell model and spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, P. [Madrid Univ. Autonoma and IFT, UAM/CSIC, E-28049 (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    In these lectures, I introduce the notion of spectroscopic factor in the shell model context. A brief review is given of the present status of the large scale applications of the Interacting Shell Model. The spectroscopic factors and the spectroscopic strength are discussed for nuclei in the vicinity of magic closures and for deformed nuclei. (author)

  6. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-05-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present.

  7. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  8. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  9. Infrared spectroscopic probing of dimethylamine clusters in an Ar matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siyang; Kjaergaard, Henrik G; Du, Lin

    2016-02-01

    Amines have many atmospheric sources and their clusters play an important role in aerosol nucleation processes. Clusters of a typical amine, dimethylamine (DMA), of different sizes were measured with matrix isolation IR (infrared) and NIR (near infrared) spectroscopy. The NIR vibrations are more separated and therefore it is easier to distinguish different sizes of clusters in this region. The DMA clusters, up to DMA tetramer, have been optimized using density functional methods, and the geometries, binding energies and thermodynamic properties of DMA clusters were obtained. The computed frequencies and intensities of NH-stretching vibrations in the DMA clusters were used to interpret the experimental spectra. We have identified the fundamental transitions of the bonded NH-stretching vibration and the first overtone transitions of the bonded and free NH-stretching vibration in the DMA clusters. Based on the changes in vibrational intensities during the annealing processes, the growth of clusters was clearly observed. The results of annealing processes indicate that DMA molecules tend to form larger clusters with lower energies under matrix temperatures, which is also supported by the calculated reaction energies of cluster formation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  11. Effect of anatomy on spectroscopic detection of cervical dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Jelena; Lau, Condon; McGee, Sasha; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Nazemi, Jonathan; Galindo, Luis; Feng, Victoria; Darragh, Teresa; de Las Morenas, Antonio; Crum, Christopher; Stier, Elizabeth; Feld, Michael; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2009-07-01

    It has long been speculated that underlying variations in tissue anatomy affect in vivo spectroscopic measurements. We investigate the effects of cervical anatomy on reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to guide the development of a diagnostic algorithm for identifying high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) free of the confounding effects of anatomy. We use spectroscopy in both contact probe and imaging modes to study patients undergoing either colposcopy or treatment for HSIL. Physical models of light propagation in tissue are used to extract parameters related to tissue morphology and biochemistry. Our results show that the transformation zone, the area in which the vast majority of HSILs are found, is spectroscopically distinct from the adjacent squamous mucosa, and that these anatomical differences can directly influence spectroscopic diagnostic parameters. Specifically, we demonstrate that performance of diagnostic algorithms for identifying HSILs is artificially enhanced when clinically normal squamous sites are included in the statistical analysis of the spectroscopic data. We conclude that underlying differences in tissue anatomy can have a confounding effect on diagnostic spectroscopic parameters and that the common practice of including clinically normal squamous sites in cervical spectroscopy results in artificially improved performance in distinguishing HSILs from clinically suspicious non-HSILs.

  12. Extracting spectroscopic factors from direct reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate

    2009-10-01

    Direct reactions have been used to probe the structure of the nucleus for decades. After some decline in the 80's and 90's these methods have more recently had a surge in popularity, and new techniques have been added to the experimentalists toolbox. One goal of direct reaction experiments is to extract spectroscopic factors (SFs), related to the shell occupancy. SFs extracted from neutron knockout reactions show reductions, compared to the theoretical value, that are related to the neutron separation energy [1], whereas SFs from the well-established (e,e'p) reaction on stable nuclei are consistently 50% - 60% lower than those expected from the independent-particle shell model [2] over a wide range of masses. pardAs the extraction of spectroscopic factors from direct reaction measurements requires the comparison of data with calculated differential cross sections, the results are by nature model dependent. The influence of different scattering (commonly optical), and bound state potentials, should not be over-looked. Recent attempts to reanalyze single-neutron transfer data using a consistent approach have shown agreement with large basis shell model calculations [3], clearly conflicting with both the (e,e'p) and the knockout data. It has been suggested that the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) is a more valid quantity to extract when the reaction is peripheral [4]. spectroscopic factors are, how they are extracted and what they really mean will be discussed in this talk.[4pt] [1] Alexandra Gade, and Thomas Glasmacher, Prog Part. Nucl. Phys. 60 (2008) 161-224.[0pt] [2] G.J. Kramer, H.P. Blok, and L. Lapik'as, Nucl. Phys. A679 (2001) 267-286.[0pt] [3] Jenny Lee, M.B. Tsang, and W.G. Lynch, Phys. Rev C 75, (2007), 064320.[0pt] [4] D.Y. Pan, F.M. Nunes, and A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, Phys. Rev. C 75, (2007) 024601.

  13. The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer: Science and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, A.; McConnachie, A.; MSE Team

    2016-10-01

    MSE is a project to replace the current 3.6 m CFHT with a 10 m class, segmented, wide-field telescope that will feed a dedicated suite of multi-object spectrographs, operating at resolutions from R˜2000 to R>20000, and obtaining >3000 spectra per pointing (>> 5 million spectra/yr). It will use much of the existing infrastructure of the current CFHT, including the pier, and will closely approximate the envelope of the existing facility. MSE will be the only fully dedicated, 10 m class, wide-field spectroscopic telescope at first light in ˜ 2025. It will fill arguably the single biggest "missing link" in the international network of astronomical facilities. At optical wavelengths, LSST, WFIRST, Euclid, and Gaia will identify many millions of astrophysically interesting targets that otherwise lack the dedicated, large aperture, spectroscopic followup facilities required to probe their chemodynamical properties. Elsewhere, SKA, eRosita and others will provide a revolution in our understanding of the multiwavelength Universe. Among this capability, MSE will be an essential tool by providing the optical data that will otherwise be chronically absent.

  14. A single probe for imaging photons, electrons and physical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilet, Nicolas; Lisunova, Yuliya; Lamattina, Fabio; Stevenson, Stephanie E.; Pigozzi, Giancarlo; Paruch, Patrycja; Fink, Rainer H.; Hug, Hans J.; Quitmann, Christoph; Raabe, Joerg

    2016-06-01

    The combination of complementary measurement techniques has become a frequent approach to improve scientific knowledge. Pairing of the high lateral resolution scanning force microscopy (SFM) with the spectroscopic information accessible through scanning transmission soft x-ray microscopy (STXM) permits assessing physical and chemical material properties with high spatial resolution. We present progress from the NanoXAS instrument towards using an SFM probe as an x-ray detector for STXM measurements. Just by the variation of one parameter, the SFM probe can be utilised to detect either sample photo-emitted electrons or transmitted photons. This allows the use of a single probe to detect electrons, photons and physical forces of interest. We also show recent progress and demonstrate the current limitations of using a high aspect ratio coaxial SFM probe to detect photo-emitted electrons with very high lateral resolution. Novel probe designs are proposed to further progress in using an SFM probe as a STXM detector.

  15. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  16. Multiparameter fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Gary R.

    1994-08-01

    The ability to quantitate physiological parameters in single living cells using fluorescence spectroscopic imaging has expanded our understanding of many cell regulatory processes. Previous studies have focussed on the measurement of single parameters, such as the concentration of calcium, and more recently two parameters, such as calcium and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging. The complexity of the interrelationships among cell biochemical reactions suggests a need to extend the measurement scheme to several parameters. Expansion of the number of parameters involves several complexities associated with fluorescent probe selection and instrumentation design as well as the processing and management of the data. A system has been assembled which provides maximum flexibility in multiparameter fluorescence imaging measurements. The system provides multiple combinations of excitation, dichroic mirror, and emission wavelengths. It has automatic acquisition of any number of parameters. The number of parameters is primarily limited by the selection of fluorescent probes with nonoverlapping spectra. We demonstrate the utility of the system by the coordinated monitoring of stimulated changes in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging coupled with a conventional transmitted light image of single smooth muscle cells. The results demonstrate coordinated changes in some instances but uncoordinated changes in others.

  17. High-resolution photonic analysis with scanned probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Andrew Gustaf

    Absorption spectroscopy is demonstrated to be feasible using a photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM) combined with a spectroscope. Methods of improving the spatial resolution and spectroscopic capabilities are studied in order to determine their potential practicability. Analysis of the photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM) and modifications made to the microscope are included with experimental results demonstrating certain image and spectral resolution capabilities. Results showing both the PSTM absorption spectra of gold island films and their independently acquired PSTM images are presented. An alternative scanning probe method involving photons is additionally examined. The new method is demonstrated to require specific improvements in order that it might provide a distinct improvement in resolution. The new type of scanning probe microscope is one utilizing nonlinear photonics: the nonlinear scanning tunneling microscope (NSTM). Basic results are described and two-photon fluorescence measurements are presented to demonstrate the principle of operation. In any scanned probe microscope or spectroscope, resolution is strongly dependent upon the characteristics of the signal as a function of distance to the sample and knowledge of these characteristics. The NSTM functionality is most dependent upon the sample-probe gap, but the gap also determines resolution in the PSTM. Hence measurements and calculations showing an analysis of the characteristics of the separation between the probe and sample surface are also presented.

  18. Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1990-07-17

    This patent describes a spectroscopic scanning tunneling microscope (SSTM) apparatus for differential atomic imaging the surface of a material sample. It comprises: a mounting stage for mounting the sample; a fine-point electrode probe positioned adjacent the mounting stage and being positionable very closely adjacent a sample that is mounted on the stage to accommodate a tunneling current between the sample and the probe; tunable electronic surface bias means connected to the surface of the sample and to the probe for electronically biasing the surface of the sample in relation to the probe with a surface voltage bias; photon bias means adjacent the stage for providing photon biasing of selected wavelengths and frequencies on the surface of the sample adjacent the probe; instrumentation means for measuring tunneling current through the probe and electronic voltage bias; data processing means; and display means.

  19. X-ray polarimetry with the Polarization Spectroscopic Telescope Array (PolSTAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krawczynski, Henric S.; Stern, Daniel; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the Polarization Spectroscopic Telescope Array (PolSTAR), a mission proposed to NASA's 2014 Small Explorer (SMEX) announcement of opportunity. PolSTAR measures the linear polarization of 3-50 keV (requirement; goal: 2.5-70 keV) X-rays probing the behavior of matter,radiation ...

  20. Bimodal Distribution and Fluorescence Response of Environment-Sensitive Probes in Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Klymchenko, Andrey S; Duportail, Guy; Demchenko, Alexander P.; Mély, Yves

    2004-01-01

    A remarkable heterogeneity is often observed in the spectroscopic properties of environment-sensitive fluorescence probes in phospholipid bilayers. To explain its origin, we provided a detailed investigation of the fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of 4′-dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (probe F) in bilayer vesicles with the variations of fatty acid composition, polar heads, temperature, and cholesterol content. Probe F, due to excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, exhibits t...

  1. Probe tip heating assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  2. Optimising Spectroscopic and Photometric Galaxy Surveys: Same-sky Benefits for Dark Energy and Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, Donnacha; Bridle, Sarah; Jouvel, Stephanie; Abdalla, Filipe B; Frieman, Joshua A

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiple cosmological probes can produce measurements of cosmological parameters much more stringent than those possible with any individual probe. We examine the combination of two highly correlated probes of late-time structure growth: (i) weak gravitational lensing from a survey with photometric redshifts and (ii) galaxy clustering and redshift space distortions from a survey with spectroscopic redshifts. We choose generic survey designs so that our results are applicable to a range of current and future photometric redshift (e.g. KiDS, DES, HSC, Euclid) and spectroscopic redshift (e.g. DESI, 4MOST, Sumire) surveys. Combining the surveys greatly improves their power to measure both dark energy and modified gravity. An independent, non-overlapping combination sees a dark energy figure of merit more than 4 times larger than that produced by either survey alone. The powerful synergies between the surveys are strongest for modified gravity, where their constraints are orthogonal, producing a...

  3. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  4. Spectroscopic and dynamical studies of highly energized small polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.W.; Silbey, R.J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The authors have initiated a program to perform spectroscopic and dynamic studies of small molecules. Large amplitude motions in excited acetylene were discussed along with plans to record the dispersed fluorescence (DF) and the stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra. SEP spectra were reported for the formyl radical. A Fourier transform spectrometer was discussed with respect to its ability to probe the structure of radicals. This instrument is capable of performing studies using various techniques such as magnetic rotation spectroscopy and sub-Doppler sideband-OODR Zeman (SOODRZ) spectroscopy.

  5. Spectroscopic evaluation of photodynamic therapy of the intraperitoneal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Sandell, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Lewis, Robert; Cengel, Keith A.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence before and after photodynamic therapy of healthy canine peritoneal cavity. Animals were treated intra-operatively after iv injection of the benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD). The small bowel was treated using a uniform light field projected by a microlenstipped fiber. The cavity was then filled with scattering medium and the remaining organs were treated using a moving diffuser. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements were made using a multi-fiber optical probe positioned on the surface of various tissues within the cavity before and after illumination. The measured data were analyzed to quantify hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation and sensitizer concentration. PMID:26028798

  6. Spectroscopic evaluation of photodynamic therapy of the intraperitoneal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Sandell, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Lewis, Robert; Cengel, Keith A.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence before and after photodynamic therapy of healthy canine peritoneal cavity. Animals were treated intra-operatively after iv injection of the benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD). The small bowel was treated using a uniform light field projected by a microlens-tipped fiber. The cavity was then filled with scattering medium and the remaining organs were treated using a moving diffuser. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements were made using a multi-fiber optical probe positioned on the surface of various tissues within the cavity before and after illumination. The measured data were analyzed to quantify hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation and sensitizer concentration.

  7. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  8. Effects of probe geometry on transscleral diffuse optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenmarker, Pontus; Xu, Can T; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Krohn, Jørgen

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the geometry of a fiber optic probe affects the transmission and reflection of light through the scleral eye wall. Two geometrical parameters of the fiber probe were investigated: the source-detector distance and the fiber protrusion, i.e. the length of the fiber extending from the flat surface of the fiber probe. For optimization of the fiber optic probe geometry, fluorescence stained choroidal tumor phantoms in ex vivo porcine eyes were measured with both diffuse reflectance- and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The strength of the fluorescence signal compared to the excitation signal was used as a measure for optimization. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and temperature were monitored to assess the impact of the probe on the eye. For visualizing any possible damage caused by the probe, the scleral surface was imaged with scanning electron microscopy after completion of the spectroscopic measurements. A source-detector distance of 5 mm with zero fiber protrusion was considered optimal in terms of spectroscopic contrast, however, a slight fiber protrusion of 0.5 mm is argued to be advantageous for clinical measurements. The study further indicates that transscleral spectroscopy can be safely performed in human eyes under in vivo conditions, without leading to an unacceptable IOP elevation, a significant rise in tissue temperature, or any visible damage to the scleral surface.

  9. Multiparametric probing of microenvironment with solvatochromic fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchenko, Andrey S; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2008-01-01

    We describe new methodology for multiparametric probing of weak non-covalent interactions in the medium based on response of environment-sensitive fluorescent dyes. The commonly used approach is based on correlation of one spectroscopic parameter (e.g. wavelength shift) with environment polarity, which describes a superposition of universal and specific (such as hydrogen bonding) interactions. In our approach, by using several independent spectroscopic parameters of a dye, we monitor simultaneously each individual type of the interactions. For deriving these extra parameters the selected dye should exist in several excited and/or ground states. In the present work, we applied 4'-(diethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone, which undergoes the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and thus exhibits an additional emission band belonging to an ESIPT product (tautomer) form of the dye. The spectroscopic characteristics of the excited normal and the tautomer states as well as of the ESIPT reaction of the dye are differently sensitive to the different types of interactions with microenvironment and therefore can be used for its multiparametric description. The new methodology allowed us to monitor simultaneously three fundamental physicochemical parameters of probe microenvironment: polarity, electronic polarizability and H-bond donor ability. The applications of this approach to binary solvent mixtures, reverse micelles, lipid bilayers and binding sites of proteins are presented and the limitations of this approach are discussed. We believe that the methodology of multiparametric probing will extend the capabilities of fluorescent probes as the tools in biomolecular and cellular research.

  10. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  11. Semi-Synthesis of Labeled Proteins for Spectroscopic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Domenico D'Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of SPPS by Merrifield in the 60s, peptide chemists have considered the possibility of preparing large proteins. The introduction of native chemical ligation in the 90s and then of expressed protein ligation have opened the way to the preparation of synthetic proteins without size limitations. This review focuses on semi-synthetic strategies useful to prepare proteins decorated with spectroscopic probes, like fluorescent labels and stable isotopes, and their biophysical applications. We show that expressed protein ligation, combining the advantages of organic chemistry with the easy and size limitless recombinant protein expression, is an excellent strategy for the chemical synthesis of labeled proteins, enabling a single protein to be functionalized at one or even more distinct positions with different probes.

  12. Properties of Ultrasound Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Rusina, M.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the measurement properties of ultrasound probes. Ultrasound probes and their parameters significantly affect the quality of the final image. In this work there are described the possibility of measuring the spatial resolution, sensitivity of the probe and measuring the length of the dead zone. Ultrasound phantom ATS Multi Purpose Phantom Type 539 was used for measurements.

  13. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kelly, Brandon [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Badenes, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bañados, Eduardo [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Borissova, Jura [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030, and Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Burgett, William S. [GMTO Corp, Suite 300, 251 S. Lake Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Chambers, Kenneth, E-mail: emorganson@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  14. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Variable Selection and Anticipated Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J.; Myers, Adam D.; Eracleous, Michael; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Bañados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Borissova, Jura; Brandt, William Nielsen; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Flewelling, Heather; Garnavich, Peter; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Isler, Jedidah C.; Kaiser, Nick; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Pâris, Isabelle; Parvizi, Mahmoud; Poleski, Radosław; Price, Paul A.; Salvato, Mara; Shanks, Tom; Schlafly, Eddie F.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Stassun, Keivan; Tonry, John T.; Walter, Fabian; Waters, Chris Z.

    2015-06-01

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg2 selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  15. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  16. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw [Moraga, CA; Cang, Hu [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Cangshan [Berkeley, CA; Wong, Chung M [San Gabriel, CA

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  17. Multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Samartzis, Peter C., E-mail: sama@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Stamataki, Katerina [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Piel, Jean-Philippe [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Katsoprinakis, George E.; Papadakis, Vassilis [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Schimowski, Xavier [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Rakitzis, T. Peter [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Loppinet, Benoit [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece)

    2014-03-31

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is an established technique, particularly useful for thickness measurements of thin films. It measures polarization rotation after a single reflection of a beam of light on the measured substrate at a given incidence angle. In this paper, we report the development of multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry where the light beam reflects multiple times on the sample. We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally the effect of sample reflectivity, number of reflections (passes), angles of incidence and detector dynamic range on ellipsometric observables tanΨ and cosΔ. The multiple pass approach provides increased sensitivity to small changes in Ψ and Δ, opening the way for single measurement determination of optical thickness T, refractive index n and absorption coefficient k of thin films, a significant improvement over the existing techniques. Based on our results, we discuss the strengths, the weaknesses and possible applications of this technique. - Highlights: • We present multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry (MPSE), a multi-pass approach to ellipsometry. • Different detectors, samples, angles of incidence and number of passes were tested. • N passes improve polarization ratio sensitivity to the power of N. • N reflections improve phase shift sensitivity by a factor of N. • MPSE can significantly improve thickness measurements in thin films.

  18. Uncertainty Assessment on Failure Accident of Voltage-Sensitive Equipment Due to Voltage Sag by Maximum Hybrid Entropy%敏感设备电压暂降失效事件不确定性的最大混合熵评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪颖; 肖先勇; 杨达

    2012-01-01

    敏感设备电压暂降失效事件是混合不确定事件,对其评估需考虑混合不确定性.以混合熵作为评价测度,建立敏感设备电压暂降失效事件不确定性的最大混合熵评估模型,并用以逆积法为基础的多阶段改进近似规划法进行模型求解.在评估过程中,将混合不确定性分解为随机性、模糊性和两者的交叉不确定性,并用随机商、模糊熵和交叉熵进行量化.以计算机(personal computer,PC)为例,考虑到PC机在电压暂降发生前可能处于全速、空载和正常等运行状态,电压暂降发生后可能出现完全死机、运算出错和“假死”等不同严重程度的失效状态,对实测样本进行评估,并与概率法、模糊法比较,结果证明,该方法所得结果客观、可行,克服了现有方法过估计或欠估计等不足,结果更符合实际.%The failure accident of voltage-sensitive equipments due to voltage sag is a hybrid uncertainty accident. Taking hybrid entropy as assessment measure a maximum hybrid entropy-based uncertainty assessment model for failure accident of voltage-sensitive equipments due to voltage sag is established and solved by multi-stage improved approximate programming. During the assessment the hybrid uncertainty is decomposed to stochastic uncertainty, fuzzy uncertainty and the crossed certainty of the both, and these uncertainties are quantized by stochastic entropy, fuzzy entropy and crossed entropy. Taking personal computer (PC) as the case and considering possible operation conditions of PC before the occurrence of voltage sag, namely full speed running, no-load and normal operation, after the occurrence of voltage sag following failure states in different severities such as PC system halt, calculation error and false system halt may occur. The measured samples are assessed and the assessment results are compared with those assessed by probabilistic assessment and fuzzy assessment. Comparison results show that

  19. Atom probe crystallography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of "atom probe crystallography", a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic...

  20. Design of branched and chiral solvatochromic probes: toward quantifying polarity gradients in dendritic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Petar; Hecht, Stefan

    2005-10-27

    [reaction: see text] A pair of chiral, branched monomer building blocks, consisting of a solvatochromic probe and a spectroscopically inactive volume dummy, has been developed. The probe can selectively be excited, and its fluorescence characteristics provide information about local polarity. Incorporation of these monomers into high-generation polyester dendrimers should enable a detailed investigation of the polarity/density profile in dendritic architectures and ultimately allow for the realization of energy gradients from one chromophore building block only.

  1. DNA induced sequestration of a bioactive cationic fluorophore from the lipid environment: A spectroscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Kundu, Pronab; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    The effect of calf-thymus DNA (ctDNA) on the lipid bound probe, formed by the cationic phenazinium dye phenosafranin (PSF) and the anionic lipid dimyristoyl-L-α-phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), has been unearthed exploiting various spectroscopic techniques. Steady state and time-resolved fluorometric studies and measurements of circular dichroism and DNA helix melting temperature reveal that in the presence of DNA the probe is dislodged from the lipid environment and gets intercalated within the DNA helix. The work qualitatively illustrates that the anionic lipid can be used as a potential nanocarrier for delivering the cationic drugs to the most relevant biomacromolecular target, DNA.

  2. FAST CARS: Engineering a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A.V.(Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia); Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromole...

  3. Multifrequency spectrum analysis using fully digital G Mode-Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Since its inception over two decades ago, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has become the standard technique for characterizing electrostatic, electrochemical and electronic properties at the nanoscale. In this work, we present a purely digital, software-based approach to KPFM utilizing big data acquisition and analysis methods. General mode (G-Mode) KPFM works by capturing the entire photodetector data stream, typically at the sampling rate limit, followed by subsequent de-noising, analysis and compression of the cantilever response. We demonstrate that the G-Mode approach allows simultaneous multi-harmonic detection, combined with on-the-fly transfer function correction—required for quantitative CPD mapping. The KPFM approach outlined in this work significantly simplifies the technique by avoiding cumbersome instrumentation optimization steps (i.e. lock in parameters, feedback gains etc), while also retaining the flexibility to be implemented on any atomic force microscopy platform. We demonstrate the added advantages of G-Mode KPFM by allowing simultaneous mapping of CPD and capacitance gradient (C‧) channels as well as increased flexibility in data exploration across frequency, time, space, and noise domains. G-Mode KPFM is particularly suitable for characterizing voltage sensitive materials or for operation in conductive electrolytes, and will be useful for probing electrodynamics in photovoltaics, liquids and ionic conductors.

  4. Multifrequency spectrum analysis using fully digital G Mode-Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Rodriguez, Brian J; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-03-11

    Since its inception over two decades ago, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has become the standard technique for characterizing electrostatic, electrochemical and electronic properties at the nanoscale. In this work, we present a purely digital, software-based approach to KPFM utilizing big data acquisition and analysis methods. General mode (G-Mode) KPFM works by capturing the entire photodetector data stream, typically at the sampling rate limit, followed by subsequent de-noising, analysis and compression of the cantilever response. We demonstrate that the G-Mode approach allows simultaneous multi-harmonic detection, combined with on-the-fly transfer function correction-required for quantitative CPD mapping. The KPFM approach outlined in this work significantly simplifies the technique by avoiding cumbersome instrumentation optimization steps (i.e. lock in parameters, feedback gains etc), while also retaining the flexibility to be implemented on any atomic force microscopy platform. We demonstrate the added advantages of G-Mode KPFM by allowing simultaneous mapping of CPD and capacitance gradient (C') channels as well as increased flexibility in data exploration across frequency, time, space, and noise domains. G-Mode KPFM is particularly suitable for characterizing voltage sensitive materials or for operation in conductive electrolytes, and will be useful for probing electrodynamics in photovoltaics, liquids and ionic conductors.

  5. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Spectroscopic properties of chlorophyll f.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqiong; Cai, Zheng-Li; Chen, Min

    2013-09-26

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of chlorophyll f (newly discovered in 2010) have been measured in acetone and methanol at different temperatures. The spectral analysis and assignment are compared with the spectra of chlorophyll a and d under the same experimental conditions. The spectroscopic properties of these chlorophylls have further been studied by the aid of density functional CAM-B3LYP and high-level symmetric adapted coupled-cluster configuration interaction calculations. The main Q and Soret bands and possible sidebands of chlorophylls have been determined. The photophysical properties of chlorophyll f are discussed.

  7. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  8. The TNG EROs Spectroscopic Identification Survey (TESIS)

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Ceca, R D; Severgnini, P; Braito, V; Bender, R; Drory, N; Feulner, G; Hopp, U; Mannucci, F; Maraston, C

    2003-01-01

    We are carrying on a near-IR very low resolution spectroscopic follow-up in parallel with XMM-Newton observations of a complete sample of ~30 bright (K'<18.5) Extremely Red Objects (EROs) selected over an area of 360 arcmin^2 of the MUNICS survey. We here present the preliminary results of the spectroscopic and X-ray data analysis.

  9. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  10. Information Acquisition & Processing in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA

    2008-01-01

    Much of the imaging and spectroscopy capabilities of the existing 20,000+ scanning probe microscopes worldwide relies on specialized data processing that links the microsecond (and sometimes faster) time scale of cantilever motion to the millisecond (and sometimes slower) time scale of image acquisition and feedback. In most SPMs, the cantilever is excited to oscillate sinusoidally and the time-averaged amplitude and/or phase are used as imaging or control signals. Traditionally, the step of converting the rapid motion of the cantilever into an amplitude or phase is performed by phase sensitive homodyne or phase-locked loop detection. The emergence of fast configurable data processing electronics in last several years has allowed the development of non-sinusoidal data acquisition and processing methods. Here, we briefly review the principles and limitations of phase sensitive detectors and discuss some of the emergent technologies based on rapid spectroscopic measurements in frequency- and time domains.

  11. Combining Spectroscopic and Photometric Surveys: Same or different sky?

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the combined constraints from a photometric and spectroscopic survey. These surveys will measure cosmology using weak lensing (WL), galaxy cluster- ing, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and redshift space distortions (RSD). We find, contrary to some findings in the recent literature, that overlapping surveys can give important benefits when measuring dark energy. We therefore try to clarify the status of this issue with a full forecast of two stage-IV surveys using a new approach to prop- erly account for covariance between the different probes in the overlapping samples. The benefit of the overlapping survey can be traced back to two factors: additional observables and sample variance cancellation. Both needs to be taken into account and contribute equally when combining 3D power spectrum and 2D correlations for lensing. With an analytic example we also illustrate that for optimal constraints, one should minimize the (Pearson) correlation coefficient between cosmological and nui- sanc...

  12. Spectroscopic properties of rare earths in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Parisi, Jürgen; Osgood, R; Warlimont, Hans; Liu, Guokui; Jacquier, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Aimed at researchers and graduate students, this book provides up-to-date information for understanding electronic interactions that impact the optical properties of rare earth ions in solids. Its goal is to establish a connection between fundamental principles and the materials properties of rare-earth activated luminescent and laser optical materials. The theoretical survey and introduction to spectroscopic properties include electronic energy level structure, intensities of optical transitions, ion-phonon interactions, line broadening, and energy transfer and up-conversion. An important aspect of the book lies in its deep and detailed discussions on materials properties and the potential of new applications such as optical storage, information processing, nanophotonics, and molecular probes that have been identified in recent experimental studies. This volume will be a valuable reference book on advanced topics of rare earth spectroscopy and materials science.

  13. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  14. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  15. Deep slitless infrared spectroscopic surveys with HST/WFC3

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, Benjamin J

    2012-01-01

    HST is commonly thought of as an optical-IR imaging or UV-spectroscopy observatory. However, the advent of WFC3-IR made it possible to do slitless infrared spectroscopic surveys over an area significant for galaxy evolution studies (~0.15 deg^2). Slitless infrared spectroscopy is uniquely possible from space due to the reduced background. Redshift surveys with WFC3-IR offer probes of the astrophysics of the galaxy population at z=1-3 from line features, and the true redshift and spatial distribution of galaxies, that cannot be done with photometric surveys alone. While HST slitless spectroscopy is low spectral resolution, its high multiplex advantage makes it competitive with future ground based IR spectrographs, its flux calibration is stable, and its high spatial resolution allows measuring the spatial extent of emission lines, which only HST can do currently for large numbers of objects. A deeper slitless IR spectroscopic survey over hundreds of arcmin^2 (eg one or more GOODS fields) is one of the remainin...

  16. Structural and spectroscopic studies of a commercial glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Stewart F., E-mail: stewart.parker@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Imberti, Silvia; Callear, Samantha K. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Albers, Peter W. [AQura GmbH, AQ-EM, Rodenbacher Chaussee 4, D-63457 Hanau (Germany)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • Structural and spectroscopic probes show that glassy carbon is very like amorphous carbon. • No evidence for fullerene-like material being present to a significant extent. • A small quantity of water is trapped in the network and may account for batch-to-batch variation in properties. - Abstract: Glassy carbon is a form of carbon made by heating a phenolic resin to high temperature in an inert atmosphere. It has been suggested that it is composed of fullerene-like structures. The aim of the present work was to characterize the material using both structural (neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy) and spectroscopic (inelastic neutron scattering, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies) methods. We find no evidence to support the suggestion of fullerene-like material being present to a significant extent, rather the model that emerges from all of the techniques is that the material is very like amorphous carbon, consisting of regions of small graphite-like basic structural units of partly stacked but mismatched structure with the edges terminated by hydrogen or hydroxyls. We do find evidence for the presence of a small quantity of water trapped in the network and suggest that this may account for batch-to-batch variation in properties that may occur.

  17. Sick, the spectroscopic inference crank

    CERN Document Server

    Casey, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives which remain severely under-utilised. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analysing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this Article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbour estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimised point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalise on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-di...

  18. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  19. 3D "spectracoustic" system: a modular, tomographic, spectroscopic mapping imaging, non-invasive, diagnostic system for detection of small starting developing tumors like melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Georgios

    2017-03-01

    This work led to a new method named 3D spectracoustic tomographic mapping imaging. The current and the future work is related to the fabrication of a combined acoustic microscopy transducer and infrared illumination probe permitting the simultaneous acquisition of the spectroscopic and the tomographic information. This probe provides with the capability of high fidelity and precision registered information from the combined modalities named spectracoustic information.

  20. Fluorescence characteristics of hydrophobic partial agonist probes of the cholecystokinin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Pinon, Delia I; Miller, Laurence J

    2006-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopic studies are powerful tools for the evaluation of receptor structure and the dynamic changes associated with receptor activation. Here, we have developed two chemically distinct fluorescent probes of the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor by attaching acrylodan or a nitrobenzoxadiazole moiety to the amino terminus of a partial agonist CCK analogue. These two probes were able to bind to the CCK receptor specifically and with high affinity, and were able to elicit only submaximal intracellular calcium responses typical of partial agonists. The fluorescence characteristics of these probes were compared with those previously reported for structurally-related full agonist and antagonist probes. Like the previous probes, the partial agonist probes exhibited longer fluorescence lifetimes and increased anisotropy when bound to the receptor than when free in solution. The receptor-bound probes were not easily quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that the fluorophores were protected from the extracellular aqueous milieu. The fluorescence characteristics of the partial agonist probes were quite similar to those of the analogous full agonist probes and quite distinct from the analogous antagonist probes. These data suggest that the partially activated conformational state of this receptor is more closely related to its fully active state than to its inactive state.

  1. MDM OSMOS Spectroscopic classification of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Subhash; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Klusmeyer, J.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Shappee, B.; Shields, J.; Brown, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C.

    2016-11-01

    We report optical spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates 2016hgd (ATel #9651), 2016hli (ATel #9685), CSS161013:015319+171853 and CSS161013:020130+141534 (http://nesssi.cacr.caltech.edu/catalina/AllSN.html).

  2. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, U.; Szeghalmi, A.; Schmitt, M.; Kiefer, W.; Popp, J.; Holzgrabe, U.

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones are important gyrase inhibitors. Even though they are used as active agents in many antibiotics, the detailed mechanism of action on a molecular level is so far not known. It is of greatest interest to shed light on this drug-target interaction to provide useful information in the fight against growing resistances and obtain new insights for the development of new powerful drugs. To reach this goal, on a first step it is essential to understand the structural characteristics of the drugs and the effects that are caused by the environment in detail. In this work we report on Raman spectroscopical investigations of a variety of gyrase inhibitors (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, enoxacin, sarafloxacin and moxifloxacin) by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with various excitation wavelengths, both in the off-resonance region (532, 633, 830 and 1064 nm) and in the resonance region (resonance Raman spectroscopy at 244, 257 and 275 nm). Furthermore DFT calculations were performed to assign the vibrational modes, as well as for an identification of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. The effect of small changes in the drug environment was studied by adding successively small amounts of water until physiological low concentrations of the drugs in aqueous solution were obtained. At these low concentrations resonance Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful and sensitive technique. Supplementary information was obtained from IR and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  3. SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Z; Uomoto, A; Bond, N; Beers, T; Allende-Prieto, C; Wilhelm, R; Lee, Y S; Sivarani, T; Juric, M; Lupton, R; Rockosi, C M; Knapp, G; Gunn, J; Yanny, B; Jester, S; Kent, S; Pier, J; Munn, J A; Richards, G; Newberg, H; Blanton, M; Eisenstein, D; Hawley, S; Anderson, S; Harris, H; Kiuchi, F; Chen, A; Bushong, J; Sohi, H; Haggard, D; Kimball, A; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A

    2007-01-01

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo] -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at ...

  4. Asiago spectroscopic classification of transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-08-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017giq, discovered by Zhijian Xu et al. in SDSS J235754.69+283007.1, and the observations of AT 2017ghp and AT 2017gio discovered by Torny et al (ATLAS) The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82 m Copernico Telescope equipped with AFOSC (range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm). Survey Name | IAU Name | Discovery date (UT) | Discovery mag | Observation (UT) | Type | z | Notes| PTSS-17vkg | SN 2017giq | 2017-08-27 15:15:18 | 18.8 |2017-08-29 22:09:09 | SN Ic | 0.029813| (1) | ATLAS17juy | AT 2017ghp | 2017-08-23 14:00:57 | 17.53 |2017-08-29 23:49:52 | ? | ? | (2) | (1) The spectrum is consistent with that of Type Ic SN events around maximum light, at a redshift 0.0298, according to the redshift of the host galaxy SDSS J235754.69+283007.1 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 13 as obtained Jan. 31, 2017 from http://www.sdss.org/dr13/data_access/bulk/); (2) Featureless, blue continuum.

  5. Automated pipelines for spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Gaia mission will have a profound impact on our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way. Gaia is providing an exhaustive census of stellar parallaxes, proper motions, positions, colors and radial velocities, but also leaves some glaring holes in an otherwise complete data set. The radial velocities measured with the on-board high-resolution spectrograph will only reach some 10 % of the full sample of stars with astrometry and photometry from the mission, and detailed chemical information will be obtained for less than 1 %. Teams all over the world are organizing large-scale projects to provide complementary radial velocities and chemistry, since this can now be done very efficiently from the ground thanks to large and mid-size telescopes with a wide field-of-view and multi-object spectrographs. As a result, automated data processing is taking an ever increasing relevance, and the concept is applying to many more areas, from targeting to analysis. In this paper, I provide a quick overview of recent, ongoing, and upcoming spectroscopic surveys, and the strategies adopted in their automated analysis pipelines.

  6. Spectroscopic Detection of Caries Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Ruohonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A caries lesion causes changes in the optical properties of the affected tissue. Currently a caries lesion can be detected only at a relatively late stage of development. Caries diagnosis also suffers from high interobserver variance. Methods. This is a pilot study to test the suitability of an optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for caries diagnosis. Reflectance visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (VIS/NIRS was used to measure caries lesions and healthy enamel on extracted human teeth. The results were analysed with a computational algorithm in order to find a rule-based classification method to detect caries lesions. Results. The classification indicated that the measured points of enamel could be assigned to one of three classes: healthy enamel, a caries lesion, and stained healthy enamel. The features that enabled this were consistent with theory. Conclusions. It seems that spectroscopic measurements can help to reduce false positives at in vitro setting. However, further research is required to evaluate the strength of the evidence for the method’s performance.

  7. Fluorescent probes sensitive to changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posokhov, Yevgen

    2016-09-01

    Environment-sensitive fluorescent probes were used for the spectroscopic visualization of pathological changes in human platelet membranes during cerebral atherosclerosis. It has been estimated that the ratiometric probes 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole and 2-phenyl-phenanthr[9,10]oxazole can detect changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during the disease.

  8. Hard Probes at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has measured several hard probe observables in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC. These measurements include jets which show modification in the hot dense medium of heavy ion collisions as well as color neutral electro-weak bosons. Together, they elucidate the nature of heavy ion collisions.

  9. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

  10. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  11. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  12. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  13. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  14. Probing biological light-harvesting phenomena by optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Filippo; Solano, Enrique; Huelga, Susana F; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Plenio, Martin B

    2011-01-01

    We propose a driven optical cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) set up aimed at directly probing energy transport dynamics in photosynthetic biomolecules. We show that detailed information concerning energy transfer paths and delocalization of exciton states can be inferred (and exciton energies estimated) from the statistical properties of the emitted photons. This approach provides us with a novel spectroscopic tool for the interrogation of biological systems in terms of quantum optical phenomena which have been usually studied for atomic or solid-state systems, e.g. trapped atoms and semiconductor quantum dots.

  15. Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC)/NMR spectroscopic properties and dynamics of compounds containing metal ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcisauskaité, Vaida

    steps towards understanding how Zn(II) reaches its target position in biological systems in vivo and in vitro experiments in aqueous solution, is the detailed investigation of water exchange reactions for Zn(II)(aq). A very advanced (albeit not complete) picture of structure and dynamics of solvated Zn......199mHg PAC and 199Hg NMR spectroscopic properties, nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, Q, asymmetry parameters, , and chemical shifts, , respectively, are the fingerprint of the local molecular and electronic structure, at the probed Hg nuclei. For this reason, these spectroscopic techniques...... compounds in terms of the atomic constituents. The analysis provided a chemophysical interpretation of changes in Vzz upon structural distortions and ligand exchange. The gained insights can be useful when predicting and understanding changes in Q values for Hg binding sites in proteins. One of the first...

  16. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Investigation of Poly(3-hexylthiophene Interaction with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio De Crescenzi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix has been proposed to enhance the polymer’s physical and electrical properties. In this study, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate the interaction between poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and nanotubes and the reciprocal modification of physical properties. The presence of P3HT-covered nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix has been observed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Then, the modification of P3HT optical properties due to nanotube inclusion has been evidenced with spectroscopic techniques like absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The study is completed with detailed nanoscale analysis by scanning probe techniques. The ordered self assembly of polymer adhering on the nanotube is unveiled by showing an example of helical wrapping of P3HT. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy study provides information on the electronic structure of nanotube-polymer assembly, revealing the charge transfer from P3HT to the nanotube.

  17. FAST CARS Developing a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    CERN Document Server

    Scully, M O; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time consuming microscopic, chemical and biological assays. Current research into real time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g. resonant Raman spectroscopy. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. The connection with previous studies based on "Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy" (CARS) is to be noted. However generating and utilizing maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is much more challenging. This extension of the CARS technique is called FAST CARS (Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy), and the present paper proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify pre-selected molecules in real time.

  18. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  19. Probing properties of cold radiofrequency plasma with polymer probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, E.; Chaniel, G.; Multanen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows the estimation of Debye length of cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  20. Probing Properties of Cold Radiofrequency Plasma with Polymer Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward; Multanen, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows estimation of the Debye length of the cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  1. Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows thermal and electrical conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Atom probe tomography today

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred Cerezo; Peter H. Clifton; Mark J. Galtrey; Humphreys, Colin J.; Kelly, Thomas. F.; David J. Larson; Sergio Lozano-Perez; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Gang Sha; Keith Thompson; Mathijs Zandbergen; Roger L. Alvis

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments) but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks) and also...

  3. Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization of surface sol-gel processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Wilson, George S

    2004-09-28

    (3-Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MTS) forms a unique film on a platinum substrate by self-assembly and sol-gel cross-linking. The gelating and drying states of the self-assembled MTS sol-gel films were probed by use of electrochemical and spectroscopic methods. The thiol moiety was the only active group within the sol-gel network. Gold nanoparticles were employed to detect the availability of the thiol group and their interaction further indicated the physicochemical states of the sol-gel inner structure. It was found that the thiol groups in the open porous MTS aerogel matrix were accessible to the gold nanoparticles while thiol groups in the compact MTS xerogel network were not accessible to the gold nanoparticles. The characteristics of the sol-gel matrix change with time because of its own irreversible gelating and drying process. The present work provides direct evidence of gold nanoparticle binding with thiol groups within the sol-gel structures and explains the different permeability of "aerogel" and "xerogel" films of MTS on the basis of electrochemical and spectroscopic results. Two endogenous species, hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid, were used to test the permeability of the self-assembled sol-gel film in different states. The MTS xerogel film on the platinum electrode was extremely selective against ascorbic acid while maintaining high sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in contrast to the relatively high permeability of ascorbic acid in the MTS aerogel film. This study showed the potential of the MTS sol-gel film as a nanoporous material in biosensor development.

  4. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  5. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  6. SICK: THE SPECTROSCOPIC INFERENCE CRANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Andrew R., E-mail: arc@ast.cam.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambdridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  7. Optimizing Spectroscopic and Photometric Galaxy Surveys: Same-Sky Benefits for Dark Energy and Modified Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Donnacha [University Coll. London; Lahav, Ofer [University Coll. London; Bridle, Sarah [Manchester U.; Jouvel, Stephanie [Barcelona, IEEC; Abdalla, Filipe B. [University Coll. London; Frieman, Joshua A. [Chicago U., KICP

    2015-08-21

    The combination of multiple cosmological probes can produce measurements of cosmological parameters much more stringent than those possible with any individual probe. We examine the combination of two highly correlated probes of late-time structure growth: (i) weak gravitational lensing from a survey with photometric redshifts and (ii) galaxy clustering and redshift space distortions from a survey with spectroscopic redshifts. We choose generic survey designs so that our results are applicable to a range of current and future photometric redshift (e.g. KiDS, DES, HSC, Euclid) and spectroscopic redshift (e.g. DESI, 4MOST, Sumire) surveys. Combining the surveys greatly improves their power to measure both dark energy and modified gravity. An independent, non-overlapping combination sees a dark energy figure of merit more than 4 times larger than that produced by either survey alone. The powerful synergies between the surveys are strongest for modified gravity, where their constraints are orthogonal, producing a non-overlapping joint figure of merit nearly 2 orders of magnitude larger than either alone. Our projected angular power spectrum formalism makes it easy to model the cross-correlation observable when the surveys overlap on the sky, producing a joint data vector and full covariance matrix. We calculate a same-sky improvement factor, from the inclusion of these cross-correlations, relative to non-overlapping surveys. We find nearly a factor of 4 for dark energy and more than a factor of 2 for modified gravity. The exact forecast figures of merit and same-sky benefits can be radically affected by a range of forecasts assumption, which we explore methodically in a sensitivity analysis. We show that that our fiducial assumptions produce robust results which give a good average picture of the science return from combining photometric and spectroscopic surveys.

  8. SPIDERS: the spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray selected clusters of galaxies in SDSS-IV

    CERN Document Server

    Clerc, Nicolas; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Finoguenov, Alexis; Dwelly, Tom; Nandra, Kirpal; Collins, Chris A; Dawson, Kyle; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli; Sadibekova, Tatyana; Brownstein, Joel R; Lin, Yen-Ting; Ridl, Jethro; Salvato, Mara; Schwope, Axel; Steinmetz, Matthias; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    SPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a program dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray AGN and galaxy clusters over a large area ($\\sim$7500 deg$^2$) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the SDSS-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). This paper describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray selected, massive ($\\sim 10^{14}$ to $10^{15}~M_{\\odot}$) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM-Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise ($\\Delta_z \\sim 0.001$) redshifts for 4,000-5,000 of these systems out to $z \\sim 0.6$. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the eff...

  9. The interaction of new piroxicam analogues with lipid bilayers--a calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniewska, Jadwiga; Szczęśniak-Sięga, Berenika; Poła, Andrzej; Sroda-Pomianek, Kamila; Malinka, Wiesław; Michalak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to assess the ability of new piroxicam analogues to interact with the lipid bilayers. The results of calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments of two new synthesized analogues of piroxicam, named PR17 and PR18 on the phase behavior of phospholipid bilayers and fluorescence quenching of fluorescent probes (Laurdan and Prodan), which molecular location within membranes is known with certainty, are shown in present work. The presented results revealed that, depending on the details of chemical structure, the studied compounds penetrated the lipid bilayers.

  10. SPIDERS: the spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray selected clusters of galaxies in SDSS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, N.; Merloni, A.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Finoguenov, A.; Dwelly, T.; Nandra, K.; Collins, C.; Dawson, K.; Kneib, J.-P.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Brownstein, J.; Lin, Y.-T.; Ridl, J.; Salvato, M.; Schwope, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Seo, H.-J.; Tinker, J.

    2016-09-01

    SPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a program dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray AGN and galaxy clusters over a large area (˜7500 deg2) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the SDSS-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). This paper describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray selected, massive (˜1014 to 1015~M⊙) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM-Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise (Δz ˜ 0.001) redshifts for 4,000-5,000 of these systems out to z ˜ 0.6. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the efficiency of selecting targets using a combination of SDSS imaging data, a robust red-sequence finder and a dedicated prioritization scheme. We describe a set of algorithms and work-flow developed to collate spectra and assign cluster membership, and to deliver catalogues of spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We discuss the relevance of line-of-sight velocity dispersion estimators for the richer systems. We illustrate our techniques by constructing a catalogue of 230 spectroscopically validated clusters (0.031 < z < 0.658), found in pilot observations. We discuss two potential science applications of the SPIDERS sample: the study of the X-ray luminosity-velocity dispersion (LX - σ) relation and the building of stacked phase-space diagrams.

  11. SPIDERS: the spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray selected clusters of galaxies in SDSS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, N.; Merloni, A.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Finoguenov, A.; Dwelly, T.; Nandra, K.; Collins, C.; Dawson, K.; Kneib, J.-P.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Brownstein, J.; Lin, Y.-T.; Ridl, J.; Salvato, M.; Schwope, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Seo, H.-J.; Tinker, J.

    2016-12-01

    SPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a programme dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray active galactic nuclei and galaxy clusters over a large area (˜7500 deg2) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey. This paper describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray-selected, massive (˜1014-1015 M⊙) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM-Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise (Δz ˜ 0.001) redshifts for 4000-5000 of these systems out to z ˜ 0.6. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the efficiency of selecting targets using a combination of SDSS imaging data, a robust red-sequence finder and a dedicated prioritization scheme. We describe a set of algorithms and work-flow developed to collate spectra and assign cluster membership, and to deliver catalogues of spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We discuss the relevance of line-of-sight velocity dispersion estimators for the richer systems. We illustrate our techniques by constructing a catalogue of 230 spectroscopically validated clusters (0.031 SPIDERS sample: the study of the X-ray luminosity-velocity dispersion (LX-σ) relation and the building of stacked phase-space diagrams.

  12. Development of Mackintosh Probe Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Noor Khazanah A.; Kaamin, Masiri; Suwandi, Amir Khan; Sahat, Suhaila; Jahaya Kesot, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic probing is a continuous soil investigation technique, which is one of the simplest soil penetration test. It basically consist of repeatedly driving a metal tipped probe into the ground using a drop weight of fixed mass and travel. Testing was carried out continuously from ground level to the final penetration depth. Once the soil investigation work done, it is difficult to pull out the probe rod from the ground, due to strong soil structure grip against probe cone and prevent the probe rod out from the ground. Thus, in this case, a tool named Extracting Probe was created to assist in the process of retracting the probe rod from the ground. In addition, Extracting Probe also can reduce the time to extract the probe rod from the ground compare with the conventional method. At the same time, it also can reduce manpower cost because only one worker involve to handle this tool compare with conventional method used two or more workers. From experiment that have been done we found that the time difference between conventional tools and extracting probe is significant, average time difference is 155 minutes. In addition the extracting probe can reduce manpower usage, and also labour cost for operating the tool. With all these advantages makes this tool has the potential to be marketed.

  13. Probe-based data storage

    CERN Document Server

    Koelmans, Wabe W; Abelmann, L

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based data storage attracted many researchers from academia and industry, resulting in unprecendeted high data-density demonstrations. This topical review gives a comprehensive overview of the main contributions that led to the major accomplishments in probe-based data storage. The most investigated technologies are reviewed: topographic, phase-change, magnetic, ferroelectric and atomic and molecular storage. Also, the positioning of probes and recording media, the cantilever arrays and parallel readout of the arrays of cantilevers are discussed. This overview serves two purposes. First, it provides an overview for new researchers entering the field of probe storage, as probe storage seems to be the only way to achieve data storage at atomic densities. Secondly, there is an enormous wealth of invaluable findings that can also be applied to many other fields of nanoscale research such as probe-based nanolithography, 3D nanopatterning, solid-state memory technologies and ultrafast probe microscopy.

  14. In situ gas sensing using a remotely detectable probe with replaceable insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sun Do; Ma, Kyungsik; Jeong, Ji Ho; Kim, Gilhwan; Lee, Kwanil; Jeong, Je-Myung; Lee, Sang Bae

    2012-01-16

    We demonstrate a spectroscopic gas sensor using an optical fiber probe with a replaceable insert. The probe consists of a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBGF) with a core diameter of 10.9 μm and a glass tube where a 2-μm hollow core fiber (HCF) with a gold coated end facet can be inserted. The HCF is designed to function as both a gate where gases can enter the HC-PBGF and a mirror reflecting the guided light back to the HC-PBGF. The opposite distal end of the probe is also designed to be able to regulate the gas pressure within the HC-PBGF for a high gas flow rate, while still transmitting the reflected light to the analysis instrument. The remote sensing probe, we believe, has much potential for detecting gases in hazardous environments.

  15. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  16. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  17. Experimental probes of axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  18. Atom Probe Tomography 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Larson, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In the world of tomographic imaging, atom probe tomography (APT) occupies the high-spatial-resolution end of the spectrum. It is highly complementary to electron tomography and is applicable to a wide range of materials. The current state of APT is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications and data analysis as they apply to many fields of research and development including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and organic materials. We also provide a brief review of the history and the instrumentation associated with APT and an assessment of the existing challenges in the field.

  19. Mobile Probing Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    characterized as being highly nomadic and thus potential users of mobile and ubiquitous technologies. The methodology has been applied in the 1ST MAGNET Beyond project in order to obtain user needs and requirements in the process of developing pilot services. We report on the initial findings from applying......Mobile Probing Kit is a low tech and low cost methodology for obtaining inspiration and insights into user needs, requirements and ideas in the early phases of a system's development process. The methodology is developed to identify user needs, requirements and ideas among knowledge workers...

  20. A highly selective and sensitive fluorescence probe for the hypochlorite anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinqi; Wang, Xiaochun; Wang, Shujuan; Shi, Wen; Wang, Ke; Ma, Huimin

    2008-01-01

    A new rhodamine B-based fluorescent probe for the hypochlorite anion (OCl(-)) has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The probe comprises a spectroscopic unit of rhodamine B and an OCl(-)-specific reactive moiety of dibenzoylhydrazine. The probe itself is nearly nonfluorescent because of its spirolactam structure. Upon reaction with OCl(-), however, a largely enhanced fluorescence is produced due to the opening of the spirolactam ring by the oxidation of the exocyclic hydrazide and subsequently the formation of the hydrolytic product rhodamine B. Most notably, the fluorescence-on reaction shows high sensitivity and extremely high selectivity for OCl(-) over other common ions and oxidants, which makes it possible for OCl(-) to be detected directly in their presence. In addition, the reaction mechanism has been investigated and proposed. The OCl(-) anion selectively oxidizes the hydrazo group in the probe, and forms the analogue of dibenzoyl diimide, which in turn hydrolyzes and releases the fluorophore. The reaction mechanism that is described here might be useful in developing excellent spectroscopic probes with cleavable active bonds for other species.

  1. Human Oral Mucosa Tissue-Engineered Constructs Monitored by Raman Fiber-Optic Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Kim, Roderick Y; Matthews, Robert V.; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Morris, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    In maxillofacial and oral surgery, there is a need for the development of tissue-engineered constructs. They are used for reconstructions due to trauma, dental implants, congenital defects, or oral cancer. A noninvasive monitoring of the fabrication of tissue-engineered constructs at the production and implantation stages done in real time is extremely important for predicting the success of tissue-engineered grafts. We demonstrated a Raman spectroscopic probe system, its design and applicati...

  2. Actinides in molecules: exotic properties probed by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Auwer, C.; Moisy, P.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaumont, D.; Simoni, E.; Conradson, S.D

    2004-07-01

    Dealing with actinide elements in molecular chemistry may result in particularly attractive and exotic physico-chemical properties. In solution, one of the spectroscopic tools able to selectively probe the structural or electronic properties of these molecules is the X-ray absorption process. Different aspects of absorption edge or EXAFS analysis related to actinide studies are presented, including phenomenological and semi-quantitative approaches. (authors)

  3. Asiago spectroscopic classification of two SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; OAPd, M. Turatto (INAF

    2016-09-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of two transients. The targets are supplied by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNOvae (ASAS-SN) and the TNS (https://wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il).

  4. Asiago spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-15db

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.

    2015-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-15db in NGC 5996. The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm), equipped with the CCD Andor IKON L936.

  5. Asiago spectroscopic classification of 2 SNe candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017lf and SN 2017ms. The targets were supplied by the Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS) and the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS).

  6. Crystallization and spectroscopic studies of manganese malonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varghese Mathew; Jochan Joseph; Sabu Jacob; K E Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The preparation of manganese malonate crystals by gel method and its spectroscopic studies are reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern reveals the crystalline nature. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the crystals are recorded and the vibrational assignments are given with possible explanations. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is used to measure the bandgap (g) of the material.

  7. Nanoantenna-Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühner, Lucca; Hentschel, Mario; Zschieschang, Ute; Klauk, Hagen; Vogt, Jochen; Huck, Christian; Giessen, Harald; Neubrech, Frank

    2017-05-26

    Spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging is ideally suited for label-free and spatially resolved characterization of molecular species, but often suffers from low infrared absorption cross sections. Here, we overcome this limitation by utilizing confined electromagnetic near-fields of resonantly excited plasmonic nanoantennas, which enhance the molecular absorption by orders of magnitude. In the experiments, we evaporate microstructured chemical patterns of C60 and pentacene with nanometer thickness on top of homogeneous arrays of tailored nanoantennas. Broadband mid-infrared spectra containing plasmonic and vibrational information were acquired with diffraction-limited resolution using a two-dimensional focal plane array detector. Evaluating the enhanced infrared absorption at the respective frequencies, spatially resolved chemical images were obtained. In these chemical images, the microstructured chemical patterns are only visible if nanoantennas are used. This confirms the superior performance of our approach over conventional spectroscopic infrared imaging. In addition to the improved sensitivity, our technique provides chemical selectivity, which would not be available with plasmonic imaging that is based on refractive index sensing. To extend the accessible spectral bandwidth of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic imaging, we employed nanostructures with dual-band resonances, providing broadband plasmonic enhancement and sensitivity. Our results demonstrate the potential of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging for spatially resolved characterization of organic layers with thicknesses of several nanometers. This is of potential interest for medical applications which are currently hampered by state-of-art infrared techniques, e.g., for distinguishing cancerous from healthy tissues.

  8. TESIS - The TNG EROs Spectroscopic Identification Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Severgnini, P; Ceca, R D; Bender, R; Drory, N; Feulner, G; Ghinassi, F; Hopp, U; Mannucci, F; Maraston, C

    2002-01-01

    A near-IR low-resolution spectroscopic follow-up of a complete sample of K1.2 and at estimating their spatial density to put constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution models. In this proceeding, the preliminary analysis of the first spectra obtained is presented.

  9. The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey has begun and will obtain high quality spectroscopy of some 100000 Milky Way stars, in the field and in open clusters, down to magnitude 19, systematically covering all the major components of the Milky Way. This survey will provide the first homogeneous o...

  10. Asiago spectroscopic classification of two transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turatto, M.; Benetti, S.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of Gaia16bzi, AT2016isl. The targets were supplied by the ESA Gaia Photometric Science Alerts Team and DPAC (http://gsaweb.ast.cam.ac.uk/alerts), the Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS) and by Kunihiro Shima..

  11. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN 2017fof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-07-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of AT 2017fof, discovered by S. Leonini, M. Conti, L.M. Tinjaca Ramirez and P. Rosi (Italian Supernovae Search Project, ISSP) in UGC 10602.

  12. Pulsating variable stars and large spectroscopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cat, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In the past decade, the research of pulsating variable stars has taken a giant leap forward thanks to the photometric measurements provided by space missions like Most, CoRoT, Kepler/K2, and Brite. These missions have provided quasi uninterrupted photometric time-series with an ultra-high quality and a total length that is not achievable from Earth. However, many of the success stories could not have been told without ground-based spectroscopic follow-up observations. Indeed, spectroscopy has some important assets as it can provide (more) accurate information about stellar parameters (like the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and abundances that are mandatory parameters for an in-depth asteroseismic study), the radial velocity (that is important for the detection of binaries and for the confirmation of cluster membership, if applicable), and the projected rotational velocity (that allows the study of the effects of rotation on pulsations). Fortunately, several large spectroscopic surveys are (becoming) available that can be used for these purposes. For some of these surveys, sub-projects have been initiated with the specific goal to complement space-based photometry. In this review, several spectroscopic surveys are introduced and compared with each other. We show that a large amount of spectroscopic data is (becoming) available for a large variety of objects.

  13. Synthesis and Spectroscopic Investigation of Azoporphyrins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of new covalently-connected azoporphyrin derivatives is described and the photochemical properties of the new compounds are discussed. The two chromophores of these derivatives exhibit their absorption spectroscopic properties respectively.In the fluorescence emission spectra, intermolecular fluorescence quenching is detected.

  14. Spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, S; Tabosa, J W R; Failache, H; Lezama, A

    2006-09-15

    We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

  15. The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.;

    2012-01-01

    The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey has begun and will obtain high quality spectroscopy of some 100000 Milky Way stars, in the field and in open clusters, down to magnitude 19, systematically covering all the major components of the Milky Way. This survey will provide the first homogeneous o...

  16. High-resolution spectroscopic probes of collisions and half-collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program explores the dynamics of gas phase collisions and photodissociation by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. Simultaneous state and velocity detection frequently permits a determination of scalar or vector correlations among products. The correlated product distributions are always more informative, and often easier to interpret than the uncorrelated product state distributions. The authors have recently built an apparatus to record transient absorption spectra with 50 nS time resolution and 20 MHz frequency resolution using a single frequency Ti:sapphire laser. The photodissociation of NCCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SCN at 193 nm is discussed.

  17. Reagent-free ultrasensitive spectroscopic probes for long term diabetes monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingari, N. C.; Barman, I.; Kang, J. W.; Horowitz, G.; Rao Dasari, Ramachandra

    2012-02-01

    Long-term glycemic control is essential in developing therapeutics for diabetics. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin have been increasingly accepted as a functional metric of glycemic control over the past two to three months and three weeks, respectively. In this talk, we present the first demonstration of non-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as a novel analytical method for quantitative detection of HbA1c and glycated albumin. Using the drop coating deposition Raman technique, we observe that the non-enzymatic glycosylation of these proteins results in subtle, but consistent, changes in vibrational features, which with the help of multivariate classification techniques can be used to discriminate the glycated proteins from their unglycated variants with 100%. Additionally, the developed multivariate calibration models show a high degree of prediction accuracy even at substantially lower concentrations than those typically encountered in clinical practice. The excellent accuracy and reproducibility achieved in this proof-of-concept study opens substantive avenues for basic investigations of glycated proteins as well as in high-throughput glycemic marker sensing in multi-component mixtures and potentially even in serum and whole blood samples.

  18. Ultrafast Spectroscopic Noninvasive Probe of Vertical Carrier Transport in Heterostructure Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    mass filtering in InGaAs /InP superlattices. Applied Physics Letters. 1986;49(13):812. 6. Williams GM, DeWames RE. Numerical-simulation of HgCdTe...carrier transport properties in heterostructure devices over a widely tunable spectral range from the visible through long-wavelength infrared. Our...device performance is often limited by carrier transport in the vertical direction, conventional approaches to measure carrier transport properties

  19. Probing Compositional Variation within Hybrid Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuhas, Benjamin D.; Habas, Susan E.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Mokari, Taleb

    2010-06-22

    We present a detailed analysis of the structural and magnetic properties of solution-grown PtCo-CdS hybrid structures in comparison to similar free-standing PtCo alloy nanoparticles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is utilized as a sensitive probe for identifying subtle differences in the structure of the hybrid materials. We found that the growth of bimetallic tips on a CdS nanorod substrate leads to a more complex nanoparticle structure composed of a PtCo alloy core and thin CoO shell. The core-shell architecture is an unexpected consequence of the different nanoparticle growth mechanism on the nanorod tip, as compared to free growth in solution. Magnetic measurements indicate that the PtCo-CdS hybrid structures are superparamagnetic despite the presence of a CoO shell. The use of X-ray spectroscopic techniques to detect minute differences in atomic structure and bonding in complex nanosystems makes it possible to better understand and predict catalytic or magnetic properties for nanoscale bimetallic hybrid materials.

  20. Probing Dark Energy with Constellation-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-09-08

    Constellation-X (Con-X) will carry out two powerful and independent sets of tests of dark energy based on X-ray observations of galaxy clusters, providing comparable accuracy to other leading dark energy probes. The first group of tests will measure the absolute distances to clusters, primarily using measurements of the X-ray gas mass fraction in the largest, dynamically relaxed clusters, but with additional constraining power provided by follow-up observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. As with supernovae studies, such data determine the transformation between redshift and true distance, d(z), allowing cosmic acceleration to be measured directly. The second, independent group of tests will use the exquisite spectroscopic capabilities of Con-X to determine scaling relations between X-ray observables and mass. Together with forthcoming X-ray and SZ cluster surveys, these data will help to constrain the growth of structure, which is also a strong function of cosmological parameters.

  1. A spectroscopic study of the hybrid pulsator Gamma Pegasi

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, C P; Briquet, M; Jayakumar, K; Bisht, S; Sanwal, B B

    2011-01-01

    The recent detection of both pressure and high-order gravity modes in the classical B-type pulsator Gamma Pegasi offers promising prospects for probing its internal structure through seismic studies. To aid further modelling of this star, we present the results of a detailed NLTE abundance analysis based on a large number of time-resolved, high-quality spectra. A chemical composition typical of nearby B-type stars is found. The hybrid nature of this star is consistent with its location in the overlapping region of the instability strips for beta Cephei and slowly pulsating B stars computed using OP opacity tables, although OPAL calculations may also be compatible with the observations once the uncertainties in the stellar parameters and the current limitations of the stability calculations are taken into account. The two known frequencies f1 = 6.58974 and f2 = 0.68241 c/d are detected in the spectroscopic time series. A mode identification is attempted for the low-frequency signal, which can be associated to ...

  2. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Fiona A; Christensen, Finn E; Hailey, Charles J; Zhang, Will W; Boggs, Steven E; Stern, Daniel; Cook, W Rick; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Kim, Yunjin; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E; Madsen, Kristin K; Mao, Peter H; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Mori, Kaya; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram R; Westergaard, Niels J; Willis, Jason; Zoglauer, Andreas; An, Hongjun; Bachetti, Matteo; Barriere, Nicolas M; Bellm, Eric C; Bhalerao, Varun; Brejnholt, Nicolai F; Fuerst, Felix; Liebe, Carl C; Markwardt, Craig B; Nynka, Melania; Vogel, Julia K; Walton, Dominic J; Wik, Daniel R; Alexander, David M; Cominsky, Lynn R; Hornschemeier, Ann E; Hornstrup, Allan; Kaspi, Victoria M; Madejski, Greg M; Matt, Giorgio; Molendi, Silvano; Smith, David M; Tomsick, John A; Ajello, Marco; Ballantyne, David R; Balokovic, Mislav; Barret, Diddier; Bauer, Franz E; Blandford, Roger D; Brandt, W Niel; Brenneman, Laura W; Chiang, James; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Chenevez, Jerome; Comastri, Andrea; Elvis, Martin; Fabian, Andrew C; Farrah, Duncan; Fryer, Chris L; Gotthelf, Eric V; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Helfand, David J; Krivonos, Roman; Meier, David L; Miller, Jon M; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ogle, Patrick; Ofek, Eran O; Ptak, Andrew; Reynolds, Stephen P; Rigby, Jand R; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Thorsett, Stephen E; Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, C Megan

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 13 June 2012, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 -- 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the ~10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low-background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than one-hundred-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded-mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Using its unprecedented combination of sensitivity, spatial and spectral resolution, NuSTAR will pursue five primary scientific objectives, and will also undertake a broad program of targeted observations. The observatory consists of two co-aligned grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes pointed at celestial targets by a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Deployed into a 600 km, near-circular, 6degree inclination orbit, the Observatory has now comp...

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of skin intrinsic signals for multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Strupler, Mathias; Boulesteix, Thierry; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2006-02-01

    We recorded multiphoton images of human skin biopsies using endogenous sources of nonlinear optical signals. We detected simultaneously two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) from intrinsic fluorophores and second harmonic generation (SHG) from collagen. We observed SHG from fibrillar collagens in the dermis, whereas no SHG was detectable from the non fibrillar type IV collagen in the basal laminae. We compared these distinct behaviours of collagens I and IV in SHG microscopy to polarization-resolved surface SHG experiments on thin films of collagens I and IV molecules. We observed similar signals for both types of molecular films, except for the chiroptical contributions which are present only for collagen I and enhance the signal typically by a factor of 2. We concluded that SHG microscopy is a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in biological tissues. In order to elucidate the origin of the endogenous fluorescence signals, we recorded 2PEF spectra at various positions in the skin biopsies, and compared these data to in vitro spectroscopic analysis. In particular, we studied the keratin fluorescence and determined its 2PEF action cross section. We observed a good agreement between 2PEF spectra recorded in the keratinized upper layers of the epidermis and in a solution of purified keratin. Finally, to illustrate the capabilities of this technique, we recorded 2PEF/SHG images of skin biopsies obtained from patients of various ages.

  4. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  5. A highly selective long-wavelength fluorescent probe for hydrazine and its application in living cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuanqiang; Zhang, Yintang; Ruan, Kehong; Meng, Fanteng; Li, Ting; Guan, Jinsheng; Du, Lulu; Qu, Peng; Xu, Maotian

    2017-09-01

    A highly selective long-wavelength turn-on fluorescent probe has been developed for the detection of N2H4. The probe was prepared by conjugation the tricyanofuran-based D-π-A system with a recognizing moiety of acetyl group. In the presence of N2H4, the probe can be effectively hydrazinolysized and produce a turn-on fluorescent emission at 610 nm as well as a large red-shift in the absorption spectrum corresponding to a color change from yellow to blue. The sensing mechanism was confirmed by HPLC, MS, UV-vis, emission spectroscopic and theoretical calculation studies. The probe displayed high selectivity and sensitivity for N2H4 with a LOD (limit of detection) of 0.16 μM. Moreover, the probe was successfully utilized for the detection of hydrazine in living cells.

  6. The 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey: The spectroscopic QSO catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Croom, Scott M; Shanks, Tom; Boyle, Brian J; Sharp, Robert G; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Brunner, Robert J; Cannon, Russell; Carson, Daniel; Chiu, Kuenley; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; De Propris, Roberto; Drinkwater, Michael J; Edge, Alastair; Fine, Stephen; Loveday, Jon; Miller, Lance; Myers, Adam D; Nichol, Robert C; Outram, Phil; Pimbblet, Kevin; Roseboom, Isaac; Ross, Nicholas; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Allyn; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A; Wake, David

    2008-01-01

    We present the final spectroscopic QSO catalogue from the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO (2SLAQ) Survey. This is a deep, 18probing in detail the faint end of the broad line AGN luminosity distribution at z<2.6. The candidate QSOs were selected from SDSS photometry and observed spectroscopically with the 2dF spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. This sample covers an area of 191.9 deg^2 and contains new spectra of 16326 objects, of which 8764 are QSOs, and 7623 are newly discovered (the remainder were previously identified by the 2QZ and SDSS surveys). The full QSO sample (including objects previously observed in the SDSS and 2QZ surveys) contains 12702 QSOs. The new 2SLAQ spectroscopic data set also contains 2343 Galactic stars, including 362 white dwarfs, and 2924 narrow emission line galaxies with a median redshift of z=0.22. We present detailed completeness estimates for the survey, based on modelling of QSO colours, including host galaxy contributi...

  7. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Variable Object Selection and Anticipated Results

    CERN Document Server

    Morganson, Eric; Anderson, Scott F; Ruan, John J; Myers, Adam D; Eracleous, Michael; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Banados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R; Bershady, Matthew A; Borissova, Jura; Brandt, William Nielsen; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter W; Davenport, James R A; Flewelling, Heather; Garnavich, Peter; Hawley, Suzanne L; Hodapp, Klaus W; Isler, Jedidah C; Kaiser, Nick; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kudritzki, Rolf P; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S; Paris, Isabelle; Parvizi, Mahmoud; Poleski, Radoslaw; Price, Paul A; Salvato, Mara; Shanks, Tom; Schlafly, Eddie F; Schneider, Donald P; Shen, Yue; Stassun, Keivan; Tonry, John T; Walter, Fabian; Waters, Chris Z

    2015-01-01

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an SDSS-IV eBOSS subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and AGN) across 7,500 square degrees selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate (KDE) analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4,000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-sele...

  8. Micro scanning probes

    CERN Document Server

    Niblock, T

    2001-01-01

    This thesis covers the design methodology, theory, modelling, fabrication and evaluation of a Micro-Scanning-Probe. The device is a thermally actuated bimorph quadrapod fabricated using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems technology. A quadrapod is a structure with four arms, in this case a planar structure with the four arms forming a cross which is dry etched out of a silicon diaphragm. Each arm has a layer of aluminium deposited on it forming a bimorph. Through heating each arm actuation is achieved in the plane of the quadrapod and the direction normal to it. Fabrication of the device has required the development of bulk micromachining techniques to handle post CMOS fabricated wafers and the patterning of thickly sputtered aluminium in bulk micro machined cavities. CMOS fabrication techniques were used to incorporate diodes onto the quadrapod arms for temperature measurement of the arms. Fine tungsten and silicon tips have also been fabricated to allow tunnelling between the tip and the platform at the centr...

  9. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  10. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Khlopov, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs) are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY) models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  11. Spontaneous Symmetry Probing

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    For relativistic quantum field theories, we consider Lorentz breaking, spatially homogeneous field configurations or states that evolve in time along a symmetry direction. We dub this situation "spontaneous symmetry probing" (SSP). We mainly focus on internal symmetries, i.e. on symmetries that commute with the Poincare group. We prove that the fluctuations around SSP states have a Lagrangian that is explicitly time independent, and we provide the field space parameterization that makes this manifest. We show that there is always a gapless Goldstone excitation that perturbs the system in the direction of motion in field space. Perhaps more interestingly, we show that if such a direction is part of a non-Abelian group of symmetries, the Goldstone bosons associated with spontaneously broken generators that do not commute with the SSP one acquire a gap, proportional to the SSP state's "speed". We outline possible applications of this formalism to inflationary cosmology.

  12. New probe of naturalness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Nathaniel; Englert, Christoph; McCullough, Matthew

    2013-09-20

    Any new scalar fields that perturbatively solve the hierarchy problem by stabilizing the Higgs boson mass also generate new contributions to the Higgs boson field-strength renormalization, irrespective of their gauge representation. These new contributions are physical, and in explicit models their magnitude can be inferred from the requirement of quadratic divergence cancellation; hence, they are directly related to the resolution of the hierarchy problem. Upon canonically normalizing the Higgs field, these new contributions lead to modifications of Higgs couplings that are typically great enough that the hierarchy problem and the concept of electroweak naturalness can be probed thoroughly within a precision Higgs boson program. Specifically, at a lepton collider this can be achieved through precision measurements of the Higgs boson associated production cross section. This would lead to indirect constraints on perturbative solutions to the hierarchy problem in the broadest sense, even if the relevant new fields are gauge singlets.

  13. Advanced Langmuir Probe (LP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronka, N. R.; Block, B. P.; Carignan, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic response of the MK-2 version of the Langmuir probe amplifier was studied. The settling time of the step response is increased by: (1) stray node-to-ground capacitance at series connections between high value feedback resistors; and (2) input capacitance due to the input cable, FET switches, and input source follower. The stray node-to-ground capacitances can be reduced to tolerable levels by elevating the string of feedback resistors above the printing board. A new feedback network was considered, with promising results. The design uses resistances having much lower nominal values, thereby minimizing the effect of stray capacitances. Faster settling times can be achieved by using an operational amplifier having a higher gain-bandwidth product.

  14. Global Abundance and Temperature Constraints via Joint Spectroscopic Phase Curve Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Line, Michael R.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob; Kreidberg, Laura; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic thermal emission phase curves can provide us with a global view of an exoplanet's atmosphere. Different wavelengths probe different atmospheric depths whereas different phases probe different planetary longitudes. This in essence allows us to reconstruct the "3D" thermal and compositional structure of these atmospheres. In this contribution I will discuss the application of powerful atmospheric retrieval approaches to spectroscopic phase curve data, specifically the WFC3+Spitzer IRAC observations of the hot-Jupiter WASP-43b. First I will show the variation in thermal structures and molecular abundances with phase, assuming each phase is independent. Secondly, I will present a new framework for performing a joint retrieval on multiple phases simultaneously. In such a framework, I will test, via Bayesian hypothesis testing, a variety of assumptions. For instance, can the absorption features across all phases be explained with a global metallicity and C-to-O ratio under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium? Can chemical quenching perturb the abundances on the cooler phases more than the hotter phases? Can we tell the difference? Can a global thermal structure "shape" explain all phases or is there structure variation with phase? Answering such questions are critical to understanding the complex interactions of atmospheric dynamics, chemical processes, and radiative energy balance in exoplanet atmospheres.

  15. Synthesis of Photoactivatable Phospholipidic Probes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing PENG; Fan Qi QU; Yi XIA; Jie Hua ZHOU; Qiong You WU; Ling PENG

    2005-01-01

    We synthesized and characterized photoactivatable phospholipidic probes 1-3. These probes have the perfluorinated aryl azide function at the polar head of phospholipid. They are stable in dark and become highly reactive upon photoirradiation. The preliminary results suggest that they are promising tools to study the topology of membrane proteins and protein-lipid interactions using photolabeling approach.

  16. Non-inductive current probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl

    1977-01-01

    The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is......The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is...

  17. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, B.deB. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

  18. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  19. Spectroscopic study of solar twins and analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Datson, Juliet; Portinari, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Context. Many large stellar surveys have been and are still being carried out, providing huge amounts of data, for which stellar physical parameters will be derived. Solar twins and analogues provide a means to test the calibration of these stellar catalogues because the Sun is the best-studied star and provides precise fundamental parameters. Solar twins should be centred on the solar values. Aims. This spectroscopic study of solar analogues selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) at a resolution of 48,000 provides effective temperatures and metallicities for these stars. We test whether our spectroscopic parameters, as well as the previous photometric calibrations, are properly centred on the Sun. In addition, we search for more solar twins in our sample. Methods. The methods used in this work are based on literature methods for solar twin searches and on methods we developed in previous work to distinguish the metallicity-temperature degeneracies in the differential comparison of spectra of solar ...

  20. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...... high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations...

  1. Are your spectroscopic data being used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Potterbusch, Megan R.; Bouquin, Daina; Erdmann, Christopher C.; Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-09-01

    The issue of availability of data and their presentation in spectroscopic publications is discussed. Different current practices are critically reviewed from the point of view of potential users, government policies, and merit of success of the authors. Indeed, properly providing the data benefits not only users but also the authors of the spectroscopic research. We will show that this increases citations to the spectroscopy papers and visibility of the research groups. Examples based on the statistical analyses of the articles published in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy will be shown. We will discuss different methods including supplementary materials to the Journals, public-curated databases and also new tools that can be utilized by spectroscopists.

  2. Cobra Probes Containing Replaceable Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John; Redding, Adam

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the basic design of cobra probes provides for relatively easy replacement of broken thermocouples. Cobra probes are standard tube-type pressure probes that may also contain thermocouples and that are routinely used in wind tunnels and aeronautical hardware. They are so named because in side views, they resemble a cobra poised to attack. Heretofore, there has been no easy way to replace a broken thermocouple in a cobra probe: instead, it has been necessary to break the probe apart and then rebuild it, typically at a cost between $2,000 and $4,000 (2004 prices). The modified design makes it possible to replace the thermocouple, in minimal time and at relatively low cost, by inserting new thermocouple wire in a tube.

  3. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    silicon processing. Using a microgripper they were detached from an array and fixed to a standard pyramidal AFM probe or alternatively inserted into a tipless cantilever equipped with a narrow slit. The nanobit-enhanced probes were used for imaging of deep trenches, without visible deformation, wear......We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard...... or dislocation of the tips of the nanobit after several scans. This approach allows an unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of scanning probe tips to the surface topology or to the specific application....

  4. Wearable probes for service design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullane, Aaron; Laaksolahti, Jarmo Matti; Svanæs, Dag

    2014-01-01

    by service employees in reflecting on the delivery of a service. In this paper, we present the ‘wearable probe’, a probe concept that captures sensor data without distracting service employees. Data captured by the probe can be used by the service employees to reflect and co-reflect on the service journey......Probes are used as a design method in user-centred design to allow end-users to inform design by collecting data from their lives. Probes are potentially useful in service innovation, but current probing methods require users to interrupt their activity and are consequently not ideal for use......, helping to identify opportunities for service evolution and innovation....

  5. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  6. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided......In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  7. Nitrile bonds as infrared probes of electrostatics in ribonuclease S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Boxer, Steven G

    2010-10-28

    Three different nitrile-containing amino acids, p-cyanophenylalanine, m-cyanophenylalanine, and S-cyanohomocysteine, have been introduced near the active site of the semisynthetic enzyme ribonuclease S (RNase S) to serve as probes of electrostatic fields. Vibrational Stark spectra, measured directly on the probe-modified proteins, confirm the predominance of the linear Stark tuning rate in describing the sensitivity of the nitrile stretch to external electric fields, a necessary property for interpreting observed frequency shifts as a quantitative measure of local electric fields that can be compared with simulations. The X-ray structures of these nitrile-modified RNase variants and enzymatic assays demonstrate minimal perturbation to the structure and function, respectively, by the probes and provide a context for understanding the influence of the environment on the nitrile stretching frequency. We examine the ability of simulation techniques to recapitulate the spectroscopic properties of these nitriles as a means to directly test a computational electrostatic model for proteins, specifically that in the ubiquitous Amber-99 force field. Although qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is observed for the largest shifts, substantial discrepancies are observed in some cases, highlighting the ongoing need for experimental metrics to inform the development of theoretical models of electrostatic fields in proteins.

  8. Nitrile Bonds as Infrared Probes of Electrostatics in Ribonuclease S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafarman, Aaron; Boxer, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Three different nitrile-containing amino acids, para-cyanophenylalanine, meta-cyanophenylalanine and S-cyano homocysteine, have been introduced near the active site of the semi-synthetic enzyme Ribonuclease S (RNase S) to serve as probes of electrostatic fields. Vibrational Stark spectra, measured directly on the probe-modified proteins, confirm the predominance of the linear Stark tuning rate in describing the sensitivity of the nitrile stretch to external electric fields, a necessary property for interpreting observed frequency shifts as a quantitative measure of local electric fields that can be compared with simulations. The X-ray structures of these nitrile-modified RNase variants and enzymatic assays demonstrate minimal perturbation to the structure and function, respectively, by the probes and provide a context for understanding the influence of the environment on the nitrile stretching frequency. We examine the ability of simulation techniques to recapitulate the spectroscopic properties of these nitriles as a means to directly test a computational electrostatic model for proteins, specifically that in the ubiquitous Amber ′99 force field. Although qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is observed for the largest shifts, substantial discrepancies are observed in some cases, highlighting the ongoing need for experimental metrics to inform the development of theoretical models of electrostatic fields in proteins. PMID:20883003

  9. Probing Protein Channel Dynamics At The Single Molecule Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. Ann; Dunn, Robert C.

    1997-03-01

    It would be difficult to overstate the importance played by protein ion channels in cellular function. These macromolecular pores allow the passage of ions across the cellular membrane and play indispensable roles in all aspects of neurophysiology. While the patch-clamp technique continues to provide elegant descriptions of the kinetic processes involved in ion channel gating, the associated conformational changes remain a mystery. We are using the spectroscopic capabilities and single molecule fluorescence sensitivity of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe these dynamics at the single channel level. Using a newly developed cantilevered NSOM probe capable of probing soft biological samples with single molecule fluorescence sensitivity, we have begun mapping the location of single NMDA receptors in intact rat cortical neurons with <100 nm spatial resolution. We will also present recent results exploring the conformational changes accompanying activation of nuclear pore channels located in the nuclear membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Our recent NSOM and AFM measurements on single nuclear pore complexes reveal large conformational changes taking place upon activation, providing rich, new molecular level details of channel function.

  10. Spectroscopic studies of ion implanted PPV films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, C. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Friend, R.H. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Sarnecki, G.J. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Lucas, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Moliton, A. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Ratier, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France)); Belorgeot, C. (Lab. de Physique Moleculaire, Faculte des Sciences, 87 - Limoges (France))

    1993-03-15

    The main results of the spectroscopic analyses (infrared and ultraviolet - visible - near infrared) carried out on PPV films before and after ion implantation with halogen and alkali ions are presented in this paper. The influence of both ions nature and implantation parameters on optical properties of this polymer have been pointed out and the appearance of a weak band due to doping has been observed by infrared spectroscopy. (orig.)

  11. Studying Young Stars with Large Spectroscopic Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Martell, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Galactic archaeology is the study of the history of star formation and chemical evolution in the Milky Way, based on present-day stellar populations. Studies of young stars are a key anchor point for Galactic archaeology, since quantities like the initial mass function and the star formation rate can be studied directly in young clusters and star forming regions. Conversely, massive spectroscopic Galactic archaeology surveys can be used as a data source for young star studies.

  12. Spectroscopic Characterisation of SWNT Polymer Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Keogh, Sinead

    2006-01-01

    In this study hybrid systems of the conjugated organic polymer poly(p-phenylene vinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-m-phenylene vinylene) (PmPV) with single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesised by the Arc discharge method and by gas-phase catalytic decomposition of carbon monoxide at high pressure (HiPco process) are explored using a wide variety of spectroscopic, microscopic and thermal techniques. Diameter dependent solubilisation has been previously shown in solutions of such composites. Firstly the...

  13. SPECTROSCOPIC GRADIENTS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Buzzoni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review some relevant properties of the observed changes of H , Mg2, and Fei Lick indices across the surface of 25 bright elliptical galaxies. The impact of these spectroscopic gradients is brie y discussed, in the framework of the leading physical mechanisms that led to galaxy formation. In particular, three relevant evolutionary scenarios are sketched, each one able, in principle, to consistently match galaxy spectral properties and e ectively constrain the composing stellar populations in these systems.

  14. Spectroscopic Gradients in Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzoni, A.; Battistini, C.; Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.

    2009-11-01

    We review some relevant properties of the observed changes of Hβ, Mg_2, and FeI Lick indices across the surface of 25 bright elliptical galaxies. The impact of these spectroscopic gradients is briefly discussed, in the framework of the leading physical mechanisms that led to galaxy formation. In particular, three relevant evolutionary scenarios are sketched, each one able, in principle, to consistently match galaxy spectral properties and effectively constrain the composing stellar populations in these systems.

  15. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaugher, Brenna; Bebek, Chris

    2014-07-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar spectroscopic redshift survey. The DESI instrument consists of a new wide-field (3.2 deg. linear field of view) corrector plus a multi-object spectrometer with up to 5000 robotically positioned optical fibers and will be installed at prime focus on the Mayall 4m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona. The fibers feed 10 three-arm spectrographs producing spectra that cover a wavelength range from 360-980 nm and have resolution of 2000-5500 depending on the wavelength. The DESI instrument is designed for a 14,000 sq. deg. multi-year survey of targets that trace the evolution of dark energy out to redshift 3.5 using the redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), emission line galaxies (ELGs) and quasars. DESI is the successor to the successful Stage-III BOSS spectroscopic redshift survey and complements imaging surveys such as the Stage-III Dark Energy Survey (DES, currently operating) and the Stage-IV Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST, planned start early in the next decade).

  16. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Spectroscopic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, A M; Brough, S; Owers, M S; Bauer, A E; Gunawardhana, M L P; Cluver, M E; Colless, M; Foster, C; Lara-Lopez, M A; Roseboom, I; Sharp, R; Steele, O; Thomas, D; Baldry, I K; Brown, M J I; Liske, J; Norberg, P; Robotham, A S G; Bamford, S; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Drinkwater, M J; Loveday, J; Meyer, M; Peacock, J A; Tuffs, R; Agius, N; Alpaslan, M; Andrae, E; Cameron, E; Cole, S; Ching, J H Y; Christodoulou, L; Conselice, C; Croom, S; Cross, N J G; De Propris, R; Delhaize, J; Dunne, L; Eales, S; Ellis, S; Frenk, C S; Graham, A; Grootes, M W; Haussler, B; Heymans, C; Hill, D; Hoyle, B; Hudson, M; Jarvis, M; Johansson, J; Jones, D H; van Kampen, E; Kelvin, L; Kuijken, K; Lopez-Sanchez, A; Maddox, S; Madore, B; Maraston, C; McNaught-Roberts, T; Nichol, R C; Oliver, S; Parkinson, H; Penny, S; Phillipps, S; Pimbblet, K A; Ponman, T; Popescu, C C; Prescott, M; Proctor, R; Sadler, E M; Sansom, A E; Seibert, M; Staveley-Smith, L; Sutherland, W; Taylor, E; Van Waerbeke, L; Vazquez-Mata, J A; Warren, S; Wijesinghe, D B; Wild, V; Wilkins, S

    2013-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is a multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic survey, using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for up to ~300000 galaxies over 280 square degrees, to a limiting magnitude of r_pet < 19.8 mag. The target galaxies are distributed over 0spectroscopic reduction and analysis pipeline. We present the steps involved in taking the raw two-dimensional spectroscopic images through to flux-calibrated one-dimensional spectra. The resulting GAMA spectra cover an observed wavelength range of 3750

  17. The Spectroscopic Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Blondin, S; Kirshner, R P; Mandel, K S; Berlind, P; Calkins, M; Challis, P; Garnavich, P M; Jha, S W; Modjaz, M; Riess, A G; Schmidt, B P

    2012-01-01

    We present 2603 spectra of 462 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) obtained during 1993-2008 through the Center for Astrophysics Supernova Program. Most of the spectra were obtained with the FAST spectrograph at the FLWO 1.5m telescope and reduced in a consistent manner, making data set well suited for studies of SN Ia spectroscopic diversity. We study the spectroscopic and photometric properties of SN Ia as a function of spectroscopic class using the classification schemes of Branch et al. and Wang et al. The width-luminosity relation appears to be steeper for SN Ia with broader lines. Based on the evolution of the characteristic Si II 6355 line, we propose improved methods for measuring velocity gradients, revealing a larger range than previously suspected, from ~0 to ~400 km/s/day considering the instantaneous velocity decline rate at maximum light. We find a weaker and less significant correlation between Si II velocity and intrinsic B-V color at maximum light than reported by Foley et al., owing to a more ...

  18. Exact probes of orientifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Torrents, Genis

    2014-01-01

    We compute the exact vacuum expectation value of circular Wilson loops for Euclidean ${\\cal N}=4$ super Yang-Mills with $G=SO(N),Sp(N)$, in the fundamental and spinor representations. These field theories are dual to type IIB string theory compactified on $AdS_5\\times {\\mathbb R} {\\mathbb P}^5$ plus certain choices of discrete torsion, and we use our results to probe this holographic duality. We first revisit the LLM-type geometries having $AdS_5\\times {\\mathbb R} {\\mathbb P}^5$ as ground state. Our results clarify and refine the identification of these LLM-type geometries as bubbling geometries arising from fermions on a half harmonic oscillator. We furthermore identify the presence of discrete torsion with the one-fermion Wigner distribution becoming negative at the origin of phase space. We then turn to the string world-sheet interpretation of our results and argue that for the quantities considered they imply two features: first, the contribution coming from world-sheets with a single crosscap is closely ...

  19. Steerable Doppler transducer probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidel, H.F.; Greenwood, D.L.

    1986-07-22

    An ultrasonic diagnostic probe is described which is capable of performing ultrasonic imaging and Doppler measurement consisting of: a hollow case having an acoustic window which passes ultrasonic energy and including chamber means for containing fluid located within the hollow case and adjacent to a portion of the acoustic window; imaging transducer means, located in the hollow case and outside the fluid chamber means, and oriented to direct ultrasonic energy through the acoustic window toward an area which is to be imaged; Doppler transducer means, located in the hollow case within the fluid chamber means, and movably oriented to direct Doppler signals through the acoustic window toward the imaged area; means located within the fluid chamber means and externally controlled for controllably moving the Doppler transducer means to select one of a plurality of axes in the imaged area along which the Doppler signals are to be directed; and means, located external to the fluid chamber means and responsive to the means for moving, for providing an indication signal for identifying the selected axis.

  20. Transient Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    Transient Astrophysics Probe (TAP), selected by NASA for a funded Concept Study, is a wide-field high-energy transient mission proposed for flight starting in the late 2020s. TAP’s main science goals, called out as Frontier Discovery areas in the 2010 Decadal Survey, are time-domain astrophysics and counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) detections. The mission instruments include unique imaging soft X-ray optics that allow ~500 deg2 FoV in each of four separate modules; a high sensitivity, 1 deg2 FoV soft X-ray telescope based on single crystal silicon optics; a passively cooled, 1 deg2 FoV Infrared telescope with bandpass 0.6-3 micron; and a set of ~8 small NaI gamma-ray detectors. TAP will observe many events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, and high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts. Perhaps most exciting is TAP’s capability to observe X-ray and IR counterparts of GWs involving stellar mass black holes detected by LIGO/Virgo, and possibly X-ray counterparts of GWs from supermassive black holes, detected by LISA and Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  1. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  2. A subcutaneous Raman needle probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John C C; Stone, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the biochemical composition of tissues and cells in the human body. We describe the initial results of a feasibility study to design and build a miniature, fiber optic probe incorporated into a standard hypodermic needle. This probe is intended for use in optical biopsies of solid tissues to provide valuable information of disease type, such as in the lymphatic system, breast, or prostate, or of such tissue types as muscle, fat, or spinal, when identifying a critical injection site. The optical design and fabrication of this probe is described, and example spectra of various ex vivo samples are shown.

  3. Subminiature Hot-Wire Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, R. V.; Lemos, F. R.; Ligrani, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Class of improved subminiature hot-wire flow-measuring probes developed. Smaller sizes yield improved resolution in measurements of practical aerodynamic flows. Probe made in one-wire, two-perpendicular-wire, and three-perpendicular-wire version for measurement of one, two, or all three components of flow. Oriented and positioned on micromanipulator stage and viewed under microscope during fabrication. Tested by taking measurements in constant-pressure turbulent boundary layer. New probes give improved measurements of turbulence quantities near surfaces and anisotropies of flows strongly influence relative errors caused by phenomena related to spatial resolution.

  4. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.; Hambarian, Artak

    2008-09-02

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  5. Superconductivity in LiFeAs probed with quasiparticle interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhixiang; Nag, Pranab Kumar; Baumann, Danny; Kappenberger, Rhea [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Wurmehl, Sabine [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Institute for Solid State Physics, TU Dresden (Germany); Buechner, Bernd [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Institute for Solid State Physics, TU Dresden (Germany); Center for Transport and Devices, TU Dresden (Germany); Hess, Christian [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Center for Transport and Devices, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In spite of many theoretical and experimental efforts on studying the superconductivity of iron-based high temperature superconductors, the puzzle about LiFeAs's superconducting mechanism and pairing symmetry are still not clear. Here we want to present our low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy results on probing the superconductivity of LiFeAs. By taking conductance spectroscopic maps for both the superconducting state and normal state, we identify the scatterings due to the electron and hole bands close to the Fermi level. We observe a strong indication that the superconducting behavior in the hole bands are important for the formation of superconductivity in LiFeAs. Our results may also shine light on understanding the superconductivity in other iron pnictide superconductors.

  6. Rational design of fluorescent membrane probes for apoptosis based on 3-hydroxyflavone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwich, Zeinab; Kucherak, Oleksandr A.; Kreder, Rémy; Richert, Ludovic; Vauchelles, Romain; Mély, Yves; Klymchenko, Andrey S.

    2013-06-01

    Environment-sensitive probes constitute powerful tools for monitoring changes in the physico-chemical properties of cell plasma membranes. Among these probes, 3-hydroxyflavone probes are of great interest due to their dual emission and ratiometric response. Here, three probes derived from the parent F2N12S were designed, characterized and applied to monitor the membrane changes occurring during apoptosis. These three probes were designed to orient the dye vertically in the membrane. They differ by the length of their alkyl chains (from 4 to 8 carbons), which were included to optimize their affinity to the lipid membranes. Among these three probes, the one with medium chain length (hexyl) showed the best affinity to model and cell membranes, while the one with the longest alkyl chains (octyl) did not efficiently stain the membranes, probably due to aggregation. The new probes were found to be more sensitive than F2N12S to both the lipid phase and surface charge in lipid vesicles and to loss of lipid order in cell plasma membranes after cholesterol extraction. The one with the shortest (butyl) chains was found to be the most sensitive to apoptosis, while the one with medium-length (hexyl) chains was the brightest. Interestingly, apoptosis induced by different agents led to similar spectroscopic effects to those produced by the loss of lipid order and change in the surface charge, confirming that apoptosis decreases the lipid order and increases the negative surface charge in the outer leaflet of cell membranes. In conclusion, these studies report the relationship between the probe structures and their sensitivity to lipid order, surface charge and apoptosis and propose new probes for membrane research.

  7. Small Probe Reentry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), and its research partner, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo (CPSLO), will develop an integrated Small Probe Reentry System (SPRS) for low...

  8. Lunar Probe Reaches Deep Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ China's second lunar probe, Chang'e-2, has reached an orbit 1.5 million kilometers from Earth for an additional mission of deep space exploration, the State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense announced.

  9. A colorimetric and fluorescence enhancement anion probe based on coumarin compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Limin; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Baofeng

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, anion probe 1 was designed and synthesized by using phenprocoumon containing acyl hydrazine with p-nitro azo salicylaldehyde reaction Dickson et al. (2008) Dickson et al. (2008) [1]. In the anion probe 1, the nitro moiety is a signaling group and the phenolic hydroxyl moiety is anion binding site. Then the anion probe 1 was characterized by mass spectra (MS) and infrared spectra (IR). The binding properties of the anion probe 1 for anions such as F-, AcO-, H2PO4-, OH-, Cl-, Br- and I- were investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectra and fluorescence spectra Shao et al. (2008) Shao et al. (2008) [2]. Furthermore, the color of anion probe 1 after addition of F-, AcO-, H2PO4- and OH- in DMSO changed from yellow to blue, while no obvious color changes were observed by addition of other tested anions. Accordingly, the anion probe 1 could sense visually F-, AcO-, H2PO4- and OH- without resorting to any spectroscopic instrumentation Amendola et al. (2010) Amendola et al. (2010) [3].

  10. Probing gravity at large scales through CMB lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Pullen, Anthony R; Ho, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    We describe a methodology to probe gravity with the CMB lensing convergence $\\kappa$, specifically by measuring $E_G$, the ratio of the Laplacian of the gravitational scalar potential difference with the peculiar velocity divergence. Using $\\kappa$ from CMB lensing as opposed to galaxy-galaxy lensing avoids intrinsic alignments while also lacking a hard limit on the lens redshift or significant uncertainties in the source plane. We model $E_G$ for general relativity and modified gravity, finding that $E_G$ for $f(R)$ gravity should be scale-dependent due to the scale-dependence of the growth rate $f$. Next, we construct an estimator for $E_G$ in terms of the lensing convergence-galaxy and galaxy angular power spectra, along with the RSD parameter $\\beta$. We also forecast statistical errors of $E_G$ from the current Planck CMB lensing map and the CMASS and LOWZ spectroscopic galaxy samples measured from the BOSS survey, as well as BOSS spectroscopic quasars, from the SDSS Data Release 11. We expect this exper...

  11. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  12. Transformer-coupled NMR probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsuzawa, Shin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we propose an NMR probe circuit that uses a transformer with a ferromagnetic core for impedance matching. The ferromagnetic core provides a strong but confined coupling that result in efficient energy transfer between the sample coil and NMR spectrometer, while not disturbing the B1 field generated by the sample coil. We built a transformer-coupled NMR probe and found that it offers comparable performance (loss NQR.

  13. Compact probing system using remote imaging for industrial plant maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, F.; Nishimura, A.

    2014-03-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and endoscope observation were combined to design a remote probing device. We use this probing device to inspect a crack of the inner wall of the heat exchanger. Crack inspection requires speed at first, and then it requires accuracy. Once Eddy Current Testing (ECT) finds a crack with a certain signal level, another method should confirm it visually. We are proposing Magnetic particle Testing (MT) using specially fabricated the Magnetic Particle Micro Capsule (MPMC). For LIBS, a multichannel spectrometer and a Q-switch YAG laser were used. Irradiation area is 270 μm, and the pulse energy was 2 mJ. This pulse energy corresponds to 5-2.2 MW/cm2. A composite-type optical fiber was used to deliver both laser energy and optical image. Samples were prepared to heat a zirconium alloy plate by underwater arc welding in order to demonstrate severe accidents of nuclear power plants. A black oxide layer covered the weld surface and white particles floated on water surface. Laser induced breakdown plasma emission was taken into the spectroscope using this optical fiber combined with telescopic optics. As a result, we were able to simultaneously perform spectroscopic measurement and observation. For MT, the MPMC which gathered in the defective area is observed with this fiber. The MPMC emits light by the illumination of UV light from this optical fiber. The size of a defect is estimated with this amount of emission. Such technology will be useful for inspection repair of reactor pipe.

  14. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Boggs, Steven; Christensen, Finn; Craig, William; Hailey, Charles; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William; Angelini, Lorella; An, Hong Jun; Bhalereo, Varun; Brejnholt, Nicolai; Cominsky, Lynn; Cook, Rick; Doll, Melania; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian; Hornstrup, Allan; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Kim, Yunjin; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason; Liebe, Carl Christian; Madejski, Greg; Madsen, Kristen Kruse; Mao, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing hard X-ray (5 - 80 keV) telescope to orbit. NuSTAR will offer a factor 50 - 100 sensitivity improvement compared to previous collimated or coded mask imagers that have operated in this energy band. In addition, NuSTAR provides sub-arcminute imaging with good spectral resolution over a 12-arcminute field of view. After launch, NuSTAR will carry out a two-year primary science mission that focuses on four key programs: studying the evolution of massive black holes through surveys carried out in fields with excellent multiwavelength coverage, understanding the population of compact objects and the nature of the massive black hole in the center of the Milky Way, constraining explosion dynamics and nucleosynthesis in supernovae, and probing the nature of particle acceleration in relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei. A number of additional observations will be included in the primary mission, and a. guest observer program will be proposed for an extended mission to expand the range of scientific targets. The payload consists of two co-aligned depth-graded multilayer coated grazing incidence optics focused onto solid state CdZnTe pixel detectors. To be launched in early 2012 on a Pegasus rocket into a low-inclination Earth orbit. NuSTAR largely avoids SAA passages, and will therefore have low and stable detector backgrounds. The telescope achieves a 10.15-meter focal length through on-orbit deployment of all mast. An aspect and alignment metrology system enable reconstruction of the absolute aspect and variations in the telescope alignment resulting from mast flexure during ground data processing. Data will be publicly available at GSFC's High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) following validation at the science operations center located at Caltech.

  15. PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Julia; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Campins, Humberto; Lorenzi, Vania; Licandro, Javier; Morate, David; Tanga, Paolo; Cellino, Alberto; Delbo, Marco

    2015-11-01

    NASA OSIRIS-REx and JAXA Hayabusa 2 sample-return missions have targeted two near-Earth asteroids: (101955) Bennu and (162173) 1999 JU3, respectively. These are primitive asteroids that are believed to originate in the inner belt, where five distinct sources have been identified: four primitive collisional families (Polana, Erigone, Sulamitis, and Clarissa), and a population of low-albedo and low-inclination background asteroids. Identifying and characterizing the populations from which these two NEAs might originate will enchance the science return of the two missions.With this main objective in mind, we initiated in 2010 a spectroscopic survey in the visible and the near-infrared to characterize the primitive collisional families in the inner belt and the low-albedo background population. This is the PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS. So far we have obtained more than 200 spectra using telescopes located at different observatories. PRIMASS uses a variety of ground based facilities. Most of the spectra have been obtained using the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), and the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), both located at the El Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (La Palma, Spain), and the 3.0m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea (Hawai, USA).We present the first results from our on-going survey (de Leon et al. 2015; Pinilla-Alonso et al. 2015; Morate et al. 2015), focused on the Polana and the Erigone primitive families, with visible and near-infrared spectra of more than 200 objects, most of them with no previous spectroscopic data. Our survey is already the largest database of primitive asteroids spectra, and we keep obtaining data on the Sulamitis and the Clarissa families, as well as on the background low-albedo population.

  16. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  17. Spectroscopic amplitudes and microscopic substructure effects in nucleon capture reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, J; Sherif, H S; Escher, Jutta; Jennings, Byron K.; Sherif, Helmy S.

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic amplitudes play an important role in nuclear capture reactions. These amplitudes are shown to include both single-particle and polarization effects: the former through their spatial dependence and the latter through their normalization (the spectroscopic factors). Coupled-channels equations are developed for the spectroscopic amplitudes. These equations serve as a convenient starting point for the derivation of several approximations: Hartree, Hartree-Fock and two different single-particle models. The single-particle models include antisymmetry in different ways, but both miss many-body effects. Therefore, cross sections calculated with either of these models need to be multiplied by the spectroscopic factor.

  18. UV Spectroscopic Indices of Galactic Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Hernández, J.; Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present the calculation of a set of 12 mid-ultraviolet (1900-3200 Å) spectroscopic indices for a sample of 15 galactic globular clusters (GGC) observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). We explore the dependence of the indices on age and metal abundance. We found that five indices (BL 2538, Fe II 2609, Mg II 2800, Mg I 2852 and Mg Wide) display a remarkably good correlation with [Fe/H]. With respect to age, only one index (BL 2740) shows a good correlation. Results from theoretical simple stellar populations well reproduce the global trends of indices vs. [Fe/H].

  19. Spectroscopic detection and characterisation of planetary atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier Cameron A.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Space based broadband infrared observations of close orbiting extrasolar giant planets at transit and secondary eclipse have proved a successful means of determining atmospheric spectral energy distributions and molecular composition. Here, a ground-based spectroscopic technique to detect and characterise planetary atmospheres is presented. Since the planet need not be transiting, this method enables a greater sample of systems to be studied. By modelling the planetary signature as a function of phase, high resolution spectroscopy has the potential to recover the signature of molecules in planetary atmospheres.

  20. Spectroscopic observation of 5 SN candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias-Rosa, N.; Pursimo, T.; Korhonen, H.; Pastorello, A.; Derlopa, the NEON school PhD students S.; Marian, V.; Scognamiglio, D.; Szigeti, L.; Cabezas, M.; Fernandes, C. S.; McWhirter, P. R.; Zervas, K.

    2017-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of SNe 2017gla, 2017glz, 2017gop, and 2017gqq, and the verification of SN2017gmr. The targets were supplied by the following surveys: ATLAS survey, see Tonry et al. (2011, PASP, 123, 58) and Tonry et al. (ATel #8680); Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (Chambers et al. 2016, arXiv:1612.05560, and http://pswww.ifa.hawaii.edu ), the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/ ); and the D The observations were performed with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope equipped with ALFOSC (range 350-950 nm; resolution 1.4 nm FWHM).

  1. Spectroscopic diagnostics of tritium recycling in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.; Stotler, D.P.; Adler, H.; Ramsey, A.T.

    1995-03-01

    The authors present the first spectroscopic measurements of tritium Balmer-alpha (T{sub {alpha}}) emission from a fusion plasma. A Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to measure the H{sub {alpha}}, D{sub {alpha}}, T{sub {alpha}} spectrum in the current D-T a experimental campaign on TFTR and the contributions of H, D and T are separated by spectral analysis. The T{sub {alpha}} line was measurable at concentrations T{sub {alpha}}/(H{sub {alpha}} + D{sub {alpha}} + T{sub {alpha}}) down to 2%.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of star forming regions

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of studies of star forming regions, carried out at the Konkoly Observatory in the last two decades. The studies involved distance determination of star-forming dark clouds, search for candidate pre-main sequence stars, and determination of the masses and ages of the candidates by spectroscopic follow-up observations. The results expanded the list of the well-studied star forming regions in our galactic environment. Data obtained by this manner may be useful in a...

  3. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. I. A Large Spectroscopically Selected Sample of Massive Early-Type Lens Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    The Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey is an efficient Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot imaging survey for new galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. The targeted lens candidates are selected spectroscopically from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database of galaxy spectra for having multiple nebular emission lines at a redshift significantly higher than that of the SDSS target galaxy. The SLACS survey is optimized to detect bright early-type lens galaxies with faint lensed sources in order to increase the sample of known gravitational lenses suitable for detailed lensing, photometric, and dynamical modeling. In this paper, the first in a series on the current results of our HST Cycle 13 imaging survey, we present a catalog of 19 newly discovered gravitational lenses, along with nine other observed candidate systems that are either possible lenses, nonlenses, or nondetections. The survey efficiency is thus >=68%. We also present Gemini 8 m and Magellan 6.5 m integral-field spectroscopic data for nine of the SLACS targets, which further support the lensing interpretation. A new method for the effective subtraction of foreground galaxy images to reveal faint background features is presented. We show that the SLACS lens galaxies have colors and ellipticities typical of the spectroscopic parent sample from which they are drawn (SDSS luminous red galaxies and quiescent MAIN sample galaxies), but are somewhat brighter and more centrally concentrated. Several explanations for the latter bias are suggested. The SLACS survey provides the first statistically significant and homogeneously selected sample of bright early-type lens galaxies, furnishing a powerful probe of the structure of early-type galaxies within the half-light radius. The high confirmation rate of lenses in the SLACS survey suggests consideration of spectroscopic lens discovery as an explicit science goal of future spectroscopic galaxy surveys.

  4. IVVS probe mechanical concept design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.rossi@enea.it; Neri, Carlo; De Collibus, Mario Ferri; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Pollastrone, Fabio; Crescenzi, Fabio

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA designed, developed and tested a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS). • IVVS mechanical design has been revised from 2011 to 2013 to meet ITER requirements. • Main improvements are piezoceramic actuators and a step focus system. • Successful qualification activities validated the concept design for ITER environment. - Abstract: ENEA has been deeply involved in the design, development and testing of a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) required for the inspection of ITER plasma-facing components. The IVVS probe shall be deployed into the vacuum vessel, providing high resolution images and metrology measurements to detect damages and possible erosion. ENEA already designed and manufactured an IVVS probe prototype based on a rad-hard concept and driven by commercial micro-step motors, which demonstrated satisfying viewing and metrology performances at room conditions. The probe sends a laser beam through a reflective rotating prism. By rotating the axes of the prism, the probe can scan all the environment points except those present in a shadow cone and the backscattered light signal is then processed to measure the intensity level (viewing) and the distance from the probe (metrology). During the last years, in order to meet all the ITER environmental conditions, such as high vacuum, gamma radiation lifetime dose up to 5 MGy, cumulative neutron fluence of about 2.3 × 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}, temperature of 120 °C and magnetic field of 8 T, the probe mechanical design was significantly revised introducing a new actuating system based on piezo-ceramic actuators and improved with a new step focus system. The optical and mechanical schemes have been then modified and refined to meet also the geometrical constraints. The paper describes the mechanical concept design solutions adopted in order to fulfill IVVS probe functional performance requirements considering ITER working environment and geometrical constraints.

  5. Grating Spectroscopes and How to Use Them

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Ken M

    2012-01-01

    Transmission grating spectroscopes look like simple filters and are designed to screw into place on the eyepiece tube of a telescope for visual use, or into a camera adapter for digicam or CCD imaging. They are relatively inexpensive and by far the easiest type of astronomical spectroscope to use, and so are the starting point for most beginners. Using the most popular commercially made filter gratings - from Rainbow Optics in the United States to Star Analyser in the United Kingdon - as examples, the book provides all the information needed to set up and use the grating to obtain stellar spectra. It also presents methods of analyzing the results. No heavy mathematics or formulas are involved, although a reasonable level of proficiency in using an astronomic telescope and, if relevant, imaging camera, is assumed. This book contains many practical hints and tips - something that is almost essential to success when starting out. It encourages new users to get quick results, and by following the worked examples,...

  6. Science capabilities of the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devost, Daniel; McConnachie, Alan; Flagey, Nicolas; Cote, Patrick; Balogh, Michael; Driver, Simon P.; Venn, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) project will transform the CFHT 3.6m optical telescope into a 10m class dedicated multiobject spectroscopic facility, with an ability to simultaneously measure thousands of objects with a spectral resolution range spanning 2,000 to 20,000. The project is currently in design phase, with full science operations nominally starting in 2025. MSE will enable transformational science in areas as diverse as exoplanetary host characterization; stellar monitoring campaigns; tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of the distant Galaxy; connecting galaxies to the large scale structure of the Universe; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, eROSITA, SKA, and WFIRST, and is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT. I will give an update on the status of the project and review some of the most exciting scientific capabilities of the observatory.

  7. Exploring the spectroscopic properties of relic radiogalaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Capetti, Alessandro; Baldi, Ranieri D; Buttiglione, Sara; Axon, David J; Celotti, Annalisa; Chiaberge, Marco

    2013-01-01

    From an optical spectroscopic survey of 3CR radiogalaxies (RGs) with z<0.3, we discovered three objects characterized by an extremely low level of gas excitation and a large deficit of line emission with respect to RGs of similar radio luminosity. We interpreted these objects as relic active galactic nuclei (AGN), i.e., sources observed after a large drop in their nuclear activity. We here present new spectroscopic observations for these three galaxies and for a group of "candidate" relics. None of the candidates can be convincingly confirmed. From the new data for the three relics, we estimate the density of the line-emitting gas. This enables us to explore the temporal evolution of the line ratios after the AGN "death". The characteristic timescale is the light-crossing time of the emission line region, a few thousand years, too short to correspond to a substantial population of relic RGs. Additional mechanisms of gas ionization, such as "relic shocks" from their past high power phase or stellar sources,...

  8. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging: The Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging seemingly matured as a technology in the mid-2000s, with commercially successful instrumentation and reports in numerous applications. Recent developments, however, have transformed our understanding of the recorded data, provided capability for new instrumentation, and greatly enhanced the ability to extract more useful information in less time. These developments are summarized here in three broad areas— data recording, interpretation of recorded data, and information extraction—and their critical review is employed to project emerging trends. Overall, the convergence of selected components from hardware, theory, algorithms, and applications is one trend. Instead of similar, general-purpose instrumentation, another trend is likely to be diverse and application-targeted designs of instrumentation driven by emerging component technologies. The recent renaissance in both fundamental science and instrumentation will likely spur investigations at the confluence of conventional spectroscopic analyses and optical physics for improved data interpretation. While chemometrics has dominated data processing, a trend will likely lie in the development of signal processing algorithms to optimally extract spectral and spatial information prior to conventional chemometric analyses. Finally, the sum of these recent advances is likely to provide unprecedented capability in measurement and scientific insight, which will present new opportunities for the applied spectroscopist. PMID:23031693

  9. Spectroscopic investigations of carious tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thareja, R K; Sharma, A K; Shukla, Shobha

    2008-11-01

    We report on the elemental composition of healthy and infected part of human tooth using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). We have used prominent constituent transitions in laser-excited tooth to diagnose the state of the tooth. A nanosecond laser pulse (355nm, 5ns) was used as an ablating pulse and the sodium (3s2S-3p2P) at 588.99 and (3s2S-3p2P) at 589.99nm, strontium (5s21S-1s5P) at 460.55nm, and calcium (3d3D-4f 3F0) at 452.55nm transitions for spectroscopic analysis. The spectroscopic observations in conjunction with discriminate analysis showed that calcium attached to the hydroxyapatite structure of the tooth was affected severely at the infected part of the tooth. The position-time plots generated from two-dimensional (2D) images conclusively showed a decrease in calcium concentration in the infected region of the irradiated tooth. Using the technique, we could distinguish between the healthy and carious parts of the tooth with significant accuracy.

  10. The HITRAN 2004 molecular spectroscopic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, L.S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)]. E-mail: lrothman@cfa.harvard.edu; Jacquemart, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Barbe, A. [Universite de Reims-Champagne-Ardenne, Groupe de Spectrometrie Moleculaire et Atmospherique, 51062 Reims (France)] (and others)

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2004 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are unresolvable; individual line parameters and absorption cross-sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols; tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for 39 molecules including many of their isotopologues. The format of the section of the database on individual line parameters of HITRAN has undergone the most extensive enhancement in almost two decades. It now lists the Einstein A-coefficients, statistical weights of the upper and lower levels of the transitions, a better system for the representation of quantum identifications, and enhanced referencing and uncertainty codes. In addition, there is a provision for making corrections to the broadening of line transitions due to line mixing.

  11. A Spectroscopic Study of Kepler Asteroseismic Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Latham, D W; Jerzykiewicz, M

    2009-01-01

    Reported are spectroscopic observations of 15 candidates for Kepler primary asteroseismic targets and 14 other stars in the Kepler field, carried out at three observatories (see the footnote). For all these stars, the radial velocities, effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and the projected rotational velocity are derived from two separate sets of data by means of two independent methods. In addition, MK type is estimated from one of these sets of data. Three stars, HIP 94335, HIP 94734, and HIP 94743, are found to have variable radial-velocity. For HIP 94335 = FL Lyr, a well-known Algol-type eclipsing variable and a double-lined spectroscopic binary, the orbital elements computed from our data agree closely with those of Popper et al. For HIP 94734 and HIP 94743 = V2077 Cyg, which we discover to be single-lined systems, orbital elements are derived. In addition, from our value of the orbital period and the Hipparcos epoch photometry, HIP 94743 is demonstrated to be a detached eclipsing binary...

  12. Spectroscopic Instrumentation in Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovici, Dominic; Mutel, Robert Lucien; Lang, Cornelia C.

    2017-01-01

    We have designed and built two spectrographs for use in undergraduate astronomy laboratories at the University of Iowa. The first, a low cost (appx. $500) low resolution (R ~ 150 - 300) grating-prism (grism) spectrometer consists of five optical elements and is easily modified to other telescope optics. The grism spectrometer is designed to be used in a modified filter wheel. This type of spectrometer allows students to undertake projects requiring sensitive spectral measurements, such as determining the redshifts of quasars. The second instrument is a high resolution (R ~ 8000), moderate cost (appx. $5000) fiber fed echelle spectrometer. The echelle spectrometer will allow students to conduct Doppler measurements such as those used to study spectroscopic binaries. Both systems are designed to be used with robotic telescope systems. The availability of 3D printing enables both of these spectrographs to be constructed in hands-on instrumentation courses where students build and commission their own instruments. Additionally, these instruments enable introductory majors and non-majors laboratory students to gain experience conducting their own spectroscopic observations.

  13. Multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes for nanoarchitectonic materials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tomonobu; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    Nanoarchitectonic systems are of interest for utilizing a vast range of nanoscale materials for future applications requiring a huge number of elemental nanocomponents. To explore the science and technology of nanoarchitectonics, advanced characterization tools that can deal with both nanoscale objects and macroscopically extended nanosystems are demanded. Multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs) are powerful tools that meet this demand because they take the advantages of conventional scanning probe microscopes and realize atomically precise electrical measurements, which cannot be done with conventional microprobing systems widely used in characterizing materials and devices. Furthermore, an MP-SPM can be used to operate some nanoarchitectonic systems. In this review, we overview the indispensable features of MP-SPMs together with the past, present and future of MP-SPM technology.

  14. Optical imaging probes in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Cristina; Lo Dico, Alessia; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-07-26

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management.Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation.The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed.

  15. Noninvasive, near infrared spectroscopic-measured muscle pH and PO2 indicate tissue perfusion for cardiac surgical patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Babs R.; Idwasi, Patrick O.; Balaguer, Jorge; Levin, Steven; Simsir, Sinan A.; Vander Salm, Thomas J.; Collette, Helen; Heard, Stephen O.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether near infrared spectroscopic measurement of tissue pH and Po2 has sufficient accuracy to assess variation in tissue perfusion resulting from changes in blood pressure and metabolic demand during cardiopulmonary bypass. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: Eighteen elective cardiac surgical patients. INTERVENTION: Cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A near infrared spectroscopic fiber optic probe was placed over the hypothenar eminence. Reference Po2 and pH sensors were inserted in the abductor digiti minimi (V). Data were collected every 30 secs during surgery and for 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass. Calibration equations developed from one third of the data were used with the remaining data to investigate sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopic measurement to physiologic changes resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass. Near infrared spectroscopic and reference pH and Po2 measurements were compared for each subject using standard error of prediction. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 at baseline were compared with values during cardiopulmonary bypass just before rewarming commenced (hypotensive, hypothermic), after rewarming (hypotensive, normothermic) just before discontinuation of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass (normotensive, normothermic) using mixed-model analysis of variance. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 were well correlated with the invasive measurement of pH (R2 =.84) and Po2 (R 2 =.66) with an average standard error of prediction of 0.022 +/- 0.008 pH units and 6 +/- 3 mm Hg, respectively. The average difference between the invasive and near infrared spectroscopic measurement was near zero for both the pH and Po2 measurements. Near infrared spectroscopic Po2 significantly decreased 50% on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass and remained depressed throughout the bypass and

  16. Noninvasive, near infrared spectroscopic-measured muscle pH and PO2 indicate tissue perfusion for cardiac surgical patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Babs R.; Idwasi, Patrick O.; Balaguer, Jorge; Levin, Steven; Simsir, Sinan A.; Vander Salm, Thomas J.; Collette, Helen; Heard, Stephen O.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether near infrared spectroscopic measurement of tissue pH and Po2 has sufficient accuracy to assess variation in tissue perfusion resulting from changes in blood pressure and metabolic demand during cardiopulmonary bypass. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: Eighteen elective cardiac surgical patients. INTERVENTION: Cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A near infrared spectroscopic fiber optic probe was placed over the hypothenar eminence. Reference Po2 and pH sensors were inserted in the abductor digiti minimi (V). Data were collected every 30 secs during surgery and for 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass. Calibration equations developed from one third of the data were used with the remaining data to investigate sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopic measurement to physiologic changes resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass. Near infrared spectroscopic and reference pH and Po2 measurements were compared for each subject using standard error of prediction. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 at baseline were compared with values during cardiopulmonary bypass just before rewarming commenced (hypotensive, hypothermic), after rewarming (hypotensive, normothermic) just before discontinuation of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass (normotensive, normothermic) using mixed-model analysis of variance. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 were well correlated with the invasive measurement of pH (R2 =.84) and Po2 (R 2 =.66) with an average standard error of prediction of 0.022 +/- 0.008 pH units and 6 +/- 3 mm Hg, respectively. The average difference between the invasive and near infrared spectroscopic measurement was near zero for both the pH and Po2 measurements. Near infrared spectroscopic Po2 significantly decreased 50% on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass and remained depressed throughout the bypass and

  17. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  18. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  19. Preparation of cesium targets for gamma-spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Basu, S. K.; Chanda, S.; Deb, P.; Eqbal, Md; Kundu, S.; Joseph, D.

    2000-11-01

    A procedure to prepare monoisotopic cesium compound targets for gamma-spectroscopic experiments is described. Using this procedure, uniform targets up to thicknesses of 0.6-1.2 mg/cm 2 were prepared and used for in-beam spectroscopic studies. The purity of the target was tested by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) measurements.

  20. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  1. Spectroscopic investigation of the vibrational quasi-continuum arising from internal rotation of a methyl group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hougen, J.T. [NIST, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this project is to use spectroscopic techniques to investigate in detail phenomena involving the vibrational quasi-continuum in a simple physical system. Acetaldehyde was chosen for the study because: (i) methyl groups have been suggested to be important promotors of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, (ii) the internal rotation of a methyl group is an easily describle large-amplitude motion, which should retain its simple character even at high levels of excitation, and (iii) the aldehyde carbonyl group offers the possibility of both vibrational and electronic probing. The present investigation of the ground electronic state has three parts: (1) understanding the {open_quotes}isolated{close_quotes} internal-rotation motion below, at, and above the top of the torsional barrier, (2) understanding in detail traditional (bond stretching and bending) vibrational fundamental and overtone states, and (3) understanding interactions involving states with multiquantum excitations of at least one of these two kinds of motion.

  2. Interaction of vasicine with calf thymus DNA: Molecular docking, spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S., Sai Murali; R. S., Sai Siddhardha; Rajesh Babu, D.; Venketesh, S.; Basavaraju, R.; Nageswara Rao, G.

    2017-06-01

    The present study brings out the interaction between vasicine, an alkaloid and Adhatoda vasica Nees with double stranded DNA. The physico-chemical interaction between small molecules and nucleic acids is a major area of focus in screening drugs against various cancers. Molecular probing in our study using Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) has revealed interaction of vasicine with DNA double helix. Here we report the interaction of vasicine with Calf thymus DNA. We present for the first time the results obtained from UV-visible, fluorescence spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric techniques that suggest a moderate to strong electrostatic, hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions mediating the DNA binding properties of vasicine, leading to disruption of DNA secondary structure.

  3. Thermomorphic phase separation in ionic liquid-organic liquid systems--conductivity and spectroscopic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Berg, Rolf W; van Hal, Roy; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2005-08-21

    Electrical conductivity, FT-Raman and NMR measurements are demonstrated as useful tools to probe and determine phase behavior of thermomorphic ionic liquid-organic liquid systems. To illustrate the methods, consecutive conductivity measurements of a thermomorphic methoxyethoxyethyl-imidazolium ionic liquid/1-hexanol system are performed in the temperature interval 25-80 degrees C using a specially constructed double-electrode cell. In addition, FT-Raman and 1H-NMR spectroscopic studies performed on the phase-separable system in the same temperature interval confirm the mutual solubility of the components in the system, the liquid-liquid equilibrium phase diagram of the binary mixture, and signify the importance of hydrogen bonding between the ionic liquid and the hydroxyl group of the alcohol.

  4. Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gayathri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

  5. Electrochemical and spectroscopic evaluation of lithium intercalation in tailored polymethacrylonitrile carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadil, K.R.; Guidotti, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Even, W.R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Disordered polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN) carbon monoliths have been studied as potential tailored electrodes for lithium ion batteries. A combination of electrochemical and surface spectroscopic probes have been used to investigate irreversible loss mechanisms. Voltammetric measurements show that Li intercalates readily into the carbon at potentials 1V positive of the reversible Li potential. The coulometric efficiency rises rapidly from 50% for the first potential cycle to greater than 85% for the third cycle, indicating that solvent decomposition is a self-limiting process. Surface film composition and thickness, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), does not vary substantially when compared to more ordered carbon surfaces. Li{sup +} profiles are particularly useful in discriminating between the bound states of Li at the surface of solution permeable PMAN carbons.

  6. Raman Spectroscopic Methods for Classification of Normal and Malignant Hypopharyngeal Tissues: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Pujary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal cancer is more common in males. The present study is aimed at exploration of potential of conventional Raman spectroscopy in classifying normal from a malignant laryngopharyngeal tissue. We have recorded Raman spectra of twenty tissues (aryepiglottic fold using an in-house built Raman setup. The spectral features of mean malignant spectrum suggests abundance proteins whereas spectral features of mean normal spectrum indicate redundancy of lipids. PCA was employed as discriminating algorithm. Both, unsupervised and supervised modes of analysis as well as match/mismatch “limit test” methodology yielded clear classification among tissue types. The findings of this study demonstrate the efficacy of conventional Raman spectroscopy in classification of normal and malignant laryngopharyngeal tissues. A rigorous evaluation of the models with development of suitable fibreoptic probe may enable real-time Raman spectroscopic diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal cancers in future.

  7. Spaser as a biological probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Weingold, Robert; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nolan, Jacqueline; Harrington, Walter; Kuchyanov, Alexander S.; Parkhomenko, Roman G.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid; Biris, Alexandru S.; Plekhanov, Alexander I.; Stockman, Mark I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding cell biology greatly benefits from the development of advanced diagnostic probes. Here we introduce a 22-nm spaser (plasmonic nanolaser) with the ability to serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of generating stimulated emission directly inside living cells and animal tissues. We have demonstrated a lasing regime associated with the formation of a dynamic vapour nanobubble around the spaser that leads to giant spasing with emission intensity and spectral width >100 times brighter and 30-fold narrower, respectively, than for quantum dots. The absorption losses in the spaser enhance its multifunctionality, allowing for nanobubble-amplified photothermal and photoacoustic imaging and therapy. Furthermore, the silica spaser surface has been covalently functionalized with folic acid for molecular targeting of cancer cells. All these properties make a nanobubble spaser a promising multimodal, super-contrast, ultrafast cellular probe with a single-pulse nanosecond excitation for a variety of in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications.

  8. Sensor probe for rectal manometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blechschmidt, R.A.; Hohlfeld, O.; Mueller, R.; Werthschuetzky, R. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Elektromechanische Konstruktionen

    2001-07-01

    In this paper a pressure sensor probe is presented that is suitable for assessing dynamic rectal pressure profiles. It consists of ten piezoresistive sensors, mounted on low temperature co-fired ceramics. The sensors are coated with a bio-compatible silicone elastomer. It was possible to reduce the size of the ceramic to 4.5 x 5.5 mm with a height of 1.4 mm. The whole probe has a diameter of 9 mm and a length of 20 cm. One healthy test person underwent rectal manometry. The experimental data and the analysis of linearity, hysteresis, temperature stability, and reproducibility are discussed. The presented sensor probe extends the classical anorectal manometry, particularly in view of quantifying disorders of the rectal motility. (orig.)

  9. Probing of Nascent Riboswitch Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvier, Adrien; Lafontaine, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The study of biologically significant and native structures is vital to characterize RNA-based regulatory mechanisms. Riboswitches are cis-acting RNA molecules that are involved in the biosynthesis and transport of cellular metabolites. Because riboswitches regulate gene expression by modulating their structure, it is vital to employ native probing assays to determine how native riboswitch structures perform highly efficient and specific ligand recognition. By employing RNase H probing, it is possible to determine the accessibility of specific RNA domains in various structural contexts. Herein, we describe how to employ RNase H probing to characterize nascent mRNA riboswitch molecules as a way to obtain information regarding the riboswitch regulation control mechanism.

  10. Hand-held survey probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kevin L [Idaho Falls, ID; Hungate, Kevin E [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A system for providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include an optical sensor to generate data corresponding to a position of the detection probe with respect to a surface; a microprocessor to receive the data; a software medium having code to process the data with the microprocessor and pre-programmed parameters, and making a comparison of the data to the parameters; and an indicator device to indicate results of the comparison. A method of providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include generating output data with an optical sensor corresponding to the relative position with respect to a surface; processing the output data, including comparing the output data to pre-programmed parameters; and indicating results of the comparison.

  11. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...... to perform real-time measurements with little or no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is now considered an invaluable analytical tool, finding application in several fields including medicine, defense and process control. When combined with fiber optics technology, Raman spectroscopy allows...... for the realization of flexible and minimally-invasive devices, able to reach remote or hardly accessible samples, and to perform in-situ analyses in hazardous environments. The work behind this Thesis focuses on the proof-of-principle demonstration of a truly in-fiber Raman probe, where all parts are realized...

  12. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A z = 6.740 GALAXY BEHIND THE BULLET CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradac, Marusa; Hall, Nicholas [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Vanzella, Eros [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy); Treu, Tommaso [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Fontana, Adriano [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, 00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Clowe, Douglas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Clippinger Labs 251B, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Zaritsky, Dennis; Clement, Benjamin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Stiavelli, Massimo, E-mail: marusa@physics.ucdavis.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    We present the first results of our spectroscopic follow-up of 6.5 < z < 10 candidate galaxies behind clusters of galaxies. We report the spectroscopic confirmation of an intrinsically faint Lyman break galaxy (LBG) identified as a z{sub 850LP}-band dropout behind the Bullet Cluster. We detect an emission line at {lambda} = 9412 A at >5{sigma} significance using a 16 hr long exposure with FORS2 VLT. Based on the absence of flux in bluer broadband filters, the blue color of the source, and the absence of additional lines, we identify the line as Ly{alpha} at z = 6.740 {+-} 0.003. The integrated line flux is f = (0.7 {+-} 0.1 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg{sup -1} s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (the uncertainties are due to random and flux calibration errors, respectively) making it the faintest Ly{alpha} flux detected at these redshifts. Given the magnification of {mu} = 3.0 {+-} 0.2 the intrinsic (corrected for lensing) flux is f {sup int} = (0.23 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg{sup -1} s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (additional uncertainty due to magnification), which is {approx}2-3 times fainter than other such measurements in z {approx} 7 galaxies. The intrinsic H{sub 160W}-band magnitude of the object is m{sup int}{sub H{sub 1{sub 6{sub 0{sub W}}}}}=27.57{+-}0.17, corresponding to 0.5 L* for LBGs at these redshifts. The galaxy is one of the two sub-L* LBG galaxies spectroscopically confirmed at these high redshifts (the other is also a lensed z = 7.045 galaxy), making it a valuable probe for the neutral hydrogen fraction in the early universe.

  13. Super-resolution spectroscopic microscopy via photon localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay; Urban, Ben E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Khuon, Satya; Chew, Teng-Leong; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional photon localization microscopy analyses only the spatial distributions of photons emitted by individual molecules to reconstruct super-resolution optical images. Unfortunately, however, the highly valuable spectroscopic information from these photons have been overlooked. Here we report a spectroscopic photon localization microscopy that is capable of capturing the inherent spectroscopic signatures of photons from individual stochastic radiation events. Spectroscopic photon localization microscopy achieved higher spatial resolution than traditional photon localization microscopy through spectral discrimination to identify the photons emitted from individual molecules. As a result, we resolved two fluorescent molecules, which were 15 nm apart, with the corresponding spatial resolution of 10 nm--a four-fold improvement over photon localization microscopy. Using spectroscopic photon localization microscopy, we further demonstrated simultaneous multi-colour super-resolution imaging of microtubules and mitochondria in COS-7 cells and showed that background autofluorescence can be identified through its distinct emission spectra.

  14. Probing TRAPPIST-1-like Systems with K2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; Queloz, Didier; Alibert, Yann; Gillen, Ed; Gillon, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The search for small planets orbiting late M dwarfs holds the promise of detecting Earth-size planets for which their atmospheres could be characterized within the next decade. The recent discovery of TRAPPIST-1 entertains hope that these systems are common around hosts located at the bottom of the main sequence. In this Letter, we investigate the ability of the repurposed Kepler mission (K2) to probe planetary systems similar to TRAPPIST-1. We perform a consistent data analysis of 189 spectroscopically confirmed M5.5 to M9 late M dwarfs from Campaigns 1-6 to search for planet candidates and inject transit signals with properties matching TRAPPIST-1b and c. We find no transiting planet candidates across our K2 sample. Our injection tests show that K2 is able to recover both TRAPPIST-1 planets for 10% of the sample only, mainly because of the inefficient throughput at red wavelengths resulting in Poisson-limited performance for these targets. Increasing injected planetary radii to match GJ 1214b’s size yields a recovery rate of 70%. The strength of K2 is its ability to probe a large number of cool hosts across the different campaigns, out of which the recovery rate of 10% may turn into bona fide detections of TRAPPIST-1-like systems within the next two years.

  15. Hard X-ray spectroscopic nano-imaging of hierarchical functional materials at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2013-11-11

    Heterogeneous catalysts often consist of an active metal (oxide) in close contact with a support material and various promoter elements. Although macroscopic properties, such as activity, selectivity and stability, can be assessed with catalyst performance testing, the development of relevant, preferably quantitative structure-performance relationships require the use of advanced characterisation methods. Spectroscopic imaging in the hard X-ray region with nanometer-scale resolution has very recently emerged as a powerful approach to elucidate the hierarchical structure and related chemistry of catalytic solids in action under realistic reaction conditions. This X-ray-based chemical imaging method benefits from the combination of high resolution (∼30 nm) with large X-ray penetration and depth of focus, and the possibility for probing large areas with mosaic imaging. These capabilities make it possible to obtain spatial and temporal information on chemical changes in catalytic solids as well as a wide variety of other functional materials, such as fuel cells and batteries, in their full complexity and integrity. In this concept article we provide details on the method and setup of full-field hard X-ray spectroscopic imaging, illustrate its potential for spatiotemporal chemical imaging by making use of recent showcases, outline the pros and cons of this experimental approach and discuss some future directions for hierarchical functional materials research.

  16. Kinematics of the Orion Nebula Cluster: Velocity Substructure and Spectroscopic Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tobin, J J; Furesz, G; Mateo, M; Megeath, S T

    2009-01-01

    We present a kinematic study of the Orion Nebula Cluster based upon radial velocities measured by multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 meter MMT and Magellan telescopes. Velocities are reported for 1613 stars, with multi-epoch data for 727 objects as part of our continuing effort to detect and analyze spectroscopic binaries. We confirm and extend the results of Furesz et al. showing that the ONC is not relaxed, consistent with its youth, and that the stars generally follow the position-velocity structure of the moderate density gas in the region, traced by $^{13}$CO. The additional radial velocities we have measured enable us to probe some discrepancies between stellar and gaseous structure which can be attributed to binary motion and the inclusion of non-members in our kinematic sample. Our multi-epoch data allow us to identify 89 spectroscopic binaries; more will be found as we continue monitoring. Our results reinforce the idea that the ONC is a cluster in formation, and thus provides a valuable tes...

  17. X-Ray Polarimetry with the Polarization Spectroscopic Telescope Array (PolSTAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Daniel; Ingram, Adam R; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Madsen, Kristin K; Aaron, Kim M; Aminia, Rashied; Baring, Matthew G; Bodaghee, Arash; Booth, Jeffrey; Borden, Chester; Boettcher, Markus; Christensen, Finn E; Coppi, Paolo S; Davis, Shane; Dexter, Jason; Done, Chris; Dominguez, Luis A; Ellison, Don; English, Robin J; Fabian, Andrew C; Falcone, Abe; Favretto, Jeffrey A; Fernandez, Rodrigo; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Kara, Erin; Lee, Chung H; Lyutikov, Maxim; Maccarone, Thomas; McKinney, Jonathan; Mihara, Tatehiro; Miller, Jon M; Narayan, Ramesh; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Oezel, Feryal; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Pravdo, Steven; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Okajima, Takashi; Toma, Kenji; Zhang, William W

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the Polarization Spectroscopic Telescope Array (PolSTAR), a mission proposed to NASA's 2014 Small Explorer (SMEX) announcement of opportunity. PolSTAR measures the linear polarization of 3-50 keV (requirement; goal: 2.5-70 keV) X-rays probing the behavior of matter, radiation and the very fabric of spacetime under the extreme conditions close to the event horizons of black holes, as well as in and around magnetars and neutron stars. The PolSTAR design is based on the technology developed for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission launched in June 2012. In particular, it uses the same X-ray optics, extendable telescope boom, optical bench, and CdZnTe detectors as NuSTAR. The mission has the sensitivity to measure ~1% linear polarization fractions for X-ray sources with fluxes down to ~5 mCrab. This paper describes the PolSTAR design as well as the science drivers and the potential science return.

  18. SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL METHODS FOR STUDYING THE INTERACTION OF METALLOPORPHYRIN WITH DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenari Inoue

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years studies on the interaction of porphyrin with DNA have received much attention because of the importance in DNA-probing and photodynamic therapy of cancer. A variety of spectroscopic methods, e.g. NMR, ESR, Mössbauer, UV-visible absorption, circular dichroism (CD, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD, IR and Raman spectroscopy, have been employed for studying interactions between porphyrin and DNA. Of these spectroscopic methods, only a few instrumental analytical techniques applicable to an aqueous buffer solution of DNA have been particularly developed to investigate porphyrin-DNA interactions. On the other hand, a number of physicochemical methods, e.g. gel electrophoresis, melting temperature measurements and hydrodynamic methods such as viscosity and sedimentation measurements, have been also used for determining the binding modes of porphyrin to DNA. The present lecture will focus on the application of visible absorption, CD and MCD spectroscopy as well as melting temperature and viscosity measurements to studies of porphyrin-DNA interactions.

  19. The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: The Quasar Luminosity Function from Data Release Nine

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Nicholas P; White, Martin; Richards, Gordon T; Myers, Adam D; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Yeche, Christophe; Swanson, Molly E C; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Ebelke, Garrett; Fan, Xiaohui; Ge, Jian; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Maraston, Claudia; Muna, Demitri; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Paris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Schawinski, Kevin; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Silverman, John D; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Weinberg, David H; York, Donald

    2012-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the optical Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine (DR9), we select a uniform sample of 22,301 i<=21.8 quasars over an area of 2236 sq. deg with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2probe the faint end of the QLF to M_i(z=2.2) = -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z=3.5. We find that a log-linear relation (in log[Phi*] - M*) ...

  20. FAST CARS: engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, M O; Kattawar, G W; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-08-20

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time.

  1. Probe Project Status and Accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burris, RD

    2001-05-07

    The Probe project has completed its first full year of operation. In this document we will describe the status of the project as of December 31, 2000. We will describe the equipment configuration, then give brief descriptions of the various projects undertaken to date. We will mention first those projects performed for outside entities and then those performed for the benefit of one of the Probe sites. We will then describe projects that are under consideration, including some for which initial actions have been taken and others which are somewhat longer-term.

  2. Radioactive Probes on Ferromagnetic Surfaces

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On the (broad) basis of our studies of nonmagnetic radioactive probe atoms on magnetic surfaces and at interfaces, we propose to investigate the magnetic interaction of magnetic probe atoms with their immediate environment, in particular of rare earth (RE) elements positioned on and in ferromagnetic surfaces. The preparation and analysis of the structural properties of such samples will be performed in the UHV chamber HYDRA at the HMI/Berlin. For the investigations of the magnetic properties of RE atoms on surfaces Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements and Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) are proposed.

  3. Confocal Raman spectroscopic analysis of cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene for application in artificial hip joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Kumakura, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Kiyotaka; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Puppulin, Leonardo; Zhu, Wenliang; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2007-01-01

    Confocal spectroscopic techniques are applied to selected Raman bands to study the microscopic features of acetabular cups made of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) before and after implantation in vivo. The micrometric lateral resolution of a laser beam focused on the polymeric surface (or subsurface) enables a highly resolved visualization of 2-D conformational population patterns, including crystalline, amorphous, orthorhombic phase fractions, and oxidation index. An optimized confocal probe configuration, aided by a computational deconvolution of the optical probe, allows minimization of the probe size along the in-depth direction and a nondestructive evaluation of microstructural properties along the material subsurface. Computational deconvolution is also attempted, based on an experimental assessment of the probe response function of the polyethylene Raman spectrum, according to a defocusing technique. A statistical set of high-resolution microstructural data are collected on a fully 3-D level on gamma-ray irradiated UHMWPE acetabular cups both as-received from the maker and after retrieval from a human body. Microstructural properties reveal significant gradients along the immediate material subsurface and distinct differences are found due to the loading history in vivo, which cannot be revealed by conventional optical spectroscopy. The applicability of the confocal spectroscopic technique is valid beyond the particular retrieval cases examined in this study, and can be easily extended to evaluate in-vitro tested components or to quality control of new polyethylene brands. Confocal Raman spectroscopy may also contribute to rationalize the complex effects of gamma-ray irradiation on the surface of medical grade UHMWPE for total joint replacement and, ultimately, to predict their actual lifetime in vivo.

  4. Spectroscopic analysis of LYSO:Ce crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, A. F.; Carreira, J. F. C.; Rodrigues, J.; Sedrine, N. Ben; Castro, I. F. C.; Correia, P. M. M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Rino, L.; Monteiro, T.

    2017-02-01

    Rare earth orthosilicates are among the most widely used scintillator materials in the last decades. Particularly, lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) is known to exhibit great potentialities in the field of radiation detectors for medical imaging. Consequently, an in-depth knowledge of the material properties is of utmost interest for the mentioned applications. In this work the spectroscopic properties of commercial cerium doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystals (LYSO:Ce) were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, steady state photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation and time resolved photoluminescence. Site selective excitation was used under steady state (325 nm) and pulsed (266 nm) conditions to separately investigate the temperature dependence of the 5d → 4f Ce1 and Ce2 luminescence, allowing to establish the thermal quenching dependence of the Ce2 optical center. In the case of the Ce1 optical center, a luminescence quantum efficiency of 78% was obtained from 14 K to room temperature with 266 nm photon excitation.

  5. Robust Spectroscopic Inference with Imperfect Models

    CERN Document Server

    Czekala, Ian; Mandel, Kaisey S; Hogg, David W; Green, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    We present a modular, extensible framework for the spectroscopic inference of physical parameters based on synthetic model spectra. The subtraction of an imperfect model from a continuously sampled spectrum introduces covariance between adjacent datapoints (pixels) into the residual spectrum. In the limit of high signal-to-noise data with large spectral range that is common for stellar parameter estimation, that covariant structure can bias the parameter determinations. We have designed a likelihood function formalism to account for the structure of the covariance matrix, utilizing the machinery of Gaussian process kernels. We specifically address the common problem of mismatches in model spectral line strengths (with respect to data) due to intrinsic model imperfections (e.g., in the atomic or molecular data, or radiative transfer treatment) by developing a novel local covariance kernel framework that identifies and self-consistently downweights pathological spectral line "outliers." By fitting multiple spec...

  6. Compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Hamdan, Khaled; Hewett, Jacqueline; Makaryceva, Juljia; Tait, Iain; Cuschieri, Alfred; Padgett, Miles J.

    2002-05-01

    We describe a compact fluorescence spectroscopic tool for in vivo point monitoring of aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence and autofluorescence, as a non-invasive method of differentiating normal and cancerous tissue. This instrument incorporates a 405nm diode laser with a shutter to prevent exposure of tissue to harmful light doses and reduce photobleaching, a bifurcated optical fibre to allow illumination of tissue and collection of fluorescence with a single fibre, a compact grating spectrometer for collection of spectra and a PC for system control. We present spectra obtained using this system both during routine gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy for cancer detection and during photodynamic therapy (PDT) of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) for monitoring of treatment progress. These results illustrate the potential of the system to be used for fluorescence monitoring in a variety of clinical applications.

  7. Improved spectroscopic parameters for transiting planet hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Guillermo; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Buchhave, Lars A; Winn, Joshua N; Holman, Matthew J; Carter, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    We report homogeneous spectroscopic determinations of the effective temperature, metallicity, and projected rotational velocity for the host stars of 56 transiting planets. Our analysis is based primarily on the Stellar Parameter Classification (SPC) technique. We investigate systematic errors by examining subsets of the data with two other methods that have often been used in previous studies (SME and MOOG). The SPC and SME results, both based on comparisons between synthetic spectra and actual spectra, show strong correlations between temperature, [Fe/H], and log g when solving for all three quantities simultaneously. In contrast the MOOG results, based on a more traditional curve-of-growth approach, show no such correlations. To combat the correlations and improve the accuracy of the temperatures and metallicities, we repeat the SPC analysis with a constraint on log g based on the mean stellar density that can be derived from the analysis of the transit light curves. Previous studies that have not taken ad...

  8. Spectroscopic properties of Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeva, Stanka; Dolashka, Pavlina; Bankov, Banko; Voelter, Wolfgang; Salvato, Benedeto; Genov, Nicolay

    1995-10-01

    The two major subunits of the Callinectes sapidus hemocyanin were isolated and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. They consist of 641 and 652 residues, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the structural integrity of the isolated polypeptide chains is preserved. Tryptophan fluorescence parameters were determined for the hemocyanin aggregates and for the subunits Cs1 and Cs2. The emitting tryptophyl fluorophores in the native hemocyanin are deeply buried in hydrophobic regions and are shielded from the solvent by the quaternary structure of the protein aggregates. In two subunits, obtained after dissociation of the aggregates, these residues become "exposed". It is concluded that the tryptophyl side chains in Cs1 and Cs2 are located in subunit interfaces (contact regions) in a negatively charged environment when the polypeptide chains are aggregated. Most probably they participate in hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. The environment of these fluorophores is more negatively charged after the dissociation of the aggregates to subunits.

  9. The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer: throughput optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagey, Nicolas; Mignot, Shan; Szeto, Kei; McConnachie, Alan; Murowinski, Rick

    2016-08-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) will obtain millions of optical to near-infrared spectra, at low (R 2,500) to high (R 40,000) spectral resolution, via a highly multiplexed ( 3000) fiber-fed system. Key science programs for MSE (black hole reverberation mapping, stellar population analysis at high redshift, subkm/ s velocity accuracy for stellar astrophysics) will target faint Galactic and extra-galactic targets (typical visual magnitudes up to 24). MSE will thus need to achieve the highest throughput possible over the 360 to 1800 nm wavelength range. Here we discuss building an optimized throughput budget in terms of performance allocation and technical solutions to steer the concept design studies.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of genetically modified flax fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymińska, L.; Gągor, A.; Hanuza, J.; Kulma, A.; Preisner, M.; Żuk, M.; Szatkowski, M.; Szopa, J.

    2014-09-01

    The principal goal of this paper is an analysis of flax fiber composition. Natural and genetically modified flax fibers derived from transgenic flax have been analyzed. Development of genetic engineering enables to improve the quality of fibers. Three transgenic plant lines with different modifications were generated based on fibrous flax plants as the origin. These are plants with: silenced cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) gene; overexpression of polygalacturonase (PGI); and expression of three genes construct containing β-ketothiolase (phb A), acetoacetyl-CoA reductase (phb B), and poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid synthase (phb C). Flax fibers have been studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. The integral intensities of the IR bands have been used for estimation of the chemical content of the normal and transgenic flaxes. The spectroscopic data were compared to those obtained from chemical analysis of flax fibers. X-ray studies have been used to characterize the changes of the crystalline structure of the flax cellulose fibers.

  11. Synthetic Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Indices in Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, M.; Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present a progress report on the calculation of ultraviolet spectroscopic indices by using the UVBLUE library of synthetic spectra. The ensemble of indices are aimed at complementing empirical databases for the study of stellar populations. The definitions for the set of indices are mainly those empirically built upon data collected with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Because the far-ultraviolet (far-UV) and mid-ultraviolet (mid-UV) are sensitive to quite dissimilar stellar populations, they are presented separately. We provide a few examples on the effects of the leading atmospheric parameters on index values. This analysis is, to our knowledge, the first based upon high resolution synthetic spectra and we envisage important applications on the study of stellar aggregates at UV wavelengths.

  12. XRASE: The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnopper, H.W.; Silver, E.; Murray, S.

    2001-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer (XRASE) has a unique combination of features that will make it possible to address many of NASA's scientific goals. These include how galaxy clusters form, the physics and chemistry of the ISM, the heating of stellar coronae, the amount and content of intergalactic...... baryonic matter, the mass of black holes and the formation of disks and jets in AGN and galactic binaries. XRASE has a thin foil, multilayered telescope with a large collecting area up to 10 keV, especially in the Fe K alpha region (1100 cm(2)). Its microcalorimeter array combines high energy resolution (7...... eV at 6 keV) and efficiency with a field-of-view of 26 arcmin(2) . A deep orbit allows for long, continuous observations. Monitoring instruments in the optical (WOM-X), UV (TAUVEX) and hard X-RAY (GRAM) bands will offer exceptional opportunities to make simultaneous multi-wavelength observations....

  13. Spectroscopic Confirmation of the Pisces Overdensity

    CERN Document Server

    Kollmeier, Juna A; Shectman, Stephen; Thompson, Ian B; Preston, George W; Simon, Joshua D; Crane, Jeffrey D; Ivezić, Željko; Sesar, Branimir

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of the "Pisces Overdensity", also known as "Structure J", a photometric overdensity of RR Lyrae stars discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at an estimated photometric distance of ~85kpc. We measure radial velocities for 8 RR Lyrae stars within Pisces. We find that 5 of the 8 stars have heliocentric radial velocities within a narrow range of -87 km/s < v < -67 km/s, suggesting that the photometric overdensity is mainly due to a physically associated system, probably a dwarf galaxy or a disrupted galaxy. Two of the remaining 3 stars differ from one another by only 9 km/s, but it would be premature to identify them as a second system.

  14. XRASE: The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnopper, H.W.; Silver, E.; Murray, S.

    2001-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectroscopic Explorer (XRASE) has a unique combination of features that will make it possible to address many of NASA's scientific goals. These include how galaxy clusters form, the physics and chemistry of the ISM, the heating of stellar coronae, the amount and content of intergalactic...... baryonic matter, the mass of black holes and the formation of disks and jets in AGN and galactic binaries. XRASE has a thin foil, multilayered telescope with a large collecting area up to 10 keV, especially in the Fe K alpha region (1100 cm(2)). Its microcalorimeter array combines high energy resolution (7...... eV at 6 keV) and efficiency with a field-of-view of 26 arcmin(2) . A deep orbit allows for long, continuous observations. Monitoring instruments in the optical (WOM-X), UV (TAUVEX) and hard X-RAY (GRAM) bands will offer exceptional opportunities to make simultaneous multi-wavelength observations....

  15. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Turid

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS) in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  16. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turid Knutsen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  17. Spectroscopic and chemometric exploration of food quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dorthe Kjær

    2002-01-01

    The desire to develop non-invasive rapid measurements of essential quality parameters in foods is the motivation of this thesis. Due to the speed and noninvasive properties of spectroscopic techniques, they have potential as on-line or atline methods and can be employed in the food industry...... in order to control the quality of the end product and to continuously monitor the production. In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of the application of spectroscopy and chemometrics in rapid control of food quality are discussed and demonstrated by the examples in the eight included...... publications. Different aspects of food quality are covered, but the focus is mainly on the development of multivariate calibrations for predictions of rather complex attributes such as the water-holding capacity of meat, ethical quality of the slaughtering procedure, protein content of single wheat kernels...

  18. Selective spectroscopic methods for water analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Bikas [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-06-24

    This dissertation explores in large part the development of a few types of spectroscopic methods in the analysis of water. Methods for the determination of some of the most important properties of water like pH, metal ion content, and chemical oxygen demand are investigated in detail. This report contains a general introduction to the subject and the conclusions. Four chapters and an appendix have been processed separately. They are: chromogenic and fluorogenic crown ether compounds for the selective extraction and determination of Hg(II); selective determination of cadmium in water using a chromogenic crown ether in a mixed micellar solution; reduction of chloride interference in chemical oxygen demand determination without using mercury salts; structural orientation patterns for a series of anthraquinone sulfonates adsorbed at an aminophenol thiolate monolayer chemisorbed at gold; and the role of chemically modified surfaces in the construction of miniaturized analytical instrumentation.

  19. Cosmic Ray Removal in Fiber Spectroscopic Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhongrui; Zhang, Haotong; Yuan, Hailong; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Guangwei; Lei, Yajuan; Dong, Yiqiao; Yang, Huiqin; Zhao, Yongheng; Cao, Zihuang

    2017-02-01

    Single-exposure spectra in large spectral surveys are valuable for time domain studies such as stellar variability, but there is no available method to eliminate cosmic rays for single-exposure, multi-fiber spectral images. In this paper, we describe a new method to detect and remove cosmic rays in multi-fiber spectroscopic single exposures. Through the use of two-dimensional profile fitting and a noise model that considers the position-dependent errors, we successfully detect as many as 80% of the cosmic rays and correct the cosmic ray polluted pixels to an average accuracy of 97.8%. Multiple tests and comparisons with both simulated data and real LAMOST data show that the method works properly in detection rate, false detection rate, and validity of cosmic ray correction.

  20. The Spectroscopic Variability of GRB 021004

    CERN Document Server

    Matheson, T; Foltz, C; West, S; Williams, G; Falco, E E; Calkins, M L; Castander, F J; Gawiser, E; Jha, S; Bersier, D F; Stanek, K Z

    2003-01-01

    We present spectra of the optical transient (OT) associated with GRB 021004. The spectra show a blue continuum with superposed absorption features and one emission line. There are two intervening metal-line systems at z = 1.380 and z = 1.602 and one very strong absorption system at a redshift of z = 2.323. Ly_alpha emission is also seen at this redshift. While the spectrum of the OT overall cannot be simply described with a power law, the spectral index over the range 5500-8850 A is steep, F_nu prop nu^(-0.96 +/- 0.03). Comparison of spectra from multiple epochs shows a distinct color evolution with the OT becoming redder with time, implying a B-V increase of ~0.2-0.3 mag over the first three days. This is the first clear example of color change in an OT detected spectroscopically.

  1. Spectroscopic sensitive polarimeter for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Nayak, Amritha; Prahl, Scott A

    2011-04-01

    We present the design and calibration of a spectroscopic sensitive polarimeter. The polarimeter can measure the full Stokes vector in the wavelength range 550 to 750 nm with 1-nm resolution and consists of a fiber-based spectrophotometer, a white light emitting diode light source, two liquid crystal retarders, and one polarizer. Calibration of the system is achieved with a scheme that does not require knowledge of the polarizing elements' orientation or retardation. Six intensity spectra are required to calculate the full spectrum Stokes vector. Error in the polarimeter is less than 5%. We report the Stokes vectors for light transmitted through nonscattering polarizing elements as well as a measurement of the depolarizing properties of chicken muscle at several wavelengths.

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Studies in Flotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been extensively employed in flotation research.The work done by the author and co-workers has been reported.A comparison has been made among the different FTIR spectroscopic techniques,e.g.,transmission FTIR spectroscopy,diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy,and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy.FTIR spectroscopy has been used to study the mechanism of interaction between the collector and the surfaces of different minerals,the mechanism of action of the depressant in improving the selectivity of flotation,and the mechanism of adsorption of the polymeric modifying reagent on mineral surfaces.The interaction between particles in mineral suspension has also been studied by FTIR spectroscopy.

  3. Characterization of Extended Time Scale 2d IR Probes of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Sashary; Le Sueur, Amanda L.; Scott, Keith J.; Thielges, Megan

    2017-06-01

    The role of dynamics in the function of proteins is well appreciated, but not precisely understood due to the difficulty in their measurement. Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy is a powerful approach for the study of protein dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. This approach has led to the development of spectrally resolved IR probes that can be applied towards the measurement of dynamics at specific sites in a protein. However, the experimental time scale is limited by the vibrational lifetime of the probe, as such their remains a need for extended time scale probes. Towards the development of better 2D IR probes for the study of protein dynamics the spectroscopic characterization of p-cyano-seleno-phenylalanine (CNSePhe), isotopically labeled p-(^{13}C^{15}N-cyano)phenylalanine (^{13}C^{15}NPhe) and the site-specific incorporation of ^{13}C^{15}NPhe in the protein plastocyanin is discussed. The incorporation of the heavy Se atom and the isotopic labeling are shown to increase the vibrational lifetime of the probe which results in collection of 2D IR spectra for analysis of dynamics on longer timescales.

  4. Spectroscopic neutron detection using composite scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, I.; Foster, A.; Kukharev, V.; Mayer, M.; Meddeb, A.; Nattress, J.; Ounaies, Z.; Trivelpiece, C.

    2016-09-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM), especially highly enriched uranium, is exceptionally difficult to detect without the use of active interrogation (AI). We are investigating the potential use of low-dose active interrogation to realize simultaneous high-contrast imaging and photofission of SNM using energetic gamma-rays produced by low-energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C and 12C(p,p‧)12C. Neutrons produced via fission are one reliable signature of the presence of SNM and are usually identified by their unique timing characteristics, such as the delayed neutron die-away. Fast neutron spectroscopy may provide additional useful discriminating characteristics for SNM detection. Spectroscopic measurements can be conducted by recoil-based or thermalization and capture-gated detectors; the latter may offer unique advantages since they facilitate low-statistics and event-by-event neutron energy measurements without spectrum unfolding. We describe the results of the development and characterization of a new type of capture-gated spectroscopic neutron detector based on a composite of scintillating polyvinyltoluene and lithium-doped scintillating glass in the form of millimeter-thick rods. The detector achieves >108 neutron-gamma discrimination resulting from its geometric properties and material selection. The design facilitates simultaneous pulse shape and pulse height discrimination, despite the fact that no materials intrinsically capable of pulse shape discrimination have been used to construct the detector. Accurate single-event measurements of neutron energy may be possible even when the energy is relatively low, such as with delayed fission neutrons. Simulation and preliminary measurements using the new composite detector are described, including those conducted using radioisotope sources and the low-dose active interrogation system based on low-energy nuclear reactions.

  5. Spectroscopic detection of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Ines; Grüner, Roman; Matthäus, Christian; Dietzek, Benjamin; Werncke, W.; Lademann, Jürgen; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    The hand-foot-syndrome presents a severe dermal side-effect of chemotherapeutic cancer treatment. The cause of this side-effect is the elimination of systemically administered chemotherapeutics with the sweat. Transported to the skin surface, the drugs subsequently penetrate into the skin in the manner of topically applied substances. Upon accumulation of the chemotherapeutics in the skin the drugs destroy cells and tissue - in the same way as they are supposed to act in cancer cells. Aiming at the development of strategies to illuminate the molecular mechanism underlying the handfoot- syndrome (and, in a second step, strategies to prevent this severe side-effect), it might be important to evaluate the concentration and distribution of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants in the human skin. The latter can be estimated by the carotenoid concentration, as carotenoids serve as marker substances for the dermal antioxidative status.Following the objectives outlined above, this contribution presents a spectroscopic study aiming at the detection and quantification of carotenoids and selected chemotherapeutics in human skin. To this end, spontaneous Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy are combined with two-photon excited fluorescence. While the latter technique is Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to your MySPIE To Do List at http://myspie.org and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval.restricted to the detection of fluorescent chemotherapeutics, e.g., doxorubicin, the vibrational spectroscopic techniques can - in principle - be applied to any type of analyte molecules. Furthermore, we will present the

  6. Highlights of the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.; Mészárosová, H.; Faria, C.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Karlický, M.; de Andrade, M. C.

    2009-07-01

    The digital, decimetric (950-2500 MHz) Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS, Sawant, H.S., Subramanian, K.R., Faria, C., et al. Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS). Solar Phys. 200, 167-176, 2001) with high time (10-1000 ms) and frequency (1-10 MHz) resolution is in regular operation since April, 1998, at the National Space Research Institute (INPE) at São José dos Campos, Brazil. The BSS has now been upgraded with a new digital data acquisition and data processing system. The new version of the BSS has improved the observational possibilities with the capability to record up to 200 frequency channels available in the selectable frequency range 950-2500 MHz. The GPS receiver permits the acquisition of data with time accuracy in the order of 0.1 ms. The software system of the BSS is composed by two distinct modules: the first, data acquisition system provides a flexible Graphical User Interface (GUI) that allows one to choose the observational parameters. The second module is the real time visualization system that permits real time visualization of the observed dynamic spectrum and additionally allows procedures for visualization and preliminary analysis of the recorded solar spectra. Using the new visualization system, we have realized two new types of dm-radio fine structures: narrow band type III bursts with positive as well as negative group frequency drift and dots emissions arranged in zebra-like and fiber-like chains. Furthermore, we have found flare generated fast wave trains according to their tadpole signature in wavelet power spectra for a decimetric type IV radio event (June 6, 2000 flare).

  7. Electroless nickel plating on optical fiber probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Huang; Zhoufeng Wang; Zhuomin Li; Wenli Deng

    2009-01-01

    As a component of near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM),optical fiber probe is an important factor influncing the equipment resolution.Electroless nickel plating is introduced to metallize the optical fiber probe.The optical fibers are etched by 40% HF with Turner etching method.Through pretreatment,the optical fiber probe is coated with Ni-P film by clectrolcss plating in a constant temperature water tank.Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDXS) are carried out to charaeterizc the deposition on fiber probe.We have rcproducibly fabricated two kinds of fiber probes with a Ni-P fihn:aperture probe and apertureless probe.In addition,reductive particle transportation on the surface of fiber probe is proposed to explain the cause of these probes.

  8. Characterization of near-field optical probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and collection characteristics of four different near-field optical-fiber probes, namely, three uncoated probes and an aluminium-coated small-aperture probe, are investigated and compared. Their radiation properties are characterized by observation of light-induced topography changes...... in a photo-sensitive film illuminated with the probes, and it is confirmed that the radiated optical field is unambigiously confined only for the coated probe. Near-field optical imaging of a standing evanescent-wave pattern is used to compare the detection characteristics of the probes, and it is concluded...... that, for the imaging of optical-field intensity distributions containing predominantly evanescent-wave components, a sharp uncoated tip is the probe of choice. Complementary results obtained with optical phase-conjugation experiments with he uncoated probes are discussed in relation to the probe...

  9. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  10. Health. CEM Probe, January 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Roy

    The importance of health and its relationship to personal and community life are explored in this issue of PROBE. Designed to acquaint British secondary school youth with topical problems, the series contains discussion and case studies of national and world issues, followed by questions for student discussion and research. Nine chapters comprise…

  11. Local probe of fractional edge states of S=1 Heisenberg spin chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F; Batista, C D; Fernández-Rossier, J

    2013-10-18

    Spin chains are among the simplest physical systems in which electron-electron interactions induce novel states of matter. Here we propose to combine atomic scale engineering and spectroscopic capabilities of state of the art scanning tunnel microscopy to probe the fractionalized edge states of individual atomic scale S=1 spin chains. These edge states arise from the topological order of the ground state in the Haldane phase. We also show that the Haldane gap and the spin-spin correlation length can be measured with the same technique.

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of a new colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescence probe for copper ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, Har Mohindra, E-mail: hmchawla@chemistry.iitd.ernet.in; Munjal, Priyanka; Goel, Preeti

    2015-08-15

    Synthesis and spectroscopic evaluation of compounds 3a, 3b and 4 reveal that cone conformer of 25,27-bis(o-aminothiophenyl propyloxy) -tetra-p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene 3a can function as a highly selective ratiometric and colorimetric fluorescence probe for copper ions. - Highlights: • We have synthesized a new calixarene based receptor 3 for Cu{sup 2+}. • 3 Showed ratiometric changes with Cu{sup 2+} in emission spectrum. • Reference compound 4 showed quenching with Cu{sup 2+} in emission spectrum. • Importance of calix[4]arene platform in ion recognition.

  13. Comparison of vibrational dynamics between non-ionic and ionic vibrational probes in water: Experimental study with two-dimensional infrared and infrared pump-probe spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Masaki; Ohta, Kaoru; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    Dynamics of the hydration structure around small vibrational probes have been extensively studied over the past few decades. However, we need to gain insight into how vibrational dynamics is affected by the molecular nature of the probe molecules in water. In this study, 2-nitro-5-thiocyanate benzoic acid (NTBA), which has an SCN group attached to an aromatic ring, and thiocyanate ion (SCN-) were used to investigate the vibrational dynamics of two vibrational probes, including vibrational frequency fluctuations and rotational relaxation. By performing two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic measurements, the vibrational frequency fluctuations of the SCN anti-stretching modes of these solutes were compared. The frequency-frequency time correlation function (FFTCF) of these solutes can be modeled by a delta function plus an exponential function and a constant. The FFTCF of NTBA was characterized by a time constant of 1.1 ps, which is similar to that of SCN-. Moreover, no component was longer than this constant. Consequently, the loss of the correlation in frequency fluctuations of the SCN anti-stretching mode of NTBA may be controlled by a mechanism similar to that of the ionic probe, which involves the hydrogen bonding dynamics of water. Polarization-controlled IR pump-probe measurements were performed for these vibrational probes in water to study the vibrational energy relaxation (VER) and reorientational relaxation processes. The VER rate of NTBA is much smaller than that of SCN-, which indicates that the intramolecular relaxation process is significant for VER of NTBA. Based on the rotational relaxation time of NTBA being shorter than that of SCN-, the internal rotational motion of the SCN group around the Cphenyl-S bond axis, where Cphenyl denotes a carbon atom of the aromatic ring to which the SCN group is attached, may play an important role in the anisotropic decay of NTBA in H2O.

  14. High pressure optical combustion probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  15. The Subsurface Ice Probe (SIPR): A Low-Power Thermal Probe for the Martian Polar Layered Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardell, G.; Hecht, M. H.; Carsey, F. D.; Engelhardt, H.; Fisher, D.; Terrell, C.; Thompson, J.

    2004-01-01

    The distinctive layering visible in images from Mars Global Surveyor of the Martian polar caps, and particularly in the north polar cap, indicates that the stratigraphy of these polar layered deposits may hold a record of Martian climate history covering millions of years. On Earth, ice sheets are cored to retrieve a pristine record of the physical and chemical properties of the ice at depth, and then studied in exacting detail in the laboratory. On the Martian north polar cap, coring is probably not a practical method for implementation in an autonomous lander. As an alternative, thermal probes that drill by melting into the ice are feasible for autonomous operation, and are capable of reasonable approximations to the scientific investigations performed on terrestrial cores, while removing meltwater to the surface for analysis. The Subsurface Ice Probe (SIPR) is such a probe under development at JPL. To explore the dominant climate cycles, it is postulated that tens of meters of depth should be profiled, as this corresponds to the vertical separation of the major layers visible in the MOC images [1]. Optical and spectroscopic analysis of the layers, presumably demarcated by embedded dust and possibly by changes in the ice properties, would contribute to the construction of a chronology. Meltwater analysis may be used to determine the soluble chemistry of the embedded dust, and to monitor gradients of atmospheric gases, particularly hydrogen and oxygen, and isotopic variations that reflect atmospheric conditions at the time the layer was deposited. Thermal measurements can be used to determine the geothermal gradient and the bulk mechanical properties of the ice.

  16. Gauss-Newton based kurtosis blind deconvolution of spectroscopic data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghe Yuan; Ziqiang Hu

    2006-01-01

    @@ The spectroscopic data recorded by dispersion spectrophotometer are usually degraded by the response function of the instrument. To improve the resolving power, double or triple cascade spectrophotometer and narrow slits have been employed, but the total flux of the radiation decreases accordingly, resulting in a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a longer measuring time. However, the spectral resolution can be improved by mathematically removing the effect of the instrument response function. Based on the ShalviWeinstein criterion, a Gauss-Newton based kurtosis blind deconvolution algorithm for spectroscopic data is proposed. Experiments with some real measured Raman spectroscopic data show that this algorithm has excellent deconvolution capability.

  17. Stellar Abundance and Galactic Chemical Evolution through LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Zhao; Yu-Qin Chen; Jian-RongShi; Yan-Chun Liang; Jin-Liang Hou; Li Chen; Hua-Wei Zhang; Ai-Gen Li

    2006-01-01

    A project of a spectroscopic survey of Galactic structure and evolution with a Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is presented. The spectroscopic survey consists of two observational modes for various targets in our Galaxy. One is a major survey of the Milky Way aimed at a systematic study of the stellar abundance and Galactic chemical evolution through low resolution (R=1000 - 2000) spectroscopy.Another is a follow-up observation with medium resolution (R=10000) spectrographs aimed at detailed studies of the selected stars with different chemical composition, kinematicsand dynamics.

  18. A COMPARISON OF SPECTROSCOPIC VERSUS IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING CLOSE COMPANIONS TO KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teske, Johanna K. [Carnegie DTM, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Hirsch, Lea [Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Furlan, Elise; Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Horch, Elliott P. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Gonzales, Erica; Crepp, Justin R., E-mail: jteske@carnegiescience.edu [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Kepler planet candidates require both spectroscopic and imaging follow-up observations to rule out false positives and detect blended stars. Traditionally, spectroscopy and high-resolution imaging have probed different host star companion parameter spaces, the former detecting tight binaries and the latter detecting wider bound companions as well as chance background stars. In this paper, we examine a sample of 11 Kepler host stars with companions detected by two techniques—near-infrared adaptive optics and/or optical speckle interferometry imaging, and a new spectroscopic deblending method. We compare the companion effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and flux ratios (F{sub B}/F{sub A}, where A is the primary and B is the companion) derived from each technique and find no cases where both companion parameters agree within 1σ errors. In 3/11 cases the companion T{sub eff} values agree within 1σ errors, and in 2/11 cases the companion F{sub B}/F{sub A} values agree within 1σ errors. Examining each Kepler system individually considering multiple avenues (isochrone mapping, contrast curves, probability of being bound), we suggest two cases for which the techniques most likely agree in their companion detections (detect the same companion star). Overall, our results support the advantage that the spectroscopic deblending technique has for finding very close-in companions (θ ≲ 0.″02–0.″05) that are not easily detectable with imaging. However, we also specifically show how high-contrast AO and speckle imaging observations detect companions at larger separations (θ ≥ 0.″02–0.″05) that are missed by the spectroscopic technique, provide additional information for characterizing the companion and its potential contamination (e.g., position angle, separation, magnitude differences), and cover a wider range of primary star effective temperatures. The investigation presented here illustrates the utility of combining the two techniques to reveal higher

  19. Applied analytics' TLG-837 - the tail gas probe unlike any other

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    In sulfur recovery, toxic hydrogen sulfide from oil or natural gas is removed by refining and converted into harmless elemental sulfur that is used for storage or sold. One of the difficulties during this process is to deal with the opaque sulfur vapor in the stream, which either condenses and fouls mechanisms, or distorts spectroscopic measurements. This paper presents an applied analytics tail gas analyzer that uses an innovative approach with a demister probe to neutralize the sulfur vapor problem. During the Claus process, water and elemental sulfur are created when H2S and SO2 react and the difficulty arises from the presence of elemental sulfur vapor throughout the process stream. Due to its relatively high boiling point, condensation of this substance clogs mechanical cavities and coats optical windows. The demister probe actively condenses sulfur vapor out of the sample in a controlled environment.

  20. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  1. Overview of Probe-based Storage Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Ci Hui; Wen, Jing; Gong, Si Di; Peng, Yuan Xiu

    2016-07-01

    The current world is in the age of big data where the total amount of global digital data is growing up at an incredible rate. This indeed necessitates a drastic enhancement on the capacity of conventional data storage devices that are, however, suffering from their respective physical drawbacks. Under this circumstance, it is essential to aggressively explore and develop alternative promising mass storage devices, leading to the presence of probe-based storage devices. In this paper, the physical principles and the current status of several different probe storage devices, including thermo-mechanical probe memory, magnetic probe memory, ferroelectric probe memory, and phase-change probe memory, are reviewed in details, as well as their respective merits and weakness. This paper provides an overview of the emerging probe memories potentially for next generation storage device so as to motivate the exploration of more innovative technologies to push forward the development of the probe storage devices.

  2. Molecular interaction of PCB153 to human serum albumin: Insights from spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chao; Fang, Senbiao; Cao, Huiming; Lu, Yan; Ma, Yaqiong [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wei, Dongfeng [Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700 (China); Xie, Xiaoyun [College of Earth and Environmental Science, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Xiaohua [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Xin [College of Food and Bioengineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China); Fei, Dongqing [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhao, Chunyan, E-mail: zhaochy07@lzu.edu.cn [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► We identify the binding mode of PCB153 to human serum albumin (HSA). ► Spectroscopic and molecular modeling results reveal that PCB153 binds at the site II. ► The interaction is mainly governed by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond forces. ► The work helps to probe transporting, distribution and toxicity effect of PCBs. -- Abstract: Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) possessed much potential hazard to environment because of its chemical stability and biological toxicity. Here, we identified the binding mode of a representative compound, PCB153, to human serum albumin (HSA) using fluorescence and molecular dynamics simulation methods. The fluorescence study showed that the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA was quenched by addition of PCB153 through a static quenching mechanism. The thermodynamic analysis proved the binding behavior was mainly governed by hydrophobic force. Furthermore, as evidenced by site marker displacement experiments using two probe compounds, it revealed that PCB153 acted exactly on subdomain IIIA (site II) of HSA. On the other hand, the molecular dynamics studies as well as free energy calculations made another important contribution to understand the conformational changes of HSA and the stability of HSA-PCB153 system. Molecular docking revealed PCB153 can bind in a large hydrophobic activity of subdomain IIIA by the hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond interactions between chlorine atoms and residue ASN391. The present work provided reasonable models helping us further understand the transporting, distribution and toxicity effect of PCBs when it spread into human blood serum.

  3. Direct visualization of both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in human cells via an uncommon spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguerre, Aurélien; Wong, Judy M. Y.; Monchaud, David

    2016-01-01

    Guanine-rich DNA or RNA sequences can fold into higher-order, four-stranded structures termed quadruplexes that are suspected to play pivotal roles in cellular mechanisms including the control of the genome integrity and gene expression. However, the biological relevance of quadruplexes is still a matter of debate owing to the paucity of unbiased evidences of their existence in cells. Recent reports on quadruplex-specific antibodies and small-molecule fluorescent probes help dispel reservations and accumulating evidences now pointing towards the cellular relevance of quadruplexes. To better assess and comprehend their biology, developing new versatile tools to detect both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in cells is essential. We report here a smart fluorescent probe that allows for the simple detection of quadruplexes thanks to an uncommon spectroscopic mechanism known as the red-edge effect (REE). We demonstrate that this effect could open avenues to greatly enhance the ability to visualize both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in human cells, using simple protocols and fluorescence detection facilities. PMID:27535322

  4. Corrosion detection in steel-reinforced concrete using a spectroscopic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Stutzman, P. E.; Wang, S.; Martys, N. S.; Hassan, A. M.; Duthinh, D.; Provenzano, V.; Chou, S. G.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Surek, J. T.; Kim, S.; McMichael, R. D.; Stiles, M. D.

    2014-02-01

    Detecting the early corrosion of steel that is embedded in reinforced concrete (rebar) is a goal that would greatly facilitate the inspection and measurement of corrosion in the US physical infrastructure. Since 2010, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been working on a large project to develop an electromagnetic (EM) probe that detects the specific corrosion products via spectroscopic means. Several principal iron corrosion products, such as hematite and goethite, are antiferromagnetic at field temperatures. At a given applied EM frequency, which depends on temperature, these compounds undergo a unique absorption resonance that identifies the presence of these particular iron corrosion products. The frequency of the resonances tends to be on the order of 100 GHz or higher, so transmitting EM waves through the cover concrete and back out again at a detectable level has been challenging. NIST has successfully detected these two iron corrosion products, and is developing equipment and methodologies that will be capable of penetrating the typical 50 mm of cover concrete in the field. The novel part of this project is the detection of specific compounds, rather than only geometrical changes in rebar cross-section. This method has the potential of providing an early-corrosion probe for steel in reinforced concrete, and for other applications where steel is covered by various layers and coatings.

  5. Thermomorphic phase separation in ionic liquid-organic liquid systems - conductivity and spectroscopic characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Berg, Rolf W.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, FT-Raman and NMR measurements are demonstrated as useful tools to probe and determine phase behavior of thermomorphic ionic liquid-organic liquid systems. To illustrate the methods, consecutive conductivity measurements of a thermomorphic methoxyethoxyethyl-imidazolium io...... of the components in the system, the liquid-liquid equilibrium phase diagram of the binary mixture, and signify the importance of hydrogen bonding between the ionic liquid and the hydroxyl group of the alcohol.......Electrical conductivity, FT-Raman and NMR measurements are demonstrated as useful tools to probe and determine phase behavior of thermomorphic ionic liquid-organic liquid systems. To illustrate the methods, consecutive conductivity measurements of a thermomorphic methoxyethoxyethyl......-imidazolium ionic liquid/1-hexanol system are performed in the temperature interval 25-80 degrees C using a specially constructed double-electrode cell. In addition, FT-Raman and H-1-NMR spectroscopic studies performed on the phase-separable system in the same temperature interval confirm the mutual solubility...

  6. Where do pulse oximeter probes break?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crede, S; Van der Merwe, G; Hutchinson, J; Woods, D; Karlen, W; Lawn, J

    2014-06-01

    Pulse oximetry, a non-invasive method for accurate assessment of blood oxygen saturation (SPO2), is an important monitoring tool in health care facilities. However, it is often not available in many low-resource settings, due to expense, overly sophisticated design, a lack of organised procurement systems and inadequate medical device management and maintenance structures. Furthermore medical devices are often fragile and not designed to withstand the conditions of low-resource settings. In order to design a probe, better suited to the needs of health care facilities in low-resource settings this study aimed to document the site and nature of pulse oximeter probe breakages in a range of different probe designs in a low to middle income country. A retrospective review of job cards relating to the assessment and repair of damaged or faulty pulse oximeter probes was conducted at a medical device repair company based in Cape Town, South Africa, specializing in pulse oximeter probe repairs. 1,840 job cards relating to the assessment and repair of pulse oximeter probes were reviewed. 60.2 % of probes sent for assessment were finger-clip probes. For all probes, excluding the neonatal wrap probes, the most common point of failure was the probe wiring (>50 %). The neonatal wrap most commonly failed at the strap (51.5 %). The total cost for quoting on the broken pulse oximeter probes and for the subsequent repair of devices, excluding replacement components, amounted to an estimated ZAR 738,810 (USD $98,508). Improving the probe wiring would increase the life span of pulse oximeter probes. Increasing the life span of probes will make pulse oximetry more affordable and accessible. This is of high priority in low-resource settings where frequent repair or replacement of probes is unaffordable or impossible.

  7. Probing zeolites by vibrational spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordiga, Silvia; Lamberti, Carlo; Bonino, Francesca; Travert, Arnaud; Thibault-Starzyk, Frédéric

    2015-10-21

    This review addresses the most relevant aspects of vibrational spectroscopies (IR, Raman and INS) applied to zeolites and zeotype materials. Surface Brønsted and Lewis acidity and surface basicity are treated in detail. The role of probe molecules and the relevance of tuning both the proton affinity and the steric hindrance of the probe to fully understand and map the complex site population present inside microporous materials are critically discussed. A detailed description of the methods needed to precisely determine the IR absorption coefficients is given, making IR a quantitative technique. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process that can be extracted from a variable-temperature IR study are described. Finally, cutting-edge space- and time-resolved experiments are reviewed. All aspects are discussed by reporting relevant examples. When available, the theoretical literature related to the reviewed experimental results is reported to support the interpretation of the vibrational spectra on an atomic level.

  8. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-04-17

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications.

  9. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with silver-coated optical fiber probe in reflection mode for investigating multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Jia; Hao, Fenghuan; Zhang, Mingqian; Tian, Qian

    2010-04-01

    We developed a tip-enhanced Raman spectrometer (TERS) with reflection mode. The instrument, with a scanning shear-force microscope (ShFM) and a side-illumination Raman spectroscope, can overcome the diffraction limit and has high sensitivity. A chemical method to fabricate optical fiber probes with Ag coating is proposed. The local electromagnetic responses of the silver-coated optical fiber probe are numerically analyzed by the finite-difference time-domain method, and the excitation wavelength is optimized to resonate with the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the probe tip. The instrument is applied to investigate a single multiwall carbon nanotube. The experiment results indicate that our TERS instrument has a spatial resolution better than 70 nm, and the enhancement factor is about 5 x 10(3).

  10. Distance probes of dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Finley, D. A.; Freedman, W. L.; Ho, S.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S. M.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Linder, E. V.; Martini, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rubin, D.; Sako, M.; Suntzeff, N. V.; Suzuki, N.; Thomas, R. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Woosley, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  11. Probing the Tautomerism of Histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, C.; Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of histidine, showing a complex nuclear quadrupole interactions arising from three ^{14}N nuclei in non-equivalent positions have been resolved and completely analyzed. Solid samples (m.p. 290°C) were vaporized by laser ablation and probed by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in a supersonic expansion. The experimental constants clearly lead to the unambiguous identification of the \\varepsilon tautomer in the gas phase.

  12. Distance Probes of Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, A; Aldering, G; Allen, S; Baltay, C; Cahn, R; D'Andrea, C; Dalal, N; Dawson, K; Denney, K; Eisenstein, D; Finley, D; Freedman, W; Ho, S; Holz, D; Kent, A; Kasen, D; Kessler, R; Kuhlmann, S; Linder, E; Martini, P; Nugent, P; Perlmutter, S; Peterson, B; Riess, A; Rubin, D; Sako, M; Suntzeff, N; Suzuki, N; Thomas, R; Wood-Vasey, W M; Woosley, S

    2013-01-01

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type IA supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  13. Chemomechanics with Molecular Force Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    probe should have [25,26]: (1) a size that is small enough to allow high-level quantum -chemical calcu- lations of geometries and energies of...macrocycles makes them amenable to high-level quantum -chemical calculations, which yield restoring forces without the ambi- guities intrinsic to...reactions to be measured and in- terpreted structurally and mechanistically by integrating molecular design, synthesis, kinetic/ mechanis - tic studies and

  14. Synthesis and Spectroscopic Analysis of Schiff Bases of Imesatin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Keywords: Schiff bases, isatin, imesatin, spectroscopic analysis, biological activity. Isatin (1H-indole-2, 3-Dione) ... groups during complex or sensitive reactions (Raman et al., 2007). ..... Derivatives for Antimicrobial Activity, Journal of. Sciences ...

  15. Spectroscopic Classification of PS16ccj with Mayall/KOSMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-05-01

    We report the classification of PS16ccj from spectroscopic observation with KOSMOS on the Mayall telescope. The observation was made on 2016 May 05 UT. We classify PS16ccj as a SN Ia near maximum light.

  16. Spectroscopic factors for two-proton radioactive nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chinmay Basu

    2004-11-01

    Spectroscopic factors for two-proton emitting nuclei are discussed in the framework of the BCS (Bardeen–Cooper–Schriefer) model. Calculations carried out for the two-proton unstable 45Fe, 48Ni and 54Zn nuclei are presented.

  17. Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Andrew V; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2017-01-16

    Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, are robust, label free and inherently non-destructive methods with a high chemical specificity and sensitivity that are frequently employed in forensic science research and practices. This review aims to discuss the applications and recent developments of these methodologies in this field. Furthermore, the use of recently emerged Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging in transmission, external reflection and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) modes are summarised with relevance and potential for forensic science applications. This spectroscopic imaging approach provides the opportunity to obtain the chemical composition of fingermarks and information about possible contaminants deposited at a crime scene. Research that demonstrates the great potential of these techniques for analysis of fingerprint residues, explosive materials and counterfeit drugs will be reviewed. The implications of this research for the examination of different materials are considered, along with an outlook of possible future research avenues for the application of vibrational spectroscopic methods to the analysis of forensic samples.

  18. SALT Spectroscopic classification of nuclear transient Gaia16cac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanowicz, A.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Buckley, David; Whitelock, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of a nuclear transient Gaia16cac discovered by Gaia. The spectrum was obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the South African Large Telescope (SALT).

  19. A Comparison of Galaxy Counting Techniques in Spectroscopically Undersampled Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measures of galactic overdensities are invaluable for precision cosmology. Obtaining these measurements is complicated when members of one’s galaxy sample lack radial depths, most commonly derived via spectroscopic redshifts. In this paper, we utilize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Main Galaxy Sample to compare seven methods of counting galaxies in cells when many of those galaxies lack redshifts. These methods fall into three categories: assigning galaxies discrete redshifts, scaling the numbers counted using regions’ spectroscopic completeness properties, and employing probabilistic techniques. We split spectroscopically undersampled regions into three types—those inside the spectroscopic footprint, those outside but adjacent to it, and those distant from it. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the preferred counting techniques are a function of region type, cell size, and redshift. We conclude by reporting optimal counting strategies under a variety of conditions.

  20. ITER perspective on fusion reactor diagnostics - A spectroscopic view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bock, M. F. M.; Barnsley, R.; Bassan, M.

    2016-01-01

    challenges to the development of spectroscopic (but also other) diagnostics. This contribution presents an overview of recent achievements in 4 topical areas: First mirror protection and cleaning, Nuclear confinement, Radiation mitigation strategy for optical and electronic components and Calibration...

  1. Flying Probe Tester: Architecture, Principle and Implementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu,Xu; Fang,Kangling; Chen,Guoqing

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the flying probe tester, which is a testing device for PCB. The architecture and principle of flying probe tester are firstly introduced. Then the implementation of hardware and software is illuminated briefly. Finally, the optimizing method for the probe's moving path is researched based on the traveling salesman problem.

  2. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopic behaviour of folic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2010-02-08

    The fluorescence spectroscopic behaviour of folic acid (FA) in 4 M HCl (dominant bi-cationic form), 0.1 M HCl (bi-cationic and cationic form), citric acid-NaOH pH 6 buffer (neutral form), 0.1 M and 4 M KOH (anionic form), and trifluoroacetic acid is studied. The thermal stability is investigated. Absolute absorption cross-section spectra are determined and compared with fluorescence excitation spectra. Intrinsic fluorescence quantum distributions and fluorescence quantum yields are extracted from fluorescence spectra measurements. The temporal fluorescence decay after picosecond pulse excitation is studied. The fluorescence quenching mechanisms for the different ionic forms of FA are discussed: excited-state proton release for bi-cationic FA, photo-physical non-radiative relaxation for cationic FA, and photo-induced intra-molecular electron transfer for neutral and anionic FA. Aerobic FA in 4 M KOH at elevated temperature dehydrated to 9,10-dehydro-folic acid. Its photo-dynamics was governed by twisted intra-molecular charge transfer and photo-isomerisation.

  4. How spectroscopic ellipsometry can aid graphene technology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria, E-mail: maria.losurdo@cnr.it; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni

    2014-11-28

    We explore the effects of substrate, grain size, oxidation and cleaning on the optical properties of chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline monolayer graphene exploiting spectroscopic ellipsometry in the NIR-Vis–UV range. Both Drude–Lorentz oscillators' and point-by-point fit approaches are used to analyze the ellipsometric spectra. For monolayer graphene, since anisotropy cannot be resolved, an isotropic model is used. A prominent absorption peak at approximately 4.8 eV, which is a mixture of π–π* interband transitions at the M-point of the Brillouin zone and of the π-plasmonic excitation, is observed. We discuss the sensitivity of this peak to the structural and cleaning quality of graphene. The comparison with previous published dielectric function spectra of graphene is discussed giving a rationale for the observed differences. - Highlights: • Optical properties of graphene are determined by ellipsometry on copper and on glass. • Optical spectra reveal the cleaning quality of transferred graphene. • Sensitivity of absorption peak to graphene structural quality is proven. • Optical properties are proven to be sensitive to oxidation of graphene. • Electronic interaction with substrate affects graphene optical properties.

  5. HEXA: a machine for spectroscopic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrado, D.; Aceituno, J.; Galadí, D.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2013-05-01

    We have performed a conceptual and viability study for HEXA, a 6.5 m aperture, wide-field telescope, with high multiplexing factor, framed in the strategic plan for the Calar Alto observatory in 2014-2018 and beyond, centred on the scientific cases arisen from the current need for wide-field spectroscopic surveys with very large multiplexing capability. The baseline design considers a field-of-view of 1.5°, multiplexing factor around or over 500 and possible spectral resolutions in the interval R = 5000 - 50 000, with instruments placed on two Nasmyth platforms. Other variants are also considered, including Ritchey-Chrétien and prime-focus solutions. The telescope concept is described, together with the instruments that have already undergone, or that are still undergoing, the conceptual design process: CEO, an innovative Imaging Fourier Transform spectrograph. GEA, a Gaia-inspired drift-scanning slitless spectrograph. BRONTESS, a fast and simple camera for guiding and ToO work. A PMAS-based multi-IFU, highly multiplexed spectrograph. And the multi-fibre spectrograph GYGES. Some of the instrument concepts analysed are based on the versatile fiber-positioner HECATE (with a minimum of 361 positioners). Some of the fibre-based instruments would allow, too, fibres entering a battery of CAF{É}-type high-res spectrographs.

  6. The spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Langer, N

    2014-01-01

    The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is an essential diagnostic diagram for stellar structure and evolution, which has now been in use for more than 100 years. Our spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell (sHR) diagram shows the inverse of the flux-mean gravity versus the effective temperature. Observed stars whose spectra have been quantitatively analyzed can be entered in this diagram without the knowledge of the stellar distance or absolute brightness. Observed stars can be as conveniently compared to stellar evolution calculations in the sHR diagram as in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. However, at the same time, our ordinate is proportional to the stellar mass-to-luminosity ratio, which can thus be directly determined. For intermediate- and low-mass star evolution at constant mass, we show that the shape of an evolutionary track in the sHR diagram is identical to that in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We also demonstrate that for hot stars, their stellar Eddington factor can be directly read off the sHR diagram. ...

  7. Spectroscopic studies in open quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rotter, I; Pichugin, K N; Seba, P

    2000-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of an open quantum system are determined by theeigenvalues and eigenfunctions of an effective Hamiltonian H consisting of theHamiltonian H_0 of the corresponding closed system and a non-Hermitiancorrection term W arising from the interaction via the continuum of decaychannels. The eigenvalues E_R of H are complex. They are the poles of theS-matrix and provide both the energies and widths of the states. We illustratethe interplay between Re(H) and Im(H) by means of the different interferencephenomena between two neighboured resonance states. Level repulsion along thereal axis appears if the interaction is caused mainly by Re(H) while abifurcation of the widths appears if the interaction occurs mainly due toIm(H). We then calculate the poles of the S-matrix and the correspondingwavefunctions for a rectangular microwave resonator with a scatter as afunction of the area of the resonator as well as of the degree of opening to aguide. The calculations are performed by using the method o...

  8. The FORS Deep Field Spectroscopic Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, S; Appenzeller, I; Bender, R; Böhm, A; Gabasch, A; Heidt, J; Hopp, U; Jäger, K; Seitz, S; Stahl, O; Tapken, C; Ziegler, B L

    2004-01-01

    We present a catalogue and atlas of low-resolution spectra of a well defined sample of 341 objects in the FORS Deep Field. All spectra were obtained with the FORS instruments at the ESO VLT with essentially the same spectroscopic setup. The observed extragalactic objects cover the redshift range 0.1 to 5.0. 98 objects are starburst galaxies and QSOs at z > 2. Using this data set we investigated the evolution of the characteristic spectral properties of bright starburst galaxies and their mutual relations as function of the redshift. Significant evolutionary effects were found for redshifts 2 < z < 4. Most conspicuous are the increase of the average C IV absorption strength, of the dust reddening, and of the intrinsic UV luminosity, and the decrease of the average Ly alpha emission strength with decreasing redshift. In part the observed evolutionary effects can be attributed to an increase of the metallicity of the galaxies with cosmic age. Moreover, the increase of the total star-formation rates and the...

  9. Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer: Scientific Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z approximately 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures (approximately 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  10. Spectroscopic variability of two Oe stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, G; Naze, Y; Eversberg, T; Alves, F; Arnold, W; Bergmann, T; Viegas, N G Correia; Fahed, R; Fernando, A; Gonzalez-Perez, J N; Carreira, L F Gouveia; Hempelmann, A; Hunger, T; Knapen, J H; Leadbeater, R; Dias, F Marques; Mittag, M; Moffat, A F J; Reinecke, N; Ribeiro, J; Romeo, N; Gallego, J Sanchez; Santos, E M Dos; Schanne, L; Schmitt, J H M M; Schroeder, K -P; Stahl, O; Stober, Ba; Stober, Be; Vollmann, K

    2015-01-01

    The Oe stars HD45314 and HD60848 have recently been found to exhibit very different X-ray properties: whilst HD60848 has an X-ray spectrum and emission level typical of most OB stars, HD45314 features a much harder and brighter X-ray emission, making it a so-called gamma Cas analogue. Monitoring the optical spectra could provide hints towards the origin of these very different behaviours. We analyse a large set of spectroscopic observations of HD45314 and HD60848, extending over 20 years. We further attempt to fit the H-alpha line profiles of both stars with a simple model of emission line formation in a Keplerian disk. Strong variations in the strengths of the H-alpha, H-beta, and He I 5876 emission lines are observed for both stars. In the case of HD60848, we find a time lag between the variations in the equivalent widths of these lines. The emission lines are double peaked with nearly identical strengths of the violet and red peaks. The H-alpha profile of this star can be successfully reproduced by our mod...

  11. Spectroscopic survey of M--type asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasier, S; Dotto, E; Migliorini, A; Ockert-Bell, M; Barucci, M A

    2010-01-01

    M-type asteroids, as defined in the Tholen taxonomy (Tholen, 1984), are medium albedo bodies supposed to have a metallic composition and to be the progenitors both of differentiated iron-nickel meteorites and enstatite chondrites. We carried out a spectroscopic survey in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (0.4-2.5 micron) of 30 asteroids chosen from the population of asteroids initially classified as Tholen M -types, aiming to investigate their surface composition. The data were obtained during several observing runs during the years 2004-2007 at the TNG, NTT, and IRTF telescopes. We computed the spectral slopes in several wavelength ranges for each observed asteroid, and we searched for diagnostic spectral features. We confirm a large variety of spectral behaviors for these objects as their spectra are extended into the near-infrared, including the identification of weak absorption bands, mainly of the 0.9 micron band tentatively attributed to orthopyroxene, and of the 0.43 micron band that may b...

  12. Spectroscopic subsystems in nearby wide binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Radial velocity (RV) monitoring of solar-type visual binaries has been conducted at the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5-m telescope to study short-period systems. Data reduction is described, mean and individual RVs of 163 observed objects are given. New spectroscopic binaries are discovered or suspected in 17 objects, for some of them orbital periods could be determined. Subsystems are efficiently detected even in a single observation by double lines and/or by the RV difference between the components of visual binaries. The potential of this detection technique is quantified by simulation and used for statistical assessment of 96 wide binaries within 67pc. It is found that 43 binaries contain at least one subsystem and the occurrence of subsystems is equally probable in either primary or secondary components. The frequency of subsystems and their periods match the simple prescription proposed by the author (2014, AJ, 147, 87). The remaining 53 simple wide binaries with a median projected separation of 1300AU have the distri...

  13. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, G.; Bonavita, S. [Istituto di Scienze Neurologiche, Seconda Universita di Napoli (Italy); Department of Neuroimaging, National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); McFarland, H.F.; Richert, N. [Department of Neuroimmunology, National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Duyn, J.H.; Frank, J.A. [Laboratory of Diagnostic Radiology Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2002-01-01

    We studied 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) to assess the neurochemical pathology of the white-matter lesions (WML) and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Our 1H-MRSI technique allowed simultaneous measurement of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho), and creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr) signal intensities from four 15-mm slices divided into 0.84 ml single-volume elements. In WML we found significantly lower NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios and a significantly higher Cho/Cr ratio than in NAWM or control white matter. In NAWM, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr were significantly lower than in control white matter. 1H-MRSI was compatible with damage to myelin in WML, and with axonal damage and/or dysfunction in WML and NAWM. These findings extend data on involvement of NAWM in MS beyond the abnormalities visible on MRI. (orig.)

  14. Spectroscopic Signatures Related to a Sunquake

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Sarah A; Zharkov, Sergei; Green, Lucie M

    2015-01-01

    The presence of flare related acoustic emission (sunquakes) in some flares represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. We present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode's EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the atmosphere above a sunquake, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the sunquake is determined using both time-distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that, unlike many previous sunquake detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time-distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger veloc...

  15. Galaxy evolution spectroscopic explorer: scientific rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-07-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures ( 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  16. Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer: Scientific Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z approximately 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures (approximately 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  17. The Van Allen Probes mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, James

    2014-01-01

    This collection of articles provides broad and detailed information about NASA’s Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin-spacecraft Earth-orbiting mission. The mission has the objective of achieving predictive understanding of the dynamic, intense, energetic, dangerous, and presently unpredictable belts of energetic particles that are magnetically trapped in Earth’s space environment above the atmosphere. It documents the science of the radiation belts and the societal benefits of achieving predictive understanding. Detailed information is provided about the Van Allen Probes mission design, the spacecraft, the science investigations, and the onboard instrumentation that must all work together to make unprecedented measurements within a most unforgiving environment, the core of Earth’s most intense radiation regions.
 This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in space science, solar-terrestrial interactions and studies of the up...

  18. Taurine-induced modulation of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shan-Shan; Yu, Kuai; Gu, Yan; Ruan, Di-Yun

    2005-08-15

    The physiological role of taurine, an abundant free amino acid in the neural system, is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate its effect on TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX-resistant (TTX-R) Na+ currents in enzymatically dissociated neurons from rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) with conventional whole-cell recording manner under voltage-clamp conditions. A TTX-S Na+ current was recorded preferentially from large DRG neurons and a TTX-R Na+ current preferentially from small ones. For TTX-S Na+ channel, taurine of the concentration > or = 10 mM shifted the activation curve in the depolarizing direction and the inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction. There was no change in the activation curve for TTX-R Na+ channel and the inactivation curve was shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction slightly in the presence of taurine > or = 20 mM. When the recovery kinetics was examined, the presence of taurine resulted in a slower recovery from inactivation of TTX-S currents and no change of TTX-R ones. All the effects of taurine were weakly concentration-dependent and partly recovered quite slowly after washout. Our data indicate that taurine alters the properties of Na+ currents in intact DRG neurons. These may contribute to the understanding of taurine as a natural neuroprotectant and the potential of taurine as a useful medicine for the treatment of sensory neuropathies.

  19. Prevention of Paralytic Neurotoxin Action on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-10

    of a- scorpion toxins to sodium channels by interacting with the active site on the toxin . The effects of these reagents on the binding of a- scorpion ...whose effects did not reach statistical significance. For some peptides, the level of a- scorpion toxin binding was increased after preincubation with...developed a different assay to measure peptide effects on scorpion toxin binding. This assay took advantage of the CNaHA-1 cells which express Type hA

  20. Molecular Basis of Paraltyic Neurotoxin Action on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-14

    of 9,700 daltons isolated from the coral Goni2oora gy. (1). The toxin enhances neurally mediated contraction of blood vessels and taenia coli of the...sites on the solium channel and to identify the site of GPT action within the structure of the sodium channel protein. 2. Site of Action of Brvyetoxin

  1. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE Ca2+ CHANNEL FUNCTION BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms underlying the acute neurophysiological and behavioral effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) remain to be elucidated. However, the function of neuronal ion channels is perturbed by VOCs. The present study examined effects of toluene (TOL), trichloroethylene ...

  2. Molecular size of different neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhanin, J; Schmid, A; Lombet, A; Wheeler, K P; Lazdunski, M; Ellory, J C

    1983-01-25

    Measurements were made of the molecular sizes of two distinct receptors on the Na+ channel in rat brain synaptosomes that are specific for different neurotoxins. Radiation inactivation of the binding of radiolabeled derivatives of the toxins was consistent with Mr = 260,000 for the tetrodotoxin receptor and Mr = 266,000 for the receptor specific for two scorpion toxins, toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus and toxin gamma from Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. Covalent cross-linking of the latter to its receptor similarly indicated Mr = 270,000. It seems most likely that these two distinct receptors reside on the same molecule.

  3. Monitoring Integrated Activity of Individual Neurons Using FRET-Based Voltage-Sensitive Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggman, Kevin L; Kristan, William B; González, Jesús E; Kleinfeld, David; Tsien, Roger Y

    2015-01-01

    Pairs of membrane-associated molecules exhibiting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) provide a sensitive technique to measure changes in a cell's membrane potential. One of the FRET pair binds to one surface of the membrane and the other is a mobile ion that dissolves in the lipid bilayer. The voltage-related signal can be measured as a change in the fluorescence of either the donor or acceptor molecules, but measuring their ratio provides the largest and most noise-free signal. This technology has been used in a variety of ways; three are documented in this chapter: (1) high throughput drug screening, (2) monitoring the activity of many neurons simultaneously during a behavior, and (3) finding synaptic targets of a stimulated neuron. In addition, we provide protocols for using the dyes on both cultured neurons and leech ganglia. We also give an updated description of the mathematical basis for measuring the coherence between electrical and optical signals. Future improvements of this technique include faster and more sensitive dyes that bleach more slowly, and the expression of one of the FRET pair genetically.

  4. Analysis of Antimicrobial-Triggered Membrane Depolarization Using Voltage Sensitive Dyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derk te Winkel, J.; Gray, D.A.; Seistrup, K.H.; Hamoen, L.W.; Strahl, H.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cytoplasmic membrane is a major inhibitory target for antimicrobial compounds. Commonly, although not exclusively, these compounds unfold their antimicrobial activity by disrupting the essential barrier function of the cell membrane. As a consequence, membrane permeability assays are

  5. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE Ca2+ CHANNEL FUNCTION BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms underlying the acute neurophysiological and behavioral effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) remain to be elucidated. However, the function of neuronal ion channels is perturbed by VOCs. The present study examined effects of toluene (TOL), trichloroethylene ...

  6. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE CALCIUM FUNCTION IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile organic solvents such as toluene (TOL) and trichloroethylene perturb nervous system function and share characteristic effects with other central nervous system depressants such as anesthetic gasses, ethanol, benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recently, mechanistic studies...

  7. COPRECIPITATION PREPARATION AND VOLTAGE SENSITIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF DOPED ZnO VARISTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    ZnOvaristorhasbeenwidelyusedinprotectiondevicesforsmalcurentelectroniccircuitsaswelasforlargecurenttransmisionlines[1].Theor...

  8. In Vivo Mesoscopic Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging of Brain Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qinggong; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Frank, Aaron; Wu, Yalun; Chen, Chao-Wei; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Chen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Functional mapping of brain activity is important in elucidating how neural networks operate in the living brain. The whisker sensory system of rodents is an excellent model to study peripherally evoked neural activity in the central nervous system. Each facial whisker is represented by discrete modules of neurons all along the pathway leading to the neocortex. These modules are called “barrels” in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory cortex. Their location (approximately 300-500 μm below cortical surface) allows for convenient imaging of whisker-evoked neural activity in vivo. Fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) provides depth-resolved fluorescence molecular information with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Angled illumination and detection configurations can improve both resolution and penetration depth. We applied angled FLOT (aFLOT) to record 3D neural activities evoked in the whisker system of mice by deflection of a single whisker in vivo. A 100 μm capillary and a pair of microelectrodes were inserted to the mouse brain to test the capability of the imaging system. The results show that it is possible to obtain 3D functional maps of the sensory periphery in the brain. This approach can be broadly applicable to functional imaging of other brain structures.

  9. Design and Evaluation of Autonomous Hybrid Frequency-Voltage Sensitive Load Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglass, Philip James; Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo; Sossan, Fabrizio;

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces an algorithm for control of autonomous loads without digital communication interfaces to provide both frequency regulation and voltage regulation services. This hybrid controller can be used to enhance frequency sensitive loads to mitigate line overload arising from reduced...

  10. Dual Regulation of Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels by PIP(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Adney, Scott K; Zhou, Lei; Logothetis, Diomedes E

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, there has been an impressive number of ion channels shown to be sensitive to the major phosphoinositide in the plasma membrane, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). Among them are voltage-gated channels, which are crucial for both neuronal and cardiac excitability. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels were shown to be regulated bidirectionally by PIP(2). On one hand, PIP(2) stabilized their activity by reducing current rundown but on the other hand it produced a voltage-dependent inhibition by shifting the activation curve to more positive voltages. For voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels PIP(2) was first shown to prevent N-type inactivation regardless of whether the fast inactivation gate was part of the pore-forming α subunit or of an accessory β subunit. Careful examination of the effects of PIP(2) on the activation mechanism of Kv1.2 has shown a similar bidirectional regulation as in the Cav channels. The two effects could be distinguished kinetically, in terms of their sensitivities to PIP(2) and by distinct molecular determinants. The rightward shift of the Kv1.2 voltage dependence implicated basic residues in the S4-S5 linker and was consistent with stabilization of the inactive state of the voltage sensor. A third type of a voltage-gated ion channel modulated by PIP(2) is the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel. PIP(2) has been shown to enhance the opening of HCN channels by shifting their voltage-dependent activation toward depolarized potentials. The sea urchin HCN channel, SpIH, showed again a PIP(2)-mediated bidirectional effect but in reverse order than the depolarization-activated Cav and Kv channels: a voltage-dependent potentiation, like the mammalian HCN channels, but also an inhibition of the cGMP-induced current activation. Just like the Kv1.2 channels, distinct molecular determinants underlied the PIP(2) dual effects on SpIH, with the proximal C-terminus implicated in the inhibitory effect. The dual regulation of these very different ion channels, all of which are voltage-dependent, points to conserved mechanisms of regulation of these channels by PIP(2).

  11. Dual Regulation of Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels by PIP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo A Rodríguez Menchaca

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 16 years, there has been an impressive number of ion channels shown to be sensitive to the major phosphoinositide in the plasma membrane, phosphatidilinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Among them are voltage-gated channels, which are crucial for both neuronal and cardiac excitability. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav channels were shown to be regulated bidirectionally by PIP2. On one hand, PIP2 stabilized their activity by reducing current rundown but on the other hand it produced a voltage-dependent inhibition by shifting the activation curve to more positive voltages. For voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels PIP2 was first shown to prevent N-type inactivation. Careful examination of the effects of PIP2 on the activation mechanism of Kv1.2 has shown a similar bidirectional regulation as in the Cav channels. The two effects could be distinguished kinetically, in terms of their sensitivities to PIP2 and by distinct molecular determinants. The rightward shift of the Kv1.2 voltage dependence implicated basic residues in the S4-S5 linker and was consistent with stabilization of the inactive state of the voltage sensor. A third type of a voltage-gated ion channel modulated by PIP2 is the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channel. PIP2 has been shown to enhance the opening of HCN channels by shifting their voltage-dependent activation toward depolarized potentials. The sea urchin HCN channel, SpIH, showed again a PIP2-mediated bidirectional effect but in reverse order than the depolarization-activated Cav and Kv channels: a voltage-dependent potentiation, like the mammalian HCN channels, but also an inhibition of the cGMP-induced current activation. Just like the Kv1.2 channels, distinct molecular determinants underlied the PIP2 dual effects on SpIH channels. The dual regulation of these very different ion channels, all of which are voltage dependent, points to conserved mechanisms of regulation of these channels by PIP2.

  12. Influence of probe geometry on the response of an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Torben; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1999-01-01

    The response of an electrostatic probe is examined with reference to the probe geometry. The study involves the evaluation of the probe lambda function, from which response-related characteristic parameters can be derived. These parameters enable the probe detection sensitivity Se and spatial...

  13. Raman fiberoptic probe for monitoring human tissue engineered oral mucosa constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Okagbare, Paul; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-02-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, there is a need for tissue engineered constructs for dental implants, reconstructions due to trauma, oral cancer or congenital defects. A non-invasive quality monitoring of the fabrication of tissue engineered constructs during their production and implantation is a required component of any successful tissue engineering technique. We demonstrate the design and application of a Raman spectroscopic probe for rapid and noninvasive monitoring of Ex Vivo Produced Oral Mucosa Equivalent constructs (EVPOMEs). We conducted in vivo studies to identify Raman spectroscopic failure indicators for EVPOMEs (already developed in vitro), and found that Raman spectra of EVPOMEs exposed to thermal stress showed correlation of the band height ratio of CH2 deformation to phenylalanine ring breathing modes, providing a Raman metric to distinguish between viable and nonviable constructs. This is the first step towards the ultimate goal to design a stand-alone system, which will be usable in a clinical setting, as the data processing and analysis will be performed with minimal user intervention, based on already established and tested Raman spectroscopic indicators for EVPOMEs.

  14. Human oral mucosa tissue-engineered constructs monitored by Raman fiber-optic probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Kim, Roderick Y; Matthews, Robert V; Marcelo, Cynthia L; Feinberg, Stephen E; Morris, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    In maxillofacial and oral surgery, there is a need for the development of tissue-engineered constructs. They are used for reconstructions due to trauma, dental implants, congenital defects, or oral cancer. A noninvasive monitoring of the fabrication of tissue-engineered constructs at the production and implantation stages done in real time is extremely important for predicting the success of tissue-engineered grafts. We demonstrated a Raman spectroscopic probe system, its design and application, for real-time ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalent (EVPOME) constructs noninvasive monitoring. We performed in vivo studies to find Raman spectroscopic indicators for postimplanted EVPOME failure and determined that Raman spectra of EVPOMEs preexposed to thermal stress during manufacturing procedures displayed correlation of the band height ratio of CH2 deformation to phenylalanine ring breathing modes, giving a Raman metric to distinguish between healthy and compromised postimplanted constructs. This study is the step toward our ultimate goal to develop a stand-alone system, to be used in a clinical setting, where the data collection and analysis are conducted on the basis of these spectroscopic indicators with minimal user intervention.

  15. Zero voltage mass spectrometry probes and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Wleklinski, Michael Stanley; Bag, Soumabha; Li, Yafeng

    2017-10-10

    The invention generally relates to zero volt mass spectrometry probes and systems. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system including a mass spectrometry probe including a porous material, and a mass spectrometer (bench-top or miniature mass spectrometer). The system operates without an application of voltage to the probe. In certain embodiments, the probe is oriented such that a distal end faces an inlet of the mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the distal end of the probe is 5 mm or less from an inlet of the mass spectrometer.

  16. Project Prometheus and Future Entry Probe Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on project Prometheus and future entry probe missions is shown. The topics include: 1) What Is Project Prometheus?; 2) What Capabilities Can Project Prometheus Offer? What Mission Types Are Being Considered?; 3) Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO); 4) How Are Mission Opportunities Changing?; 5) Missions Of Interest a Year Ago; 6) Missions Now Being Considered For Further Study; 7) Galileo-Style (Conventional) Probe Delivery; 8) Galileo-Style Probe Support; 9) Conventional Delivery and Support of Multiple Probes; 10) How Entry Probe Delivery From an NEP Vehicle Is Different; and 11) Concluding Remarks.

  17. Probing the electric field in organic double layer-system by optical second harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Eunju; Shibata, Yoshinori; Manaka, Takaaki [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Iwamoto, Mitsumasa, E-mail: iwamoto@ome.pe.titech.ac.j [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Optical electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurements were employed to probe the electric field in the active layer of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The OFETs used were double-layered with an active layer of pentacene/poly (3-hexyl thiophene) P3HT on SiO{sub 2} gate insulator with Au source and drain electrodes. It was shown that SHG from the P3HT bottom layer could be selectively probed at a wavelength of 450 nm. Similarly, by using OLEDs comprised of a double layer of Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminium (Alq{sub 3}) and N'-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine ({alpha}-NPD) with a device structure of indium-zinc oxide (IZO)/{alpha}-NPD/Alq{sub 3}/Al, it was shown that EFISHG from the Alq{sub 3} layer could be selectively probed at a wavelength of 1000 nm by reflective laser beam irradiation from IZO-side. The results show that the spectroscopic nature of materials allows us to selectively probe the electric field distribution in each layer of multi-layer in organic devices.

  18. Electrochemical studies of redox probes in self-organized lyotropic liquid crystalline systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Suresh Kumar; V Lakshminarayanan

    2009-09-01

    Lyotropic liquid crystalline phases formed by surfactants are of special importance due to their close resemblance to biological systems. The redox reactions in such ordered media are of fundamental interest in understanding several complex processes occurring in the biological media, where the former can act as model systems. In this work, we have carried out the redox reactions of benzoquinone| hydroquinone, methyl viologen and ferrocenemethanol probes in a lyotropic hexagonal columnar phase (H1 phase) using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic studies. The liquid crystalline phase we have studied is made up of the non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-100 and water. Polarizing optical microscopic examination confirmed that the columnar hexagonal phase is retained even after the addition of redox probe as well as the supporting electrolyte. Our studies show a significant shift in the half-peak potentials of the redox probes in the H1 phase as compared to the solvent phase. The diffusion coefficient values for different redox probes in the H1 phase were also found to be significantly reduced when compared to the corresponding solvent media.

  19. Ultrafast spectroscopic imaging of exfoliated graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grancini, Giulia; Martino, Nicola; Petrozza, Annamaria; Lanzani, Guglielmo [Center for Nano Science and Technology rate at PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Giovanni Pascoli, 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Bianchi, Massimiliano; Rizzi, Laura Giorgia; Sordan, Roman [L-NESS, Department of Physics, Polo di Como, Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Russo, Valeria [Department of Energetics, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milano (Italy); Li Bassi, Andrea; Casari, Carlo Spartaco [Center for Nano Science and Technology rate at PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Giovanni Pascoli, 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Energetics, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    In this paper we investigate the carrier cooling dynamics in graphene flakes exploiting ultrafast transient absorption imaging technique. This tool enables us to combine nanoscale spatial resolution and sub-picosecond (ps) time resolution. It provides many advantages over the standard transient absorption techniques because it directly investigates the excited state dynamics at a local scale that would be usually averaged out. The local dynamics show a photobleaching recovery in the first ps, assigned to cooling by electron-phonon scattering. We found that the photoexcited carrier dynamics is spatially uniform over the micrometer-sized exfoliated graphene layer. Ultrafast pump-probe technique is combined with an optical microscope to investigate the local excited state dynamics in graphene flakes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Flexible Ultrasonic Phased-Array Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施克仁; 阙开良; 郭大勇

    2004-01-01

    In ultrasonic phased-array testing, most probes are rigid with fixed elements. However, when testing a cambered piece, a rigid probe cannot be used directly, but an ultrasonic chock or coupling media must be used, which adds cost and reduces the accuracy. The objective of this research was to improve the tests of cambered pieces. A flexible ultrasonic phased-array probe was developed to do the flexible phased-array testing. The key technologies in the flexible phased-array probe include the probe design and the phased-array control. A new method was developed to design the flexible probe according to the curvature of the piece and the test depth. The method includes the calculation of the element's height (he), the relative rotation angle ((e), the distance between the adjoining elements (de), and the element's effective testing range. A flexible ultrasonic phased-array probe has been developed using this method.

  1. DBD dyes as fluorescence lifetime probes to study conformational changes in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzinek, Robert; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Heuveling, Johanna; Mertens, Monique; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin; Wessig, Pablo

    2013-12-16

    Previously, [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3]benzodioxole (DBD)-based fluorophores used as highly sensitive fluorescence lifetime probes reporting on their microenvironmental polarity have been described. Now, a new generation of DBD dyes has been developed. Although they are still sensitive to polarity, in contrast to the former DBD dyes, they have extraordinary spectroscopic properties even in aqueous surroundings. They are characterized by long fluorescence lifetimes (10-20 ns), large Stokes shifts (≈100 nm), high photostabilities, and high quantum yields (>0.56). Here, the spectroscopic properties and synthesis of functionalized derivatives for labeling biological targets are described. Furthermore, thio-reactive maleimido derivatives of both DBD generations show strong intramolecular fluorescence quenching. This mechanism has been investigated and is found to undergo a photoelectron transfer (PET) process. After reaction with a thiol group, this fluorescence quenching is prevented, indicating successful bonding. Being sensitive to their environmental polarity, these compounds have been used as powerful fluorescence lifetime probes for the investigation of conformational changes in the maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter through fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. The differing tendencies of the fluorescence lifetime change for both DBD dye generations promote their combination as a powerful toolkit for studying microenvironments in proteins.

  2. Spectroscopic characterizations of organic/inorganic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govani, Jayesh R.

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, pure and 0.3 wt%, 0.4 wt%, as well as 0.5 wt% L-arginine doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals were grown using solution growth techniques and further subjected to infrared (IR) absorption and Raman studies for confirmation of chemical group functionalization for investigating the incorporation mechanism of the L-arginine organic material into the KDP crystal structure. Infrared spectroscopic analysis suggests that structural changes are occurring for the L-arginine molecule as a result of its interaction with the KPD crystal. Infrared spectroscopic technique confirms the disturbance of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, suggesting successful incorporation of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. Raman analysis also reveals modification of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, implying successful inclusion of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. With the help of Gaussian software, a prediction of possible incorporation mechanisms of the organic material was obtained from comparison of the simulated infrared and Raman vibrational spectra with the experimental results. Furthermore, we also studied the effect of L-arginine doping on the thermal stability of the grown KDP crystal by employing Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA suggests that increasing the level of L-arginine doping speeds the decomposition process and it weakens the KDP crystal, which indicates successful doping of the KDP crystals with L-arginine amino acid. Urinary stones are one of the oldest and most widely spread diseases in humans, animals and birds. Many remedies have been employed through the ages for the treatment of urinary stones. Recent medicinal measures reflect the modern advances, which are based on surgical removal, percutaneous techniques and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Although these procedures are valuable, they are quite expensive for most people. Furthermore, recurrence of these diseases is awfully frequent with

  3. Light, Molecules, Action: Using Ultrafast Uv-Visible and X-Ray Spectroscopy to Probe Excited State Dynamics in Photoactive Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sension, R. J.

    2017-06-01

    Light provides a versatile energy source capable of precise manipulation of material systems on size scales ranging from molecular to macroscopic. Photochemistry provides the means for transforming light energy from photon to process via movement of charge, a change in shape, a change in size, or the cleavage of a bond. Photochemistry produces action. In the work to be presented here ultrafast UV-Visible pump-probe, and pump-repump-probe methods have been used to probe the excited state dynamics of stilbene-based molecular motors, cyclohexadiene-based switches, and polyene-based photoacids. Both ultrafast UV-Visible and X-ray absorption spectroscopies have been applied to the study of cobalamin (vitamin B_{12}) based compounds. Optical measurements provide precise characterization of spectroscopic signatures of the intermediate species on the S_{1} surface, while time-resolved XANES spectra at the Co K-edge probe the structural changes that accompany these transformations.

  4. Time resolved spectroscopic studies on some nanophosphors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harish Chander; Santa Chawla

    2008-06-01

    Time resolved spectroscopy is an important tool for studying photophysical processes in phosphors. Present work investigates the steady state and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic characteristics of ZnS, ZnO and (Zn, Mg)O nanophosphors both in powder as well as thin film form. Photoluminescence (PL) of ZnS nanophosphors typically exhibit a purple/blue emission peak termed as self activated (SA) luminescence and emission at different wavelengths arising due to dopant impurities e.g. green emission for ZnS : Cu, orange emission for ZnS : Mn and red emission for ZnS : Eu. The lifetimes obtained from decay curves range from ns to ms level and suggest the radiative recombination path involving donor–acceptor pair recombination or internal electronic transitions of the impurity atom. A series of ZnMgO nanophosphor thin films with varied Zn : Mg ratios were prepared by chemical bath deposition. Photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra exhibit variations with changing Mg ratio. Luminescence lifetime as short as 10-10 s was observed for ZnO and ZnMgO (100 : 10) nanophosphors. With increasing Mg ratio, PL decay shifts into microsecond range. ZnO and ZnMgO alloys up to 50% Mg were prepared as powder by solid state mixing and sintering at high temperature in reducing atmosphere. Time resolved decay of PL indicated lifetime in the microsecond time scale. The novelty of the work lies in clear experimental evidence of dopants (Cu, Mn, Eu and Mg) in the decay process and luminescence life times in II–VI semiconductor nanocrystals of ZnS and ZnO. For ZnS, blue self activated luminescence decays faster than Cu and Mn related emission. For undoped ZnO nanocrystals, PL decay is in the nanosecond range whereas with Mg doping the decay becomes much slower in the microsecond range.

  5. Orbital Parameters for Two Young Spectroscopic Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnath, Nicole

    I report orbital parameters for two low-mass, pre-main sequence spectroscopic binaries VSB 111 and VSB 126. These systems were originally identified as single-lined on the basis of visible-light spectral observations. High-resolution, infrared spectra were obtained to detect absorption lines of the secondary stars and measure radial velocities of both components in the systems. The combination of the visible and infrared observations of VSB 111 leads to a period of 902.1+/-0.9 days, an eccentricity of 0.788+/-0.008, and a mass ratio of 0.52+/-0.05. VSB 126 has a period of 12.9244+/-0.0002 days, an eccentricity of 0.18+/-0.02, and a mass ratio of 0.29+/-0.02. Visible-light photometry using the 0.8-m telescope at Lowell Observatory provided rotation periods for the primary stars in both systems, 3.74+/-0.02 days for VSB 111 and 5.71+/-0.07 days for VSB 126. Based on the vsini values, the primary rotation periods, and estimates for the primary radii, I find inclinations for the primary-star rotation axes, 42+47 -16° for VSB 111 and 54+36-29° for VSB 126, and compare these to the inclination angle of the binary orbits, iorb = 36+/-4° for VSB 111 and i orb = 45+/-4° for VSB 126, estimated from the orbital solutions. Both binaries are located in the young, star- forming cluster NGC 2264 with a complex and clumpy gas and dust structure at a distance of ~800 pc. The center-of-mass velocities of the two systems are consistent with distinct CO clouds within NGC 2264.

  6. Spectroscopic studies of microwave plasmas containing hexamethyldisiloxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-10-01

    Low-pressure microwave discharges containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with admixtures of oxygen and nitrogen, used for the deposition of silicon containing films, have been studied spectroscopically. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS). The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and gas mixture at relatively low pressures, up to 50 Pa, and power values, up to 2 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of seven stable molecules, HMDSO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO and CO2, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ IRLAS using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the temperature in the plasma hot and colder zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, three different methods based on emission and absorption spectroscopy data of N2, CH3 and CO have been used. In this approach line profile analysis has been combined with spectral simulation methods. The concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in the range between 1011 to 1015 cm-3, are in the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power, pressure and gas mixture on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the HMDSO precursor gas including its fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products was analyzed in detail.

  7. Probing the nano-bio interface with nanoplasmonic optical probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X.; Wu, Linxi; Khanehzar, Ali; Feizpour, Amin; Xu, Fangda; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2014-08-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have large cross-sections in both optical and electron microscopy and plasmon coupling between noble metal nanoparticles facilitate the characterization of subdiffraction limit separations through spectral analysis of the scattered light in Plasmon Coupling Microscopy (PCM). The size compatibility of noble metal nanoparticles together with the ability to encode specific functionality in a rational fashion by control of the nanoparticle surface makes noble metal nanoparticles unique probes for a broad range of biological processes. Recent applications of the technology include i.) characterization of cellular heterogeneity in nanomaterial uptake and processing through macrophages, ii.) testing the role of viral membrane lipids in mediating viral binding and trafficking, and iii.) characterizing the spatial organization of cancer biomarkers in plasma membranes. This paper reviews some of these applications and introduces the physical and material science principles underlying them. We will also introduce the use of membrane wrapped noble metal nanoparticles, which combine the superb photophysical properties of a nanoparticle core with the biological functionality of a membrane, as probes in PCM.

  8. Astrophysical probes of fundamental physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, C.J.A.P. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    I review the motivation for varying fundamental couplings and discuss how these measurements can be used to constrain fundamental physics scenarios that would otherwise be inaccessible to experiment. I highlight the current controversial evidence for varying couplings and present some new results. Finally I focus on the relation between varying couplings and dark energy, and explain how varying coupling measurements might be used to probe the nature of dark energy, with some advantages over standard methods. In particular I discuss what can be achieved with future spectrographs such as ESPRESSO and CODEX.

  9. Soft QGP probes with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Graczykowski, Łukasz Kamil

    2016-01-01

    In heavy-ion collisions at the LHC a hot and dense medium of deconfided partons, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), is created. Its global properties can be characterized by the measurements of particles in the low transverse momentum (or "soft") regime, which represent the majority of created particles. In this report we outline a selection of measurements of the soft probes by the ALICE experiment in pp, p--Pb, and Pb--Pb collisions. The paper focuses on recent flow measurements via angular correlations and femtoscopic studies. The first ever preliminary analysis of $\\mathrm{K}^0_{\\rm S}\\mathrm{K}^{\\pm}$ femtoscopy is also presented.

  10. Probing Below the Visible Cloud Layers in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Imke; Sault, Robert J.; Butler, Bryan J.; DeBoer, David R.; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-10-01

    Visible and near-infrared images of the giant planets reveal a multitude of clouds, ranging in size from tiny, hardly visible, features to giant storm systems, such as Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA. At radio wavelengths we can probe altitudes in Jupiter's atmosphere below these visible cloud layers. We used the upgraded Very Large Array to map this unexplored region down to ~10 bar. We will present full radio maps at frequencies between 4 and ~35 GHz, with typical spatial resolutions of order 1000-2000 km. We will also show spectra and radiative transfer calculations of individual features, such as the Great Red Spot, Oval BA, hot spots and ammonia-rich "plumes". Our maps are complementary to observations planned for Juno's microwave radiometer (MWR). MWR's field-of-view is tiny, ~1000 km at the highest frequencies at perijove, and is limited to extremely narrow swaths of longitude; as such, our VLA maps will provide regional and global context at wavelengths overlapping with Juno MWR. Several maps at 8-12 GHz, at a spatial resolution of ~1000 km, will be taken during Juno perijove passes.Our analysis to date, based on 4-18 GHz maps, reveal a dynamically active planet at pressures up ammonia gas from Jupiter's deep atmosphere in "plumes", at concentrations similar to that measured by the Galileo Probe. At higher altitudes, the ammonia gas in these plumes will condense out, and as such could be responsible for the spectroscopically identified fresh ammonia ice clouds detected by the Galileo spacecraft at these latitudes.

  11. Radiation damping in microcoil NMR probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, V V

    2006-04-01

    Radiation damping arises from the field induced in the receiver coil by large bulk magnetization and tends to selectively drive this magnetization back to equilibrium much faster than relaxation processes. The demand for increased sensitivity in mass-limited samples has led to the development of microcoil NMR probes that are capable of obtaining high quality NMR spectra with small sample volumes (nL-microL). Microcoil probes are optimized to increase sensitivity by increasing either the sample-to-coil ratio (filling factor) of the probe or quality factor of the detection coil. Though radiation damping effects have been studied in standard NMR probes, these effects have not been measured in the microcoil probes. Here a systematic evaluation of radiation damping effects in a microcoil NMR probe is presented and the results are compared with similar measurements in conventional large volume samples. These results show that radiation-damping effects in microcoil probe is much more pronounced than in 5 mm probes, and that it is critically important to optimize NMR experiments to minimize these effects. As microcoil probes provide better control of the bulk magnetization, with good RF and B0 inhomogeneity, in addition to negligible dipolar field effects due to nearly spherical sample volumes, these probes can be used exclusively to study the complex behavior of radiation damping.

  12. ProbeMaker: an extensible framework for design of sets of oligonucleotide probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Johan; Nilsson, Mats; Landegren, Ulf

    2005-01-01

    Background Procedures for genetic analyses based on oligonucleotide probes are powerful tools that can allow highly parallel investigations of genetic material. Such procedures require the design of large sets of probes using application-specific design constraints. Results ProbeMaker is a software framework for computer-assisted design and analysis of sets of oligonucleotide probe sequences. The tool assists in the design of probes for sets of target sequences, incorporating sequence motifs for purposes such as amplification, visualization, or identification. An extension system allows the framework to be equipped with application-specific components for evaluation of probe sequences, and provides the possibility to include support for importing sequence data from a variety of file formats. Conclusion ProbeMaker is a suitable tool for many different oligonucleotide design and analysis tasks, including the design of probe sets for various types of parallel genetic analyses, experimental validation of design parameters, and in silico testing of probe sequence evaluation algorithms. PMID:16171527

  13. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  14. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector.

  15. Tunable nanowire nonlinear optical probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Yuri; Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Onorato, Robert M.; Saykally, Richard J.; Liphardt, Jan; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    One crucial challenge for subwavelength optics has been thedevelopment of a tunable source of coherent laser radiation for use inthe physical, information, and biological sciences that is stable at roomtemperature and physiological conditions. Current advanced near-fieldimaging techniques using fiber-optic scattering probes1,2 have alreadyachieved spatial resolution down to the 20-nm range. Recently reportedfar-field approaches for optical microscopy, including stimulatedemission depletion (STED)3, structured illumination4, and photoactivatedlocalization microscopy (PALM)5, have also enabled impressive,theoretically-unlimited spatial resolution of fluorescent biomolecularcomplexes. Previous work with laser tweezers6-8 has suggested the promiseof using optical traps to create novel spatial probes and sensors.Inorganic nanowires have diameters substantially below the wavelength ofvisible light and have unique electronic and optical properties9,10 thatmake them prime candidates for subwavelength laser and imagingtechnology. Here we report the development of an electrode-free,continuously-tunable coherent visible light source compatible withphysiological environments, from individual potassium niobate (KNbO3)nanowires. These wires exhibit efficient second harmonic generation(SHG), and act as frequency converters, allowing the local synthesis of awide range of colors via sum and difference frequency generation (SFG,DFG). We use this tunable nanometric light source to implement a novelform of subwavelength microscopy, in which an infrared (IR) laser is usedto optically trap and scan a nanowire over a sample, suggesting a widerange of potential applications in physics, chemistry, materials science,and biology.

  16. Sensitive Probe for Symmetry Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Ye; XIAO Guo-Qing; GUO Wen-Jun; REN ZhongZhou; ZUO Wei; LEE Xi-Guo

    2007-01-01

    Based on both very obvious isospin effect of the neutron-proton number ratio of nucleon emissions (n/p)nucl on symmetry potential and (n/p)nucl's sensitive dependence on symmetry potential in the nuclear reactions induced by halo-neutron projectiles, compared to the same mass stable projectile, probing symmetry potential is investigated within the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics with isospin and momentum-dependent interactions for different symmetry potentials U1sym and U2sym. It is found that the neutron-halo projectile induces very obvious increase of (n/p)nucl and strengthens the dependence of (n/p)nucl on the symmetry potential for all the beam energies and impact parameters, compared to the same mass stable projectile under the same incident channel condition. Therefore (n/p)nucl induced by the neutron-halo projectile is a more favourable probe than the normal neutron-rich and neutron-poor projectiles for extracting the symmetry potential.

  17. Information Gains from Cosmological Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Grandis, S; Refregier, A; Amara, A; Nicola, A

    2015-01-01

    In light of the growing number of cosmological observations, it is important to develop versatile tools to quantify the constraining power and consistency of cosmological probes. Originally motivated from information theory, we use the relative entropy to compute the information gained by Bayesian updates in units of bits. This measure quantifies both the improvement in precision and the 'surprise', i.e. the tension arising from shifts in central values. Our starting point is a WMAP9 prior which we update with observations of the distance ladder, supernovae (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and weak lensing as well as the 2015 Planck release. We consider the parameters of the flat $\\Lambda$CDM concordance model and some of its extensions which include curvature and Dark Energy equation of state parameter $w$. We find that, relative to WMAP9 and within these model spaces, the probes that have provided the greatest gains are Planck (10 bits), followed by BAO surveys (5.1 bits) and SNe experiments (3.1 ...

  18. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yu K; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-07

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of chromium bioremediation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Marcus, M. A.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J. T.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination frequently involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to identify the biogeochemical reactions that control in situ chromium reduction in the presence of different dominant electron acceptors, i.e., NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-. It was hypothesized that indirect, abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) by reduced metabolic products [Fe(II) and sulfides] would dominate over direct enzymatic reduction by denitrifying, iron-reducing, or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is further hypothesized that the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) would produce relatively pure chromium hydroxide precipitates, whereas indirect reduction would result in mixed Cr-Fe hydroxide solid phases. Flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the 100H site at Hanford, WA were subjected to nitrate-, sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions in the presence of 5 µM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions from the nitrate- and sulfate-reducing columns; however only a small amount of Cr(VI) was removed under iron-reducing conditions. Preliminary analysis of micro X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the untreated and iron-reducing column sediments contained pre-existing Cr in the form of primary minerals, e.g. chromite and/or Cr-bearing micas. However, there was an increase in the relative abundance of mixed-phase Cr-Fe hydroxides, i.e., Cr1-xFex(OH)3 in the nitrate- and sulfate-treated columns. A possible explanation for the observations is that the production of Fe(II) was enhanced under the nitrate- and sulfate- reducing conditions, and was most likely sulfide-driven in the latter case. The Fe(II) was subsequently available for reduction of Cr(VI) resulting in the mixed-phase precipitates. The results from the spectroscopic analysis support the hypothesis that Fe(II)-mediated Cr reduction prevails over direct

  20. Spectroscopic Signatures Related to a Sunquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S. A.; Harra, L. K.; Zharkov, S.; Green, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    The presence of flare-related acoustic emission (sunquakes (SQs)) in some flares, and only in specific locations within the flaring environment, represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. In an attempt to contribute to understanding the origins of SQs we present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode’s EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona above an SQ, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the SQ is determined using both time-distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that unlike many previous SQ detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time-distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using EIS and IRIS spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location, at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger velocity shifts and substantially broader profiles than in the location with no SQ, and there is a good correlation between blueshifted, hot coronal, hard X-ray (HXR), and redshifted chromospheric emission, consistent with the idea of a strong downward motion driven by rapid heating by nonthermal electrons and the formation of chromospheric shocks. Exploiting the diagnostic potential of the Mg ii triplet lines, we also find evidence for a single large temperature increase deep in the atmosphere, which is consistent with this scenario. The time of the 6 mHz and time-distance peak signal coincides with a secondary peak in the energy release process, but in this case we find no evidence of HXR emission in the quake location, instead finding very broad spectral lines, strongly shifted to the red, indicating