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Sample records for voltage-dependent charge movement

  1. Charged Residues at the First Transmembrane Region Contribute to the Voltage Dependence of the Slow Gate of Connexins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Bernardo I; García, Isaac E; Pupo, Amaury; Retamal, Mauricio A; Martínez, Agustín D; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2016-07-22

    Connexins (Cxs) are a family of membrane-spanning proteins that form gap junction channels and hemichannels. Connexin-based channels exhibit two distinct voltage-dependent gating mechanisms termed slow and fast gating. Residues located at the C terminus of the first transmembrane segment (TM-1) are important structural components of the slow gate. Here, we determined the role of the charged residues at the end of TM-1 in voltage sensing in Cx26, Cx46, and Cx50. Conductance/voltage curves obtained from tail currents together with kinetics analysis reveal that the fast and slow gates of Cx26 involves the movement of two and four charges across the electric field, respectively. Primary sequence alignment of different Cxs shows the presence of well conserved glutamate residues in the C terminus of TM-1; only Cx26 contains a lysine in that position (lysine 41). Neutralization of lysine 41 in Cx26 increases the voltage dependence of the slow gate. Swapping of lysine 41 with glutamate 42 maintains the voltage dependence. In Cx46, neutralization of negative charges or addition of a positive charge in the Cx26 equivalent region reduced the slow gate voltage dependence. In Cx50, the addition of a glutamate in the same region decreased the voltage dependence, and the neutralization of a negative charge increased it. These results indicate that the charges at the end of TM-1 are part of the slow gate voltage sensor in Cxs. The fact that Cx42, which has no charge in this region, still presents voltage-dependent slow gating suggests that charges still unidentified also contribute to the slow gate voltage sensitivity.

  2. Analysis and Comparison of Voltage Dependent Charging Strategies for Single-Phase Electric Vehicles in an Unbalanced Danish Distribution Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez, Jorge Nájera; Knezovic, Katarina; Marinelli, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies four voltage dependent solutions for modulating the charging of multiple Electric Vehicles (EVs) in a real Danish network. Uncontrolled EV charging, especially in grid with high EV penetration, can result in overloaded lines and transformers, low-voltages and other performance......-in on phases with lower voltages are constrained during the charging period. In order to solve instability issues which may occur due to lack of communication between the controllers, several improvements are applied to the aforementioned droop control. Simulation results demonstrate the performance...

  3. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements for determining voltage-dependent charge-separation efficiencies of subcells in triple-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tex, David M.; Ihara, Toshiyuki; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Conventional external quantum-efficiency measurement of solar cells provides charge-collection efficiency for approximate short-circuit conditions. Because this differs from actual operating voltages, the optimization of high-quality tandem solar cells is especially complicated. Here, we propose a contactless method, which allows for the determination of the voltage dependence of charge-collection efficiency for each subcell independently. By investigating the power dependence of photoluminescence decays, charge-separation and recombination-loss time constants are obtained. The upper limit of the charge-collection efficiencies at the operating points is then obtained by applying the uniform field model. This technique may complement electrical characterization of the voltage dependence of charge collection, since subcells are directly accessible.

  4. Charged residues distribution modulates selectivity of the open state of human isoforms of the voltage dependent anion-selective channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Giuseppe Federico; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Messina, Angela; De Pinto, Vito; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Voltage Dependent Anion-selective Channels (VDACs) are pore-forming proteins located in the outer mitochondrial membrane. They are responsible for the access of ions and energetic metabolites into the inner membrane transport systems. Three VDAC isoforms exist in mammalian, but their specific role is unknown. In this work we have performed extensive (overall ∼5 µs) Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the human VDAC isoforms to detect structural and conformational variations among them, possibly related to specific functional roles of these proteins. Secondary structure analysis of the N-terminal domain shows a high similarity among the three human isoforms of VDAC but with a different plasticity. In particular, the N-terminal domain of the hVDAC1 is characterized by a higher plasticity, with a ∼20% occurrence for the 'unstructured' conformation throughout the folded segment, while hVDAC2, containing a peculiar extension of 11 amino acids at the N-terminal end, presents an additional 310-helical folded portion comprising residues 10' to 3, adhering to the barrel wall. The N-terminal sequences of hVDAC isoforms are predicted to have a low flexibility, with possible consequences in the dynamics of the human VDACs. Clear differences were found between hVDAC1 and hVDAC3 against hVDAC2: a significantly modified dynamics with possible important consequence on the voltage-gating mechanism. Charge distribution inside and at the mouth of the pore is responsible for a different preferential localization of ions with opposite charge and provide a valuable rationale for hVDAC1 and hVDAC3 having a Cl-/K+ selectivity ratio of 1.8, whereas hVDAC2 of 1.4. Our conclusion is that hVDAC isoforms, despite sharing a similar scaffold, have modified working features and a biological work is now requested to give evidence to the described dissimilarities.

  5. Voltage dependence of the Na-K pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Weer, P; Gadsby, D C; Rakowski, R F

    1988-01-01

    Present evidence demonstrates that the Na-K pump rate is voltage dependent, whereas early work was largely inconclusive. The I-V relationship has a positive slope over a wide voltage range, and the existence of a negative slope region is now doubtful. Monotonic voltage dependence is consistent with the reaction cycle containing a single voltage-dependent step. Recent measurements suggest that this voltage-dependent step occurs during Na translocation and may be deocclusion of Na+. In addition, two results suggest that K translocation is voltage insensitive: (a) large positive potentials appear to have no influence on Rb-Rb exchange or associated conformational transitions; and (b) transient currents associated with Na translocation appear to involve movement of a single charge, which is sufficient for a 3Na-2K cycle. The simplest interpretation is that the pump's cation binding sites supply two negative charges. Pre-steady-state measurements demonstrate that Na translocation precedes the pump cycle's rate-limiting step, presumably K translocation. But, because K translocation seems voltage insensitive, the voltage dependence of the steady-state pump rate probably reflects that of the concentration of the intermediate entering this slow step. Further pump current and flux data (both transient and steady-state), carefully determined over a range of conditions, should increase our understanding of the voltage-dependent step(s) in the Na-K pump cycle.

  6. Voltage Dependence of Supercapacitor Capacitance

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    Szewczyk Arkadiusz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Double-Layer Capacitors (EDLC, called Supercapacitors (SC, are electronic devices that are capable to store a relatively high amount of energy in a small volume comparing to other types of capacitors. They are composed of an activated carbon layer and electrolyte solution. The charge is stored on electrodes, forming the Helmholtz layer, and in electrolyte. The capacitance of supercapacitor is voltage- dependent. We propose an experimental method, based on monitoring of charging and discharging a supercapacitor, which enables to evaluate the charge in an SC structure as well as the Capacitance-Voltage (C-V dependence. The measurement setup, method and experimental results of charging/discharging commercially available supercapacitors in various voltage and current conditions are presented. The total charge stored in an SC structure is proportional to the square of voltage at SC electrodes while the charge on electrodes increases linearly with the voltage on SC electrodes. The Helmholtz capacitance increases linearly with the voltage bias while a sublinear increase of total capacitance was found. The voltage on SC increases after the discharge of electrodes due to diffusion of charges from the electrolyte to the electrodes. We have found that the recovery voltage value is linearly proportional to the initial bias voltage value.

  7. Lack of negatively charged residues at the external mouth of Kir2.2 channels enable the voltage-dependent block by external Mg2+.

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    Junwei Li

    Full Text Available Kir channels display voltage-dependent block by cytosolic cations such as Mg2+ and polyamines that causes inward rectification. In fact, cations can regulate K channel activity from both the extracellular and intracellular sides. Previous studies have provided insight into the up-regulation of Kir channel activity by extracellular K+ concentration. In contrast, extracellular Mg2+ has been found to reduce the amplitude of the single-channel current at milimolar concentrations. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of Kir channel blockade by external Mg2+ and the relationship between the Mg2+ blockade and activity potentiation by permeant K+ ions. In this study, we applied an interactive approach between theory and experiment. Electrophysiological recordings on Kir2.2 and its mutants were performed by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our results confirmed that extracellular Mg2+ could reduce heterologously expressed WT Kir2.2 currents in a voltage dependent manner. The kinetics of inhibition and recovery of Mg2+ exhibit a 3∼4s time constant. Molecular dynamics simulation results revealed a Mg2+ binding site located at the extracellular mouth of Kir2.2 that showed voltage-dependent Mg2+ binding. The mutants, G119D, Q126E and H128D, increased the number of permeant K+ ions and reduced the voltage-dependent blockade of Kir2.2 by extracellular Mg2+.

  8. Voltage dependence of Na translocation by the Na/K pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, M; Gadsby, D C

    During each complete reaction cycle, the Na/K pump transports three Na ions out across the cell membrane and two K ions in. The resulting net extrusion of positive charge generates outward membrane current but, until now, it was unclear how that net charge movement occurs. Reasonable possibilities included a single positive charge moving outwards during Na translocation; or a single negative charge moving inwards during K translocation; or either positive or negative charges moving during both translocation steps, but in unequal quantities. Any step that involves net charge movement through the membrane must have voltage-dependent transition rates. Here we report measurements of transient, voltage-dependent, displacement currents generated by the pump when its normal Na/K transport cycle has been interrupted by removal of external K and it is thus constrained to carry out Na/Na exchange. The quantity and voltage sensitivity of the charge moved during these transient currents suggests that Na translocation includes a voltage-dependent transition involving movement of one positive charge across the membrane. This single step can thus fully account for the electrogenic nature of Na/K exchange. The result provides important new insight into the molecular mechanism of active cation transport.

  9. Voltage-dependent gating of hERG potassium channels

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    Yen May eCheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which voltage-gated channels sense changes in membrane voltage and energetically couple this with opening of the ion conducting pore has been the source of significant interest. In voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels, much of our knowledge in this area comes from Shaker-type channels, for which voltage-dependent gating is quite rapid. In these channels, activation and deactivation are associated with rapid reconfiguration of the voltage-sensing domain unit that is electromechanically coupled, via the S4-S5 linker helix, to the rate-limiting opening of an intracellular pore gate. However, fast voltage-dependent gating kinetics are not typical of all Kv channels, such as Kv11.1 (human ether-a-go-go related gene, hERG, which activates and deactivates very slowly. Compared to Shaker channels, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying slow hERG gating is much poorer. Here, we present a comparative review of the structure-function relationships underlying voltage-dependent gating in Shaker and hERG channels, with a focus on the roles of the voltage sensing domain and the S4-S5 linker that couples voltage sensor movements to the pore. Measurements of gating current kinetics and fluorimetric analysis of voltage sensor movement are consistent with models suggesting that the hERG activation pathway contains a voltage independent step, which limits voltage sensor transitions. Constraints upon hERG voltage sensor movement may result from loose packing of the S4 helices and additional intra-voltage sensor counter charge interactions. More recent data suggest that key amino acid differences in the hERG voltage sensing unit and S4-S5 linker, relative to fast activating Shaker-type Kv channels, may also contribute to the increased stability of the resting state of the voltage sensor.

  10. The Mechanism of Voltage Dependent Gating of the NaChBac Prokaryotic Sodium Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaen, Paul G.

    Electrical signaling in cells depends on selective conductance of ions through membrane proteins called 'voltage gated ion channels'. These channels are characterized by their ability turn on and off the flow of ionic current by opening and closing their conductive pore in response to changes in membrane potential. The opening and closing of the pore is a mechanically linked to conformational movement of the positively charged fourth transmembrane segment (S4) in 'the voltage sensor' region. How the S4 moves in response to membrane potential is a controversial subject. In this thesis, we used the prokaryotic sodium channel NaChBac as our model sodium channel to study voltage dependent movement of the S4 in the voltage sensor. We use a disulfide-locking method where we introduced pairs of cysteines in the voltage sensor that crosslink and trap the S4 in its path after depolarization. We screened over one hundred mutations of the NaChBac channel in the whole cell patch clamp assay and demonstrated discrete and sequential voltage dependent ion pair interactions that occur in at least three states between the positively charged residues of the S4 segment and the acidic residues in the S1, S2 and S3 segments. In conjunction with structural modeling of the voltage sensor and our disulfide locking data, we propose that the S4 moves in and out of the plane of the membrane 8-13 A, forming distinct gating charge interactions with counter charges of the voltage sensor and adopts a 310 helix over a portion of its structure during activation. These findings are compatible with the sliding helix model and refine our understanding of the structural determinates of voltage sensor function in voltage gated ion channels.

  11. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth, E-mail: sasikanth.manipatruni@intel.com; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A. [Exploratory Integrated Circuits, Components Research, Intel Corp., Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  12. Reversal of HCN channel voltage dependence via bridging of the S4-S5 linker and Post-S6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prole, David L; Yellen, Gary

    2006-09-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels possess charged domains that move in response to changes in transmembrane voltage. How this movement is transduced into gating of the channel pore is largely unknown. Here we show directly that two functionally important regions of the spHCN1 pacemaker channel, the S4-S5 linker and the C-linker, come into close proximity during gating. Cross-linking these regions with high-affinity metal bridges or disulfide bridges dramatically alters channel gating in the absence of cAMP; after modification the polarity of voltage dependence is reversed. Instead of being closed at positive voltage and activating with hyperpolarization, modified channels are closed at negative voltage and activate with depolarization. Mechanistically, this reversal of voltage dependence occurs as a result of selectively eliminating channel deactivation, while retaining an existing inactivation process. Bridging also alters channel activation by cAMP, showing that interaction of these two regions can also affect the efficacy of physiological ligands.

  13. Gating currents from a Kv3 subfamily potassium channel: charge movement and modification by BDS-II toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuren; Robertson, Brian; Fedida, David

    2007-11-01

    Kv3 channels have a major role in determining neuronal excitability, and are characterized by ultra-rapid kinetics of gating and a high activation threshold. However, the gating currents, which occur as a result of positional changes of the charged elements in the channel structure during activation, are not well understood. Here we report a study of gating currents from wild-type Kv3.2b channels, expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells to facilitate high time-resolution recording. On-gating currents (I(g,on)) had extremely rapid kinetics such that at +80 mV, the time constant for the decay of I(g,on) was only approximately 0.3 ms. Decay of I(g,on) appeared mono-exponential at all potentials studied, and in support of this, the charge-voltage (Q-V) relationship was fitted with a single Boltzmann function, supporting the idea that only one charge system is required to account for the time course of I(g,on) and the voltage dependence of Q(on). The voltage (V((1/2))) for half movement of gating charge was -8.4 +/- 4.0 mV (n = 6), which closely matches the voltage dependence of activation of Kv3.2b ionic currents reported before. Depolarizations to more positive potentials than 0 mV decreased the amplitude and slowed the decay of the off-gating currents (I(g,off)), suggesting that a rate-limiting step in opening was present in Kv3 channels as in Shaker and other Kv channels. Return of charge was negatively shifted along the potential axis with a V((1/2)) of Q(off) of -80.9 +/- 0.8 mV (n = 3), which allowed approximately 90% charge return upon repolarization to -100 mV. BDS-II toxin apparently reduced I(g,on), and greatly slowed the kinetics of I(g,on), while shifting the Q-V relationship in the depolarizing direction. However, the Q-V relationship remained well fitted by a single Boltzmann function. These data provide the first description of Kv3 gating currents and give further insight into the interaction of BDS toxins and Kv3 channels.

  14. Conductance hysteresis in the voltage-dependent anion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Shay M; Teijido, Oscar; Hoogerheide, David P; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-09-01

    Hysteresis in the conductance of voltage-sensitive ion channels is observed when the transmembrane voltage is periodically varied with time. Although this phenomenon has been used in studies of gating of the voltage-dependent anion channel, VDAC, from the outer mitochondrial membrane for nearly four decades, full hysteresis curves have never been reported, because the focus was solely on the channel opening branches of the hysteresis loops. We studied the hysteretic response of a multichannel VDAC system to a triangular voltage ramp the frequency of which was varied over three orders of magnitude, from 0.5 mHz to 0.2 Hz. We found that in this wide frequency range the area encircled by the hysteresis curves changes by less than a factor of three, suggesting broad distribution of the characteristic times and strongly non-equilibrium behavior. At the same time, quasi-equilibrium two-state behavior is observed for hysteresis branches corresponding to VDAC opening. This enables calculation of the usual equilibrium gating parameters, gating charge and voltage of equipartitioning, which were found to be almost insensitive to the ramp frequency. To rationalize this peculiarity, we hypothesize that during voltage-induced closure and opening the system explores different regions of the complex free energy landscape, and, in the opening branch, follows quasi-equilibrium paths.

  15. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-11-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca) currents, when using Ba as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift (∼-10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivation rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries by means of multimodal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca channels.

  16. The effects of S4 segments on the voltage-dependence of inactivation for Cav3.1 calcium channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JunYing

    2007-01-01

    T-type calcium channels exhibit fast voltage-dependent inactivation,for which the underlying structure-function relationship still remains unclear.To investigate the roles of S4 segments in voltage-dependent inactivation of T-type calcium channels,we created S4 replacement chimeras between Cav3.1 calcium channels(fast voltage-dependent inactivation)and Cav1.2 calcium channels(little oltage-dependent inactivation)by replacing S4s in Cav3.1 with the corresponding regions in Cav1.2.Wild type and chimeric channels were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and channel currents were recorded with two-electrode voltage-clamp.We showed that replacing S4 region in domain I shifted voltage-dependence for inactivation of Cav3.1 to the left,and the V0.5 inact and kinact value were significantly changed.However replacing S4s in domains Ⅱ-Ⅳ had no effects on the voltage-dependent inactivation properties.These results suggest that the roles of S4 segments in domains Ⅰ-Ⅳ are different,and S4 in domain I is likely to be involved in voltage-dependent Inactivation process.Its movement during membrane depolarization may trigger a conformational change in the inactivation gate.

  17. Voltage-dependent changes in specific membrane capacitance caused by prestin, the outer hair cell lateral membrane motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Navarrete, Enrique

    2002-05-01

    In the outer hair cell (OHC), membrane capacitance principally derives from two components - that associated with lateral membrane sensor/motor charge movement, and that proportional to the membrane surface area (C(sa)). We used measures of membrane capacitance to test a model hypothesis that OHC lateral membrane molecular motors, recently identified as the protein prestin, fluctuate between two area states. By measuring membrane capacitance in native OHCs or prestin-transfected HEK cells at extreme voltages (+/-200 mV) where motor-derived charge movement is small or absent, we observed that C(sa) depends on the state of the motors, or correspondingly on membrane voltage. Deiters cells or control HEK cells, which lack motors, do not show this dependence. We modeled the voltage-dependent change in C(sa) as a Boltzmann process with the same parameters that describe the charge movement of the motors' voltage sensors. C(sa) is 3.28+/-0.75 pF (mean +/-SD; n=23) larger during extreme hyperpolarization, and the number of motors in OHCs and prestin-transfected HEK cells correlates with the magnitude of Delta C(sa)( r=0.78). Although these data are consistent with the area motor model, the corresponding area change, assuming 0.5 microF/cm(2) under constant membrane thickness, is unphysiologically large, and indicates that the capacitance change must result from changes not only in lateral membrane area but also specific capacitance. Thus, we conclude that a conformational change in the lateral membrane motor, prestin, additionally alters the dielectric constant and/or thickness of the lateral plasma membrane.

  18. Voltage Dependence of Conformational Dynamics and Subconducting States of VDAC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Rodolfo; Weichbrodt, Conrad; Paltrinieri, Licia; Mey, Ingo; Villinger, Saskia; Giller, Karin; Lange, Adam; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Becker, Stefan; Steinem, Claudia; de Groot, Bert L

    2016-09-20

    The voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC-1) is an important protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane that transports energy metabolites and is involved in apoptosis. The available structures of VDAC proteins show a wide β-stranded barrel pore, with its N-terminal α-helix (N-α) bound to its interior. Electrophysiology experiments revealed that voltage, its polarity, and membrane composition modulate VDAC currents. Experiments with VDAC-1 mutants identified amino acids that regulate the gating process. However, the mechanisms for how these factors regulate VDAC-1, and which changes they trigger in the channel, are still unknown. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations and single-channel experiments of VDAC-1 show agreement for the current-voltage relationships of an "open" channel and they also show several subconducting transient states that are more cation selective in the simulations. We observed voltage-dependent asymmetric distortions of the VDAC-1 barrel and the displacement of particular charged amino acids. We constructed conformational models of the protein voltage response and the pore changes that consistently explain the protein conformations observed at opposite voltage polarities, either in phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine membranes. The submicrosecond VDAC-1 voltage response shows intrinsic structural changes that explain the role of key gating amino acids and support some of the current gating hypotheses. These voltage-dependent protein changes include asymmetric barrel distortion, its interaction with the membrane, and significant displacement of N-α amino acids.

  19. Analytical Model for Voltage-Dependent Photo and Dark Currents in Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

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    Mesbahus Saleheen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A physics-based explicit mathematical model for the external voltage-dependent forward dark current in bulk heterojunction (BHJ organic solar cells is developed by considering Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH recombination and solving the continuity equations for both electrons and holes. An analytical model for the external voltage-dependent photocurrent in BHJ organic solar cells is also proposed by incorporating exponential photon absorption, dissociation efficiency of bound electron-hole pairs (EHPs, carrier trapping, and carrier drift and diffusion in the photon absorption layer. Modified Braun’s model is used to compute the electric field-dependent dissociation efficiency of the bound EHPs. The overall net current is calculated considering the actual solar spectrum. The mathematical models are verified by comparing the model calculations with various published experimental results. We analyze the effects of the contact properties, blend compositions, charge carrier transport properties (carrier mobility and lifetime, and cell design on the current-voltage characteristics. The power conversion efficiency of BHJ organic solar cells mostly depends on electron transport properties of the acceptor layer. The results of this paper indicate that improvement of charge carrier transport (both mobility and lifetime and dissociation of bound EHPs in organic blend are critically important to increase the power conversion efficiency of the BHJ solar cells.

  20. Pharmacology of the human cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part II: inactivation and blocking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, Poul; Barksmann, Trine L.; Kristensen, Berit I.

    2004-01-01

    Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents......Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents...

  1. Voltage dependence of rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation within a membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    The inactivation of a Na+ channel occurs when the activation of the charged S4 segment of domain IV, with rate functions $\\alpha_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i}$, is followed by the binding of an intracellular hydrophobic motif which blocks conduction through the ion pore, with rate functions $\\gamma_{i}$ and $\\delta_{i}$. During a voltage clamp of the Na+ channel, the solution of the master equation for inactivation reduces to the relaxation of a rate equation when the binding of the inactivation motif is rate limiting ($\\alpha_{i} \\gg \\gamma_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i} \\gg \\delta_{i}$). The voltage dependence of the derived forward rate function for Na+ channel inactivation has an exponential dependence on the membrane potential for small depolarizations and approaches a constant value for larger depolarizations, whereas the voltage dependence of the backward rate function is exponential, and each rate has a similar form to the Hodgkin-Huxley empirical rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation in the squid axon.

  2. Manipulating the voltage dependence of tunneling spin torques

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2012-10-01

    Voltage-driven spin transfer torques in magnetic tunnel junctions provide an outstanding tool to design advanced spin-based devices for memory and reprogrammable logic applications. The non-linear voltage dependence of the torque has a direct impact on current-driven magnetization dynamics and on devices performances. After a brief overview of the progress made to date in the theoretical description of the spin torque in tunnel junctions, I present different ways to alter and control the bias dependence of both components of the spin torque. Engineering the junction (barrier and electrodes) structural asymmetries or controlling the spin accumulation profile in the free layer offer promising tools to design effcient spin devices.

  3. Origin of the voltage dependence of G-protein regulation of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Yu-Hang; Bangaru, Saroja D; He, Linling; Abele, Kathryn; Tanabe, Shihori; Kozasa, Tohru; Yang, Jian

    2008-12-24

    G-protein (Gbetagamma)-mediated voltage-dependent inhibition of N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels contributes to presynaptic inhibition and short-term synaptic plasticity. The voltage dependence derives from the dissociation of Gbetagamma from the inhibited channels, but the underlying molecular and biophysical mechanisms remain largely unclear. In this study we investigated the role in this process of Ca(2+) channel beta subunit (Ca(v)beta) and a rigid alpha-helical structure between the alpha-interacting domain (AID), the primary Ca(v)beta docking site on the channel alpha(1) subunit, and the pore-lining IS6 segment. Gbetagamma inhibition of P/Q-type channels was reconstituted in giant inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes. Large populations of channels devoid of Ca(v)beta were produced by washing out a mutant Ca(v)beta with a reduced affinity for the AID. These beta-less channels were still inhibited by Gbetagamma, but without any voltage dependence, indicating that Ca(v)beta is indispensable for voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition. A truncated Ca(v)beta containing only the AID-binding guanylate kinase (GK) domain could fully confer voltage dependence to Gbetagamma inhibition. Gbetagamma did not alter inactivation properties, and channels recovered from Gbetagamma inhibition exhibited the same activation property as un-inhibited channels, indicating that Gbetagamma does not dislodge Ca(v)beta from the inhibited channel. Furthermore, voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition was abolished when the rigid alpha-helix between the AID and IS6 was disrupted by insertion of multiple glycines, which also eliminated Ca(v)beta regulation of channel gating, revealing a pivotal role of this rigid alpha-helix in both processes. These results suggest that depolarization-triggered movement of IS6, coupled to the subsequent conformational change of the Gbetagamma-binding pocket through a rigid alpha-helix induced partly by the Ca(v)beta GK domain, causes the

  4. Sucrose- and H-dependent charge movements associated with the gating of sucrose transporter ZmSUT1.

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    Armando Carpaneto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In contrast to man the majority of higher plants use sucrose as mobile carbohydrate. Accordingly proton-driven sucrose transporters are crucial for cell-to-cell and long-distance distribution within the plant body. Generally very negative plant membrane potentials and the ability to accumulate sucrose quantities of more than 1 M document that plants must have evolved transporters with unique structural and functional features. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To unravel the functional properties of one specific high capacity plasma membrane sucrose transporter in detail, we expressed the sucrose/H(+ co-transporter from maize ZmSUT1 in Xenopus oocytes. Application of sucrose in an acidic pH environment elicited inward proton currents. Interestingly the sucrose-dependent H(+ transport was associated with a decrease in membrane capacitance (C(m. In addition to sucrose C(m was modulated by the membrane potential and external protons. In order to explore the molecular mechanism underlying these C(m changes, presteady-state currents (I(pre of ZmSUT1 transport were analyzed. Decay of I(pre could be best fitted by double exponentials. When plotted against the voltage the charge Q, associated to I(pre, was dependent on sucrose and protons. The mathematical derivative of the charge Q versus voltage was well in line with the observed C(m changes. Based on these parameters a turnover rate of 500 molecules sucrose/s was calculated. In contrast to gating currents of voltage dependent-potassium channels the analysis of ZmSUT1-derived presteady-state currents in the absence of sucrose (I =  Q/τ was sufficient to predict ZmSUT1 transport-associated currents. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together our results indicate that in the absence of sucrose, 'trapped' protons move back and forth between an outer and an inner site within the transmembrane domains of ZmSUT1. This movement of protons in the electric field of the membrane gives rise to the presteady

  5. Electrical models of excitation-contraction coupling and charge movement in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, R T; Levis, R A; Eisenberg, R S

    1980-07-01

    The consequences of ionic current flow from the T system to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscle are examined. The Appendix analyzes a simple model in which the conductance gx, linking T system and SR, is in series with a parallel resistor and capacitor having fixed values. The conductance gx is supposed to increase rapidly with depolarization and to decrease slowly with repolarization. Nonlinear transient currents computed from this model have some of the properties of gating currents produced by intramembrane charge movement. In particular, the integral of the transient current upon depolarization approximates that upon repolarization. Thus, equality of nonlinear charge movement can occur without intramembrane charge movement. A more complicated model is used in the text to fit the structure of skeletal muscle and other properties of its charge movement. Rectification is introduced into gx and the membrane conductance of the terminal cisternae to give asymmetry in the time-course of the transient currents and saturation in the curve relating charge movement to depolarization, respectively. The more complex model fits experimental data quite well if the longitudinal tubules of the sarcoplasmic reticulum are isolated from the terminal cisternae by a substantial resistance and if calcium release from the terminal cisternae is, for the most part, electrically silent. Specific experimental tests of the model are proposed, and the implications for excitation-contraction coupling are discussed.

  6. [Role of voltage-dependent ion channels in epileptogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Mousnier, B; Couraud, F

    1993-10-01

    The aim of this review is to gather information in favour of the involvement of voltage-dependent ion channels in epileptogenesis. Although, up to now, no study has shown that epilepsy is accompanied by a modification in the activity to these channels, the recently acquired knowledge of their physiology allows to presume would favor their involvement in epileptogenesis. The results from electrophysiological studies are as follows: a persistent sodium current increases neuronal excitability whereas potassium currents have an inhibitory role. In particular, calcium-dependent potassium current are involved in the post-hyperpolarization phases which follows PDS. Calcium currents are also involved in the genesis of the "bursting pacemaker" activity displayed by the neurons presumed to be inducers of the epileptic activity. Biochemical data has shown that as a consequence of epileptic activity, sodium and calcium channels are down regulated. This down-regulation could be a way to reduces neuronal hyperexcitability. Pharmacological data demonstrate the drugs which activate calcium channels or which inhibit potassium channels have a convusilvant effect. On the contrary, agents which block calcium or sodium channels or which properties. Among the latter ones, some antiepileptic drugs can be found. In summary situations which lead to increase in calcium and sodium currents and/or to an inhibition in potassium currents are potentially epileptogenic.

  7. Toner Display Based on Movement of Tribo-electrically Charged Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takashi Kitamura

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of toner display based on an electrical movement of black and white charged particles has been investigated. Two kinds of particles of black and white charged in the different electric polarity are enclosed in two ITO transparent electrodes using an insulating spacer. The particle movement is controlled by the external electric field applied between two transparent electrodes. The black toner is adhered on the electrode by an electrostatic force across the CTL to display a black image. The toners can be put back to the counter electrode by applying a reverse electric field, and a white image is formed. The black and white solid images are displayed by the switch of polarity of applied voltage in toner display cell. The polarity of charge and the value of charge to mass ratio of two particles were measured by observation of the particle separation on the surface-type electrodes and using q/m meter, respectively.

  8. Phosphorylation of purified mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 modifies channel voltage-dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC phosphorylated by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 (JNK3 was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single-channel electrophysiological properties of the native and the phosphorylated VDAC were compared. The open probability versus voltage curve of the native VDAC displayed symmetry around the voltage axis, whereas that of the phosphorylated VDAC showed asymmetry. This result indicates that phosphorylation by JNK3 modifies voltage-dependence of VDAC.

  9. The voltage dependence of Ih in human myelinated axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, James; Trevillion, Louise; Bostock, Hugh; Burke, David

    2012-01-01

    HCN channels are responsible for Ih, a voltage-gated inwardly rectifying current activated by hyperpolarization. This current appears to be more active in human sensory axons than motor and may play a role in the determination of threshold. Differences in Ih are likely to be responsible for the high variability in accommodation to hyperpolarization seen in different subjects. The aim of this study was to characterise this current in human axons, both motor and sensory. Recordings of multiple axonal excitability properties were performed in 10 subjects, with a focus on the changes in threshold evoked by longer and stronger hyperpolarizing currents than normally studied. The findings confirm that accommodation to hyperpolarization is greater in sensory than motor axons in all subjects, but the variability between subjects was greater than the modality difference. An existing model of motor axons was modified to take into account the behaviour seen with longer and stronger hyperpolarization, and a mathematical model of human sensory axons was developed based on the data collected. The differences in behaviour of sensory and motor axons and the differences between different subjects are best explained by modulation of the voltage dependence, along with a modest increase of expression of the underlying conductance of Ih. Accommodation to hyperpolarization for the mean sensory data is fitted well with a value of −94.2 mV for the mid-point of activation (V0.5) of Ih as compared to −107.3 mV for the mean motor data. The variation in response to hyperpolarization between subjects is accounted for by varying this parameter for each modality (sensory: −89.2 to −104.2 mV; motor −87.3 to −127.3 mV). These voltage differences are within the range that has been described for physiological modulation of Ih function. The presence of slowly activated Ih isoforms on both motor and sensory axons was suggested by modelling a large internodal leak current and a masking of

  10. G Protein-induced Trafficking of Voltage-dependent Calcium Channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eugene Tombler; Nory Jun Cabanilla; Paul Carman; Natasha Permaul; John J. Hall; Ryan W. Richman; Jessica Lee; Jennifer Rodriguez; Dan P. Felsenfeld; Robert F. Hennigan; María A. Diversé-Pierluissi

    2006-01-01

    .... Here we report a novel mechanism for G protein-mediated modulation of neuronal voltage-dependent calcium channels that involves the destabilization and subsequent removal of calcium channels from the plasma membrane...

  11. Analytical Model for Voltage-Dependent Photo and Dark Currents in Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A physics-based explicit mathematical model for the external voltage-dependent forward dark current in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells is developed by considering Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination and solving the continuity equations for both electrons and holes. An analytical model for the external voltage-dependent photocurrent in BHJ organic solar cells is also proposed by incorporating exponential photon absorption, dissociation efficiency of bound electron-hole pairs (...

  12. Pharmacology of the human red cell voltage-dependent cation channel Part I. Activation by clotrimazole and analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barksmann, Trine Lyberth; Kristensen, Berit I.; Christophersen, Palle.

    2004-01-01

    Human red cells, Nonselective voltage dependent cation channel, NSVDC channel, Gárdos channel blockers, NSVDC channel activators......Human red cells, Nonselective voltage dependent cation channel, NSVDC channel, Gárdos channel blockers, NSVDC channel activators...

  13. Extracellular Linkers Completely Transplant the Voltage Dependence from Kv1.2 Ion Channels to Kv2.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinder, Fredrik; Madeja, Michael; Zeberg, Hugo; Århem, Peter

    2016-10-18

    The transmembrane voltage needed to open different voltage-gated K (Kv) channels differs by up to 50 mV from each other. In this study we test the hypothesis that the channels' voltage dependences to a large extent are set by charged amino-acid residues of the extracellular linkers of the Kv channels, which electrostatically affect the charged amino-acid residues of the voltage sensor S4. Extracellular cations shift the conductance-versus-voltage curve, G(V), by interfering with these extracellular charges. We have explored these issues by analyzing the effects of the divalent strontium ion (Sr(2+)) on the voltage dependence of the G(V) curves of wild-type and chimeric Kv channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using the voltage-clamp technique. Out of seven Kv channels, Kv1.2 was found to be most sensitive to Sr(2+) (50 mM shifted G(V) by +21.7 mV), and Kv2.1 to be the least sensitive (+7.8 mV). Experiments on 25 chimeras, constructed from Kv1.2 and Kv2.1, showed that the large Sr(2+)-induced G(V) shift of Kv1.2 can be transferred to Kv2.1 by exchanging the extracellular linker between S3 and S4 (L3/4) in combination with either the extracellular linker between S5 and the pore (L5/P) or that between the pore and S6 (LP/6). The effects of the linker substitutions were nonadditive, suggesting specific structural interactions. The free energy of these interactions was ∼20 kJ/mol, suggesting involvement of hydrophobic interactions and/or hydrogen bonds. Using principles from double-layer theory we derived an approximate linear equation (relating the voltage shifts to altered ionic strength), which proved to well match experimental data, suggesting that Sr(2+) acts on these channels mainly by screening surface charges. Taken together, these results highlight the extracellular surface potential at the voltage sensor as an important determinant of the channels' voltage dependence, making the extracellular linkers essential targets for evolutionary selection.

  14. Novel expression and regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in placentas from women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hiten D; McCallum, Laura A; Kurlak, Lesia O; Greenwood, Iain A; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Tribe, Rachel M

    2011-09-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with structural/functional alterations in placental and maternal vasculature. Voltage-dependant potassium channels encoded by KCNQ1-5 genes have been detected in several types of blood vessels where they promote vascular relaxation. Voltage-dependant potassium channel function can be modulated by KCNE1-5-encoded accessory proteins. The aim of this study was to determine whether KCNQ and KCNE genes are differentially expressed in placentas from women with preeclampsia compared with normotensive controls and to examine any differences in those who delivered preterm (voltage-dependant potassium channels are expressed and markedly modulated in placentas from preeclamptic women. Differential expression of isoforms may lead to altered cell proliferation. The correlation between KCNQ3 and KCNE5 expression is indicative of a novel channel complex and warrants further investigation.

  15. Understanding optically stimulated charge movement in quartz and feldspar using time-resolved measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankjaergaard, C.

    2010-02-15

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz and feldspar are widely used in accident dosimetry and luminescence dating. In order to improve already existing methods or to develop new methods towards extending the current limits of the technique, it is important to understand the charge movement within these materials. Earlier studies have primarily focussed on examination of the trap behaviour; however, this only tells half of the story as OSL is a combination of charge stimulation and recombination. By using time-resolved OSL (TR-OSL), one can directly examine the recombination route(s), and thus obtain insight into the other half of the process involved in luminescence emission. This thesis studies the TR-OSL and optically stimulated phosphorescence signals from quartz and feldspars spanning several orders of magnitude in time (few ns to the seconds time scale) in order to identify various charge transport mechanisms in the different time regimes. The techniques employed are time-resolved OSL, continuous-wave OSL, TL, optically stimulated exo-electron (OSE) emission and time-resolved OSE. These different techniques are used in combination with variable thermal or optical stimulation energy. The thesis first delves into three main methodological developments, namely (i) research and development of the equipment for TR-OSL measurements, (ii) finding the best method for multiple-exponential analysis of a TR-OSL curve, and (iii) optimisation of the pulsing configuration for the best separation of quartz OSL from a mixed quarts-feldspar sample. It then proceeds to study the different charge transport mechanisms subsequent to an optical stimulation pulse in quartz and feldspars. The results obtained for quartz conclude that the main lifetime component in quartz represents an excited state lifetime of the recombination centre, and the more slowly decaying components on the millisecond to seconds time scale arise from charge recycling

  16. KCNQ1 Channels Voltage Dependence through a Voltage-dependent Binding of the S4-S5 Linker to the Pore Domain*

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels are tetramers of six transmembrane domain (S1–S6) proteins. Crystallographic data demonstrate that the tetrameric pore (S5–S6) is surrounded by four voltage sensor domains (S1–S4). One key question remains: how do voltage sensors (S4) regulate pore gating? Previous mutagenesis data obtained on the Kv channel KCNQ1 highlighted the critical role of specific residues in both the S4-S5 linker (S4S5L) and S6 C terminus (S6T). From these data, we hypothesiz...

  17. Voltage-dependent currents in microvillar receptor cells of the frog vomeronasal organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotier, D; Døving, K B; Rosin, J F

    1993-08-01

    Vomeronasal receptor cells are differentiated bipolar neurons with a long dendrite bearing numerous microvilli. Isolated cells (with a mean dendritic length of 65 microns) and cells in mucosal slices were studied using whole-cell and Nystatin-perforated patch-clamp recordings. At rest, the membrane potential was -61 +/- 13 mV (mean +/- SD; n = 61). Sixty-four per cent of the cells had a resting potential in the range of -60 to -86 mV, with almost no spontaneous action potential. The input resistance was in the G omega range and overshooting repetitive action potentials were elicited by injecting depolarizing current pulses in the range of 2-10 pA. Voltage-dependent currents were characterized under voltage-clamp conditions. A transient fast inward current activating near -45 mV was blocked by tetrodotoxin. In isolated cells, it was half-deactivated at a membrane potential near -75 mV. An outward K+ current was blocked by internal Cs+ ions or by external tetraethylammonium or Ba2+ ions. A calcium-activated voltage-dependent potassium current was blocked by external Cd2+ ions. A voltage-dependent Ca2+ current was observed in an iso-osmotic BaCl2 solution. Finally, a hyperpolarization-activated inward current was recorded. Voltage-dependent currents in these microvillar olfactory receptor neurons appear qualitatively similar to those already described in ciliated olfactory receptor cells located in the principal olfactory epithelium.

  18. Engineering of a Genetically Encodable Fluorescent Voltage Sensor Exploiting Fast Ci-VSP Voltage-Sensing Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia Lundby; Hiroki Mutoh; Dimitar Dimitrov; Walther Akemann; Thomas Knöpfel

    2008-01-01

    Ci-VSP contains a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) homologous to that of voltage-gated potassium channels. Using charge displacement ('gating' current) measurements we show that voltage-sensing movements of this VSD can occur within 1 ms in mammalian membranes. Our analysis lead to development of a genetically encodable fluorescent protein voltage sensor (VSFP) in which the fast, voltage-dependent conformational changes of the Ci-VSP voltage sensor are transduced to similarly fast fluorescence re...

  19. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France); Clare, Jeffrey J. [Eaton Pharma Consulting, Eaton Socon, Cambridgeshire PE19 8EF (United Kingdom); Debanne, Dominique [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France); Alcaraz, Gisele, E-mail: gisele.alcaraz@univmed.fr [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  20. Localization and pharmacological characterization of voltage dependent calcium channels in cultured neocortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, D B; Lund, T M; Belhage, B

    2001-01-01

    using the fluorescent calcium chelator fura-2. The types of calcium channels present at the synaptic terminal were determined by the inhibitory action of calcium channel blockers on potassium-induced [3H]GABA release in the same cell preparation. L-, N-, P-, Q- and R-/T-type voltage dependent calcium...... channels were differentially distributed in somata, neurites and nerve terminals. omega-conotoxin MVIIC (omega-CgTx MVIIC) inhibited approximately 40% of the Ca(2+)-rise in both somata and neurites and 60% of the potassium induced [3H]GABA release, indicating that the Q-type channel is the quantitatively...... in cytosolic calcium concentration. The results of this investigation demonstrate that pharmacologically distinct types of voltage dependent calcium channels are differentially localized in cell bodies, neurites and nerve terminals of mouse cortical neurons but that the Q-type calcium channel appears...

  1. Lavender Oil-Potent Anxiolytic Properties via Modulating Voltage Dependent Calcium Channels

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical data support the clinical use of oral lavender oil in patients suffering from subsyndromal anxiety. We identified the molecular mechanism of action that will alter the perception of lavender oil as a nonspecific ingredient of aromatherapy to a potent anxiolytic inhibiting voltage dependent calcium channels (VOCCs) as highly selective drug target. In contrast to previous publications where exorbitant high concentrations were used, the effects of lavender oil in behavioral, bioc...

  2. Zn2+ regulates Kv2.1 voltage-dependent gating and localization following ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Aras, Mandar A.; Saadi, Robert A.; Aizenman, Elias

    2009-01-01

    The delayed-rectifier K+ channel Kv2.1 exists in highly phosphorylated somatodendritic clusters. Ischemia induces rapid Kv2.1 dephosphorylation and a dispersal of these clusters, accompanied by a hyperpolarizing shift in their voltage-dependent activation kinetics. Transient modulation of Kv2.1 activity and localization following ischemia is dependent on a rise in intracellular Ca2+and the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Here, we show that neuronal free Zn2+also plays a critical role in the ...

  3. A comparative study of the action of tolperisone on seven different voltage dependent sodium channel isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Doris; Lohberger, Birgit; Steinecker, Bibiane; Schmidt, Kurt; Quasthoff, Stefan; Schreibmayer, Wolfgang

    2006-05-24

    The specific, acute interaction of tolperisone, an agent used as a muscle relaxant and for the treatment of chronic pain conditions, with the Na(v1.2), Na(v1.3), Na(v1.4), Na(v1.5), Na(v1.6), Na(v1.7), and Na(v1.8) isoforms of voltage dependent sodium channels was investigated and compared to that of lidocaine. Voltage dependent sodium channels were expressed in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system and sodium currents were recorded with the two electrode voltage clamp technique. Cumulative dose response relations revealed marked differences in IC(50) values between the two drugs on identical isoforms, as well as between isoforms. A detailed kinetic analysis uncovered that tolperisone as well as lidocaine exhibited their blocking action not only via state dependent association/dissociation with voltage dependent sodium channels, but a considerable fraction of inhibition is tonic, i.e. permanent and basic in nature. Voltage dependent activation was affected to a minor extent only. A shift in steady-state inactivation to more negative potentials could be observed for most drug/isoform combinations. The contribution of this shift to overall block was, however, small at drug concentrations resulting in considerable overall block. Recovery from inactivation was affected notably by both drugs. Lidocaine application led to a pronounced prolongation of the time constant of the fast recovery process for the Na(v1.3), Na(v1.5), and Na(v1.7) isoforms, indicating common structural properties in the local anesthetic receptor site of these three proteins. Interestingly, this characteristic drug action was not observed for tolperisone.

  4. Proper Voltage-Dependent Ion Channel Function in Dysferlin-Deficient Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Lena; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Koenig, Xaver

    2015-01-01

    Dysferlin plays a decisive role in calcium-dependent membrane repair in myocytes. Mutations in the encoding DYSF gene cause a number of myopathies, e.g. limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B). Besides skeletal muscle degenerative processes, dysferlin deficiency is also associated with cardiac complications. Thus, both LGMD2B patients and dysferlin-deficient mice develop a dilated cardiomyopathy. We and others have recently reported that dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy show significant abnormalities in voltage-dependent ion channels, which may contribute to the pathophysiology in dystrophic cardiomyopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate if dysferlin, like dystrophin, is a regulator of cardiac ion channels. By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, we compared the properties of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels, as well as action potentials in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dysferlin-deficient (dysf) mice. In contrast to dystrophin deficiency, the lack of dysferlin did not impair the ion channel properties and left action potential parameters unaltered. In connection with normal ECGs in dysf mice these results suggest that dysferlin deficiency does not perturb cardiac electrophysiology. Our study demonstrates that dysferlin does not regulate cardiac voltage-dependent ion channels, and implies that abnormalities in cardiac ion channels are not a universal characteristic of all muscular dystrophy types. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Development of voltage-dependent calcium, sodium, and potassium currents in Xenopus spinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dowd, D K; Ribera, A B; Spitzer, N C

    1988-03-01

    Action potentials of embryonic nerve and muscle cells often have a different ionic dependence and longer duration than those of mature cells. The action potential of spinal cord neurons from Xenopus laevis exhibits a prominent calcium component at early stages of development that diminishes with age as the impulse becomes principally sodium dependent. Whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis has been undertaken to characterize the changes in membrane currents during development of these neurons in culture. Four voltage-dependent currents of cells were identified and examined during the first day in vitro, when most of the change in the action potential occurs. There are no changes in the peak density of the calcium current (ICa), its voltage dependence, or time to half-maximal activation; a small increase in inactivation is apparent. The major change in sodium current (INa) is a 2-fold increase in its density. In addition, more subtle changes in the kinetics of the macroscopic sodium current were noted. The peak density of voltage-dependent potassium current (IKv) increases 3-fold, and this current becomes activated almost twice as fast. No changes were noted in the extent of its inactivation. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IKc) consists of an inactivating and a sustained component. The former increases 2-fold in peak current density, and the latter increases similarly at less depolarized voltages. The changes in these currents contribute to the decrease in duration and the change in ionic dependence of the impulse.

  6. Hypotonicity activates a voltage-dependent membrane conductance in N2a neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruno, Akiyuki; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2017-03-04

    To maintain cellular and bodily homeostasis, cells respond to extracellular stimuli including osmotic stress by activating various ion channels, which have been implicated in many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. However, cellular osmosensory mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report a novel voltage-dependent current in N2a cells activated by exposure to hypotonic stress. After a hypotonic challenge, N2a cells sequentially develop two distinct currents. The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) current emerges first and, after a delay, activation of a previously uncharacterized strongly outwardly rectifying current follows. The latter, delayed current (Id) is insensitive to NPPB, a nonspecific blocker of Cl(-) channels, and intracellular Mg(2+), which inhibits VRAC and swelling-activated TRPM3 and TRPM7 channels. Replacement of extracellular Na(+) with NMDG(+) reduces inward tail currents, suggesting that Id is mediated by cations. Finally, Id shows voltage-dependent activation with slow activation kinetics and half-maximal activation at +76 mV. These pharmacological and biophysical characteristics of Id are distinct from those of known osmotic cell swelling-activated ion channels. In conclusion, our data identify and characterize a novel osmotically-activated, voltage-dependent ion channel in N2a cells.

  7. Proper Voltage-Dependent Ion Channel Function in Dysferlin-Deficient Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Rubi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dysferlin plays a decisive role in calcium-dependent membrane repair in myocytes. Mutations in the encoding DYSF gene cause a number of myopathies, e.g. limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B. Besides skeletal muscle degenerative processes, dysferlin deficiency is also associated with cardiac complications. Thus, both LGMD2B patients and dysferlin-deficient mice develop a dilated cardiomyopathy. We and others have recently reported that dystrophin-deficient ventricular cardiomyocytes from mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy show significant abnormalities in voltage-dependent ion channels, which may contribute to the pathophysiology in dystrophic cardiomyopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate if dysferlin, like dystrophin, is a regulator of cardiac ion channels. Methods and Results: By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, we compared the properties of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels, as well as action potentials in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dysferlin-deficient (dysf mice. In contrast to dystrophin deficiency, the lack of dysferlin did not impair the ion channel properties and left action potential parameters unaltered. In connection with normal ECGs in dysf mice these results suggest that dysferlin deficiency does not perturb cardiac electrophysiology. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that dysferlin does not regulate cardiac voltage-dependent ion channels, and implies that abnormalities in cardiac ion channels are not a universal characteristic of all muscular dystrophy types.

  8. Voltage-dependent calcium channels from brain incorporated into planar lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark T.; French, Robert J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    1984-03-01

    Many important physiological processes, including neurotransmitter release and muscle contraction1-3, are regulated by the concentration of Ca2+ ions in the cell. Levels of cytoplasmic Ca2+ can be elevated by the entry of Ca2+ ions through voltage-dependent channels which are selective for Ca2+, Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions4-14. We have measured currents through single, voltage-dependent calcium channels from rat brain that have been incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. Channel gating was voltage-dependent: membrane depolarization increased the channel open times and decreased the closed times. The channels were selective for divalent cations over monovalent ions. The well-known calcium channel blockers, lanthanum and cadmium, produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the apparent single-channel conductance. Contrary to expectations14, the nature of the divalent cation carrying current through the channel affected not only the single-channel conductance, but also the channel open times, with mean open times being shortest for barium.

  9. Endocytic regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kuniaki; Norota, Ikuo; Obara, Yutaro

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of cardiac ion channels is critical for the prevention of arrhythmia caused by abnormal excitability. Ion channels can be regulated by a change in function (qualitative) and a change in number (quantitative). Functional changes have been extensively investigated for many ion channels including cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels. By contrast, the regulation of ion channel numbers has not been widely examined, particularly with respect to acute modulation of ion channels. This article briefly summarizes stimulus-induced endocytic regulation of major voltage-dependent potassium channels in the heart. The stimuli known to cause their endocytosis include receptor activation, drugs, and low extracellular [K(+)], following which the potassium channels undergo either clathrin-mediated or caveolin-mediated endocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytic regulation has been demonstrated for Kv1.2, Kv1.5, KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), and Kv4.3, while drug-induced endocytosis has been demonstrated for Kv1.5 and hERG. Low [K(+)](o)-induced endocytosis might be unique for hERG channels, whose electrophysiological characteristics are known to be under strong influence of [K(+)](o). Although the precise mechanisms have not been elucidated, it is obvious that major cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels are modulated by endocytosis, which leads to changes in cardiac excitability.

  10. KCNQ1 channels voltage dependence through a voltage-dependent binding of the S4-S5 linker to the pore domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choveau, Frank S; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Abderemane Ali, Fayal; Labro, Alain J; Rose, Thierry; Dahimène, Shehrazade; Boudin, Hélène; Le Hénaff, Carole; Escande, Denis; Snyders, Dirk J; Charpentier, Flavien; Mérot, Jean; Baró, Isabelle; Loussouarn, Gildas

    2011-01-07

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels are tetramers of six transmembrane domain (S1-S6) proteins. Crystallographic data demonstrate that the tetrameric pore (S5-S6) is surrounded by four voltage sensor domains (S1-S4). One key question remains: how do voltage sensors (S4) regulate pore gating? Previous mutagenesis data obtained on the Kv channel KCNQ1 highlighted the critical role of specific residues in both the S4-S5 linker (S4S5(L)) and S6 C terminus (S6(T)). From these data, we hypothesized that S4S5(L) behaves like a ligand specifically interacting with S6(T) and stabilizing the closed state. To test this hypothesis, we designed plasmid-encoded peptides corresponding to portions of S4S5(L) and S6(T) of the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1 and evaluated their effects on the channel activity in the presence and absence of the ancillary subunit KCNE1. We showed that S4S5(L) peptides inhibit KCNQ1, in a reversible and state-dependent manner. S4S5(L) peptides also inhibited a voltage-independent KCNQ1 mutant. This inhibition was competitively prevented by a peptide mimicking S6(T), consistent with S4S5(L) binding to S6(T). Val(254) in S4S5(L) is known to contact Leu(353) in S6(T) when the channel is closed, and mutations of these residues alter the coupling between the two regions. The same mutations introduced in peptides altered their effects, further confirming S4S5(L) binding to S6(T). Our results suggest a mechanistic model in which S4S5(L) acts as a voltage-dependent ligand bound to its receptor on S6 at rest. This interaction locks the channel in a closed state. Upon plasma membrane depolarization, S4 pulls S4S5(L) away from S6(T), allowing channel opening.

  11. Voltage-dependent metabolic regulation of Kv2.1 channels in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masashi; Nakata, Masanori; Yamato, Shiho; Dezaki, Katsuya; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, San-e; Kawakami, Masanobu; Yada, Toshihiko; Kakei, Masafumi

    2010-05-28

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv channels) play a crucial role in formation of action potentials in response to glucose stimulation in pancreatic beta-ells. We previously reported that the Kv channel is regulated by glucose metabolism, particularly by MgATP. We examined whether the regulation of Kv channels is voltage-dependent and mechanistically related with phosphorylation of the channels. In rat pancreatic beta-cells, suppression of glucose metabolism with low glucose concentrations of 2.8mM or less or by metabolic inhibitors decreased the Kv2.1-channel activity at positive membrane potentials, while increased it at potentials negative to -10 mV, suggesting that modulation of Kv channels by glucose metabolism is voltage-dependent. Similarly, in HEK293 cells expressing the recombinant Kv2.1 channels, 0mM but not 10mM MgATP modulated the channel activity in a manner similar to that in beta-cells. Both steady-state activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel were shifted toward the negative potential in association with the voltage-dependent modulation of the channels by cytosolic dialysis of alkaline phosphatase in beta-cells. The modulation of Kv-channel current-voltage relations were also observed during and after glucose-stimulated electrical excitation. These results suggest that the cellular metabolism including MgATP production and/or channel phosphorylation/dephosphorylation underlie the physiological modulation of Kv2.1 channels during glucose-induced insulin secretion.

  12. Purification and Characterization of Two Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Isoforms from Plant Seeds1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, Helge; Wattiez, Ruddy; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Homblé, Fabrice

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondria were isolated from imbibed seeds of lentil (Lens culinaris) and Phaseolus vulgaris. We copurified two voltage-dependent anion channel from detergent solubilized mitochondria in a single purification step using hydroxyapatite. The two isoforms from P. vulgaris were separated by chromatofocusing chromatography in 4 m urea without any loss of channel activity. Channel activity of each isoform was characterized upon reconstitution into diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine planar lipid bilayers. Both isoforms form large conductance channels that are slightly anion selective and display cation selective substates. PMID:11080295

  13. Admittance Spectroscopy in CZTSSe: Metastability Behavior and Voltage Dependent Defect Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeper, Mark J.; Hages, Charles J.; Li, Jian V.; Levi, Dean; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2016-11-21

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed on a CZTSSe device with a carrier injection pretreatment and under electronically relaxed conditions to demonstrate metastability behavior. We show that the measurements with the carrier injection pretreatment demonstrate two admittance signatures while the relaxed measurement demonstrates only one admittance signature with a different activation energy. Additionally, voltage dependent admittance spectroscopy was performed using the carrier injection pretreatment method at each of the applied voltage bias. The activation energies of the two admittance signatures were calculated and are shown to be independent of the voltage bias.

  14. Conducting and voltage-dependent behaviors of potassium ion channels reconstituted from diaphragm sarcoplasmic reticulum: comparison with the cardiac isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picher, M; Decrouy, A; Rousseau, E

    1996-02-21

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) K+ channels from canine diaphragm were studied upon fusion of longitudinal and junctional membrane vesicles into planar lipid bilayers (PLB). The large-conductance cation selective channel (gamma(max) = 250 pS; Km = 33 mM) displays long-lasting open events which are much more frequent at positive than at negative voltages. A major subconducting state about 45% of the fully-open state current amplitude was occasionally observed at all voltages. The voltage-dependence of the open probability displays a sigmoid relationship that was fitted by the Boltzmann equation and expressed in terms of thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy (delta Gi) and the effective gating charge (Zs): delta Gi = 0.27 kcal/mol and Zs = -1.19 in 250 mM potassium gluconate (K-gluconate). Kinetic analyses also confirmed the voltage-dependent gating behavior of this channel, and indicate the implication of at least two open and three closed states. The diaphragm SR K+ channel shares several biophysical properties with the cardiac isoform: g = 180 pS, delta Gi = 0.75 kcal/mol, Zs = -1.45 in 150 mM K-gluconate, and a similar sigmoid P(o)/voltage relationship. Little is known about the regulation of the diaphragm and cardiac SR K+ channels. The conductance and gating of these channels were not influenced by physiological concentrations of Ca2+ (0.1 microM-1 mM) or Mg2+ (0.25-1 mM), as well as by cGMP (25-100 microM), lemakalim (1-100 microM), glyburide (up to 10 microM) or charybdotoxin (45-200 nM), added either to the cis or to the trans chamber. The apparent lack of biochemical or pharmacological modulation of these channels implies that they are not related to any of the well characterized surface membrane K+ channels. On the other hand, their voltage sensitivity strongly suggests that their activity could be modulated by putative changes in SR membrane potential that might occur during calcium fluxes.

  15. Uncoupling charge movement from channel opening in voltage-gated potassium channels by ruthenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Ishida, Itzel G; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E; Espinosa-Jalapa, Noel; Pérez-Guzmán, José A; Elías-Viñas, David; Le Lagadec, Ronan; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D

    2011-05-06

    The Kv2.1 channel generates a delayed-rectifier current in neurons and is responsible for modulation of neuronal spike frequency and membrane repolarization in pancreatic β-cells and cardiomyocytes. As with other tetrameric voltage-activated K(+)-channels, it has been proposed that each of the four Kv2.1 voltage-sensing domains activates independently upon depolarization, leading to a final concerted transition that causes channel opening. The mechanism by which voltage-sensor activation is coupled to the gating of the pore is still not understood. Here we show that the carbon-monoxide releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) is an allosteric inhibitor of the Kv2.1 channel and that its inhibitory properties derive from the CORM-2 ability to largely reduce the voltage dependence of the opening transition, uncoupling voltage-sensor activation from the concerted opening transition. We additionally demonstrate that CORM-2 modulates Shaker K(+)-channels in a similar manner. Our data suggest that the mechanism of inhibition by CORM-2 may be common to voltage-activated channels and that this compound should be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of electromechanical coupling.

  16. Cellular elements for seeing in the dark: voltage-dependent conductances in cockroach photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmela Iikka

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of voltage-dependent conductances in sensory information processing is well-established in insect photoreceptors. Here we present the characterization of electrical properties in photoreceptors of the cockroach (Periplaneta americana, a nocturnal insect with a visual system adapted for dim light. Results Whole-cell patch-clamped photoreceptors had high capacitances and input resistances, indicating large photosensitive rhabdomeres suitable for efficient photon capture and amplification of small photocurrents at low light levels. Two voltage-dependent potassium conductances were found in the photoreceptors: a delayed rectifier type (KDR and a fast transient inactivating type (KA. Activation of KDR occurred during physiological voltage responses induced by light stimulation, whereas KA was nearly fully inactivated already at the dark resting potential. In addition, hyperpolarization of photoreceptors activated a small-amplitude inward-rectifying (IR current mediated at least partially by chloride. Computer simulations showed that KDR shapes light responses by opposing the light-induced depolarization and speeding up the membrane time constant, whereas KA and IR have a negligible role in the majority of cells. However, larger KA conductances were found in smaller and rapidly adapting photoreceptors, where KA could have a functional role. Conclusions The relative expression of KA and KDR in cockroach photoreceptors was opposite to the previously hypothesized framework for dark-active insects, necessitating further comparative work on the conductances. In general, the varying deployment of stereotypical K+ conductances in insect photoreceptors highlights their functional flexibility in neural coding.

  17. The Eag domain regulates the voltage-dependent inactivation of rat Eag1 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Eag (Kv10 and Erg (Kv11 belong to two distinct subfamilies of the ether-à-go-go K+ channel family (KCNH. While Erg channels are characterized by an inward-rectifying current-voltage relationship that results from a C-type inactivation, mammalian Eag channels display little or no voltage-dependent inactivation. Although the amino (N-terminal region such as the eag domain is not required for the C-type inactivation of Erg channels, an N-terminal deletion in mouse Eag1 has been shown to produce a voltage-dependent inactivation. To further discern the role of the eag domain in the inactivation of Eag1 channels, we generated N-terminal chimeras between rat Eag (rEag1 and human Erg (hERG1 channels that involved swapping the eag domain alone or the complete cytoplasmic N-terminal region. Functional analyses indicated that introduction of the homologous hERG1 eag domain led to both a fast phase and a slow phase of channel inactivation in the rEag1 chimeras. By contrast, the inactivation features were retained in the reverse hERG1 chimeras. Furthermore, an eag domain-lacking rEag1 deletion mutant also showed the fast phase of inactivation that was notably attenuated upon co-expression with the rEag1 eag domain fragment, but not with the hERG1 eag domain fragment. Additionally, we have identified a point mutation in the S4-S5 linker region of rEag1 that resulted in a similar inactivation phenotype. Biophysical analyses of these mutant constructs suggested that the inactivation gating of rEag1 was distinctly different from that of hERG1. Overall, our findings are consistent with the notion that the eag domain plays a critical role in regulating the inactivation gating of rEag1. We propose that the eag domain may destabilize or mask an inherent voltage-dependent inactivation of rEag1 K+ channels.

  18. Effects of in vitro and in vivo lead exposure on voltage-dependent calcium channels in central neurons of Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G

    1987-01-01

    Currents through calcium channels of members of an identified cluster of neurons (B cells) in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis were studied under voltage clamp. The normal physiological saline was modified to maximize the visibility of voltage-dependent calcium currents and minimize contamination by other currents. Barium was used as the charge carrier for the calcium channels. Depolarizing voltage steps induce an inward current, the magnitude of which varies with the barium concentration. In brains taken from animals not exposed in vivo to lead, in vitro addition of lead acetate to the recording medium (0.25 to 14 microM) inhibits the barium current by 59 +/- 14% (mean +/- s.d.), in a manner that is independent of the lead concentration. The magnitude of the residual current still varies with the barium concentration. The voltage dependence of the current appears to be unaffected by lead. In contrast to some other calcium-channel blockers, such as cobalt, the inhibition of barium currents by in vitro lead exposure is irreversible, at least in short-term experiments. Contrary to expectations based on these in vitro results, barium currents in B cells of animals exposed to 5 microM lead for 6 to 12 weeks in vivo were approximately twice as large as barium currents in B cells from unexposed controls, when both were recorded in lead-free saline. It is possible that chronic in vivo lead exposure causes an increase in the number of calcium channels in these neurons.

  19. A vesicle-trafficking protein commandeers Kv channel voltage sensors for voltage-dependent secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefen, Christopher; Karnik, Rucha; Larson, Emily; Lefoulon, Cécile; Wang, Yizhou; Waghmare, Sakharam; Zhang, Ben; Hills, Adrian; Blatt, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Growth in plants depends on ion transport for osmotic solute uptake and secretory membrane trafficking to deliver material for wall remodelling and cell expansion. The coordination of these processes lies at the heart of the question, unresolved for more than a century, of how plants regulate cell volume and turgor. Here we report that the SNARE protein SYP121 (SYR1/PEN1), which mediates vesicle fusion at the Arabidopsis plasma membrane, binds the voltage sensor domains (VSDs) of K(+) channels to confer a voltage dependence on secretory traffic in parallel with K(+) uptake. VSD binding enhances secretion in vivo subject to voltage, and mutations affecting VSD conformation alter binding and secretion in parallel with channel gating, net K(+) concentration, osmotic content and growth. These results demonstrate a new and unexpected mechanism for secretory control, in which a subset of plant SNAREs commandeer K(+) channel VSDs to coordinate membrane trafficking with K(+) uptake for growth.

  20. Voltage-dependent K+ currents contribute to heterogeneity of olfactory ensheathing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rela, Lorena; Piantanida, Ana Paula; Bordey, Angelique; Greer, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory nerve is permissive for axon growth throughout life. This has been attributed in part to the olfactory ensheathing glial cells that encompass the olfactory sensory neuron fascicles. Olfactory ensheathing cells also promote axon growth in vitro and when transplanted in vivo to sites of injury. The mechanisms involved remain largely unidentified owing in part to the limited knowledge of the physiological properties of ensheathing cells. Glial cells rely for many functions on the properties of the potassium channels expressed; however, those expressed in ensheathing cells are unknown. Here we show that olfactory ensheathing cells express voltage-dependent potassium currents compatible with inward rectifier (Kir) and delayed rectifier (KDR) channels. Together with gap junction coupling, these contribute to the heterogeneity of membrane properties observed in olfactory ensheathing cells. The relevance of K+ currents expressed by ensheathing cells is discussed in relation to plasticity of the olfactory nerve. PMID:25856239

  1. Selective modulation of cellular voltage dependent calcium channels by hyperbaric pressure - a suggested HPNS partial mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eAviner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Professional deep sea divers experience motor and cognitive impairment, known as High Pressure Neurological Syndrome (HPNS, when exposed to pressures of 100 msw (1.1MPa and above, considered to be the result of synaptic transmission alteration. Previous studies have indicated modulation of presynaptic Ca2+ currents at high pressure. We directly measured for the first time pressure effects on the currents of voltage dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Pressure selectivity augmented the current in CaV1.2 and depressed it in CaV3.2 channels. Pressure application also affected the channels' kinetics, such as ƮRise, ƮDecay. Pressure modulation of VDCCs seems to play an important role in generation of HPNS signs and symptoms.

  2. G protein-induced trafficking of voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombler, Eugene; Cabanilla, Nory Jun; Carman, Paul; Permaul, Natasha; Hall, John J; Richman, Ryan W; Lee, Jessica; Rodriguez, Jennifer; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Hennigan, Robert F; Diversé-Pierluissi, María A

    2006-01-20

    Calcium channels are well known targets for inhibition by G protein-coupled receptors, and multiple forms of inhibition have been described. Here we report a novel mechanism for G protein-mediated modulation of neuronal voltage-dependent calcium channels that involves the destabilization and subsequent removal of calcium channels from the plasma membrane. Imaging experiments in living sensory neurons show that, within seconds of receptor activation, calcium channels are cleared from the membrane and sequestered in clathrin-coated vesicles. Disruption of the L1-CAM-ankyrin B complex with the calcium channel mimics transmitter-induced trafficking of the channels, reduces calcium influx, and decreases exocytosis. Our results suggest that G protein-induced removal of plasma membrane calcium channels is a consequence of disrupting channel-cytoskeleton interactions and might represent a novel mechanism of presynaptic inhibition.

  3. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Alan Zaydman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD and pore-gate (PGD structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7 channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1 channels. In this review, we put these findings in the context of the current understanding of voltage-dependent gating, lipid modulation of Kv channel activation, and PIP2-regulation of KCNQ channels. We suggest that lipid-mediated coupling of functional domains is a common mechanism among KCNQ channels that may be applicable to other Kv channels and membrane proteins.

  4. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD) and pore-gate (PGD) structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7) channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1 channels. In this review, we put these findings in the context of the current understanding of voltage-dependent gating, lipid modulation of Kv channel activation, and PIP2-regulation of KCNQ channels. We suggest that lipid-mediated coupling of functional domains is a common mechanism among KCNQ channels that may be applicable to other Kv channels and membrane proteins.

  5. Understanding optically stimulated charge movement in quartz and feldspar using time-resolved measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina

    to identify various charge transport mechanisms in the different time regimes. The techniques employed are time-resolved OSL, continuous-wave OSL, TL, optically stimulated exo-electron (OSE) emission and time-resolved OSE. These different techniques are used in combination with variable thermal or optical...... and the conduction band in determining charge transport. It is suggested that unlike quartz, the excited state lifetime does not play an important role in our measurements. Finally, it is shown that one of these routes favors production if a least fading signal (due to quantum mechanical tunnelling) in feldspars...... the TR-OSL and optically stimulated phosphorescence signals from quartz and feldspars spanning several orders of magnitude in time (few ns to the seconds time scale) in order to identify various charge transport mechanisms in the different time regimes. The techniques employed are time-resolved OSL...

  6. Over Expression of Voltage Dependent Anion Channel 2 (VDAC2 in Muscles of Electrically Stunned Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norshahida Abu Samah, Azura Amid, and Faridah Yusof

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Water bath stunning is a common practice in commercial slaughterhouses. Such treatment is economic and in line with animal welfare practice. However, the conditions applied for the stunning process may vary from a slaughterhouse to another slaughterhouse. Such a loose regulation on the stunning procedure has opened up doors for food adulteration such as over dose stunning. In this study, a simple and reliable approach using proteomics have been developed to study the effect of different currents and voltages in stunning on the protein expression of the chickens. Protein profiles of the chickens were constructed in order to detect any differences in protein expression and modifications. The different voltage studied were 10 V, 40 V and 70 V while the values for current studied were 0.25 A, 0.5 A, and 0.75 A. After the proteomics analyses using 2D Platinum ImageMaster 6.0 and Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight (MALDI TOF spectrometry identification, Voltage dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 was identified to be over expressed in the muscle sample of over stunned chicken. The over expression of VDAC2 was confirmed at the transcriptional level of RNA expression. Real Time PCR showed that all over stunned samples contained higher mRNA expression level for VDAC2 genes. The mRNA level of VDAC2 was up-regulated by 59.87 fold change when normalized with housekeeping gene. In conclusion, VDAC2 could serve as potential biomarkers for identification of electrically stimulated chickens. The existence of these biomarkers will help to monitor the slaughtering and stunning process in the future. It will revolutionize the food authentication field and give a new breathe to the meat industry.ABSTRAK: Kaedah "waterbath stunning" merupakan amalan biasa di pusat-pusat penyembelihan. Kaedah ini adalah ekonomik dan selari dengan amalan kebajikan haiwan. Walaubagaimanapun, syarat-syarat yang digunakan untuk proses kejutan tersebut mungkin

  7. Voltage dependence of proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin mutants with altered lifetime of the M intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Geibel

    Full Text Available The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR from Halobacterium salinarum is tightly regulated by the [H(+] gradient and transmembrane potential. BR exhibits optoelectric properties, since spectral changes during the photocycle are kinetically controlled by voltage, which predestines BR for optical storage or processing devices. BR mutants with prolonged lifetime of the blue-shifted M intermediate would be advantageous, but the optoelectric properties of such mutants are still elusive. Using expression in Xenopus oocytes and two-electrode voltage-clamping, we analyzed photocurrents of BR mutants with kinetically destabilized (F171C, F219L or stabilized (D96N, D96G M intermediate in response to green light (to probe H(+ pumping and blue laser flashes (to probe accumulation/decay of M. These mutants have divergent M lifetimes. As for BR-WT, this strictly correlates with the voltage dependence of H(+ pumping. BR-F171C and BR-F219L showed photocurrents similar to BR-WT. Yet, BR-F171C showed a weaker voltage dependence of proton pumping. For both mutants, blue laser flashes applied during and after green-light illumination showed reduced M accumulation and shorter M lifetime. In contrast, BR-D96G and BR-D96N exhibited small photocurrents, with nonlinear current-voltage curves, which increased strongly in the presence of azide. Blue laser flashes showed heavy M accumulation and prolonged M lifetime, which accounts for the strongly reduced H(+ pumping rate. Hyperpolarizing potentials augmented these effects. The combination of M-stabilizing and -destabilizing mutations in BR-D96G/F171C/F219L (BR-tri shows that disruption of the primary proton donor Asp-96 is fatal for BR as a proton pump. Mechanistically, M destabilizing mutations cannot compensate for the disruption of Asp-96. Accordingly, BR-tri and BR-D96G photocurrents were similar. However, BR-tri showed negative blue laser flash-induced currents even without actinic green light, indicating

  8. Charge movement in grains of quartz studied using exo-electron emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Denby, Phil M.; Murray, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    A flow-through Geiger-Muller pancake electron detector attachment has been fitted to the Riso TL/OSL reader, enabling optically stimulated electrons (OSE) to be measured simultaneously with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). This detector has been used to provide new insights into charge mo...

  9. Cortisone dissociates voltage-dependent K+ channel from its beta subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yaping; Weng, Jun; Kabaleeswaran, Venkataraman; Li, Huiguang; Cao, Yu; Bhosle, Rahul C.; Zhou, Ming

    2009-01-01

    The Shaker family voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv1) are expressed in a wide variety of cells and essential for cellular excitability. In humans, loss-of-function mutations of Kv1 channels lead to hyperexcitability and are directly linked to episodic ataxia and atrial fibrillation. All Kv1 channels assemble with beta subunits (Kvβ) and certain Kvβs, for example Kvβ1, have an N-terminal segment that closes a channel by the N-type inactivation mechanism. In principle dissociation of Kvβ1, although never reported, should eliminate inactivation and thus potentiate Kv1 current. We found that cortisone increases mammalian (rat) Kv1 channel activity by binding to Kvβ1. A crystal structure of the Kvβ-cortisone complex was solved to 1.82 Å resolution and revealed novel cortisone binding sites. Further studies demonstrated that cortisone promotes dissociation of Kvβ. The new mode of channel modulation may be explored by native or synthetic ligands to fine tune cellular excitability. PMID:18806782

  10. RAS-RAF-MEK-dependent oxidative cell death involving voltage-dependent anion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagoda, Nicholas; von Rechenberg, Moritz; Zaganjor, Elma; Bauer, Andras J; Yang, Wan Seok; Fridman, Daniel J; Wolpaw, Adam J; Smukste, Inese; Peltier, John M; Boniface, J Jay; Smith, Richard; Lessnick, Stephen L; Sahasrabudhe, Sudhir; Stockwell, Brent R

    2007-06-14

    Therapeutics that discriminate between the genetic makeup of normal cells and tumour cells are valuable for treating and understanding cancer. Small molecules with oncogene-selective lethality may reveal novel functions of oncoproteins and enable the creation of more selective drugs. Here we describe the mechanism of action of the selective anti-tumour agent erastin, involving the RAS-RAF-MEK signalling pathway functioning in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Erastin exhibits greater lethality in human tumour cells harbouring mutations in the oncogenes HRAS, KRAS or BRAF. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we discovered that erastin acts through mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs)--a novel target for anti-cancer drugs. We show that erastin treatment of cells harbouring oncogenic RAS causes the appearance of oxidative species and subsequent death through an oxidative, non-apoptotic mechanism. RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of VDAC2 or VDAC3 caused resistance to erastin, implicating these two VDAC isoforms in the mechanism of action of erastin. Moreover, using purified mitochondria expressing a single VDAC isoform, we found that erastin alters the permeability of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Finally, using a radiolabelled analogue and a filter-binding assay, we show that erastin binds directly to VDAC2. These results demonstrate that ligands to VDAC proteins can induce non-apoptotic cell death selectively in some tumour cells harbouring activating mutations in the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway.

  11. Functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, K J; Nutter, T J; Elmer, L W; Kempner, E S

    1985-03-25

    Radiation inactivation was used in situ to determine the functional unit sizes of the neurotoxin receptors of the voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain. Frozen or lyophilized synaptosomes were irradiated with high energy electrons generated by a linear accelerator and assayed for [3H]saxitoxin, 125I-Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (alpha-scorpion toxin), 125I-Centruroides suffusus suffusus (beta-scorpion toxin), and batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-[3H]benzoate binding activity. The functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors determined in situ by target analysis are 220,000 for saxitoxin, 263,000 for alpha-scorpion toxin, and 45,000 for beta-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the inactivation curve for batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-benzoate binding to the channel yields two target sizes of Mr approximately 287,000 (50%) and approximately 51,000 (50%). The results are independent of the purity of the membrane preparation. Comparison of the radiation inactivation data with the protein composition of the rat brain sodium channel indicates that there are at least two functional components.

  12. Pharmacological Investigation of Voltage-dependent Ca2+ Channels in Human Ejaculatory Sperm in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lu; LIU Jihong; LI Jiagui; YE Zhangqun

    2006-01-01

    The types of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in human ejaculatory sperm and the effects of calcium channel blocker (CCB) on human sperm motility parameters in vitro were investigated. The human sperm motility parameters in vitro in response to the pharmacological agents nifedipine (NIF, inhibitor of L-type VDCC) and ω-conotoxin (GVIA, inhibitor of N-type VDCC) were compared and analyzed statistically. The results showed that NIF (1, 5, 10 μmol/L)could not only significantly affect human sperm's shape but also spermatozoa motility after incubated at least 10 min in vitro (P<0.001). GVIA (0.1, 0.5 and 1 μmol/L) could just only significantly affect human sperm's progressive motility (a %+b %) after incubated for 20 min in vitro (P<0.01), but they both could not significantly affect spermic abnormality rate. It is suggested that L-type VDCC, non L-type VDCCs and isoform of L-type VDCC exist in the cell membrane of human sperm solely or together, and they participate in the spermic physiological processes especially the spermic motility.

  13. Voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel and Na+ channel in frog taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwayanagi, M; Miyake, M; Kurihara, K

    1983-01-01

    Frog taste cells were hyperpolarized by injecting an inward current pulse, and regenerative anode-break potentials were observed at the termination of the current pulse. The results obtained are as follows. 1) The magnitude of the anode-break potentials increased with the extent of hyperpolarization of taste cells and reached a saturation level around -200 mV. 2) The magnitudes of the anode-break potentials observed in 80 different taste cells hyperpolarized to about -200 mV were distributed widely from cell to cell. The average magnitude was 39 mV. 3) The anode-break potentials were recorded after the lingual artery was perfused with artificial solutions containing various channel blockers. The results indicated that the anode-break potentials are composed of Na+ and Ca2+ components. 4) The slope of the current-voltage relation obtained with cells hyperpolarized to 100 mV was appreciably decreased above -50 mV by application of tetrodotoxin to the perfusing solution. Discussion was made on possible roles of the voltage-dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels in the electrotonic spreading of the depolarization at the receptor membranes to the synaptic area and in releasing a chemical transmitter.

  14. Tetrahydroacridine inhibits voltage-dependent Na+ current in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei WANG; Yi-ping WANG; Guo-yuan HU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of tetrahydroacridine (tacrine) on voltage-gated Na+ channels in cardiac tissues.METHODS: Single ventricular myocytes were enzymatically dissociated from adult guinea-pig heart. Voltagedependent Na+ current was recorded using whole cell voltage-clamp technique. RESULTS: (1) Tacrine reversibly inhibited Na+ current with an IC50 value of 120 μmol/L (95 % confidence range: 108-133 μmol/L). (2) The inhibitory effects of tacrine on Na+ current exhibited both a tonic nature and use-dependence. (3) Tacrine at 100 μmol/L caused a negative shift (about 10 mV) in the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation of Na+ current, and retarded its recovery from inactivation, but did not affect its activation curve. (4) Intracellular application of tacrine significantly inhibited Na+ current. CONCLUSION: In addition to blocking other voltage-gated ion channels,tacrine blocked Na+ channels in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. Tactine acted as inactivation stabilizer of Na+channels in cardiac tissues.

  15. Regulation of mitochondrial function by voltage dependent anion channels in ethanol metabolism and the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasters, John J; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Czerny, Christoph; Zhong, Zhi; Maldonado, Eduardo N

    2012-06-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC) are highly conserved proteins that are responsible for permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane to hydrophilic metabolites like ATP, ADP and respiratory substrates. Although previously assumed to remain open, VDAC closure is emerging as an important mechanism for regulation of global mitochondrial metabolism in apoptotic cells and also in cells that are not dying. During hepatic ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, VDAC closure suppresses exchange of mitochondrial metabolites, resulting in inhibition of ureagenesis. In vivo, VDAC closure after ethanol occurs coordinately with mitochondrial uncoupling. Since acetaldehyde passes through membranes independently of channels and transporters, VDAC closure and uncoupling together foster selective and more rapid oxidative metabolism of toxic acetaldehyde to nontoxic acetate by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. In single reconstituted VDAC, tubulin decreases VDAC conductance, and in HepG2 hepatoma cells, free tubulin negatively modulates mitochondrial membrane potential, an effect enhanced by protein kinase A. Tubulin-dependent closure of VDAC in cancer cells contributes to suppression of mitochondrial metabolism and may underlie the Warburg phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: VDAC structure, function, and regulation of mitochondrial metabolism.

  16. Regulation of KV channel voltage-dependent activation by transmembrane β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eSun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-activated K+ (KV channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. KV channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSD. The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many KV channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the KV β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of KV α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into KV channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  17. Laser-driven micro-Coulomb charge movement and energy conversion to relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobble, J. A.; Palaniyappan, S.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Huang, C.; Gautier, D. C.; Clark, D. D.; Falk, K.; Jung, D.

    2016-09-01

    Development of robust instrumentation has shown evidence for a multi-μC expulsion of relativistic electrons from a sub-μm-thick foil, laser illuminated with 60-70 J on target at 2 × 1020 W/cm2. From previous work and with electron spectroscopy, it is seen that an exponential electron energy distribution is accurate enough to calculate the emitted electron charge and energy content. The 5-10-μC charge for the >100-TW Trident Laser represents the first active measurement of the >50% laser-light-to-electron conversion efficiency. By shorting out the TV/m electric field usually associated with accelerating multi-MeV ions from such targets, one finds that this charge is representative of a multi-MA current of relativistic electrons for diverse applications from electron fast ignition to advanced radiography concepts. Included with the details of the discoveries of this research, shortcomings of the diagnostics and means of improving their fidelity are discussed.

  18. The human red cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part III: Distribution homogeneity and pH dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, P.; Barksmann, T. L.; Christophersen, P.

    2006-01-01

    The homogeneity of the distribution of the non-selective voltage-dependent cation channel (the NSVDC channel) in the human erythrocyte, and the pH dependence was investigated. Activation of this channel caused a uniform cellular dehydration, which was characterized by the changes in the erythrocyte...

  19. VOLTAGE-DEPENDENT SODIUM AND POTASSIUM, BUT NO CALCIUM CONDUCTANCES IN DDT1 MF-2 SMOOTH-MUSCLE CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLLEMAN, A; NELEMANS, A; VANDENAKKER, J; DUIN, M; DENHERTOG, A

    1991-01-01

    Voltage-dependent inward and outward membrane currents were investigated in the DDT1 MF-2 smooth muscle cell line using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Application of a pulse protocol with subsequent depolarizing voltage steps elicited an inactivating inward current and a non-inactivating outw

  20. Voltage dependence property of parameters for human body discharge in air through a small metal rod

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Discharge parameters are measured and calculated in electrostatic discharge (ESD) from charged human body through a small moving handheld metal rod. Correlation study has been performed on discharge parameters with charge voltage as well as approach speed. At charge voltage 800 V, difference of discharge parameters caused by fast and slow approach speed of electrode is found to reach extreme values. To explore the reason for this special case, an analysis with a short-gap ESD model is carried out.

  1. Lavender oil-potent anxiolytic properties via modulating voltage dependent calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwald, Anita M; Nöldner, Michael; Wilmes, Thomas; Klugbauer, Norbert; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical data support the clinical use of oral lavender oil in patients suffering from subsyndromal anxiety. We identified the molecular mechanism of action that will alter the perception of lavender oil as a nonspecific ingredient of aromatherapy to a potent anxiolytic inhibiting voltage dependent calcium channels (VOCCs) as highly selective drug target. In contrast to previous publications where exorbitant high concentrations were used, the effects of lavender oil in behavioral, biochemical, and electrophysiological experiments were investigated in physiological concentrations in the nanomolar range, which correlate to a single dosage of 80 mg/d in humans that was used in clinical trials. We show for the first time that lavender oil bears some similarities with the established anxiolytic pregabalin. Lavender oil inhibits VOCCs in synaptosomes, primary hippocampal neurons and stably overexpressing cell lines in the same range such as pregabalin. Interestingly, Silexan does not primarily bind to P/Q type calcium channels such as pregabalin and does not interact with the binding site of pregabalin, the α2δ subunit of VOCCs. Lavender oil reduces non-selectively the calcium influx through several different types of VOCCs such as the N-type, P/Q-type and T-type VOCCs. In the hippocampus, one brain region important for anxiety disorders, we show that inhibition by lavender oil is mainly mediated via N-type and P/Q-type VOCCs. Taken together, we provide a pharmacological and molecular rationale for the clinical use of the oral application of lavender oil in patients suffering from anxiety.

  2. Lavender oil-potent anxiolytic properties via modulating voltage dependent calcium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M Schuwald

    Full Text Available Recent clinical data support the clinical use of oral lavender oil in patients suffering from subsyndromal anxiety. We identified the molecular mechanism of action that will alter the perception of lavender oil as a nonspecific ingredient of aromatherapy to a potent anxiolytic inhibiting voltage dependent calcium channels (VOCCs as highly selective drug target. In contrast to previous publications where exorbitant high concentrations were used, the effects of lavender oil in behavioral, biochemical, and electrophysiological experiments were investigated in physiological concentrations in the nanomolar range, which correlate to a single dosage of 80 mg/d in humans that was used in clinical trials. We show for the first time that lavender oil bears some similarities with the established anxiolytic pregabalin. Lavender oil inhibits VOCCs in synaptosomes, primary hippocampal neurons and stably overexpressing cell lines in the same range such as pregabalin. Interestingly, Silexan does not primarily bind to P/Q type calcium channels such as pregabalin and does not interact with the binding site of pregabalin, the α2δ subunit of VOCCs. Lavender oil reduces non-selectively the calcium influx through several different types of VOCCs such as the N-type, P/Q-type and T-type VOCCs. In the hippocampus, one brain region important for anxiety disorders, we show that inhibition by lavender oil is mainly mediated via N-type and P/Q-type VOCCs. Taken together, we provide a pharmacological and molecular rationale for the clinical use of the oral application of lavender oil in patients suffering from anxiety.

  3. Voltage-dependent modulation of cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2 by protamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula L Diaz-Sylvester

    Full Text Available It has been reported that protamine (>10 microg/ml blocks single skeletal RyR1 channels and inhibits RyR1-mediated Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum microsomes. We extended these studies to cardiac RyR2 reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers. We found that protamine (0.02-20 microg/ml added to the cytosolic surface of fully activated RyR2 affected channel activity in a voltage-dependent manner. At membrane voltage (V(m; SR lumen-cytosol = 0 mV, protamine induced conductance transitions to several intermediate states (substates as well as full block of RyR2. At V(m>10 mV, the substate with the highest level of conductance was predominant. Increasing V(m from 0 to +80 mV, decreased the number of transitions and residence of the channel in this substate. The drop in current amplitude (full opening to substate had the same magnitude at 0 and +80 mV despite the approximately 3-fold increase in amplitude of the full opening. This is more similar to rectification of channel conductance induced by other polycations than to the action of selective conductance modifiers (ryanoids, imperatoxin. A distinctive effect of protamine (which might be shared with polylysines and histones but not with non-peptidic polycations is the activation of RyR2 in the presence of nanomolar cytosolic Ca2+ and millimolar Mg2+ levels. Our results suggest that RyRs would be subject to dual modulation (activation and block by polycationic domains of neighboring proteins via electrostatic interactions. Understanding these interactions could be important as such anomalies may be associated with the increased RyR2-mediated Ca2+ leak observed in cardiac diseases.

  4. Vestibular integrator neurons have quadratic functions due to voltage dependent conductances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Christophe; Eugène, Daniel; Idoux, Erwin; Moore, Lee E

    2013-12-01

    The nonlinear properties of the dendrites of the prepositus hypoglossi nucleus (PHN) neurons are essential for the operation of the vestibular neural integrator that converts a head velocity signal to one that controls eye position. A novel system of frequency probing, namely quadratic sinusoidal analysis (QSA), was used to decode the intrinsic nonlinear behavior of these neurons under voltage clamp conditions. Voltage clamp currents were measured at harmonic and interactive frequencies using specific nonoverlapping stimulation frequencies. Eigenanalysis of the QSA matrix reduces it to a remarkably compact processing unit, composed of just one or two dominant components (eigenvalues). The QSA matrix of rat PHN neurons provides signatures of the voltage dependent conductances for their particular dendritic and somatic distributions. An important part of the nonlinear response is due to the persistent sodium conductance (gNaP), which is likely to be essential for sustained effects needed for a neural integrator. It was found that responses in the range of 10 mV peak to peak could be well described by quadratic nonlinearities suggesting that effects of higher degree nonlinearities would add only marginal improvement. Therefore, the quadratic response is likely to sufficiently capture most of the nonlinear behavior of neuronal systems except for extremely large synaptic inputs. Thus, neurons have two distinct linear and quadratic functions, which shows that piecewise linear + quadratic analysis is much more complete than just piecewise linear analysis; in addition quadratic analysis can be done at a single holding potential. Furthermore, the nonlinear neuronal responses contain more frequencies over a wider frequency band than the input signal. As a consequence, they convert limited amplitude and bandwidth input signals to wider bandwidth and more complex output responses. Finally, simulations at subthreshold membrane potentials with realistic PHN neuron models

  5. Voltage dependent potassium channel remodeling in murine intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hai Liu

    Full Text Available Partial obstruction of the small intestine causes obvious hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and motility disorder in the bowel proximate to the obstruction. To identify electric remodeling of hypertrophic smooth muscles in partially obstructed murine small intestine, the patch-clamp and intracellular microelectrode recording methods were used to identify the possible electric remodeling and Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were utilized to examine the channel protein expression and phosphorylation level changes in this research. After 14 days of obstruction, partial obstruction caused obvious smooth muscle hypertrophy in the proximally located intestine. The slow waves of intestinal smooth muscles in the dilated region were significantly suppressed, their amplitude and frequency were reduced, whilst the resting membrane potentials were depolarized compared with normal and sham animals. The current density of voltage dependent potassium channel (KV was significantly decreased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells and the voltage sensitivity of KV activation was altered. The sensitivity of KV currents (IKV to TEA, a nonselective potassium channel blocker, increased significantly, but the sensitivity of IKv to 4-AP, a KV blocker, stays the same. The protein levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were up-regulated in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cell membrane. The serine and threonine phosphorylation levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were significantly increased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Thus this study represents the first identification of KV channel remodeling in murine small intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction. The enhanced phosphorylations of KV4.3 and KV2.2 may be involved in this process.

  6. Voltage dependent potassium channel remodeling in murine intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong-Hai; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xin; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Yi-Song; Lu, Hong-Li; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Kim, Young-chul; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2014-01-01

    Partial obstruction of the small intestine causes obvious hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and motility disorder in the bowel proximate to the obstruction. To identify electric remodeling of hypertrophic smooth muscles in partially obstructed murine small intestine, the patch-clamp and intracellular microelectrode recording methods were used to identify the possible electric remodeling and Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were utilized to examine the channel protein expression and phosphorylation level changes in this research. After 14 days of obstruction, partial obstruction caused obvious smooth muscle hypertrophy in the proximally located intestine. The slow waves of intestinal smooth muscles in the dilated region were significantly suppressed, their amplitude and frequency were reduced, whilst the resting membrane potentials were depolarized compared with normal and sham animals. The current density of voltage dependent potassium channel (KV) was significantly decreased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells and the voltage sensitivity of KV activation was altered. The sensitivity of KV currents (IKV) to TEA, a nonselective potassium channel blocker, increased significantly, but the sensitivity of IKv to 4-AP, a KV blocker, stays the same. The protein levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were up-regulated in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cell membrane. The serine and threonine phosphorylation levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were significantly increased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Thus this study represents the first identification of KV channel remodeling in murine small intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction. The enhanced phosphorylations of KV4.3 and KV2.2 may be involved in this process.

  7. Engineering of a genetically encodable fluorescent voltage sensor exploiting fast Ci-VSP voltage-sensing movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Mutoh, Hiroki; Dimitrov, Dimitar

    2008-01-01

    Ci-VSP contains a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) homologous to that of voltage-gated potassium channels. Using charge displacement ('gating' current) measurements we show that voltage-sensing movements of this VSD can occur within 1 ms in mammalian membranes. Our analysis lead to development of a g...... of a genetically encodable fluorescent protein voltage sensor (VSFP) in which the fast, voltage-dependent conformational changes of the Ci-VSP voltage sensor are transduced to similarly fast fluorescence read-outs....

  8. Stochastic Dynamics of Electrical Membrane with Voltage-Dependent Ion Channel Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Hong; Qian, Min

    2014-01-01

    Brownian ratchet like stochastic theory for the electrochemical membrane system of Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) is developed. The system is characterized by a continuous variable $Q_m(t)$, representing mobile membrane charge density, and a discrete variable $K_t$ representing ion channel conformational dynamics. A Nernst-Planck-Nyquist-Johnson type equilibrium is obtained when multiple conducting ions have a common reversal potential. Detailed balance yields a previously unknown relation between the channel switching rates and membrane capacitance, bypassing Eyring-type explicit treatment of gating charge kinetics. From a molecular structural standpoint, membrane charge $Q_m$ is a more natural dynamic variable than potential $V_m$; our formalism treats $Q_m$-dependent conformational transition rates $\\lambda_{ij}$ as intrinsic parameters. Therefore in principle, $\\lambda_{ij}$ vs. $V_m$ is experimental protocol dependent,e.g., different from voltage or charge clamping measurements. For constant membrane capacitance pe...

  9. Effects of arsenic trioxide on voltage-dependent potassium channels and on cell proliferation of human multiple myeloma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jin; WANG Wei; WEI Qing-fang; FENG Tie-ming; TAN Li-jun; YANG Bao-feng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Arsenic trioxide (ATO) can induce cellular apoptosis and inhibit the activities of multiple myeloma (MM)cells in vitro,1 but how it works is not very clear. Recent studies showed that ATO worked on the voltagedependent potassium channel and L-type calcium channel in myocardial cells,2-5 but the effect of ATO on ion channels of tumor cells was rarely reported. As the potassium channel plays an important role in controlling cell proliferation,6 we studied the effects of ATO on the voltage-dependent potassium current (Ikv) of the voltage-dependent potassium channel in an MM cell line,and probed into the relationship between changes of the Ikv caused by ATO and cell proliferation.

  10. State-dependent FRET reports calcium- and voltage-dependent gating-ring motions in BK channels

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Pablo; Contreras, Jorge E.; Plested, Andrew J. R.; Sigworth, Fred J.; Holmgren, Miguel; Giraldez, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium channels (BK, “Big K+”) are important controllers of cell excitability. In the BK channel, a large C-terminal intracellular region containing a “gating-ring” structure has been proposed to transduce Ca2+ binding into channel opening. Using patch-clamp fluorometry, we have investigated the calcium and voltage dependence of conformational changes of the gating-ring region of BK channels, while simultaneously monitoring channel conductan...

  11. VOLTAGE STABILITY ASSESSMENT FOR WIND FARMS INTEGRATION INTO ELECTRICITY GRIDS WITH AND WITHOUT CONSIDERATION OF VOLTAGE DEPENDENT LOADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOMA R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comparative study between the effects on voltage stability of the integration of a wind farm into the electricity grid with or without voltage dependent loads in the context of different locations of a synchronous compensator from the grid. The P-V curves are built by using the PowerFactory DigSilent 15.2.2 and a DPL script that implements a simplified form of the Continuation Power Flow method.

  12. Beta-scorpion toxin effects suggest electrostatic interactions in domain II of voltage-dependent sodium channels. : Electrostatic interactions between segments IIS2, IIS3 and IIS4 of Na+ channel.

    OpenAIRE

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Cestèle, Sandrine

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Beta-scorpion toxins specifically modulate the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by acting through a voltage-sensor trapping model. We used mutagenesis, functional analysis and the action of beta-toxin as tools to investigate the existence and role in channel activation of molecular interactions between the charged residues of the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II of sodium channels. Mutating to arginine the acidic residues of the S2 and S3 transmembran...

  13. The action of a phorbol ester on voltage-dependent parameters of the sodium current in isolated hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhmakov, I V; Klee, M R

    1994-03-01

    The action of a phorbol ester (phorbol-12,13-diacetate) on the voltage-activated sodium current has been investigated by the voltage-clamp method in acutely isolated pyramidal neurons from rat hippocampus. The intracellular perfusion of isolated pyramidal neurons for 30-40 min induced a gradual 10-15 mV shift in both the current-voltage relationship and voltage-dependent steady-state inactivation to more negative potentials. The application of phorbol ester (1-10 microM) to isolated neurons for the same time increased the amplitude of sodium current by 15-20%, shifted the above-mentioned voltage-dependent parameters for an additional 10-15 mV in the same direction and changed the slope of the steady-state inactivation curve. In contrast, after prolonged incubation of slices in the phorbol ester-containing solution (1-10 microM) for 0.5-3 h, subsequent application of phorbol ester at the same concentration caused neither the addition shift of the voltage-dependent characteristics of sodium channels nor the change of the slope of the steady-state inactivation curve. However, in this case an increase in the amplitude of sodium current by 15-20% during 30-40 min intracellular perfusion was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Phosphoinositide 5- and 3-phosphatase activities of a voltage-sensing phosphatase in living cells show identical voltage dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Dongil; Kruse, Martin; Kim, Dong-Il; Hille, Bertil; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-06-28

    Voltage-sensing phosphatases (VSPs) are homologs of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] 3-phosphatase. However, VSPs have a wider range of substrates, cleaving 3-phosphate from PI(3,4)P2 and probably PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3 in response to membrane depolarization. Recent proposals say these reactions have differing voltage dependence. Using Förster resonance energy transfer probes specific for different PIs in living cells with zebrafish VSP, we quantitate both voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions against endogenous substrates. These activities become apparent with different voltage thresholds, voltage sensitivities, and catalytic rates. As an analytical tool, we refine a kinetic model that includes the endogenous pools of phosphoinositides, endogenous phosphatase and kinase reactions connecting them, and four exogenous voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions of VSP. We show that apparent voltage threshold differences for seeing effects of the 5- and 3-phosphatase activities in cells are not due to different intrinsic voltage dependence of these reactions. Rather, the reactions have a common voltage dependence, and apparent differences arise only because each VSP subreaction has a different absolute catalytic rate that begins to surpass the respective endogenous enzyme activities at different voltages. For zebrafish VSP, our modeling revealed that 3-phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5)P3 is 55-fold slower than 5-phosphatase activity against PI(4,5)P2; thus, PI(4,5)P2 generated more slowly from dephosphorylating PI(3,4,5)P3 might never accumulate. When 5-phosphatase activity was counteracted by coexpression of a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, there was accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 in parallel to PI(3,4,5)P3 dephosphorylation

  15. Flow- and voltage-dependent blocking effect of ethosuximide on the inward rectifier K⁺ (Kir2.1) channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiung-Wei; Kuo, Chung-Chin

    2015-08-01

    Absence seizures are manifestations of abnormal thalamocortical oscillations characterized by spike-and-wave complexes in EEG. Ethosuximide (ETX) is one of the principal medications against absence seizures. We investigate the effect of ETX on the Kir2.1 channel, a prototypical inward rectifier K(+) channel possibly playing an important role in the setting of neuronal membrane potential. We demonstrate that the outward currents of Kir2.1 channels are significantly inhibited by intracellular ETX. We further show that the movement of neutral molecule ETX in the Kir2.1 channel is accompanied by ∼1.2 K(+), giving rise to the vivid voltage dependence of ETX unbinding rate. Moreover, the apparent affinity (K d ) of ETX in the channels are decreased by single-point mutations involving M183, E224, and S165, and especially by double mutations involving T141/S165, which always also disrupt the flux-coupling feature of ETX block. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrates narrowing of the pore at ∼D172 by binding of ETX to S165 or T141. ETX block of the Kir2.1 channels may cause a modest but critical depolarization of the relevant neurons, decreasing available T-type Ca(2+) channels and consequently lessening pathological thalamocortical burst discharges.

  16. Effect of angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension on the voltage-dependent contractions of mouse arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2016-02-01

    Arterial hypertension (AHT) affects the voltage dependency of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes. We analyzed the effect of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AHT on L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated isometric contractions in conduit arteries. AHT was induced in C57Bl6 mice with AngII-filled osmotic mini-pumps (4 weeks). Normotensive mice treated with saline-filled osmotic mini-pumps were used for comparison. Voltage-dependent contractions mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels were studied in vaso-reactive studies in vitro in isolated aortic and femoral arteries by using extracellular K(+) concentration-response (KDR) experiments. In aortic segments, AngII-induced AHT significantly sensitized isometric contractions induced by elevated extracellular K(+) and depolarization. This sensitization was partly prevented by normalizing blood pressure with hydralazine, suggesting that it was caused by AHT rather than by direct AngII effects on aortic smooth muscle cells. The EC50 for extracellular K(+) obtained in vitro correlated significantly with the rise in arterial blood pressure induced by AngII in vivo. The AHT-induced sensitization persisted when aortic segments were exposed to levcromakalim or to inhibitors of basal nitric oxide release. Consistent with these observations, AngII-treatment also sensitized the vaso-relaxing effects of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem during K(+)-induced contractions. Unlike aorta, AngII-treatment desensitized the isometric contractions to depolarization in femoral arteries pointing to vascular bed specific responses of arteries to hypertension. AHT affects the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of conduit arteries. This effect may contribute to the decreased vascular compliance in AHT and explain the efficacy of Ca(2+) channel blockers to reduce vascular stiffness and central blood pressure in AHT.

  17. Single electron charge sensitivity of liquid-gated carbon nanotube transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Tal; Wang, Neng-Ping; Kevek, Joshua W; Brown, Morgan A; Wilson, Heather; Heinze, Stefan; Minot, Ethan D

    2014-09-10

    Random telegraph signals corresponding to activated charge traps were observed with liquid-gated CNT FETs. The high signal-to-noise ratio that we observe demonstrates that single electron charge sensing is possible with CNT FETs in liquids at room temperature. We have characterized the gate-voltage dependence of the random telegraph signals and compared to theoretical predictions. The gate-voltage dependence clearly identifies the sign of the activated trapped charge.

  18. Development of a voltage-dependent current noise algorithm for conductance-based stochastic modelling of auditory nerve fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Werner; Hanekom, Tania; Hanekom, Johan J

    2016-12-01

    This study presents the development of an alternative noise current term and novel voltage-dependent current noise algorithm for conductance-based stochastic auditory nerve fibre (ANF) models. ANFs are known to have significant variance in threshold stimulus which affects temporal characteristics such as latency. This variance is primarily caused by the stochastic behaviour or microscopic fluctuations of the node of Ranvier's voltage-dependent sodium channels of which the intensity is a function of membrane voltage. Though easy to implement and low in computational cost, existing current noise models have two deficiencies: it is independent of membrane voltage, and it is unable to inherently determine the noise intensity required to produce in vivo measured discharge probability functions. The proposed algorithm overcomes these deficiencies while maintaining its low computational cost and ease of implementation compared to other conductance and Markovian-based stochastic models. The algorithm is applied to a Hodgkin-Huxley-based compartmental cat ANF model and validated via comparison of the threshold probability and latency distributions to measured cat ANF data. Simulation results show the algorithm's adherence to in vivo stochastic fibre characteristics such as an exponential relationship between the membrane noise and transmembrane voltage, a negative linear relationship between the log of the relative spread of the discharge probability and the log of the fibre diameter and a decrease in latency with an increase in stimulus intensity.

  19. Blockade of the voltage-dependent sodium current in isolated rat hippocampal neurons by tetrodotoxin and lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, M; Oyama, Y; Ikemoto, Y; Akaike, N

    1989-04-10

    The effects of tetrodotoxin and lidocaine on the voltage-dependent sodium current (INa) were studied in the CA1 pyramidal neurons isolated acutely from rat hippocampus using a 'concentration-clamp' technique which combines the intracellular perfusion with a rapid external solution change within a few ms. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) exerted its inhibitory action in time- and dose-dependent manner on the peak amplitude of INa without any apparent effects on both the current activation and inactivation processes of the current. The time course for reaching a steady-state of the inhibitory action shortened with increasing TTX concentration, but the time course of recovery from the inhibition after washing out the toxin was quite the same at any concentrations used. Lidocaine also inhibited dose-dependently the INa, though with slightly accelerating both the activation and inactivation processes. The time courses for reaching the steady-state inhibition and the recovery from the inhibition were much shorter than those in the case of TTX. The results indicate that the voltage-dependent sodium channel of mammalian brain neuron is TTX-sensitive as well as that of peripheral neuron and that the mode of TTX inhibition on the INa is quite different from that of lidocaine.

  20. Frequency and voltage dependence dielectric properties, ac electrical conductivity and electric modulus profiles in Al/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PVA/p-Si structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilkan, Çiğdem, E-mail: cigdembilkan@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, The University of Çankırı Karatekin, 18100 Çankırı (Turkey); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Altındal, Şemsettin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, The University of Gazi, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Shokrani-Havigh, Roya [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    In this research a simple microwave-assisted method have been used for preparation of cobalt oxide nanostructures. The as-prepared sample has been investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the other hand, frequency and voltage dependence of both the real and imaginary parts of dielectric constants (ε′, ε″) and electric modulus (M′ and M″), loss tangent (tanδ), and ac electrical conductivity (σ{sub ac}) values of Al/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PVA/p-Si structures were obtained in the wide range of frequency and voltage using capacitance (C) and conductance (G/ω) data at room temperature. The values of ε′, ε″ and tanδ were found to decrease with increasing frequency almost for each applied bias voltage, but the changes in these parameters become more effective in the depletion region at low frequencies due to the charges at surface states and their relaxation time and polarization effect. While the value of σ is almost constant at low frequency, increases almost as exponentially at high frequency which are corresponding to σ{sub dc} and σ{sub ac}, respectively. The M′ and M″ have low values at low frequencies region and then an increase with frequency due to short-range mobility of charge carriers. While the value of M′ increase with increasing frequency, the value of M″ shows two peak and the peaks positions shifts to higher frequency with increasing applied voltage due to the decrease of the polarization and N{sub ss} effects with increasing frequency.

  1. Frequency and voltage dependence dielectric properties, ac electrical conductivity and electric modulus profiles in Al/Co3O4-PVA/p-Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilkan, Çiğdem; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar; Altındal, Şemsettin; Shokrani-Havigh, Roya

    2016-11-01

    In this research a simple microwave-assisted method have been used for preparation of cobalt oxide nanostructures. The as-prepared sample has been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the other hand, frequency and voltage dependence of both the real and imaginary parts of dielectric constants (ε‧, ε″) and electric modulus (M‧ and M″), loss tangent (tanδ), and ac electrical conductivity (σac) values of Al/Co3O4-PVA/p-Si structures were obtained in the wide range of frequency and voltage using capacitance (C) and conductance (G/ω) data at room temperature. The values of ε‧, ε″ and tanδ were found to decrease with increasing frequency almost for each applied bias voltage, but the changes in these parameters become more effective in the depletion region at low frequencies due to the charges at surface states and their relaxation time and polarization effect. While the value of σ is almost constant at low frequency, increases almost as exponentially at high frequency which are corresponding to σdc and σac, respectively. The M‧ and M″ have low values at low frequencies region and then an increase with frequency due to short-range mobility of charge carriers. While the value of M‧ increase with increasing frequency, the value of M″ shows two peak and the peaks positions shifts to higher frequency with increasing applied voltage due to the decrease of the polarization and Nss effects with increasing frequency.

  2. [Role of calcineurin in down-regulation of left ventricular transmural voltage- dependent K(+) currents in mice with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen-Xia; Dong, Fang; Chang, Yan-Chao; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yan-Fang

    2015-08-25

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of calcineurin in the down-regulation of left ventricular transmural voltage-dependent K(+) currents in heart failure. Transverse aorta was banded by using microsurgical techniques to create mouse heart failure model. Sham-operated (Sham) or aorta banded (Band) mice were randomized to receive calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) or vehicle. The densities and kinetic properties of voltage-dependent K(+) currents, as well as action potential (AP), of left ventricular subendocardial (Endo) and subepicardial (Epi) myocytes were determined by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that calcineurin activity was significant higher in Endo myocytes than that in Epi ones in all the groups. Compared with Sham group, Band mice showed significantly increased calcineurin activity both in Endo and Epi myocytes. CsA significantly reduced calcineurin activity in Band mice. CsA treatment in Band mice partially reversed the down-regulation of Ito density, completely reversed the down-regulation of IK,slow density both in Endo and Epi myocytes, and Iss density in Endo myocytes. In addition, CsA treatment in Band mice partially antagonized the prolongation of action potential duration (APD), and APD at 50% (APD50) and 90% repolarization (APD90) were significantly reduced. Because of non-parallel shortening of APD in Endo and Epi myocytes, the ratio of Endo/Epi APD90 was reduced from 4.8:1 in Band mice to 2.6:1 in CsA-treated mice, which was close to that in Sham mice. The results suggest that non-parallel activation of calcineurin in Endo and Epi myocytes contributes to the down-regulation of transmural voltage-dependent K(+) currents and the amplification of transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) in left ventricular failure hearts. Inhibition of calcineurin may be a potential new therapeutic strategy to prevent and cure arrhythmias and sudden death in heart failure.

  3. General method to predict voltage-dependent ionic conduction in a solid electrolyte coating on electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Cheng, Yang-Tse; Qi, Yue

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the ionic conduction in solid electrolytes in contact with electrodes is vitally important to many applications, such as lithium ion batteries. The problem is complex because both the internal properties of the materials (e.g., electronic structure) and the characteristics of the externally contacting phases (e.g., voltage of the electrode) affect defect formation and transport. In this paper, we developed a method based on density functional theory to study the physics of defects in a solid electrolyte in equilibrium with an external environment. This method was then applied to predict the ionic conduction in lithium fluoride (LiF), in contact with different electrodes which serve as reservoirs with adjustable Li chemical potential (μLi) for defect formation. LiF was chosen because it is a major component in the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on lithium ion battery electrodes. Seventeen possible native defects with their relevant charge states in LiF were investigated to determine the dominant defect types on various electrodes. The diffusion barrier of dominant defects was calculated by the climbed nudged elastic band method. The ionic conductivity was then obtained from the concentration and mobility of defects using the Nernst-Einstein relationship. Three regions for defect formation were identified as a function of μLi: (1) intrinsic, (2) transitional, and (3) p -type region. In the intrinsic region (high μLi, typical for LiF on the negative electrode), the main defects are Schottky pairs and in the p -type region (low μLi, typical for LiF on the positive electrode) are Li ion vacancies. The ionic conductivity is calculated to be approximately 10-31Scm-1 when LiF is in contact with a negative electrode but it can increase to 10-12Scm-1 on a positive electrode. This insight suggests that divalent cation (e.g., Mg2+) doping is necessary to improve Li ion transport through the engineered LiF coating, especially for LiF on negative

  4. Differential expression of T- and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in renal resistance vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard; Jensen, Boye L.; Andreasen, D;

    2001-01-01

    .2 protein was demonstrated by immunochemical labeling of rat preglomerular vasculature and juxtamedullary efferent arterioles and vasa recta. Cortical efferent arterioles were not immunopositive. Recordings of intracellular calcium concentration with digital fluorescence imaging microscopy showed......The distribution of voltage-dependent calcium channels in kidney pre- and postglomerular resistance vessels was determined at the molecular and functional levels. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of microdissected rat preglomerular vessels and cultured smooth muscle cells...... showed coexpression of mRNAs for T-type subunits (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2) and for an L-type subunit (Ca(V)1.2). The same expression pattern was observed in juxtamedullary efferent arterioles and outer medullary vasa recta. No calcium channel messages were detected in cortical efferent arterioles. Ca(V)1...

  5. Characterization and functional analysis of voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) from orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Zhao, Zhe; Hong, Xiaoyou; Chen, Kunci; Zhu, Xinping

    2014-07-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a highly conserved integral protein of mitochondria in different eukaryotic species. It forms a selective channel in the mitochondrial outer membrane that serves as the controlled pathway for small metabolites and ions. In this study, a VDAC gene, EcVDAC1, was isolated from orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). The EcVDAC1 exhibits ubiquitous expression in various tissues of orange-spotted grouper and is upregulated in liver, gill, and spleen after stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Subcellular localization analysis shows that the EcVDAC1 protein colocalized with the mitochondria. A caspase-3 assay demonstrates that overexpression of the EcVDAC1 induced apoptotic cell death in fathead minnow cells. The data presented in this study provide new information regarding the relationship between LPS and the EcVDAC1 gene, suggesting that the fish VDAC1 gene may play an important role in antibacterial immune response.

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HAN SOL KIM; HONGLIANG LI; HYE WON KIM; SUNG EUN SHIN; IL-WHAN CHOI; AMY L FIRTH; HYOWEON BANG; YOUNG MIN BAE; WON SUN PARK

    2016-12-01

    We examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv)channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using the voltage-clamp technique. Sertralinedecreased the Kv channel current in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 0.18 μM and a slope value (Hillcoefficient) of 0.61. Although the application of 1 μM sertraline did not affect the steady-state activation curves,sertraline caused a significant, negative shift in the inactivation curves. Pretreatment with another SSRI, paroxetine,had no significant effect on Kv currents and did not alter the inhibitory effects of sertraline on Kv currents. From theseresults, we concluded that sertraline dose-dependently inhibited Kv currents independently of serotonin reuptakeinhibition by shifting inactivation curves to a more negative potential.

  7. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Sol; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Hye Won; Shin, Sung Eun; Choi, Il-Whan; Firth, Amy L; Bang, Hyoweon; Bae, Young Min; Park, Won Sun

    2016-12-01

    We examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using the voltage-clamp technique. Sertraline decreased the Kv channel current in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 0.18 mu M and a slope value (Hill coefficient) of 0.61. Although the application of 1 mu M sertraline did not affect the steady-state activation curves, sertraline caused a significant, negative shift in the inactivation curves. Pretreatment with another SSRI, paroxetine, had no significant effect on Kv currents and did not alter the inhibitory effects of sertraline on Kv currents. From these results, we concluded that sertraline dose-dependently inhibited Kv currents independently of serotonin reuptake inhibition by shifting inactivation curves to a more negative potential.

  8. Temperature and bias voltage dependence of Co/Pd multilayer-based magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, Zoe, E-mail: zkugler@physik.uni-bielefeld.d [Bielefeld University, Department of Physics, Universitaetsstr. 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Drewello, Volker; Schaefers, Markus; Schmalhorst, Jan; Reiss, Guenter; Thomas, Andy [Bielefeld University, Department of Physics, Universitaetsstr. 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Temperature- and bias voltage-dependent transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pd electrodes are presented. Magnetization measurements of the Co/Pd multilayers are performed to characterize the electrodes. The effects of the Co layer thickness in the Co/Pd bilayers, the annealing temperature, the Co thickness at the MgO barrier interface, and the number of bilayers on the tunneling magneto resistance (TMR) effect are investigated. TMR-ratios of about 11% at room temperature and 18.5% at 13 K are measured and two well-defined switching fields are observed. The results are compared to measurements of MTJs with Co-Fe-B electrodes and in-plane anisotropy.

  9. Differential expression of T- and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in renal resistance vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard; Jensen, Boye L.; Andreasen, D

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of voltage-dependent calcium channels in kidney pre- and postglomerular resistance vessels was determined at the molecular and functional levels. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of microdissected rat preglomerular vessels and cultured smooth muscle cells...... showed coexpression of mRNAs for T-type subunits (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2) and for an L-type subunit (Ca(V)1.2). The same expression pattern was observed in juxtamedullary efferent arterioles and outer medullary vasa recta. No calcium channel messages were detected in cortical efferent arterioles. Ca(V)1.......2 protein was demonstrated by immunochemical labeling of rat preglomerular vasculature and juxtamedullary efferent arterioles and vasa recta. Cortical efferent arterioles were not immunopositive. Recordings of intracellular calcium concentration with digital fluorescence imaging microscopy showed...

  10. Voltage dependence of Hodgkin-Huxley rate functions for a multistage K+ channel voltage sensor within a membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, S. R.

    2014-11-01

    The activation of a K+channel sensor in two sequential stages during a voltage clamp may be described as the translocation of a Brownian particle in an energy landscape with two large barriers between states. A solution of the Smoluchowski equation for a square-well approximation to the potential function of the S4 voltage sensor satisfies a master equation and has two frequencies that may be determined from the forward and backward rate functions. When the higher-frequency terms have small amplitude, the solution reduces to the relaxation of a rate equation, where the derived two-state rate functions are dependent on the relative magnitude of the forward rates (α and γ ) and the backward rates (β and δ ) for each stage. In particular, the voltage dependence of the Hodgkin-Huxley rate functions for a K+channel may be derived by assuming that the rate functions of the first stage are large relative to those of the second stage—α ≫γ and β ≫δ . For a Shaker IR K+ channel, the first forward and backward transitions are rate limiting (α <γ and δ ≪β ), and for an activation process with either two or three stages, the derived two-state rate functions also have a voltage dependence that is of a similar form to that determined for the squid axon. The potential variation generated by the interaction between a two-stage K+ ion channel and a noninactivating Na+ ion channel is determined by the master equation for K+channel activation and the ionic current equation when the Na+channel activation time is small, and if β ≪δ and α ≪γ , the system may exhibit a small amplitude oscillation between spikes, or mixed-mode oscillation, in which the slow closed state modulates the K+ ion channel conductance in the membrane.

  11. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Izumi; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na(+)-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na(+) influx through voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na(+) concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na(+) with an equimolar concentration of Li(+). The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na(+) currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd(2+) at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca(2+)-channel blockers Co(2+) and Ni(2+) at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd(2+) (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na(+) influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na(+) influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na(+) channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory.

  12. trans-Caryophyllene, a Natural Sesquiterpene, Causes Tracheal Smooth Muscle Relaxation through Blockade of Voltage-Dependent Ca2+ Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jader Santos Cruz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available trans-Caryophyllene is a major component in the essential oils of various species of medicinal plants used in popular medicine in Brazil. It belongs to the chemical class of the sesquiterpenes and has been the subject of a number of studies. Here, we evaluated the effects of this compound in airway smooth muscle. The biological activities of trans-caryophyllene were examined in isolated bath organs to investigate the effect in basal tonus. Electromechanical and pharmacomechanical couplings were evaluated through the responses to K+ depolarization and exposure to acetylcholine (ACh, respectively. Isolated cells of rat tracheal smooth muscle were used to investigate trans-caryophyllene effects on voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels by using the whole-cell voltage-clamp configuration of the patch-clamp technique. trans-Caryophyllene showed more efficiency in the blockade of electromechanical excitation-contraction coupling while it has only minor inhibitory effect on pharmacomechanical coupling. Epithelium removal does not modify tracheal smooth muscle response elicited by trans-caryophyllene in the pharmacomechanical coupling. Under Ca2+-free conditions, pre-exposure to trans-caryophyllene did not reduce the contraction induced by ACh in isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle, regardless of the presence of intact epithelium. In the whole-cell configuration, trans-caryophyllene (3 mM, inhibited the inward Ba2+ current (IBa to approximately 50% of control levels. Altogether, our results demonstrate that trans-caryophyllene has anti-spasmodic activity on rat tracheal smooth muscle which could be explained, at least in part, by the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels blockade.

  13. Neutralization of Gating Charges in Domain II of the Sodium Channel α Subunit Enhances Voltage-Sensor Trapping by a β-Scorpion Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestèle, Sandrine; Scheuer, Todd; Mantegazza, Massimo; Rochat, Hervé; Catterall, William A.

    2001-01-01

    β-Scorpion toxins shift the voltage dependence of activation of sodium channels to more negative membrane potentials, but only after a strong depolarizing prepulse to fully activate the channels. Their receptor site includes the S3–S4 loop at the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor in domain II of the α subunit. Here, we probe the role of gating charges in the IIS4 segment in β-scorpion toxin action by mutagenesis and functional analysis of the resulting mutant sodium channels. Neutralization of the positively charged amino acid residues in the IIS4 segment by mutation to glutamine shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive membrane potentials and reduces the steepness of voltage-dependent gating, which is consistent with the presumed role of these residues as gating charges. Surprisingly, neutralization of the gating charges at the outer end of the IIS4 segment by the mutations R850Q, R850C, R853Q, and R853C markedly enhances β-scorpion toxin action, whereas mutations R856Q, K859Q, and K862Q have no effect. In contrast to wild-type, the β-scorpion toxin Css IV causes a negative shift of the voltage dependence of activation of mutants R853Q and R853C without a depolarizing prepulse at holding potentials from −80 to −140 mV. Reaction of mutant R853C with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate causes a positive shift of the voltage dependence of activation and restores the requirement for a depolarizing prepulse for Css IV action. Enhancement of sodium channel activation by Css IV causes large tail currents upon repolarization, indicating slowed deactivation of the IIS4 voltage sensor by the bound toxin. Our results are consistent with a voltage-sensor–trapping model in which the β-scorpion toxin traps the IIS4 voltage sensor in its activated position as it moves outward in response to depolarization and holds it there, slowing its inward movement on deactivation and enhancing subsequent channel activation. Evidently

  14. Decreases of voltage-dependent K+ currents densities in ventricular myocytes of guinea pigs by chronic oxidant stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-li DONG; Yan LIU; Yu-hong ZHOU; Wei-hua SONG; He WANG; Bao-feng YANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the changes of delayed rectifier K+ currents (Ik) and inward rectifier K+ currents (Ik1) in the ventricular myocytes of guinea pigs during the gradual apoptotic process by the chronic oxidant stress treatment.METHODS: H2O250 μmol/L (24 h) was used for inducing apoptosis in the cardiomyocytes culture of neonatal rats and to treat the isolated ventricular myocytes of adult guinea pigs in vitro for 24 h. Apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL methods and voltage-dependent K+ currents were recorded by patch-clamp techniques. RESULTS: H2O250 μmol/L (24 h) induced cell apoptosis in the cardiomyocytes culture of neonatal rats. This concentration was used to treat the isolated ventricular myocytes of adult guinea pigs in vitro for 24 h and the voltage-dependent K+currents densities (Ik, Ik1) were down-regulated. The densities of the delayed rectifier K+ currents (Ik) in 50 μmol/L H2O2 group were 2.52±0.57 pA/pF vs 5.73±1.84 pA/pF in the control group at +50 mV (n=8, P<0.01). The densities of the inward rectifier K+ currents (Ik1) in 50 μmol/L H2O2 group were -13.9±2.70 pA/pF, 2.52±0.57 pA/pF vs -59.7± 11.9 pA/pF, 5.73± 1.84 pA/pF in the control group at -120 mV (n=8, P<0.01) and -40 mV (n=8, P<0.05), respectively. The extent of inward rectifier property of Ik1 was weakened by 50μmol/L H2O2 treatment. CONCLUSION: The densities of Ik, Ik1 in the cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs were downregulated and the inward rectifier property of Ik1 was weakened during the gradual apoptotic process after 50 μmol/L H2O2 treatment for 24 h.

  15. Voltage-dependent potassium currents during fast spikes of rat cerebellar Purkinje neurons: inhibition by BDS-I toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, Marco; Metz, Alexia E; Bean, Bruce P

    2007-01-01

    We characterized the kinetics and pharmacological properties of voltage-activated potassium currents in rat cerebellar Purkinje neurons using recordings from nucleated patches, which allowed high resolution of activation and deactivation kinetics. Activation was exceptionally rapid, with 10-90% activation in about 400 mus at +30 mV, near the peak of the spike. Deactivation was also extremely rapid, with a decay time constant of about 300 mus near -80 mV. These rapid activation and deactivation kinetics are consistent with mediation by Kv3-family channels but are even faster than reported for Kv3-family channels in other neurons. The peptide toxin BDS-I had very little blocking effect on potassium currents elicited by 100-ms depolarizing steps, but the potassium current evoked by action potential waveforms was inhibited nearly completely. The mechanism of inhibition by BDS-I involves slowing of activation rather than total channel block, consistent with the effects described in cloned Kv3-family channels and this explains the dramatically different effects on currents evoked by short spikes versus voltage steps. As predicted from this mechanism, the effects of toxin on spike width were relatively modest (broadening by roughly 25%). These results show that BDS-I-sensitive channels with ultrafast activation and deactivation kinetics carry virtually all of the voltage-dependent potassium current underlying repolarization during normal Purkinje cell spikes.

  16. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1(VDAC1) Participates the Apoptosis of the Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Desminopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yanqing; Gong, Qi; Jiang, Aihua; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Desminopathies caused by the mutation in the gene coding for desmin are genetically protein aggregation myopathies. Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of pathological changes in the desminopathies at the earliest stage. The molecular mechanisms of mitochondria dysfunction in desminopathies remain exclusive. VDAC1 regulates mitochondrial uptake across the outer membrane and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Relationships between desminopathies and Voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) remain unclear. Here we successfully constructed the desminopathy rat model, evaluated with conventional stains, containing hematoxylin and eosin (HE), Gomori Trichrome (MGT), (PAS), red oil (ORO), NADH-TR, SDH staining and immunohistochemistry. Immunofluorescence results showed that VDAC1 was accumulated in the desmin highly stained area of muscle fibers of desminopathy patients or desminopathy rat model compared to the normal ones. Meanwhile apoptosis related proteins bax and ATF2 were involved in desminopathy patients and desminopathy rat model, but not bcl-2, bcl-xl or HK2.VDAC1 and desmin are closely relevant in the tissue splices of deminopathies patients and rats with desminopathy at protein lever. Moreover, apoptotic proteins are also involved in the desminopathies, like bax, ATF2, but not bcl-2, bcl-xl or HK2. This pathological analysis presents the correlation between VDAC1 and desmin, and apoptosis related proteins are correlated in the desminopathy. Furthermore, we provide a rat model of desminopathy for the investigation of desmin related myopathy. PMID:27941998

  17. Inhibitory effect of resveratrol on the proliferation of GH3 pituitary-adenoma cells and voltage-dependent potassium current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Chu; Lanlan Wei; Chao Wang; Yu Cheng; Kongbin Yang; Baofeng Yang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Recent researches indicate that activation of potassium channel is likely to cause many kinds of cells to proliferate and differentiate;using chemical to block the potassium channel can restrain the proliferation of small lung-cancer cells.breast cancer.prostate cancer and human lymphocyte,etc.Previous researches proved that resveratrol(RE),a selective estrogen receptor modulator(SERM).could inhibit growth of GH3 calls,induce apoptosis,and resist tumor through interfering K+ channel.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effects of RE on Voltage-dependent K+ current [Ik(v)] and cell proliferation in GH3 pituitary-tumor cells.DESIGN:Observational contrast study.SETTING:Department of Neurosurgery.the First Clinical Hospital of Harbin Medical University;Department of Microbiology,Harbin Medical University;Department of Pharmacology,Harbin Medical University.MATERIALS: GH3 pituitary-tumor cell line of rats was purchased from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC).RE and[3-(4,5-dimethylthiazo1-2-y1)-2.5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide](MTT)were obtained from Sigma Chemical CO,St Louis,USA;Ham's F-10 medium from Gibco BRL;Equine serum and fetal bovine serum from Hyclone Laboratories,Logan,UT;FACSCalibur flow cytometer from BD Company,USA.RE was dissolved in ethanol and stored at-20 ℃.It was diluted to different concentrations (10.50,100 μmol/L)with medium and extra cellular solution when needed.rhe final concentration of ethanol was Jess than 0.01%.METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Department of Microbiology and Pharmacology of Harbin Medical University from March 2005 to January 2006.①Cell preparation:Proliferating indexes affected by 10.50 and 100 μmol/L RE were measured with MTT,respectively.0.0001 volume fraction of ethan ol was added into control group.Inhibitory rate of cellular growth was calculated as the following formula:Inhibitory rate (%)=(1-A value in experimental group/A value in control group)x100%.The experiments mentioned above were

  18. Multiphasic profiles for voltage-dependent K+ channels: Reanalysis of data of MacKinnon and coworkers

    CERN Document Server

    Nissen, Per

    2016-01-01

    In a study of the role that voltage-dependent K+ channels may have in the mechanosensation of living cells (Schmidt et al. Proc Soc Natl Acad Sci USA 109: 10352-10357. 2012), the data were as conventionally done fitted by a Boltzmann function. However, as also found for other data for ion channels, this interpretation must be rejected in favor of a multiphasic profile, a series of straight lines separated by discontinuous transitions, quite often in the form of noncontiguities (jumps). The data points in the present study are often very unevenly distributed around the curvilinear profiles. Thus, for 43 of the 75 profiles, the probability is less than 5% that the uneven distribution is due to chance, for 26 the probability is less than 1%, and for 12 the probability is less than 0.1%, giving a vanishingly low overall probability for all profiles. Especially at low voltages, the differences between the fits to curvilinear and multiphasic profiles may be huge. In the multiphasic profiles, adjacent lines are quit...

  19. Correlation character of ionic current fluctuations: analysis of ion current through a voltage-dependent potassium single channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong-Han, Lan; Huang, Xi; Jia-Rui, Lin

    2005-10-03

    The gating of ion channels has widely been modeled by assuming the transition between open and closed states is a memoryless process. Nevertheless, the statistical analysis of an ionic current signal recorded from voltage dependence K(+) single channel is presented. Calculating the sample auto-correlation function of the ionic current based on the digitized signals, rather than the sequence of open and closed states duration time. The results provide evidence for the existence of memory. For different voltages, the ion channel current fluctuation has different correlation attributions. The correlations in data generated by simulation of two Markov models, on one hand, auto-correlation function of the ionic current shows a weaker memory, after a delayed period of time, the attribute of memory does not exist; on the other hand, the correlation depends on the number of states in the Markov model. For V(p)=-60 mV pipette potential, spectral analysis of ion channel current was conducted, the result indicates that the spectrum is not a flat spectrum, the data set from ionic current fluctuations shows considerable variability with a broad 1/f -like spectrum, alpha=1.261+/-0.24. Thus the ion current fluctuations give information about the kinetics of the channel protein, the results suggest the correlation character of ion channel protein nonlinear kinetics regardless of whether the channel is in open or closed state.

  20. Scorpion toxin prolongs an inactivation phase of the voltage-dependent sodium current in rat isolated single hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, M; Oyama, Y; Ikemoto, Y; Akaike, N

    1989-05-15

    The effects of scorpion toxin on the voltage-dependent sodium current (INa) of CA1 pyramidal neurons isolated from rat hippocampus were studied under the single-electrode voltage-clamp condition using a 'concentration-clamp' technique. The toxin increased the peak amplitude of INa and prolonged its inactivation phase in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Inactivation phase of INa proceeded with two exponential components in the absence (control) and presence of the toxin. In the toxin-treated neurons, both the time constant of slow component and its fractional contribution to the total current increased dose-dependently while the fractional contribution of the fast one decreased in a dose-dependent fashion without changing its time constant. Actions of scorpion toxin on the sodium channels of hippocampal pyramidal neurons were essentially similar to those of peripheral preparations. Therefore, it can be concluded that the sodium channels of mammalian brain neurons have structures and functions similar to peripheral channels.

  1. Inhibition of rat hippocampal excitability by the plant alkaloid 3-acetylaconitine mediated by interaction with voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A

    1997-02-01

    The effects of the Aconitum alkaloid 3-acetylaconitine on neuronal activity were investigated in the slice preparation and on cultivated neurons of rat hippocampus by extracellular and patch-clamp recordings, respectively. 3-Acetylaconitine (0.01-1 microM) diminished the orthodromic and antidromic population spike in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of the drug was preceded by a transiently enhanced excitability. The latency of onset of the inhibition was accelerated by increased stimulation frequency, whereas recovery during washout of the alkaloid was accelerated by decreased stimulation frequency. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of 3-acetylaconitine was evaluated in two different models of epileptiform activity induced either by blockade of GABA receptors by bicuculline (10 microM) or by a nominal Mg(2+)-free bathing medium. In accordance with the activity-dependent mode of action, this compound abolished the synaptically evoked population spikes in the presence of bicuculline or nominal Mg(2+)-free bathing medium, respectively. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed an interaction of 3-acetylaconitine with the voltage-dependent sodium channel. At a concentration of 1 microM, 3-acetylaconitine did not affect the peak amplitude of the sodium current, but shifted the current-voltage relationship in the hyperpolarized direction such that sodium currents were already activated at the resting potential.

  2. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-07-05

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane.

  3. Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs, porin) expressed in the plasma membrane regulate the differentiation and function of human osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Shigeru; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Nanke, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    Fewer molecules have been identified on human than murine osteoclasts, the former differing from murine osteoclasts in many ways. We show that voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs, porin) are expressed in the plasma membrane of human osteoclasts. A search for novel proteins expressed in the plasma membrane of human osteoclasts identified VDAC. Anti-VDAC antibodies inhibited human osteoclastogenesis in vitro. VDAC expression was detected in membranes by immunoelectron microscopy and immunocytochemical double staining. The VDAC protein functions as a Cl(-) channel. VDACs regulate bone resorption, which show using Osteologic™ plates. The epitope of the antibody lay within a 10-amino acid sequence in the VDAC. The findings suggest that the VDAC is, at least partly, a novel Cl(-) channel regulating the differentiation and function of human osteoclasts. VDACs may play a crucial role in acidifying the resorption lacunae between osteoclasts and bone. Inhibitors of VDACs could be used to treat diseases involving increased resorption, such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Paget's disease. © 2012 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  4. The voltage-dependent K+ channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comes, Núria; Bielanska, Joanna; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Condom, Enric; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ferreres, Joan C.; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv) are involved in a number of physiological processes, including immunomodulation, cell volume regulation, apoptosis as well as differentiation. Some Kv channels participate in the proliferation and migration of normal and tumor cells, contributing to metastasis. Altered expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels has been found in several types of tumors and cancer cells. In general, while the expression of Kv1.3 apparently exhibits no clear pattern, Kv1.5 is induced in many of the analyzed metastatic tissues. Interestingly, evidence indicates that Kv1.5 channel shows inversed correlation with malignancy in some gliomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. However, Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 are similarly remodeled in some cancers. For instance, expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 correlates with a certain grade of tumorigenicity in muscle sarcomas. Differential remodeling of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 expression in human cancers may indicate their role in tumor growth and their importance as potential tumor markers. However, despite of this increasing body of information, which considers Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 as emerging tumoral markers, further research must be performed to reach any conclusion. In this review, we summarize what it has been lately documented about Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels in human cancer. PMID:24133455

  5. The voltage-dependent K(+) channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comes, Núria; Bielanska, Joanna; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Condom, Enric; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ferreres, Joan C; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-10-10

    Voltage-dependent K(+) channels (Kv) are involved in a number of physiological processes, including immunomodulation, cell volume regulation, apoptosis as well as differentiation. Some Kv channels participate in the proliferation and migration of normal and tumor cells, contributing to metastasis. Altered expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels has been found in several types of tumors and cancer cells. In general, while the expression of Kv1.3 apparently exhibits no clear pattern, Kv1.5 is induced in many of the analyzed metastatic tissues. Interestingly, evidence indicates that Kv1.5 channel shows inversed correlation with malignancy in some gliomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. However, Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 are similarly remodeled in some cancers. For instance, expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 correlates with a certain grade of tumorigenicity in muscle sarcomas. Differential remodeling of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 expression in human cancers may indicate their role in tumor growth and their importance as potential tumor markers. However, despite of this increasing body of information, which considers Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 as emerging tumoral markers, further research must be performed to reach any conclusion. In this review, we summarize what it has been lately documented about Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels in human cancer.

  6. Actin Dynamics Regulates Voltage-Dependent Calcium-Permeable Channels of the Vicia faba Guard Cell Plasma Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Liu-Min Fan

    2009-01-01

    Free cytosolic Ca~(2+) ([Ca~(2+)]_(cyt)) is an ubiquitous second messenger in plant cell signaling, and [Ca~(2+)]_(cyt) elevation is associated with Ca~(2+)-permeable channels in the plasma membrane and endomembranes regulated by a wide range of stimuli. However, knowledge regarding Ca~(2+) channels and their regulation remains limited in planta. A type of voltage-dependent Ca~(2+)-permeable channel was identified and characterized for the Vicia faba L. guard cell plasma membrane by using patch-clamp techniques. These channels are permeable to both Ba~(2+) and Ca~(2+), and their activities can be inhibited by micromolar Gd~(3+). The unitary conductance and the reversal potential of the channels depend on the Ca~(2+) or Ba~(2+) gradients across the plasma membrane. The inward whole-cell Ca~(2+) (Ba~(2+)) current, as well as the unitary current amplitude and NP. of the single Ca~(2+) channel, increase along with the membrane hyperpolarization. Pharmacological experiments suggest that actin dynamics may serve as an upstream regulator of this type of calcium channel of the guard cell plasma membrane. Cytochalasin D, an actin polymerization blocker, activated the NP_o of these channels at the single channel level and increased the current amplitude at the whole-cell level. But these channel activations and current increments could be restrained by pretreatment with an F-actin stabilizer, phalloidin. The potential physiological significance of this regulatory mechanism is also discussed.

  7. Probing the gate--voltage-dependent surface potential of individual InAs nanowires using random telegraph signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfi, Joe; Paradiso, Nicola; Roddaro, Stefano; Heun, Stefan; Nair, Selvakumar V; Savelyev, Igor G; Blumin, Marina; Beltram, Fabio; Ruda, Harry E

    2011-03-22

    We report a novel method for probing the gate-voltage dependence of the surface potential of individual semiconductor nanowires. The statistics of electronic occupation of a single defect on the surface of the nanowire, determined from a random telegraph signal, is used as a measure for the local potential. The method is demonstrated for the case of one or two switching defects in indium arsenide (InAs) nanowire field effect transistors at temperatures T=25-77 K. Comparison with a self-consistent model shows that surface potential variation is retarded in the conducting regime due to screening by surface states with density Dss≈10(12) cm(-2) eV(-1). Temperature-dependent dynamics of electron capture and emission producing the random telegraph signals are also analyzed, and multiphonon emission is identified as the process responsible for capture and emission of electrons from the surface traps. Two defects studied in detail had capture activation energies of EB≈50 meV and EB≈110 meV and cross sections of σ∞≈3×10(-19) cm2 and σ∞≈2×10(-17) cm2, respectively. A lattice relaxation energy of Sℏω=187±15 meV was found for the first defect.

  8. Voltage-dependent anion channels modulate mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells: regulation by free tubulin and erastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Eduardo N; Sheldon, Kely L; DeHart, David N; Patnaik, Jyoti; Manevich, Yefim; Townsend, Danyelle M; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Lemasters, John J

    2013-04-26

    Respiratory substrates and adenine nucleotides cross the mitochondrial outer membrane through the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), comprising three isoforms--VDAC1, 2, and 3. We characterized the role of individual isoforms in mitochondrial metabolism by HepG2 human hepatoma cells using siRNA. With VDAC3 to the greatest extent, all VDAC isoforms contributed to the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, but only VDAC3 knockdown decreased ATP, ADP, NAD(P)H, and mitochondrial redox state. Cells expressing predominantly VDAC3 were least sensitive to depolarization induced by increased free tubulin. In planar lipid bilayers, free tubulin inhibited VDAC1 and VDAC2 but not VDAC3. Erastin, a compound that interacts with VDAC, blocked and reversed mitochondrial depolarization after microtubule destabilizers in intact cells and antagonized tubulin-induced VDAC blockage in planar bilayers. In conclusion, free tubulin inhibits VDAC1/2 and limits mitochondrial metabolism in HepG2 cells, contributing to the Warburg phenomenon. Reversal of tubulin-VDAC interaction by erastin antagonizes Warburg metabolism and restores oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

  9. Cloning, chromosomal localization, and functional expression of the alpha 1 subunit of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel from normal human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, D; Mikala, G; Yatani, A; Engle, D B; Iles, D E; Segers, B; Sinke, R J; Weghuis, D O; Klöckner, U; Wakamori, M

    1993-01-01

    A unique structural variant of the cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha 1 subunit cDNA was isolated from libraries derived from normal human heart mRNA. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to other calcium channel alpha 1 subunits. However, differences from t

  10. Chemical Vapour Deposition Diamond - Charge Carrier Movement at Low Temperatures and Use in Time-Critical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, Hendrik; Pernegger, Heinz

    Diamond, a wide band gap semiconductor with exceptional electrical properties, has found its way in diverse fields of application reaching from the usage as a sensor material for beam loss monitors at particle accelerator facilities, to laser windows, to UV light sensors in space applications, e.g. for space weather forecasting. Though often used at room temperature, little is known about the charge transport in diamond towards liquid helium temperatures. In this work the method of the transient current technique is employed at temperatures between room temperature and 2 K. The temperature and electric field strength dependence of the pulse shape, the charge carrier transit time, the drift velocity, the saturation velocity, and the low-field mobility is measured in detector-grade scCVD diamond. Furthermore, the usability of diamond in time-critical applications is tested, and the main results are presented.

  11. Poly(ethylene glycol-cholesterol inhibits L-type Ca2+ channel currents and augments voltage-dependent inactivation in A7r5 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikuo Ochi

    Full Text Available Cholesterol distributes at a high density in the membrane lipid raft and modulates ion channel currents. Poly(ethylene glycol cholesteryl ether (PEG-cholesterol is a nonionic amphipathic lipid consisting of lipophilic cholesterol and covalently bound hydrophilic PEG. PEG-cholesterol is used to formulate lipoplexes to transfect cultured cells, and liposomes for encapsulated drug delivery. PEG-cholesterol is dissolved in the external leaflet of the lipid bilayer, and expands it to flatten the caveolae and widen the gap between the two leaflets. We studied the effect of PEG-cholesterol on whole cell L-type Ca(2+ channel currents (I(Ca,L recorded from cultured A7r5 arterial smooth muscle cells. The pretreatment of cells with PEG-cholesterol decreased the density of ICa,L and augmented the voltage-dependent inactivation with acceleration of time course of inactivation and negative shift of steady-state inactivation curve. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD is a cholesterol-binding oligosaccharide. The enrichment of cholesterol by the MβCD:cholesterol complex (cholesterol (MβCD caused inhibition of I(Ca,L but did not augment voltage-dependent inactivation. Incubation with MβCD increased I(Ca,L, slowed the time course of inactivation and shifted the inactivation curve to a positive direction. Additional pretreatment by a high concentration of MβCD of the cells initially pretreated with PEG-cholesterol, increased I(Ca,L to a greater level than the control, and removed the augmented voltage-dependent inactivation. Due to the enhancement of the voltage-dependent inactivation, PEG-cholesterol inhibited window I(Ca,L more strongly as compared with cholesterol (MβCD. Poly(ethylene glycol conferred to cholesterol the efficacy to induce sustained augmentation of voltage-dependent inactivation of I(Ca,L.

  12. Altered ischemic cerebral injury in mice lacking αIE subunit of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective ①To set up a stable and reproducible focal cerebral infarct modelin mice; (②To examine theinvolvement of αIE subunit of voltage-dependent Ca2 + channel in cerebral ischemic injury. Methods Male C57BL/6J Jclmice 8 ~ 12w and F4 ~ F6αIE subunit of Ca2+ channel mutant mice were both used in this study. All animals were allowedto freely access to food and water before and after operation. Animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium 60mg/kg,ip. Rectal temperature was continuously monitored before, during and after operation, and maintained at (36.6 +0.1 )°C by a autoregulating pad. To produce pilot models, the middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded either by sur-gical ligation or electrical coagulation and in some models the common carotid artery (CCA) was surgically ligated in tan-dem. In our latter work the MCA was cut off soon after it was ligated or coagulated in order to make sure that the bloodflow was occluded completely. The MCA was coagulated or ligated with a bipolar coagulator or microsurgery suture at thesite just superior to the rhinal fissure. Twenty~four hours after the operation, the mice were anesthetized and decapitated,then their brains were dissected from the skull and put into cold artificial brain spinal fluid as soon as possible. Lmm thickcoronal sections were cut by vibratome and stained with 2% 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) at 37°C for30min. Every section was photographed positively and the whole infarction volume was calculated by summing up the in-farction volumes of all sections by NIH Image System. Infarction ratio ( % ) was also calculated by the following fommula:(contralateral volume-ipsilateral undamaged volume)/contralateral volume × 100% to eliminate the influence of edema.In brief, the mutant mice were produced with gene targeting technique. F4 ~ F6 mice were used in this experiment. Alloffsprings were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the genotypes remained umknown

  13. Voltage dependence of Hodgkin-Huxley rate functions for a multistage K^{+} channel voltage sensor within a membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, S R

    2014-11-01

    The activation of a K^{+} channel sensor in two sequential stages during a voltage clamp may be described as the translocation of a Brownian particle in an energy landscape with two large barriers between states. A solution of the Smoluchowski equation for a square-well approximation to the potential function of the S4 voltage sensor satisfies a master equation and has two frequencies that may be determined from the forward and backward rate functions. When the higher-frequency terms have small amplitude, the solution reduces to the relaxation of a rate equation, where the derived two-state rate functions are dependent on the relative magnitude of the forward rates (α and γ) and the backward rates (β and δ) for each stage. In particular, the voltage dependence of the Hodgkin-Huxley rate functions for a K^{+} channel may be derived by assuming that the rate functions of the first stage are large relative to those of the second stage-α≫γ and β≫δ. For a Shaker IR K^{+} channel, the first forward and backward transitions are rate limiting (αchannel and a noninactivating Na^{+} ion channel is determined by the master equation for K^{+} channel activation and the ionic current equation when the Na^{+} channel activation time is small, and if β≪δ and α≪γ, the system may exhibit a small amplitude oscillation between spikes, or mixed-mode oscillation, in which the slow closed state modulates the K^{+} ion channel conductance in the membrane.

  14. Voltage-dependent ionic channels in differentiating neural precursor cells collected from adult mouse brains six hours post-mortem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellardita, Carmelo; Bolzoni, Francesco; Sorosina, Melissa; Marfia, Giovanni; Carelli, Stephana; Gorio, Alfredo; Formenti, Alessandro

    2012-04-01

    A novel type of adult neural precursor cells (NPCs) has been isolated from the subventricular zone of the mouse 6 hr after animal death (T6-NPCs). This condition is supposed to select hypoxia-resistant cells of scientific and clinical interest. Ionic channels are ultimately the expression of the functional maturation of neurons, so the aim of this research was to characterize the pattern of the main voltage-dependent ionic channels in T6-NPCs differentiating to a neuronal phenotype, comparing it with NPCs isolated soon after death (T0-NPCs). T6- and T0-NPCs grow in medium containing epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Differentiation was performed in small wells without the addition of growth factors, in the presence of adhesion molecules, fetal bovine serum, and leukemia inhibitory factor. Ionic currents, recorded by means of whole-cell patch-clamp, namely, I(Ca2+) HVA, both L- and non-L-type, I(K+) delayed rectifying, I(K+) inward rectifier, transient I(K+A) , and TTX-sensitive I(Na+) have been found, although Na(+) currents were found in only a small percentage of cells and after the fifth week of differentiation. No significant differences in current types, density, orcell capacitance were observed between T6-NPCs and T0-NPCs. The sequence in which the markers appear in new neural cells is not necessarily a fixed program, but the discrepancies in morphological, biochemical, and electrophysiological maturation of mouse NPCs to neurons, possibly different in vivo, suggest that the various steps of the differentiation are independently regulated. Therefore, in addition to morphological and biochemical data, functional tests should be considered for characterizing the maturation of neurons.

  15. The Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 1 Mediates Amyloid β Toxicity and Represents a Potential Target for Alzheimer Disease Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilansky, Angela; Dangoor, Liron; Nakdimon, Itay; Ben-Hail, Danya; Mizrachi, Dario; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), found in the mitochondrial outer membrane, forms the main interface between mitochondrial and cellular metabolisms, mediates the passage of a variety of molecules across the mitochondrial outer membrane, and is central to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. VDAC1 is overexpressed in post-mortem brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The development and progress of AD are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the cytotoxic effects of accumulated amyloid β (Aβ). In this study we demonstrate the involvement of VDAC1 and a VDAC1 N-terminal peptide (VDAC1-N-Ter) in Aβ cell penetration and cell death induction. Aβ directly interacted with VDAC1 and VDAC1-N-Ter, as monitored by VDAC1 channel conductance, surface plasmon resonance, and microscale thermophoresis. Preincubated Aβ interacted with bilayer-reconstituted VDAC1 and increased its conductance ∼ 2-fold. Incubation of cells with Aβ resulted in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. However, the presence of non-cell-penetrating VDAC1-N-Ter peptide prevented Aβ cellular entry and Aβ-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Likewise, silencing VDAC1 expression by specific siRNA prevented Aβ entry into the cytosol as well as Aβ-induced toxicity. Finally, the mode of Aβ-mediated action involves detachment of mitochondria-bound hexokinase, induction of VDAC1 oligomerization, and cytochrome c release, a sequence of events leading to apoptosis. As such, we suggest that Aβ-mediated toxicity involves mitochondrial and plasma membrane VDAC1, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis induction. The VDAC1-N-Ter peptide targeting Aβ cytotoxicity is thus a potential new therapeutic strategy for AD treatment.

  16. Thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizers alter lipid bilayer properties and voltage-dependent sodium channel function: implications for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinova, Radda; Herold, Karl F; Sanford, R Lea; Greathouse, Denise V; Hemmings, Hugh C; Andersen, Olaf S

    2011-08-01

    The thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. Their canonical effects are mediated by activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcription factor. In addition to effects mediated by gene activation, the TZDs cause acute, transcription-independent changes in various membrane transport processes, including glucose transport, and they alter the function of a diverse group of membrane proteins, including ion channels. The basis for these off-target effects is unknown, but the TZDs are hydrophobic/amphiphilic and adsorb to the bilayer-water interface, which will alter bilayer properties, meaning that the TZDs may alter membrane protein function by bilayer-mediated mechanisms. We therefore explored whether the TZDs alter lipid bilayer properties sufficiently to be sensed by bilayer-spanning proteins, using gramicidin A (gA) channels as probes. The TZDs altered bilayer elastic properties with potencies that did not correlate with their affinity for PPARγ. At concentrations where they altered gA channel function, they also altered the function of voltage-dependent sodium channels, producing a prepulse-dependent current inhibition and hyperpolarizing shift in the steady-state inactivation curve. The shifts in the inactivation curve produced by the TZDs and other amphiphiles can be superimposed by plotting them as a function of the changes in gA channel lifetimes. The TZDs' partition coefficients into lipid bilayers were measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The most potent bilayer modifier, troglitazone, alters bilayer properties at clinically relevant free concentrations; the least potent bilayer modifiers, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, do not. Unlike other TZDs tested, ciglitazone behaves like a hydrophobic anion and alters the gA monomer-dimer equilibrium by more than one mechanism. Our results provide a possible mechanism for some off-target effects of an important group of drugs, and

  17. Photoaffinity labeling with cholesterol analogues precisely maps a cholesterol-binding site in voltage-dependent anion channel-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budelier, Melissa M; Cheng, Wayland W L; Bergdoll, Lucie; Chen, Zi-Wei; Janetka, James W; Abramson, Jeff; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F; Whitelegge, Julian P; Evers, Alex S

    2017-06-02

    Voltage-dependent anion channel-1 (VDAC1) is a highly regulated β-barrel membrane protein that mediates transport of ions and metabolites between the mitochondria and cytosol of the cell. VDAC1 co-purifies with cholesterol and is functionally regulated by cholesterol, among other endogenous lipids. Molecular modeling studies based on NMR observations have suggested five cholesterol-binding sites in VDAC1, but direct experimental evidence for these sites is lacking. Here, to determine the sites of cholesterol binding, we photolabeled purified mouse VDAC1 (mVDAC1) with photoactivatable cholesterol analogues and analyzed the photolabeled sites with both top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and bottom-up MS paired with a clickable, stable isotope-labeled tag, FLI-tag. Using cholesterol analogues with a diazirine in either the 7 position of the steroid ring (LKM38) or the aliphatic tail (KK174), we mapped a binding pocket in mVDAC1 localized to Thr(83) and Glu(73), respectively. When Glu(73) was mutated to a glutamine, KK174 no longer photolabeled this residue, but instead labeled the nearby Tyr(62) within this same binding pocket. The combination of analytical strategies employed in this work permits detailed molecular mapping of a cholesterol-binding site in a protein, including an orientation of the sterol within the site. Our work raises the interesting possibility that cholesterol-mediated regulation of VDAC1 may be facilitated through a specific binding site at the functionally important Glu(73) residue. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Transient voltage-dependent potassium currents are reduced in NTS neurons isolated from renal wrap hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belugin, Sergei; Mifflin, Steve

    2005-12-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp measurements were made in neurons enzymatically dispersed from the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) to determine if alterations occur in voltage-dependent potassium channels from rats made hypertensive (HT) by unilateral nephrectomy/renal wrap for 4 wk. Some rats had the fluorescent tracer DiA applied to the aortic nerve before the experiment to identify NTS neurons receiving monosynaptic baroreceptor afferent inputs. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was greater in 4-wk HT (165 +/- 5 mmHg, n = 26, P NTS neurons from NT and HT rats. At activation voltages from -10 to +10 mV, TOCs were significantly less in HT neurons compared with those observed in NT neurons (P NTS neurons from NT and HT rats and was not different comparing neurons from NT and HT rats. However, examination of the subset of NTS neurons exhibiting somatic DiA fluorescence revealed that DiA-labeled neurons from HT rats had a significantly shorter duration delayed excitation (n = 8 cells, P = 0.022) than DiA-labeled neurons from NT rats (n = 7 cells). Neurons with delayed excitation from HT rats had a significantly broader first action potential (AP) and a slower maximal downstroke velocity of repolarization compared with NT neurons with delayed excitation (P = 0.016 and P = 0.014, respectively). The number of APs in the first 200 ms of a sustained depolarization was greater in HT than NT neurons (P = 0.012). These results suggest that HT of 4-wk duration reduces TOCs in NTS neurons, and this contributes to reduced delayed excitation and increased AP responses to depolarizing inputs. Such changes could alter baroreflex function in hypertension.

  19. Distribution of voltage-dependent and intracellular Ca2+ channels in submucosal neurons from rat distal colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Matthias; Bader, Sandra; Bell, Anna; Diener, Martin

    2013-09-01

    We recently observed a bradykinin-induced increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in submucosal neurons of rat colon, an increase inhibited by blockers of voltage-dependent Ca2+ (Ca(v)) channels. As the types of Ca(v) channels used by this part of the enteric nervous system are unknown, the expression of various Ca(v) subunits has been investigated in whole-mount submucosal preparations by immunohistochemistry. Submucosal neurons, identified by a neuronal marker (microtubule-associated protein 2), are immunoreactive for Ca(v)1.2, Ca(v)1.3 and Ca(v)2.2, expression being confirmed by reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction. These data agree with previous observations that the inhibition of L- and N-type Ca2+ currents strongly inhibits the response to bradykinin. However, whole-cell patch-clamp experiments have revealed that bradykinin does not enhance Ca2+ inward currents under voltage-clamp conditions. Consequently, bradykinin does not directly interact with Ca(v) channels. Instead, the kinin-induced Ca2+ influx is caused indirectly by the membrane depolarization evoked by this peptide. As intracellular Ca2+ channels on Ca(2+)-storing organelles can also contribute to Ca2+ signaling, their expression has been investigated by imaging experiments and immunohistochemistry. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R) have been functionally demonstrated in submucosal neurons loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye, fura-2. Histamine, a typical agonist coupled to the phospholipase C pathway, induces an increase in the fura-2 signal ratio, which is suppressed by 2-aminophenylborate, a blocker of IP3 receptors. The expression of IP3R1 has been confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In contrast, ryanodine, tested over a wide concentration range, evokes no increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration nor is there immunohistochemical evidence for the expression of ryanodine receptors in these neurons. Thus, rat submucosal neurons are equipped

  20. Voltage-dependent regulation of CaV2.2 channels by Gq-coupled receptor is facilitated by membrane-localized β subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Dongil; Baek, Christina; Kim, Dong-Il; Kweon, Hae-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal through molecular messengers, such as Gβγ, Ca(2+), and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), to modulate N-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV2.2) channels, playing a crucial role in regulating synaptic transmission. However, the cellular pathways through which GqPCRs inhibit CaV2.2 channel current are not completely understood. Here, we report that the location of CaV β subunits is key to determining the voltage dependence of CaV2.2 channel modulation by GqPCRs. Application of the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M to tsA-201 cells expressing M1 receptors, together with CaV N-type α1B, α2δ1, and membrane-localized β2a subunits, shifted the current-voltage relationship for CaV2.2 activation 5 mV to the right and slowed current activation. Muscarinic suppression of CaV2.2 activity was relieved by strong depolarizing prepulses. Moreover, when the C terminus of β-adrenergic receptor kinase (which binds Gβγ) was coexpressed with N-type channels, inhibition of CaV2.2 current after M1 receptor activation was markedly reduced and delayed, whereas the delay between PIP2 hydrolysis and inhibition of CaV2.2 current was decreased. When the Gβγ-insensitive CaV2.2 α1C-1B chimera was expressed, voltage-dependent inhibition of calcium current was virtually abolished, suggesting that M1 receptors act through Gβγ to inhibit CaV2.2 channels bearing membrane-localized CaV β2a subunits. Expression of cytosolic β subunits such as β2b and β3, as well as the palmitoylation-negative mutant β2a(C3,4S), reduced the voltage dependence of M1 muscarinic inhibition of CaV2.2 channels, whereas it increased inhibition mediated by PIP2 depletion. Together, our results indicate that, with membrane-localized CaV β subunits, CaV2.2 channels are subject to Gβγ-mediated voltage-dependent inhibition, whereas cytosol-localized β subunits confer more effective PIP2-mediated voltage-independent regulation. Thus, the voltage dependence of

  1. Independent movement of the voltage sensors in KV2.1/KV6.4 heterotetramers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocksteins, Elke; Snyders, Dirk J; Holmgren, Miguel

    2017-01-31

    Heterotetramer voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels KV2.1/KV6.4 display a gating charge-voltage (QV) distribution composed by two separate components. We use state dependent chemical accessibility to cysteines substituted in either KV2.1 or KV6.4 to assess the voltage sensor movements of each subunit. By comparing the voltage dependences of chemical modification and gating charge displacement, here we show that each gating charge component corresponds to a specific subunit forming the heterotetramer. The voltage sensors from KV6.4 subunits move at more negative potentials than the voltage sensors belonging to KV2.1 subunits. These results indicate that the voltage sensors from the tetrameric channels move independently. In addition, our data shows that 75% of the total charge is attributed to KV2.1, while 25% to KV6.4. Thus, the most parsimonious model for KV2.1/KV6.4 channels' stoichiometry is 3:1.

  2. Rab3 interacting molecule 3 mutations associated with autism alter regulation of voltage-dependent Ca²⁺ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yoshinori; Hirano, Mitsuru; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kazuma; Nakahara, Keiko; Mori, Masayuki X; Mori, Yasuo

    2015-09-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorder characterized by impaired reciprocal social interaction, disrupted communication, and restricted and stereotyped patterns of interests. Autism is known to have a strong genetic component. Although mutations in several genes account for only a small proportion of individuals with autism, they provide insight into potential biological mechanisms that underlie autism, such as dysfunction in Ca(2+) signaling, synaptic dysfunction, and abnormal brain connectivity. In autism patients, two mutations have been reported in the Rab3 interacting molecule 3 (RIM3) gene. We have previously demonstrated that RIM3 physically and functionally interacts with voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) expressed in neurons via the β subunits, and increases neurotransmitter release. Here, by introducing corresponding autism-associated mutations that replace glutamic acid residue 176 with alanine (E176A) and methionine residue 259 with valine (M259V) into the C2B domain of mouse RIM3, we demonstrate that both mutations partly cancel the suppressive RIM3 effect on voltage-dependent inactivation of Ba(2+) currents through P/Q-type CaV2.1 recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. In recombinant N-type CaV2.2 VDCCs, the attenuation of the suppressive RIM3 effect on voltage-dependent inactivation is conserved for M259V but not E176A. Slowing of activation speed of P/Q-type CaV2.1 currents by RIM3 is abolished in E176A, while the physical interaction between RIM3 and β subunits is significantly attenuated in M259V. Moreover, increases by RIM3 in depolarization-induced Ca(2+) influx and acetylcholine release are significantly attenuated by E176A in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Thus, our data raise the interesting possibility that autism phenotypes are elicited by synaptic dysfunction via altered regulation of presynaptic VDCC function and neurotransmitter release.

  3. Electrical characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}-solar cells by voltage dependent time-resolved photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiberg, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.maiberg@physik.uni-halle.de; Spindler, Conrad; Jarzembowski, Enrico; Scheer, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) is a promising method for the investigation of charge carrier dynamics and recombination kinetics in semiconductor devices. To characterize Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) solar cells, we measured TRPL for different applied external forward voltages. We show that the TRPL decay time increases with increasing voltage in case of a high excitation intensity. This result is valid for a wide range of excitation frequencies of the laser. By simulation of the measured transients we determined semiconductor parameters which allow fitting the experimental photoluminescence transients for different voltages. The deduced quantities are the lifetime for deep defect assisted Schockley-Read-Hall recombination, doping density and charge carrier mobilities of the solar cell's absorber layer with values of 10 ns, 2 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} and 1 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively, for a standard CIGSe solar cell. We further studied the appearance of a photovoltage in TRPL experiments with single-photon-counting methods. By experimental results we show a dependence of the open circuit voltage on the laser repetition rate, which influences the TRPL decay. - Highlights: • Time-resolved photoluminescence on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}-solar for different bias voltages • Build up of a photovoltage that varies luminescence decay for open circuit conditions • Inhibition of luminescence decay for increasing bias forward voltages • Determination of charge carrier mobilities and minority carrier lifetime by simulations.

  4. Aspartic Acid Residue D3 Critically Determines Cx50 Gap Junction Channel Transjunctional Voltage-Dependent Gating and Unitary Conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Li; Nakagawa, So; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Bai, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the aspartic acid residue (D) at the third position is critical in determining the voltage polarity of fast Vj-gating of Cx50 channels. To test whether another negatively charged residue (a glutamic acid residue, E) could fulfill the role of the D3 residue, we generated the mutant Cx50D3E. Vj-dependent gating properties of this mutant channel were characterized by double-patch-clamp recordings in N2A cells. Macroscopically, the D3E substitution reduced the residual conductance (Gmin) to near zero and outwardly shifted the half-inactivation voltage (V0), which is a result of both a reduced aggregate gating charge (z) and a reduced free-energy difference between the open and closed states. Single Cx50D3E gap junction channels showed reduced unitary conductance (γj) of the main open state, reduced open dwell time at ±40 mV, and absence of a long-lived substate. In contrast, a G8E substitution tested to compare the effects of the E residue at the third and eighth positions did not modify the Vj-dependent gating profile or γj. In summary, this study is the first that we know of to suggest that the D3 residue plays an essential role, in addition to serving as a negative-charge provider, as a critical determinant of the Vj-dependent gating sensitivity, open-closed stability, and unitary conductance of Cx50 gap junction channels. PMID:22404924

  5. KCNE1 divides the voltage sensor movement in KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels into two steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barro-Soria, Rene; Rebolledo, Santiago; Liin, Sara I.; Perez, Marta E.; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kass, Robert S.; Larsson, H. Peter

    2014-04-01

    The functional properties of KCNQ1 channels are highly dependent on associated KCNE-β subunits. Mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE subunits can cause congenital channelopathies, such as deafness, cardiac arrhythmias and epilepsy. The mechanism by which KCNE1-β subunits slow the kinetics of KCNQ1 channels is a matter of current controversy. Here we show that KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel activation occurs in two steps: first, mutually independent voltage sensor movements in the four KCNQ1 subunits generate the main gating charge movement and underlie the initial delay in the activation time course of KCNQ1/KCNE1 currents. Second, a slower and concerted conformational change of all four voltage sensors and the gate, which opens the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel. Our data show that KCNE1 divides the voltage sensor movement into two steps with widely different voltage dependences and kinetics. The two voltage sensor steps in KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels can be pharmacologically isolated and further separated by a disease-causing mutation.

  6. Bias voltage dependence of molecular orientation of dialkyl ketone and fatty acid alkyl ester at the liquid–graphite interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibino, Masahiro, E-mail: hibino@mmm.muroran-it.ac.jp [Department of Applied Sciences, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto-cho, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 18-pentatriacontanone (as ketone) and stearyl stearate (as ester) were formed on a graphite surface at the liquid–solid interface. • Orientations of the molecules in SAMs on the substrate were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. • A perpendicular carbon skeleton-plane orientation with the CO pointing up on the surface is favorable for a substrate with negative charge and vice versa. - Abstract: Molecular orientations of self-assembled 18-pentatriacontanone (as ketone) and stearyl stearate (as ester) monolayers adsorbed on a graphite surface were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the liquid–solid interface. At a positive sample bias, the central areas of the dialkyl ketone and fatty acid alkyl ester molecules in the STM images appeared as two bright regions on both sides of a dim spot and a bright region on one side of a dim spot, whereas at a negative sample bias, the areas appeared dim. This contrast variation indicates that a perpendicular carbon skeleton-plane orientation with the CO pointing down on the surface is favorable for a substrate with positive charge and vice versa because of the greater electronegativity of the oxygen atom. Upon the bias voltage reversal, the delay time for the STM image contrast change in the region was observed on a time scale of minutes. The difference between the delay time lengths for the direction of bias polarity change indicates that the perpendicular configuration with CO pointing up is more stable than that with CO pointing down. These results indicate that the use of an electric field along a direction vertical to the monolayer on the substrate provides control over the orientations of the molecules between two stable states at the liquid–solid interface.

  7. Coexpression of voltage-dependent calcium channels Cav1.2, 2.1a, and 2.1b in vascular myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Ditte; Friis, Ulla Glenert; Uhrenholt, Torben Rene

    2006-01-01

    , and blocking P-type currents (omega-agatoxin IVA 10 nmol/L) led to 20.2+/-3.0% inhibition, whereas 300 nmol/L of omega agatoxin IVA (blocking P/Q-type) inhibited 45.0+/-7.3%. In rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5), blockade of L-type channels resulted in 28.5+/-6.1% inhibition, simultaneous blockade of L...... microscopy revealed expression of both channels in all of the smooth muscle cells. Whole-cell patch clamp on single preglomerular VSMCs from mice showed L-, P-, and Q-type currents. Blockade of the L-type currents by calciseptine (20 nmol/L) inhibited 35.6+/-3.9% of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ current......-type and P-type channels inhibited 58.0+/-11.8%, and simultaneous inhibition of L-, P-, and Q-type channels led to blockade (88.7+/-5.6%) of the Ca2+ current. We conclude that aortic and renal preglomerular smooth muscle cells express L-, P-, and Q-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in the rat and mouse....

  8. Structural mapping of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Distance between the tetrodotoxin and Centruroides suffusus suffusus II beta-scorpion toxin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbon, H; Angelides, K J

    1984-05-25

    A 7- dimethylaminocoumarin -4-acetate fluorescent derivative of toxin II from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css II) has been prepared to study the structural, conformational, and cellular properties of the beta-neurotoxin receptor site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel. The derivative retains high affinity for its receptor site on the synaptosomal sodium channel with a KD of 7 nM and site capacity of 1.5 pmol/mg of synaptosomal protein. The fluorescent toxin is very environmentally sensitive and the fluorescence emission upon binding indicates that the Css II receptor is largely hydrophobic. Binding of tetrodotoxin or batrachotoxin does not alter the spectroscopic properties of bound Css II, whereas toxin V from Leiurus quinquestriatus effects a 10-nm blue shift to a more hydrophobic environment. This is the first direct indication of conformational coupling between these separate neurotoxin receptor sites. The distance between the tetrodotoxin and Css II scorpion toxin receptors on the sodium channel was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Efficiencies were measured by both donor quenching and acceptor-sensitized emission. The distance between these two neurotoxin sites is about 34 A. The implications of these receptor locations together with other known molecular distances are discussed in terms of a molecular structure of the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

  9. Functional coupling between large-conductance potassium channels and Cav3.2 voltage-dependent calcium channels participates in prostate cancer cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Gackière

    2013-07-01

    It is strongly suspected that potassium (K+ channels are involved in various aspects of prostate cancer development, such as cell growth. However, the molecular nature of those K+ channels implicated in prostate cancer cell proliferation and the mechanisms through which they control proliferation are still unknown. This study uses pharmacological, biophysical and molecular approaches to show that the main voltage-dependent K+ current in prostate cancer LNCaP cells is carried by large-conductance BK channels. Indeed, most of the voltage-dependent current was inhibited by inhibitors of BK channels (paxillin and iberiotoxin and by siRNA targeting BK channels. In addition, we reveal that BK channels constitute the main K+ channel family involved in setting the resting membrane potential in LNCaP cells at around −40 mV. This consequently promotes a constitutive calcium entry through T-type Cav3.2 calcium channels. We demonstrate, using single-channel recording, confocal imaging and co-immunoprecipitation approaches, that both channels form macromolecular complexes. Finally, using flow cytometry cell cycle measurements, cell survival assays and Ki67 immunofluorescent staining, we show that both BK and Cav3.2 channels participate in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells.

  10. Altered calcium homeostasis in motor neurons following AMPA receptor but not voltage-dependent calcium channels' activation in a genetic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guatteo, Ezia; Carunchio, Irene; Pieri, Massimo; Albo, Federica; Canu, Nadia; Mercuri, Nicola B; Zona, Cristina

    2007-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a substantial loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem and motor cortex. By combining electrophysiological recordings with imaging techniques, clearance/buffering capacity of cultured spinal cord motor neurons after a calcium accumulation has been analyzed in response to AMPA receptors' (AMPARs') activation and to depolarizing stimuli in a genetic mouse model of ALS (G93A). Our studies demonstrate that the amplitude of the calcium signal in response to AMPARs' or voltage-dependent calcium channels' activation is not significantly different in controls and G93A motor neurons. On the contrary, in G93A motor neurons, the [Ca(2+)](i) recovery to basal level is significantly slower compared to control neurons following AMPARs but not voltage-dependent calcium channels' activation. This difference was not observed in G93A cultured cortical neurons. This observation is the first to indicate a specific alteration of the calcium clearance linked to AMPA receptors' activation in G93A motor neurons and the involvement of AMPA receptor regulatory proteins controlling both AMPA receptor functionality and the sequence of events connected to them.

  11. Physics-Based Compact Model for CIGS and CdTe Solar Cells: From Voltage-Dependent Carrier Collection to Light-Enhanced Reverse Breakdown: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xingshu; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Raguse, John; Garris, Rebekah; Deline, Chris; Silverman, Timothy

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we develop a physics-based compact model for copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) heterojunction solar cells that attributes the failure of superposition to voltage-dependent carrier collection in the absorber layer, and interprets light-enhanced reverse breakdown as a consequence of tunneling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction. The temperature dependence of the model is validated against both simulation and experimental data for the entire range of bias conditions. The model can be used to characterize device parameters, optimize new designs, and most importantly, predict performance and reliability of solar panels including the effects of self-heating and reverse breakdown due to partial-shading degradation.

  12. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 2 of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtVDAC2 Is Involved in ABA-Mediated Early Seedling Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xufeng Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC is the major transport protein in the outer membrane of mitochondria and plays crucial roles in energy metabolism, apoptosis, and metabolites transport. In plants, the expression of VDACs can be affected by different stresses, including drought, salinity and pathogen defense. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of AtVDAC2 in A. thaliana and found ABA suppressed the accumulation of AtVDAC2 transcripts. Further, phenotype analysis of this VDAC deregulated-expression transgenic Arabidopsis plants indicated that AtVDAC2 anti-sense line showed an ABA-insensitivity phenotype during the early seedling development under ABA treatment. The results suggested that AtVDAC2 might be involved in ABA signaling in A. thaliana.

  13. Reduced KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium channel activity underlies impaired ß-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of renal arteries in hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chadha, Preet S; Zunke, Friederike; Zhu, Hai-Lei;

    2012-01-01

    KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium (Kv7.4) channels are important regulators of vascular tone that are severely compromised in models of hypertension. However, there is no information as to the role of these channels in responses to endogenous vasodilators. We used a molecular knockdown...... strategy, as well as pharmacological tools, to examine the hypothesis that Kv7.4 channels contribute to ß-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and underlie the vascular deficit in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry confirmed gene and protein...... spontaneously hypertensive rats, which was associated with ˜60% decrease in Kv7.4 abundance. This study provides the first evidence that Kv7 channels contribute to ß-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and that abrogation of Kv7.4 channels is strongly implicated in the impaired ß...

  14. Involvement of presynaptic voltage-dependent Kv3 channel in endothelin-1-induced inhibition of noradrenaline release from rat gastric sympathetic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kumiko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Kenjiro; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2012-11-05

    We previously reported that two types of K(+) channels, the BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel coupled with phospholipase C (PLC) and the voltage-dependent K(+) channel (Kv channel), are, respectively, involved in the prostanoid TP receptor- and muscarinic M(2) receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline (NA) release from rat gastric sympathetic nerves. In the present study, therefore, we examined whether these K(+) channels are involved in endothelin-1-induced inhibition of NA release, using an isolated, vascularly perfused rat stomach. The gastric sympathetic postganglionic nerves around the left gastric artery were electrically stimulated twice at 2.5 Hz for 1 min, and endothelin-1 was added during the second stimulation. Endothelin-1 (1, 2 and 10 nM) dose-dependently inhibited gastric NA release. Endothelin-1 (2 nM)-induced inhibition of NA release was neither attenuated by PLC inhibitors [U-73122 (3 μM) and ET-18-OCH(3) (3 μM)] nor by Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blockers [charybdotoxin (0.1 μM) (a blocker of BK type K(+) channel) and apamin (0.3 μM) (a blocker of SK type K(+) channel)]. The endothelin-1-induced inhibitory response was also not attenuated by α-dendrotoxin (0.1 μM) (a selective inhibitor of Kv1 channel), but abolished by 4-aminopyridine (20 μM) (a selectively inhibitory dose for Kv3 channel). These results suggest the involvement of a voltage-dependent Kv3 channel in the endothelin-1-induced inhibition of NA release from the gastric sympathetic nerves in rats.

  15. Ropivacaine-Induced Contraction Is Attenuated by Both Endothelial Nitric Oxide and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels in Isolated Rat Aortae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Ho Ok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated endothelium-derived vasodilators and potassium channels involved in the modulation of ropivacaine-induced contraction. In endothelium-intact rat aortae, ropivacaine concentration-response curves were generated in the presence or absence of the following inhibitors: the nonspecific nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, the neuronal NOS inhibitor Nω-propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride, the inducible NOS inhibitor 1400W dihydrochloride, the nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (GC inhibitor ODQ, the NOS and GC inhibitor methylene blue, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin, the cytochrome p450 epoxygenase inhibitor fluconazole, the voltage-dependent potassium channel inhibitor 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitor tetraethylammonium (TEA, the inward-rectifying potassium channel inhibitor barium chloride, and the ATP-sensitive potassium channel inhibitor glibenclamide. The effect of ropivacaine on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells was examined by western blotting. Ropivacaine-induced contraction was weaker in endothelium-intact aortae than in endothelium-denuded aortae. L-NAME, ODQ, and methylene blue enhanced ropivacaine-induced contraction, whereas wortmannin, Nω-propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride, 1400W dihydrochloride, and fluconazole had no effect. 4-AP and TEA enhanced ropivacaine-induced contraction; however, barium chloride and glibenclamide had no effect. eNOS phosphorylation was induced by ropivacaine. These results suggest that ropivacaine-induced contraction is attenuated primarily by both endothelial nitric oxide and voltage-dependent potassium channels.

  16. Heparin/heparan sulfates bind to and modulate neuronal L-type (Cav1.2) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garau, Gianpiero; Magotti, Paola; Heine, Martin; Korotchenko, Svetlana; Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Berezin, Vladimir; Dityatev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies revealed that L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (Cav1.2 L-VDCCs) are modulated by the neural extracellular matrix backbone, polyanionic glycan hyaluronic acid. Here we used isothermal titration calorimetry and screened a set of peptides derived from the extracellular domains of Cav1.2α1 to identify putative binding sites between the channel and hyaluronic acid or another class of polyanionic glycans, such as heparin/heparan sulfates. None of the tested peptides showed detectable interaction with hyaluronic acid, but two peptides derived from the first pore-forming domain of Cav1.2α1 subunit bound to heparin. At 25 °C the binding of the peptide P7 (MGKMHKTCYN) was at ~50 μM, and that of the peptide P8 (GHGRQCQNGTVCKPGWDGPKHG) was at ~21 μM. The Cav1.2α1 first pore forming segment that contained both peptides maintained a high affinity for heparin (~23 μM), integrating their enthalpic and entropic binding contributions. Interaction between heparin and recombinant as well as native full-length neuronal Cav1.2α1 channels was confirmed using the heparin-agarose pull down assay. Whole cell patch clamp recordings in HEK293 cells transfected with neuronal Cav1.2 channels revealed that enzymatic digestion of highly sulfated heparan sulfates with heparinase 1 affects neither voltage-dependence of channel activation nor the level of steady state inactivation, but did speed up channel inactivation. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with heparinase 1 reduced the firing rate and led to appearance of long-lasting bursts in the same manner as treatment with the inhibitor of L-VDCC diltiazem. Thus, heparan sulfate proteoglycans may bind to and regulate L-VDCC inactivation and network activity.

  17. Cyanocobalamin, vitamin B12, depresses glutamate release through inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kun-Long; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Huang, Chia-Yu; Wang, Su-Jane

    2009-01-14

    The effect of cyanocobalamin, vitamin B12, on glutamate release in isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) prepared from rat prefrontal cortex was examined. Cyanocobalamin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of cyanocobalamin was blocked by the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, not by the glutamate transporter inhibitor L-transpyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid or the nontransportable glutamate inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate, indicating that this release inhibition results from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis and not from an inhibition of Ca(2+)-independent efflux via glutamate transporter. Examination of the effect of cyanocobalamin on cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration revealed that the inhibition of glutamate release could be attributed to a reduction in voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx. Consistent with this, the N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker omega-conotoxin MVIIC, largely attenuated the inhibitory effect of cyanocobalamin on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release, but the Ca(2+) release inhibitor dantrolene had no effect. Cyanocobalamin did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-aminopyridine-mediated depolarization; thus, the inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca(2+) influx and glutamate release produced by cyanocobalamin was not due to its decreasing synaptosomal excitability. In addition, cyanocobalamin-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca(2+) influx and glutamate release was significantly attenuated by protein kinase C inhibitors GF109203X and Ro318220. Furthermore, 4-aminopyridine-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C was significantly reduced by cyanocobalamin. These results suggest that cyanocobalamin effects a decrease in protein kinase C activation, which subsequently reduces the Ca(2+) entry through voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels to cause a decrease in evoked glutamate

  18. "Slow" Voltage-Dependent Inactivation of CaV2.2 Calcium Channels Is Modulated by the PKC Activator Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate (PMA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu

    Full Text Available CaV2.2 (N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca2+ channels play key roles in neurons and neuroendocrine cells including the control of cellular excitability, neurotransmitter / hormone secretion, and gene expression. Calcium entry is precisely controlled by channel gating properties including multiple forms of inactivation. "Fast" voltage-dependent inactivation is relatively well-characterized and occurs over the tens-to- hundreds of milliseconds timeframe. Superimposed on this is the molecularly distinct, but poorly understood process of "slow" voltage-dependent inactivation, which develops / recovers over seconds-to-minutes. Protein kinases can modulate "slow" inactivation of sodium channels, but little is known about if/how second messengers control "slow" inactivation of Ca2+ channels. We investigated this using recombinant CaV2.2 channels expressed in HEK293 cells and native CaV2 channels endogenously expressed in adrenal chromaffin cells. The PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA dramatically prolonged recovery from "slow" inactivation, but an inactive control (4α-PMA had no effect. This effect of PMA was prevented by calphostin C, which targets the C1-domain on PKC, but only partially reduced by inhibitors that target the catalytic domain of PKC. The subtype of the channel β-subunit altered the kinetics of inactivation but not the magnitude of slowing produced by PMA. Intracellular GDP-β-S reduced the effect of PMA suggesting a role for G proteins in modulating "slow" inactivation. We postulate that the kinetics of recovery from "slow" inactivation could provide a molecular memory of recent cellular activity and help control CaV2 channel availability, electrical excitability, and neurotransmission in the seconds-to-minutes timeframe.

  19. The agonist-specific voltage dependence of M2 muscarinic receptors modulates the deactivation of the acetylcholine-gated K(+) current (I KACh).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G; Alamilla, Javier; Sanchez-Chapula, José A; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A

    2016-07-01

    Recently, it has been shown that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) display intrinsic voltage sensitivity. We reported that the voltage sensitivity of M2 muscarinic receptor (M2R) is also ligand specific. Here, we provide additional evidence to understand the mechanism underlying the ligand-specific voltage sensitivity of the M2R. Using ACh, pilocarpine (Pilo), and bethanechol (Beth), we evaluated the agonist-specific effects of voltage by measuring the ACh-activated K(+) current (I KACh) in feline and rabbit atrial myocytes and in HEK-293 cells expressing M2R-Kir3.1/Kir3.4. The activation of I KACh by the muscarinic agonist Beth was voltage insensitive, suggesting that the voltage-induced conformational changes in M2R do not modify its affinity for this agonist. Moreover, deactivation of the Beth-evoked I KACh was voltage insensitive. By contrast, deactivation of the ACh-induced I KACh was significantly slower at -100 mV than at +50 mV, while an opposite effect was observed when I KACh was activated by Pilo. These findings are consistent with the voltage affinity pattern observed for these three agonists. Our findings suggest that independent of how voltage disturbs the receptor binding site, the voltage dependence of the signaling pathway is ultimately determined by the agonist. These observations emphasize the pharmacological potential to regulate the M2R-parasympathetic associated cardiac function and also other cellular signaling pathways by exploiting the voltage-dependent properties of GPCRs.

  20. S1-S3 counter charges in the voltage sensor module of a mammalian sodium channel regulate fast inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groome, James R; Winston, Vern

    2013-05-01

    The movement of positively charged S4 segments through the electric field drives the voltage-dependent gating of ion channels. Studies of prokaryotic sodium channels provide a mechanistic view of activation facilitated by electrostatic interactions of negatively charged residues in S1 and S2 segments, with positive counterparts in the S4 segment. In mammalian sodium channels, S4 segments promote domain-specific functions that include activation and several forms of inactivation. We tested the idea that S1-S3 countercharges regulate eukaryotic sodium channel functions, including fast inactivation. Using structural data provided by bacterial channels, we constructed homology models of the S1-S4 voltage sensor module (VSM) for each domain of the mammalian skeletal muscle sodium channel hNaV1.4. These show that side chains of putative countercharges in hNaV1.4 are oriented toward the positive charge complement of S4. We used mutagenesis to define the roles of conserved residues in the extracellular negative charge cluster (ENC), hydrophobic charge region (HCR), and intracellular negative charge cluster (INC). Activation was inhibited with charge-reversing VSM mutations in domains I-III. Charge reversal of ENC residues in domains III (E1051R, D1069K) and IV (E1373K, N1389K) destabilized fast inactivation by decreasing its probability, slowing entry, and accelerating recovery. Several INC mutations increased inactivation from closed states and slowed recovery. Our results extend the functional characterization of VSM countercharges to fast inactivation, and support the premise that these residues play a critical role in domain-specific gating transitions for a mammalian sodium channel.

  1. A CACNA1C variant associated with reduced voltage-dependent inactivation, increased CaV1.2 channel window current, and arrhythmogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hennessey

    Full Text Available Mutations in CACNA1C that increase current through the CaV1.2 L-type Ca2+ channel underlie rare forms of long QT syndrome (LQTS, and Timothy syndrome (TS. We identified a variant in CACNA1C in a male child of Filipino descent with arrhythmias and extracardiac features by candidate gene sequencing and performed functional expression studies to electrophysiologically characterize the effects of the variant on CaV1.2 channels. As a baby, the subject developed seizures and displayed developmental delays at 30 months of age. At age 5 years, he displayed a QTc of 520 ms and experienced recurrent VT. Physical exam at 17 years of age was notable for microcephaly, short stature, lower extremity weakness and atrophy with hyperreflexia, spastic diplegia, multiple dental caries and episodes of rhabdomyolysis. Candidate gene sequencing identified a G>C transversion at position 5731 of CACNA1C (rs374528680 predicting a glycine>arginine substitution at residue 1911 (p.G1911R of CaV1.2. The allele frequency of this variant is 0.01 in Malays, but absent in 984 Caucasian alleles and in the 1000 genomes project. In electrophysiological analyses, the variant decreased voltage-dependent inactivation, thus causing a gain of function of CaV1.2. We also observed a negative shift of V1/2 of activation and positive shift of V1/2 of channel inactivation, resulting in an increase of the window current. Together, these suggest a gain-of-function effect on CaV1.2 and suggest increased susceptibility for arrhythmias in certain clinical settings. The p.G1911R variant was also identified in a case of sudden unexplained infant death (SUID, for which an increasing number of clinical observations have demonstrated can be associated with arrhythmogenic mutations in cardiac ion channels. In summary, the combined effects of the CACNA1C variant to diminish voltage-dependent inactivation of CaV1.2 and increase window current expand our appreciation of mechanisms by which a gain of

  2. Involvement of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation in the voltage-dependent regulation of the Ca(2+) concentration in porcine coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Hisao; Ohya, Susumu; Muraki, Katsuhiko; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2012-08-01

    The involvement of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) formation in the voltage-dependent regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was examined in smooth muscle cells of the porcine coronary artery. Slow ramp depolarization from -90 to 0 mV induced progressive [Ca(2+)](i) increase. The slope was reduced or increased in the presence of Cd(2+) or (±)-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-(2-[trifluoromethyl]-phenyl)pyridine-3-carboxlic acid methyl ester (Bay K 8644), respectively. The decrease in [Ca(2+)](i) via the membrane hyperpolarization induced by K(+) channel openers (levcromakalim and Evans blue) under current clamp was identical to that under voltage clamp. The step hyperpolarization from -40 to -80 mV reduced [Ca(2+)](i) uniformly over the whole-cell area with a time constant of ∼10 s. The [Ca(2+)](i) at either potential was unaffected by heparin, an inhibitor of IP(3) receptors. Alternatively, [Ca(2+)](i) rapidly increased in the peripheral regions by depolarization from -80 to 0 mV and stayed at that level (∼400 nM) during a 60-s pulse. When the pipette solution contained IP(3) pathway blockers [heparin, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate, xestospongin C, or 1-[6-[((17β)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5[10]-trien-17-yl)amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)], the peak [Ca(2+)](i) was unchanged, but the sustained [Ca(2+)](i) was gradually reduced by ∼250 nM within 30 s. In the presence of Cd(2+), a long depolarization period slightly increased the [Ca(2+)](i), which was lower than that in the presence of heparin alone. In coronary arterial myocytes, the sustained increase in the [Ca(2+)](i) during depolarization was partly caused by the Ca(2+) release mediated by the enhanced formation of IP(3). The initial [Ca(2+)](i) elevation triggered by the Ca(2+) influx though voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels may be predominantly responsible for the activation of phospholipase C for IP(3) formation.

  3. Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  4. Forgetting of long-term memory requires activation of NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and calcineurin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachser, Ricardo Marcelo; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana Paula; Lunardi, Paula; Pedraza, Lizeth Katherine; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto; Hardt, Oliver; de Oliveira Alvares, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying memory consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction have been well characterized. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of forgetting processes remain to be elucidated. Here we used behavioral, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to explore mechanisms controlling forgetting. We found that post-acquisition chronic inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (LVDCC), and protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), maintains long-term object location memory that otherwise would have been forgotten. We further show that NMDAR activation is necessary to induce forgetting of object recognition memory. Studying the role of NMDAR activation in the decay of the early phase of long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in the hippocampus, we found that ifenprodil infused 30 min after LTP induction in vivo blocks the decay of CA1-evoked postsynaptic plasticity, suggesting that GluN2B-containing NMDARs activation are critical to promote LTP decay. Taken together, these findings indicate that a well-regulated forgetting process, initiated by Ca2+ influx through LVDCCs and GluN2B-NMDARs followed by CaN activation, controls the maintenance of hippocampal LTP and long-term memories over time. PMID:26947131

  5. Evidence for functional interaction of plasma membrane electron transport, voltage-dependent anion channel and volume-regulated anion channel in frog aorta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rashmi P Rao; J Prakasa Rao

    2010-12-01

    Frog aortic tissue exhibits plasma membrane electron transport (PMET) owing to its ability to reduce ferricyanide even in the presence of mitochondrial poisons, such as cyanide and azide. Exposure to hypotonic solution (108 mOsmol/kg H2O) enhanced the reduction of ferricyanide in excised aortic tissue of frog. Increment in ferricyanide reductase activity was also brought about by the presence of homocysteine (100 M dissolved in isotonic frog Ringer solution), a redox active compound and a potent modulator of PMET. Two plasma-membrane-bound channels, the volume regulated anion channel (VRAC) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), are involved in the response to hypotonic stress. The presence of VRAC and VDAC antagonists–tamoxifen, glibenclamide, fluoxetine and verapamil, and 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS), respectively–inhibited this enhanced activity brought about by either hypotonic stress or homocysteine. The blockers do not affect the ferricyanide reductase activity under isotonic conditions. Taken together, these findings indicate a functional interaction of the three plasma membrane proteins, namely, ferricyanide reductase (PMET), VDAC and VRAC.

  6. Correlation between Barrier Width, Barrier Height, and DC Bias Voltage Dependences on the Magnetoresistance Ratio in Ir-Mn Exchange Biased Single and Double Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Amano, Minoru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Takahashi, Shigeki; Sagoi, Masayuki; Inomata, Koichiro

    2000-10-01

    Dual spin-valve-type double tunnel junctions (DTJs) of Ir-Mn/CoFe/AlOx/Co90Fe10/AlOx/CoFe/Ir-Mn and spin-valve-type single tunnel junctions (STJs) of Ir-Mn/CoFe/AlOx/CoFe/Ni-Fe were fabricated using an ultrahigh vacuum sputtering system, conventional photolithography and ion-beam milling. The STJs could be fabricated with various barrier heights by changing the oxidization conditions during deposition and changing the annealing temperature after deposition, while the AlOx layer thickness remained unchanged. There was a correlation between barrier width, height estimated using Simmons’ expressions, and dc bias voltage dependence on the MR ratio. The VB dependence on the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio was mainly related to the barrier width, and the decrease in the TMR ratio with increasing bias voltage is well explained, taking into account the spin-independent two-step tunneling via defect states in the barrier, as a main mechanism, at room temperature. Under optimized oxidization and annealing conditions, the maximum TMR ratio at a low bias voltage, and the dc bias voltage value at which the TMR ratio decreases in value by half (V1/2) were 42.4% and 952 mV in DTJs, and 49.0% and 425 mV in STJs, respectively.

  7. hERG S4-S5 linker acts as a voltage-dependent ligand that binds to the activation gate and locks it in a closed state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Olfat A; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Loussouarn, Gildas

    2017-12-01

    Delayed-rectifier potassium channels (hERG and KCNQ1) play a major role in cardiac repolarization. These channels are formed by a tetrameric pore (S5-S6) surrounded by four voltage sensor domains (S1-S4). Coupling between voltage sensor domains and the pore activation gate is critical for channel voltage-dependence. However, molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that covalently binding, through a disulfide bridge, a peptide mimicking the S4-S5 linker (S4-S5L) to the channel S6 C-terminus (S6T) completely inhibits hERG. This shows that channel S4-S5L is sufficient to stabilize the pore activation gate in its closed state. Conversely, covalently binding a peptide mimicking S6T to the channel S4-S5L prevents its inhibiting effect and renders the channel almost completely voltage-independent. This shows that the channel S4-S5L is necessary to stabilize the activation gate in its closed state. Altogether, our results provide chemical evidence that S4-S5L acts as a voltage-controlled ligand that binds S6T to lock the channel in a closed state, elucidating the coupling between voltage sensors and the gate in delayed rectifier potassium channels and potentially other voltage-gated channels.

  8. Ca2+ channel inhibitor NNC 55-0396 inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Youn Kyoung; Hong, Da Hye; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Dae-Joong; Na, Sung Hun; Park, Hongzoo; Jung, Won-Kyo; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated the inhibitory effect of NNC 55-0396, a T-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, on voltage-dependent K(+) (K(V)) channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells. NNC 55-0396 decreased the amplitude of K(V) currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC(50) of 0.080 μM and a Hill coefficient of 0.76.NNC 55-0396 did not affect steady-state activation and inactivation curves, indicating that the compound does not affect the voltage sensitivity of K(V) channel gating. Both the K(V) currents and the inhibitory effect of NNC 55-0396 on K(V) channels were not altered by depletion of extracellular Ca(2+) or intracellular ATP, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of NNC 55-0396 is independent of Ca(2+)-channel activity and phosphorylation-dependent signaling cascades. From these results, we concluded that NNC 55-0396 dosedependently inhibits K(V) currents, independently of Ca(2+)-channel activity and intracellular signaling cascades.

  9. Forgetting of long-term memory requires activation of NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and calcineurin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachser, Ricardo Marcelo; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana Paula; Lunardi, Paula; Pedraza, Lizeth Katherine; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto; Hardt, Oliver; Alvares, Lucas de Oliveira

    2016-03-07

    In the past decades, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying memory consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction have been well characterized. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of forgetting processes remain to be elucidated. Here we used behavioral, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to explore mechanisms controlling forgetting. We found that post-acquisition chronic inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (LVDCC), and protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), maintains long-term object location memory that otherwise would have been forgotten. We further show that NMDAR activation is necessary to induce forgetting of object recognition memory. Studying the role of NMDAR activation in the decay of the early phase of long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in the hippocampus, we found that ifenprodil infused 30 min after LTP induction in vivo blocks the decay of CA1-evoked postsynaptic plasticity, suggesting that GluN2B-containing NMDARs activation are critical to promote LTP decay. Taken together, these findings indicate that a well-regulated forgetting process, initiated by Ca(2+) influx through LVDCCs and GluN2B-NMDARs followed by CaN activation, controls the maintenance of hippocampal LTP and long-term memories over time.

  10. Differential rescue of spatial memory deficits in aged rats by L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, S C; D'Angelo, H M; Royer, S E; Kaercher, R M; Adzovic, L; Wenk, G L

    2014-11-01

    Age-associated memory impairments may result as a consequence of neuroinflammatory induction of intracellular calcium (Ca(+2)) dysregulation. Altered L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC) and ryanodine receptor (RyR) activity may underlie age-associated learning and memory impairments. Various neuroinflammatory markers are associated with increased activity of both L-VDCCs and RyRs, and increased neuroinflammation is associated with normal aging. In vitro, pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs and RyRs has been shown to be anti-inflammatory. Here, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs or RyRs with the drugs nimodipine and dantrolene, respectively, could improve spatial memory and reduce age-associated increases in microglia activation. Dantrolene and nimodipine differentially attenuated age-associated spatial memory deficits but were not anti-inflammatory in vivo. Furthermore, RyR gene expression was inversely correlated with spatial memory, highlighting the central role of Ca(+2) dysregulation in age-associated memory deficits.

  11. α-Synuclein Shows High Affinity Interaction with Voltage-dependent Anion Channel, Suggesting Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Regulation and Toxicity in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Gurnev, Philip A; Protchenko, Olga; Hoogerheide, David P; Yap, Thai Leong; Philpott, Caroline C; Lee, Jennifer C; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-07-24

    Participation of the small, intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein (α-syn) in Parkinson disease (PD) pathogenesis has been well documented. Although recent research demonstrates the involvement of α-syn in mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegeneration and suggests direct interaction of α-syn with mitochondria, the molecular mechanism(s) of α-syn toxicity and its effect on neuronal mitochondria remain vague. Here we report that at nanomolar concentrations, α-syn reversibly blocks the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), the major channel of the mitochondrial outer membrane that controls most of the metabolite fluxes in and out of the mitochondria. Detailed analysis of the blockage kinetics of VDAC reconstituted into planar lipid membranes suggests that α-syn is able to translocate through the channel and thus target complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Supporting our in vitro experiments, a yeast model of PD shows that α-syn toxicity in yeast depends on VDAC. The functional interactions between VDAC and α-syn, revealed by the present study, point toward the long sought after physiological and pathophysiological roles for monomeric α-syn in PD and in other α-synucleinopathies.

  12. Alterations of voltage-dependent calcium channel currents in basilar artery smooth muscle cells at early stage of subarachnoid hemorrhage in a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianqing Shi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the changes in the currents of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs in smooth muscle cells of basilar artery in a rabbit model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. METHODS: New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into five groups: sham (C, normal (N, 24 hours (S1, 48 hours (S2 and 72 hours (S3 after SAH. Non-heparinized autologous arterial blood (1 ml/kg was injected into the cisterna magna to create SAH after intravenous anesthesia, and 1 ml/kg of saline was injected into cisterna magna in the sham group. Rabbits in group N received no injections. Basilar artery in S1, S2, S3 group were isolated at 24, 48, 72 hours after SAH. Basilar artery in group C was isolated at 72 hours after physiological saline injection. Basilar artery smooth muscle cells were isolated for all groups. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was utilized to record cell membrane capacitance and VDCCs currents. The VDCCs antagonist nifedipine was added to the bath solution to block the Ca(++ channels currents. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the number of cells isolated, the cell size and membrane capacitance among all the five groups. VDCC currents in the S1-S3 groups had higher amplitudes than those in control and sham groups. The significant change of current amplitude was observed at 72 hours after SAH, which was higher than those of 24 and 48 hours. The VDCCs were shown to expression in human artery smooth muscle cells. CONCLUSIONS: The changes of activation characteristics and voltage-current relationship at 72 hours after SAH might be an important event which leads to a series of molecular events in the microenvironment of the basilar artery smooth muscle cells. This may be the key time point for potential therapeutic intervention against subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  13. Delta receptors are required for full inhibitory coupling of mu-receptors to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Wendy; John, Scott; Maga, Matthew; Evans, Christopher J; Hales, Tim G

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant micro and delta opioid receptors expressed in cell lines can form heterodimers with distinctive properties and trafficking. However, a role for opioid receptor heterodimerization in neurons has yet to be identified. The inhibitory coupling of opioid receptors to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) is a relatively inefficient process and therefore provides a sensitive assay of altered opioid receptor function and expression. We examined micro-receptor coupling to VDCCs in dorsal root ganglion neurons of delta(+/+), delta(+/-), and delta(-/-) mice. Neurons deficient in delta receptors exhibited reduced inhibition of VDCCs by morphine and [D-Ala(2),Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO). An absence of delta receptors caused reduced efficacy of DAMGO without affecting potency. An absence of delta receptors reduced neither the density of VDCCs nor their inhibition by either the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen or intracellular guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate. Flow cytometry revealed a reduction in micro-receptor surface expression in delta(-/-) neurons without altered DAMGO-induced internalization. There was no change in micro-receptor mRNA levels. D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2)-sensitive mu-receptor-coupling efficacy was fully restored to delta(+/+) levels in delta(-/-) neurons by expression of recombinant delta receptors. However, the dimerization-deficient delta-15 construct expressed in delta(-/-) neurons failed to fully restore the inhibitory coupling of micro-receptors compared with that seen in delta(+/+) neurons, suggesting that, although not essential for micro-receptor function, micro-delta receptor dimerization contributes to full micro-agonist efficacy. Because DAMGO exhibited a similar potency in delta(+/+) and delta(-/-) neurons and caused similar levels of internalization, the role for heterodimerization is probably at the level of receptor biosynthesis.

  14. A conserved threonine in the S1-S2 loop of KV7.2 and K V7.3 channels regulates voltage-dependent activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füll, Yvonne; Seebohm, Guiscard; Lerche, Holger; Maljevic, Snezana

    2013-06-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels KV7.2 and KV7.3 (KCNQ2/3 genes) play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability. More than 50 KCNQ2/3 mutations have been identified to cause an inherited form of epilepsy in newborns. For two of those (E119G and S122L) found in the S1-S2 region of KV7.2, we previously showed a decreased channel availability mainly at action potential subthreshold voltages caused by a slight depolarizing shift of the activation curve. Interestingly, recent studies revealed that a threonine residue within the S1-S2 loop, highly conserved among different classes of KV channels, is crucial for both their function and surface expression. To investigate the functional role of the homologous threonine residues in KV7.2 (T114) and KV7.3 (T144) channels, we replaced them with alanine and examined the electrophysiological properties using heterologous expression in CHO cells and whole cell patch clamping. Channels comprising mutant subunits yielded decreased potassium currents with slowed activation and accelerated deactivation kinetics. However, the most striking effect was a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation reaching +30 mV upon co-expression of both mutant subunits. Potential interactions of T114 within the channel were analyzed by creating a 3D homology model of KV7.2 in an open state suggesting that this residue plays a central role in the formation of a stable interface between the S1-S2 and the S5 segment helices. This could be the explanation why substitution of the conserved threonine in KV7.2 and KV7.3 channels destabilizes the open and favors the closed state of these channels.

  15. 线粒体电压依赖性阴离子通道与心血管疾病%Voltage-dependent Anion Channel and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏晶

    2013-01-01

    电压依赖性阴离子通道(VDAC)是位于线粒体外膜的通道蛋白,是线粒体与细胞质之间转运ATP以及其他代谢产物的主要通道,在线粒体代谢和细胞生长中发挥重要调控作用.近期研究发现,在心肌缺血再灌、糖尿病、心衰、高血压和动脉粥样硬化时,VDAC表达明显增加,引起细胞内钙离子循环紊乱、氧化应激,进而导致细胞凋亡,已成为心血管疾病研究的新热点.本文就VDAC的分子功能,调控及其在心血管疾病中的作用和相关机制进行综述.%The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC),a mitochondrial membrane channel protein located in the outer of mitochondrial membrane,is the main pathway between mitochondria and cytoplasm exchanging ADP,ATP,and other metabolites,and plays an important role in mitochondrial metabolism and cell growth.A growing evidence showed that VDAC was increased in cardiovascular diseases including myocardial ischemia and reperfusion,diabetes,heart failure,hypertension and atherosclerosis.The abnormal state of VDAC will result in cell death by inducing calcium cycling dysfunction and oxidative stress.And VDAC has become a hot topic in the field of cardiovascular diseases research.In this article,we will introduce the molecular function and regulation of VDAC and its role in cardiovascular diseases.

  16. IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody inhibits the voltage-dependent calcium channel currents in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Nagaoka, Takumi; Hotta, Sayako; Utsunomiya, Iku; Yoshino, Hiide; Miyatake, Tadashi; Hoshi, Keiko; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the effects of IgG anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies, produced by immunizing rabbits with GalNAc-GD1a, on the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCCs) currents in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. VDCCs currents in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Immunized rabbit serum that had a high titer of anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies inhibited the VDCCs currents in the NGF-differentiated PC12 cells (36.0+/-9.6% reduction). The inhibitory effect of this serum was reversed to some degree within 3-4 min by washing with bath solution. Similarly, application of purified IgG from rabbit serum immunized with GalNAc-GD1a significantly inhibited the VDCCs currents in PC12 cells (30.6+/-2.5% reduction), and this inhibition was recovered by washing with bath solution. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect was also observed in the GalNAc-GD1a affinity column binding fraction (reduction of 31.1+/-9.85%), while the GalNAc-GD1a affinity column pass-through fraction attenuated the inhibitory effect on VDCCs currents. Normal rabbit serum and normal rabbit IgG did not affect the VDCCs currents in the PC12 cells. In an immunocytochemical study using fluorescence staining, the PC12 cells were stained using GalNAc-GD1a binding fraction. These results indicate that anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibodies inhibit the VDCCs currents in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells.

  17. Reduced KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium channel activity underlies impaired β-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of renal arteries in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Preet S; Zunke, Friederike; Zhu, Hai-Lei; Davis, Alison J; Jepps, Thomas A; Olesen, Søren P; Cole, William C; Moffatt, James D; Greenwood, Iain A

    2012-04-01

    KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium (Kv7.4) channels are important regulators of vascular tone that are severely compromised in models of hypertension. However, there is no information as to the role of these channels in responses to endogenous vasodilators. We used a molecular knockdown strategy, as well as pharmacological tools, to examine the hypothesis that Kv7.4 channels contribute to β-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and underlie the vascular deficit in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry confirmed gene and protein expression of KCNQ1, KCNQ3, KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and Kv7.1, Kv7.4, and Kv7.5 in rat renal artery. Isoproterenol produced concentration-dependent relaxation of precontracted renal arteries and increased Kv7 channel currents in isolated smooth muscle cells. Application of the Kv7 blocker linopirdine attenuated isoproterenol-induced relaxation and current. Isoproterenol-induced relaxations were also reduced in arteries incubated with small interference RNAs targeted to KCNQ4 that produced a ≈60% decrease in Kv7.4 protein level. Relaxation to isoproterenol and the Kv7 activator S-1 were abolished in arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats, which was associated with ≈60% decrease in Kv7.4 abundance. This study provides the first evidence that Kv7 channels contribute to β-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and that abrogation of Kv7.4 channels is strongly implicated in the impaired β-adrenoceptor pathway in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These findings may provide a novel pathogenic link between arterial dysfunction and hypertension.

  18. Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) promote mitophagy to protect neuron from death in an early brain injury following a subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Lu, Jianfei; Mi, Yongjie; Shi, Zhao; Chen, Chunhua; Riley, John; Zhou, Changman

    2014-07-21

    The term mitophagy is coined to describe the selective removal of mitochondria by autophagy but the process itself is still contentious, especially in the early period following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In the present study, we investigated the role of mitophagy following 48h after SAH injury in rats. Specifically evaluating whether mitophagy, through voltage dependant anion channels (VDACs) interacting with microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, could orchestrate the induction of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in neurons, a VDAC1siRNA and an activitor Rapamycian (RAPA), were engaged. One hundred and twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Sham, SAH, SAH+VDAC1siRNA, and SAH+RAPA. Outcomes measured included mortality rate, brain edema, BBB disruption, and neurobehavioral testing. We also used western blotting techniques to analyze the expressions of key mitophagic/autophagic proteins and pro-apoptotic protein such as ROS, VDAC1, LC-3II and Caspase-3. Rapamycin treatment significantly improved the mortality rate, cerebral edema, and neurobehavioral deficits; apoptotic and necrotic cell death in neurons were reduced by Rapamycin following SAH injury. However, VDAC1siRNA worsened the brain injury following SAH. Immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis demonstrated a decreased expression of VDAC1, LC3II, and an increase of ROS and Caspase-3 followed by VDAC1siRNA administration. In conclusion, mitophagy induced by VDAC1 following SAH injury may in fact play a significant role in neuroprotection, the mechanism which may be through the attenuation of the apoptosic and necrosic molecular pathways. This translates a preservation of functional integrity and an improvement in mortality.

  19. Voltage-dependent gating of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated pacemaker channels: molecular coupling between the S4-S5 and C-linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decher, Niels; Chen, Jun; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2004-04-02

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels have a transmembrane topology that is highly similar to voltage-gated K(+) channels, yet HCN channels open in response to membrane hyperpolarization instead of depolarization. The structural basis for the "inverted" voltage dependence of HCN gating and how voltage sensing by the S1-S4 domains is coupled to the opening of the intracellular gate formed by the S6 domain are unknown. Coupling could arise from interaction between specific residues or entire transmembrane domains. We previously reported that the mutation of specific residues in the S4-S5 linker of HCN2 (i.e. Tyr-331 and Arg-339) prevented normal channel closure presumably by disruption of a crucial interaction with the activation gate. Here we hypothesized that the C-linker, a carboxyl terminus segment that connects S6 to the cyclic nucleotide binding domain, interacts with specific residues of the S4-S5 linker to mediate coupling. The recently solved structure of the C-linker of HCN2 indicates that an alpha-helix (the A'-helix) is located near the end of each S6 domain, the presumed location of the activation gate. Ala-scanning mutagenesis of the end of S6 and the A'-helix identified five residues that were important for normal gating as mutations disrupted channel closure. However, partial deletion of the C-linker indicated that the presence of only two of these residues was required for normal coupling. Further mutation analyses suggested that a specific electrostatic interaction between Arg-339 of the S4-S5 linker and Asp-443 of the C-linker stabilizes the closed state and thus participates in the coupling of voltage sensing and activation gating in HCN channels.

  20. The N-Terminal Peptides of the Three Human Isoforms of the Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Have Different Helical Propensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiani, Carlo; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Amodeo, Giuseppe Federico; Grdadolnik, Joze; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; De Pinto, Vito; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Casu, Mariano

    2015-09-15

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main mitochondrial porin allowing the exchange of ions and metabolites between the cytosol and the mitochondrion. In addition, VDAC was found to actively interact with proteins playing a fundamental role in the regulation of apoptosis and being of central interest in cancer research. VDAC is a large transmembrane β-barrel channel, whose N-terminal helical fragment adheres to the channel interior, partially closing the pore. This fragment is considered to play a key role in protein stability and function as well as in the interaction with apoptosis-related proteins. Three VDAC isoforms are differently expressed in higher eukaryotes, for which distinct and complementary roles are proposed. In this work, the folding propensity of their N-terminal fragments has been compared. By using multiple spectroscopic techniques, and complementing the experimental results with theoretical computer-assisted approaches, we have characterized their conformational equilibrium. Significant differences were found in the intrinsic helical propensity of the three peptides, decreasing in the following order: hVDAC2 > hVDAC3 > hVDAC1. In light of the models proposed in the literature to explain voltage gating, selectivity, and permeability, as well as interactions with functionally related proteins, our results suggest that the different chemicophysical properties of the N-terminal domain are possibly correlated to different functions for the three isoforms. The overall emerging picture is that a similar transmembrane water accessible conduit has been equipped with not identical domains, whose differences can modulate the functional roles of the three VDAC isoforms.

  1. The calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B inhibits voltage-dependent K{sup +} channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongliang; Hong, Da Hye; Kim, Han Sol; Kim, Hye Won [Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Physiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Chuncheon, 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Won-Kyo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Marine-Integrated Biomedical Technology (BK21 Plus), Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Sung Hun [Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kangwon National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min [Department of Immunology, Lab of Dendritic Cell Differentiation and Regulation, College of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Il-Whan, E-mail: cihima@inje.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won Sun, E-mail: parkws@kangwon.ac.kr [Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Physiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Chuncheon, 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the effects of the calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B on voltage-dependent K{sup +} (Kv) channels using whole-cell patch clamp technique in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells. CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) value of 0.81 μM. The decay rate of Kv channel inactivation was accelerated by CGS 9343B. The rate constants of association and dissociation for CGS 9343B were 2.77 ± 0.04 μM{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 2.55 ± 1.50 s{sup −1}, respectively. CGS 9343B did not affect the steady-state activation curve, but shifted the inactivation curve toward to a more negative potential. Train pulses (1 or 2 Hz) application progressively increased the CGS 9343B-induced Kv channel inhibition. In addition, the inactivation recovery time constant was increased in the presence of CGS 9343B, suggesting that CGS 9343B-induced inhibition of Kv channel was use-dependent. Another calmodulin inhibitor, W-13, did not affect Kv currents, and did not change the inhibitory effect of CGS 9343B on Kv current. Our results demonstrated that CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner, independent of calmodulin inhibition. - Highlights: • We investigated the effects of CGS 9394B on Kv channels. • CGS 9394B inhibited Kv current in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner. • Caution is required when using CGS 9394B in vascular function studies.

  2. The episodic ataxia type 1 mutation I262T alters voltage-dependent gating and disrupts protein biosynthesis of human Kv1.1 potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Han; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Huang, Jing-Jia; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-18

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential for setting neuronal membrane excitability. Mutations in human Kv1.1 channels are linked to episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). The EA1-associated mutation I262T was identified from a patient with atypical phenotypes. Although a previous report has characterized its suppression effect, several key questions regarding the impact of the I262T mutation on Kv1.1 as well as other members of the Kv1 subfamily remain unanswered. Herein we show that the dominant-negative effect of I262T on Kv1.1 current expression is not reversed by co-expression with Kvβ1.1 or Kvβ2 subunits. Biochemical examinations indicate that I262T displays enhanced protein degradation and impedes membrane trafficking of Kv1.1 wild-type subunits. I262T appears to be the first EA1 mutation directly associated with impaired protein stability. Further functional analyses demonstrate that I262T changes the voltage-dependent activation and Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation, uncouples inactivation from activation gating, and decelerates the kinetics of cumulative inactivation of Kv1.1 channels. I262T also exerts similar dominant effects on the gating of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 channels. Together our data suggest that I262T confers altered channel gating and reduced functional expression of Kv1 channels, which may account for some of the phenotypes of the EA1 patient.

  3. Inflammatory cytokine signaling in insulin producing beta-cells enhances the colocalization correlation coefficient between L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and calcium-sensing receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Jai

    2008-08-01

    The immunological processes in type 1 diabetes and metabolic/inflammatory disorder in type 2 diabetes converge on common signaling pathway(s) leading to beta-cell death in these two diseases. The cytokine-mediated beta-cell death seems to be dependent on voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC)-mediated Ca2+ entry. The Ca2+ handling molecular networks control the homeostasis of [Ca2+]i in the beta-cell. The activity and membrane density of VDCC are regulated by several mechanisms including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). CaR is a 123-kDa seven transmembrane extracellular Ca2+ sensing protein that belongs to GPCR family C. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), is a cytokine widely known to activate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription in beta-cells. To obtain a better understanding of TNF-alpha-induced molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC, confocal fluorescence measurements were performed on insulin-producing beta-cells exposed to varying concentrations of TNF-alpha and the results are discussed in the light of increased colocalization correlation coefficient. The insulin producing beta-cells were exposed to 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 ng/ml TNF-alpha for 24 h at 37 degrees . The cells were then immunolabelled with antibodies directed against CaR, VDCC, and NF-kappaB. The confocal fluorescence imaging data showed enhancement in the colocalization correlation coefficient between CaR and VDCC in beta-cells exposed to TNF-alpha thereby indicating increased membrane delimited spatial interactions between these two membrane proteins. TNF-alpha-induced colocalization of VDCC with CaR was inhibited by nimodipine, an inhibitor of L-type VDCC thereby suggesting that VDCC activity is required for spatial interactions with CaR. The 3-D confocal fluorescence imaging data also demonstrated that addition of TNF-alpha to RIN cells led to the translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Such molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC in tissues

  4. Transcriptional upregulation of α2δ-1 elevates arterial smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel surface expression and cerebrovascular constriction in genetic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, John P; Bulley, Simon; Narayanan, Damodaran; Thomas-Gatewood, Candice; Luzny, Patrik; Pachuau, Judith; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2012-10-01

    A hallmark of hypertension is an increase in arterial myocyte voltage-dependent Ca2+ (CaV1.2) currents that induces pathological vasoconstriction. CaV1.2 channels are heteromeric complexes composed of a pore-forming CaV1.2α1 with auxiliary α2δ and β subunits. Molecular mechanisms that elevate CaV1.2 currents during hypertension and the potential contribution of CaV1.2 auxiliary subunits are unclear. Here, we investigated the pathological significance of α2δ subunits in vasoconstriction associated with hypertension. Age-dependent development of hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats was associated with an unequal elevation in α2δ-1 and CaV1.2α1 mRNA and protein in cerebral artery myocytes, with α2δ-1 increasing more than CaV1.2α1. Other α2δ isoforms did not emerge in hypertension. Myocytes and arteries of hypertensive spontaneously hypertensive rats displayed higher surface-localized α2δ-1 and CaV1.2α1 proteins, surface α2δ-1:CaV1.2α1 ratio, CaV1.2 current density and noninactivating current, and pressure- and depolarization-induced vasoconstriction than those of Wistar-Kyoto controls. Pregabalin, an α2δ-1 ligand, did not alter α2δ-1 or CaV1.2α1 total protein but normalized α2δ-1 and CaV1.2α1 surface expression, surface α2δ-1:CaV1.2α1, CaV1.2 current density and inactivation, and vasoconstriction in myocytes and arteries of hypertensive rats to control levels. Genetic hypertension is associated with an elevation in α2δ-1 expression that promotes surface trafficking of CaV1.2 channels in cerebral artery myocytes. This leads to an increase in CaV1.2 current-density and a reduction in current inactivation that induces vasoconstriction. Data also suggest that α2δ-1 targeting is a novel strategy that may be used to reverse pathological CaV1.2 channel trafficking to induce cerebrovascular dilation in hypertension.

  5. Temperature and voltage dependence of barrier height and ideality factor in Au/0.07 graphene-doped PVA/n-Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altındal Yerişkin, S.; Balbaşı, M.; Demirezen, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Au/0.07 graphene-doped PVA/n-Si structures were fabricated and current conduction mechanism in these structures were investigated in the temperature range of 80-380 K through forward bias current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Main electrical parameters were extracted from I-V data. Zero-bias barrier height (overline{Φ}_{B0} ) and ideality factor (n) were found strong functions of temperature and their values ranged from 0.234 eV and 4.98 (at 80 K) to 0.882 eV and 1.15 (at 380 K), respectively. Φ ap versus q/2kT plot was drawn to obtain an evidence of a Gaussian distribution of the barrier heights (BHs) and it revealed two distinct linear regions with different slopes and intercepts. The mean values of BH (Φ Bo) and zero-bias standard deviation (σ s ) were obtained from the intercept and slope of the linear regions of this plot as 1.30 eV and 0.16 V for the first region (280-380 K) and 0.74 eV and 0.085 V for the second region (80-240 K), respectively. Thus, the values of overline{Φ}_{B0} and effective Richardson constant (A*) were also found from the intercept and slope of the modified Richardson plot [ln(I s /T 2) - q 2 σ {/o 2} /2k 2 T 2 vs q/kT] as 1.31 eV and 130 A/cm2 K2 for the first region and 0.76 eV and 922 A/cm2 K2 for the second region, respectively. The value of A* for the first region was very close to the theoretical value for n-Si (112 A/cm2 K2). The energy density distribution profile of surface states (Nss) was also extracted from the forward bias I-V data by taking into account voltage dependent effective BH (Φe) and n.

  6. Charge filling factors in clean and disordered arrays of tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kelly A; Vogt, Nicolas; Cole, Jared H

    2015-12-02

    We simulate one-dimensional arrays of tunnel junctions using the kinetic Monte Carlo method to study charge filling behaviour in the large charging energy limit. By applying a small fixed voltage bias and varying the offset voltage, we investigate this behaviour in clean and disordered arrays (both weak and strong disorder effects). The offset voltage dependent modulation of the current is highly sensitive to background charge disorder and exhibits substantial variation depending on the strength of the disorder. We show that while small fractional charge filling factors are likely to be washed out in experimental devices due to strong background charge disorder, larger factors may be observable.

  7. Gαi2- and Gαi3-specific regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Dizayee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two pertussis toxin sensitive G(i proteins, G(i2 and G(i3, are expressed in cardiomyocytes and upregulated in heart failure. It has been proposed that the highly homologous G(i isoforms are functionally distinct. To test for isoform-specific functions of G(i proteins, we examined their role in the regulation of cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC. METHODS: Ventricular tissues and isolated myocytes were obtained from mice with targeted deletion of either Gα(i2 (Gα(i2 (-/- or Gα(i3 (Gα(i3 (-/-. mRNA levels of Gα(i/o isoforms and L-VDCC subunits were quantified by real-time PCR. Gα(i and Ca(vα(1 protein levels as well as protein kinase B/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels were assessed by immunoblot analysis. L-VDCC function was assessed by whole-cell and single-channel current recordings. RESULTS: In cardiac tissue from Gα(i2 (-/- mice, Gα(i3 mRNA and protein expression was upregulated to 187 ± 21% and 567 ± 59%, respectively. In Gα(i3 (-/- mouse hearts, Gα(i2 mRNA (127 ± 5% and protein (131 ± 10% levels were slightly enhanced. Interestingly, L-VDCC current density in cardiomyocytes from Gα(i2 (-/- mice was lowered (-7.9 ± 0.6 pA/pF, n = 11, p<0.05 compared to wild-type cells (-10.7 ± 0.5 pA/pF, n = 22, whereas it was increased in myocytes from Gα(i3 (-/- mice (-14.3 ± 0.8 pA/pF, n = 14, p<0.05. Steady-state inactivation was shifted to negative potentials, and recovery kinetics slowed in the absence of Gα(i2 (but not of Gα(i3 and following treatment with pertussis toxin in Gα(i3 (-/-. The pore forming Ca(vα(1 protein level was unchanged in all mouse models analyzed, similar to mRNA levels of Ca(vα(1 and Ca(vβ(2 subunits. Interestingly, at the cellular signalling level, phosphorylation assays revealed abolished carbachol-triggered activation of ERK1/2 in mice lacking Gα(i2. CONCLUSION: Our data provide novel evidence for an isoform

  8. [Stereotypic movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  9. The sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum toxin BcIII modulates the sodium current kinetics of rat dorsal root ganglia neurons and is displaced in a voltage-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salceda, Emilio; López, Omar; Zaharenko, André J; Garateix, Anoland; Soto, Enrique

    2010-03-01

    Sea anemone toxins bind to site 3 of the sodium channels, which is partially formed by the extracellular linker connecting S3 and S4 segments of domain IV, slowing down the inactivation process. In this work we have characterized the actions of BcIII, a sea anemone polypeptide toxin isolated from Bunodosoma caissarum, on neuronal sodium currents using the patch clamp technique. Neurons of the dorsal root ganglia of Wistar rats (P5-9) in primary culture were used for this study (n=65). The main effects of BcIII were a concentration-dependent increase in the sodium current inactivation time course (IC(50)=2.8 microM) as well as an increase in the current peak amplitude. BcIII did not modify the voltage at which 50% of the channels are activated or inactivated, nor the reversal potential of sodium current. BcIII shows a voltage-dependent action. A progressive acceleration of sodium current fast inactivation with longer conditioning pulses was observed, which was steeper as more depolarizing were the prepulses. The same was observed for other two anemone toxins (CgNa, from Condylactis gigantea and ATX-II, from Anemonia viridis). These results suggest that the binding affinity of sea anemone toxins may be reduced in a voltage-dependent manner, as has been described for alpha-scorpion toxins.

  10. Chronic electroconvulsive stimulation but not chronic restraint stress modulates mRNA expression of voltage-dependent potassium channels Kv7.2 and Kv11.1 in the rat piriform cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjæresen, Marie-Louise; Hageman, Ida; Plenge, Per

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which stress and electroconvulsive therapy exert opposite effects on the course of major depression are not known. Potential candidates might include the voltage-dependent potassium channels. Potassium channels play an important role in maintaining the resting membrane potential...... and controlling neuronal excitability. To explore this hypothesis, we examined the effects of one or several electroconvulsive stimulations and chronic restraint stress (6 h/day for 21 days) on the expression of voltage-dependent potassium channel Kv7.2, Kv11.1, and Kv11.3 mRNA in the rat brain using in situ...... hybridization. Repeated, but not acute, electroconvulsive stimulation increased Kv7.2 and Kv11.1 mRNA levels in the piriform cortex. In contrast, restraint stress had no significant effect on mRNA expression of Kv7.2, Kv11.1, or Kv11.3 in any of the brain regions examined. Thus, it appears that the investigated...

  11. Voltage-dependent capacitance behavior and underlying mechanisms in metal-insulator-metal capacitors with Al2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 nano-laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bao; Liu, Wen-Jun; Wei, Lei; Ding, Shi-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Nano-laminates consisting of high-permittivity dielectrics and SiO2 have been extensively studied for radio frequency metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors because of their superior voltage linearity and low leakage current. However, there are no reports on the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics at a high sweep voltage range. In this work, an interesting variation in the voltage-dependent capacitance that forms a ‘ω’-like shape is demonstrated for the MIM capacitors with Al2O3/ZrO2/SiO2 nano-laminates. As the thickness ratio of the SiO2 film to the total insulator increases to around 0.15, the C-V curve changes from an upward parabolic shape to a ‘ω’ shape. This can be explained based on the competition between the orientation polarization from SiO2 and the electrode polarization from Al2O3 and ZrO2. When the SiO2 film is very thin, the electrode polarization dominates in the MIM capacitor, generating a positive curvature C-V curve. When the thickness of SiO2 is increased, the orientation polarization is enhanced and thus both polarizations are operating in the MIM capacitors. This leads to the appearance of a multiple domain C-V curve containing positive and negative curvatures. Therefore, good consistency between the experimental results and the theoretical simulations is demonstrated. Such voltage-dependent capacitance behavior is not determined by the stack structure of the insulator, measurement frequency and oscillator voltage, but by the thickness ratio of the SiO2 film to the whole insulator. These findings are helpful to engineer MIM capacitors with good voltage linearity.

  12. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...... levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear...... as possible operational moves....

  13. Striking movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Like all music performance, percussion playing requires high control over timing and sound properties. Specific to percussionists, however, is the need to adjust the movement to different instruments with varying physical properties and tactile feedback to the player. Furthermore, the well define...

  14. Chloroplast movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    Chloroplast movement is important for plant survival under high light and for efficient photosynthesis under low light. This review introduces recent knowledge on chloroplast movement and shows how to analyze the responses and the moving mechanisms, potentially inspiring research in this field. Avoidance from the strong light is mediated by blue light receptor phototropin 2 (phot2) plausibly localized on the chloroplast envelop and accumulation at the week light-irradiated area is mediated by phot1 and phot2 localized on the plasma membrane. Chloroplasts move by chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments that must be polymerized by Chloroplast Unusual Positioning1 (CHUP1) at the front side of moving chloroplast. To understand the signal transduction pathways and the mechanism of chloroplast movement, that is, from light capture to motive force-generating mechanism, various methods should be employed based on the various aspects. Observation of chloroplast distribution pattern under different light condition by fixed cell sectioning is somewhat an old-fashioned technique but the most basic and important way. However, most importantly, precise chloroplast behavior during and just after the induction of chloroplast movement by partial cell irradiation using an irradiator with either low light or strong light microbeam should be recorded by time lapse photographs under infrared light and analyzed. Recently various factors involved in chloroplast movement, such as cp-actin filaments and CHUP1, could be traced in Arabidopsis transgenic lines with fluorescent protein tags under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and/or a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). These methods are listed and their advantages and disadvantages are evaluated.

  15. Scanning capacitance microscopy and spectroscopy applied to local charge modifications and characterization of nitride-oxide-silicon heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, M.; Wiesendanger, R.

    1995-10-01

    We have combined a home-built capacitance sensor with a commercial scanning force microscope to obtain a Scanning Capacitance Microscope (SCM). The SCM has been used to study Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (NOS) heterostructures which offer potential applications in charge storage technology. Charge writing and reading on a submicrometer scale is demonstrated with our SCM setup. In addition, SCM appears to be very useful for the characterization of subsurface defects in semiconductor devices which are inaccessible by most of the other scanning probe microscopies. Finally, we introduce a novel spectroscopic mode of SCM operation which offers combined voltage-dependent and spatially resolved information about inhomogeneous charge distributions in semiconductor devices.

  16. Gracious Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Kreft

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1984 Christopher Cordner offered a critical view on theories of graceful movement in sport developed by Ng. G. Wulk, David Best and Joseph Kupfer. In 2001 Paul Davis criticized his view. Cordner responded, rejecting all the criticism. More than a century before, Herbert Spencer and Jean-Marie Guyau had a similar controversy over grace. Both exchanges of opinion involve three positions: that grace is the most efficient movement and therefore something quantitative and measurable; that grace is expression of the wholeness of person and the world; and that grace is something which neither science nor philosophy can explain. To clarify these conflicting issues, this article proposes to examine the history of the notion which goes back to the Latin gratia and has root in the Ancient Greek charis, and to apply the concepts of cultural anchor and thin coherence, following John R. Searle’s explanation that we produce epistemically objective accounts of ontologically subjective reality.

  17. Antinuclear movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Hee; Im, Jaeg Yeong

    1988-08-15

    This book is for antinuclear movement. So, this book introduces many articles on nuclear issues of Asia and the pacific area. The titles of articles are the crusades of Reagan by Werner Plaha, contending between super powers in Europe by Alva Reimer Myrdal, claims of resistance by Daniel Ellsberg, nuclear and the Korean Peninsula by Go, Seung Woo, Liberation but of belief of nuclear weapon by Lee, Young Hee and nuclear weapon in Korea by peter Haze.

  18. A Microscopic Capacitor Model of Voltage Coupling in Membrane Proteins: Gating Charge Fluctuations in Ci-VSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-01-28

    The voltage sensitivity of membrane proteins is reflected in the response of the voltage sensing domains (VSDs) to the changes in membrane potential. This response is implicated in the displacement of positively charged residues, associated with the conformational changes of VSDs. The displaced charges generate nonlinear (i.e., voltage-dependent) capacitance current called the gating current (and its corresponding gating charge), which is a key experimental quantity that characterizes voltage activation in VSMP. However, the relevant theoretical/computational approaches, aimed to correlate the structural information on VSMP to electrophysiological measurements, have been rather limited, posing a broad challenge in computer simulations of VSMP. Concomitant with the development of our coarse-graining (CG) model of voltage coupling, we apply our theoretical framework for the treatments of voltage effects in membrane proteins to modeling the VSMP activation, taking the VSDs (Ci-VSD) derived from the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) as a model system. Our CG model reproduces the observed gating charge of Ci-VSD activation in several different perspectives. In particular, a new closed-form expression of the gating charge is evaluated in both nonequilibrium and equilibrium ways, while considering the fluctuation-dissipation relation that connects a nonequilibrium measurement of the gating charge to an equilibrium measurement of charge fluctuations (i.e., the voltage-independent linear component of membrane capacitance). In turn, the expression uncovers a novel link that connects an equilibrium measurement of the voltage-independent linear capacitance to a nonequilibrium measurement of the voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (whose integral over voltage is equal to the gating charge). In addition, our CG model yields capacitor-like voltage dependent free energy parabolas, resulting in the free energy difference and the free energy barrier for

  19. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  20. Genotypic to expression profiling of bovine calcium channel, voltage-dependent, alpha-2/delta subunit 1 gene, and their association with bovine mastitis among Frieswal (HFX Sahiwal) crossbred cattle of Indian origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Rajib; Singh, Umesh; Kumar, Sushil; Kumar, Arun; Singh, Rani; Sengar, Gyanendra; Mann, Sandeep; Sharma, Arjava

    2014-04-01

    Calcium channel, voltage-dependent, alpha-2/delta subunit 1 (CACNA2D1) gene is considered to be an important noncytokine candidate gene influencing mastitis. Scanty of reports are available until today regarding the role play of CACNA2D1 gene on the susceptibility of bovine mastitis. We interrogated the CACNA2D1 G519663A [A>G] SNP by PCR-RFLP among two hundreds Frieswal (HF X Sahiwal) crossbred cattle of Indian origin. Genotypic frequency of AA (51.5, n=101) was comparatively higher than AG (35, n=70) and GG (14.5, n=29). Association of Somatic cell score (SCS) with genotypes revealed that, GG genotypes showing lesser count (less susceptible to mastitis) compare to AA and AG. Relative expression of CACNA2D1 transcript (in milk samples) was significantly higher among GG than AG and AA. Further we have also isolated blood sample from the all groups and PBMCs were cultured from each blood sample as per the standard protocol. They were treated with Calcium channel blocker and the expression level of the CACNA2D1 gene was evaluated by Real Time PCR. Results show that expression level decline in each genotypic group after treatment and expression level of GG are again significantly higher than AA and AG. Thus, it may be concluded that GG genotypic animals are favorable for selecting disease resistant breeds.

  1. The Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1 (AtVDAC1 Negatively Regulates Plant Cold Responses during Germination and Seedling Development in Arabidopsis and Interacts with Calcium Sensor CBL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC, a highly conserved major mitochondrial outer membrane protein, plays crucial roles in energy metabolism and metabolite transport. However, knowledge about the roles of the VDAC family in plants is limited. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of VDAC1 in Arabidopsis and found that cold stress promoted the accumulation of VDAC1 transcripts in imbibed seeds and mature plants. Overexpression of VDAC1 reduced tolerance to cold stress in Arabidopsis. Phenotype analysis of VDAC1 T-DNA insertion mutant plants indicated that a vdac1 mutant line had faster germination kinetics under cold treatment and showed enhanced tolerance to freezing. The yeast two-hybrid system revealed that VDAC1 interacts with CBL1, a calcium sensor in plants. Like the vdac1, a cbl1 mutant also exhibited a higher seed germination rate. We conclude that both VDAC1 and CBL1 regulate cold stress responses during seed germination and plant development.

  2. Frequency and voltage dependence of electric and dielectric properties of Au/TiO2/n-4H-SiC (metal-insulator-semiconductor) type Schottky barrier diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrıkulu, E. E.; Yıldız, D. E.; Günen, A.; Altındal, Ş.

    2015-09-01

    The main electrical and dielectric properties of Au/TiO2/n-4H-SiC (MIS) type Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) have been investigated as functions of frequency and applied bias voltage. We believe that the use of high dielectric interfacial layer between metal and semiconductor can improve the performance of Schottky diodes. From the experimental data, both electrical and dielectric parameters were found as strong function of frequency and applied bias voltage. The Fermi energy level (EF), the concentration of doping donor atoms (P), barrier height (ΦB) and series resistance (Rs) values were obtained from reverse and forward bias C-V characteristics. The changes in EF and ND with frequency are considerably low. Therefore, their values were taken at about constant. The real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant (\\varepsilon \\prime , \\varepsilon \\prime\\prime ), tangent loss (tanδ), ac electrical conductivity (σac), and real and imaginary parts of electric modulus (M‧ and M″) values were also obtained from reverse and forward bias C-V and G/ω-V characteristics. In addition, the voltage dependent profiles of all these electrical and dielectric parameters were drawn for each frequency. These results confirmed that both electrical and dielectric properties of Au/TiO2/n-4H-SiC (MIS) type SBD are quite sensitive to both the frequency and applied bias voltage due to surface polarization, density distribution of interface traps (Dit), and interfacial layer.

  3. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  4. Charged Leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, J; Babu, K; Bernstein, R H; Blum, T; Brown, D N; Casey, B C K; Cheng, C -h; Cirigliano, V; Cohen, A; Deshpande, A; Dukes, E C; Echenard, B; Gaponenko, A; Glenzinski, D; Gonzalez-Alonso, M; Grancagnolo, F; Grossman, Y; Harnik, R; Hitlin, D G; Kiburg, B; Knoepfe, K; Kumar, K; Lim, G; Lu, Z -T; McKeen, D; Miller, J P; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Ray, R; Roberts, B L; Rominsky, M; Semertzidis, Y; Stoeckinger, D; Talman, R; Van De Water, R; Winter, P

    2013-01-01

    This is the report of the Intensity Frontier Charged Lepton Working Group of the 2013 Community Summer Study "Snowmass on the Mississippi", summarizing the current status and future experimental opportunities in muon and tau lepton studies and their sensitivity to new physics. These include searches for charged lepton flavor violation, measurements of magnetic and electric dipole moments, and precision measurements of the decay spectrum and parity-violating asymmetries.

  5. Active movements in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Vladislav S; Jovanov, Emil

    2008-01-01

    The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis) captures insects with one of the most rapid movements in the plant kingdom. We investigated trap closure by mechanical and electrical stimuli using the novel charge-injection method and high-speed recording. We proposed a new hydroelastic curvature mechanism, which is based on the assumption that the lobes possess curvature elasticity and are composed of outer and inner hydraulic layers with different hydrostatic pressure. The open state of the trap contains high elastic energy accumulated due to the hydrostatic pressure difference between the hydraulic layers of the lobe. Stimuli open pores connecting the two layers, water rushes from one hydraulic layer to another, and the trap relaxes to the equilibrium configuration corresponding to the closed state. In this paper we derived equations describing this system based on elasticity Hamiltonian and found closing kinetics. The novel charge-injection stimulation method gives insight into mechanisms of the different steps of signal transduction and response in the plant kingdom. PMID:19513230

  6. Charge collection and capacitance-voltage analysis in irradiated n-type magnetic Czochralski silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petterson, M.K.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Betancourt, C. [SCIPP UC Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, 95064 CA (United States); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy)], E-mail: mara.bruzzi@unifi.it; Scaringella, M.; Tosi, C.; Macchiolo, A. [INFN, Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Manna, N.; Creanza, D. [Universita di Bari (Italy); Boscardin, M.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N. [ITC, IRST, Povo, Trento (Italy); Borrello, L.; Messineo, A. [INFN Pisa (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.F. [Universita di Trento (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    The depletion depth of irradiated n-type silicon microstrip detectors can be inferred from both the reciprocal capacitance and from the amount of collected charge. Capacitance voltage (C-V) measurements at different frequencies and temperatures are being compared with the bias voltage dependence of the charge collection on an irradiated n-type magnetic Czochralski silicon detector. Good agreement between the reciprocal capacitance and the median collected charge is found when the frequency of the C-V measurement is selected such that it scales with the temperature dependence of the leakage current. Measuring C-V characteristics at prescribed combinations of temperature and frequency allows then a realistic estimate of the depletion characteristics of irradiated silicon strip detectors based on C-V data alone.

  7. Movement disorders and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver-Dunckley, Erika D; Adler, Charles H

    2012-11-01

    This article summarizes what is currently known about sleep disturbances in several movement disorders including Parkinson disease, essential tremor, parkinsonism, dystonia, Huntington disease, myoclonus, and ataxias. There is an association between movement disorders and sleep. In some cases the prevalence of sleep disorders is much higher in patients with movement disorder, such as rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson disease. In other cases, sleep difficulties worsen the involuntary movements. In many cases the medications used to treat patients with movement disorder disturb sleep or cause daytime sleepiness. The importance of discussing sleep issues in patients with movement disorders cannot be underestimated.

  8. Biomechanics of foetal movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C. Nowlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foetal movements commence at seven weeks of gestation, with the foetal movement repertoire including twitches, whole body movements, stretches, isolated limb movements, breathing movements, head and neck movements, jaw movements (including yawning, sucking and swallowing and hiccups by ten weeks of gestational age. There are two key biomechanical aspects to gross foetal movements; the first being that the foetus moves in a dynamically changing constrained physical environment in which the freedom to move becomes increasingly restricted with increasing foetal size and decreasing amniotic fluid. Therefore, the mechanical environment experienced by the foetus affects its ability to move freely. Secondly, the mechanical forces induced by foetal movements are crucial for normal skeletal development, as evidenced by a number of conditions and syndromes for which reduced or abnormal foetal movements are implicated, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip, arthrogryposis and foetal akinesia deformation sequence. This review examines both the biomechanical effects of the physical environment on foetal movements through discussion of intrauterine factors, such as space, foetal positioning and volume of amniotic fluid, and the biomechanical role of gross foetal movements in human skeletal development through investigation of the effects of abnormal movement on the bones and joints. This review also highlights computational simulations of foetal movements that attempt to determine the mechanical forces acting on the foetus as it moves. Finally, avenues for future research into foetal movement biomechanics are highlighted, which have potential impact for a diverse range of fields including foetal medicine, musculoskeletal disorders and tissue engineering.

  9. Biomechanics of foetal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlan, N C

    2015-01-02

    Foetal movements commence at seven weeks of gestation, with the foetal movement repertoire including twitches, whole body movements, stretches, isolated limb movements, breathing movements, head and neck movements, jaw movements (including yawning, sucking and swallowing) and hiccups by ten weeks of gestational age. There are two key biomechanical aspects to gross foetal movements; the first being that the foetus moves in a dynamically changing constrained physical environment in which the freedom to move becomes increasingly restricted with increasing foetal size and decreasing amniotic fluid. Therefore, the mechanical environment experienced by the foetus affects its ability to move freely. Secondly, the mechanical forces induced by foetal movements are crucial for normal skeletal development, as evidenced by a number of conditions and syndromes for which reduced or abnormal foetal movements are implicated, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip, arthrogryposis and foetal akinesia deformation sequence. This review examines both the biomechanical effects of the physical environment on foetal movements through discussion of intrauterine factors, such as space, foetal positioning and volume of amniotic fluid, and the biomechanical role of gross foetal movements in human skeletal development through investigation of the effects of abnormal movement on the bones and joints. This review also highlights computational simulations of foetal movements that attempt to determine the mechanical forces acting on the foetus as it moves. Finally, avenues for future research into foetal movement biomechanics are highlighted, which have potential impact for a diverse range of fields including foetal medicine, musculoskeletal disorders and tissue engineering.

  10. A Physics-Based Charge-Control Model for InP DHBT Including Current-Blocking Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Ji; JIN Zhi; SU Yong-Bo; CHENG Wei; WANG Xian-Wai; CHEN Gao-Peng; LIU Xin-Yu

    2009-01-01

    We develop a physics-based charge-control InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor model including three important effects: current blocking, mobile-charge modulation of the base-collector capacitance and velocity-field modulation in the transit time. The bias-dependent base-collector depletion charge is obtained analytically, which takes into account the mobile-charge modulation. Then, a measurement based voltage-dependent transit time formulation is implemented. As a result, over a wide range of biases, the developed model shows good agreement between the modeled and measured S-parameters and cutoff frequency. Also, the model considering current blocking effect demonstrates more accurate prediction of the output characteristics than conventional vertical bipolar inter company results.

  11. Simulating charge transport in flexible systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Clark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Systems in which movements occur on two significantly different time domains, such as organic electronic components with flexible molecules, require different simulation techniques for the two time scales. In the case of molecular electronics, charge transport is complicated by the several different mechanisms (and theoretical models that apply in different cases. We cannot yet combine time scales of molecular and electronic movement in simulations of real systems. This review describes our progress towards this goal.

  12. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement-based intera......In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  13. Discrete electrostatic charge transfer by the electrophoresis of a charged droplet in a dielectric liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Do Jin; Ahn, Myung Mo; Yoo, Byeong Sun; Moon, Dustin; Lee, Dong Woog; Kang, In Seok

    2012-08-14

    We have experimentally investigated the electrostatic charging of a water droplet on an electrified electrode surface to explain the detailed inductive charging processes and use them for the detection of droplet position in a lab-on-a-chip system. The periodic bouncing motion of a droplet between two planar electrodes has been examined by using a high-resolution electrometer and an image analysis method. We have found that this charging process consists of three steps. The first step is inductive charge accumulation on the opposite electrode by the charge of a droplet. This induction process occurs while the droplet approaches the electrode, and it produces an induction current signal at the electrometer. The second step is the discharging of the droplet by the accumulated induced charge at the moment of contact. For this second step, there is no charge-transfer detection at the electrometer. The third step is the charging of the neutralized droplet to a certain charged state while the droplet is in contact with the electrode. The charge transfer of the third step is detected as the pulse-type signal of an electrometer. The second and third steps occur simultaneously and rapidly. We have found that the induction current by the movement of a charged droplet can be accurately used to measure the charge of the droplet and can also be used to monitor the position of a droplet under actuation. The implications of the current findings for understanding and measuring the charging process are discussed.

  14. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  15. Stereotypic movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001548.htm Stereotypic movement disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes ...

  16. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder in ... the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over time ...

  17. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  18. Predicate Movements in Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou-hsin, Teng

    1975-01-01

    The movements of such higher predicates as time, locative, and complementation verbs are studied, and Tai's Predicate Placement Constraint is rejected as an incorrect account of predicate movements in Chinese. It is proposed, on the other hand, that there is only leftward movement involving predicates in Chinese. (Author)

  19. Linking Literacy and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  20. Social movements and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The article examines the role of social movements in the development of scientific knowledge. Interactions between social movements and science in broad, historical terms are discussed. The relations between the new social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and changes in the contemporary scientific...

  1. CHARGE Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semanti Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy, gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age, GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 ΅IU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient′s karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness. [1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have

  2. Artificial charge-modulationin atomic-scale perovskite titanate superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtomo, A; Muller, D A; Grazul, J L; Hwang, H Y

    2002-09-26

    The nature and length scales of charge screening in complex oxides are fundamental to a wide range of systems, spanning ceramic voltage-dependent resistors (varistors), oxide tunnel junctions and charge ordering in mixed-valence compounds. There are wide variations in the degree of charge disproportionation, length scale, and orientation in the mixed-valence compounds: these have been the subject of intense theoretical study, but little is known about the microscopic electronic structure. Here we have fabricated an idealized structure to examine these issues by growing atomically abrupt layers of LaTi(3+)O(3) embedded in SrTi(4+)O(3). Using an atomic-scale electron beam, we have observed the spatial distribution of the extra electron on the titanium sites. This distribution results in metallic conductivity, even though the superlattice structure is based on two insulators. Despite the chemical abruptness of the interfaces, we find that a minimum thickness of five LaTiO(3) layers is required for the centre titanium site to recover bulk-like electronic properties. This represents a framework within which the short-length-scale electronic response can be probed and incorporated in thin-film oxide heterostructures.

  3. Physics Models of Pronuclear Movements in Eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Cheng

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on published experimental data, Newton's laws, and Coulomb's law, we investigate natural and normal pronuclear movements in wild types of eggs and develop physics models to fit the experimental data quantitatively. The difference between our modeling calculated results and the experimental data is less than 20%. Our models explain why and how pronuclei move in even or in variant velocities. We hypothesize: During the migration, positively charged asters (or self assembled microtubules drive two negatively charged sperm and egg pronuclei to move towards each other. The driving force comes from a spontaneous and strong Electromagnetic Field (EMF. Hamilton's principle determines the path of these movements. A natural and normal EMF inside or around the pronuclei can be alternated environmentally. An abnormal EMF could induce aberrant embryos that cause life disease. We believe our models are helpful to further understand the mechanism of fertilization and have potential clinical value to prevent aberrant embryos that induce human life disease.

  4. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Ryder, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Lommele, Stephen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  5. The mathematics of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  6. Nanotube-based source of charges for experiments with solid helium at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenko, D. N.; Walmsley, P. M.; Golov, A. I.; Kolesnikov, N. N.; Kotov, Yu. V.; Levchenko, A. A.; Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.; Fear, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    Methods of preparation of the field-emission sources of charges from carbon nanotubes suitable for study of injected charges in solid helium at low temperatures T nanotubes onto a flat copper substrate or by mechanical rubbing of nanotubes into porous metal surface. The test study of the voltage-current characteristics of a diode cell with the nanotube source in superfluid He II have shown that at voltages above 120 V one can observe a relatively large current I ≥ 10-13 A of negative charges in liquid helium. The field and temperature dependences of positive and negative currents in solid 4He were studied in samples grown by the blocked capillary technique. Usage of the nanotube based source of injected charges had permitted us for the first time to observe motion of the positive charges in solid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K. The current-voltage dependence could be described by a power law I ˜Uα , with the value of the exponent α ≫ 2, much higher than what one would expect for the regime of space charge limited currents.

  7. Mimosa pudica: Electrical and mechanical stimulation of plant movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Foster, Justin C; Ashby, Talitha A; Walker, Ronald K; Johnson, Jon A; Markin, Vladislav S

    2010-02-01

    Thigmonastic movements in the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica L., associated with fast responses to environmental stimuli, appear to be regulated through electrical and chemical signal transductions. The thigmonastic responses of M. pudica can be considered in three stages: stimulus perception, electrical signal transmission and induction of mechanical, hydrodynamical and biochemical responses. We investigated the mechanical movements of the pinnae and petioles in M. pudica induced by the electrical stimulation of a pulvinus, petiole, secondary pulvinus or pinna by a low electrical voltage and charge. The threshold value was 1.3-1.5 V of applied voltage and 2 to 10 microC of charge for the closing of the pinnules. Both voltage and electrical charge are responsible for the electro-stimulated closing of a leaf. The mechanism behind closing the leaf in M. pudica is discussed. The hydroelastic curvature mechanism closely describes the kinetics of M. pudica leaf movements.

  8. Randomness Of Amoeba Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kuwajima, T.; Ohki, M.; Tacano, M.; Sikula, J.

    2005-11-01

    Movements of amoebas were automatically traced using the difference between two successive frames of the microscopic movie. It was observed that the movements were almost random in that the directions and the magnitudes of the successive two steps are not correlated, and that the distance from the origin was proportional to the square root of the step number.

  9. Exploring pedestrian movement patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orellana, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop an approach for exploring, analysing and interpreting movement patterns of pedestrians interacting with the environment. This objective is broken down in sub-objectives related to four research questions. A case study of the movement of visitors in a n

  10. Exploring pedestrian movement patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orellana, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop an approach for exploring, analysing and interpreting movement patterns of pedestrians interacting with the environment. This objective is broken down in sub-objectives related to four research questions. A case study of the movement of visitors in a n

  11. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  12. Effects of different kinds of stretch on voltage-dependent calcium current in antrial circular smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig%不同牵张刺激对豚鼠胃窦环行肌细胞电压依赖性钙电流的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许文燮; 李英; 吴龙仁; 李在琉

    2000-01-01

    利用全细胞膜片钳技术,在胃窦环行肌细胞上观察了不同方式的牵张刺激对电压依赖性钙电流的影响,探讨牵张刺激对胃窦平滑肌细胞电压依赖性钙电流的作用.用低渗性溶液灌流细胞引起的牵张刺激首先增加电压依赖性钙电流,接着激活一种内向性钳制电流.钙电流的增加发生在灌流后1 min内,而内向性钳制电流在细胞明显膨胀之后缓慢激活.低渗和正压引起的细胞膨胀明显增加电压依赖性钙离子电流,而利用两个电极直接牵拉细胞则不出现钙电流增加效应.结果提示: 细胞膜牵张增强电压依赖性钙通道的活性,而这一作用可能与牵拉引起的细胞所受的膜张力或/和牵拉的方向有关.%In order to elucidate the effect of membrane stretch on ionic currents, we employed the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to investigate the effects of different kinds of stretch on voltage-dependent calcium currents in antrial circular smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig. The membrane stretch induced by superfusing the smooth muscle cells with hyposmotic bath solution enhanced voltage-operated calcium current and activated inward holding current. The increase in calcium current occurred within 1 minute of superfusion and the sustained inward holding current was slowly activated after prominent cell swelling. Voltage-dependent calcium currents (Ica) were significantly increased by membrane stretch which was induced by cell swelling and cell inflation, but was not affected by direct longitudinal stretch (110~130%) using two electrodes.The results suggest that the cell membrane stretch can increase voltage-dependent calcium channel activity and the effect of stretch on calcium channels was related to the membrane tension and/or the direction of membrane stretch.

  13. Engineering geology of underground movements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, F.G.; Culshaw, M.G.; Cripps, J.C.; Lovell, M.A. (eds.) (Teeside Polytechnic, Middlesbrough (UK). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    39 papers are presented under the following session headings: introduction; ground movements due to tunnelling; ground movements due to deep excavations; ground movements and construction operations; ground movements due to abandoned mine workings; ground movements due to longwall mining; abandoned limestone mines in the West Midlands; investigation of ground movements; ground movements due to the abstraction or injection of fluids; and induced seismicity. Each session is followed by a discussion.

  14. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins.

  15. Battery charging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carollo, J.A.; Kalinsky, W.A.

    1984-02-21

    A battery charger utilizes three basic modes of operation that includes a maintenance mode, a rapid charge mode and time controlled limited charging mode. The device utilizes feedback from the battery being charged of voltage, current and temperature to determine the mode of operation and the time period during which the battery is being charged.

  16. Social movements in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Theodore M; Fee, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Most public health practitioners know that public health has relied on biomedical advances and administrative improvements, but it is less commonly understood that social movements in health have also been sources of motivation for population health advances. This review considers the impacts of social movements focused on urban conditions and health, on the health of children, and on behavioral and substance-related determinants of health and illustrates how these movements have significantly influenced public health activities and programs. We hope this review will motivate public health workers to make common cause with social activists and to encourage social activists to ally with public health professionals.

  17. Studying Social Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; McCurdy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The research method of participant observation has long been used by scholars interested in the motivations, dynamics, tactics and strategies of social movements from a movement perspective. Despite participant observation being a common research method, there have been very few efforts to bring...... and then draws specific links to how the method has been used in the study of activism and social movements. In doing so, this article brings together key academic debates on participant observation, which have been considered separately, such as insider/outsider and overt/covert, but not previously been brought...

  18. Modulation of nitrogen vacancy charge state and fluorescence in nanodiamonds using electrochemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaveli, Sinan; Gaathon, Ophir; Wolcott, Abraham; Sakakibara, Reyu; Shemesh, Or A.; Peterka, Darcy S.; Boyden, Edward S.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Yuste, Rafael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV-) center in diamond has attracted strong interest for a wide range of sensing and quantum information processing applications. To this end, recent work has focused on controlling the NV charge state, whose stability strongly depends on its electrostatic environment. Here, we demonstrate that the charge state and fluorescence dynamics of single NV centers in nanodiamonds with different surface terminations can be controlled by an externally applied potential difference in an electrochemical cell. The voltage dependence of the NV charge state can be used to stabilize the NV- state for spin-based sensing protocols and provides a method of charge state-dependent fluorescence sensing of electrochemical potentials. We detect clear NV fluorescence modulation for voltage changes down to 100 mV, with a single NV and down to 20 mV with multiple NV centers in a wide-field imaging mode. These results suggest that NV centers in nanodiamonds could enable parallel optical detection of biologically relevant electrochemical potentials.

  19. Modulation of nitrogen vacancy charge state and fluorescence in nanodiamonds using electrochemical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaveli, Sinan; Gaathon, Ophir; Wolcott, Abraham; Sakakibara, Reyu; Shemesh, Or A; Peterka, Darcy S; Boyden, Edward S; Owen, Jonathan S; Yuste, Rafael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-04-12

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV(-)) center in diamond has attracted strong interest for a wide range of sensing and quantum information processing applications. To this end, recent work has focused on controlling the NV charge state, whose stability strongly depends on its electrostatic environment. Here, we demonstrate that the charge state and fluorescence dynamics of single NV centers in nanodiamonds with different surface terminations can be controlled by an externally applied potential difference in an electrochemical cell. The voltage dependence of the NV charge state can be used to stabilize the NV(-) state for spin-based sensing protocols and provides a method of charge state-dependent fluorescence sensing of electrochemical potentials. We detect clear NV fluorescence modulation for voltage changes down to 100 mV, with a single NV and down to 20 mV with multiple NV centers in a wide-field imaging mode. These results suggest that NV centers in nanodiamonds could enable parallel optical detection of biologically relevant electrochemical potentials.

  20. Movement and Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Movement and Coordination Page Content Article Body At this age, your ... level will strengthen his body and develop his coordination. In the months ahead, your child’s running will ...

  1. The "Children's Rights" Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    The author argues that the "children's rights" movement is an attack on the authority of parents and teachers and that it is undermining school discipline and traditional family roles. Condensed from "American Educator," Spring 1981, pp30-33. (SJL)

  2. UAVs and Patient Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    to mitigate hemorrhage, to optimize airway management , and to reduce the time interval between the point of injury and surgical intervention.72...depth look at the evolution of patient movement and the utilization of advanced technologies from to ultimately decrease the time to care. Future...with its employment for Class VII resupply (i.e., blood) and easily evolves toward full scale patient movement using advanced remote tele-monitoring

  3. The Circular Camera Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    2014-01-01

    It has been an accepted precept in film theory that specific stylistic features do not express specific content. Nevertheless, it is possible to find many examples in the history of film in which stylistic features do express specific content: for instance, the circular camera movement is used...... such as the circular camera movement. Keywords: embodied perception, embodied style, explicit narration, interpretation, style pattern, television style...

  4. MIRROR MOVEMENT: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA. Momen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movement is an interesting but often overlooked neurological soft sign;these movements are described as simultaneous contralateral, involuntary, identical movements that accompany voluntary movements. This neurologic problem is very rarely seen in children; in familial cases there is a positive history of these movements in parents, diminishing with time. Here, we have presented the case of an 11-year old girl with mirror movements in her upper limbs which interfered with her hand writing. Her neurological examination revealed normal results. In this report, we have tried to explain some of the pathophysiologic mechanisms related to these abnormal movements.Keywords:Mirror Movements, Children, Soft neurologic sign

  5. Breakdown of 1D water wires inside Charged Carbon Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Pant, Shashank

    2016-01-01

    Using Molecular Dynamics approach we investigated the structure, dynamics of water confined inside pristine and charged 6,6 carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This study reports the breakdown of 1D water wires and the emergence of triangular faced water on incorporating charges in 6,6 CNTs. Incorporation of charges results in high potential barriers to the flipping of water molecules due to the formation of a large number of hydrogen bonds. The PMF analyses show the presence of ~2 kcal/mol barrier for the movement of water inside pristine CNT and almost negligible barrier in charged CNTs.

  6. Magnetic charge quantisation and fractionally charged quarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, G. 't

    1976-01-01

    If magnetic monopoles with Schwinger's value of the magnetic charge would exist then that would pose serious restrictions on theories with fractionally charged quarks, even if they are confined. Weak and electromagnetic interactions must be unified with color, leading to a Weinberg angle w close to

  7. Charge storage and tunneling mechanism of Ni nanocrystals embedded HfOx film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. X. Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A nano-floating gate memory structure based on Ni nanocrystals (NCs embedded HfOx film is deposited by means of radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. Microstructure investigations reveal that self-organized Ni-NCs with diameters of 4-8 nm are well dispersed in amorphous HfOx matrix. Pt/Ni-NCs embedded HfOx/Si/Ag capacitor structures exhibit voltage-dependent capacitance-voltage hysteresis, and a maximum flat-band voltage shift of 1.5 V, corresponding to a charge storage density of 6.0 × 1012 electrons/cm2, is achieved. These capacitor memory cells exhibit good endurance characteristic up to 4 × 104 cycles and excellent retention performance of 105 s, fulfilling the requirements of next generation non-volatile memory devices. Schottky tunneling is proven to be responsible for electrons tunneling in these capacitors.

  8. Posttraumatic functional movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, C; Edwards, M J; Bhatia, K P

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the nervous system may account for a range of neurologic symptoms. Trauma location and severity are important determinants of the resulting symptoms. In severe head injury with structural brain abnormalities, the occurrence of trauma-induced movement disorders, most commonly hyperkinesias such as tremor and dystonia, is well recognized and its diagnosis straightforward. However, the association of minor traumatic events, which do not lead to significant persistent structural brain damage, with the onset of movement disorders is more contentious. The lack of clear clinical-neuroanatomic (or symptom lesion) correlations in these cases, the variable timing between traumatic event and symptom onset, but also the presence of unusual clinical features in a number of such patients, which overlap with signs encountered in patients with functional neurologic disorders, contribute to this controversy. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the movement disorders, most notably dystonia, that have been associated with peripheral trauma and focus on their unusual characteristics, as well as their overlap with functional neurologic disorders. We will then provide details on pathophysiologic views that relate minor peripheral injuries to the development of movement disorders and compare them to knowledge from primary organic and functional movement disorders. Finally, we will comment on the appropriate management of these disorders.

  9. Linear shaped charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Saul, Venner W.

    2017-07-11

    Linear shaped charges are described herein. In a general embodiment, the linear shaped charge has an explosive with an elongated arrowhead-shaped profile. The linear shaped charge also has and an elongated v-shaped liner that is inset into a recess of the explosive. Another linear shaped charge includes an explosive that is shaped as a star-shaped prism. Liners are inset into crevices of the explosive, where the explosive acts as a tamper.

  10. Legacy of the Environmental Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Stan L.

    1976-01-01

    An effort to select an important contemporary social movement (the environmental movement) and to assess some of the important impacts it has had on the larger society. This review of the environmental movement indicates it may be following a path similiar to the life-cycle of previous movements. (Author/BT)

  11. Movement as utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couton, Philippe; López, José Julián

    2009-10-01

    Opposition to utopianism on ontological and political grounds has seemingly relegated it to a potentially dangerous form of antiquated idealism. This conclusion is based on a restrictive view of utopia as excessively ordered panoptic discursive constructions. This overlooks the fact that, from its inception, movement has been central to the utopian tradition. The power of utopianism indeed resides in its ability to instantiate the tension between movement and place that has marked social transformations in the modern era. This tension continues in contemporary discussions of movement-based social processes, particularly international migration and related identity formations, such as open borders transnationalism and cosmopolitanism. Understood as such, utopia remains an ongoing and powerful, albeit problematic instrument of social and political imagination.

  12. Moderately nonlinear diffuse-charge dynamics under an ac voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Robert F.; Khair, Aditya S.

    2015-09-01

    The response of a symmetric binary electrolyte between two parallel, blocking electrodes to a moderate amplitude ac voltage is quantified. The diffuse charge dynamics are modeled via the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for a dilute solution of point-like ions. The solution to these equations is expressed as a Fourier series with a voltage perturbation expansion for arbitrary Debye layer thickness and ac frequency. Here, the perturbation expansion in voltage proceeds in powers of Vo/(kBT /e ) , where Vo is the amplitude of the driving voltage and kBT /e is the thermal voltage with kB as Boltzmann's constant, T as the temperature, and e as the fundamental charge. We show that the response of the electrolyte remains essentially linear in voltage amplitude at frequencies greater than the RC frequency of Debye layer charging, D /λDL , where D is the ion diffusivity, λD is the Debye layer thickness, and L is half the cell width. In contrast, nonlinear response is predicted at frequencies below the RC frequency. We find that the ion densities exhibit symmetric deviations from the (uniform) equilibrium density at even orders of the voltage amplitude. This leads to the voltage dependence of the current in the external circuit arising from the odd orders of voltage. For instance, the first nonlinear contribution to the current is O (Vo3) which contains the expected third harmonic but also a component oscillating at the applied frequency. We use this to compute a generalized impedance for moderate voltages, the first nonlinear contribution to which is quadratic in Vo. This contribution predicts a decrease in the imaginary part of the impedance at low frequency, which is due to the increase in Debye layer capacitance with increasing Vo. In contrast, the real part of the impedance increases at low frequency, due to adsorption of neutral salt from the bulk to the Debye layer.

  13. Voltage-dependent amplification of synaptic inputs in respiratory motoneurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enríquez Denton, M; Wienecke, Jacob; Zhang, Mengliang

    2012-01-01

    of the inputs. Knowledge of these processes is important in understanding conditions such as motoneurone disease, or the spasticity that can follow spinal cord injury or stroke Respiration is a natural motor act that continues normally under experimental conditions, and this study investigated, for the first...

  14. Voltage-Dependent Intrinsic Bursting in Olfactory Bulb Golgi Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, R. Todd; Rozman, Peter A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), local synaptic circuits modulate the evolving pattern of activity in mitral and tufted cells following olfactory sensory stimulation. GABAergic granule cells, the most numerous interneuron subtype in this brain region, have been extensively studied. However, classic studies using Golgi staining methods…

  15. Voltage-Dependent Intrinsic Bursting in Olfactory Bulb Golgi Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, R. Todd; Rozman, Peter A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), local synaptic circuits modulate the evolving pattern of activity in mitral and tufted cells following olfactory sensory stimulation. GABAergic granule cells, the most numerous interneuron subtype in this brain region, have been extensively studied. However, classic studies using Golgi staining methods…

  16. A movement ecology paradigm for unifying organismal movement research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Ran; Getz, Wayne M.; Revilla, Eloy; Holyoak, Marcel; Kadmon, Ronen; Saltz, David; Smouse, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    Movement of individual organisms is fundamental to life, quilting our planet in a rich tapestry of phenomena with diverse implications for ecosystems and humans. Movement research is both plentiful and insightful, and recent methodological advances facilitate obtaining a detailed view of individual movement. Yet, we lack a general unifying paradigm, derived from first principles, which can place movement studies within a common context and advance the development of a mature scientific discipline. This introductory article to the Movement Ecology Special Feature proposes a paradigm that integrates conceptual, theoretical, methodological, and empirical frameworks for studying movement of all organisms, from microbes to trees to elephants. We introduce a conceptual framework depicting the interplay among four basic mechanistic components of organismal movement: the internal state (why move?), motion (how to move?), and navigation (when and where to move?) capacities of the individual and the external factors affecting movement. We demonstrate how the proposed framework aids the study of various taxa and movement types; promotes the formulation of hypotheses about movement; and complements existing biomechanical, cognitive, random, and optimality paradigms of movement. The proposed framework integrates eclectic research on movement into a structured paradigm and aims at providing a basis for hypothesis generation and a vehicle facilitating the understanding of the causes, mechanisms, and spatiotemporal patterns of movement and their role in various ecological and evolutionary processes. ”Now we must consider in general the common reason for moving with any movement whatever.“ (Aristotle, De Motu Animalium, 4th century B.C.) PMID:19060196

  17. Electrodynamics of Radiating Charges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Grøn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of electrodynamics of radiating charges is reviewed with special emphasis on the role of the Schott energy for the conservation of energy for a charge and its electromagnetic field. It is made clear that the existence of radiation from a charge is not invariant against a transformation between two reference frames that has an accelerated motion relative to each other. The questions whether the existence of radiation from a uniformly accelerated charge with vanishing radiation reaction force is in conflict with the principle of equivalence and whether a freely falling charge radiates are reviewed. It is shown that the resolution of an electromagnetic “perpetuum mobile paradox” associated with a charge moving geodetically along a circular path in the Schwarzschild spacetime requires the so-called tail terms in the equation of motion of a charged particle.

  18. The Mastery of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Rudolf; Ullmann, Lisa

    In this third edition, some amendments and additions have been made to the original text, first published in 1950. As in past editions, the relationship between the inner motivation of movement and the outer functioning of the body is explored. Acting and dancing are shown as activities deeply concerned with man's urge to establish values and…

  19. The Hopi Traditionalist Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmer, Richard O.

    1994-01-01

    Traces development of Hopi Traditionalism since 1906 as a social movement within the context of Hopi culture and sociopolitical history. Discusses the role of ideology in mediating political and economic conditions of history and collective cultural consciousness. Offers conclusions about the political role of indigenous culture and culturally…

  20. Material and Affective Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    2014-01-01

    . The chapter traces the former pupil’s memories of physical and affective movements within the larger context of school and discovers surprisingly diverse modes of knowing, relating, and attending to things, teachers and classmates among and between the three generations. It thus taps into the rich realms...

  1. Mungiki as Youth Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Like many other African countries, Kenya has a large and growing youth population. Some of the youths are mobilized into militant and political networks; one of these is the Mungiki movement. The article explores Mungiki’s combination of politics, religion and Kikuyu traditions. Using the examples...

  2. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  3. Autoimmune movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeon, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune movement disorders encapsulate a large and diverse group of neurologic disorders occurring either in isolation or accompanying more diffuse autoimmune encephalitic illnesses. The full range of movement phenomena has been described and, as they often occur in adults, many of the presentations can mimic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease. Disorders may be ataxic, hypokinetic (parkinsonism), or hyperkinetic (myoclonus, chorea, tics, and other dyskinetic disorders). The autoantibody targets are diverse and include neuronal surface proteins such as leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glycine receptors, as well as antibodies (such as intracellular antigens) that are markers of a central nervous system process mediated by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. However, there are two conditions, stiff-person syndrome (also known as stiff-man syndrome) and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), that are always autoimmune movement disorders. In some instances (such as Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody-1 (PCA-1) autoimmunity), antibodies detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid can be indicative of a paraneoplastic cause, and may direct the cancer search. In other instances (such as 65kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) autoimmunity), a paraneoplastic cause is very unlikely, and early treatment with immunotherapy may promote improvement or recovery. Here we describe the different types of movement disorder and the clinical features and antibodies associated with them, and discuss treatment.

  4. Measuring Facial Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  5. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Ambar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychogenic movement Disorders (PMD may result from somatoform disorders, factitious disorders, malingering, depression anxiety disorders and less frequently, histrionic personality disorders. First recognized by Henry Head in early twentieth century, PMD s commonly encountered and clues to their differentiation from organic disease. A generally accepted management protocol has been outlined.

  6. The Matter of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres, Phil

    2015-01-01

    This contribution concerns itself with the design and realisation of architectures that operate with material dynamics. It presents this concern as a counter to the consideration of movement in architecture as something conceptualised from the position of the observer. The contribution draws upon...

  7. West African Antislavery Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi; Pelckmans, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    -slavery movements had raised awareness, this political emergence was even easier. Indeed the fight against ‘slave mentalities’ was everywhere a major challenge and a crucial step to mobilize groups of slave status under a united force. As this article argues changes in political structures and changes in political...

  8. [Architecture and movement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivallan, Armel

    2012-01-01

    Leading an architectural project means accompanying the movement which it induces within the teams. Between questioning, uncertainty and fear, the organisational changes inherent to the new facility must be subject to constructive and ongoing exchanges. Ethics, safety and training are revised and the unit projects are sometimes modified.

  9. The Sadr II Movement: An Organizational Fight for Legitimacy within the Iraqi Shi’a Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    fight for credibility and stature.[15] Quintan Wiktorowicz describes this phenomenon in Islamic movements as: A movement group…asserts its authority...34. There is no charge, and your address will be used for no other purpose. References 1. Wiktorowicz, Quintan , Islamic Activism: A Social Movement...Muqtada al-Sadr’s age is estimated between twenty-five and thirty. 13. Cole, Op. Cit. 14. Ibid. 15. Wiktorowicz, Quintan , "Framing Jihad

  10. [Ergonomic movement in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Huizer, J J A; Bolderman, F W

    2014-02-01

    'Ergonomic movement in dentistry' is a recently developed ergonomic programme for dental healthcare professionals which is intended to prevent work-related complaints and assist in recovering from them. The programme is recommended by disability insurers in cases of specific physical complaints, limitations or disability, as a consequence of which a dental healthcare professional is unable to carry out his or her work. In a four-day training programme, in one's own workplace, skills are taught in the areas of work organization, work attitude and movement. These skills are directly applied in the treatment ofpatients and, if necessary, further improved. In this way, one advances step by step to an ergonomic way of working. Evaluations have shown that the programme is advantageous for the attitude toward work, the workplace and the work organization as well as the reduction of disability.

  11. Studying frozen movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy White

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of Spyros Papapetros, On the Animation of the Inorganic: Art, Architecture, and the Extension of Life: Spyros Papapetros examines ideas about simulated movement and inorganic life during and after the turn of the twentieth century. Exploring works of a selection of important art historians as well as artists and architects of the period, the author maintains that the ability to identify with material objects was repressed by modernist culture, and yet found expression stylistically through depictions of inorganic forms. That expression is shown to have continuity with older medieval and renaissance depictions. The book is organized by a narrative that evokes the modes of inquiry documented and critiqued by the content of the book, employing movement as a narrative device, a metaphor, while serving as a subject of inquiry.

  12. Automatic Chloroplast Movement Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Henrik; Zeidler, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    In response to low or high intensities of light, the chloroplasts in the mesophyll cells of the leaf are able to increase or decrease their exposure to light by accumulating at the upper and lower sides or along the side walls of the cell respectively. This movement, regulated by the phototropin blue light photoreceptors phot1 and phot2, results in a decreased or increased transmission of light through the leaf. This way the plant is able to optimize harvesting of the incoming light or avoid damage caused by excess light. Here we describe a method that indirectly measures the movement of chloroplasts by taking advantage of the resulting change in leaf transmittance. By using a microplate reader, quantitative measurements of chloroplast accumulation or avoidance can be monitored over time, for multiple samples with relatively little hands-on time.

  13. Human Purposive Movement Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    movement patterns; for example, horses , deer, and javelina exhibit grazing behaviors that are similar to, but not quite the same as, cattle. Individual...conveyance would be modeled. This might be as simple as a person riding a horse , mule, camel, or burro, or as complex as a multiwheeled truck, train...or tracked vehicle. The assumption presented is that each system of conveyance reflects the will of its operator/ rider , whether that system is a

  14. Confronting Islamic Jihadist Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Afzal Upal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that in order to win the long-term fight against Islamic Jihadist movements, we must confront their ideological foundations and provide the majority of Muslims with an alternative narrative that satisfies their social identity needs for a positive esteem.  By analysing social identity dynamics of Western-Muslim interactions, this paper presents some novel ideas that can lead to the creation of such a narrative.

  15. Cannabis in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Vahl, K R; Kolbe, H; Schneider, U; Emrich, H M

    1999-10-01

    Central cannabinoid receptors are densely located in the output nuclei of the basal ganglia (globus pallidus, substantia nigra pars reticulata), suggesting their involvement in the regulation of motor activity. Furthermore, there is evidence that endogenous cannabinoid transmission plays a role in the manipulation of other transmitter systems within the basal ganglia by increasing GABAergic transmission, inhibiting glutamate release and affecting dopaminergic uptake. Most hyperkinetic and hypokinetic movement disorders are caused by a dysfunction of basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. It has been suggested that an endogenous cannabinoid tone participates in the control of movements and, therefore, the central cannabinoid system might play a role in the pathophysiology of these diseases. During the last years in humans a limited number of clinical trials demonstrated that cannabinoids might be useful in the treatment of movement disorders. Despite the lack of controlled studies there is evidence that cannabinoids are of therapeutic value in the treatment of tics in Tourette syndrome, the reduction of levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson s disease and some forms of tremor and dystonia. It can be speculated that cannabinoid antagonists might be useful in the treatment of chorea in Huntington s disease and hypokinetic parkinsonian syndromes.

  16. Monitoring underground movements

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    On 16 September 2015 at 22:54:33 (UTC), an 8.3-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Chile. 11,650 km away, at CERN, a new-generation instrument – the Precision Laser Inclinometer (PLI) – recorded the extreme event. The PLI is being tested by a JINR/CERN/ATLAS team to measure the movements of underground structures and detectors.   The Precision Laser Inclinometer during assembly. The instrument has proven very accurate when taking measurements of the movements of underground structures at CERN.    The Precision Laser Inclinometer is an extremely sensitive device capable of monitoring ground angular oscillations in a frequency range of 0.001-1 Hz with a precision of 10-10 rad/Hz1/2. The instrument is currently installed in one of the old ISR transfer tunnels (TT1) built in 1970. However, its final destination could be the ATLAS cavern, where it would measure and monitor the fine movements of the underground structures, which can affect the precise posi...

  17. Rooted in Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The result of the synergy between four doctoral projects and an advanced MA-level course on Bronze Age Europe, this integrated assemblage of articles represents a variety of different subjects united by a single theme: movement. Ranging from theoretical discussion of the various responses to and ...... period of European prehistory. In so doing, the text not only addresses transmission and reception, but also the conceptualization of mobility within a world which was literally Rooted in Movement.......The result of the synergy between four doctoral projects and an advanced MA-level course on Bronze Age Europe, this integrated assemblage of articles represents a variety of different subjects united by a single theme: movement. Ranging from theoretical discussion of the various responses...... to and reactions from the circulation of people, objects and ideas to the transmission of the spiral and the ‚trade’ in crafting expertise, this volume takes a fresh look at old questions. Each article within this monograph represents a different approach to mobility framed within a highly mobile and dynamic...

  18. Human preference for air movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.

    2002-01-01

    Human preference for air movement was studied at slightly cool, neutral, and slightly warm overall thermal sensations and at temperatures ranging from 18 deg.C to 28 deg.C. Air movement preference depended on both thermal sensation and temperature, but large inter-individual differences existed...... between subjects. Preference for less air movement was linearly correlated with draught discomfort, but the percentage of subjects who felt draught was lower than the percentage who preferred less air movement....

  19. Segmenting Trajectories by Movement States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchin, M.; Kruckenberg, H.; Kölzsch, A.; Timpf, S.; Laube, P.

    2013-01-01

    Dividing movement trajectories according to different movement states of animals has become a challenge in movement ecology, as well as in algorithm development. In this study, we revisit and extend a framework for trajectory segmentation based on spatio-temporal criteria for this purpose. We adapt

  20. Surface Charging and Points of Zero Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Kosmulski, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Presents Points of Zero Charge data on well-defined specimen of materials sorted by trademark, manufacturer, and location. This text emphasizes the comparison between particular results obtained for different portions of the same or very similar material and synthesizes the information published in research reports over the past few decades

  1. Oxaliplatin neurotoxicity – no general ion channel surface-charge effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrsson Hans

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug. Neurotoxicity is the dose-limiting side effect. Previous investigations have reported that acute neurotoxicity could be mediated via voltage-gated ion channels. A possible mechanism for some of the effects is a modification of surface charges around the ion channel, either because of chelation of extracellular Ca2+, or because of binding of a charged biotransformation product of oxaliplatin to the channel. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, we investigated the effects of oxaliplatin and its chloride complex [Pt(dachoxCl]- on the voltage-gated Shaker K channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The recordings were made with the two-electrode and the cut-open oocyte voltage clamp techniques. Conclusion To our surprise, we did not see any effects on the current amplitudes, on the current time courses, or on the voltage dependence of the Shaker wild-type channel. Oxaliplatin is expected to bind to cysteines. Therefore, we explored if there could be a specific effect on single (E418C and double-cysteine (R362C/F416C mutated Shaker channels previously shown to be sensitive to cysteine-specific reagents. Neither of these channels were affected by oxaliplatin. The clear lack of effect on the Shaker K channel suggests that oxaliplatin or its monochloro complex has no general surface-charge effect on the channels, as has been suggested before, but rather a specific effect to the channels previously shown to be affected.

  2. The effect of finite pore length on ion structure and charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsprecher, Konrad; Abele, Manuel; Kondrat, Svyatoslav; Holm, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Nanoporous supercapacitors play an important role in modern energy storage systems, and their modeling is essential to predict and optimize the charging behaviour. Two classes of models have been developed that consist of finite and infinitely long pores. Here, we show that although both types of models predict qualitatively consistent results, there are important differences emerging due to the finite pore length. In particular, we find that the ion density inside a finite pore is not constant, but increases linearly from the pore entrance to the pore end, where the ions form a strongly layered structure. This hinders a direct quantitative comparison between the two models. In addition, we show that although the ion density between the electrodes changes appreciably with the applied potential, this change has a minor effect on charging. Our simulations also reveal a complex charging behaviour, which is adsorption-driven at high voltages, but it is dominated either by co-ion desorption or by adsorption of both types of ions at low voltages, depending on the ion concentration.

  3. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  4. Induced Charge Capacitive Deionization

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, S; Biesheuvel, P M; Bercovici, M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the phenomenon of induced-charge capacitive deionization (ICCDI) that occurs around a porous and conducting particle immersed in an electrolyte, under the action of an external electrostatic field. The external electric field induces an electric dipole in the porous particle, leading to capacitive charging of its volume by both cations and anions at opposite poles. This regime is characterized both by a large RC charging time and a small electrochemical charge relaxation time, which leads to rapid and significant deionization of ionic species from a volume which is on the scale of the particle. We show by theory and experiment that the transient response around a cylindrical particle results in spatially non-uniform charging and non-steady growth of depletion regions which emerge around the particle's poles. Potentially, ICCDI can be useful in applications where fast concentration changes of ionic species are required over large volumes.

  5. Movement Patterns in Educational Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Although movement is essential in location-based games to get from one point of interest to the next, it is seldom taken into account for the game design and the selection of locations. Instead, player movement is usually analyzed after the fact, i.e. when the game is ready to play. In this paper...... we compare this post-hoc movement analysis with an approach that utilizes the methods for movement analysis to inform the game design itself. We show that both approaches have their merits and solve different tasks, but that there is a benefit of taking movement more serious in designing location...

  6. Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel Plays a Role in the Formation of Large-amplitude Miniature Excitatory Postsynaptic Current%电压依赖性钙通道参与大振幅微小兴奋性突触后电流形成的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄福森; 杨小娟; 王儒蓉; 吴超然

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察电压依赖性钙通道是否作用于大鼠脊髓背角胶状质层(SG)神经元大振幅微小兴奋性突触后电流的形成.方法 选用成年雄性Sprague-Dawley (SD)大鼠,2%~3%异氟烷麻醉后,分离其腰骶部的脊髓,然后切片.采用全细胞电压钳技术,玻璃微电极的电阻为4~6 MΩ,钳制电压为-70 mV,记录胶状质层神经元微小兴奋性突触后电流( mEPSC)电流.将电流信号用Axopatch 200来放大并储存于电脑.对照组和用药结束后,持续采样mEPSC电流30 s.mEPSC电流的频率和振幅用Clampfit 8.1进行分析.结果 钳制电压为-70 mV时,所有SG神经元均有自发性的EPSC.辣椒素增加mEPSC发生的频率和波幅.钴离子抑制辣椒素诱导的大振幅mEPSC.钴离子抑制辣椒素诱导的mEPSC的平均振幅,而不抑制其发生频率.结论 电压依赖性钙离子通道参与了辣椒素引起的痛觉形成.%Objective To observe whether the voltage-dependent calcium channel contributes to the formation of capsaicin-induced miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) in rats. Methods Experiments were performed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The lumbosacral portion of the spinal cord were separated after anesthesia by 2%-3% isoflurane, and the spinal cord slices were prepared. Whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was applied to substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons with a glass patch-pipette having a resistance of 4-6 MΩ, holding potential -70 mV. Signals were amplified with an Axopatch 200 amplifier and then stored in a personal computer. The mEPSC in controls and immediately after the end of drug applications were sampled for 30 seconds and the frequency and amplitude were analyzed using Clampfit 8.1. Results All SG neurons in this database had spontaneous mEPSC with the holding potential of-70 mV. Capsaicin increased the frequency and mean amplitude of mEPSC. Cobalt inhibited the capsaicin-induced large-amplitude mEPSC, as well as the mean amplitude but

  7. Knowledge through movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Kjær; Moser, T.

    2003-01-01

    In: Children and adolescents in movement - perspectives and ideas. The Danish Ministry of Culture, pages 150 - 162. 2003 Short description: the article debunks a lot of the myths surrounding body and learning, and replace them with a vision about another kind of learning. The aim is to reintroduc....... The current focus on the head and lack of attention to the body unifies society to focus on cognitive learning. This has implications for the values created by this system. Learning Lab Denmark aims to examine new ways of reintroducing the body into learning....

  8. Energy and Movement

    CERN Document Server

    90, Sol

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, Energy and Movement, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  9. Stereotypic movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Harvey S

    2011-01-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive, rhythmic, fixed, patterned in form, amplitude, and localization, but purposeless (e.g., hand shaking, waving, body rocking, head nodding). They are commonly seen in children; both in normal children (primary stereotypy) and in individuals with additional behavioral or neurological signs and symptoms (secondary stereotypy). They should be differentiated from compulsions (OCD), tics (tic disorders), trichotillomania, skin picking disorder, or the direct physiological effect of a substance. There is increasing evidence to support a neurobiological mechanism. Response to behavioral and pharmacological therapies is variable.

  10. Tracking the Poster Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2015-01-01

    commercial and graphic design of various kinds of which British and Foreign Posters offers a particularly rich example. The exhibition attracted commercial, artistic and curatorial forces substantiating the idea of a movement, and approached commercial art from a perspective that raised new awareness towards...... graphic material in urban and museum space alike. To clarify the curatorial approach the analysis draws on a theoretical scheme of ecological semiotics, the concept of counterability and contextualising displays, which I name poster milieux: the 1931 case demonstrates how contemporary commercial art...

  11. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Group dynamic movement is a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognised, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However......, to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...

  12. Trajectory Indexing Using Movement Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfoser, D.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2005-01-01

    With the proliferation of mobile computing, the ability to index efficiently the movements of mobile objects becomes important. Objects are typically seen as moving in two-dimensional (x,y) space, which means that their movements across time may be embedded in the three-dimensional (x,y,t) space....... Further, the movements are typically represented as trajectories, sequences of connected line segments. In certain cases, movement is restricted; specifically, in this paper, we aim at exploiting that movements occur in transportation networks to reduce the dimensionality of the data. Briefly, the idea...... is to reduce movements to occur in one spatial dimension. As a consequence, the movement occurs in two-dimensional (x,t) space. The advantages of considering such lower-dimensional trajectories are that the overall size of the data is reduced and that lower-dimensional data is to be indexed. Since off...

  13. Movement disorders in cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna, Raja; Jankovic, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Movement disorders can occur as primary (idiopathic) or genetic disease, as a manifestation of an underlying neurodegenerative disorder, or secondary to a wide range of neurological or systemic diseases. Cerebrovascular diseases represent up to 22% of secondary movement disorders, and involuntary movements develop after 1-4% of strokes. Post-stroke movement disorders can manifest in parkinsonism or a wide range of hyperkinetic movement disorders including chorea, ballism, athetosis, dystonia, tremor, myoclonus, stereotypies, and akathisia. Some of these disorders occur immediately after acute stroke, whereas others can develop later, and yet others represent delayed-onset progressive movement disorders. These movement disorders have been encountered in patients with ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes, subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformations, and dural arteriovenous fistula affecting the basal ganglia, their connections, or both.

  14. [Movement disorders is psychiatric diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidasi, Zoltan; Salacz, Pal; Csibri, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Movement disorders are common in psychiatry. The movement disorder can either be the symptom of a psychiatric disorder, can share a common aetiological factor with it, or can be the consequence of psychopharmacological therapy. Most common features include tic, stereotypy, compulsion, akathisia, dyskinesias, tremor, hypokinesia and disturbances of posture and gait. We discuss characteristics and clinical importance of these features. Movement disorders are frequently present in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, catatonia, Tourette-disorder and psychogenic movement disorder, leading to differential-diagnostic and therapeutical difficulties in everyday practice. Movement disorders due to psychopharmacotherapy can be classified as early-onset, late-onset and tardive. Frequent psychiatric comorbidity is found in primary movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, Huntington's disease, diffuse Lewy-body disorder. Complex neuropsychiatric approach is effective concerning overlapping clinical features and spectrums of disorders in terms of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases.

  15. CONTROLS ON CAPITAL MOVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petris Sorina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, capital mobility was encouraged across national borders, because it was considered that such capital can seek the highest rate of return. However, recent global financial developments have shown that, due to contagion, the mobility of capital flows can cause severe financial imbalances. In the context of globalization, liberalization or maintaining controls on capital flows is a current topic, more debated by economists. This topic is very important, due to the impact of liberalization decision or maintaining controls on capital flows has on the overall macroeconomic framework. The paper analyzes the relationship between capital flows’ control and the income per capita, the degree of central bank independence, democracy country, the foreign exchange regime. Also, it analyzes the effectiveness in time of capital controls, taking account of financial system development and potential risks of instability. Over time, it was observed that a period in which they have imposed restrictions on capital movements was followed by a removal of such restrictions, and vice versa. Cyclic change of capital movements regime corresponds to the cyclic evolution of the global economy. Full capital account liberalization led to the emergence of currency and financial crises, so that the idea of maintaining controls on capital is not rejected by economists. After a full liberalization of capital flows, there is a change in the mentality of an increasing number of economists, who support the maintenance of controls, in a gradual liberalization.

  16. Movement disorders in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review movement disorders in children. They are common but have etiology and phenomenology different than in adults. Tics are the most common phenomena although in most instances they are mild and have a favorable long-term prognosis. Dystonia is the second most common phenomena but when present it is usually genetic or idiopathic and causes meaningful disability. Sydenham's chorea is the most common cause of chorea in children worldwide. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a much rarer cause of chorea but it is always to be ruled out given the lack of a specific diagnostic marker for Sydenham's chorea. Tremor, usually caused by drugs or essential tremor, is regarded as rather uncommon in children. Arguably, most pediatric patients with tremor do not seek medical attention because of the lack of disability. Stereotypies are relatively uncommon but their recognition is clinically relevant since they are usually associated with severe conditions such as autism and Rett syndrome. Parkinsonism is quite rare in children and either results from encephalitis or is a side effect of medications. Wilson's disease must be ruled out in all children with movement disorders.

  17. An improved charge pump with suppressed charge sharing effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Bai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A differential charge pump with reduced charge sharing effect is presented. The current-steering topology is adopted for fast switching. A replica charge pump is added to provide a current path for the complementary branch of the master charge pump in the current switching. Through the replica charge pump, the voltage at the complementary node of the master charge pump keeps stable during switching, and the dynamic charge sharing effect is avoided. Apply the charge pump to a 4.8 GHz band integer-N PLL, the measured reference spur is -49.7dBc with a 4-MHz reference frequency.

  18. Space-Charge Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, N

    2013-01-01

    First, this chapter introduces the expressions for the electric and magnetic space-charge internal fields and forces induced by high-intensity beams. Then, the root-mean-square equation with space charge is derived and discussed. In the third section, the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir law, which gives the maximum current density that can be extracted from an ion source, is exposed. Space-charge compensation can occur in the low-energy beam transport lines (located after the ion source). This phenomenon, which counteracts the spacecharge defocusing effect, is explained and its main parameters are presented. The fifth section presents an overview of the principal methods to perform beam dynamics numerical simulations. An example of a particles-in-cells code, SolMaxP, which takes into account space-charge compensation, is given. Finally, beam dynamics simulation results obtained with this code in the case of the IFMIF injector are presented.

  19. Water Quality Protection Charges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — The Water Quality Protection Charge (WQPC) is a line item on your property tax bill. WQPC funds many of the County's clean water initiatives including: • Restoration...

  20. EV Charging Infrastructure Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karner, Donald [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Garetson, Thomas [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    As highlighted in the U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge, vehicle technology is advancing toward an objective to “… produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today’s gasoline-powered vehicles …” [1] by developing more efficient drivetrains, greater battery energy storage per dollar, and lighter-weight vehicle components and construction. With this technology advancement and improved vehicle performance, the objective for charging infrastructure is to promote vehicle adoption and maximize the number of electric miles driven. The EV Everywhere Charging Infrastructure Roadmap (hereafter referred to as Roadmap) looks forward and assumes that the technical challenges and vehicle performance improvements set forth in the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge will be met. The Roadmap identifies and prioritizes deployment of charging infrastructure in support of this charging infrastructure objective for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge

  1. Primitive Virtual Negative Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kiyoung

    2008-01-01

    Physical fields, such as gravity and electromagnetic field, are interpreted as results from rearrangement of vacuum particles to get the equilibrium of net charge density and net mass density in 4-dimensional complex space. Then, both fields should interact to each other in that physical interaction is considered as a field-to-field interaction. Hence, Mass-Charge interaction is introduced with primitive-virtual negative charge defined for the mass. With the concept of Mass-Charge interaction electric equilibrium of the earth is discussed, especially about the electric field and magnetic field of the earth. For unsettled phenomena related with the earth's gravity, such as antigravity phenomenon, gravity anomalies during the solar eclipses, the connection between geomagnetic storms and earthquakes, etc., possible explanations are discussed.

  2. The London Congestion Charge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leape, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    .... Traffic congestion has declined substantially, and the program is largely popular. This article describes the origins of the London congestion charge, how it overcame practical and theoretical difficulties, and what effects it has had...

  3. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror mov...

  4. Knowledge through movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Kjær; Moser, T.

    2003-01-01

    the bodily aspect to the educational system in a highly effective and useful way. Abstract: Children and adolescents are raised to passivity. Lack of motion in kindergartens and schools promote obesity and life style-related diseases, but another and just as dire consequence is the impact on learning......In: Children and adolescents in movement - perspectives and ideas. The Danish Ministry of Culture, pages 150 - 162. 2003 Short description: the article debunks a lot of the myths surrounding body and learning, and replace them with a vision about another kind of learning. The aim is to reintroduce....... The current focus on the head and lack of attention to the body unifies society to focus on cognitive learning. This has implications for the values created by this system. Learning Lab Denmark aims to examine new ways of reintroducing the body into learning....

  5. Electrically charged targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  6. Charge-sensitive amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Startsev V. I.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider design and circuit design techniques of reduction of the influence of the pyroelectric effect on operation of the charge sensitive amplifiers. The presented experimental results confirm the validity of the measures taken to reduce the impact of pyroelectric currents. Pyroelectric currents are caused by the influence of the temperature gradient on the piezoelectric sensor and on the output voltage of charge sensitive amplifiers.

  7. Electric Vehicle Charging Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Grahn, Pia

    2014-01-01

    With an electrified passenger transportation fleet, carbon dioxide emissions could be reduced significantly depending on the electric power production mix. Increased electric power consumption due to electric vehicle charging demands of electric vehicle fleets may be met by increased amount of renewable power production in the electrical systems. With electric vehicle fleets in the transportation system there is a need for establishing an electric vehicle charging infrastructure that distribu...

  8. Charged Higgs Boson Searches

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of a charged Higgs boson would be tangible proof of physics beyond the Standard Model. This note presents the ATLAS potential for discovering a charged Higgs boson, utilizing five different final states of the signal arising from the three dominating fermionic decay modes of the charged Higgs boson. The search covers the region below the top quark mass, taking into account the present experimental constraints, the transition region with a charged Higgs boson mass of the order of the top quark mass, and the high-mass region with a charged Higgs boson mass up to 600 GeV. All studies are performed with a realistic simulation of the detector response including all three trigger levels and taking into account all dominant systematic uncertainties. Results are given in terms of discovery and exclusion contours for each channel individually and for all channels combined, showing that the ATLAS experiment is capable of detecting the charged Higgs boson in a significant fraction of the (tan beta , mH+-) ...

  9. Bewitched - The Tea Party Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashbee, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the development of the Tea Party movement, the character of its thinking and the nature of the interests and constituencies to which it is tied. The article suggests that despite the importance of ideas and interests, and the process of interaction between them, the movement....... The political friction that this creates has contributed to the anger that has characterised the movement. While the Tea Party movement may, as such, have only an ephemeral existence, independent conservatives are likely to remain a significant and potent constituency and will, within the institutional...

  10. Physiology of psychogenic movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Psychogenic movement disorders (PMDs) are common, but their physiology is largely unknown. In most situations, the movement is involuntary, but in a minority, when the disorder is malingering or factitious, the patient is lying and the movement is voluntary. Physiologically, we cannot tell the difference between voluntary and involuntary. The Bereitschaftspotential (BP) is indicative of certain brain mechanisms for generating movement, and is seen with ordinarily voluntary movements, but by itself does not indicate that a movement is voluntary. There are good clinical neurophysiological methods available to determine whether myoclonus or tremor is a PMD. For example, psychogenic myoclonus generally has a BP, and psychogenic stimulus-sensitive myoclonus has a variable latency with times similar to normal reaction times. Psychogenic tremor will have variable frequency over time, be synchronous in the two arms, and might well be entrained with voluntary rhythmic movements. These facts suggest that PMDs share voluntary mechanisms for movement production. There are no definitive tests to differentiate psychogenic dystonia from organic dystonia, although one has been recently reported. Similar physiological abnormalities are seen in both groups. The question arises as to how a movement can be produced with voluntary mechanisms, but not be considered voluntary.

  11. Movement Matters: Observing the Benefits of Movement Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Melani Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Montessori's first premise is that movement and cognition are closely entwined, and movement can enhance thinking and learning (Lillard, 2005). Children must move, and practice moving, to develop strength, balance, and the stability needed to fully participate in the rigors of daily life. It is imperative for young children's motor…

  12. Eye Movements in Gaze Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllenbach, Emilie; Hansen, John Paulin; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gaze as a sole input modality must support complex navigation and selection tasks. Gaze interaction combines specific eye movements and graphic display objects (GDOs). This paper suggests a unifying taxonomy of gaze interaction principles. The taxonomy deals with three types of eye movements: fix...

  13. The Explanatory Range of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    2005-01-01

    Drawing a distinction between systemic and functional explanations of movement in general, I shall argue that the Chomskyan view of movement in language is originally functional. With the advent of the Minimimalist Program, however, it has become systemic, but no argument for this change has been...

  14. Compensatory eye movements in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Alphen (Adriaan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis will address the generation of compensatory eye movements in naturally mutated or genetically modified mice. The reason for generating compensatory eye movements is solely related to the requirements for good vision. In a subject moving through its environment the projection

  15. Human preference for air movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.;

    2002-01-01

    Human preference for air movement was studied at slightly cool, neutral, and slightly warm overall thermal sensations and at temperatures ranging from 18 deg.C to 28 deg.C. Air movement preference depended on both thermal sensation and temperature, but large inter-individual differences existed...

  16. Theosophically Inspired Movements in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybdal, René

    2016-01-01

    The theosophical movement has had a significant influence on the esoteric milieu in Denmark during the 20th Century. In this paper the inspiration on other Groups in Denmark is explored.......The theosophical movement has had a significant influence on the esoteric milieu in Denmark during the 20th Century. In this paper the inspiration on other Groups in Denmark is explored....

  17. Movement disorders in spinocerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Giunti, P.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) can present with a large variety of noncerebellar symptoms, including movement disorders. In fact, movement disorders are frequent in many of the various SCA subtypes, and they can be the presenting, dominant, or even isolated disease feature. When c

  18. Eye Movements in Gaze Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllenbach, Emilie; Hansen, John Paulin; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gaze as a sole input modality must support complex navigation and selection tasks. Gaze interaction combines specific eye movements and graphic display objects (GDOs). This paper suggests a unifying taxonomy of gaze interaction principles. The taxonomy deals with three types of eye movements...

  19. Air movement - good or bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    Air movement - good or bad? The question can only be answered by those who are exposed when they are exposed. Human perception of air movement depends on environmental factors including air velocity, air velocity fluctuations, air temperature, and personal factors such as overall thermal sensation...... and activity level. Even for the same individual, sensitivity to air movement may change from day to day as a result of e.g. different levels of fatigue. Based on existing literature, the current paper summarizes factors influencing the human perception of air movement and attempts to specify in general terms...... influences the subjective perception of air movement. With occupants feeling warmer than neutral, at temperatures above 23oC or at raised activity levels, humans generally do not feel draught at air velocities typical for indoor environments (up to around 0.4 m/s). In the higher temperature range, very high...

  20. Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2007-01-01

    known as ‘the poetics of cinema.’ The dissertation embraces two branches of research within this perspective: stylistics and historical poetics (stylistic history). The dissertation takes on three questions in relation to camera movement and is accordingly divided into three major sections. The first...... section unearths what characterizes the literature on camera movement. The second section of the dissertation delineates the history of camera movement itself within narrative cinema. Several organizational principles subtending the on-screen effect of camera movement are revealed in section two...... to illustrate how the functions may mesh in individual camera movements six concrete examples are analyzed. The analyses illustrate how the taxonomy presented can substantiate analysis and interpretation of film style. More generally, the dissertation - and particularly these in-depth analyses - illustrates how...

  1. Recognizing and predicting movement effects: identifying critical movement features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen; Williams, A Mark

    2010-01-01

    It is not clear whether the critical features used to discriminate movements are identical to those involved in predicting the same movement's effects and consequently, whether the mechanisms underlying recognition and anticipation differ. We examined whether people rely on different kinematic information when required to recognize differences in the movement pattern in comparison to when they have to anticipate the outcome of these same movements. Naïve participants were presented with paired presentations of point-light animated tennis shots that ended at racket-ball contact. We instructed them either to judge whether the movements observed were the same or different or to predict shot direction (left vs. right). In addition, we locally manipulated the kinematics of point-light figures in an effort to identify the critical features used when making recognition and anticipation judgments. It appears that observers rely on different sources of information when required to recognize movement differences compared to when they need to anticipate the outcome of the same observed movements. Findings are discussed with reference to recent ideas focusing on the role of perceptual and motor resonance in perceptual judgments.

  2. Electric vehicle battery charging controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    to a battery management system in the electric vehicle to charge a battery therein, a first communication unit for receiving a charging message via a communication network, and a control unit for controlling a charging current provided from the charge source to the electric vehicle, the controlling at least...

  3. Holographic charge density waves

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2013-01-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with non-zero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  4. Holographic charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with nonzero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  5. Charges for linearized gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Aksteiner, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Maxwell test fields as well as solutions of linearized gravity on the Kerr exterior admit non-radiating modes, i.e. non-trivial time-independent solutions. These are closely related to conserved charges. In this paper we discuss the non-radiating modes for linearized gravity, which may be seen to correspond to the Poincare Lie-algebra. The 2-dimensional isometry group of Kerr corresponds to a 2-parameter family of gauge-invariant non-radiating modes representing infinitesimal perturbations of mass and azimuthal angular momentum. We calculate the linearized mass charge in terms of linearized Newman-Penrose scalars.

  6. Jellyfish movement data - Determining Movement Patterns of Jellyfish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is to determine horizontal and vertical movement patterns of two jellyfish species in Hood Canal, in relation to environmental variables. It is being...

  7. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  8. The London Congestion Charge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leape, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    .... In early 2003, London imposed a congestion charge—a daily charge for driving or parking a vehicle on public roads within central London between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. on workdays...

  9. Magnetoencephalographic study on facial movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku eMiki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we introduced our three studies that focused on facial movements. In the first study, we examined the temporal characteristics of neural responses elicited by viewing mouth movements, and assessed differences between the responses to mouth opening and closing movements and an averting eyes condition. Our results showed that the occipitotemporal area, the human MT/V5 homologue, was active in the perception of both mouth and eye motions. Viewing mouth and eye movements did not elicit significantly different activity in the occipitotemporal area, which indicated that perception of the movement of facial parts may be processed in the same manner, and this is different from motion in general. In the second study, we investigated whether early activity in the occipitotemporal region evoked by eye movements was influenced by a face contour and/or features such as the mouth. Our results revealed specific information processing for eye movements in the occipitotemporal region, and this activity was significantly influenced by whether movements appeared with the facial contour and/or features, in other words, whether the eyes moved, even if the movement itself was the same. In the third study, we examined the effects of inverting the facial contour (hair and chin and features (eyes, nose, and mouth on processing for static and dynamic face perception. Our results showed the following: (1 In static face perception, activity in the right fusiform area was affected more by the inversion of features while that in the left fusiform area was affected more by a disruption in the spatial relationship between the contour and features, and (2 In dynamic face perception, activity in the right occipitotemporal area was affected by the inversion of the facial contour.

  10. Movement disorders emergencies: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato P. Munhoz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders (MD encompass acute and chronic diseases characterized by involuntary movements and/or loss of control or efficiency in voluntary movements. In this review, we covered situations in which the main manifestations are MDs that pose significant risks for acute morbidity and mortality. The authors examine literature data on the most relevant MD emergencies, including those related to Parkinson's disease, acute drug reactions (acute dystonia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, serotonergic syndrome and malignant hyperthermia, acute exacerbation of chronic MD (status dystonicus, hemiballism and stiff-person syndrome, highlighting clinical presentation, demographics, diagnosis and management.

  11. Antiglobalization movements and their critics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Antiglobalization movements are transnational social movements that challenge what they perceive as a monolithic global laissez-faire economic regime. From the 1990s, these movements have accused global political and economic networks of delivering too much power to dominant elites at the expense...... of disenfranchised poor populations and countries. The term antiglobalization is rejected by some supporters who, although espousing grassroots resistance to global liberalization and greater local control over resources and decision making, point out that they are themselves global: They draw attention to global...

  12. Movement disorders in systemic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poewe, Werner; Djamshidian-Tehrani, Atbin

    2015-02-01

    Movement disorders, classically involving dysfunction of the basal ganglia commonly occur in neurodegenerative and structural brain disorders. At times, however, movement disorders can be the initial manifestation of a systemic disease. In this article we discuss the most common movement disorders which may present in infectious, autoimmune, paraneoplastic, metabolic and endocrine diseases. Management often has to be multidisciplinary involving primary care physicians, neurologists, allied health professionals including nurses, occupational therapists and less frequently neurosurgeons. Recognizing and treating the underlying systemic disease is important in order to improve the neurological symptoms.

  13. Optimization of BEV Charging Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei

    This paper presents different approaches to optimize fast charging and workplace charging strategy of battery electric vehicle (BEV) drivers. For the fast charging analysis, a rule-based model was built to simulate BEV charging behavior. Monte Carlo analysis was performed to explore to the potential range of congestion at fast charging stations which could be more than four hours at the most crowded stations. Genetic algorithm was performed to explore the theoretical minimum waiting time at fast charging stations, and it can decrease the waiting time at the most crowded stations to be shorter than one hour. A deterministic approach was proposed as a feasible suggestion that people should consider to take fast charging when the state of charge is approaching 40 miles. This suggestion is hoped to help to minimize potential congestion at fast charging stations. For the workplace charging analysis, scenario analysis was performed to simulate temporal distribution of charging demand under different workplace charging strategies. It was found that if BEV drivers charge as much as possible and as late as possible at workplace, it could increase the utility of solar-generated electricity while relieve grid stress of extra intensive electricity demand at night caused by charging electric vehicles at home.

  14. Laban Movement Analysis in Dance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Toby

    1984-01-01

    Laban Movement Analysis is a system that helps dancers recognize and define the variety of elements that make up the movement event. This is not a method of teaching a movement style, but provides a means for creative expression. (DF)

  15. Special Education as a Social Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, M. Stephen; Smith, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Social movements are defined, the extent to which special education fits common definitions of social movements is assessed, and the life cycle of social movements is examined with particular focus on implications for special education. (Author)

  16. Emergence and Development of Bulgaria's Environmental Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Uday; Snavely, Keith

    1998-01-01

    Bulgaria's environmental movement played a role in ending communist rule, but environmental issues were not completely resolved. Social movements may never achieve their objectives in totality but instead enter a new cycle of the movement. (SK)

  17. Eye Movements When Viewing Advertisements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eHiggins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads, before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet. Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research.

  18. Eye movements when viewing advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research. PMID:24672500

  19. Social movements: A poststructuralist reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antón Fernández de Rota Irimia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The present article tries to rethink social movements from a poststructuralist position, going beyond Synthesis Theory. For the last twenty years the synthesis of the theories of Resource Mobilization, Political Opportunity and Cognitive Framing has been taken to be the last word in the sociology of social movements. Nevertheless, far from being any sort of advance, Synthesis Theory has merely perpetuated previous theories, without, in my opinion,managing to reconceptualize the constitution of power, or the force and embodiment of movement. The lack of theoretical attention to the definition of movement is a curious absence which needs to be redressed . My aim is approach it not from the notion of "subject" or any other type of "institution", but rather in terms of the contingencies of everyday life.   

  20. Teaching Movement Activities as Performativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ole

    2017-01-01

    subjects the teaching style should be characterized by more variation and motivate the pupils. Research has shown that there is a correlation between physical activity and intellectual capital (e.g. educational attainment and academic performance), physical capital (e.g. physical fitness and reduction...... of the risk for diseases and risk factors) and emotional capital (e.g. fun, enjoyment and self-esteem) (Bailey, Hillman, Arent, & Petitpas, 2013). The school reform prescribes that all pupils from grade 1-9 must have at least 45 minutes of movement activities in average every day.Next to the well-known PE-teaching...... the movement activities must be integrated in the academic and creative subjects as active teaching and brain breaks etc. or as organized activities during the extended school day. Movement activities has become a part of all subjects and all teachers’ professional task. Since these movement activities...

  1. Trajectory Indexing Using Movement Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfoser, D.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2005-01-01

    With the proliferation of mobile computing, the ability to index efficiently the movements of mobile objects becomes important. Objects are typically seen as moving in two-dimensional (x,y) space, which means that their movements across time may be embedded in the three-dimensional (x,y,t) space...... is to reduce movements to occur in one spatial dimension. As a consequence, the movement occurs in two-dimensional (x,t) space. The advantages of considering such lower-dimensional trajectories are that the overall size of the data is reduced and that lower-dimensional data is to be indexed. Since off......-the-shelf database management systems typically do not offer higher-dimensional indexing, this reduction in dimensionality allows us to use existing DBMSes to store and index trajectories. Moreover, we argue that, given the right circumstances, indexing these dimensionality-reduced trajectories can be more efficient...

  2. Mindful movement and skilled attention

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel “mind-body connection” has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing ...

  3. Invarient patterns in articulatory movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Patrizia

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the reported study is to discover an effective method of characterizing movement patterns of the crucial articulator as the function of an abstract syllable magnitude and the adjacent boundary, and at the same time to investigate effects of prosodic control on utterance organization. In particular, the speed of movement when a flesh point on the tongue blade or the lower lip crosses a selected position relative to the occlusion plane is examined. The time of such crossing provides an effective measure of syllable timing and syllable duration according to previous work. In the present work, using a very limited vocabulary with only a few consonants and one vowel as the key speech materials, effects of contrastive emphasis on demisyllabic movement patterns were studied. The theoretical framework for this analysis is the C/D model of speech production in relation to the concept of an invariant part of selected articulatory movements. The results show evidence in favor of the existence of ``iceberg'' patterns, but a linear dependence of slope on the total excursion of the demisyllabic movement, instead of the approximate constancy of the threshold crossing speed as suggested in the original proposal of the iceberg, has been found. Accordingly, a revision of the original concept of iceberg, seems necessary. This refinement is consistent with the C/D model assumption on ``prominence control'' that the syllable magnitude determines the movement amplitude, accompanying directly related syllable duration change. In this assumption, the movement of a consonantal component should also be proportional to syllable magnitude. The results suggests, however, systematic outliers deviating from the linear dependence of movement speed on excursion. This deviation may be caused by the effect of the immediately following boundary, often referred to as phrase-final elongation. Thesis advisor: Osamu Fujimura Copies of this thesis written in English can be obtained from

  4. Emotional processing affects movement speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hälbig, Thomas D; Borod, Joan C; Frisina, Pasquale G; Tse, Winona; Voustianiouk, Andrei; Olanow, C Warren; Gracies, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-01

    Emotions can affect various aspects of human behavior. The impact of emotions on behavior is traditionally thought to occur at central, cognitive and motor preparation stages. Using EMG to measure the effects of emotion on movement, we found that emotional stimuli differing in valence and arousal elicited highly specific effects on peripheral movement time. This result has conceptual implications for the emotion-motion link and potentially practical implications for neurorehabilitation and professional environments where fast motor reactions are critical.

  5. The movement ecology of seagrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kathryn; van Dijk, Kor-Jent; Ruiz-Montoya, Leonardo; Kendrick, Gary A; Krauss, Siegfried L; Waycott, Michelle; Verduin, Jennifer; Lowe, Ryan; Statton, John; Brown, Eloise; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-11-22

    A movement ecology framework is applied to enhance our understanding of the causes, mechanisms and consequences of movement in seagrasses: marine, clonal, flowering plants. Four life-history stages of seagrasses can move: pollen, sexual propagules, vegetative fragments and the spread of individuals through clonal growth. Movement occurs on the water surface, in the water column, on or in the sediment, via animal vectors and through spreading clones. A capacity for long-distance dispersal and demographic connectivity over multiple timeframes is the novel feature of the movement ecology of seagrasses with significant evolutionary and ecological consequences. The space-time movement footprint of different life-history stages varies. For example, the distance moved by reproductive propagules and vegetative expansion via clonal growth is similar, but the timescales range exponentially, from hours to months or centuries to millennia, respectively. Consequently, environmental factors and key traits that interact to influence movement also operate on vastly different spatial and temporal scales. Six key future research areas have been identified.

  6. Measurement of Neutrino Induced, Charged Current, Charged Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilking, Michael Joseph [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Neutrinos are among the least understood particles in the standard model of particle physics. At neutrino energies in the 1 GeV range, neutrino properties are typically determined by observing the outgoing charged lepton produced in a charged current quasi-elastic interactions. The largest charged current background to these measurements comes from charged current pion production interactions, for which there is very little available data.

  7. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajesh; Dixit, Puneet Kumar; Lalla, Rakesh; Singh, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand. PMID:26019431

  8. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand.

  9. High Voltage Charge Pump

    KAUST Repository

    Emira, Ahmed A.

    2014-10-09

    Various embodiments of a high voltage charge pump are described. One embodiment is a charge pump circuit that comprises a plurality of switching stages each including a clock input, a clock input inverse, a clock output, and a clock output inverse. The circuit further comprises a plurality of pumping capacitors, wherein one or more pumping capacitors are coupled to a corresponding switching stage. The circuit also comprises a maximum selection circuit coupled to a last switching stage among the plurality of switching stages, the maximum selection circuit configured to filter noise on the output clock and the output clock inverse of the last switching stage, the maximum selection circuit further configured to generate a DC output voltage based on the output clock and the output clock inverse of the last switching stage.

  10. Perturbatively charged holographic disorder

    CERN Document Server

    O'Keeffe, Daniel K

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of holography applied to condensed matter physics, we study a model of perturbatively charged disorder in D=4 dimensions. Starting from initially uncharged AdS_4, a randomly fluctuating boundary chemical potential is introduced by turning on a bulk gauge field parameterized by a disorder strength and a characteristic scale k_0. Accounting for gravitational backreaction, we construct an asymptotically AdS solution perturbatively in the disorder strength. The disorder averaged geometry displays unphysical divergences in the deep interior. We explain how to remove these divergences and arrive at a well behaved solution. The disorder averaged DC conductivity is calculated and is found to contain a correction to the AdS result. The correction appears at second order in the disorder strength and scales inversely with k_0. We discuss the extension to a system with a finite initial charge density. The disorder averaged DC conductivity may be calculated by adopting a technique developed for hologr...

  11. Electrically charged curvaton

    CERN Document Server

    D'Onofrio, Michela; Rajantie, Arttu

    2012-01-01

    We consider the possibility that the primordial curvature perturbation was generated through the curvaton mechanism from a scalar field with an electric charge, or precisely the Standard Model U(1) weak hypercharge. This links the dynamics of the very early universe concretely to the Standard Model of particle physics, and because the coupling strength is known, it reduces the number of free parameters in the curvaton model. We show that the model is compatible with CMB observations for Hubble rate $H_* > 10^8 GeV$ and curvaton mass $m > 10^{-2}H_*$. Charge fluctuations generated during inflation are screened by electron-positron pairs, and therefore do not violate observational constraints. The interaction with the gauge field leads to interesting dynamics after inflation, including resonant preheating, with potentially highly non-trivial observational consequences, which should be studied more carefully using numerical field theory simulations.

  12. Charged Lifshitz Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani, M. H.; Pourhasan, R.; Mann, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate modifications of the Lifshitz black hole solutions due to the presence of Maxwell charge in higher dimensions for arbitrary $z$ and any topology. We find that the behaviour of large black holes is insensitive to the topology of the solutions, whereas for small black holes significant differences emerge. We generalize a relation previously obtained for neutral Lifshitz black branes, and study more generally the thermodynamic relationship between energy, entropy, and chemical pot...

  13. Extremally charged line

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzner, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of a static, cylindrically symmetric Majumdar-Papapetrou-type solution of Einstein-Maxwell equations. We locate its singularities, establish its algebraic type, find its asymptotic properties and weak-field limit, study the structure of electrogeodesics, and determine the mass and charge of its sources. We provide an interpretation of the spacetime and discuss the parameter appearing in the metric.

  14. Existence of magnetic charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, David

    1990-10-01

    A status report is presented on the existence of quarks carrying the Dirac unit of magnetic charge g = (137/2) e. The Paschen-Back effect in dyonium is discussed. From the dyonium model, Akers predicted the existence of a new η meson at 1814 MeV with I G(JPC) = 0+(0-+). Experimental evidence now confirms the existence of the meson resonance.

  15. Distributed charging of electrical assets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Phan, Dung; Sharma, Mayank; Wu, Chai Wah; Xiong, Jinjun

    2016-02-16

    The present disclosure relates generally to the field of distributed charging of electrical assets. In various examples, distributed charging of electrical assets may be implemented in the form of systems, methods and/or algorithms.

  16. Mindful movement and skilled attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Dav; Schumann, Frank; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel “mind-body connection” has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage “higher-order” inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer’s spectrum of mindful learning that spans from “mindlessness” to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais’ suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other

  17. Mindful movement and skilled attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Dav; Schumann, Frank; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel "mind-body connection" has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage "higher-order" inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer's spectrum of mindful learning that spans from "mindlessness" to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais' suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other populations.

  18. Mindful Movement and Skilled Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dav eClark

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel mind-body connection has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage higher-order inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer’s spectrum of mindful learning that spans from mindlessness to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais’ suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other

  19. Mass movement in northeast Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, John F.; Weihs, Brandon J.; Schettler, Megan Jensen

    Mass movements of nearly all types occur in Afghanistan but in the high relief, rugged Pamir and Hindu Kush mountains of northeastern Afghanistan, mass-movement threats to lives and property necessitated study to elucidate problems to development. Twenty-two different mass movements in bedrock in the Badakhshan Province of northeastern Afghanistan were studied for this paper, including large rock falls and rock slides, along with massive slope-failure complexes with many types and rates of movement. Where higher altitudes prevail in the region, ice-cemented and ice-cored rock glaciers are also common and overlie some of the other mass movements. Inasmuch as seismic energy sources in the Eastern Hindu Kush are maximal in southern Badakhshan, and relief, slope angles and precipitation all increase from west to east as well, the causes of the pervasive mass movement are plentiful enough, although direct cause and slope-failure effect are not known. Some weak sedimentary lithologies downfaulted into, or draped across crystalline rocks, also failed. Some intermixed tills also occur but are not easily differentiated, even with analysis on the ground. Using high resolution satellite imagery and digital elevation models, we assessed geomorphologic parameters to characterize spatial-organization structures related to zones of erosion, deposition and further hazard potential. Analyses indicate that many of the massive slope failures can be characterized and differentiated into various process domains and chronologic-development zones with their different impacts upon the landscape. Mass movements in Afghanistan can exhibit unique topographic signatures that can be used to better assess hazards in other mountain areas, especially where landslide-dam breakout floods threaten. Development of roads, bridges, buildings, and irrigation networks should be done with care in these regions of Afghanistan.

  20. Banking Bank Charge Debates Continue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG PEI

    2006-01-01

    @@ The saying, "There's no such thing as a free lunch" is one that can be applied to the charges increasingly being imposed on savers by Chinese banks.Ranging from managementfees for small deposit accounts to charges for withdrawals of large amounts of cash, from ATM cross-bank withdrawal charges to annual fees for bank payment cards, charges by banks are becoming a unstoppable trend. But it is not a trend the general public is so keen to accept.

  1. Notch Charge-Coupled Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, James

    1992-01-01

    Notch charge-coupled devices are imaging arrays of photodetectors designed to exhibit high charge-transfer efficiencies necessary for operation in ultra-large array, and less vulnerable to degradation by energetic protons, neutrons, and electrons. Main channel of horizontal register includes deep narrow inner channel (notch). Small packets of charge remain confined to notch. Larger packets spill into rest of channel; transferred in usual way. Degradation of charge-transfer efficiency by energetic particles reduced.

  2. Modular Battery Charge Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Robert; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to masterless, distributed, digital-charge control for batteries requiring charge control has been developed and implemented. This approach is required in battery chemistries that need cell-level charge control for safety and is characterized by the use of one controller per cell, resulting in redundant sensors for critical components, such as voltage, temperature, and current. The charge controllers in a given battery interact in a masterless fashion for the purpose of cell balancing, charge control, and state-of-charge estimation. This makes the battery system invariably fault-tolerant. The solution to the single-fault failure, due to the use of a single charge controller (CC), was solved by implementing one CC per cell and linking them via an isolated communication bus [e.g., controller area network (CAN)] in a masterless fashion so that the failure of one or more CCs will not impact the remaining functional CCs. Each micro-controller-based CC digitizes the cell voltage (V(sub cell)), two cell temperatures, and the voltage across the switch (V); the latter variable is used in conjunction with V(sub cell) to estimate the bypass current for a given bypass resistor. Furthermore, CC1 digitizes the battery current (I1) and battery voltage (V(sub batt) and CC5 digitizes a second battery current (I2). As a result, redundant readings are taken for temperature, battery current, and battery voltage through the summation of the individual cell voltages given that each CC knows the voltage of the other cells. For the purpose of cell balancing, each CC periodically and independently transmits its cell voltage and stores the received cell voltage of the other cells in an array. The position in the array depends on the identifier (ID) of the transmitting CC. After eight cell voltage receptions, the array is checked to see if one or more cells did not transmit. If one or more transmissions are missing, the missing cell(s) is (are) eliminated from cell

  3. Predictions of nuclear charge radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, M.; Lu, Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2016-12-01

    The nuclear charge radius is a fundamental property of an atomic nucleus. In this article we study the predictive power of empirical relations for experimental nuclear charge radii of neighboring nuclei and predict the unknown charge radii of 1085 nuclei based on the experimental CR2013 database within an uncertainty of 0.03 fm.

  4. Tools for charged Higgs bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staal, Oscar

    2010-12-15

    We review the status of publicly available software tools applicable to charged Higgs physics. A selection of codes are highlighted in more detail, focusing on new developments that have taken place since the previous charged Higgs workshop in 2008. We conclude that phenomenologists now have the tools ready to face the LHC data. A new web page collecting charged Higgs resources is presented. (orig.)

  5. Improving Charging-Breeding Simulations with Space-Charge Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Ryan; Kwiatkowski, Ania; Steinbrügge, René

    2016-09-01

    Rare-isotope-beam facilities use Highly Charged Ions (HCI) for accelerators accelerating heavy ions and to improve measurement precision and resolving power of certain experiments. An Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is able to create HCI through successive electron impact, charge breeding trapped ions into higher charge states. CBSIM was created to calculate successive charge breeding with an EBIT. It was augmented by transferring it into an object-oriented programming language, including additional elements, improving ion-ion collision factors, and exploring the overlap of the electron beam with the ions. The calculation is enhanced with the effects of residual background gas by computing the space charge due to charge breeding. The program assimilates background species, ionizes and charge breeds them alongside the element being studied, and allows them to interact with the desired species through charge exchange, giving fairer overview of realistic charge breeding. Calculations of charge breeding will be shown for realistic experimental conditions. We reexamined the implementation of ionization energies, cross sections, and ion-ion interactions when charge breeding.

  6. Charge dynamic characteristics in corona-charged polytetrafluoroethylene film electrets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈钢进; 肖慧明; 朱春凤

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the charge dynamics characteristics of injection, transport and decay in porous and non-porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film electrets were investigated by means of corona charging, isothermal and thermal stimulating surface-potential decay measurements. The results showed that the initial surface potential, whether positively or negatively charging, is much higher in non-porous PTFE than in porous PTFE. For porous film the value of initial sur-face potentials increases with increase of film thickness. Higher charging temperature can remarkably improve charge stability. The charge dynamics are correlated to materials microstructure according to their scanning electron micrographs.For non-porous PTFE films, polarizability change of C-F bonds is the main origin of electret charges; but for porous PTFE film a large number of bulk and interface type traps are expected because of the greater area of interface and higher crys-tallinity.

  7. Charge dynamic characteristics in corona-charged polytetrafluoroethylene film electrets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈钢进; 肖慧明; 朱春凤

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the charge dynamics characteristics of injection, transport and decay in porous and non-porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film electrets were investigated by means of corona charging, isothermal and thermal stimulating surface-potential decay measurements. The results showed that the initial surface potential, whether positively or negatively charging, is much higher in non-porous PTFE than in porous PTFE. For porous film the value of initial surface potentials increases with increase of film thickness. Higher charging temperature can remarkably improve charge stability. The charge dynamics are correlated to materials microstructure according to their scanning electron micrographs.For non-porous PTFE films, polarizability change of C-F bonds is the main origin of electret charges; but for porous PTFE film a large number of bulk and interface type traps are expected because of the greater area of interface and higher crystallinity.

  8. Charge renormalization in planar and spherical charged lipidic aqueous interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordi, Federico; Cametti, Cesare; Sennato, Simona; Paoli, Beatrice; Marianecci, Carlotta

    2006-03-16

    The charge renormalization in planar and spherical charged lipidic aqueous interfaces has been investigated by means of thermodynamic and electrokinetic measurements. We analyzed the behavior of mixed DOTAP/DOPE monolayers at the air-electrolyte solution interface and DOTAP/DOPE liposomes 100 nm in size dispersed in an aqueous phase of varying ionic strength. For the two systems, we have compared the "effective" surface charge derived from the measurements of surface potential and zeta-potential to the "bare" charge based on the stoichiometry of the lipid mixture investigated. The results confirm that a strong charge renormalization occurs, whose strength depends on the geometry of the mesoscopic system. The dependence of the "effective" charge on the "bare" charge is discussed in light of an analytical approximation based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation recently proposed.

  9. Movement sequencing in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Long, Jeffrey D; Lourens, Spencer G; Stout, Julie C; Mills, James A; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-08-01

    To examine longitudinal changes in movement sequencing in prodromal Huntington's disease (HD) participants (795 prodromal HD; 225 controls) from the PREDICT-HD study. Prodromal HD participants were tested over seven annual visits and were stratified into three groups (low, medium, high) based on their CAG-Age Product (CAP) score, which indicates likely increasing proximity to diagnosis. A cued movement sequence task assessed the impact of advance cueing on response initiation and execution via three levels of advance information. Compared to controls, all CAP groups showed longer initiation and movement times across all conditions at baseline, demonstrating a disease gradient for the majority of outcomes. Across all conditions, the high CAP group had the highest mean for baseline testing, but also demonstrated an increase in movement time across the study. For initiation time, the high CAP group showed the highest mean baseline time across all conditions, but also faster decreasing rates of change over time. With progress to diagnosis, participants may increasingly use compensatory strategies, as evidenced by faster initiation. However, this occurred in conjunction with slowed execution times, suggesting a decline in effectively accessing control processes required to translate movement into effective execution.

  10. Bimanual-vertical hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jay C; Cohen, Matthew L; Williamson, John; Burtis, Brandon; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2011-07-01

    Patients often demonstrate attentional and action-intentional biases in both the transverse and coronal planes. In addition, when making forelimb movements in the transverse plane, normal participants also have spatial and magnitude asymmetries, but forelimb spatial asymmetries have not been studied in coronal space. Thus, to learn if when normal people make vertical movements they have right-left spatial and magnitude biases, seventeen healthy, blindfolded volunteers had their hands (holding pens) placed vertically in their midsagittal plane, 10 inches apart, on pieces of paper positioned above, below, and at eye-level. Participants were asked to move their hands together vertically and meet in the middle. Participants demonstrated less angular deviation in the below-eye condition than in the other spatial conditions, when moving down than up, and with their right than left hand. Movements toward eye level from upper or lower space were also more accurate than movements in the other directions. Independent of hand, lines were longer with downward than upward movements and the right hand moved more distance than the left. These attentional-intentional asymmetries may be related to gravitational force, hand-hemispheric dominance, and spatial "where" asymmetries; however, the mechanisms accounting for these asymmetries must be ascertained by future research.

  11. The impact of eye movements and tones on disturbing memories involving PTSD and other mental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; Ernst, R.; Marques, L.; Hornsveld, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background A wide array of experimental studies are supportive of a working memory explanation for the effects of eye movements in EMDR therapy. The working memory account predicts that, as a consequence of competition in working memory, traumatic memories lose their emotional charge. Method This

  12. A Theatre Movement Bibliography, 1978 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Lynne

    Reference materials that deal with various aspects of theater movement are grouped in this partially annotated bibliography under the following headings: anatomy, kinesiology, and physiology; combat and martial arts; integrated approaches to movement; mime; miscellaneous acting and movement approaches; movement notations systems; movement…

  13. Parametric HMMs for Movement Recognition and Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dennis; Krüger, Volker

    2009-01-01

    A common problem in human movement recognition is the recognition of movements of a particular type (semantic). E.g., grasping movements have a particular semantic (grasping) but the actual movements usually have very different appearances due to, e.g., different grasping directions. In this pape...

  14. Charge sniffer for electrostatics demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Mihai P.

    2011-02-01

    An electronic electroscope with a special design for demonstrations and experiments on static electricity is described. It operates as an electric charge sniffer by detecting slightly charged objects when they are brought to the front of its sensing electrode. The sniffer has the advantage of combining high directional sensitivity with a logarithmic bar display. It allows for the identification of electric charge polarity during charge separation by friction, peeling, electrostatic induction, batteries, or secondary coils of power transformers. Other experiments in electrostatics, such as observing the electric field of an oscillating dipole and the distance dependence of the electric field generated by simple charge configurations, are also described.

  15. Antiproton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Heiss, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming operation of the extra low energy antiprotons ring at CERN, the upgrade of the antiproton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of 1 08 e+ /s will open the possibility for new experiments with antihydrogen (H ¯). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of H ¯. For four months of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of C P T and the first determination of the antiproton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  16. Yarbus, Eye Movements, and Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W Tatler

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of Yarbus's research on eye movements was enormous following the translation of his book Eye Movements and Vision into English in 1967. In stark contrast, the published material in English concerning his life is scant. We provide a brief biography of Yarbus and assess his impact on contemporary approaches to research on eye movements. While early interest in his work focused on his study of stabilised retinal images, more recently this has been replaced with interest in his work on the cognitive influences on scanning patterns. We extended his experiment on the effect of instructions on viewing a picture using a portrait of Yarbus rather than a painting. The results obtained broadly supported those found by Yarbus.

  17. Sustainability of natural movement activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Metzgar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a focus on reducing energy consumption in commercial buildings as a means of increasing their sustainability. As part of this trend, various health clubs and fitness centers have been designed to lower consumption of resources such as electricity and water. However, energy consumption is just one part of sustainability, with human health and economic health also paramount. When all components of sustainability are analyzed, other forms of physical activity may possess higher levels of sustainability than traditional gym exercise. Natural movement activity consists of outdoor activity that replicates movements performed by ancient humans during the Paleolithic era. A full analysis of sustainability shows that natural movement activity consumes fewer resources and provides unique psychological and physical benefits compared with traditional indoor exercise.

  18. Movement in aesthetic form creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the good practice based experiences found when movement is used to strengthen form creation and to create flow in the process of artistic education. Faced with the design engineering students’ problems with creating forms with aesthetic statements, the experiences with movement...... inspired the thesis that the design engineers’ training in aesthetic form creation can be improved by integrating the movement potential into their education. The paper documents the on-going work on developing a model for embodied creation of form called ‘Somatechne model’. The study also identifies...... a lens to assess the students’ development of mind-body skills, known as ‘The Three Soma’. The Somatechne model also helps to identify the activity that gives the students the opportunity to develop their sensibility and thus aesthetic attention....

  19. Price Based Electric Vehicle Charging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahat, Pukar; Handl, Martin; Kanstrup, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    It is expected that a lot of the new light vehicles in the future will be electrical vehicles (EV). The storage capacity of these EVs has the potential to complement renewable energy resources and mitigate its intermittency. However, EV charging may have negative impact on the power grid. This pa......It is expected that a lot of the new light vehicles in the future will be electrical vehicles (EV). The storage capacity of these EVs has the potential to complement renewable energy resources and mitigate its intermittency. However, EV charging may have negative impact on the power grid....... This paper investigates the impact on a Danish distribution system when the EV charging aims to reduce the charging cost by charging at the cheapest hours. Results show that the charging based on the price signal only will have adverse effect on the grid. The paper also proposes an alternate EV charging...

  20. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    and powerful families lived comfortably in the cities from the tithes, taxes, tribute, and ... number of renewal and resistance movements, most of which the Romans ... generally do not mount serious revolts, unless their backs are against the wall .... memories cannot have been without their effect on popular life in Nazareth.

  1. Proprioceptive Control of Human Movement. The Human Movement Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, John

    Various research studies concerned with the feedback from proprioceptors which accompany movement and the way in which this information is relevant to the control of activity are brought together in this volume. It is intended for the use of those who have some basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as well as an acquaintance with…

  2. Movement Perception and Movement Production in Asperger's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kelly J.; Shiffrar, Maggie; Kerns, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether motor difficulties documented in Asperger's Syndrome (AS) are related to compromised visual abilities, this study examined perception and movement in response to dynamic visual environments. Fourteen males with AS and 16 controls aged 7-23 completed measures of motor skills, postural response to optic flow, and visual…

  3. Manipulation of charge on a single donor atom by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichmann, K.; Wenderoth, M.; Loth, S.; Ulbrich, R.G. [IV. Phys. Inst., Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Garleff, J.K.; Wijnheijmer, A.P.; Koenraad, P.M. [PSN, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    We investigated silicon donors in highly doped GaAs by spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy at 6 K. Recently it was shown by Feenstra, that the shape of the tip has a strong influence of the extension of the tip induced band bending (TIBB) in the semiconductor. Sharp tips produce a lateral extension of TIBB in the semiconductor within the range of nanometers. The charge of an individual impurity can be manipulated by the TIBB in the following way: Donors, away from the tip, will be neutral, as the thermal energy at 6K is much smaller than the ionisation energy of the donor. The bands and the donor energy levels are lifted for positive sample voltage. At a certain amount of TIBB the donor ground state is lifted above the onset of the conduction band and the donor will be ionised. In the measurement the ionisation of the donor is seen as a peak in the dI/dV signal. In spatially resolved dI/dV maps the signal has a ring like structure. For higher applied voltages the diameter of the ring increases. By comparing the calculated TIBB and the voltage dependence of the lateral displacement of the measured peak a value of about 150 meV for the donor level can be extracted.

  4. Charged Galileon black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Babichev, Eugeny; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematic...

  5. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  6. Charged Galileon black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  7. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffner, Francis K [Richland, WA; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. [Richland, WA; Hammerstrom, Donald J [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  8. Naturalistic arm movements during obstacle avoidance in 3D and the identification of movement primitives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Britta; Lipinski, John; Schöner, Gregor

    2012-10-01

    By studying human movement in the laboratory, a number of regularities and invariants such as planarity and the principle of isochrony have been discovered. The theoretical idea has gained traction that movement may be generated from a limited set of movement primitives that would encode these invariants. In this study, we ask if invariants and movement primitives capture naturalistic human movement. Participants moved objects to target locations while avoiding obstacles using unconstrained arm movements in three dimensions. Two experiments manipulated the spatial layout of targets, obstacles, and the locations in the transport movement where an obstacle was encountered. We found that all movement trajectories were planar, with the inclination of the movement plane reflecting the obstacle constraint. The timing of the movement was consistent with both global isochrony (same movement time for variable path lengths) and local isochrony (same movement time for two components of the obstacle avoidance movement). The identified movement primitives of transport (movement from start to target position) and lift (movement perpendicular to transport within the movement plane) varied independently with obstacle conditions. Their scaling accounted for the observed double peak structure of movement speed. Overall, the observed naturalistic movement was astoundingly regular. Its decomposition into primitives suggests simple mechanisms for movement generation.

  9. Observation of charge transport through CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in a single-electron transistor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobo, Masanori; Yamamoto, Makoto; Ishii, Hisao; Noguchi, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    We fabricated single-electron transistors (SETs) having CdSe/ZnS core-shell-type quantum dots (CdSe/ZnS-QDs) as a Coulomb island using a wet chemistry technique. The CdSe/ZnS-QDs were deposited onto Au electrodes with or without the assistance of a self-assembled monolayer of octane(di)thiols. The CdSe/ZnS-QDs were adsorbed onto the Au electrodes even without the interlayer of thiol molecules depending on the concentration of the CdSe/ZnS-QD solution. The electron-transport characteristics through the CdSe/ZnS-QDs were examined in an SET structure at 13 K. Coulomb blockade behavior with typical gate voltage dependence was clearly observed. The estimated charge addition energies of a CdSe/ZnS-QD ranged from 70 to 280 meV. Moreover, additional structures, including negative differential conductance, appeared in the stability diagram in the source-drain bias region beyond 100 mV; these structures are specific to single-charge transport through the discrete energy levels in the Coulomb island.

  10. Electric field observations of time constants related to charging and charge neutralization processes in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. C.; Evans, D. S.; Troim, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Polar 5 electric field results are reviewed, and the transients from Polar 3 are presented. The phenomena are discussed from the standpoint of space charge. On the basis of the Polar 5 results, the large magnitude of the electric field from Polar 3 is seen as indicating that the observed space charge was probably within a few km or less of the payload. Reference is made to Cole's prediction (1960) that charges in the ionosphere would reach equilibrium with a time constant of the order of a few microsec. The processes involved in the two cases presented here require time constants of the order of ms. If the sheath dimensions are taken to be between 50 and 100 m, which is not considered unreasonable in view of the electric field measurements, then a qualitative estimate of the neutralization time would be the transit time for ions across the sheath. Since the kinetic velocity of a 1-eV proton is approximately 14 m/s, it would traverse the distance in 4 to 8 ms, assuming freedom of movement across magnetic field lines. This is the order of the decay times observed on Polar 5.

  11. Fetal onset of general movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luechinger, Annemarie B.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Van Kan, Colette M.; de Vries, JIP

    2008-01-01

    Perinatal qualitative assessment of general movements (GMs) is a tool to evaluate the integrity of the young nervous system. The aim of this investigation was to study the emergence of GMs. Fetal onset of GMs was studied sonographically in 18 fetuses during the first trimester of uncomplicated in vi

  12. Poems from the Occupy Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Annas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available From the beginning of the Occupy Movement, poetry has occupied a major supporting role.  Both the New York and Boston encampments immediately set up a library tent, and poetry readings were a regular part of the camp’s activities.

  13. Eye movements and information geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Reiner

    2016-08-01

    The human visual system uses eye movements to gather visual information. They act as visual scanning processes and can roughly be divided into two different types: small movements around fixation points and larger movements between fixation points. The processes are often modeled as random walks, and recent models based on heavy tail distributions, also known as Levý flights, have been used in these investigations. In contrast to these approaches we do not model the stochastic processes, but we will show that the step lengths of the movements between fixation points follow generalized Pareto distributions (GPDs). We will use general arguments from the theory of extreme value statistics to motivate the usage of the GPD and show empirically that the GPDs provide good fits for measured eye tracking data. In the framework of information geometry the GPDs with a common threshold form a two-dimensional Riemann manifold with the Fisher information matrix as a metric. We compute the Fisher information matrix for the GPDs and introduce a feature vector describing a GPD by its parameters and different geometrical properties of its Fisher information matrix. In our statistical analysis we use eye tracker measurements in a database with 15 observers viewing 1003 images under free-viewing conditions. We use Matlab functions with their standard parameter settings and show that a naive Bayes classifier using the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix provides a high classification rate identifying the 15 observers in the database.

  14. Constraint-induced movement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellini, Greta; Gianola, Silvia; Banzi, Rita;

    2014-01-01

    on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) included in a Cochrane systematic review on the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for stroke patients. METHODS: We extracted data on the functional independence measure (FIM) and the action research arm test (ARAT) from RCTs that compared CIMT...

  15. Women's Movements and Human Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Betty

    1975-01-01

    Two strands of futurism share values of equality, development, and peace, and can catalyze each other into potentially transformational forces. The path is re-education: World order thinking provides an appropriate content for adult learning, and women's movements provide the energy of commitment and a worldwide network for communicating policies.…

  16. THE INTERNATIONAL WALDORF SCHOOL MOVEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VON BARAVALLE, HERMANN

    AN HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE WALDORF SCHOOL PLAN TRACES THE MOVEMENT FROM ITS FOUNDING IN STUTTGART, GERMANY IN 1919, BY THE WALDORF ASTORIA COMPANY AND UNDER THE DIRECTION OF RUDOLF STEINER, TO ITS INTRODUCTION INTO SWITZERLAND, OTHER EUROPEAN COUNTRIES, THE AMERICAS, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, AND SOUTH AFRICA, A TOTAL OF 175 SCHOOLS AS OF 1963. THE…

  17. Charge Breeding of Radioactive Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Wenander, F J C

    2013-01-01

    Charge breeding is a technique to increase the charge state of ions, in many cases radioactive ions. The singly charged radioactive ions, produced in an isotope separator on-line facility, and extracted with a low kinetic energy of some tens of keV, are injected into a charge breeder, where the charge state is increased to Q. The transformed ions are either directed towards a dedicated experiment requiring highly charged ions, or post-accelerated to higher beam energies. In this paper the physics processes involved in the production of highly charged ions will be introduced, and the injection and extraction beam parameters of the charge breeder defined. A description of the three main charge-breeding methods is given, namely: electron stripping in gas jet or foil; external ion injection into an electron-beam ion source/trap (EBIS/T); and external ion injection into an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). In addition, some preparatory devices for charge breeding and practical beam delivery aspects ...

  18. 增龄引起犬心房L型电压依赖型钙通道离子重构的分子机制%Aging-related ionic remodeling of L-type voltage dependent calcium channel in left atria of canine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周贤惠; 张健; 甘天翊; 许国军; 汤宝鹏

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨增龄导致犬心房L型电压依赖型钙通道离子重构的分子机制.方法 采用全细胞膜片钳技术记录犬左心房肌细胞L型电压依赖型钙通道动作电位时限(APD90)、动作电位平台期电压和L型钙离子电流(ICa-L)特性.应用实时定量逆转录聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)法测定犬左心耳L型电压依赖型钙通道α1亚单位(CaV1.2)、钙离子释放通道兰尼碱受体(RYR2)、肌浆网钙调控-Ca2+ ATP酶基因(SERCA2)、钙激活蛋白酶-Ⅰ(Calpain-Ⅰ)、磷酸受钠蛋白(PLN1)等的mRNA表达,用Western blot检测蛋白表达.结果 老年犬与成年犬比较,心房肌细胞L型电压依赖型钙通道APD90较长[(340.5±10.1)ms 比(320.0±7.9) ms,P<0.05];动作电位平台期电压较低[(-9.5±1.7)mV比(-6.4±1.1)mV,P<0.05];ICa-L电流密度较低[(-14.04±0.82)pA/pF比(-8.11±0.54)pA/pF,P<0.05].老年犬与成年犬比较,CaV1.2基因表达明显下调(0.90±0.35比2.38±0.40,P<0.05),RYR2基因表达明显上调(4.39±4.68比1.49±1.69,P<0.05),两组犬SERCA2、Calpain-Ⅰ、PLN1基因表达差异无统计学意义;CaV1.2蛋白表达明显下调(0.13±0.10比0.29±0.12,P<0.05),RYR2蛋白明显上调(0.18±0.21比0.08±0.36,P<0.05),两组犬SERCA2、Calpain-Ⅰ、PLN1蛋白表达无明显改变.结论 增龄导致犬心房肌细胞钙通道CaV1.2和RYR2基因和蛋白表达的改变是L型电压依赖型钙通道离子重构的分子机制,可能是老年相关性心房颤动的潜在机制之一.%Objective To investigate aging-related ionic remodeling of L-type voltage dependent calcium channel (LVDCC) in left atria of canine.Methods Seven adult (2.0-2.5 years ) and 10 aged (>8 years) dogs were used.The current of LVDCC was recorded by patch clamp technique in the whole cell mode.The action potential duration (APD90),amplitude of action potential plateau (APA),ICa-L peak current density of LVDCC were recorded. The mRNA and protein expressions of αlc subunit (CaV1

  19. Explosive bulk charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  20. Fractional lattice charge transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  1. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  2. Battery charging stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergey, M.

    1997-12-01

    This paper discusses the concept of battery charging stations (BCSs), designed to service rural owners of battery power sources. Many such power sources now are transported to urban areas for recharging. A BCS provides the opportunity to locate these facilities closer to the user, is often powered by renewable sources, or hybrid systems, takes advantage of economies of scale, and has the potential to provide lower cost of service, better service, and better cost recovery than other rural electrification programs. Typical systems discussed can service 200 to 1200 people, and consist of stations powered by photovoltaics, wind/PV, wind/diesel, or diesel only. Examples of installed systems are presented, followed by cost figures, economic analysis, and typical system design and performance numbers.

  3. Eventful places in the 2011 movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Bjarke Skærlund

    as locale, location and sense of place, I show how the 2011 movements re-created the occupied places of Tahrir Square, Zuccotti Park and elsewhere along these three dimensions of place. This re-creation, I suggest, can be grasped as an attempt to transform a hegemonic place, a node in hegemonic structures......Inspired by the Occupy movement, the Egyptian revolutionaries and other of the 2011 social movements, this paper investigates the relationship between social movement and place. Drawing on first-hand accounts from these movements, I argue that the relationship between movement and place...... is dialectical and mutually constitutive: the physical and symbolic characteristics of place influence the formation of the movement and its actions while the latter re-creates the place. This is a corrective to a dominant approach in social movement studies to see movements as a ‘dependent variable...

  4. High dynamic range charge measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-04

    A charge amplifier for use in radiation sensing includes an amplifier, at least one switch, and at least one capacitor. The switch selectively couples the input of the switch to one of at least two voltages. The capacitor is electrically coupled in series between the input of the amplifier and the input of the switch. The capacitor is electrically coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. A method of measuring charge in radiation sensing includes selectively diverting charge from an input of an amplifier to an input of at least one capacitor by selectively coupling an output of the at least one capacitor to one of at least two voltages. The input of the at least one capacitor is operatively coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. The method also includes calculating a total charge based on a sum of the amplified charge and the diverted charge.

  5. 12 CFR 226.4 - Finance charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance charge. 226.4 Section 226.4 Banks and... LENDING (REGULATION Z) General § 226.4 Finance charge. (a) Definition. The finance charge is the cost of...) Charges by third parties. The finance charge includes fees and amounts charged by someone other than...

  6. [The People's Health Movement: health for all now].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Sebastián, Miguel; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Breilh, Jaime; Peralta, Arturo Quizhpe

    2005-07-01

    We are moving away from the year 2000, and the goal of "health for all" remains distant. Economic globalization, which many consider to be one of the most serious threats to health, moves ahead, along with globalization of international health policies. A small number of powerful actors are in charge of setting the agenda, and they relegate to an inferior position the World Health Organization, which has moved away from the goal of "health for all." All of this has helped to promote a neoliberal mentality in the field of health. The People's Health Movement was created with the objective of reestablishing the right to comprehensive health and to development with equity as principal priorities of health policies at the local, national, and international levels. The People's Health Movement uses as a strategy the People's Charter for Health, which was approved at the first People's Health Assembly, which was held in Bangladesh in 2000. The Charter expresses collective concerns and the belief in a better and healthier world as a meeting point in order to promote a world health movement and a call for radical action. In July 2005 the People's Health Movement will hold the People's Health Assembly 2, in the city of Cuenca, Ecuador. The slogan of that meeting will be "The voices of the earth are calling!--let's build a healthy world." Among the topics that will be examined at the meeting are: health as a fundamental human right; militarization and occupation; environmental degradation; emerging and reemerging pandemics; equity, poverty, and health; the importance of cultural diversity; social and political violence; health in the hands of the people; health at work; traditional medicine and bioenergetic medicine; gender; and health sector reform. The objective of the People's Health Movement is to help to reach the Millennium Development Goals and to smooth the path toward attaining health for all, in Latin America and the Caribbean as well as in the rest of the world.

  7. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Horsley

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the origins and development of the earliest Jesus movements within the context of persistent conflict between the Judean and Galilean peasantry and their Jerusalem and Roman rulers. It explores the prominence of popular prophetic and messianic movements and shows how the earliest movements that formed in response to Jesus’ mission exhibit similar features and patterns. Jesus is not treated as separate from social roles and political-economic relationships. Viewing Jesus against the background of village communities in which people lived, the Gospels are understood as genuine communication with other people in historical social contexts. The article argues that the net effect of these interrelated factors of theologically determined New Testament interpretation is a combination of assumptions and procedures that would be unacceptable in the regular investigation of history. Another version of the essay was published in Horsley, Richard A (ed, A people’s history of Christianity, Volume 1: Christian origins, 23-46. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress.

  8. Movement planning of video and of manual aiming movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Patrick; Proteau, Luc

    2005-01-01

    We studied aiming performance of adults for video- and manual aiming tasks when they had visual information about the location of the starting base or when they had not. In video-aiming, foveating the starting base and then the target prior to movement initiation (Foveation) resulted in less aiming bias and variability than when the starting base was not visible (PNV), or visible without the participants foveating it prior to movement initiation (PSV). In manual aiming, Foveation and PSV procedures resulted in identical results but reduced aiming bias and variability in comparison to the PNV procedures. The results indicate that participants had difficulty in transforming the locations of the starting base and of the target when seen on a vertical screen into an appropriate movement trajectory. Successive foveation of the starting base and of the target facilitated this transformation, resulting in direction variability being reduced by more than half in comparison to the PNV and PSV conditions. This suggests that in video-aiming the efference copy of the saccade can be used by the CNS to approximate the hand trajectory in the workspace and/or in joint coordinates (Jouffrais and Boussaoud, 1999). Hand trajectory could be readily available in manual aiming if the target location can be recoded directly in hand-coordinates as recently suggested by Buneo et al. (2002).

  9. Eye-movements and ongoing task processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, David T; Meleger, Alec; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Snyder, Jim; Dorvlo, Atsu S S; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2003-06-01

    This study tests the relation between eye-movements and thought processing. Subjects were given specific modality tasks (visual, gustatory, kinesthetic) and assessed on whether they responded with distinct eye-movements. Some subjects' eye-movements reflected ongoing thought processing. Instead of a universal pattern, as suggested by the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis, this study yielded subject-specific idiosyncratic eye-movements across all modalities. Included is a discussion of the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis regarding eye-movements and its implications for the eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing theory.

  10. Low-charge-state linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kim, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    A design is being developed for a low-charge-state linac suitable for injecting ATLAS with a low-charge-state, radioactive beam. Initial work indicates that the existing ATLAS interdigital superconducting accelerating structures, together with the superconducting quadrupole transverse focussing element discussed above, provides a basis for a high-performance low-charge-state linac. The initial 2 or 3 MV of such a linac could be based on a normally-conducting, low-frequency RFQ, possibly combined with 24-MHz superconducting interdigital structures. Beam dynamics studies of the whole low-charge-state post-accelerator section were carried out in early FY 1995.

  11. Butterflies with rotation and charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Alan P.; Ross, Simon F.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the butterfly effect for black holes with rotation or charge. We perturb rotating BTZ and charged black holes in 2 + 1 dimensions by adding a small perturbation on one asymptotic region, described by a shock wave in the spacetime, and explore the effect of this shock wave on the length of geodesics through the wormhole and hence on correlation functions. We find the effect of the perturbation grows exponentially at a rate controlled by the temperature; dependence on the angular momentum or charge does not appear explicitly. We comment on issues affecting the extension to higher-dimensional charged black holes.

  12. Butterflies with rotation and charge

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    We explore the butterfly effect for black holes with rotation or charge. We perturb rotating BTZ and charged black holes in 2+1 dimensions by adding a small perturbation on one asymptotic region, described by a shock wave in the spacetime, and explore the effect of this shock wave on the length of geodesics through the wormhole and hence on correlation functions. We find the effect of the perturbation grows exponentially at a rate controlled by the temperature; dependence on the angular momentum or charge does not appear explicitly. We comment on issues affecting the extension to higher-dimensional charged black holes.

  13. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-06-04

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles.

  14. Charge transport in polymeric transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Salleo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric semiconductors have attracted much attention because of their possible use as active materials in printed electronics. Thin-film transistors (TFTs are a convenient tool for studying charge-transport physics in conjugated polymers. Two families of materials are reviewed here: fluorene copolymers and polythiophenes. Because charge transport is highly anisotropic in molecular conductors, the electrical properties of conjugated polymers are strongly dependent on microstructure. Molecular weight, polydispersity, and regioregularity all affect morphology and charge-transport in these materials. Charge transport models based on microstructure are instrumental in identifying the electrical bottlenecks in these materials.

  15. Charged Polaritons with Spin 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samoilov V.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a new model for metal which is based on the stimulated vibration of independent charged Fermi-ions, representing as independent harmonic oscillators with natural frequencies, under action of longitudinal and transverse elastic waves. Due to application of the elastic wave-particle principle and ion-wave dualities, we predict the existence of two types of charged Polaritons with spin 1 which are induced by longitudinal and transverse elastic fields. As result of presented theory, at small wavenumbers, these charged polaritons represent charged phonons.

  16. Movement

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the relationship between California red-legged frogs and their habitat in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened...

  17. Highly Charged Clusters of Fullerenes: Charge Mobility and Appearance Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manil, B.; Maunoury, L.; Huber, B. A.; Jensen, J.; Schmidt, H. T.; Zettergren, H.; Cederquist, H.; Tomita, S.; Hvelplund, P.

    2003-11-01

    Clusters of fullerenes (C60,C70)n are produced in a gas aggregation source and are multiply ionized in collisions with highly charged Xe20+,30+ ions. Their stabilities and decay processes are analyzed with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Fullerene clusters in charge states up to q=5 have been observed and appearance sizes are found to be as small as napp=5, 10, 21, and 33 for q=2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The analysis of the multicoincident fragmentation spectra indicates a high charge mobility. This is in contrast to charge localization effects which have been reported for Arq+n rare gas clusters. Clusters of fullerenes are found to be conducting when multiply charged.

  18. Cortical control of whisker movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Carl C H

    2014-01-01

    Facial muscles drive whisker movements, which are important for active tactile sensory perception in mice and rats. These whisker muscles are innervated by cholinergic motor neurons located in the lateral facial nucleus. The whisker motor neurons receive synaptic inputs from premotor neurons, which are located within the brain stem, the midbrain, and the neocortex. Complex, distributed neural circuits therefore regulate whisker movement during behavior. This review focuses specifically on cortical whisker motor control. The whisker primary motor cortex (M1) strongly innervates brain stem reticular nuclei containing whisker premotor neurons, which might form a central pattern generator for rhythmic whisker protraction. In a parallel analogous pathway, the whisker primary somatosensory cortex (S1) strongly projects to the brain stem spinal trigeminal interpolaris nucleus, which contains whisker premotor neurons innervating muscles for whisker retraction. These anatomical pathways may play important functional roles, since stimulation of M1 drives exploratory rhythmic whisking, whereas stimulation of S1 drives whisker retraction.

  19. Sensory aspects of movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, Tourette's syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed.

  20. Charge transfer in multicomponent oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, A. F.; Ceder, G.

    1998-02-01

    The transfer of charge between different ions in an oxide plays an essential role in the stability of these compounds. Since small variations in charge can introduce large changes in the total energy, a correct description of this phenomenon is critical. In this work, we show that the ionic charge in oxides can strongly depend on its atomic environment. A model to assign point charges to atoms as a function of their atomic environment has recently been proposed for binary alloys [C. Wolverton, A. Zunger, S. Froyen, and S.-H. Wei, Phys. Rev. B 54, 7843 (1996)] and proven to be very successful in screened solids such as semiconductors and metals. Here, we extend this formalism to multicomponent oxides and we assess its applicability. The simple point-charge model predicts a linear relation between the charge on an atom and the number of unlike neighbors, and between the net value of the charge and the Coulomb field at a given site. The applicability of this approach is tested in a large-supercell self-consistent tight-binding calculation for a random Zr-Ca-O alloy. The observed fluctuations of the ionic charge about the average linear behavior (as a function of the number of unlike neighbors) was larger than 0.25 electrons even when many shells of atomic neighbors were considered in the fit. This variation is significant since it can introduce large errors in the electrostatic energy. On the other hand, for small absolute values of the charge, the ionic charge varied linearly with the Coulomb field, in agreement with previous findings. However, for large Coulomb fields, this function saturates at the formal chemical charge.

  1. National epilepsy movement in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    P T Fernandes; Noronha, A. L. A.; Sander, J. W.; L. M. Li

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a social network of epilepsy lay organization in Brazil to provide advocacy for people with epilepsy and eventually forma powerful National Epilepsy movement. Method.-We actively searched for any associations, support groups or organizations related to epilepsy in the country by personal contacts, internet search and by telephone search. Contact was then established with any entity found. Results: The first meeting was held in Campinas in March 2003, and was attended by ...

  2. Dance movement therapy for depression

    OpenAIRE

    Meekums, B; Karkou, V; Nelson, EA

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a debilitating condition affecting more than 350 million people worldwide (WHO 2012) with a limited number of evidence-based treatments. Drug treatments may be inappropriate due to side effects and cost, and not everyone can use talking therapies.There is a need for evidence-based treatments that can be applied across cultures and with people who find it difficult to verbally articulate thoughts and feelings. Dance movement therapy (DMT) is used with people from a ra...

  3. Social Movements, Protest, and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of Latin American social groups to mobilize has excited the imagination of students of the region since the birth of Latin American studies itself. Alongside the cultural turn, many social movement organizations continue to engage directly with politics. Aspirational goals notwithstanding, in order to improve conditions they devote much of their energy to influencing policy. Although scholars have begun to address the policy impact of Latin American social movements, we have limited systematized understanding of the conditions and mechanisms by which social movement protest affects policy outcomes. This essay argues that a policy process approach offers a useful first cut into more systematic analysis of social movements, protest, and their policy consequences in Latin America. Resumen: Movimientos Sociales, Protesta y Políticas de Gobierno La capacidad de movilización social que evidencia América Latina ha captado el imaginario de investigadores desde los albores de los estudios latinoamericanos. A pesar del giro cultural sobre el tema, muchos movimientos sociales siguen entablando la política de forma directa. Amén de sus metas aspiracionales, en pos de mejorar sus condiciones dedican una cantidad apreciable de sus esfuerzos a influenciar políticas de gobierno. Si bien es cierto que una cantidad no menospreciable de investigadores consideran esos impactos aún hace falta conocimiento sistematizado sobre las condiciones y los mecanismos a través de los cuales la protesta social afecta las políticas del estado. Este ensayo argumenta que enfoques centrados en los procesos de la política pública ofrecen una buena entrada al análisis más sistemático sobre los movimientos sociales, protesta, y sus consecuencias para políticas de gobierno.

  4. Chinese Movements and Social Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Chinese Movements and Social Controls 6. AUTHOR Michelle S. Mui 5. FUNDING NUMBERS...reform era and the various methods of social control used by the Chinese government to deal with them. The thesis will use historical data and...imprisonment and forced exile. The thesis will also explore the evolution of social control over the decades of social change in China . What

  5. Movement Data Anonymity through Generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Monreale

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless networks and mobile devices, such as mobile phones and GPS receivers, sense and track the movements of people and vehicles, producing society-wide mobility databases. This is a challenging scenario for data analysis and mining. On the one hand, exciting opportunities arise out of discovering new knowledge about human mobile behavior, and thus fuel intelligent info-mobility applications. On other hand, new privacy concerns arise when mobility data are published. The risk is particularly high for GPS trajectories, which represent movement of a very high precision and spatio-temporal resolution: the de-identification of such trajectories (i.e., forgetting the ID of their associated owners is only a weak protection, as generally it is possible to re-identify a person by observing her routine movements. In this paper we propose a method for achieving true anonymity in a dataset of published trajectories, by defining a transformation of the original GPS trajectories based on spatial generalization and k-anonymity. The proposed method offers a formal data protection safeguard, quantified as a theoretical upper bound to the probability of re-identification. We conduct a thorough study on a real-life GPS trajectory dataset, and provide strong empirical evidence that the proposed anonymity techniques achieve the conflicting goals of data utility and data privacy. In practice, the achieved anonymity protection is much stronger than the theoretical worst case, while the quality of the cluster analysis on the trajectory data is preserved.

  6. Cervical spine movement during intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Swain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been growing concerns following documented instances of neurological deterioration in patients with cervical spine injury as a result of intubation. A significant body of evidence has since evolved with the primary objective of ascertaining the safest way of securing the endotracheal tube in patients with suspected and proven cervical injury. The search for a mode of intubation producing the least movement at the cervical spine is an ongoing process and is limited by logistic and ethical issues. The ensuing review is an attempt to review available evidence on cervical movements during intubation and to comprehensively outline the movement at the cervical spine with a wide plethora of intubation aids. Literature search was sourced from digital libraries including PubMed, Medline and Google Scholar in addition to the standard textbooks of Anaesthesiology. The keywords used in literature search included 'cervical spine motion,' 'neurological deterioration,' 'intubation biomechanics,' 'direct laryngoscopy,' 'flexible fibreoptic intubation,' 'video laryngoscopes' and 'craniocervical motion.' The scientific information in this review is expected to assist neuroanaesthesiologists for planning airway management in patients with neurological injury as well as to direct further research into this topic which has significant clinical and patient safety implications.

  7. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled.

  8. Towards a discursive analytics of movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frello, Birgitta

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes as its point of departure the expanding scholarly interest in issues of mobility and movement. It argues that movement is not only a physical activity which is entangled in power and meaning but is fundamentally discursively constituted. Through discussions of theory and of three...... examples taken from Danish media, it is shown that the study of movement cannot be separated from that of discursive power. Access to and control over physical movement is unequally distributed. However, so is access to and control over assessing which activities can meaningfully be given the label...... ‘movement' in the first place. Understanding movement in this way leads us to ask how various activities are given the status of ‘movement', as well as how they are given meaning and importance, by whom and with what consequences. This involves asking how the poles between which movement takes place...

  9. The Transformation of the "Old Feminist" Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Charles

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates how the "Old Feminist" movement, originating in broad humanitarian concerns that affirmed woman's selfhood, eventually was transformed into the essentially different "Woman Suffrage" movement. Analyzes a key episode, the 1860 divorce debate. (PD)

  10. Functional jerks, tics, and paroxysmal movement disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreissen, Y. E. M.; Cath, D C; Tijssen, M A J; Hallet, Mark; Stone, Jon; Carson, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Functional jerks are among the most common functional movement disorders. The diagnosis of functional jerks is mainly based on neurologic examination revealing specific positive clinical signs. Differentiation from other jerky movements, such as tics, organic myoclonus, and primary paroxysmal

  11. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, Alberto [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas Zac. (Mexico); Rojas, Efrain, E-mail: cordero@esfm.ipn.mx, E-mail: amolgado@fisica.uaz.edu.mx, E-mail: efrojas@uv.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-03-21

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  12. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero, Ruben; Rojas, Efrain

    2010-01-01

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We show thus that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  13. Calculating charged defects using CRYSTAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Christine L.; Liborio, Leandro; Mallia, Giuseppe; Tomić, Stanko; Harrison, Nicholas M.

    2010-07-01

    The methodology for the calculation of charged defects using the CRYSTAL program is discussed. Two example calculations are used to illustrate the methodology: He+ ions in a vacuum and two intrinsic charged defects, Cu vacancies and Ga substitution for Cu, in the chalcopyrite CuGaS2.

  14. Metallic charge stripes in cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Some recent evidence for the existence of dynamic, metallic stripes in the 214-family of cuprates is reviewed. The mechanism of stripe pinning is considered, and changes in the charge density within stripes between the pinned and dynamic phases is discussed. From a purely experimental perspective, dynamic charge stripes are fully compatible with nodal ``quasiparticles'' and other electronic properties common to all superconducting cuprates.

  15. Filling of charged cylindrical capillaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Siddhartha; Chanda, Sourayon; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Tas, N.R.; Chakraborty, Suman; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2014-01-01

    We provide an analytical model to describe the filling dynamics of horizontal cylindrical capillaries having charged walls. The presence of surface charge leads to two distinct effects: It leads to a retarding electrical force on the liquid column and also causes a reduced viscous drag force because

  16. Charge transport in amorphous oligothiophenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, Manuel; Baumeier, Bjoern; Andrienko, Denis [Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Elschner, Chris; Riede, Moritz; Leo, Karl [TU Dresden, Institute of Applied Photophysics, Mommsenstr. 13, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Organic semiconducting materials are needed for emerging devices such as photovoltaic solar cells. In this work we combine first principle calculations, molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to study charge transport in dicyanovinyl oligothiophenes of different lengths. Poole-Frenkel behavior of the charge carrier mobility is rationalized based on electrostatic and conformational disorder.

  17. Balance and Self-Efficacy of Balance in Children with CHARGE Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haibach, Pamela S.; Lieberman, Lauren J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Balance is a critical component of daily living, because it affects all movements and the ability to function independently. Children with CHARGE syndrome have sensory and motor impairments that could negatively affect their balance and postural control. The purpose of the study presented in this article was to assess the balance and…

  18. Holography, charge and baryon asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Mongan, T R

    2009-01-01

    The holographic principle indicates the finite number of bits of information available on the particle horizon describes all physics within the horizon. Linking information on the horizon with Standard Model particles requires a holographic model describing constituents (preons) of Standard Model particles in terms of bits of information on the horizon. Standard Model particles have charges 0, 1/3, 2/3 or 1 in units of the electron charge e, so bits in a preon model must be identified with fractional charge. Energy must be transferred to change the state of a bit, and labeling the low energy state of a bit e/3n and the high energy state -e/3n amounts to defining electric charge. Any such charged preon model will produce more protons than anti-protons at the time of baryogenesis and require baryon asymmetry. It will also produce more positrons than electrons, as suggested by astrophysical measurements.

  19. Charge order in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulut, Sinan; Kampf, Arno P. [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Atkinson, Bill A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by widespread experimental evidence of charge orders in underdoped cuprate superconductors, we study a three band model of a cuprate plane. Our calculations start from a pseudogap-like normal system with a reconstructed Fermi surface, and we search for charge instabilities. From the charge susceptibilities, we identify a charge ordering instability with an ordering wavevector, q*, that matches experimental results not only with respect to the doping dependence but more importantly regarding its magnitude and direction. Namely, q* points along the Brillouin zone axes. Thus, our results clarify the discrepancy between many recent theoretical calculations and the experiments. We extend this calculation towards possible loop current instabilities and the charge ordering pattern in bilayer systems.

  20. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Ilgner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) turbulence and grain growth which are coupled in a two-way process. We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains and aggregates with fractal dimension D_f = 2. Applying a simple chemical network that accounts for collisional charging of grains, we provide a semi-analytical solution. This allowed us to calculate the equilibrium population of grain charges and the ionisation fraction efficiently. The grain charging was evaluated for different dynamical environments ranging from static to non-stationary disc configurations. The results show that the adsorption/desorption of neutral gas-phase heavy metals, such as magnesium, effects the ...

  1. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-09-01

    With the broad interest in and development of superhydrophobic surfaces for self-cleaning, condensation heat transfer enhancement and anti-icing applications, more detailed insights on droplet interactions on these surfaces have emerged. Specifically, when two droplets coalesce, they can spontaneously jump away from a superhydrophobic surface due to the release of excess surface energy. Here we show that jumping droplets gain a net positive charge that causes them to repel each other mid-flight. We used electric fields to quantify the charge on the droplets and identified the mechanism for the charge accumulation, which is associated with the formation of the electric double layer at the droplet-surface interface. The observation of droplet charge accumulation provides insight into jumping droplet physics as well as processes involving charged liquid droplets. Furthermore, this work is a starting point for more advanced approaches for enhancing jumping droplet surface performance by using external electric fields to control droplet jumping.

  2. Static Gas-Charging Plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indoe, William

    2012-01-01

    A gas-charging plug can be easily analyzed for random vibration. The design features two steeped O-rings in a radial configuration at two different diameters, with a 0.050-in. (.1.3-mm) diameter through-hole between the two O-rings. In the charging state, the top O-ring is engaged and sealing. The bottom O-ring outer diameter is not squeezed, and allows air to flow by it into the tank. The inner diameter is stretched to plug the gland diameter, and is restrained by the O-ring groove. The charging port bushing provides mechanical stop to restrain the plug during gas charge removal. It also prevents the plug from becoming a projectile when removing gas charge from the accumulator. The plug can easily be verified after installation to ensure leakage requirements are met.

  3. Piston-assisted charge pumping

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, D; Mourokh, L

    2015-01-01

    We examine charge transport through a system of three sites connected in series in the situation when an oscillating charged piston modulates the energy of the middle site. We show that with an appropriate set of parameters, charge can be transferred against an applied voltage. In this scenario, when the oscillating piston shifts away from the middle site, the energy of the site decreases and it is populated by a charge transferred from the lower energy site. On the other hand, when the piston returns to close proximity, the energy of the middle site increases and it is depopulated by the higher energy site. Thus through this process, the charge is pumped against the potential gradient. Our results can explain the process of proton pumping in one of the mitochondrial enzymes, Complex I. Moreover, this mechanism can be used for electron pumping in semiconductor nanostructures.

  4. Collaborative Mobile Charging and Coverage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰

    2014-01-01

    Wireless energy charging using mobile vehicles has been a viable research topic recently in the area of wireless networks and mobile computing. This paper gives a short survey of recent research conducted in our research group in the area of collaborative mobile charging. In collaborative mobile charging, multiple mobile chargers work together to accomplish a given set of ob jectives. These ob jectives include charging sensors at different frequencies with a minimum number of mobile chargers and reaching the farthest sensor for a given set of mobile chargers, subject to various constraints, including speed and energy limits of mobile chargers. Through the process of problem formulation, solution construction, and future work extension for problems related to collaborative mobile charging and coverage, we present three principles for good practice in conducting research. These principles can potentially be used for assisting graduate students in selecting a research problem for a term project, which can eventually be expanded to a thesis/dissertation topic.

  5. Movement Strategies in a Haptic Search Task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Polanen, V.; Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Movement strategies were investigated in a haptic search task where participants indicated whether a target was present among a varying number of items. Hand movements were classified according to two criteria into three movement types. Results indicated that an easy search was performed with a para

  6. Latino Movement: A Target for Harassment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Members of the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (MEChA), which translates to Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, report that their movement is being targeted by school administrators across the country due to its demands for Chicano/Latino studies programs and protests against anti-immigration and anti-affirmative action movements.…

  7. Eventful places in the 2011 movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Bjarke Skærlund

    is dialectical and mutually constitutive: the physical and symbolic characteristics of place influence the formation of the movement and its actions while the latter re-creates the place. This is a corrective to a dominant approach in social movement studies to see movements as a ‘dependent variable...

  8. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  9. Human Movement Potential: Its Ideokinetic Facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweigard, Lulu E.

    This book focuses on the interdependence of postural alignment and the performance of movement. It provides an educational method (ideokinesis), which stresses the inherent capacity of the nervous system to determine the most efficient neuromuscular coordination for each movement. This method of teaching body balance and efficient movement has…

  10. Mexican-American: Movements and Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Carlos

    Biographical studies of 20 influential Chicano leaders trace Mexican American history from 1848 to the present. The book is organized chronologically by four historical periods: (1) The Cortinista Movement, 1848-1876; (2) The Teresita Movement, 1888-1905; (3) The Magonista Movement, 1904-1919; and (4) The Chicano Activists, 1920 ;o the present.…

  11. Strategic Directions of the Movement Disorder Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Hallett, M.D

    2000-01-01

    @@The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) is the international not-for-profit organization representing and serving clinicians, other health professionals, researchers and policy makers interested in the area of movement disorders. The Society is represented in 68 countries by approximately 1,500 members. The Society has developed regional sections and welcomes affiliation of regional Movement Disorder groups.

  12. Eye Movement Disorders in Dyslexia. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, Leon; And Others

    Eye movements of 18 male and seven female dyslexic children and 10 normal children were evaluated to determine if eye movement disorders may be the cause of some of the symptoms associated with dyslexia. Data on eye movements were collected while Ss moved their eyes from one fixation point to another in a nonreading situation. Errors in vertical…

  13. Coding and Interpreting Movement on the Rorschach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holaday, Margot

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 26 Rorschach experts and 19 students of Rorschach use was conducted to help students using the Exner Comprehensive System determine whether to code movement for nouns with definitions that include movement. Experts and students did not reach agreement, but a literature review suggests such nouns should often be coded as movement. (SLD)

  14. Transformers: Movement Experiences for Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagovic, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Transformers are simple movement experiences for the classroom that engage the mind and body, focus energy, and help children transition to the next activity. Teachers can use them throughout the day, every day. The author explains the basic movements and suggests ways to build on them. They range from deep breathing to gentle wake-up movements to…

  15. Portable refrigerant charge meter and method for determining the actual refrigerant charge in HVAC systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhiming; Abdelaziz, Omar; LaClair, Tim L.

    2017-08-08

    A refrigerant charge meter and a method for determining the actual refrigerant charge in HVAC systems are described. The meter includes means for determining an optimum refrigerant charge from system subcooling and system component parameters. The meter also includes means for determining the ratio of the actual refrigerant charge to the optimum refrigerant charge. Finally, the meter includes means for determining the actual refrigerant charge from the optimum refrigerant charge and the ratio of the actual refrigerant charge to the optimum refrigerant charge.

  16. Simulation for signal charge transfer of charge coupled devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zujun; Liu Yinong; Chen Wei; Tang Benqi; Xiao Zhigang; Huang Shaoyan; Liu Minbo; Zhang Yong

    2009-01-01

    Physical device models and numerical processing methods are presented to simulate a linear buried channel charge coupled devices (CCDs). The dynamic transfer process of CCD is carried out by a three-phase clock pulse driver. By using the semiconductor device simulation software MEDICI, dynamic transfer pictures of signal charges cells, electron concentration and electrostatic potential are presented. The key parameters of CCD such as charge transfer efficiency (CTE) and dark electrons are numerically simulated. The simulation results agree with the theoretic and experimental results.

  17. Radiation by moving charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    It is generally accepted that in order to describe the dynamics of relativistic particles in the laboratory (lab) frame it is sufficient to take into account the relativistic dependence of the particle momenta on the velocity. This solution of the dynamics problem in the lab frame makes no reference to Lorentz transformations. For this reason they are not discussed in particle tracking calculations in accelerator and plasma physics. It is generally believed that the electrodynamics problem can be treated within the same ''single inertial frame'' description without reference to Lorentz transformations. In particular, in order to evaluate radiation fields arising from charged particles in motion we need to know their velocities and positions as a function of the lab frame time t. The relativistic motion of a particle in the lab frame is described by Newton's second law ''corrected'' for the relativistic dependence of momentum on velocity. It is assumed in all standard derivations that one can perform identification of the trajectories in the source part of the usual Maxwell's equations with the trajectories vector x(t) measured (or calculated by using the corrected Newton's second law) in the lab frame. This way of coupling fields and particles is considered since more than a century as the relativistically correct procedure.We argue that this procedure needs to be changed, and we demonstrate the following, completely counterintuitive statement: the results of conventional theory of radiation by relativistically moving charges are not consistent with the principle of relativity. In order to find the trajectory of a particle in the lab frame consistent with the usual Maxwell's equations, one needs to solve the dynamic equation inmanifestly covariant form by using the coordinate-independent proper time τ to parameterize the particle world-line in space-time. We show that there is a difference between &apos

  18. Phase behavior of charged colloids : many-body effects, charge renormalization and charge regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetekouw, Bastiaan

    2006-01-01

    The main topic of this thesis is Poisson–Boltzmann theory for suspensions of charged colloids in two of its approximations: cell-type approximations that explicitly take into account non-linear effects near the colloidal surfaces, such as charge renormalization, at the expense of neglecting any

  19. Charge Injection, Charge Trapping and Charge Transfer in Quantum-Dot Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehme, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on fundamental processes in Quantum-Dot Solids, after light absorption. Transient Absorption and Time-resolved Photoluminescence spectrocopy reveal the dynamics of charge transfer and charge trapping processes. Typically, both occur on a picosecond time scale and compete with each

  20. What makes a movement a gesture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novack, Miriam A; Wakefield, Elizabeth M; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Theories of how adults interpret the actions of others have focused on the goals and intentions of actors engaged in object-directed actions. Recent research has challenged this assumption, and shown that movements are often interpreted as being for their own sake (Schachner & Carey, 2013). Here we postulate a third interpretation of movement-movement that represents action, but does not literally act on objects in the world. These movements are gestures. In this paper, we describe a framework for predicting when movements are likely to be seen as representations. In Study 1, adults described one of three scenes: (1) an actor moving objects, (2) an actor moving her hands in the presence of objects (but not touching them) or (3) an actor moving her hands in the absence of objects. Participants systematically described the movements as depicting an object-directed action when the actor moved objects, and favored describing the movements as depicting movement for its own sake when the actor produced the same movements in the absence of objects. However, participants favored describing the movements as representations when the actor produced the movements near, but not on, the objects. Study 2 explored two additional features-the form of an actor's hands and the presence of speech-like sounds-to test the effect of context on observers' classification of movement as representational. When movements are seen as representations, they have the power to influence communication, learning, and cognition in ways that movement for its own sake does not. By incorporating representational gesture into our framework for movement analysis, we take an important step towards developing a more cohesive understanding of action-interpretation.

  1. PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 and PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED1 Mediate Photorelocation Movements of Both Chloroplasts and Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2015-10-01

    Organelle movement and positioning play important roles in fundamental cellular activities and adaptive responses to environmental stress in plants. To optimize photosynthetic light utilization, chloroplasts move toward weak blue light (the accumulation response) and escape from strong blue light (the avoidance response). Nuclei also move in response to strong blue light by utilizing the light-induced movement of attached plastids in leaf cells. Blue light receptor phototropins and several factors for chloroplast photorelocation movement have been identified through molecular genetic analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 (PMI1) is a plant-specific C2-domain protein that is required for efficient chloroplast photorelocation movement. There are two PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED (PMIR) genes, PMIR1 and PMIR2, in the Arabidopsis genome. However, the mechanism in which PMI1 regulates chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements and the involvement of PMIR1 and PMIR2 in these organelle movements remained unknown. Here, we analyzed chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mutant lines of PMI1, PMIR1, and PMIR2. In mesophyll cells, the pmi1 single mutant showed severe defects in both chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements resulting from the impaired regulation of chloroplast-actin filaments. In pavement cells, pmi1 mutant plants were partially defective in both plastid and nuclear photorelocation movements, but pmi1pmir1 and pmi1pmir1pmir2 mutant lines lacked the blue light-induced movement responses of plastids and nuclei completely. These results indicated that PMI1 is essential for chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mesophyll cells and that both PMI1 and PMIR1 are indispensable for photorelocation movements of plastids and thus, nuclei in pavement cells.

  2. When Charged Black Holes Merge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Most theoretical models assume that black holes arent charged. But a new study shows that mergers of charged black holes could explain a variety of astrophysical phenomena, from fast radio bursts to gamma-ray bursts.No HairThe black hole no hair theorem states that all black holes can be described by just three things: their mass, their spin, and their charge. Masses and spins have been observed and measured, but weve never measured the charge of a black hole and its widely believed that real black holes dont actually have any charge.That said, weve also never shown that black holes dont have charge, or set any upper limits on the charge that they might have. So lets suppose, for a moment, that its possible for a black hole to be charged. How might that affect what we know about the merger of two black holes? A recent theoretical study by Bing Zhang (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) examines this question.Intensity profile of a fast radio burst, a sudden burst of radio emission that lasts only a few milliseconds. [Swinburne Astronomy Productions]Driving TransientsZhangs work envisions a pair of black holes in a binary system. He argues that if just one of the black holes carries charge possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere then it may be possible for the system to produce an electromagnetic signal that could accompany gravitational waves, such as a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst!In Zhangs model, the inspiral of the two black holes generates a global magnetic dipole thats perpendicular to the plane of the binarys orbit. The magnetic flux increases rapidly as the separation between the black holes decreases, generating an increasingly powerful magnetic wind. This wind, in turn, can give rise to a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst, depending on the value of the black holes charge.Artists illustration of a short gamma-ray burst, thought to be caused by the merger of two compact objects. [ESO/A. Roquette]Zhang calculates lower limits on the charge

  3. Numeric description of space charge in polyethylene under ac electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Xu, Z.; Chen, G.; Lewin, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    Space charge in polyethylene-based insulation materials and its effect on the local electric field under a dc environment have been extensively examined over the last few decades while the behavior of space charge under ac stress has received less attention. Space charge phenomenon under ac electric fields becomes an important issue with increased operating field strength in many applications, such as next generation high voltage cables. In this paper, a bipolar charge transport model has been developed to simulate space charge in polymers under ac electric fields. Obtained simulation results show that there is a small quantity of phase-dependent bipolar charge accumulation in the vicinity of the electrodes that does not move into the bulk under ac stress. This causes a slight distortion of the local field in the bulk. However, at lower frequencies less than 1 Hz, there is increased charge accumulation and penetration. Comparison with available experimental data suggests that the model is capable of describing the underlying physics of charge behavior when a dielectric material is subjected to ac electric fields. Due to the weak charge movement in the bulk, the conduction current density is small and hence the displacement component dominates the total current density and this increases linearly with ac frequency.

  4. Big break for charge symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, G A

    2003-01-01

    Two new experiments have detected charge-symmetry breaking, the mechanism responsible for protons and neutrons having different masses. Symmetry is a crucial concept in the theories that describe the subatomic world because it has an intimate connection with the laws of conservation. The theory of the strong interaction between quarks - quantum chromodynamics - is approximately invariant under what is called charge symmetry. In other words, if we swap an up quark for a down quark, then the strong interaction will look almost the same. This symmetry is related to the concept of sup i sospin sup , and is not the same as charge conjugation (in which a particle is replaced by its antiparticle). Charge symmetry is broken by the competition between two different effects. The first is the small difference in mass between up and down quarks, which is about 200 times less than the mass of the proton. The second is their different electric charges. The up quark has a charge of +2/3 in units of the proton charge, while ...

  5. Charge-pump voltage converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, John P.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2009-11-03

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  6. Analyzing Affect of Image Charge in Space Charge Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangXueying; XuHushan; JiaFei; LiWenfei

    2003-01-01

    There is an increasing requirement of high injection current and highly charged ion beams for accelerators at many laboratories, such as CERN, GSI, GANIL and IMP, with the development of super-conducting ECR source in recent.years. In this case, the space charge effect becomes a major concern when the beam current is as high as tens of mA. In fact, the faradic field induced by the image charges will be come into the metallic surfaces while the beams are transported in a vacuum tube or in between two plates. In order to ensure studying the space charge effect in reason, it is necessary to investigate the effect from such a field.

  7. Proteoglycans and orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, R J; Embery, G

    2001-12-01

    Proteoglycans represent an important and diverse family of extracellular matrix components within the connective tissues of the periodontium. This review focuses on the function and metabolism of the various proteoglycans in periodontal tissues, such as alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, and considers their potential fate in response to an orthodontic force. Such considerations provide an important background in evaluating the potential for proteoglycan metabolites, alongside other connective tissue metabolites, as biomarkers for assessing the deep-seated metabolic changes and as a diagnostic tool in monitoring orthodontic tooth movement.

  8. Stereotypic movement disorder: easily missed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Roger D; Soltanifar, Atefeh; Baer, Susan

    2010-08-01

    To expand the understanding of stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) and its differentiation from tics and autistic stereotypies. Forty-two children (31 males, mean age 6y 3mo, SD 2y 8mo; 11 females, mean age 6y 7mo, SD 1y 9mo) consecutively diagnosed with SMD, without-self-injurious behavior, intellectual disability, sensory impairment, or an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), were assessed in a neuropsychiatry clinic. A list of probe questions on the nature of the stereotypy was administered to parents (and to children if developmentally ready). Questionnaires administered included the Stereotypy Severity Scale, Short Sensory Profile, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, Repetitive Behavior Scale--Revised, and the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire. The stereotyped movement patterns were directly observed and in some cases further documented by video recordings made by parents. The probe questions were used again on follow-up at a mean age of 10 years 7 months (SD 4y 4mo). Mean age at onset was 17 months. Males exceeded females by 3:1. Family history of a pattern of SMD was reported in 13 and neuropsychiatric comorbidity in 30 (attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder in 16, tics in 18, and developmental coordination disorder in 16). Obsessive-compulsive disorder occurred in only two. The Short Sensory Profile correlated with comorbidity (p<0.001), the Stereotypy Severity Scale (p=0.009), and the Repetitive Behavior Scale (p<0.001); the last correlated with the Stereotypy Severity Scale (p=0.001). Children (but not their parents) liked their movements, which were usually associated with excitement or imaginative play. Mean length of follow-up was 4 years 8 months (SD 2y 10mo). Of the 39 children followed for longer than 6 months, the behavior stopped or was gradually shaped so as to occur primarily privately in 25. Misdiagnosis was common: 26 were initially referred as tics, 10 as ASD, five as compulsions, and one as epilepsy. Co-occurring facial

  9. Eye movement monitoring of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennifer D; Riggs, Lily; McQuiggan, Douglas A; McQuiggan, Doug

    2010-08-15

    Explicit (often verbal) reports are typically used to investigate memory (e.g. "Tell me what you remember about the person you saw at the bank yesterday."), however such reports can often be unreliable or sensitive to response bias, and may be unobtainable in some participant populations. Furthermore, explicit reports only reveal when information has reached consciousness and cannot comment on when memories were accessed during processing, regardless of whether the information is subsequently accessed in a conscious manner. Eye movement monitoring (eye tracking) provides a tool by which memory can be probed without asking participants to comment on the contents of their memories, and access of such memories can be revealed on-line. Video-based eye trackers (either head-mounted or remote) use a system of cameras and infrared markers to examine the pupil and corneal reflection in each eye as the participant views a display monitor. For head-mounted eye trackers, infrared markers are also used to determine head position to allow for head movement and more precise localization of eye position. Here, we demonstrate the use of a head-mounted eye tracking system to investigate memory performance in neurologically-intact and neurologically-impaired adults. Eye movement monitoring procedures begin with the placement of the eye tracker on the participant, and setup of the head and eye cameras. Calibration and validation procedures are conducted to ensure accuracy of eye position recording. Real-time recordings of X,Y-coordinate positions on the display monitor are then converted and used to describe periods of time in which the eye is static (i.e. fixations) versus in motion (i.e., saccades). Fixations and saccades are time-locked with respect to the onset/offset of a visual display or another external event (e.g. button press). Experimental manipulations are constructed to examine how and when patterns of fixations and saccades are altered through different types of prior

  10. Self-reflection of movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilbourn, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    To keep a respectable distance from each other, technology and medicine have each carved people along Cartesian lines. I present two short cases that explore what it would mean to bridge these two perspectives through a simple tool while researching personal experiences of patients as they make...... sense of their health. The conclusion is that there is a need for research tools to get users to articulate their own movement practices and meanwhile hold a view towards a designerly approach to research....

  11. Brownian movement and molecular reality

    CERN Document Server

    Perrin, Jean

    2005-01-01

    How do we know that molecules really exist? An important clue came from Brownian movement, a concept developed in 1827 by botanist Robert Brown, who noticed that tiny objects like pollen grains shook and moved erratically when viewed under a microscope. Nearly 80 years later, in 1905, Albert Einstein explained this ""Brownian motion"" as the result of bombardment by molecules. Einstein offered a quantitative explanation by mathematically estimating the average distance covered by the particles over time as a result of molecular bombardment. Four years later, Jean Baptiste Perrin wrote Brownia

  12. Charge density waves in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor'kov, LP

    2012-01-01

    The latest addition to this series covers a field which is commonly referred to as charge density wave dynamics.The most thoroughly investigated materials are inorganic linear chain compounds with highly anisotropic electronic properties. The volume opens with an examination of their structural properties and the essential features which allow charge density waves to develop.The behaviour of the charge density waves, where interesting phenomena are observed, is treated both from a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The role of impurities in statics and dynamics is considered and an

  13. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. -L.; Xiao, Z. -L.; Snezhko, A.; Xu, J.; Ocola, L. E.; Divan, R.; Pearson, J. E.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. -K.

    2016-05-19

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  14. Dance-movement therapy for movement development of a child with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Sernec, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Movement is a basic need of children that allows them to learn appropriate responses and control behavior. The research problem refers to the observation of the qualitative aspect of the movement of a child with attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity. The main purpose of the study was to verify the effects of the dance-movement therapy on movement repertoire and expression and also movement competence in different situations. The survey was conducted as action research. Case-study was b...

  15. Effect of Zn Adsorption on Charge of Variable Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNHAN-YUAN

    1993-01-01

    The variation in appa rent carge of two typical variable charge soils resulting from Zn adsorption were studied by KCl saturation and NH4NO3 replacement methods.Results showed that zinc were adsorbed specifically to those sites with negative charge.As in different pH ranges,the percantages of specific and electrostatic adsorptions of zine and the mechanisms of specific adsorption were different,the effects of Zn adsorption on apparent charge were varied and could be characterized as:when 1 mmol Zn2+ was adsorbed,a change about 1 mmol in the apparent charge was observed in the low pH range(1),1.4 to 1.5mmol in the moderate pH range(II) and 0.55 to 0.6mmol in the high pH range (III).These experimental data,in terms of soil charge,proved once more author's conclusion in the preceding paper(Sun,1993) that in accordance with the behaviors of Zn adsorption by the variable charge soils in relation to pH,three pH ranges with different adsorption mechanisms were delineated;that is,in Range I,specific adsorption was the predominant mechanism,in Ranges II and III,specific and electrostatic adsorptions co-existed,but their specific adsorption mechanisms were not identical.

  16. Susceptibility genes in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Sonja; Singleton, Andrew

    2008-05-15

    During the last years, remarkable progress in our understanding of molecular genetic mechanisms underlying movement disorders has been achieved. The successes of linkage studies, followed by positional cloning, have dominated the last decade and several genes underlying monogenic disorders have been discovered. The pathobiological understanding garnered from these mutations has laid the foundation for much of the search for genetic loci that confer risk for, rather than cause, disease. With the introduction of whole genome association studies as a novel tool to investigate genetic variation underlying common, complex diseases, a new era in neurogenomics has just begun. As the field rapidly moves forward several new challenges and critical questions in clinical care have to be addressed. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the discovery of susceptibility loci underlying major movement disorders, explain the newest methodologies and tools employed for finding and characterizing genes and discuss how insights into the molecular genetic basis of neurological disorders will impact therapeutic concepts in patient care.

  17. Proteomic Characterization of Stomatal Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sixue Chen

    2012-01-01

    Stomata on leaf epidermis formed by pairs of guard cells control CO2 intake and water transpiration,and respond to different environmental conditions.Stress induced stomatal closure is mediated via an intricate hormone network in guard cells.Here we report absicic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) responsive proteins and redox sensitive proteins.Both ABA and MeJA cause stomatal movement and H2O2 production.Using an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation approach,we have identified many ABA and/or MeJA responsive proteins in B.napus guard cells.Most of the genes encoding these proteins contain hormone responsive elements in the promoters,indicating that they are potentially regulated at the transcriptional level.The protein level changes were validated using Western blot analysis.We have also identified redox responsive proteins in the above signaling processes.The identification of the hormone responsive proteins and redox state changes has revealed interesting molecular mechanisms underlying guard cell functions in stomatal movement.The knowledge has great potential to be applied to crop engineering for enhanced yield and stress tolerance.

  18. Nonisothermal moisture movement in wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianjun; ZHANG Biguang; LI Wenjun; LI Yanjun

    2006-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of temperature gradient on moisture movement during highly intensive drying,such as microwave-vacuum drying,the profile of the temperature and moisture content in sealed wood whose opposite faces were subjected to temperature gradient for a short time was measured.The ratio of the moisture content (MC) gradient to the temperature gradient (dM/dT) was calculated and the factors influencing moisture movement under nonisothermal conditions were discussed.The results indicate that moisture moved in wood from the warm surface to the cold one even if opposite faces of the sealed wood assembly were exposed continuously to different but constant temperatures for a short period.The moisture content on the cold surface was higher than that on the warm surface.The moisture content gradient opposite to the temperature gradient was established,and the dM/dT was below 0.9%/℃.The temperature in the sample and the distance from the hot surface of the sample was strongly linearly correlated.With an increase in temperature,initial moisture content and experimental time,the dM/dT was significantly increased.

  19. Anticipatory Eye Movements in Congkak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheryl Chong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Congkak is a traditional Malaysian board game involving two players taking turns to pick up marbles from a series of holes on the board. We used this game as a model to explore the role of anticipatory eye movements during natural actions (in this case serially picking up/putting marbles as novices learnt the game. Prior work on eye and hand movements in natural behaviour shows that much of the demand on the visual system is computed at the moment it is needed and doesn't depend on information acquired from previous fixations. Vision is driven by the task demands. However, anticipatory fixations to upcoming targets of manipulation have recently been shown to confer spatial accuracy and influence the eye-hand latency. We find that experience with the game also influences the deployment of these anticipatory “look-ahead” fixations, and that their influence on eye-hand latency varies with experience. Results suggest that as our experience in Congkak grows, so does our knowledge of the space relationships necessary for task success.

  20. Charge Transport in one dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Holcombe, S R

    2010-01-01

    We consider charge transport in nanopores where the dielectric constant inside the nanopore is much greater than in the surrounding material, so that the flux of the electric fields due to the charges is almost entirely confined to the nanopore. That means that we may model the electric fields due to charge densities in the nanopore in terms of average properties across the nanopore as solutions of one dimensional Poisson equations. We develop basic equations for an M component system using equations of continuity to relate concentrations to currents, and flux equations relating currents to concentration gradients and conductivities. We then derive simplified scaled versions of the equations. We develop exact solutions for the one component case in a variety of boundary conditions using a Hopf-Cole transformation, Fourier series, and periodic solutions of the Burgers equation. These are compared with a simpler model in which the scaled diffusivity is zero so that all charge motion is driven by the electric fi...

  1. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzbauer, J. L. [Mississippi U.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  2. Induced-charge Electrokinetic Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Bazant, M Z; Bazant, Martin Z.; Squires, Todd M.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of AC electro-osmosis near micro-electrodes, we predict a broad class of nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena involving induced interfacial charge. By considering various polarizable objects (metals or dielectrics) in DC and AC applied fields, we develop a simple physical picture of `induced-charge electro-osmosis' (ICEO), the fluid slip at a surface due to an electric field acting on the diffuse charge it induces. We also discuss `induced-charge electrophoresis' (ICEP), the analogous motion of a freely-suspended polarizable particle. Both differ significantly from their classical linear counterparts. We present a mathematical theory of ICEO flows in the weakly nonlinear limit of thin double layers. As an example, we calculate the time-dependent ICEO slip around a metallic sphere with a thin dielectric coating in a suddenly-applied DC field. We briefly discuss possible applications of ICEO to microfluidics and of ICEP to colloidal manipulation.

  3. Organic Text Authors Charge Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the recent controversy involving two organic chemistry textbooks. The charge of plagiarism and the court litigations are the object of interest in the chemical community since many prominant scientists are planned as witnesses. (SA)

  4. Screening Effect in Charge Qubit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Ming; XIAO Xiao; GAO Yi-Bo

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of screening effect on quantum decoherence for charge qubit and the process of quantum information storage. When the flux produced by the circulating current in SQUID loop is considered, screening effect is formally characterized by a LC resonator. Using large-detuning condition and Fr(o)hlich transformation in the qubit-cavity-resonator system, we calculate the decoherence factor for charge qubit and the effective qubit-cavity Hamiltonian. The decoherence factor owns a factorized structure, it shows that screening effect is a resource of decoherence for charge qubit. The effective Hamiltonian shows that the screening effect results in a frequency shift for charge qubit and a modified qubit-cavity coupling constant induced by a LC resonator.

  5. BRST charge for nonlinear algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Buchbinder, I L

    2007-01-01

    We study the construction of the classical nilpotent canonical BRST charge for the nonlinear gauge algebras where a commutator (in terms of Poisson brackets) of the constraints is a finite order polynomial of the constraints.

  6. Quantum physics: Destruction of discrete charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2016-08-01

    Electric charge is quantized in units of the electron's charge. An experiment explores the suppression of charge quantization caused by quantum fluctuations and supports a long-standing theory that explains this behaviour. See Letter p.58

  7. Charged-Lepton Flavour Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Hoecker, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This writeup of a talk at the 2011 Lepton-Photon symposium in Mumbai, India, summarises recent results in the charged-lepton flavour sector. I review searches for charged-lepton flavour violation, lepton electric dipole moments and flavour-conserving CP violation. I also discuss recent progress in tau-lepton physics and in the Standard Model prediction of the muon anomalous magnetic moment.

  8. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-04-01

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  9. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles

    OpenAIRE

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  10. A note on charged interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Huaqiang [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Yu, M Y [Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr-University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    A condition associated with the plasma boundary or other charged interface is reviewed. It is pointed out that in comparing theories and simulations of such interfaces, in order to avoid conflicting results it should be ascertained that the systems under consideration are thermodynamically equivalent. For the plasma-wall interface in equilibrium, the rate of change of the surface-charge density with respect to the surface potential must be positive.

  11. Multizone Artillery Propelling Charge Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    PROJECT, TASK AREA 4 WORK UNIT NUMBERS IL162618AH80 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS US Army Armament Research & Development Command...are affected by the many interrelated components comprising the charge. We have identified areas of concern for bagged multizone charges; studies...B. Brodman DRDAP-LCB-I, D. Spring DRDAR-LCE, R. Walker DRDAR-LCU-CT E. Barrleres R. Davitt DRDAR-CLU-CV C.Mandala E. Moore DRDAR-LCM-E S

  12. Metallic charge stripes in cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, J.M

    2004-08-01

    Some recent evidence for the existence of dynamic, metallic stripes in the 214 family of cuprates is reviewed. The mechanism of stripe pinning is considered, and changes in the charge density within stripes between the pinned and dynamic phases is discussed. From a purely experimental perspective, dynamic charge stripes are fully compatible with nodal 'quasiparticles' and other electronic properties common to all superconducting cuprates.

  13. Metallic charge stripes in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2004-08-01

    Some recent evidence for the existence of dynamic, metallic stripes in the 214 family of cuprates is reviewed. The mechanism of stripe pinning is considered, and changes in the charge density within stripes between the pinned and dynamic phases is discussed. From a purely experimental perspective, dynamic charge stripes are fully compatible with nodal “quasiparticles” and other electronic properties common to all superconducting cuprates.

  14. Charged-lepton flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andreas Hoecker

    2012-11-01

    This write-up on a talk at the 2011 Lepton–Photon symposium in Mumbai, India, summarizes recent results in the charged-lepton flavour sector. Searches for charged-lepton flavour violation, lepton electric dipole moments and flavour-conserving CP violation are reviewed here. Recent progress in -lepton physics and in the Standard Model prediction of the muon anomalous magnetic moment is also discussed.

  15. Fractional Effective Charges and Misner-Wheeler Charge without Charge Effect in Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Smolyaninov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transformation optics enables engineering of the effective topology and dimensionality of the optical space in metamaterials. Nonlinear optics of such metamaterials may mimic Kaluza-Klein theories having one or more kinds of effective charges. As a result, novel photon blockade devices may be realized. Here we demonstrate that an electromagnetic wormhole may be designed, which connects two points of such an optical space and changes its effective topological connectivity. Electromagnetic field configurations, which exhibit fractional effective charges, appear as a result of such topology change. Moreover, such effects as Misner-Wheeler “charge without charge” may be replicated.

  16. Perspectives on functional and hyperkinetic movement disorders : Phenomenology & pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Salm, S.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Functional movement disorders (FMD), previously known as conversion disorders or psychogenic movement disorders, are abnormal movements which cannot be attributed to other neurological disorders. FMD are frequently encountered in movement disorder outpatient clinics. Yet, most neurologists consider

  17. Jet charge at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  18. Electroelasticity of Charged Black Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay; Obers, Niels A

    2013-01-01

    We present the first order corrected dynamics of fluid branes carrying higher-form charge by obtaining the general form of their equations of motion to pole-dipole order. Assuming linear response theory, we characterize the corresponding effective theory of stationary bent charged (an)isotropic fluid branes in terms of two sets of response coefficients, the Young modulus and the piezoelectric moduli. We subsequently find large classes of examples in gravity of this effective theory, by constructing stationary strained charged black brane solutions to first order in a derivative expansion. Using solution generating techniques and bent neutral black branes as a seed solution, we obtain a class of charged black brane geometries carrying smeared Maxwell charge in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity. In the specific case of ten-dimensional space-time we furthermore use T-duality to generate bent black branes with higher-form charge, including smeared D-branes of type II string theory. By subsequently measuring the be...

  19. Solar Charged Stand Alone Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Vasugi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with solar powered stand alone inverter which converts the variable dc output of a photovoltaic solar panel into ac that can be fed to loads. Stand alone inverters are used in systems where the inverter get its energy from batteries charged by photo voltaic arrays. A charge controller limits the rate at which electric current is added to or drawn from electric batteries. This charge discharge controller is needed to prevent the battery from being overcharged or discharged thus prolonging its life. The charge/discharge control is necessary in order to achieve safety and increase the capacity of the battery. The project has been tested according its operational purposes. Maximum power rating of the experimented solar charge controller is 100W according battery capacities. Cost effective solar charge controller has been designed and implemented to have efficient system and much longer battery lifetime. The dc output is given to inverter and then it is supplied to loads. This method is very cheap and cost effective.

  20. Cortical potentials associated with voluntary mandibular movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Kaji, R; Hamano, T; Kohara, N; Kimura, J; Shibasaki, H; Iizuka, T

    2000-07-01

    Movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) are negative potentials over the scalp, which gradually increase prior to voluntary movements, and might be applied to elucidate the cortical efferent function of the mandibular movements. We compared the MRCPs accompanying various mandibular movements to study the motor control mechanism underlying these movements. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded from 11 electrodes placed over the scalp (F3, Fz, F4, T3, C3, Cz, C4, T4, P3, Pz, and P4), according to the International 10-20 System, and electromyograms (EMGs) were obtained from surface electrodes over the masseter muscle and the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. Ten healthy subjects were requested to make brisk and self-paced mandibular movements in 4 different directions (mouth-opening and -closing, and left and right lateral movements). We obtained MRCPs by averaging the EEG, using the visually determined EMG onset as a trigger signal. In all the movements, a slowly increasing, bilaterally widespread negativity starting 1.5 to 2.0 sec before the EMG onset (Bereitschaftspotential, or BP proper) was observed, with the maximum over the vertex region. The negative slope (NS') occurred about 300 to 700 msec before the EMG onset. The cortical maps of BP/NS' (BP and NS' combined), immediately prior to the mouth-opening and closing, showed a symmetrical distribution, whereas that for the lateral movements showed a tendency of predominance over the hemisphere ipsilateral to the direction of the movement. BP/NS' amplitudes at the onset of movement differed significantly or tended to do so between open, close, and lateral movements, suggesting that MRCP recordings may thus provide a means to explore the role of the cerebral cortex in the control of mandibular movements.