WorldWideScience

Sample records for voltage oscillation frequency

  1. Analysis on voltage oscillation of a mid-frequency series resonant inverter for DRMP coils on J-TEXT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Long-jian, E-mail: liulongjian001@yeah.net [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yu, Ke-xun; Zhang, Ming; Nan, Jie-yin; Jiang, Guo-zhong; Rao, Bo; Li, Xuan [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • The reason of high-voltage oscillation of a series resonant inverter for DRMP coils is analyzed. • The condition or method for reduction of high-voltage oscillation is discussed. • The considerations of dead time and switch frequency for reduction of high-voltage oscillation are discussed. - Abstract: This paper deals with the voltage oscillation of an AC power supply for generating dynamic magnetic perturbation (DRMP) on J-TEXT. The power supply is a series resonant inverter with a matching transformer. It was noted that the high-voltage oscillation at transformer primary side is caused by an interaction between the line inductance and the stray capacitance of the matching transformer at switching transitions. In order to reduce the high-voltage oscillation and consider the requirement for soft-switching technique simultaneously, the switching frequency should be chosen properly by fine-tuning. The dead time should be chosen according to the relative size of minimum required dead time for protection and the optimal dead time.

  2. Voltage-controlled photonic oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, A A; Ilchenko, V S; Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2010-05-15

    We report the development and demonstration of an X-band voltage-controlled photonic oscillator based on a whispering gallery mode resonator made of an electro-optic crystalline material. The oscillator has good spectral purity and wide, agile, linear tunability. We have modified the existing theoretical model of the opto-electronic oscillator to describe the performance of our tunable oscillator and have found a good agreement between the theoretical predictions and the measurement results. We show that the device is promising for higher-frequency applications where high-performance tunable oscillators with wide tunability do not exist.

  3. Research on the Influence of Switching Frequency on Low-Frequency Oscillation in the Voltage-Controlled Buck-Boost Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faqiang Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of switching frequency on the low-frequency oscillation in the voltage-controlled buck-boost converter is studied in this paper. Firstly, the mathematical model of this system is derived. And then, a glimpse at the influence of switching frequency on the low-frequency oscillation in this system by MATLAB/Simulink is given. The improved averaged model of the system is established, and the corresponding theoretical analysis is presented. It is found that the switching frequency has an important influence on the low-frequency oscillation in the system, that is, the low-frequency oscillation is easy to occur when the switching frequency is low. Finally, the effectiveness of the improved averaged model and the theoretical analysis are confirmed by circuit experiment.

  4. Method to minimize the low-frequency neutral-point voltage oscillations with time-offset injection for neutral-point-clamped inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Lee, Kyo-Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to reduce the low-frequency neutral-point voltage oscillations. The neutral-point voltage oscillations are considerably reduced by adding a time-offset to the three phase turn-on times. The proper time-offset is simply calculated considering the phase currents and dwell...

  5. Method to Minimize the Low-Frequency Neutral-Point Voltage Oscillations With Time-Offset Injection for Neutral-Point-Clamped Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Ui-Min; Blaabjerg, Frede; Lee, Kyo-Beum

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to reduce the low-frequency neutral-point voltage oscillations. The neutral-point voltage oscillations are considerably reduced by adding a time offset to the three-phase turn-on times. The proper time offset is simply calculated considering the phase currents and dwell...

  6. A Voltage Controlled Oscillator for a Phase-Locked Loop Frequency Synthesizer in a Silicon-on-Sapphire Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, Sean [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    2009-05-21

    Engineers from a government-owned engineering and manufacturing facility were contracted by government-owned research laboratory to design and build an S-band telemetry transmitter using Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit (RFIC) technology packaged in a Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) Multi-Chip Module. The integrated circuit technology chosen for the Phase-Locked Loop Frequency Synthesizer portion of the telemetry transmitter was a 0.25 um CMOS process that utilizes a sapphire substrate and is fabricated by Peregrine Semiconductor corporation. This thesis work details the design of the Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) portion of the PLL frequency synthesizer and constitutes an fully integrated VCO core circuit and a high-isolation buffer amplifier. The high-isolation buffer amplifier was designed to provide 16 dB of gain for 2200-3495 MHz as well as 60 dB of isolation for the oscillator core to provide immunity to frequency pulling due to RF load mismatch. Actual measurements of the amplifier gain and isolation showed the gain was approximately 5 dB lower than the simulated gain when all bond-wire and test substrate parasitics were taken into account. The isolation measurements were shown to be 28 dB at the high end of the frequency band but the measurement was more than likely compromised due to the aforementioned bond-wire and test substrate parasitics. The S-band oscillator discussed in this work was designed to operate over a frequency range of 2200 to 2300 MHz with a minimum output power of 0 dBm with a phase-noise of -92 dBc/Hz at a 100 kHz offset from the carrier. The tuning range was measured to be from 2215 MHz to 2330 MHz with a minimum output power of -7 dBm over the measured frequency range. A phase-noise of -90 dBc was measured at a 100 kHz offset from the carrier.

  7. Programable Driver for Voltage-Controlled Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, L. E.; Mcneil, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Electronically programable read-only memory (EPROM) and digital-to-analog converter provide customized time-varying voltage for frequency modulation. Voltage used to modulate IMPATT oscillator that serves as microwave pump for solid-state maser in low-noise amplifier. EPROM simple to tailor voltage waveform to suit characteristics of given maser. Digital information for waveform programed into EPROM chip; digital-to-analog converter reads information and produces corresponding analog wave. Principle readily adapted to other applications.

  8. Design for Voltage Controlled Oscillator for GPS Frequency Adjustment%GPS校频的压控振荡器设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李仲秋; 曾全胜

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of frequency stability and noise suppression ability of voltage controlled oscillation (VCO) is the key that the frequency standard production circuit obtains the high stability. high accuracy of standard frequency signals based on feedback control principle and GPS tame adjusting frequency technology. The comprehensive difference LC model VCO (using COMS capacitance array as LC component) is designed according to the advantages of difference model VCO and LC model VCO. The relationship of the VCO noise with frequency regulating scope and stable time was researched. It has a high control ability for power supply noise and basic noise. The emulation result indicates that the time of VCO frequency stability is short and the accuracy abides by the accuracy of GPS standard.%提高压控振荡器(VCO)的频率稳定度和嗓声抑制能力,是基于反馈控制原理与GPS驯服校频技术频标产生电路获得高稳定度、高准确率的标准频率信号的关键.综合差分对型VCO.LC型VCO的优点,研究压控振荡器的噪声与频率调节范围及稳定时间的关系,设计一种全差分结构的LC型压控振荡器(使用COW电容阵列作LC元件),具有较高的电源噪声和衬底噪声抑制能力.仿真结果表明,该压控振荡器的频率稳定时间短,准确度锁定在GPS标准的准确度上.

  9. Silicon-Germanium Voltage-Controlled Oscillator at 105 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alden; Larocca, Tim; Chang, M. Frank; Samoska, Lorene A.

    2011-01-01

    A group at UCLA, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has designed a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) created specifically for a compact, integrated, electronically tunable frequency generator useable for submillimeter- wave science instruments operating in extreme cold environments.

  10. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  11. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  12. Microwave transistor oscillator frequency tripling

    OpenAIRE

    B. A. Kotserzhynskyi

    2010-01-01

    The frequency tripler state of the art is consided. The oscillator-frequency tripler design is now at the state of scientific research. Microwave companies release the devices of the such structure: oscillator, buffer, amplifier-tripler.

  13. Microwave transistor oscillator frequency tripling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kotserzhynskyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency tripler state of the art is consided. The oscillator-frequency tripler design is now at the state of scientific research. Microwave companies release the devices of the such structure: oscillator, buffer, amplifier-tripler.

  14. A Voltage Controlled Oscillator using Ring Structure in CMOS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. Devendra Rani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-Controlled Ring Oscillators are crucial components in many wireless communication systems. The goal of this project is to design a high speed and lower power consumption, a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO, based on ring oscillators in 250nm CMOS technology, which provides a frequency of 2.4GHz. This CMOS based VCO is used for high speed wireless communication applications. A design of VCO includes delay cell, bias circuitry, and tuning circuitry using Tanner 13.0v software.

  15. Excitation of voltage oscillations in an induction voltage adder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichelle Bruner

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The induction voltage adder is an accelerator architecture used in recent designs of pulsed-power driven x-ray radiographic systems such as Sandia National Laboratories’ Radiographic Integrated Test Stand (RITS, the Atomic Weapons Establishment’s planned Hydrus Facility, and the Naval Research Laboratory’s Mercury. Each of these designs relies on magnetic insulation to prevent electron loss across the anode-cathode gap in the vicinity of the adder as well as in the coaxial transmission line. Particle-in-cell simulations of the RITS adder and transmission line show that, as magnetic insulation is being established during a pulse, some electron loss occurs across the gap. Sufficient delay in the cavity pulse timings provides an opportunity for high-momentum electrons to deeply penetrate the cavities of the adder cells where they can excite radio-frequency resonances. These oscillations may be amplified in subsequent gaps, resulting in oscillations in the output power. The specific modes supported by the RITS-6 accelerator and details of the mechanism by which they are excited are presented in this paper.

  16. Voltage-controlled narrowband and wide, variable-range four-segment quartz crystal oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslan, Ruzaini; Satoh, Tomio; Akitsu, Tetsuya

    2012-03-01

    In this work, our goal is to develop a voltage-controlled variable-frequency quartz crystal oscillator with narrowband response, wide, variable frequency range and the capacity to oscillate across the series resonance frequency using a four-segment configuration of a quartz crystal oscillator. In conventional quartz oscillators, the quartz resonator is inserted in the feedback loop between the input and the output of the active circuit, providing sufficient gain and the phase relation. In the oscillator developed here, the quartz crystal resonator is inserted between the loop circuit and the ground potential. The performance of the voltage-controlled variable-frequency oscillator is demonstrated across the series resonance frequency.

  17. Frequency of self-oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Groszkowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of Self-Oscillations covers the realm of electric oscillations that plays an important role both in the scientific and technical aspects. This book is composed of nine chapters, and begins with the introduction to the alternating currents and oscillation. The succeeding chapters deal with the free oscillations in linear isolated systems. These topics are followed by discussions on self-oscillations in linear systems. Other chapters describe the self-oscillations in non-linear systems, the influence of linear elements on frequency of oscillations, and the electro mechanical oscillato

  18. Frequency-controlled voltage regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Converting input ac to higher frequency reduce size and weight and makes possible unique kind of regulation. Since conversion frequency is above range of human hearing, supply generated on audible noise. It also exploits highfrequency conversion features to regulate its output voltage in novel way. Circuit is inherently short-circuit proof.

  19. GAPOD and GA DC-voltage regulator based UPFC supplementary cont roller for damping low frequency oscillations in Multi-machine power systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakka. Obulesu, Dr. S.F. Kodad, Dr. B.V. Sankar Ram

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC is the most versatile device in the FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission Systems which has emerged to enhance power system stability spectrum and dynamic performance. This paper briefs the effectiveness of the proposed GAPOD and GA DC-voltage regulator which has been tested on a 3-Machine, 9-Bus power system in comparison with Particle swarm optimization based Multi-Stage Fuzzy (PSOMSF DC-voltage regulator. The non-linear time-domain simulation results show thatthe oscillations of synchronous machines could be quickly and effectively damped with proposed GAPOD and GA DC-voltage regulator. The construction and implementation of this controller is fairly easy, which can be useful in real world power system.

  20. Voltage-Controlled Sapphire Oscillator: Design, Development, and Preliminary Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2007-08-01

    We present the design for a new short-term frequency standard, the voltage-controlled sapphire oscillator, as a practical and lower-cost alternative to a cryogenic sapphire oscillator operating at liquid helium temperatures. Performance goals are a frequency stability of 1 x 10^-14 (1 second equal to or less than tau equal to or less than 100 seconds), more than 2 years of continuous operation, and practical operability. Key elements include the sapphire resonator, low-power and long-life cryocooler, frequency compensation method, and cryo-Pound design. We report the design verification, experimental results, and test results of the cryocooler environmental sensitivity, as well as a preliminary stability measurement.

  1. A Simple Voltage Controlled Oscillator Using Bootstrap Circuits and NOR-RS Flip Flop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikla, Amphawan; Pongswatd, Sawai; Sasaki, Hirofumi; Fujimoto, Kuniaki; Yahara, Mitsutoshi

    This paper presents a simple and successful design for a voltage controlled oscillator. The proposed circuit is based on the use of two identical bootstrap circuits and a NOR-RS Flip Flop to generate wide-tunable sawtooth and square waves. Increasing control voltage linearly increases the output oscillation frequency. Experimental results verifying the performances of the proposed circuit are in agreement with the calculated values.

  2. Frequency jumps in single chip microwave LC oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualco, Gabriele; Grisi, Marco; Boero, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.boero@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    We report on the experimental observation of oscillation frequency jumps in microwave LC oscillators fabricated using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technologies. The LC oscillators, operating at a frequency of about 20 GHz, consist of a single turn planar coil, a metal-oxide-metal capacitor, and two cross-coupled metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors used as negative resistance network. At 300 K as well as at 77 K, the oscillation frequency is a continuous function of the oscillator bias voltage. At 4 K, frequency jumps as large as 30 MHz are experimentally observed. This behavior is tentatively attributed to the emission and capture of single electrons from defects and dopant atoms.

  3. Transformer-based design techniques for oscillators and frequency dividers

    CERN Document Server

    Luong, Howard Cam

    2016-01-01

    This book provides in-depth coverage of transformer-based design techniques that enable CMOS oscillators and frequency dividers to achieve state-of-the-art performance.  Design, optimization, and measured performance of oscillators and frequency dividers for different applications are discussed in detail, focusing on not only ultra-low supply voltage but also ultra-wide frequency tuning range and locking range.  This book will be an invaluable reference for anyone working or interested in CMOS radio-frequency or mm-Wave integrated circuits and systems.

  4. Elimination of output voltage oscillations in DC-DC converter using PWM with PI controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasappa Veeranna Bhupasandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the SIMULINK model of a PWM controlled DC-DC converter is modeled using switching function concept to control the speed of the DC motor. The presence of the voltage oscillation cycles due to higher switching frequency in the DC-DC converter is identified. The effect of these oscillations on the output voltage of the converter, Armature current, Developed torque and Speed of the DC motor is analyzed. In order to minimize the oscillation cycles the PI controller is proposed in the PWM controller.

  5. Interpretation on Partial Discharge of Typical Insulation Model Under Oscillating Impulse Voltage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhenquan; ZHAO Xuefeng; LI Jisheng; LI Yanming

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to give an overview on partial discharges under oscillating impulse voltage.Three models(void in solid,needle-plate in air and oil) were presented,which describe the stochastic discharge process and represent internal discharges in solids and corona in air or silicon oil.Moreover,an air cored Rogowski coil and a sampling resistor for partial discharge(PD) measurement were developed and introduced in this paper.PD inception and extinction voltages(PDIV,PDEV) under single oscillating impulse voltage and AC voltage were investigated with different test samples.Experimental results firstly revealed that the PD inception voltage(PDIV) decreased with increasing applied voltage;secondly the PD inception voltage for three different insulating materials,showed an escalating trend with increasing frequency of the applied voltage.It was proven that the characteristics of PD under oscillating impulse voltage were identical to the features under AC voltage,which could be measured with the phase resolved partial discharge analysis(PRPDA) technique.Based on the reorganization and analysis of PDs under oscillating impulse voltage,the information about insulation defects was extracted from the measured data and used for estimating the risk of insulation failure of the equipment.

  6. Voltage, Temperature, Frequency Margin Test Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the tests is to establish the camera functionality when it is exposed to an extreme environment for prolonged periods, thus simulating the end of life performance. This environment covers temperature, input clock frequency and supply voltage variation......The purpose of the tests is to establish the camera functionality when it is exposed to an extreme environment for prolonged periods, thus simulating the end of life performance. This environment covers temperature, input clock frequency and supply voltage variation...

  7. The Coefficient of the Voltage Induced Frequency Shift Measurement on a Quartz Tuning Fork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Hou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the coefficient of the voltage induced frequency shift (VIFS of a 32.768 KHz quartz tuning fork. Three vibration modes were studied: one prong oscillating, two prongs oscillating in the same direction, and two prongs oscillating in opposite directions. They all showed a parabolic dependence of the eigen-frequency shift on the bias voltage applied across the fork, due to the voltage-induced internal stress, which varies as the fork oscillates. The average coefficient of the VIFS effect is as low as several hundred nano-Hz per millivolt, implying that fast-response voltage-controlled oscillators and phase-locked loops with nano-Hz resolution can be built.

  8. Phase noise and frequency stability in oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiola, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Presenting a comprehensive account of oscillator phase noise and frequency stability, this practical text is both mathematically rigorous and accessible. An in-depth treatment of the noise mechanism is given, describing the oscillator as a physical system, and showing that simple general laws govern the stability of a large variety of oscillators differing in technology and frequency range. Inevitably, special attention is given to amplifiers, resonators, delay lines, feedback, and flicker (1/f) noise. The reverse engineering of oscillators based on phase-noise spectra is also covered, and end-of-chapter exercises are given. Uniquely, numerous practical examples are presented, including case studies taken from laboratory prototypes and commercial oscillators, which allow the oscillator internal design to be understood by analyzing its phase-noise spectrum. Based on tutorials given by the author at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, international IEEE meetings, and in industry, this is a useful reference for acade...

  9. Low Voltage Low Power Quadrature LC Oscillator Based on Back-gate Superharmonic Capacitive Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Minglin; Li, Zhijun

    2013-09-01

    This work introduces a new low voltage low power superharmonic capacitive coupling quadrature LC oscillator (QLCO) made by coupling two identical cross-connected LC oscillators without tail transistor. In each of the core oscillators, the back-gate nodes of the cross-coupled NMOS pair and PMOS pair, acting as common mode nodes, have been connected directly. Then the core oscillators are coupled together via capacitive coupling of the PMOS common mode node in one of the core oscillators to the NMOS common mode node in the other core oscillator, and vice versa. Only capacitors are used for coupling of the two core oscillators and therefore no extra noise sources are imposed on the circuit. Operation of the proposed QLCO was investigated with simulation using a commercial 0.18 µm RF CMOS technology: it shows a power dissipation of 5.2 mW from a 0.6 V supply voltage. Since the proposed core oscillator has Complementary NMOS and PMOS cross coupled pairs, and capacitive coupling method will not introduce extra phase noise, so this circuit can operate with a low phase noise as low as -126.8 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from center oscillation frequency of 2.4 GHz, as confirmed with simulation.

  10. Noise tolerant voltage-controlled LC oscillator circuits for deep submicron VLSI system-on-a-chip radio circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Typpö, Jukka

    2003-01-01

    This thesis studies the problems with maintaining the spectral purity of fully integrated VCO circuits for radio frequency synthesizers in single-chip system designs. LC tank circuit oscillator circuits are shown to convert amplitude variation in the tank circuit voltage into frequency modulation, if voltage dependent capacitances are present in the tank circuit. Since the parasitic capacitances of the gain transistors and the capacitance of the varactor device in a VCO circuit are voltage de...

  11. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  12. Phase noise analysis of voltage controlled oscillator used in cesium atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Menghui; Tang, Liang; Qiao, Donghai

    2017-03-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) cesium frequency standard plays a significant role in precision guidance of missile and global positioning system (GPS). Low noise 4.596 GHz voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) is an indispensable part of microwave signal source in cesium frequency standard. Low-phase noise is also the most important and difficult performance indicator of VCO. Starting from phase noise analysis method proposed by Leeson, the formulas about the relationship between phase noise of output signal of oscillator feedback model and phase fluctuation spectrum of amplifier, phase noise of oscillator are derived in this paper. Finally, the asymptote model of microwave oscillator is proposed based on the formula derivation. The experiment shows that when the reverse bias voltage of variode is 1.8 V, the designed oscillation frequency of VCO is 4.596 GHz, the power is ‑1 dBm and the DC power consumption is 19.6 mW. The tendency of phase noise simulation curve and actual test curve conform to asymptote model. The phase noise in 1 and 10 kHz is, respectively, ‑60.86 and ‑86.58 dBc/Hz. The significance of the paper lies in determining the main factors influencing oscillator phase noise and providing guiding direction for the design of low-phase noise VCO.

  13. Frequency stabilization by synchronization of Duffing oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanette, Damián H.

    2016-07-01

    We present analytical and numerical results on the joint dynamics of two coupled Duffing oscillators with nonlinearity of opposite signs (hardening and softening). In particular, we focus on the existence and stability of synchronized oscillations where the frequency is independent of the amplitude. In this regime, the amplitude-frequency interdependence (a-f effect) —a noxious consequence of nonlinearity, which jeopardizes the use of micromechanical oscillators in the design of time-keeping devices— is suppressed. By means of a multiple time scale formulation, we find approximate conditions under which frequency stabilization is achieved, characterize the stability of the resulting oscillations, and compare with numerical solutions to the equations of motion.

  14. Dynamical model of series-resonant converter with peak capacitor voltage predictor and switching frequency control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietkiewicz, A.; Tollik, D.; Klaassens, J. B.

    1989-08-01

    A simple small-signal low-frequency model of an idealized series resonant converter employing peak capacitor voltage prediction and switching frequency control is proposed. Two different versions of the model describe all possible conversion modes. It is found that step down modes offer better dynamic characteristics over most important network functions than do the step-up modes. The dynamical model of the series resonant converter with peak capacitor voltage prediction and switching frequency programming is much simpler than such popular control stategies as frequency VCO (voltage controlled oscillators) based control, or diode conduction angle control.

  15. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-08-11

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  16. Simulation Model solves exact the Enigma named Generating high Voltages and high Frequencies by Tesla Coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo Janjanin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Simulation model of Tesla coil has been successfully completed, and has been verified the procedure and functioning. The literature and documentation for the model were taken from the rich sources, especially the copies of Tesla patents. The oscillating system‟s electrical scheme consists of the voltage supply 220/50 Hz, Fe transformer, capacitor and belonging chosen electrical components, the air gap in the primary Tesla coil (air transformer and spark gap in the exit of the coil. The investigation of the oscillating process Tesla coil‟s system using the simulation model in MATLAB & SIMULINK have given the exact solution the enigma named the generating high voltage and high frequency the Tesla‟s coil. The inductance voltage from the spark current in the primary (coil with its high voltage impulse excites the oscillating series circuit Ce-L3-R3 on the secondary of the air transformer to its own damped oscillations

  17. Low Phase Noise SiGe Push-Push Oscillators for Millimeter Wave Frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis low phase noise SiGe HBT monolithically integrated push-push oscillators for millimeter wave frequency generation are investigated. Nonlinear simulation methods for oscillator signal and noise analysis and device physics at high currents and high voltages are discussed. Push-push oscillators with output frequencies from 63 GHz up to 280 GHz were designed and after fabrication in an external foundry investigated experimentally. For automotive radar applications a VCO with a cent...

  18. Hot carrier effects on jitter and phase noise in CMOS voltage-controlled oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Srivastava, Ashok

    2005-05-01

    The effects of hot carrier stress on CMOS voltage-controlled oscillators (VCO) are investigated. A model of the threshold voltage degradation in MOSFETs due to hot carrier stress has been used to model jitter and phase noise in voltage-controlled oscillators. The relation between the stress time which induces the hot carrier effects and the degradation of the VCO performance is presented. The VCO performance degradation takes into consideration decrease in operation frequency, increase in jitter and phase noise and decrease in tuning range. The experimental circuits have been designed in 0.5 μm n-well CMOS technology for operation at 3 V. It is shown that when the MOSFET threshold voltage, increases from 0.4 V to 0.9 V due to the hot carrier effect, for the single-ended ring oscillator, the oscillation frequency changes from 538 MHz to 360 MHz, and the phase noise changes from -104 dBc to -105 dBc at 1 MHz frequency offset with a power dissipation of 0.37 mW. For the current-starved VCO, the tuning range changes from 72 MHz - 287 MHz to 65.4 MHz - 201 MHz, and the phase noise changes from -109 dBc to -107 dBc at 1 MHz offset from the center frequency, 200 MHz; for the double-ended differential VCO, the tuning range changes from 32 MHz - 983 MHz to 26 MHz - 698 MHz, and phase noise changes from -86 dBc to -87 dBc at 1 MHz offset from the center frequency, 700 MHz.

  19. High-frequency graphene voltage amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-Jen; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes Garcia, Alberto; Franklin, Aaron D; Bol, Ageeth A; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-09-14

    While graphene transistors have proven capable of delivering gigahertz-range cutoff frequencies, applying the devices to RF circuits has been largely hindered by the lack of current saturation in the zero band gap graphene. Herein, the first high-frequency voltage amplifier is demonstrated using large-area chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. The graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has a 6-finger gate design with gate length of 500 nm. The graphene common-source amplifier exhibits ∼5 dB low frequency gain with the 3 dB bandwidth greater than 6 GHz. This first AC voltage gain demonstration of a GFET is attributed to the clear current saturation in the device, which is enabled by an ultrathin gate dielectric (4 nm HfO(2)) of the embedded gate structures. The device also shows extrinsic transconductance of 1.2 mS/μm at 1 V drain bias, the highest for graphene FETs using large-scale graphene reported to date.

  20. The dynamics of high-frequency DC RSQUID oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegrum, C M [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: colin@phys.strath.ac.uk

    2009-06-15

    Josephson circuit simulation software has been used to study the properties of a range of two-junction DC RSQUIDs configured as current-controlled heterodyne oscillators. We find that, if the loop inductance is small, their current-voltage curves are modified substantially due to self-induced Shapiro steps. When the heterodyne frequency is comparable with the Josephson frequency of the junctions the step amplitude becomes very large and additional features are seen, including sub-harmonic steps and step tails. We point out that conventional DC RSQUIDs generally have too large a loop inductance for some of these effects to be seen in the I-V curves, and we suggest that nanofabrication techniques could be used to make novel low-inductance RSQUIDs. We have also demonstrated that by applying a sinusoidally varying RF flux to a DC RSQUID it is possible to phase-modulate the heterodyne oscillation, which could have useful practical applications.

  1. Observation of multi-scale oscillation of laminar lifted flames with low-frequency AC electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Ryu, Seol

    2010-01-01

    The oscillation behavior of laminar lifted flames under the influence of low-frequency AC has been investigated experimentally in coflow jets. Various oscillation modes were existed depending on jet velocity and the voltage and frequency of AC, especially when the AC frequency was typically smaller than 30 Hz. Three different oscillation modes were observed: (1) large-scale oscillation with the oscillation frequency of about 0.1 Hz, which was independent of the applied AC frequency, (2) small-scale oscillation synchronized to the applied AC frequency, and (3) doubly-periodic oscillation with small-scale oscillation embedded in large-scale oscillation. As the AC frequency decreased from 30 Hz, the oscillation modes were in the order of the large-scale oscillation, doubly-periodic oscillation, and small-scale oscillation. The onset of the oscillation for the AC frequency smaller than 30 Hz was in close agreement with the delay time scale for the ionic wind effect to occur, that is, the collision response time. Frequency-doubling behavior for the small-scale oscillation has also been observed. Possible mechanisms for the large-scale oscillation and the frequency-doubling behavior have been discussed, although the detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms will be a future study. © 2009 The Combustion Institute.

  2. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voltage and frequency variations. 111.01-17 Section 111... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations. Unless... and +6 percent to −10 percent of rated voltage. This limitation does not address transient conditions....

  3. Design and analysis of a three-stage voltage-controlled ring oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuemei, Lei; Zhigong, Wang; Lianfeng, Shen

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes a large tuning range low phase noise voltage-controlled ring oscillator (ring VCO) based on a different cascade voltage logic delay cell with current-source load to change the current of output node. The method for optimization is presented. Furthermore, the analysis of performance of the proposed ring VCO is confirmed by the measurement results. The three-stage proposed ring VCO was fabricated in the 180-nm CMOS process of SMIC. The measurement results show that the oscillator frequency of the ring VCO is from 0.770 to 5.286 GHz and the phase noise is 97.93 dBc/Hz at an offset of 1 MHz from 5.268 GHz with a total power of 15.1 mW from a 1.8 V supply while occupying only 0.00175 mm2 of the core die area.

  4. Stabilizing Ferroresonance Oscillations in Voltage Transformers Using Limiter Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Radmanesh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper employs the multiple scales method and chaos theory for analyzing chaotic behavior of the voltage transformer (VT with linear core loss model. It is shown that ferroresonance phenomenon in VTs can be classified as chaotic dynamics, including a sequence of bifurcations such as period doubling bifurcation (PDB, saddle node bifurcation (SNB, Hopf Bifurcation (HB and chaos. Bifurcation diagrams and phase plane diagrams are drawn using a continuation method for linear core loss model and lyapunov exponents are obtained using the multiple scales method. At first an overview of the subject in the literature is provided. Then, ferroresonance phenomenon is introduced and its various types in a VT are simulated. Finally the effects of ferroresonance suppression circuit on stabilizing these oscillations are studied. The proposed approach is implemented using MATLAB, and simulation results are presented. The results show connecting the ferroresonance suppression circuit to the system configuration, causes great controlling effect on ferroresonance overvoltage.

  5. On the self-excitation mechanisms of Plasma Series Resonance oscillations in single- and multi-frequency capacitive discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Schuengel, Edmund; Korolov, Ihor; Derzsi, Aranka; Donko, Zoltan; Schulze, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The self-excitation of plasma series resonance (PSR) oscillations is a prominent feature in the current of low pressure capacitive radio frequency (RF) discharges. This resonance leads to high frequency oscillations of the charge in the sheaths and enhances electron heating. Up to now, the phenomenon has only been observed in asymmetric discharges. There, the nonlinearity in the voltage balance, which is necessary for the self-excitation of resonance oscillations with frequencies above the applied frequencies, is caused predominantly by the quadratic contribution to the charge-voltage relation of the plasma sheaths. Using PIC/MCC simulations of single- and multi- frequency capacitive discharges and an equivalent circuit model, we demonstrate that other mechanisms such as a cubic contribution to the charge-voltage relation of the plasma sheaths and the time dependent bulk electron plasma frequency can cause the self-excitation of PSR oscillations, as well. These mechanisms have been neglected in previous model...

  6. Stabilizing Microwave Frequency of a Photonic Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong

    2006-01-01

    A scheme for stabilizing the frequency of a microwave signal is proposed that exploits the operational characteristics of a coupled optoelectronic oscillator (COEO) and related optoelectronic equipment. An essential element in the scheme is a fiber mode-locked laser (MLL), the optical frequency of which is locked to an atomic transition. In this scheme, the optical frequency stability of the mode-locked laser is transferred to that of the microwave in the same device. Relative to prior schemes for using wideband optical frequency comb to stabilize microwave signals, this scheme is simpler and lends itself more readily to implementation in relatively compact, rugged equipment. The anticipated development of small, low-power, lightweight, highly stable microwave oscillators based on this scheme would afford great benefits in communication, navigation, metrology, and fundamental sciences. COEOs of various designs, at various stages of development, in some cases called by different names, have been described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. A COEO is an optoelectronic apparatus that generates both short (picosecond) optical pulses and a steady microwave signal having an ultrahigh degree of spectral purity. The term "coupled optoelectronic" in the full name of such an apparatus signifies that its optical and electronic oscillations are coupled to each other in a single device. The present frequency-stabilization scheme is best described indirectly by describing the laboratory apparatus used to demonstrate it. The apparatus (see figure) includes a COEO that generates a comb-like optical spectrum, the various frequency components of which interfere, producing short optical pulses. This spectrum is centered at a nominal wavelength of 1,560 nm. The spectrum separation of this comb is about 10 GHz, as determined primarily by the length of an optical loop and the bandpass filter in the microwave feedback loop. The optical loop serves as microwave resonator

  7. Low-Voltage, Low-Power, and Wide-Tuning-Range Ring-VCO for Frequency ΔΣ Modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuan Vu, Cao; Wisland, Dag T.; Lande, Tor Sverre

    A low-voltage, low-power, and wide-tuning-range VCO which converts an analog input voltage to phase information for a frequency ΔΣ modulator is proposed in this paper. The VCO is based on a differential ring oscillator, which is improved with modified symmetric load and a positive feedback in the...

  8. On the investigation of voltage controlled oscillator phase noise for IoT applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddad F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage controlled oscillator (VCO is one of the key elements in radio frequency (RF transceivers. A VCO working at 2.4 GHz and designed in CMOS technology is presented. It is suitable for low-cost and low-noise applications using wireless standards such as ZigBee, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and WPAN (Wireless Personal Area Network. The noise characteristics of this RF VCO are investigated. Noise measurements, especially, phase noise are achieved under different environmental conditions.

  9. An analysis of the autodyne effect of oscillators with linear frequency modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votoropin, S. D.; Noskov, V. Ya.; Smolskiy, S. M.

    2008-06-01

    General equations are obtained for the autodyne response in the case of an arbitrary frequency modulation both over the active element bias circuit and voltage variation on the voltage-dependent capacitor (varicap). The results of investigation of an autodyne oscillator with linear frequency modulation following the antisymmetric and symmetric saw-tooth function are presented, with the oscillator being affected by its own reflected radiation. Special features of self-oscillations of such autodynes are considered, with the aim to improve their characteristics and extend the functional capabilities of short-range autodyne radars. The experimental results obtained for the TIGEL 08FM oscillator module manufactured using a hybrid-integral technology on the basis of a mm-range Gunn diode are reported.

  10. A Low Phase Noise CMOS Quadrature Voltage Control Oscillator Using Clock Gated Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothi Baskar A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This project presents the low phase noise cmos quadrature voltage control oscillator using clock gating technique. Here the colpitts vco is used to split the capacitance in the Qvco circuit producing quadrature output. The startup condition in the oscillator is improved by using enhancement [12].This QVCO performs the operation anti phase injection locking fordevice reuse [8]. The new clock gating technique is used to reduce the power with thepower supply 1.5v. The QVCO uses a 0.5mwith phase error of 0.4 and exhibits a phase noise of -118dBc/HZ at 1MHZ offset at the centre frequency of 500MHZ. Index terms: current switching, clock gating, phase noise, Qvco

  11. Frequency to Voltage Converter Analog Front-End Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos; Raines, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The frequency to voltage converter analog front end evaluation prototype (F2V AFE) is an evaluation board designed for comparison of different methods of accurately extracting the frequency of a sinusoidal input signal. A configurable input stage is routed to one or several of five separate, configurable filtering circuits, and then to a configurable output stage. Amplifier selection and gain, filter corner frequencies, and comparator hysteresis and voltage reference are all easily configurable through the use of jumpers and potentiometers.

  12. Voltage and frequency control in the Islanded portion of the CIGRE Low Voltage distribution network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, Ghullam; Bak, Claus Leth; Buriro, Ehsan Ali

    2017-01-01

    imbalance in the islanded MG. The voltage and the frequency of the islanded MG can be restored to the permissible limits if the desired/exceeded amount of active and reactive power is injected/absorbed by the locally available sources in islanded MG. This paper proposes the control strategy which can...... by providing some ancillary services. The main focus of this paper is about the development of a control system for the islanded MG, the selection of Voltage-Frequency controller for the most suitable DG unit of the Low Voltage test network and the control of voltage and frequency in islanding condition. Under...... compensate the problems of the voltage and the frequency deviations in the islanded MG. The selection of the VF controller for the most suitable DG unit of the LV test network is also presented in this paper and effectiveness of the controllers is verified by presenting simulation results...

  13. Proportional integral plus multi-frequency resonant current controller for grid-connected voltage source converter under imbalanced and distorted supply voltage conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-bing HU; Wei ZHANG; Hong-sheng WANG; Yi-kang HE; Lie XU

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a current control scheme for a grid-connected pulse width modulator (PWM) voltage source converter (GC-VSC) under imbalanced and distorted supply voltage conditions. The control scheme is implemented in the positive synchronously rotating reference frame and composed of a single proportional integral (PI) regulator and multi-frequency resonant controllers tuned at the frequencies of 2ω and 6ω, respectively. The experimental results, with the target of eliminating the active power oscillations and current harmonics on a prototype GC-VSC system, validate the feasibility of the proposed current control scheme during supply voltage imbalance and distortion.

  14. Spin-torque diode radio-frequency detector with voltage tuned resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skowroński, Witold, E-mail: skowron@agh.edu.pl; Frankowski, Marek; Stobiecki, Tomasz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Wrona, Jerzy [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Singulus Technologies, Kahl am Main 63796 (Germany); Ogrodnik, Piotr [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Barnaś, Józef [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland)

    2014-08-18

    We report on a voltage-tunable radio-frequency (RF) detector based on a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). The spin-torque diode effect is used to excite and/or detect RF oscillations in the magnetic free layer of the MTJ. In order to reduce the overall in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the free layer, we take advantage of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at the interface between ferromagnetic and insulating layers. The applied bias voltage is shown to have a significant influence on the magnetic anisotropy, and thus on the resonance frequency of the device. This influence also depends on the voltage polarity. The obtained results are accounted for in terms of the interplay of spin-transfer-torque and voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy effects.

  15. Persistent sodium current contributes to induced voltage oscillations in locomotor-related hb9 interneurons in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziskind-Conhaim, Lea; Wu, Linying; Wiesner, Eric P

    2008-10-01

    Neurochemically induced membrane voltage oscillations and firing episodes in spinal excitatory interneurons expressing the HB9 protein (Hb9 INs) are synchronous with locomotor-like rhythmic motor outputs, suggesting that they contribute to the excitatory drive of motoneurons during locomotion. Similar to central pattern generator neurons in other systems, Hb9 INs are interconnected via electrical coupling, and their rhythmic activity does not depend on fast glutamatergic synaptic transmission. The primary objective of this study was to determine the contribution of fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission and subthreshold voltage-dependent currents to the induced membrane oscillations in Hb9 INs in the postnatal mouse spinal cord. The non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) reduced the amplitude of voltage oscillations but did not alter their frequency. CNQX suppressed rhythmic motor activity. Blocking glycine and GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory synapses as well as cholinergic transmission did not change the properties of CNQX-resistant membrane oscillations. However, disinhibition triggered new episodes of slow motor bursting that were not correlated with induced locomotor-like rhythms in Hb9 INs. Our observations indicated that fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs did not control the frequency of induced rhythmic activity in Hb9 INs. We next examined the contribution of persistent sodium current (INaP) to subthreshold membrane oscillations in the absence of primary glutamatergic, GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic drive to Hb9 INs. Low concentrations of riluzole that blocked the slow-inactivating component of sodium current gradually suppressed the amplitude and reduced the frequency of voltage oscillations. Our finding that INaP regulates locomotor-related rhythmic activity in Hb9 INs independently of primary synaptic transmission supports the concept that these neurons constitute an

  16. TOWARDS THRESHOLD FREQUENCY IN CHAOTIC COLPITTS OSCILLATOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Tamasevicius, Arunas; Mykolaitis, Gytis

    2007-01-01

    A novel version of chaotic Colpitts oscillator is described. Instead of a linear loss resistor, it includes an extra inductor and diode in the collector circuit of the transistor. The modified circuit in comparison with the common Colpitts oscillator may generate chaotic oscillations at the funda......A novel version of chaotic Colpitts oscillator is described. Instead of a linear loss resistor, it includes an extra inductor and diode in the collector circuit of the transistor. The modified circuit in comparison with the common Colpitts oscillator may generate chaotic oscillations...

  17. Stimulus induced high frequency oscillations are present in neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick M Hales

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathological high frequency oscillations (250-600Hz are present in the brains of epileptic animals and humans. The etiology of these oscillations and how they contribute to the diseased state remains unclear. This work identifies the presence of microstimulation-evoked high frequency oscillations (250-400Hz in dissociated neuronal networks cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs. Oscillations are more apparent with higher stimulus voltages. As with in vivo studies, activity is isolated to a single electrode, however the MEA provides improved spatial resolution with no spread of the oscillation to adjacent electrodes 200µm away. Oscillations develop across 4 weeks in vitro. Oscillations still occur in the presence of tetrodotoxin and synaptic blockers, and they cause no apparent disruption in the ability of oscillation-presenting electrodes to elicit directly evoked action potentials (dAPs or promote the spread of synaptic activity throughout the culture. Chelating calcium with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA causes a temporal prolongation of the oscillation. Finally, carbenoxolone significantly reduces or eliminates the high frequency oscillations. Gap junctions may play a significant role in maintaining the oscillation given the inhibitory effect of carbenoxolone, the propagating effect of reduced calcium conditions and the isolated nature of the activity as demonstrated in previous studies. This is the first demonstration of stimulus evoked high frequency oscillations in dissociated cultures. Unlike current models that rely on complex in vivo recording conditions, this work presents a simple controllable model in neuronal cultures on MEAs to further investigate how the oscillations occur at the molecular level and how they may contribute to the pathophysiology of disease.

  18. Electronically Tunable Quadrature Sinusoidal Oscillator with Equal Output Amplitudes during Frequency Tuning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Den Satipar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new configuration of voltage-mode quadrature sinusoidal oscillator is proposed. The proposed oscillator employs two voltage differencing current conveyors (VDCCs, two resistors, and two grounded capacitors. In this design, the use of multiple/dual output terminal active building block is not required. The tuning of frequency of oscillation (FO can be done electronically by adjusting the bias current of active device without affecting condition of oscillation (CO. The electronic tuning can be done by controlling the bias current using a digital circuit. The amplitude of two sinusoidal outputs is equal when the frequency of oscillation is tuned. This makes the sinusoidal output voltages meet good total harmonic distortions (THD. Moreover, the proposed circuit can provide the sinusoidal output current with high impedance which is connected to external load or to another circuit without the use of buffer device. To confirm that the oscillator can generate the quadrature sinusoidal output signal, the experimental results using VDCC constructed from commercially available ICs are also included. The experimental results agree well with theoretical anticipation.

  19. Investigation on multi-frequency oscillations in InGaAs planar Gunn diode with multiple anode-cathode spacings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Alimi, Y.; Ma, G. L.

    2016-12-01

    Current oscillations in an AlGaAs/InGaAs/AlGaAs-based two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG)-based hetero-structure have been investigated by means of semiconductor device simulation software SILVACO, with an interest on the charge domain formation at large biases. Single-frequency oscillations are generated in planar Gunn diodes with uniform anode and cathode contacts. The oscillation frequency reduces as the applied bias voltage increases. We show that it is possible to create multiple, independent charge domains in a novel Gunn diode structure with designed multiple anode-cathode spacings. This enables simultaneous generation of multiple frequency oscillations in a single planar device, in contrast to traditional vertical Gunn diodes where only single-frequency oscillations can be achieved. More interestingly, frequency mixing in multiple-channel configured Gunn diodes appeared. This proof-of-concept opens up the possibility for realizing compact self-oscillating mixer at millimeter-wave applications.

  20. Measurement of a power system nominal voltage, frequency and voltage flicker parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkandari, A.M. [College of Technological Studies, Electrical Engineering Technology Department, Shwiekh (Kuwait); Soliman, S.A. [Electrical Power and Machines Department, Misr University for Science and Technology, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-09-15

    We present, in this paper, an approach for identifying the frequency and amplitude of voltage flicker signal that imposed on the nominal voltage signal, as well as the amplitude and frequency of the nominal signal itself. The proposed algorithm performs the estimation in two steps; in the first step the original voltage signal is shifted forward and backward by an integer number of sample, one sample in this paper. The new generated signals from such a shift together with the original one is used to estimate the amplitude of the original signal voltage that composed of the nominal voltage and flicker voltage. The average of this amplitude gives the amplitude of the nominal voltage; this amplitude is subtracted from the original identified signal amplitude to obtain the samples of the flicker voltage. In the second step, the argument of the signal is calculated by simply dividing the magnitude of signal sample with the estimated amplitude in the first step. Calculating the arccosine of the argument, the frequency of the nominal signal as well as the phase angle can be computing using the least error square estimation algorithm. Simulation examples are given within the text to show the features of the proposed approach. (author)

  1. HYBRID EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHMS FOR FREQUENCY AND VOLTAGE CONTROL IN POWER GENERATING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Soundarrajan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Power generating system has the responsibility to ensure that adequate power is delivered to the load, both reliably and economically. Any electrical system must be maintained at the desired operating level characterized by nominal frequency and voltage profile. But the ability of the power system to track the load is limited due to physical and technical consideration. Hence, a Power System Control is required to maintain a continuous balance between power generation and load demand. The quality of power supply is affected due to continuous and random changes in load during the operation of the power system. Load Frequency Controller (LFC and Automatic Voltage Regulator (AVR play an important role in maintaining constant frequency and voltage in order to ensure the reliability of electric power. The fixed gain PID controllers used for this application fail to perform under varying load conditions and hence provide poor dynamic characteristics with large settling time, overshoot and oscillations. In this paper, Evolutionary Algorithms (EA like, Enhanced Particle Swarm Optimization (EPSO, Multi Objective Particle Swarm Optimization (MOPSO, and Stochastic Particle Swarm Optimization (SPSO are proposed to overcome the premature convergence problem in a standard PSO. These algorithms reduce transient oscillations and also increase the computational efficiency. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed controller adapt themselves appropriate to varying loads and hence provide better performance characteristics with respect to settling time, oscillations and overshoot.

  2. Fuzzy Algorithm for Supervisory Voltage/Frequency Control of a Self Excited Induction Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein F. Soliman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of a Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC to regulate the voltage of a Self Excited Induction Generator (SEIG driven by Wind Energy Conversion Schemes (WECS. The proposed FLC is used to tune the integral gain (KI of a Proportional plus Integral (PI controller. Two types of controls, for the generator and for the wind turbine, using a FLC algorithm, are introduced in this paper. The voltage control is performed to adapt the terminal voltage via self excitation. The frequency control is conducted to adjust the stator frequency through tuning the pitch angle of the WECS blades. Both controllers utilize the Fuzzy technique to enhance the overall dynamic performance.  The simulation result depicts a better dynamic response for the system under study during the starting period, and the load variation. The percentage overshoot, rising time and oscillation are better with the fuzzy controller than with the PI controller type. 

  3. Frequency Response and Gap Tuning for Nonlinear Electrical Oscillator Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Harish S.; Vaz, Garnet J.

    2013-01-01

    We study nonlinear electrical oscillator networks, the smallest example of which consists of a voltage-dependent capacitor, an inductor, and a resistor driven by a pure tone source. By allowing the network topology to be that of any connected graph, such circuits generalize spatially discrete nonlinear transmission lines/lattices that have proven useful in high-frequency analog devices. For such networks, we develop two algorithms to compute the steady-state response when a subset of nodes are driven at the same fixed frequency. The algorithms we devise are orders of magnitude more accurate and efficient than stepping towards the steady-state using a standard numerical integrator. We seek to enhance a given network's nonlinear behavior by altering the eigenvalues of the graph Laplacian, i.e., the resonances of the linearized system. We develop a Newton-type method that solves for the network inductances such that the graph Laplacian achieves a desired set of eigenvalues; this method enables one to move the eigenvalues while keeping the network topology fixed. Running numerical experiments using three different random graph models, we show that shrinking the gap between the graph Laplacian's first two eigenvalues dramatically improves a network's ability to (i) transfer energy to higher harmonics, and (ii) generate large-amplitude signals. Our results shed light on the relationship between a network's structure, encoded by the graph Laplacian, and its function, defined in this case by the presence of strongly nonlinear effects in the frequency response. PMID:24223751

  4. Frequency-locked chaotic opto-RF oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Thorette, Aurélien; Brunel, Marc; Vallet, Marc

    2016-01-01

    A driven opto-RF oscillator, consisting of a dual-frequency laser (DFL) submitted to frequency-shifted feedback, is studied experimentally and numerically in a chaotic regime. Precise control of the reinjection strength and detuning permits to isolate a parameter region of bounded-phase chaos, where the opto-RF oscillator is frequency-locked to the master oscillator, in spite of chaotic phase and intensity oscillations. Robust experimental evidence of this synchronization regime is found and phase noise spectra allows to compare phase-locking and bounded-phase chaos regimes. In particular, it is found that the long-term phase stability of the master oscillator is well transferred to the opto-RF oscillator even in the chaotic regime.

  5. Frequency-locked chaotic opto-RF oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorette, Aurélien; Romanelli, Marco; Brunel, Marc; Vallet, Marc

    2016-06-15

    A driven opto-RF oscillator, consisting of a dual-frequency laser (DFL) submitted to frequency-shifted feedback, is experimentally and numerically studied in a chaotic regime. Precise control of the reinjection strength and detuning permits isolation of a parameter region of bounded-phase chaos, where the opto-RF oscillator is frequency-locked to the master oscillator, in spite of chaotic phase and intensity oscillations. Robust experimental evidence of this synchronization regime is found, and phase noise spectra allow us to compare phase-locking and bounded-phase chaos regimes. In particular, it is found that the long-term phase stability of the master oscillator is well transferred to the opto-RF oscillator, even in the chaotic regime.

  6. Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in cerebral vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Hansson, Andreas; Phillip, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    The etiology behind and physiological significance of spontaneous oscillations in the low-frequency spectrum in both systemic and cerebral vessels remain unknown. Experimental studies have proposed that spontaneous oscillations in cerebral blood flow reflect impaired cerebral autoregulation (CA......). Analysis of CA by measurement of spontaneous oscillations in the low-frequency spectrum in cerebral vessels might be a useful tool for assessing risk and investigating different treatment strategies in carotid artery disease (CAD) and stroke. We reviewed studies exploring spontaneous oscillations...... coefficients in the time domain are the most frequently used parameters for analyzing spontaneous oscillations in systemic and cerebral vessels. At present, there is no gold standard for analyzing spontaneous oscillations in the low-frequency spectrum, and simplistic models of CA have failed to predict...

  7. Radio-frequency sheath voltages and slow wave electric field spatial structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colas, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.colas@cea.fr; Lu, Ling-Feng [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Křivská, Alena [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Jacquot, Jonathan [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    We investigate theoretically how sheath radio-frequency (RF) oscillations relate to the spatial structure of the RF parallel electric field emitted by Ion Cyclotron (IC) wave launchers, using a simple model of Slow Wave (SW) evanescence coupled with Direct Current (DC) plasma biasing via sheath boundary conditions in a plasma-filled 2-dimensional (parallel, radial) rectangle. Within a “wide sheaths” asymptotic regime, valid for large-amplitude near RF fields, our model becomes partly linear: the sheath oscillating voltage at open field line boundaries is a linear combination of elementary contributions by every source point of the radiated RF field map. These individual contributions are all the more intense as the SW emission point is toroidally nearer to the sheath walls. A limit formula is given for a source infinitely close to the sheaths. The decay of sheath RF voltages with the sheath/source parallel distance is quantified as a function of two characteristic SW evanescence lengths. Decay lengths are smaller than antenna parallel extensions. The sheath RF voltages at an IC antenna side limiter are therefore mainly sensitive to SW emission near this limiter, as recent observations suggest. Toroidal proximity effects could also explain why sheath oscillations persist with antisymmetric strap toroidal phasing, despite the parallel anti-symmetry of the radiated field map. They could also justify current attempts at reducing the RF fields induced near antenna boxes to attenuate sheath oscillations in their vicinity.

  8. Theoretical investigation of frequency characteristics of free oscillation and injection-locked magnetrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Song; Gao, Dong-ping; Zhang, Zhao-chuan; Wang, Wei-long

    2016-11-01

    The frequency characteristics of free oscillation magnetron (FOM) and injection-locked magnetron (ILM) are theoretically investigated. By using the equal power voltage obtained from the experiment data, expressions of the frequency and radio frequency (RF) voltage of FOM and ILM, as well as the locking bandwidth, on the anode voltage and magnetic field are derived. With the increase of the anode voltage and the decrease of the magnetic field, the power and its growth rate increase, while the frequency increases and its growth rate decreases. The theoretical frequency and power of FOM agree with the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results. Besides, the theoretical trends of the power and frequency with the anode voltage and magnetic field are consistent with the experimental results, which verifies the accuracy of the theory. The theory provides a novel calculation method of frequency characteristics. It can approximately analyze the power and frequency of both FOM and ILM, which promotes the industrial applications of magnetron and microwave energy. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328901) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11305177).

  9. Continuation of the development of a millimeter wave wideband tunable waveguide voltage controlled oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascioli, A.

    1990-05-01

    A waveguide voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) was designed for use in the 26 GHz to 40 GHz range. The VCO uses a novel approach involving a double radial line concept to provide tuning bandwidths in excess of 3 GHz at these frequencies. The system was modelled via an equivalent circuit and the various parameters influencing performance, particularly the tuning range, were analyzed. Software simulation of the system was developed to predict the behavior of the circuit. The simulation package allows for verification of assumptions made during the development of the equivalent circuit. Results obtained from the simulation are in agreement with those obtained experimentally. The simulation also verified that the Gunn diode capacitance and resistance exist within a certain known range. Their exact values must be determined empirically.

  10. The use of radial integrated circuits for the design of voltage-controlled oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jaeger, M.

    A theoretical model for the behavior of voltage-controlled oscillators (VCO) used in millimeter-wave applications is presented, with attention concentrated on multi-diode structures. A radial structure is considered, featuring the VCOs operating in the Q band with ICs. The model developed examines the electromagnetic behavior of the circuit, taking into account multimodal functioning. Experimental results are presented for the frequency evolution with impedance. The design of a VCO, through integration of a Gunn diode and a varactor into a radial system, is described, including an analysis of the series resistance of the varactor. Optimum operational conditions are defined, as are device dimensions. Finally, the technique is extended to the design of power combiners.

  11. High-frequency capillary waves excited by oscillating microbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Pommella, Angelo; Poulichet, Vincent; Garbin, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video shows high-frequency capillary waves excited by the volumetric oscillations of microbubbles near a free surface. The frequency of the capillary waves is controlled by the oscillation frequency of the microbubbles, which are driven by an ultrasound field. Radial capillary waves produced by single bubbles and interference patterns generated by the superposition of capillary waves from multiple bubbles are shown.

  12. Influence of voltage rise time on phase locking by priming effect in weakly resonant relativistic backward wave oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dewen; Deng, Yuqun; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Wu, Ping; Chen, Changhua

    2017-05-01

    Phase locking is the key point of coherent power combination, which is very important for the development of high power microwave sources. In this paper, theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations investigate the influence of the diode voltage rise time on phase locking by the priming effect in a weakly resonant relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). When the diode voltage rise time becomes long and the final output frequency remains unchanged, the initial operation frequency may fluctuate around a value which is not equal to the final output frequency. Moreover, this state may last for several nanoseconds and then jumps to the final output frequency, which is very important for phase locking. Besides, it is suggested that, due to the weak resonance of the RF cavity without the electron beam, the microwave signal with frequency which is much lower than the final output frequency is usually excited at the beginning of the starting process. Finally, it is found that, when the injected frequency approaches the frequency of the initial microwave signal, the phase locking by the priming effect in the RBWO with long voltage rise time is noticeably improved, and the starting process becomes more rapid as well. The simulation results agree well with theoretical analysis.

  13. Damping Of Low Frequency Oscillations In Power System Using Device Upfc With Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Divya Lakshmi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Power stability is an important issue that is becoming increasingly important to an power systems at all levels. We are unable to achieve the stability of the system due to some factors. Low frequency oscillation’s is one of the major factors that affect the transmission line capacity. Traditionally power system stabilizers(PSS are being used to damp these inevitable oscillations. In advanced technology FACTS devices such as unified power flow controllers (UPFC are used to control the power flow in transmission lines. They can also replace the PSS to damp the low frequency oscillations effectively through direct control of voltage and power. In our model, single machine infinite bus power system with UPFC is considered. The designed FUZZY based UPFC controllers adjusts four UPFC inputs by appropriately processing of input error signal and provides an efficient damping. The results of the simulation show that the UPFC with FUZZY LOGIC controller is effectively damping the LOW FREQUENCY OSCILLATIONS.

  14. High-frequency current oscillations in graphene-boron nitride resonant tunnel diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenaway, Mark; Gaskell, Jenn; Eaves, Laurence; Novoselov, Kostya; Mishchenko, Artem; Geim, Andre; Fromhold, Mark

    The successful realisation of multilayer graphene-hBN-graphene resonant tunnelling diodes (graphene- RTDs) with negative differential conductance (NDC) and MHz current oscillations offers the exciting possibility of exploiting them as high-frequency oscillators and mixers. In this paper, we examine their potential for generating higher frequencies by simulating the oscillations in the tunnel current and charge that arise when the device is biased in the NDC region and placed in a resonant circuit. Using the Bardeen transfer Hamiltonian method, we examine the effect on the device characteristics of the twist angle, θ, between the two graphene electrodes, the hBN barrier thickness and of the carrier density in the graphene electrodes, which can be adjusted by chemical doping or by an applied bias voltage. The simulations accurately reproduce our recently-reported measurements on these RTDs (Fig. 4,). The results of simulations show that frequencies of tens of GHz are achievable by optimising the device parameters. Leverhulme Trust, UK.

  15. Amplitude and Frequency Control: Stability of Limit Cycles in Phase-Shift and Twin-T Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Dada

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We show a technique for external direct current (DC control of the amplitudes of limit cycles both in the Phase-shift and Twin-T oscillators. We have found that amplitudes of the oscillator output voltage depend on the DC control voltage. By varying the total impedance of each oscillator oscillatory network, frequencies of oscillations are controlled using potentiometers. The main advantage of the proposed circuits is that both the amplitude and frequency of the waveforms generated can be independently controlled. Analytical, numerical, and experimental methods are used to determine the boundaries of the states of the oscillators. Equilibrium points, stable limit cycles, and divergent states are found. Analytical results are compared with the numerical and experimental solutions, and a good agreement is obtained.

  16. Current orientation and contact distance dependence of rapid voltage oscillations in the organic conductor β''-[bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene]3(HSO4)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Hitoshi; Tamura, Kozo; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Bando, Yoshimasa; Kawamoto, Tadashi; Mori, Takehiko

    2010-12-01

    In an organic conductor β″-[bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene]3(HSO4)2, characteristic voltage oscillation is observed in the negative differential resistance region of the nonlinear conductivity below the metal-insulator transition at 125 K. The observed frequency f is 4-25 kHz and increases linearly with the collective current Jco. The oscillation appears in the two crystal directions of the conducting layer in agreement with the two-dimensional nonstripe charge order, where the anisotropy of the Jco/f slope is about two. The voltage oscillation disappears when the contact distance is larger than 0.02 cm, and at the same time the current-voltage characteristics loses a sharp negative resistance region. Since this critical length corresponds to the characteristic domain size of the charge order, the observed oscillation is interpreted by coherent transport of charge order which can move in different two directions.

  17. Zero-voltage switching converter absorbing parasitic parameters for super high frequency induction heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-shi WANG; Hui-ming CHEN

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel mega-Hz-level super high frequency zero-voltage soft-switching converter for induction heating power supplies. The prominent advantage of this topology is that it can absorb both inductive and capacitive parasitic components in the converter. The switch devices operate in a zero-voltage soft-switching mode. Consequently, the high voltage and high current spikes caused by parasitic inductors or capacitors oscillation do not occur in this circuit, and the high power loss caused by high frequency switching can be greatly reduced. A large value inductor is adopted between the input capacitor and the switches, thus, this novel converter shares the benefits of both voltage-type and current-type circuits simultaneously, and there are no needs of dead time between two switches. The working principles in different modes are introduced, Results of simulation and experiments operated at around 1 MHz frequency verify the validity of parasitic components absorption and show that this converter is competent for super high frequency applications.

  18. Coordination of Voltage and Frequency Feedback in Load-Frequency Control Capability of Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseinzadeh, Bakhtyar; Silva, Filipe Faria Da; Bak, Claus Leth

    2014-01-01

    regulation. The proposed scheme demonstrates remarkable improvement transient state of both voltage and frequency profiles in comparison with conventional LFC designs provided by Central Power Plants (CPP) or Wind Power Plants (WPP). Numerical simulations carried out in DigSilent Power- Factory confirm......, sufficient reserve capacity should be procured. This paper addresses the Load-Frequency Control (LFC) scheme offered by VSWT. Feedback loop of locally measured voltage and frequency data is employed to improve transient and permanent response to achieve faster and more efficient LFC action and voltage...

  19. Self-stabilization of high-frequency oscillations in semiconductor superlattices by time-delay autosynchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesner, J; Amann, A; Janson, N B; Just, W; Schöll, E

    2003-12-01

    We present a scheme to stabilize high-frequency domain oscillations in semiconductor superlattices by a time-delayed feedback loop. Applying concepts from chaos control theory we propose to control the spatiotemporal dynamics of fronts of accumulation and depletion layers which are generated at the emitter and may collide and annihilate during their transit, and thereby suppress chaos. The proposed method only requires the feedback of internal global electrical variables, viz., current and voltage, which makes the practical implementation very easy.

  20. Voltage-ampere characteristics of YBCO coated conductor under inhomogeneous oscillating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, J.; Shen, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, H.; Matsuda, K.; Li, J.; Zhang, X.; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-06-01

    Direct current carrying type II superconductors present a dynamic resistance when subjected to an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the current direction. If a superconductor is under a homogeneous field with high magnitude, the dynamic resistance value is nearly independent of transport current. Hoffmann and coworkers [Hoffmann et al., IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 21, 1628 (2011)] discovered, however, flux pumping effect when a superconducting tape is under an inhomogeneous field orthogonal to the tape surface generated by rotating magnets. Following their work, we report the whole Voltage-Ampere (V-I) curves of an YBCO coated conductor under permanent magnets rotating with different frequencies and directions. We discovered that the two curves under opposite rotating directions differ from each other constantly when the transport current is less than the critical current, whereas the difference gradually reduces after the transport current exceeds the critical value. We also find that for different field frequencies, the difference between the two curves decreases faster with lower field frequency. The result indicates that the transport loss is dependent on the relative direction of the transport current and field travelling, which is distinct from traditional dynamic resistance model. The work may be instructive for the design of superconducting motors.

  1. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Zhao, Yiping; Holland, Herman J.; Burger, Johannes Faas; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency

  2. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Zhao, Yiping; Holland, Herman J.; Burger, Johannes Faas; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pre

  3. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, S.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Jansen, H.V.; Zhao, Y.; Holland, H.J.; Burger, J.F.; Elwenspoek, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pre

  4. Chaotic Colpitts Oscillator for the Ultrahigh Frequency Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, A.; Mykolaitis, G.; Bumeliene, S.

    2006-01-01

    PSpice simulation and experimental results demonstrating chaotic performance of the Colpitts oscillator in the ultrahigh frequency (300–1000 MHz) range are presented.Various combinations of the resonance tank parameters are considered to achieve a fundamental frequency as high as possible...

  5. A revisit to self-excited push pull vacuum tube radio frequency oscillator for ion sources and power measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlondo, L R; Lalremruata, B; Punte, L R M; Rebecca, L; Lalnunthari, J; Thanga, H H

    2016-04-01

    Self-excited push-pull vacuum tube oscillator is one of the most commonly used oscillators in radio frequency (RF)-ion plasma sources for generation of ions using radio frequency. However, in spite of its fundamental role in the process of plasma formation, the working and operational characteristics are the most frequently skip part in the descriptions of RF ion sources in literatures. A more detailed treatment is given in the present work on the RF oscillator alone using twin beam power tetrodes 829B and GI30. The circuit operates at 102 MHz, and the oscillation conditions, stability in frequency, and RF output power are studied and analyzed. A modified form of photometric method and RF peak voltage detection method are employed to study the variation of the oscillator output power with plate voltage. The power curves obtained from these measurements are quadratic in nature and increase with increase in plate voltage. However, the RF output power as measured by photometric methods is always less than the value calculated from peak voltage measurements. This difference is due to the fact that the filament coil of the ordinary light bulb used as load/detector in photometric method is not a perfect inductor. The effect of inductive reactance on power transfer to load was further investigated and a technique is developed to estimate the amount of power correction needed in the photometric measurement result.

  6. A Novel Frequency Output Accelerometer Using Ring Oscillator and Mixer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGZhaohua; YUERuifeng; LIULitian

    2004-01-01

    A novel digital accelerometer using ring oscillator and mixer is presented. The sensitive unit of this accelerometer is MOS ring oscillators located on silicon beams. The output is frequency signal. Mixer is used as interior signal processor in order to improve characteristics of the output signal. The accelerometer has many perfect characteristics such as high sensitivity, low temperature coefficient and simple fabrication process. The frequency character of MOS ring oscillator and its relationship with acceleration are described. The MOS ring oscillator, mixer circuits and physical structures of this accelerometer are designed. The device was fabricated by standard IC process mixed with MEMS process. The sensitivity of fabricated devices is 6.91 kHz/g.

  7. High-frequency Oscillations in Eyewalls of Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weibiao; Chen, Shumin

    2017-04-01

    High-frequency oscillations, with periods of about 2 hours, are first identified by applying wavelet analysis to observed minutely wind speeds around the eye and eyewall of tropical cyclones (TCs). Analysis of a model simulation of Typhoon Hagupit (2008) shows that the oscillations also occur in the intensity of TC, vertical motion, convergence activity and air density around the eyewall. Sequences of oscillations in these variables follow a certain order. In a typical cycle, the drop of density in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is followed by an increase in the inward radial wind; this enhanced frictional convergence causes increase in density, followed by a decrease in the inward radial wind. The increase in convergence in the PBL causes increase of updraft at the top of the PBL, followed by high vertical velocity at high altitude of 8-10 km, then the increase of the maximum wind speed, and vice versa. Key words: tropical cyclone, high-frequency oscillations, eyewall, intensity

  8. Oscillator frequency stability improvement by means of negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Galliou, Serge; Abbé, Philippe; Komine, Vadim

    2011-11-01

    A novel, simple method is proposed to increase the frequency stability of an oscillator. An additional negative feedback is used in combination with the positive loop of the harmonic oscillator to decrease the phase sensitivity to fluctuations of parameters other than the resonator. The main advantage of the proposed correction approach is that it does not require expensive external elements such as mixers or resonators. The validity of the method is theoretically demonstrated on a Colpitts oscillator using the control system theory approach and numerical simulations, and is experimentally verified with phase noise measurements of an actual oscillator-mockup. It is shown that the medium-term frequency stability can be easily improved by a factor of ten.

  9. Effect of embedded voltage source converter on power system oscillation damping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R; DUNN

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the damping torque analysis of power system oscillation stability as affected by the dynamic and control functions of an embedded voltage source converter(VSC).The objective of the study is to explain why and how the dynamic and basic control functions of the embedded VSC,ac and dc voltage regulation,provide damping to power system oscillations.The most important conclusion obtained in the paper is that both the dynamics and the dc voltage control of the VSC contribute a variable damping torque,which can be positive or negative,at different levels of system load conditions.More positive damping torque can be provided by the VSC at a heavier load condition.There exists a point of system load condition where the VSC provides no damping torque to power system oscillation hence dose not impose any influence on power system oscillation stability.The VSC studied in the paper can be the power-electronics-based interface of various FACTS(flexible ac transmission systems) devices,energy storage systems and renewable power generation units,although the focus of the discussion presented in this paper is the effect of the dynamics and basic control functions of the VSC themselves on power system oscillation damping.To demonstrate the analytical conclusions obtained in the paper,results of eigenvalue computation and nonlinear simulation of an example power system with STATCOM(static synchronous compensator) are given.

  10. Oscillation Frequencies for Simultaneous Trapping of Heteronuclear Alkali Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillation frequencies for simultaneous trapping of more than one type of alkali atoms in a common optical lattice. For this purpose, we present numerical results for magic trapping conditions, where the oscillation frequencies for two different kind of alkali atoms using laser lights in the wavelength range 500-1200 nm are same. These wavelengths will be of immense interest for studying static and dynamic properties of boson-boson, boson-fermion, fermion-fermion, and boson-boson-boson mixtures involving different isotopes of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Fr alkali atoms. In addition to this, we were also able to locate a magic wavelength around 808.1 nm where all the three Li, K, and Rb atoms are found to be suitable for oscillating at the same frequency in a common optical trap.

  11. Radio Frequency Tunable Oscillator Device Based on a SmB_{6} Microcrystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alex; Efimkin, Dmitry K; Galitski, Victor; Fisk, Zachary; Xia, Jing

    2016-04-22

    Radio frequency tunable oscillators are vital electronic components for signal generation, characterization, and processing. They are often constructed with a resonant circuit and a "negative" resistor, such as a Gunn diode, involving complex structure and large footprints. Here we report that a piece of SmB_{6}, 100  μm in size, works as a current-controlled oscillator in the 30 MHz frequency range. SmB_{6} is a strongly correlated Kondo insulator that was recently found to have a robust surface state likely to be protected by the topology of its electronics structure. We exploit its nonlinear dynamics, and demonstrate large ac voltage outputs with frequencies from 20 Hz to 30 MHz by adjusting a small dc bias current. The behaviors of these oscillators agree well with a theoretical model describing the thermal and electronic dynamics of coupled surface and bulk states. With reduced crystal size we anticipate the device to work at higher frequencies, even in the THz regime. This type of oscillator might be realized in other materials with a metallic surface and a semiconducting bulk.

  12. Radio Frequency Tunable Oscillator Device Based on a SmB6 Microcrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alex; Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Galitski, Victor; Fisk, Zachary; Xia, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Radio frequency tunable oscillators are vital electronic components for signal generation, characterization, and processing. They are often constructed with a resonant circuit and a "negative" resistor, such as a Gunn diode, involving complex structure and large footprints. Here we report that a piece of SmB6 , 100 μ m in size, works as a current-controlled oscillator in the 30 MHz frequency range. SmB6 is a strongly correlated Kondo insulator that was recently found to have a robust surface state likely to be protected by the topology of its electronics structure. We exploit its nonlinear dynamics, and demonstrate large ac voltage outputs with frequencies from 20 Hz to 30 MHz by adjusting a small dc bias current. The behaviors of these oscillators agree well with a theoretical model describing the thermal and electronic dynamics of coupled surface and bulk states. With reduced crystal size we anticipate the device to work at higher frequencies, even in the THz regime. This type of oscillator might be realized in other materials with a metallic surface and a semiconducting bulk.

  13. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators on symmetry of intrinsic frequency in ring network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arindam Saha; R E Amritkar

    2014-12-01

    Kuramoto oscillators have been proposed earlier as a model for interacting systems that exhibit synchronization. In this article, we study the difference between networks with symmetric and asymmetric distribution of natural frequencies. We first indicate that synchronization frequency of oscillators in a completely connected network is always equal to the mean of the natural frequency distribution. In particular, shape of the natural frequency distribution does not affect the synchronization frequency in this case. Then, we analyse the case of oscillators in a directed ring network, where asymmetry in the natural frequency distribution is seen to shift the synchronization frequency of the network. We also present an estimate of the shift in the frequencies for slightly asymmetric distributions.

  14. Frequency and amplitude stabilization in MEMS and NEMS oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Changyao; Lopez, Omar Daniel; Czaplewski, David A.

    2017-06-14

    This invention comprises a nonlinear micro- and nano-mechanical resonator that can maintain frequency of operation and amplitude of operation for a period of time after all external power has been removed from the device. Utilizing specific nonlinear dynamics of the micromechanical resonator, mechanical energy at low frequencies can be input and stored in higher frequencies modes, thus using the multiple degrees of freedom of the resonator to extend its energy storage capacity. Furthermore, the energy stored in multiple vibrational modes can be used to maintain the resonator oscillating for a fixed period of time, even without an external power supply. This is the first demonstration of an "autonomous" frequency source that can maintain a constant frequency and vibrating amplitude when no external power is provided, making it ideal for applications requiring an oscillator in low power, or limited and intermittent power supplies.

  15. Low-Frequency Relaxation Oscillations in Capacitive Discharge Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhu-Wen; M.A.LIEBERMAN; Sungjin KIM; JI Shi-Yin; DENG Ming-Sen; SUN Guang-Yu

    2008-01-01

    Low-frequency (2.72-3.70 Hz) relaxation oscillations at 100m Tort at higher absorbed power were observed from time-varying optical emission of the main discharge chamber and the periphery.We interpret the low frequency oscillations using an electromagnetic model of the slot impedance with parallel connection variational peripheral capacitance,coupled to a circuit analysis of the system including the matching network.The model results are in general agreement with the experimental observations,and indicate a variety of bchaviours dependent on the matching conditions.

  16. Current-oscillator correlation and Fano factor spectrum of quantum shuttle with finite bias voltage and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenxi; Cao, Yunshan; Ma, Zhongshui

    2012-05-01

    A general master equation is derived to describe an electromechanical single-dot transistor in the Coulomb blockade regime. In the equation, Fermi distribution functions in the two leads are taken into account, which allows one to study the system as a function of bias voltage and temperature of the leads. Furthermore, we treat the coherent interaction mechanism between electron tunneling events and the dynamics of excited vibrational modes. Stationary solutions of the equation are numerically calculated. We show that current through the oscillating island at low temperature appears to have step-like characteristics as a function of the bias voltage and the steps depend on the mean phonon number of the oscillator. At higher temperatures the current steps would disappear and this event is accompanied by the emergence of thermal noise of the charge transfer. When the system is mainly in the ground state, the zero frequency Fano factor of current manifests sub-Poissonian noise and when the system is partially driven into its excited states it exhibits super-Poissonian noise. The difference in the current noise would almost be removed for the situation in which the dissipation rate of the oscillator is much larger than the bare tunneling rates of electrons.

  17. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency ``Madden-Julian oscillation`` observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  18. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency Madden-Julian oscillation'' observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  19. Very High Frequency Interleaved Self-Oscillating Resonant SEPIC Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacevic, Milovan; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes analysis and design procedure of an interleaved, self-oscillating resonant SEPIC converter, suitable for operation at very high frequencies (VHF) ranging from 30 MHz to 300 MHz. The presented circuit consists of two resonant SEPIC DC-DC converters, and a capacitive...

  20. Red Giant Oscillations: Stellar Models and Mode Frequency Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jendreieck, A.; Weiss, A.; Aguirre, Victor Silva

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results on modelling KIC 7693833, the so far most metal-poor red-giant star observed by {\\it Kepler}. From time series spanning several months, global oscillation parameters and individual frequencies were obtained and compared to theoretical calculations. Evolution models ......_\\odot$ in radius and of about 2.5 Gyr in age....

  1. Magnetic frequency tuning of the microwave Gunn diode oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbatov, Sergey S.; A.A. Semenov; Usanov, Dmitry A.; Sorokin, A. N.; Kvasko, Vladimir Yu.

    2009-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that the oscillation frequency of a Gunn diode placed in the low-dimensional resonance system “metal pin–closely set short-circuiter” can be effectively controlled by magnetic field applied in the normal direction with respect to the waveguide wide wall.

  2. A dual-band quadrature VCO with gain proportional to oscillation frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrui, Zhu; Haigang, Yang; Tongqiang, Gao; Hui, Zhang

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a novel dual-band quadrature voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) with the gain proportional to the oscillation frequency. Frequency synthesizers with this VCO can reduce the bandwidth fluctuation over all the frequency ranges without compensation or calibration. Besides the original switched capacitor array, an extra switched varactor array is adopted for the implementation of the proposed VCO. The tuning technique of changing the values of the capacitor and varactor at the same ratio is also derived. For verification purposes, a 2.5 G/3.5 G dual-band quadrature VCO is fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process for WiMAX applications. Measurement results show that the VCO gain is closely proportional to the oscillation frequency with ±16% variation over the entire frequency range. The phase noise is -138.15 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz from the 2.5 GHz carrier and -137.44 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz from the 3.5 GHz carrier.

  3. Voltage-to-frequency converters CMOS design and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Azcona Murillo, Cristina; Pueyo, Santiago Celma

    2013-01-01

    This book develops voltage-to-frequency converter (VFC) solutions integrated in standard CMOS technology to be used as a part of a microcontroller-based, multisensor interface in the environment of portable applications, particularly within a WSN node.  Coverage includes the total design flow of monolithic VFCs, according to the target application, as well as the analysis, design and implementation of the main VFC blocks, revealing the main challenges and solutions encountered during the design of such high performance cells. Four complete VFCs, each temperature compensated, are fully designed and evaluated: a programmable VFC that includes an offset frequency and a sleep/mode enable terminal; a low power rail-to-rail VFC; and two rail-to-rail differential VFCs.

  4. Non-contact magnetically coupled rectilinear-rotary oscillations to exploit low-frequency broadband energy harvesting with frequency up-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Wang, Ya

    2016-09-01

    Ambient vibrations have a rectilinear and broadband nature and are particularly rich in the low-frequency regions. This letter reports an electromagnetic energy harvester to transform low-frequency broadband rectilinear vibrations into electricity with frequency up-conversion. The harvester consists of a rectilinear oscillator and a rotary oscillator coupled through magnetic force induced by four arc permanent magnets centrosymmetrically distributed on each oscillator. The rotary oscillator also includes two repulsive magnets and six stationary coils with steel screws inside to obtain and maintain four equilibrium positions with shallowed potential wells. The magnetic interaction between the rectilinear oscillator and the rotary oscillator is formulated using a magnetic dipole model. The restoring torque induced by the steel screws on the rotor is experimentally measured. Magnetically coupled governing equations are derived and their numerical solutions are used to characterize the dynamic response of the harvester under chirp excitations. Experimental results demonstrate its excellent harvesting capability of scavenging low-frequency wideband vibrational energy under slow-frequency-drifted excitations, simple harmonic excitations, and mixed-frequency excitations. Under harmonic excitations, the rectilinear oscillator vibrates non-harmonically but approximately periodically, while the rotary counterpart oscillates in a more complex pattern varying with the excitation frequency, which leads to the frequency up-conversion (up to 10 times increase) and broadened bandwidth (25% increase from its resonant frequency). Experiments show an output voltage of 5 V (RMS)/40 V (Peak to Peak) and an output power of 55 mW (RMS)/950 mW (Peak) at an optimal load of 465 Ω under harmonic excitation of 4 Hz at 0.7 g.

  5. Sustaining GHz oscillation of carbon nanotube based oscillators via a MHz frequency excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Zhe Liu, Jefferson

    2016-05-01

    There have been intensive studies to investigate the properties of gigahertz nano-oscillators based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Many of these studies, however, revealed that the unique telescopic translational oscillations in such devices would damp quickly due to various energy dissipation mechanisms. This challenge remains the primary obstacle against its practical applications. Herein, we propose a design concept in which a GHz oscillation could be re-excited by a MHz mechanical motion. This design involves a triple-walled CNT, in which sliding of the longer inner tube at a MHz frequency can re-excite and sustain a GHz oscillation of the shorter middle tube. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations prove this design concept at ˜10 nm scale. A mathematical model is developed to explore the feasibility at a larger size scale. As an example, in an oscillatory system with the CNT’s length above 100 nm, the high oscillatory frequency range of 1.8-3.3 GHz could be excited by moving the inner tube at a much lower frequency of 53.4 MHz. This design concept together with the mechanical model could energize the development of GHz nano-oscillators in miniaturized electro-mechanical devices.

  6. a Network of Oscillators Emulating the Italian High-Voltage Power Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Sarra Fiore, Angelo

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a dynamical model based on Kuramoto-like oscillators is used to represent the Italian high-voltage power grid. Nodes of the network are generators/substations, while links are the physical connections between generators/substations. The normal operating regime of the power grid corresponds to the regime in which the oscillations of all the nodes are synchronized. We studied the conditions for synchronization and the effect of dynamical perturbations on the nodes. The analysis allows to define several dynamical parameters assessing the dynamical robustness of the network.

  7. Frequency analysis of nonlinear oscillations via the global error minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalami Yazdi, M.; Hosseini Tehrani, P.

    2016-06-01

    The capacity and effectiveness of a modified variational approach, namely global error minimization (GEM) is illustrated in this study. For this purpose, the free oscillations of a rod rocking on a cylindrical surface and the Duffing-harmonic oscillator are treated. In order to validate and exhibit the merit of the method, the obtained result is compared with both of the exact frequency and the outcome of other well-known analytical methods. The corollary reveals that the first order approximation leads to an acceptable relative error, specially for large initial conditions. The procedure can be promisingly exerted to the conservative nonlinear problems.

  8. Weak Signal Frequency Detection Method Based on Generalized Duffing Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Si-Hong; YUAN Yong; WANG Hui-Qi; LUO Mao-Kang

    2011-01-01

    @@ The sensitive characteristic to the initial value of chaos system sufficiently demonstrates the superiority in weak signal parameters detection.Analyzing the current chaos-based frequency detection method, a novel generalized Duffing equation is proposed to detect weak signal frequency.By choosing a suitable adjusting factor, when the outside driving force frequency is equal to that of the detected signal, the generalized Duffing oscillator is in great period state, which can obtain the frequency information of the detected signal.The simulation results indicate this method is rapidly convenient and shows better accuracy.%The sensitive characteristic to the initial value of chaos system sufficiently demonstrates the superiority in weak signal parameters detection. Analyzing the current chaos-based frequency detection method, a novel generalized Duffing equation is proposed to detect weak signal frequency. By choosing a suitable adjusting factor, when the outside driving force frequency is equal to that of the detected signal, the generalized Duffing oscillator is in great period state, which can obtain the frequency information of the detected signal. The simulation results indicate this method is rapidly convenient and shows better accuracy.

  9. FPGA implementation of high-frequency multiple PWM for variable voltage variable frequency controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boumaaraf, Abdelâali, E-mail: aboumaaraf@yahoo.fr [Université Abbès Laghrour, Laboratoire des capteurs, Instrumentations et procédés (LCIP), Khenchela (Algeria); University of Farhat Abbas Setif1, Sétif, 19000 (Algeria); Mohamadi, Tayeb [University of Farhat Abbas Setif1, Sétif, 19000 (Algeria); Gourmat, Laïd [Université Abbès Laghrour, Khenchela, 40000 (Algeria)

    2016-07-25

    In this paper, we present the FPGA implementation of the multiple pulse width modulation (MPWM) signal generation with repetition of data segments, applied to the variable frequency variable voltage systems and specially at to the photovoltaic water pumping system, in order to generate a signal command very easily between 10 Hz to 60 Hz with a small frequency and reduce the cost of the control system.

  10. Design of a high frequency low voltage CMOS operational amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Kakoty

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented in this paper for the design of a high frequency CMOS operational amplifier (Op-Amp which operates at 3V power supply using tsmc 0.18 micron CMOS technology. The OPAMPdesigned is a two-stage CMOS OPAMP followed by an output buffer. This Operational Transconductance Amplifier (OTA employs a Miller capacitor and is compensated with a current buffer compensation technique. The unique behaviour of the MOS transistors in saturation region not only allows a designer to work at a low voltage, but also at a high frequency. Designing of two-stage op-ampsis a multi-dimensional-optimization problem where optimization of one or more parameters may easily result into degradation of others. The OPAMP is designed to exhibit a unity gain frequency of 2.02GHzand exhibits a gain of 49.02dB with a 60.50 phase margin. As compared to the conventional approach, the proposed compensation method results in a higher unity gain frequency under the same load condition.Design has been carried out in Tanner tools. Simulation results are verified using S-edit and W-edit.

  11. Design of a high frequency low voltage CMOS operational amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Kakoty

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented in this paper for the design of a high frequency CMOS operational amplifier (Op-Amp which operates at 3V power supply using tsmc 0.18 micron CMOS technology. The OPAMPdesigned is a two-stage CMOS OPAMP followed by an output buffer. This OperationalTransconductance Amplifier (OTA employs a Miller capacitor and is compensated with a current buffercompensation technique. The unique behaviour of the MOS transistors in saturation region not onlyallows a designer to work at a low voltage, but also at a high frequency. Designing of two-stage op-ampsis a multi-dimensional-optimization problem where optimization of one or more parameters may easilyresult into degradation of others. The OPAMP is designed to exhibit a unity gain frequency of 2.02GHzand exhibits a gain of 49.02dB with a 60.50 phase margin. As compared to the conventional approach, theproposed compensation method results in a higher unity gain frequency under the same load condition.Design has been carried out in Tanner tools. Simulation results are verified using S-edit and W-edit.

  12. On the surface physics affecting solar oscillation frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, G.; Trampedach, R.; Aarslev, M. J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2017-01-01

    Adiabatic oscillation frequencies of stellar models, computed with the standard mixing-length formulation for convection, increasingly deviate with radial order from observations in solar-like stars. Standard solar models overestimate adiabatic frequencies by as much as ˜ 20 μHz. In this Letter, we address the physical processes of turbulent convection that are predominantly responsible for the frequency differences between standard models and observations, also called `surface effects'. We compare measured solar frequencies from the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft with frequency calculations that include 3D hydrodynamical simulation results in the equilibrium model, non-adiabatic effects, and a consistent treatment of the turbulent pressure in both the equilibrium and stability computations. With the consistent inclusion of the above physics in our model computation, we are able to reproduce the observed solar frequencies to ≲3 μHz without the need of any additional ad hoc functional corrections.

  13. On the surface physics affecting solar oscillation frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Houdek, G; Aarslev, M J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic oscillation frequencies of stellar models, computed with the standard mixing-length formulation for convection, increasingly deviate with radial order from observations in solar-like stars. Standard solar models overestimate adiabatic frequencies by as much as ~ 20 {\\mu}Hz. In this letter, we address the physical processes of turbulent convection that are predominantly responsible for the frequency differences between standard models and observations, also called `surface effects'. We compare measured solar frequencies from the MDI instrument on the SOHO spacecraft with frequency calculations that include three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulation results in the equilibrium model, nonadiabatic effects, and a consistent treatment of the turbulent pressure in both the equilibrium and stability computations. With the consistent inclusion of the above physics in our model computation we are able to reproduce the observed solar frequencies to < 3 {\\mu}Hz without the need of any additional ad-hoc...

  14. Characterization of voltage-gated K+ currents contributing to subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in hippocampal CA1 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, France; Haufler, Darrell; Skinner, Frances K; Lacaille, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-01

    CA1 inhibitory interneurons at the stratum lacunosum-moleculare and radiatum junction (LM/RAD-INs) display subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) involving voltage-dependent Na(+) and A-type K(+) currents. LM/RAD-INs also express other voltage-gated K(+) currents, although their properties and role in MPOs remain unclear. Here, we characterized these voltage-gated K(+) currents and investigated their role in MPOs. Using outside-out patch recordings from LM/RAD-IN somata, we distinguished four voltage-gated K(+) currents based on their pharmacology and activation/inactivation properties: a fast delayed rectifier current (I(Kfast)), a slow delayed rectifier current (I(Kslow)), a rapidly inactivating A-type current (I(A)), and a slowly inactivating current (I(D)). Their relative contribution to the total K(+) current was I(A) > I(Kfast) > I(Kslow) = I(D). The presence of I(D) and the relative contributions of K(+) currents in LM/RAD-INs are different from those of other CA1 interneurons, suggesting the presence of differential complement of K(+) currents in subgroups of interneurons. We next determined whether these K(+) currents were sufficient for MPO generation using a single-compartment model of LM/RAD-INs. The model captured the subthreshold voltage dependence of MPOs. Moreover, all K(+) currents were active at subthreshold potentials but I(D), I(A), and the persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) were most active near threshold. Using impedance analysis, we found that I(A) and I(NaP) contribute to MPO generation by modulating peak spectral frequency during MPOs and governing the voltage range over which MPOs occur. Our findings uncover a differential expression of a complement of K(+) channels that underlies intrinsic rhythmic activity in inhibitory interneurons.

  15. Voltage-controlled oscillator at 6 GHz for Doppler radar in heart sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Predrag

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the design of a low noise voltage controlled oscillator (VCO for heart sensing applications is presented. It is designed using Ansoft Designer software to have a low level of phase noise, therefore a bipolar transistor is chosen. Many effects such as the behavior of large signals, the parasitic effects of packages, etc., are taken into account. Hence, through a nonlinear analysis, quite accurate simulation results are provided.

  16. Low-Voltage, Low-Power, and Wide-Tuning-Range Ring-VCO for Frequency ΔΣ Modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuan Vu, Cao; Wisland, Dag T.; Lande, Tor Sverre

    A low-voltage, low-power, and wide-tuning-range VCO which converts an analog input voltage to phase information for a frequency ΔΣ modulator is proposed in this paper. The VCO is based on a differential ring oscillator, which is improved with modified symmetric load and a positive feedback...... in the differential delay cells, a new bias circuit and a full-swing amplifier. The proposed VCO operating with two stages at a power supply voltage of 0.6 V can achieve wide tuning-range and low power consumption of 176.892 uW. The new VCO has a good linearity reducing harmonic distortion for frequency ΔΣ modulator...

  17. Measurement of high-degree solar oscillation frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, K. T.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Hill, F.

    1995-01-01

    We present m-averaged solar p- and f-mode oscillation frequencies over the frequency range nu greater than 1.8 and less than 5.0 mHz and the spherical harmonic degree range l greater than or equal to 100 and less than or equal to 1200 from full-disk, 1000 x 1024 pixel, Ca II intensity images collected 1993 June 22-25 with a temporal cadence of 60 s. We itemize the sources and magnitudes of statistical and systematic uncertainties and of small frequency corrections, and we show that our frequencies represent an improvement in accuracy and coverage over previous measurements. Our frequencies agree at the 2 micro Hz level with Mount Wilson frequencies determined for l less than or equal to 600 from full-disk images, and we find systematic offsets of 10-20 micro Hz with respect to frequencies measured from Big Bear and La Palma observations. We give evidence that these latter offsets are indicative of spatial scaling uncertainties associated with the analysis of partial-disk images. In comparison with theory, our p-mode frequencies agree within 10 micro Hz of frequencies predicted by the Los Alamos model but are as much as 100 micro Hz smaller than frequencies predicted by the Denmark and Yale models at degrees near 1000. We also find systematic differences between our n = 0 frequencies and the frequencies closely agreed upon by all three models.

  18. A Constant Energy-Per-Cycle Ring Oscillator Over a Wide Frequency Range for Wireless Sensor Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inhee; Sylvester, Dennis; Blaauw, David

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an energy-efficient oscillator for wireless sensor nodes (WSNs). It avoids short-circuit current by minimizing the time spent in the input voltage range from Vthn to [Vdd - |Vthp|]. A current-feeding scheme with gate voltage control enables the oscillator to operate over a wide frequency range. A test chip is fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show that the proposed oscillator achieves a constant energy-per-cycle (EpC) of 0.8 pJ/cycle over the 21-60 MHz frequency range and is more efficient than a conventional current-starved ring oscillator (CSRO) below 300 kHz at 1.8 V supply voltage. As an application example, the proposed oscillator is implemented in a switched-capacitor DC-DC converter. The converter is 11%-56% more efficient for load power values ranging from 583 pW to 2.9 nW than a converter using a conventional CSRO.

  19. Trapped Ion Oscillation Frequencies as Sensors for Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Nörtershäuser

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The oscillation frequencies of charged particles in a Penning trap can serve as sensors for spectroscopy when additional field components are introduced to the magnetic and electric fields used for confinement. The presence of so-called “magnetic bottles” and specific electric anharmonicities creates calculable energy-dependences of the oscillation frequencies in the radiofrequency domain which may be used to detect the absorption or emission of photons both in the microwave and optical frequency domains. The precise electronic measurement of these oscillation frequencies therefore represents an optical sensor for spectroscopy. We discuss possible applications for precision laser and microwave spectroscopy and their role in the determination of magnetic moments and excited state lifetimes. Also, the trap-assisted measurement of radiative nuclear de-excitations in the X-ray domain is discussed. This way, the different applications range over more than 12 orders of magnitude in the detectable photon energies, from below μeV in the microwave domain to beyond MeV in the X-ray domain.

  20. Conditional intrinsic voltage oscillations in mature vertebrate neurons undergo specific changes in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guertin, Pierre A; Hounsgaard, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Although intrinsic neuronal properties in invertebrates are well known to undergo specific adaptive changes in culture, long-term adaptation of similar properties in mature vertebrate neurons remain poorly understood. To investigate this, we used an organotypic slice preparation from the spinal...... cord of adult turtles maintainable for several weeks in culture conditions. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced-tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage oscillations in motoneurons were approximately 10 times faster in culture than in acute preparations. Oscillations in culture were abolished by NMDA...... receptor antagonists or by high extracellular Mg2+ concentrations. However, in contrast with results from motoneurons in the acute slice, NMDA-induced oscillations in culture did not depend on CaV1.3 channel activation as they still remained after nifedipine application. Other CaV1.3 channel...

  1. Efficient Low-Voltage Operation of a CW Gyrotron Oscillator at 233 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstein, Melissa K; Bajaj, Vikram S; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2007-02-01

    The gyrotron oscillator is a source of high average power millimeter-wave through terahertz radiation. In this paper, we report low beam power and high-efficiency operation of a tunable gyrotron oscillator at 233 GHz. The low-voltage operating mode provides a path to further miniaturization of the gyrotron through reduction in the size of the electron gun, power supply, collector, and cooling system, which will benefit industrial and scientific applications requiring portability. Detailed studies of low-voltage operation in the TE(2) (,) (3) (,) (1) mode reveal that the mode can be excited with less than 7 W of beam power at 3.5 kV. During CW operation with 3.5-kV beam voltage and 50-mA beam current, the gyrotron generates 12 W of RF power at 233.2 GHz. The EGUN electron optics code describes the low-voltage operation of the electron gun. Using gun-operating parameters derived from EGUN simulations, we show that a linear theory adequately predicts the low experimental starting currents.

  2. Primary somatosensory contextual modulation is encoded by oscillation frequency change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, T; Milde, T; Curio, G; Debener, S; Lehmann, T; Leistritz, L; Witte, O W; Witte, H; Haueisen, J

    2015-09-01

    This study characterized thalamo-cortical communication by assessing the effect of context-dependent modulation on the very early somatosensory evoked high-frequency oscillations (HF oscillations). We applied electrical stimuli to the median nerve together with an auditory oddball paradigm, presenting standard and deviant target tones representing differential cognitive contexts to the constantly repeated electrical stimulation. Median nerve stimulation without auditory stimulation served as unimodal control. A model consisting of one subcortical (near thalamus) and two cortical (Brodmann areas 1 and 3b) dipolar sources explained the measured HF oscillations. Both at subcortical and the cortical levels HF oscillations were significantly smaller during bimodal (somatosensory plus auditory) than unimodal (somatosensory only) stimulation. A delay differential equation model was developed to investigate interactions within the 3-node thalamo-cortical network. Importantly, a significant change in the eigenfrequency of Brodmann area 3b was related to the context-dependent modulation, while there was no change in the network coupling. This model strongly suggests cortico-thalamic feedback from both cortical Brodmann areas 1 and 3b to the thalamus. With the 3-node network model, thalamo-cortical feedback could be described. Frequency encoding plays an important role in contextual modulation in the somatosensory thalamo-cortical network. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paulin Florence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a “Pay as you go” basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption.

  4. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, A Paulin; Shanthi, V; Simon, C B Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a "Pay as you go" basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption.

  5. Quantum inductance and high frequency oscillators in graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begliarbekov, Milan; Strauf, Stefan; Search, Christopher P

    2011-04-22

    Here we investigate high frequency AC transport through narrow graphene nanoribbons with top-gate potentials that form a localized quantum dot. We show that as a consequence of the finite dwell time of an electron inside the quantum dot (QD), the QD behaves like a classical inductor at sufficiently high frequencies ω ≥ GHz. When the geometric capacitance of the top-gate and the quantum capacitance of the nanoribbon are accounted for, the admittance of the device behaves like a classical serial RLC circuit with resonant frequencies ω ∼ 100-900 GHz and Q-factors greater than 10(6). These results indicate that graphene nanoribbons can serve as all-electronic ultra-high frequency oscillators and filters, thereby extending the reach of high frequency electronics into new domains.

  6. Frequency-shift vibro-acoustic modulation driven by low-frequency broadband excitations in a bistable cantilever oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingbo; Xu, Yanyan; Lu, Siliang; Shao, Yong

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a frequency-shift vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect in a bistable microcracked cantilever oscillator. Low-frequency broadband excitations induced a VAM effect with a shifted modulation frequency through involving a microcracked metal beam in a bistable oscillator model. We used nonlinear dynamics equations and principles to describe the mechanism of a bistable oscillator whose natural frequency varied as the oscillation amplitude increased. We demonstrated this frequency-shift VAM effect using a prototype bistable oscillator model designed to efficiently detect microcracks in solid materials via the VAM effect using ambient vibration excitations.

  7. Convective contributions to the frequencies of solar oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, C S; Nordlund, A A; Stein, R F; Trampedach, R

    1999-01-01

    Differences between observed and theoretical eigenfrequencies of the Sun have characteristics which identify them as arising predominantly from properties of the oscillations in the vicinity of the solar surface: in the super-adiabatic, convective boundary layer and above. These frequency differences may therefore provide useful information about the structure of these regions, precisely where the theory of solar structure is most uncertain. In the present work we use numerical simulations of the outer part of the Sun to quantify the influence of turbulent convection on solar oscillation frequencies. Separating the influence into effects on the mean model and effects on the physics of the modes, we find that the main model effects are due to the turbulent pressure that provides additional support against gravity, and thermal differences between average 3-D models and 1-D models. Surfaces of constant pressure in the visible photosphere are elevated by about 150 km, relative to a standard envelope model. As a r...

  8. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO)

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Petrozzino S.; Gatta A.; Bona S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to resp...

  9. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and neuromuscular disease. PCEF (Peak Cough Expiratory Flow is used as a standardized indicator of efficiency of cough.Results: the High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO is useful, in cases of increased production of mucus and impairment of muco-ciliary clearance, to remove the tracheobronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients with neuromuscular disease and frequent respiratory infections is focused on treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST has a central role in treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions reducing respiratory infections.

  10. Frequency-stabilization of mode-locked laser-based photonic microwave oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Salik, Ertan; Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will describe our recent phase-noise measurements of photonic microwave oscillators. We will aslo discuss our investigation of the frequency stability link between the optical and microwave frequencies in the coupled oscillator.

  11. Frequencies and amplitudes of high-degree solar oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, James Morris

    Measurements of some of the properties of high-degree solar p- and f-mode oscillations are presented. Using high-resolution velocity images from Big Bear Solar Observatory, we have measured mode frequencies, which provide information about the composition and internal structure of the Sun, and mode velocity amplitudes (corrected for the effects of atmospheric seeing), which tell us about the oscillation excitation and damping mechanisms. We present a new and more accurate table of the Sun's acoustic vibration frequencies, nunl, as a function of radial order n and spherical harmonic degree l. These frequencies are averages over azimuthal order m and approximate the normal mode frequencies of a nonrotating spherically symmetric Sun near solar minimum. The frequencies presented here are for solar p- and f-modes with 180 less than or = l less than or = 1920, 0 less than or = n less than or = 8, and 1.7 mHz less than or = nunl less than or = 5.3 mHz. The uncertainties, sigmanl, in the frequencies areas are as low as 3.1 micro-Hz. The theoretically expected f-mode frequencies are given by omega squared = gkh approx. = gl/R, where g is the gravitational acceleration at the surface, kh is the horizontal component of the wave vector, and R is the radius of the Sun. We find that the observed frequencies are significantly less than expected for l greater than 1000, for which we have no explanation. Observations of high-degree oscillations, which have very small spatial features, suffer from the effects of atmospheric image blurring and image motion (or 'seeing'), thereby reducing the amplitudes of their spatial-frequency components. In an attempt to correct the velocity amplitudes for these effects, we simultaneously measured the atmospheric modulation transfer function (MTF) by looking at the effects of seeing on the solar limb. We are able to correct the velocity amplitudes using the MTF out to l approx. = 1200. We find that the frequency of the peak velocity power (as a

  12. Effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation on pleural pressure and oscillated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Tal; Skjodt, Neil M; Jones, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HF-CWO) is directly related to the level of oscillated flow (osc) in the airways. We used the Vest system to investigate the effects of HFCWO on chest wall and pleural pressures and we correlated these pressures to the resultant osc. We also compared the latest HFCWO device with it predecessor. Different combinations of vest inflation pressure (background pressure) and oscillation frequency were randomly applied to 10 healthy volunteers. Chest wall pressure was determined using an air-filled bag under the vest and pleural pressure was estimated using an esophageal balloon. Reverse plethysmography was used to measure osc at the mouth and a spirometer was used to measure changes in end-expired lung volume. We found a significant correlation between chest wall and pleural pressure with approximately one-third of the chest wall pressure transmitted into the pleural space. Mean esophageal pressure remained negative at all background pressure/frequency combinations. There was a significant correlation (pHFCWO and since osc is dependent on esophageal pulse pressure, which in turn is dependent on chest wall pulse pressure, it follows that the effectiveness of HFCWO is influenced by the ability to generate an effective chest wall pulse pressure.

  13. High Sensitivity Magnetic Flux Sensors with Direct Voltage Readout Double Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelerhof, D.J.; Duuren, van M.J.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.; Kawai, J.; Kado, H.

    1995-01-01

    The experimental sensitivity of double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) has been compared with theory and with the results obtained by numerical simulations. The experimental sensitivity ranges from 60 to 13h, where h is Planck's constant, for relaxation frequencies from 0.4 up to 10 GHz. For l

  14. High Sensitivity Magnetic Flux Sensors with Direct Voltage Readout Double Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelerhof, D.J.; Adelerhof, Derk Jan; van Duuren, M.J.; Flokstra, Jakob; Rogalla, Horst; Kawai, J.; Kado, H.

    1995-01-01

    The experimental sensitivity of double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) has been compared with theory and with the results obtained by numerical simulations. The experimental sensitivity ranges from 60 to 13h, where h is Planck's constant, for relaxation frequencies from 0.4 up to 10 GHz. For

  15. Detecting the harmonics of oscillations with time-variable frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, L. W.; Stefanovska, A.; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2011-01-01

    A method is introduced for the spectral analysis of complex noisy signals containing several frequency components. It enables components that are independent to be distinguished from the harmonics of nonsinusoidal oscillatory processes of lower frequency. The method is based on mutual information and surrogate testing combined with the wavelet transform, and it is applicable to relatively short time series containing frequencies that are time variable. Where the fundamental frequency and harmonics of a process can be identified, the characteristic shape of the corresponding oscillation can be determined, enabling adaptive filtering to remove other components and nonoscillatory noise from the signal. Thus the total bandwidth of the signal can be correctly partitioned and the power associated with each component then can be quantified more accurately. The method is first demonstrated on numerical examples. It is then used to identify the higher harmonics of oscillations in human skin blood flow, both spontaneous and associated with periodic iontophoresis of a vasodilatory agent. The method should be equally relevant to all situations where signals of comparable complexity are encountered, including applications in astrophysics, engineering, and electrical circuits, as well as in other areas of physiology and biology.

  16. Systems and methods for process and user driven dynamic voltage and frequency scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Arindam; Lin, Bin; Memik, Gokhan; Dinda, Peter; Dick, Robert

    2011-03-22

    Certain embodiments of the present invention provide a method for power management including determining at least one of an operating frequency and an operating voltage for a processor and configuring the processor based on the determined at least one of the operating frequency and the operating voltage. The operating frequency is determined based at least in part on direct user input. The operating voltage is determined based at least in part on an individual profile for processor.

  17. Dynamics of phase oscillators with generalized frequency-weighted coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Can; Gao, Jian; Xiang, Hairong; Jia, Wenjing; Guan, Shuguang; Zheng, Zhigang

    2016-12-01

    Heterogeneous coupling patterns among interacting elements are ubiquitous in real systems ranging from physics, chemistry to biology communities, which have attracted much attention during recent years. In this paper, we extend the Kuramoto model by considering a particular heterogeneous coupling scheme in an ensemble of phase oscillators, where each oscillator pair interacts with different coupling strength that is weighted by a general function of the natural frequency. The Kuramoto theory for the transition to synchronization can be explicitly generalized, such as the expression for the critical coupling strength. Also, a self-consistency approach is developed to predict the stationary states in the thermodynamic limit. Moreover, Landau damping effects are further revealed by means of linear stability analysis and resonance poles theory below the critical threshold, which turns to be far more generic. Our theoretical analysis and numerical results are consistent with each other, which can help us understand the synchronization transition in general networks with heterogenous couplings.

  18. Tunable optical frequency division using a phase-locked optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D; Wong, N C

    1992-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a novel optical parametric oscillator approach to tunable optical frequency division. The beat frequency of the signal and idler subharmonic outputs of a tunable cw KTP optical parametric oscillator was phase locked to a microwave reference frequency source, which thus permitted precise determination of the output frequencies at approximately half the input pump frequency.

  19. A Closed Form Solution for Nonlinear Oscillators Frequencies Using Amplitude-Frequency Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many nonlinear systems in industry including oscillators can be simulated as a mass-spring system. In reality, all kinds of oscillators are nonlinear due to the nonlinear nature of springs. Due to this nonlinearity, most of the studies on oscillation systems are numerically carried out while an analytical approach with a closed form expression for system response would be very useful in different applications. Some analytical techniques have been presented in the literature for the solution of strong nonlinear oscillators as well as approximate and numerical solutions. In this paper, Amplitude-Frequency Formulation (AFF approach is applied to analyze some periodic problems arising in classical dynamics. Results are compared with another approximate analytical technique called Energy Balance Method developed by the authors (EBM and also numerical solutions. Close agreement of the obtained results reveal the accuracy of the employed method for several practical problems in engineering.

  20. A voltage-controlled ring oscillator using InP full enhancement-mode HEMT logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Du; Yang, Dai; Yanling, Chen; Fuhua, Yang

    2009-03-01

    A voltage-controlled ring oscillator (VCO) based on a full enhancement-mode InAlAs/InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) logic is proposed. An enhancement-mode HEMT (E-HEMT) is fabricated, whose threshold is demonstrated to be 10 mV. The model of the E-HEMT is established and used in the SPICE simulation of the VCO. The result proves that the full E-HEMT logic technology can be applied to the VCO. And compared with the HEMT DCFL technology, the complexity of our fabrication process is reduced and the reliability is improved.

  1. A voltage-controlled ring oscillator using InP full enhancement-mode HEMT logic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Rui; Dai Yang; Chen Yanling; Yang Fuhua

    2009-01-01

    A voltage-controlled ring oscillator (VCO) based on a full enhancement-mode InAIAs/InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) logic is proposed. An enhancement-mode HEMT (E-HEMT) is fabricated, whose threshold is demonstrated to be 10 mV. The model of the E-HEMT is established and used in the SPICE simulation of the VCO. The result proves that the full E-HEMT logic technology can be applied to the VCO. And compared with the HEMT DCFL technology, the complexity of our fabrication process is reduced and the reliability is improved.

  2. Voltage-clamp studies of transient inward current and mechanical oscillations induced by ouabain in ferret papillary muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagueuzian, H S; Katzung, B G

    1982-06-01

    1. We studied the effects of a toxic concentration of ouabain on transmembrane electrical activity and on mechanical behaviour of right ventricular papillary muscles from ferrets in a single sucrose-gap using current clamp and voltage clamp.2. Ouabain (1.4-1.8 muM) induced oscillatory after-potentials and after-concentrations in current-clamp experiments. Voltage clamp showed that the oscillatory after-potential was caused by a transient inward current, similar to that in Purkinje fibres.3. The transient current had a sigmoidal dependence on the preceding (activating) voltage step V1, with a treshold around -13 mV and a plateau between +10 and 20 mV. There was a decline in current amplitude for more positive clamps. When activated by a fixed V1 voltage step, and measured at different repolarization levels V2, the transient current manifested an inverse dependence on V2 between -50 and -10 mV. No outward transient current could be detected. Total replacement of Na in the bathing medium by Tris or by sucrose abolished the transient current.4. Ouabain caused an increase of phasic (twitch) tension responses to voltage steps at all potentials without shifting the curve relating these variables on the voltage axis. The drug evoked an even greater increase in the tonic tension responses.5. After prolonged exposure, oscillatory mechanical responses were frequently recorded during positive voltage steps. Unlike the after-contraction, these mechanical fluctuations were not consistently damped and were not accompanied by detectable synchronous current fluctuations. Catecholamines and dibutyryl cyclic AMP markedly reduced the amplitude of the tonic contraction and the mechanical oscillations but increased their frequency. Caffeine had no effect on the tonic contraction amplitude but abolished the fluctuations.6. These results support the proposal that Ca is transiently released from the overloaded sarcoplasmic reticulum in ouabain-intoxicated muscle and may evoke oscillatory

  3. Parametric frequency transformation in a superconducting waveguide line with an integrated Josephson oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisenko, M. V.; Munyaev, V. O.; Satanin, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    The parametric frequency division in a coplanar waveguide line with an integrated single-contact rf SQUID (Josephson oscillator) is discussed. It is assumed that the oscillator is excited by pump pulses whose carrier frequency can be a multiple of the plasma frequency of the oscillator. It is shown that the Josephson oscillator excited at the pump frequency can induce frequency division by emitting subharmonics that are multiples of the fundamental frequency (fractional resonances). Parameters for which parametric frequency transformation occurs are determined. The possible generalization of this effect to the quantum case in which correlated microwave photons (entangled photon states) can be generated is discussed.

  4. A precise measurement of the $B^0$ meson oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The oscillation frequency, $\\Delta m_d$, of $B^0$ mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a $D^-$ or $D^{*-}$ meson in the final state, in a data sample of $pp$ collisions collected by the LHCb detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0$\\mbox{fb}^{-1}$. A combination of the two decay modes gives $\\Delta m_d = (505.0 \\pm 2.1 \\pm 1.0) \\rm \\,ns^{-1}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is compatible with the current world average and has similar precision.

  5. A precise measurement of the $B^0$ meson oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Vecchi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The oscillation frequency of $B^0$ mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a charged $D$ or $D^*$ meson in the final state, on a data sample collected by the LHCb detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions. A combination of the two decay modes gives $\\Delta m_d = (503.6 \\pm 2.0 \\pm 1.3)$ ns$^{-1}$ , where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is compatible with the current world average and has comparable precision

  6. High frequency oscillations and high frequency functional network characteristics in the intraoperative electrocorticogram in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweiphenning, W. J E M; van 't Klooster, M. A.; van Diessen, E.; van Klink, N. E C; Huiskamp, G. J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074463640; Gebbink, T. A.; Leijten, F. S S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/152243054; Gosselaar, P. H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304813990; Otte, W. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/168455706; Stam, C. J.; Braun, K. P J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/207237239; Zijlmans, G. J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304819581

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High frequency oscillations (HFOs; > 80 Hz), especially fast ripples (FRs, 250-500 Hz), are novel biomarkers for epileptogenic tissue. The pathophysiology suggests enhanced functional connectivity within FR generating tissue. Our aim was to determine the relation between brain areas

  7. Frequency comb metrology with an optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balskus, K; Schilt, S; Wittwer, V J; Brochard, P; Ploetzing, T; Jornod, N; McCracken, R A; Zhang, Z; Bartels, A; Reid, D T; Südmeyer, T

    2016-04-18

    We report on the first demonstration of absolute frequency comb metrology with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) frequency comb. The synchronously-pumped OPO operated in the 1.5-µm spectral region and was referenced to an H-maser atomic clock. Using different techniques, we thoroughly characterized the frequency noise power spectral density (PSD) of the repetition rate frep, of the carrier-envelope offset frequency fCEO, and of an optical comb line νN. The comb mode optical linewidth at 1557 nm was determined to be ~70 kHz for an observation time of 1 s from the measured frequency noise PSD, and was limited by the stability of the microwave frequency standard available for the stabilization of the comb repetition rate. We achieved a tight lock of the carrier envelope offset frequency with only ~300 mrad residual integrated phase noise, which makes its contribution to the optical linewidth negligible. The OPO comb was used to measure the absolute optical frequency of a near-infrared laser whose second-harmonic component was locked to the F = 2→3 transition of the 87Rb D2 line at 780 nm, leading to a measured transition frequency of νRb = 384,228,115,346 ± 16 kHz. We performed the same measurement with a commercial fiber-laser comb operating in the 1.5-µm region. Both the OPO comb and the commercial fiber comb achieved similar performance. The measurement accuracy was limited by interferometric noise in the fibered setup of the Rb-stabilized laser.

  8. The frequency of neutral meson and neutrino oscillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, B.

    1997-03-01

    Interference between the different mass eigenstate components of a neutral K meson causes its decay probability to oscillate with time. Related oscillations occur in the decay chain {phi} {yields} KK {yields} f{sub 1}f{sub 2} (where f{sub 1,2} are decay channels), in neutral B decay, in the chain {Upsilon}(4s) {yields} BB {yields} f{sub 1}F{sub 2}, and in massive neutrino propagation. Since the mass eigenstates comprising a neutral K, a neutral B, or a neutrino have different masses, they have different speeds at any given momentum. Thus, classically, they become separated in space and time. This circumstance can tempt one to evaluate their contributions to the K or B decay, or to the neutrino interaction with a detector, at different spacetime points. However, these quantum-mechanically interfering contributions must always be evaluated at precisely the same point. Evaluating them at different points can lead to predicted oscillation frequencies double their true values.

  9. Measurement of the Bs-Bsbar Oscillation Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca-Almenar, C; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Di Turo, P; Dorr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H J; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; García, J E; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P F; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Van Remortel, N; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A W; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the Bs-Bsbar oscillation frequency Delta m_s. We use 1 fb^-1 of data from p-pbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The sample contains signals of 3,600 fully reconstructed hadronic Bs decays and 37,000 partially reconstructed semileptonic Bs decays. We measure the probability as a function of proper decay time that the Bs decays with the same, or opposite, flavor as the flavor at production, and we find a signal consistent with Bs-Bsbar oscillations. The probability that random fluctuations could produce a comparable signal is 0.2%. Under the hypothesis that the signal is due to Bs-Bsbar oscillations, we measure Delta m_s = 17.31^{+0.33}_{-0.18} (stat.) +- 0.07 (syst.) ps^-1 and determine |Vtd/Vts| = 0.208^{+0.001}_{-0.002} (exp.) ^{+0.008}_{-0.006} (theo.).

  10. Measurement of the Bs0-Bs0 oscillation frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H J; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-08-11

    We present the first precise measurement of the Bs0-Bs0 oscillation frequency Deltams. We use 1 fb-1 of data from pp collisions at sqrts=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The sample contains signals of 3600 fully reconstructed hadronic Bs decays and 37,000 partially reconstructed semileptonic Bs decays. We measure the probability as a function of proper decay time that the Bs decays with the same, or opposite, flavor as the flavor at production, and we find a signal consistent with Bs0-Bs0 oscillations. The probability that random fluctuations could produce a comparable signal is 0.2%. Under the hypothesis that the signal is due to Bs0-Bs0 oscillations, we measure Deltams=17.31(-0.18)+0.33(stat)+/-0.07(syst) ps-1 and determine |Vtd/Vts|=0.208(-0.002)+0.001(expt)-0.006(+0.008)(theor).

  11. Motor dysfunction in the tottering mouse is linked to cerebellar spontaneous low frequency oscillations revealed by flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Wang, Xinming; Gao, Wangcai; Barnes, Justin; Hendrix, Claudia M.; Hess, Ellen J.; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging is developing into a powerful research tool to study neural activity, particularly in vivo. In this study we used this imaging technique to investigate the neuronal mechanism underlying the episodic movement disorder that is characteristic of the tottering (tg) mouse, a model of episodic ataxia type 2. Both EA2 and the tg mouse are caused by mutations in the gene encoding Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These mutations result in a reduction in P/Q Ca2+ channel function. Both EA2 patients and tg mice have a characteristic phenotype consisting of transient motor attacks triggered by stress, caffeine or ethanol. The neural events underlying these episodes of dystonia are unknown. Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging revealed spontaneous, transient, low frequency oscillations in the cerebellar cortex of the tg mouse. Lasting from 30 - 120 minutes, the oscillations originate in one area then spread to surrounding regions over 30 - 60 minutes. The oscillations are reduced by removing extracellular Ca2+ and blocking Cav 1.2/1.3 (L-type) Ca2+ channels. The oscillations are not affected by blocking AMPA receptors or by electrical stimulation of the parallel fiber - Purkinje cell circuit, suggesting the oscillations are generated intrinsically in the cerebellar cortex. Conversely, L-type Ca2+ agonists generate oscillations with similar properties. In the awake tg mouse, transcranial flavoprotein imaging revealed low frequency oscillations that are accentuated during caffeine induced attacks of dystonia. The oscillations increase during the attacks of dystonia and are coupled to oscillations in face and hindlimb EMG activity. These transient oscillations and the associated cerebellar dysfunction provide a novel mechanism by which an ion channel disorder results in episodic motor dysfunction.

  12. A SCHEDULING SCHEME WITH DYNAMIC FREQUENCY CLOCKING AND MULTIPLE VOLTAGES FOR LOW POWER DESIGNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Dongxin; Wang Ling; Yang Xiaozong

    2007-01-01

    In this letter, a scheduling scheme based on Dynamic Frequency Clocking (DFC) and multiple voltages is proposed for low power designs under the timing and the resource constraints.Unlike the conventional methods at high level synthesis where only voltages of nodes were considered,the scheme based on a gain function considers both voltage and frequency simultaneously to reduce energy consumption. Experiments with a number of DSP benchmarks show that the proposed scheme achieves an effective energy reduction.

  13. A New High Frequency Injection Method Based on Duty Cycle Shifting without Maximum Voltage Magnitude Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Dong; Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2015-01-01

    The conventional high frequency signal injection method is to superimpose a high frequency voltage signal to the commanded stator voltage before space vector modulation. Therefore, the magnitude of the voltage used for machine torque production is limited. In this paper, a new high frequency...... injection method, in which high frequency signal is generated by shifting the duty cycle between two neighboring switching periods, is proposed. This method allows injecting a high frequency signal at half of the switching frequency without the necessity to sacrifice the machine fundamental voltage...... amplitude. This may be utilized to develop new position estimation algorithm without involving the inductance in the medium to high speed range. As an application example, a developed inductance independent position estimation algorithm using the proposed high frequency injection method is applied to drive...

  14. Performance evaluation of Type-3 PLLs under wide variation in input voltage and frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aravind, C. K.; Rani, B.Indu; Chakkarapani, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of Type-3 PLL under wide variation in input voltage and frequency. Using small signal modeling, the performance of both single loop and dual loop type-3 PLL for variation in input voltage and frequency is studied. The analysis shows that for the same...... bandwidth, both the single loop and dual loop Type-3 PLL exhibit similar dynamics provided the supply voltage is balanced. However, under voltage sag conditions, dual loop PLL shows improved dynamic response without affecting its stability. Further, the tracking time is reduced as the feed forward frequency...... is a function of supply frequency. To improve the filtering characteristics under frequency deviations, a dual loop Type 3 adaptive PLL which accurately tracks the phase and frequency of the input signal under wide frequency deviations is developed. Simulations are carried out in MATLAB and experimentally...

  15. High frequency oscillations mirror disease activity in patients with focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Karolin; LeVan, Pierre; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Fauser, Susanne; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Jacobs, Julia

    2013-08-01

    The study analyzes the occurrence of high frequency oscillations in different types of focal cortical dysplasia in 22 patients with refractory epilepsy. High frequency oscillations are biomarkers for epileptic tissue, but it is unknown whether they can reflect increasingly dysplastic tissue changes as well as epileptic disease activity. High frequency oscillations (80-450 Hz) were visually marked by two independent reviewers in all channels of intracranial implanted grid, strips, and depth electrodes in patients with focal cortical dysplasia and refractory epilepsy. Rates of high frequency oscillations in patients with pathologically confirmed focal cortical dysplasia of Palmini type 1a and b were compared with those in type 2a and b. Patients with focal cortical dysplasia type 2 had significantly more seizures than those with type 1 (p high frequency oscillations were significantly higher in patients with focal cortical dysplasia type 2 versus type 1 (p high frequency oscillations were significantly higher in presumed epileptogenic areas than outside (p high frequency oscillations mirrors the higher epileptogenicity of focal cortical dysplasia type 2 lesions compared to type 1 lesions. Therefore, rates of high frequency oscillations can reflect disease activity of a lesion. This has implications for the use of high frequency oscillations as biomarkers for epileptogenic areas, because a detailed analysis of their rates may be necessary to use high frequency oscillations as a predictive tool in epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Estimation of the Frequency of Instantaneous Voltage Drops Dependent on Arrangement of Line Surge Arresters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Hironao; Kozuka, Masahiro; Itamoto, Naoki; Shinjo, Kazuo; Ishii, Masaru

    Lightning faults on transmission lines often cause instantaneous voltage drops in power systems. Influences of instantaneous voltage drops become increasingly serious in high technology industries etc. As countermeasures of instantaneous voltage drops, uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) are employed. On the other hand, line surge arresters are installed on transmission lines increasingly as one of the effective countermeasures of double-circuit faults caused by lightning strokes. Additionally, the arresters are effective as one of the reduction methods for the frequency of instantaneous voltage drops. In this paper, the frequency of instantaneous voltage drops reduced by installation of line surge arresters on transmission lines is estimated by employing EMTP analysis. Also, the accuracy of the method in estimating the frequency of instantaneous voltage drops in power systems is evaluated through comparison with experience.

  17. Voltage-Balancing Method for Modular Multilevel Converters Switched at Grid Frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Fujin; Chen, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    The modular multilevel converter (MMC) becomes attractive for high-voltage and high-power applications due to its high modularity, availability, and power quality. The voltage balance issue of capacitors is very important in the MMC, and the balancing of the capacitor voltage is increasingly...... difficult as the switching frequency is reduced. In this paper, a voltage-balancing method is proposed for the MMC switched at grid frequency with reduced losses and does not rely on the arm current. By assigning the low-frequency pulses with different pulse widths, the capacitor charge transfer in the MMC...... can be controlled for keeping the capacitor voltage balancing in the MMC. Simulations and experimental studies of the MMC are conducted, and the results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed capacitor voltage-balancing method....

  18. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions are generated by active oscillators clustered in frequency plateaus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Bastian; Wit, Hero; van Dijk, Pim

    It is commonly assumed that the active process linked to hair-cell motility is an important factor contributing to SOAEs. A chain of coupled, active and nonlinear oscillators with tonotopic organization can be used to account for key aspects of cochlear processing, including SOAEs and related......, 918–926] that a linear array of active oscillators with nearest neighbour coupling produces clusters of oscillators with a common oscillation frequency (frequency plateaus) and a preferred frequency separation. The frequency plateaus can also be entrained to the frequency of an external tone. Both...

  19. Experimental assessment of anomalous low-frequency noise increase at the onset of Gunn oscillations in InGaAs planar diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Ó.; Alimi, Y.; Song, A.; Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.; Pérez, S.; Mateos, J.; González, T.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the presence of anomalous low-frequency fluctuations during the initiation of higher frequency oscillations in InGaAs-based Gunn planar diodes has been evidenced and investigated. Accurate measurements showing the evolution of the power spectral density of the device with respect to the applied voltage have been carried out. Such spectra have been obtained in the wide frequency range between 10 MHz and 43.5 GHz, simultaneously covering both the low-frequency noise and the fundamental oscillation peak at some tens of GHz. This provides valuable information to better understand how these fluctuations appear and how these are distributed in frequency. For much higher frequency operation, such understanding can be utilized as a simple tool to predict the presence of Gunn oscillations without requiring a direct detection.

  20. Electronically Tunable Dual-Input Integrator Employing a Single CDBA and a Multiplier: Voltage Controlled Quadrature Oscillator Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nandi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new dual-input differential input active integrator using a current differencing buffered amplifier (CDBA is proposed. A multiplier element is appropriately used in the circuit whose control voltage (Vc tunes the integrator time constant (τ electronically. The design of a voltage controlled quadrature oscillator (VCQO based on the proposed integrator had been satisfactorily implemented. A new type of measurement for the tuning error of the oscillator based on the Nyquist plot is presented that shows an error of only 2% at fo≈ 1 MHz with Total Harmonic Distortion (THD less than 3%.

  1. Measurement of the B d0 meson oscillation frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alpat, B.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Antreasyan, D.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Baschirotto, A.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boucham, A.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brock, I. C.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Cai, X. D.; Campanelli, M.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Castello, R.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chan, A.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A. P.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; De Boeck, H.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dorne, I.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Dutta, S.; Easo, S.; Efremenko, Yu.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S. N.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gerald, J.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldstein, J.; Gong, Z. F.; Gougas, A.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hartmann, B.; Hasan, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Hu, G.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirkby, J.; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Korolko, I.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krenz, W.; Kuijten, H.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Landi, G.; Lapoint, C.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurikainen, P.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lieb, E.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, W.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangla, S.; Marchesini, P.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNally, D.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; von der Mey, M.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; van Mil, A. J. W.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Monteleoni, B.; Moore, R.; Morganti, S.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Muheim, F.; Nagy, E.; Nahn, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Park, H. K.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Peach, D.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petrak, S.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Pinto, J. C.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Produit, N.; Prokofiev, D.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Rind, O.; Ro, S.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosselet, Ph.; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sarkar, S.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schoeneich, B.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shukla, J.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Soulimov, V.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Strauch, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Tang, X. W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonisch, F.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tully, C.; Tuchscherer, H.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Völkert, R.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xu, J.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yao, X. Y.; Ye, J. B.; Yeh, S. C.; You, J. M.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; L3 Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Time-dependent B d0- overlineBd0 mixing is studied using 1.5 million hadronic Z decays collected by L3. Semileptonic B decays are selected by requiring at least one reconstructed lepton in both thrust hemispheres. Charge correlations between the tagged leptons are studied as a function of proper time. The proper time of the b-hadron decay is measured by reconstructing the production and decay vertices using a silicon microvertex detector. The measured B d0 meson oscillation frequency corresponds to a mass difference Δmd between the two B d0 mass eigenstates of Δmd = (0.496 -0.051+0.055 (stat) ± 0.043 (syst)) ps -1.

  2. A precise measurement of the B^0 meson oscillation frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; C. Forshaw, D.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; K. Kuonen, A.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.

    2016-07-01

    The oscillation frequency, Δ m_d, of B^0 mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a D^- or D^{*-} meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 3.0fb^{-1} of pp collisions, collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV. A combination of the two decay modes gives Δ m_d = (505.0 ± 2.1 ± 1.0) ns^{-1}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is consistent with the current world average and has similar precision.

  3. Measurement of the B$_{d}^{0}$ meson oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Brambilla, Elena; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Castello, R; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hangarter, K; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Ilyas, M M; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapinos, P; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Kramer, T; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Lenti, M; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Ludovici, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Macchiolo, A; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Raghavan, R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Rind, O; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Röhner, S; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Schöneich, B; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Sticozzi, F; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonisch, F; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino

    1996-01-01

    Time-dependent \\Bd-\\Bbd\\ mixing is studied using 1.5 million hadronic Z decays collected by L3. Semileptonic B decays are selected by requiring at least one reconstructed lepton in both thrust hemispheres. Charge correlations between the tagged leptons are studied as a function of proper time. The proper time of the b-hadron decay is measured by reconstructing the production and decay vertices using a silicon microvertex detector. The measured \\Bd\\ meson oscillation frequency corresponds to a mass difference \\Dmd\\ between the two \\Bd\\ mass eigenstates of \\begin{displaymath} \\Dmd = \\left( 0.496 ^{+ 0.055}_{- 0.051}\\ \\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm{ 0.043}\\ \\mathrm{(syst)} \\right)\\ \\mathrm{ps}^{-1}. \\end{displaymath}

  4. An oscillation phenomenon of low frequency reverberation in the shallow water and its physical explanation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fenghua; LIU Jianjun; LI Zhenglin; ZHANG Renhe

    2005-01-01

    An oscillation phenomenon of the low frequency reverberation intensity was observed in several shallow water reverberation experiments. This phenomenon cannot be explained by the widely used incoherent reverberation theory. In this paper, to explain the observed oscillation phenomenon, a normal mode based coherent reverberation theory is presented. The theoretical analysis and numerical results show that modal interference can cause the regular oscillation phenomenon of the low frequency reverberation intensity, and the oscillation frequency is determined by the normal mode eigen-values. A new method to estimate the bottom sound speed based on the oscillation frequency of reverberation intensity was presented in this paper. The experimental results at three different sites indicate that the bottom sound speed estimated from the oscillation frequency of reverberation intensity agrees with that inverted from Matched Field Processing (MFP) well.

  5. High-frequency oscillations and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Maxime; Shiri, Zahra; Chen, Li-Yuan; Avoli, Massimo

    2017-01-20

    The interest of epileptologists has recently shifted from the macroscopic analysis of interictal spikes and seizures to the microscopic analysis of short events in the EEG that are not visible to the naked eye but are observed once the signal has been filtered in specific frequency bands. With the use of new technologies that allow multichannel recordings at high sampling rates and the development of computer algorithms that permit the automated analysis of extensive amounts of data, it is now possible to extract high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) between 80 and 500Hz from the EEG; HFOs have been further categorised as ripples (80-200Hz) and fast ripples (250-500Hz). Within the context of epileptic disorders, HFOs should reflect the pathological activity of neural networks that sustain seizure generation, and could serve as biomarkers of epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. We review here the presumptive cellular mechanisms of ripples and fast ripples in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. We also focus on recent findings regarding the occurrence of HFOs during epileptiform activity observed in in vitro models of epileptiform synchronization, in in vivo models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in epileptic patients. Finally, we address the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on HFOs and raise some questions and issues related to the definition of HFOs.

  6. LDRD final report on Bloch Oscillations in two-dimensional nanostructure arrays for high frequency applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Pan, Wei; Reno, John Louis; Wendt, Joel Robert; Barton, Daniel Lee

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the physics of Bloch oscillations (BO) of electrons, engineered in high mobility quantum wells patterned into lateral periodic arrays of nanostructures, i.e. two-dimensional (2D) quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs). A BO occurs when an electron moves out of the Brillouin zone (BZ) in response to a DC electric field, passing back into the BZ on the opposite side. This results in quantum oscillations of the electron--i.e., a high frequency AC current in response to a DC voltage. Thus, engineering a BO will yield continuously electrically tunable high-frequency sources (and detectors) for sensor applications, and be a physics tour-de-force. More than a decade ago, Bloch oscillation (BO) was observed in a quantum well superlattice (QWSL) in short-pulse optical experiments. However, its potential as electrically biased high frequency source and detector so far has not been realized. This is partially due to fast damping of BO in QWSLs. In this project, we have investigated the possibility of improving the stability of BO by fabricating lateral superlattices of periodic coupled nanostructures, such as metal grid, quantum (anti)dots arrays, in high quality GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures. In these nanostructures, the lateral quantum confinement has been shown theoretically to suppress the optical-phonon scattering, believed to be the main mechanism for fast damping of BO in QWSLs. Over the last three years, we have made great progress toward demonstrating Bloch oscillations in QDSLs. In the first two years of this project, we studied the negative differential conductance and the Bloch radiation induced edge-magnetoplasmon resonance. Recently, in collaboration with Prof. Kono's group at Rice University, we investigated the time-domain THz magneto-spectroscopy measurements in QDSLs and two-dimensional electron systems. A surprising DC electrical field induced THz phase flip was observed. More measurements are planned to investigate this

  7. Radio frequency current-voltage probe for impedance and power measurements in multi-frequency unmatched loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T.; Delattre, P. A.; Booth, J. P.; Johnson, E. V.; Dine, S.

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band, inline current-voltage probe, with a characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, is presented for the measurement of voltage and current waveforms, impedance, and power in rf systems. The probe, which uses capacitive and inductive sensors to determine the voltage and current, respectively, can be used for the measurement of single or multi-frequency signals into both matched and unmatched loads, over a frequency range of about 1-100 MHz. The probe calibration and impedance/power measurement technique are described in detail, and the calibrated probe results are compared with those obtained from a vector network analyzer and other commercial power meters. Use of the probe is demonstrated with the measurement of power into an unmatched capacitively coupled plasma excited by multi-frequency tailored voltage waveforms.

  8. Radio frequency current-voltage probe for impedance and power measurements in multi-frequency unmatched loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T; Delattre, P A; Booth, J P; Johnson, E V; Dine, S

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band, inline current-voltage probe, with a characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, is presented for the measurement of voltage and current waveforms, impedance, and power in rf systems. The probe, which uses capacitive and inductive sensors to determine the voltage and current, respectively, can be used for the measurement of single or multi-frequency signals into both matched and unmatched loads, over a frequency range of about 1-100 MHz. The probe calibration and impedance/power measurement technique are described in detail, and the calibrated probe results are compared with those obtained from a vector network analyzer and other commercial power meters. Use of the probe is demonstrated with the measurement of power into an unmatched capacitively coupled plasma excited by multi-frequency tailored voltage waveforms.

  9. [Design of a high-voltage insulation testing system of X-ray high frequency generators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Mo, Guo-Ming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Yu, Jie-Ying; Dai, Shu-Guang

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the transformer of X-ray high-voltage high-frequency generators and, have designed and implemented a high-voltage insulation testing system for its oil tank using full-bridge series resonant soft switching PFM DC-DC converter.

  10. Low frequency noise in resonant Josephson soliton oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Holst, T.; Wellstood, Frederick C.;

    1991-01-01

    to the Nyquist voltage noise in a resistance equal to the dynamic resistance RD of the current-voltage characteristic of the bias point. In contrast, measurements of the linewidth of the microwave radiation from the same JTL showed that the spectral density of the underlying noise voltage scaled as R D2/RS where...

  11. Power system low frequency oscillation monitoring and analysis based on multi-signal online identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The advance in the wide-area measurement system (WAMS) is driving the power system to the trend of wide-area monitoring and control.The Prony method is usually used for low frequency oscillation online identification.However,the identified amplitude and phase information is not sufficiently used.In this paper,the amplitude is adopted to detect the occurrence of the oscillation and to obtain the mode observability of the sites.The phase is adopted to identify the oscillation generator grouping and to obtain the mode shapes.The time varying characteristics of low frequency oscillations are studied.The behaviors and the characters of low frequency oscillations are displayed by dynamic visual techniques.Demonstrations on the "11.9" low frequency oscillation of the Guizhou Power Grid substantiate the feasibility and the validation of the proposed methods.

  12. On the frequency of oscillations in the pair plasma generated by a strong electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, A; Ruffini, R; Vereshchagin, G V

    2011-01-01

    We study the frequency of the plasma oscillations of electron-positron pairs created by the vacuum polarization in an uniform electric field with strength E in the range 0.2 Ec 0. Thereby, we focus our attention on its evolution in time studying how this oscillation frequency approaches the plasma frequency. The time-scale needed to approach to the plasma frequency and the power spectrum of these oscillations are computed. The characteristic frequency of the power spectrum is determined uniquely from the initial value of the electric field strength. The effects of plasma degeneracy and pair annihilation are discussed.

  13. High-frequency high-voltage high-power DC-to-DC converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. G.; Owen, H. A.; Wilson, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    A simple analysis of the current and voltage waveshapes associated with the power transistor and the power diode in an example current-or-voltage step-up (buck-boost) converter is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to provide an overview of the problems and design trade-offs which must be addressed as high-power high-voltage converters are operated at switching frequencies in the range of 100 kHz and beyond. Although the analysis focuses on the current-or-voltage step-up converter as the vehicle for discussion, the basic principles presented are applicable to other converter topologies as well.

  14. Cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations in studying motivation and emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Knyazev, G.G.

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that brain functions are realized by simultaneous oscillations in various frequency bands. In addition to examining oscillations in pre-specified bands, interactions and relations between the different frequency bandwidths is another important aspect that needs to be considered in

  15. Design of CMOS Low Voltage Controlled Oscillators%低电压CMOS压控振荡器设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华珠; 黄海云

    2011-01-01

    A low noise CMOS voltage controlled oscillator was designed and analyzed based on CSMC process. The basic theory and small signal model for the VCO were introduced. The performance of the VCO's phase noise and tuning rang were optimized by the LC noise filtering technology, proper circuit structure and device parameter. The circuit was simulated under supply voltage of 1.2 V. The frequency of the VCO ranges from 2. 24 GHz to 2. 57 GHz, the tail current is 3 mA, and the tuning range is about 13. 7%.%设计和分析了一种低电压CMOS压控振荡器,对设计的电路进行理论分析和模型建立,并使用仿真工具对电路进行验证和优化.设计中主要考虑相位噪声和调谐宽度等指标,通过采用电感电容滤波技术以及合理调整电路结构和元器件参数,使相位噪声和调谐宽度均达到了较高的性能指标.结果表明,在1.2 V工作电压下,设计的VCO的尾电流为3 mA,输出振荡频率为2.24~2.57 GHz,中心频率约为2.4 GHz,调谐范围达到13.7%.

  16. Spontaneous low frequency oscillation studies in gallium arsenide fast photoconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Foulon, F; Brullot, B; Petit, P; Bergonzo, P; Rubbelynck, C

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of spontaneous low frequency oscillations (LFO, f approx 0.01 Hz) occurring at high electric field (>1 kV/cm) in resistive photoconductors (PCD) made from semi-insulating GaAs on the response of the PCDs under pulsed gamma-ray irradiation (E approx 1.2 MeV, tau sub F sub W sub H sub M =30 ns). The PCDs were fabricated using GaAs from five commercially available sources. The PCDs were irradiated with fission neutrons in order to reduce their response time down to less than 100 ps. The amplitude of the LFOs was found to be related to the carrier lifetime, and thus defect concentration in the GaAs material. It was larger for material exhibiting high carrier lifetime. Increasing the localised defect concentration, such as EL2 type defect, through GaAs irradiation with fission neutrons was found to decrease the amplitude of the LFOs. PCDs irradiated at high neutron doses (>1x10 sup 1 sup 5 neutrons/cm sup 2) showed no LFOs. It is suggested that interactions between the propagatin...

  17. Secondary Frequency and Voltage Control of Islanded Microgrids via Distributed Averaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W. Simpson-Porco, John; Shafiee, Qobad; Dorfler, Florian

    2015-01-01

    actions. The frequency controller rapidly regulates the microgrid frequency to its nominal value while maintaining active power sharing among the distributed generators. Tuning of the voltage controller provides a simple and intuitive trade-off between the conflicting goals of voltage regulation......In this work we present new distributed controllers for secondary frequency and voltage control in islanded microgrids. Inspired by techniques from cooperative control, the proposed controllers use localized information and nearest neighbour communication to collectively perform secondary control...... and reactive power sharing. Our designs require no knowledge of the microgrid topology, impedances or loads. The distributed architecture allows for flexibility and redundancy, and eliminates the need for a central microgrid controller. We provide a voltage stability analysis and present extensive experimental...

  18. Data mining neocortical high-frequency oscillations in epilepsy and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Justin A; Stead, Matt; Krieger, Abba; Stacey, William; Maus, Douglas; Marsh, Eric; Viventi, Jonathan; Lee, Kendall H; Marsh, Richard; Litt, Brian; Worrell, Gregory A

    2011-10-01

    Transient high-frequency (100-500 Hz) oscillations of the local field potential have been studied extensively in human mesial temporal lobe. Previous studies report that both ripple (100-250 Hz) and fast ripple (250-500 Hz) oscillations are increased in the seizure-onset zone of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Comparatively little is known, however, about their spatial distribution with respect to seizure-onset zone in neocortical epilepsy, or their prevalence in normal brain. We present a quantitative analysis of high-frequency oscillations and their rates of occurrence in a group of nine patients with neocortical epilepsy and two control patients with no history of seizures. Oscillations were automatically detected and classified using an unsupervised approach in a data set of unprecedented volume in epilepsy research, over 12 terabytes of continuous long-term micro- and macro-electrode intracranial recordings, without human preprocessing, enabling selection-bias-free estimates of oscillation rates. There are three main results: (i) a cluster of ripple frequency oscillations with median spectral centroid = 137 Hz is increased in the seizure-onset zone more frequently than a cluster of fast ripple frequency oscillations (median spectral centroid = 305 Hz); (ii) we found no difference in the rates of high frequency oscillations in control neocortex and the non-seizure-onset zone neocortex of patients with epilepsy, despite the possibility of different underlying mechanisms of generation; and (iii) while previous studies have demonstrated that oscillations recorded by parenchyma-penetrating micro-electrodes have higher peak 100-500 Hz frequencies than penetrating macro-electrodes, this was not found for the epipial electrodes used here to record from the neocortical surface. We conclude that the relative rate of ripple frequency oscillations is a potential biomarker for epileptic neocortex, but that larger prospective studies correlating high-frequency

  19. Cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations in studying motivation and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G; Knyazev, Gennady G

    2012-03-01

    Research has shown that brain functions are realized by simultaneous oscillations in various frequency bands. In addition to examining oscillations in pre-specified bands, interactions and relations between the different frequency bandwidths is another important aspect that needs to be considered in unraveling the workings of the human brain and its functions. In this review we provide evidence that studying interdependencies between brain oscillations may be a valuable approach to study the electrophysiological processes associated with motivation and emotional states. Studies will be presented showing that amplitude-amplitude coupling between delta-alpha and delta-beta oscillations varies as a function of state anxiety and approach-avoidance-related motivation, and that changes in the association between delta-beta oscillations can be observed following successful psychotherapy. Together these studies suggest that cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations may contribute to expanding our understanding of the neural processes underlying motivation and emotion.

  20. Application of Metal Oxide Surge Arrester on the Non-Conventional Chaotic Ferroresonance Oscillation in Voltage Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Radmanesh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of MOSA on controlling of the non-conventional ferroresonance overvoltage in the iron core voltage transformer is studied. It is expected that MOSA can generally damp ferroresonance overvoltages. Time-domain study is used to analyze this effect. Study is done on a voltage transformer rated 100VA, 275 kV. The magnetization characteristic of the transformer coil is modeled by a single-parameter twoterm polynomial with q = 7 degree of nonlinearity. Core loss is modeled by linear resistance. Simulation results show that connecting the MOSA in parallel to the voltage transformer, shows a great controlling effect of the ferroresonance oscillations. Phase plane, time domain voltage waveforms, FFT analysis and bifurcation diagrams are also given. Significant effect on settling down to the chaos, the range of parameter values that may lead to ferroresonance overvoltages and controlling these phenomena are obtained and presented.

  1. Low-frequency switching voltage regulators for terrestrial photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delombard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The photovoltaic technology project and the stand alone applications project are discussed. Two types of low frequency switching type regulators were investigated. The design, operating characteristics and field application of these regulators is described. The regulators are small in size, low in cost, very low in power dissipation, reliable and allow considerable flexibility in system design.

  2. Design of Plasma Generator Driven by High-frequency High-voltage Power Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yong-Nong

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a high-frequency high-voltage power supply designed for plasma generator is presented. The powersupply mainly consists of a series resonant converter with a high-frequency high-voltage boost transformer. Due to theindispensable high-voltage inheritance in the operation of plasma generator, the analysis of transformer needconsidering not only winding resistance, leakage inductance, magnetizing inductance, and core-loss resistance, butalso parasitic capacitance resulted from the insulation wrappings on the high-voltage side. This research exhibits asimple approach to measuring equivalent circuit parameters of the high-frequency, high-voltage transformer with straycapacitance being introduced into the conventional modeling. The proposed modeling scheme provides not only aprecise measurement procedure but also effective design information for series-load resonant converter. The plasmadischarging plate is designed as part of the electric circuit in the series load-resonant converter and the circuit modelof the plasma discharging plate is also conducted as well. Thus, the overall model of the high-voltage plasmagenerator is built and the designing procedures for appropriate selections of the corresponding resonant-circuitparameters can be established. Finally, a high-voltage plasma generator with 220V, 60Hz, and 1kW input, along witha 22 kHz and over 8kV output, is realized and implemented.

  3. High-frequency oscillations in Parkinson's disease: spatial distribution and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Hirschmann, Jan; Elben, Saskia; Hartmann, Christian J; Vesper, Jan; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2014-09-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been related to excessive beta band oscillations in the basal ganglia. Recent recordings from the subthalamic nucleus of PD patients showed that beta oscillations show strong cross-frequency coupling with high-frequency oscillations (>200 Hz). However, little is known about the characteristics and functional properties of these oscillations. We studied the spatial distribution of high-frequency oscillations and their relation to PD motor symptoms. We included 10 PD patients in medication OFF who underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Intraoperative five-channel microelectrode recordings were performed at 9 to 10 recording sites within the subthalamic nucleus and its immediate surroundings. We found a focal spatial distribution of high-frequency oscillations with highest power 2 mm below the dorsolateral border of the subthalamic nucleus. Within the subthalamic nucleus, power peaked slightly anterior to the DBS target site. In addition, contralateral akinesia/rigidity scores were negatively correlated with high-frequency oscillation power. Our results demonstrate a focal origin of high-frequency oscillations within the subthalamic nucleus and provide further evidence for their functional association with motor state. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Frequency-dependent Transient Response of an Oscillating Electrically Actuated Droplet

    OpenAIRE

    Dash, S.; Kumari, N; Garimella, S V

    2012-01-01

    The transient response of a millimeter-sized sessile droplet under electrical actuation is experimentally investigated. Under dc actuation, the droplet spreading rate increases as the applied voltage is increased due to the higher electrical forces induced. At sufficiently high dc voltages, competition between the electrical actuation force, droplet inertia, the retarding surface tension force and contact line friction leads to droplet oscillation. The timescale for the droplet to attain its ...

  5. Instability Parameters of Optical Oscillation Frequency in Plasma Central Discharge and Periphery Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhu-Wen; M.A.LIEBERMAN; Sungjin KIM

    2006-01-01

    @@ We have observed relaxation oscillations in a capacitive discharge in Ar gas, connected to a peripheral ground chamber. The plasma oscillations observed from time-varying optical emission from the main discharge chamber show, for example, a high frequency (75.37kHz) relaxation oscillation, at 100mTorr and 8 W absorbed power,and a low frequency (2.72 Hz) relaxation oscillation, 100mTorr and 325 W absorbed power. Time-varying optical emission intensity and plasma density are also detected with a Langmuir probe. The theoretical result agrees well with experiments.

  6. Design and Evaluation of Autonomous Hybrid Frequency-Voltage Sensitive Load Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglass, Philip James; Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo; Sossan, Fabrizio;

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces an algorithm for control of autonomous loads without digital communication interfaces to provide both frequency regulation and voltage regulation services. This hybrid controller can be used to enhance frequency sensitive loads to mitigate line overload arising from reduced...

  7. The Control of Voltage and Frequency of Self-excited Three-Phase Induction Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Dragomirescu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work it is presented the control of voltage and frequency of threephase induction generator in autonomous regime. It is adjusted the intensity of voltage and frequency at the terminals of the consumer by means of frequency converter, in conditions of driving the induction generator at constant speed. System testing and measurements were carried out by the Laboratory for Designing and Testing of Equipment Excitation and Automation of the Center for Research in Hydraulics, Automation and Thermal Processes (CCHAPT within “Eftimie Murgu” University of Resita.

  8. Variable Voltage Source Inverter with controlled frequency spectrum based on Random Pulse Width Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farrukh Yaqub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for single phase variable voltage inverter based on Random Pulse Width Modulation. In Random Pulse Width Modulation based inverter, the frequency spectrum of the output current and voltage waveforms becomes continuous because of the randomization of the switching function of the devices controlling the output voltages. This paper establishes a theory that if the distributions of the random numbers generated by the random source are kept within certain limit with respect to the peak value of reference sinusoidal waveform, the frequency spectrum can be controlled. On the basis of the results, a novel drive using variable tap changing transformer (optional and adaptive random number generator, to control the ratio between the numbers generated by the random source and the reference waveform has been suggested that will guarantee a better power quality profile for a broad range of output voltages.

  9. Theoretical analyses of cellular transmembrane voltage in suspensions induced by high-frequency fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yong; Wang, Changzhen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Xiangjun

    2015-04-01

    A change of the transmembrane voltage is considered to cause biophysical and biochemical responses in cells. The present study focuses on the cellular transmembrane voltage (Δφ) induced by external fields. We detail analytical equations for the transmembrane voltage induced by external high-frequency (above the relaxation frequency of the cell membrane) fields on cells of a spherical shape in suspensions and layers. At direct current (DC) and low frequencies, the cell membrane was assumed to be non-conductive under physiologic conditions. However, with increasing frequency, the permittivity of the cytoplasm/extracellular medium and conductivity of the membrane must be accounted for. Our main work is to extend application of the analytical solution of Δφ to the high-frequency range. We first introduce the transmembrane voltage generated by DC and low-frequency exposures on a single cell. Then, we focus on cell suspensions exposed to high-frequency fields. Using the effective medium theory and the reasonable assumption, the approximate analytical solution of Δφ on cells in suspensions and layers can be derived. Phenomenological effective medium theory equations cannot be used to calculate the local electric field of cell suspensions, so we raised a possible solution based on the Bergman theory. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Numerical Analysis of Conductor Galloping Limitation by Oscillation Frequency Detuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Serguey

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical method has been developed for calculation of conductor oscillations at the moment of galloping that takes account of pendulum  oscillation dampers in the form of eccentric loads. The method is recommended for a numerical analysis of various schemes pertaining to arrangement of horizontal pendulums in the span and their parameters including angles of their initial setting. The obtained results can be used for designing and operation of aerial power lines. 

  11. Robust Frequency and Voltage Stability Control Strategy for Standalone AC/DC Hybrid Microgrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furqan Asghar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The microgrid (MG concept is attracting considerable attention as a solution to energy deficiencies, especially in remote areas, but the intermittent nature of renewable sources and varying loads cause many control problems and thereby affect the quality of power within a microgrid operating in standalone mode. This might cause large frequency and voltage deviations in the system due to unpredictable output power fluctuations. Furthermore, without any main grid support, it is more complex to control and manage the system. In past, droop control and various other coordination control strategies have been presented to stabilize the microgrid frequency and voltages, but in order to utilize the available resources up to their maximum capacity in a positive way, new and robust control mechanisms are required. In this paper, a standalone microgrid is presented, which integrates renewable energy-based distributed generations and local loads. A fuzzy logic-based intelligent control technique is proposed to maintain the frequency and DC (direct current-link voltage stability for sudden changes in load or generation power. Also from a frequency control perspective, a battery energy storage system (BESS is suggested as a replacement for a synchronous generator to stabilize the nominal system frequency as a synchronous generator is unable to operate at its maximum efficiency while being controlled for stabilization purposes. Likewise, a super capacitor (SC and BESS is used to stabilize DC bus voltages even though maximum possible energy is being extracted from renewable generated sources using maximum power point tracking. This newly proposed control method proves to be effective by reducing transient time, minimizing the frequency deviations, maintaining voltages even though maximum power point tracking is working and preventing generators from exceeding their power ratings during disturbances. However, due to the BESS limited capacity, load switching

  12. Wind/PV Generation for Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping in the Eastern Interconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yong [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Gracia, Jose R [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Liu, Yilu [ORNL

    2013-12-01

    This report presents the control of renewable energy sources, including the variable-speed wind generators and solar photovoltaic (PV) generators, for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI). In this report, based on the user-defined wind/PV generator electrical control model and the 16,000-bus Eastern Interconnection dynamic model, the additional controllers for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are developed and incorporated and the potential contributions of renewable energy sources to the EI system frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are evaluated.

  13. Graphene-hexagonal boron nitride resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskell, J.; Fromhold, T. M.; Greenaway, M. T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Eaves, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Novoselov, K. S.; Mishchenko, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Geim, A. K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-07

    We assess the potential of two-terminal graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators, using self-consistent quantum transport and electrostatic simulations to determine the time-dependent response of the diodes in a resonant circuit. We quantify how the frequency and power of the current oscillations depend on the diode and circuit parameters including the doping of the graphene electrodes, device geometry, alignment of the graphene lattices, and the circuit impedances. Our results indicate that current oscillations with frequencies of up to several hundred GHz should be achievable.

  14. High and low frequency relaxation oscillations in a capacitive discharge plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Zhu-Wen; Sungjin Kim; Ji Shi-Yin; Sun Guang-Yu; Deng Ming-Sen

    2008-01-01

    Both high and low frequency relaxation oscillations have been observed in an argon capacitive discharge connected to a peripheral grounded chamber through a slot with dielectric spacers.The oscillations,observed from time-varying optical emission of the main discharge chamber,show,for example,a high frequency(46 kHz)relaxation oscillation at 100 mTorr,with an absorbed power near the peripheral breakdown,and a low frequency(2.7-3.7 Hz)oscillation,at a higher absorbed power.The high frequency oscillation is found to ignite a plasma in the slot,but usually not in the periphery.The high frequency oscillation is interpreted by using an electromagnetic model of the slot impedance,combined with the circuit analysis of the system including a matching network.The model is further developed by using a parallel connection of variable peripheral capacitance to analyse the low frequency oscillation.The results obtained from the model are in agreement with the experimental observations and indicate that a variety of behaviours are dependent on the matching conditions.

  15. Tesla’s high voltage and high frequency generators with oscillatory circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetić Jovan M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The principles that represent the basics of the work of the high voltage and high frequency generator with oscillating circuits will be discussed. Until 1891, Tesla made and used mechanical generators with a large number of extruded poles for the frequencies up to about 20 kHz. The first electric generators based on a new principle of a weakly coupled oscillatory circuits he used for the wireless signal transmission, for the study of the discharges in vacuum tubes, the wireless energy transmission, for the production of the cathode rays, that is x-rays and other experiments. Aiming to transfer the signals and the energy to any point of the surface of the Earth, in the late of 19th century, he had discovered and later patented a new type of high frequency generator called a magnifying transmitter. He used it to examine the propagation of electromagnetic waves over the surface of the Earth in experiments in Colorado Springs in the period 1899-1900. Tesla observed the formation of standing electromagnetic waves on the surface of the Earth by measuring radiated electric field from distant lightning thunderstorm. He got the idea to generate the similar radiation to produce the standing waves. On the one hand, signal transmission, i.e. communication at great distances would be possible and on the other hand, with more powerful and with at least three magnifying transmitters the wireless transmission of energy without conductors at any point of the Earth surface could also be achieved. The discovery of the standing waves on the surface of the Earth and the invention of the magnifying transmitter he claimed his greatest inventions. Less than two years later, at the end of 1901, he designed and started to build a much stronger magnifying transmitter on Long Island near New York City (the Wardenclyffe tower wishing to become a world telecommunication center. During the tower construction, he elaborated the plans for an even stronger transmitter based on

  16. A Resonantly-Excited Disk-Oscillation Model of High-Frequency QPOs of Microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Shoji

    2012-01-01

    A possible model of twin high-frequency QPOs (HF QPOs) of microquasars is examined. The disk is assumed to have global magnetic fields and to be deformed with a two-armed pattern. In this deformed disk, set of a two-armed ($m=2$) vertical p-mode oscillation and an axisymmetric ($m=0$) g-mode oscillation are considered. They resonantly interact through the disk deformation when their frequencies are the same. This resonant interaction amplifies the set of the above oscillations in the case where these two oscillations have wave energies of opposite signs. These oscillations are assumed to be excited most efficiently in the case where the radial group velocities of these two waves vanish at the same place. The above set of oscillations is not unique, depending on the node number, $n$, of oscillations in the vertical direction. We consider that the basic two sets of oscillations correspond to the twin QPOs. The frequencies of these oscillations depend on disk parameters such as strength of magnetic fields. For o...

  17. High frequency oscillations and high frequency functional network characteristics in the intraoperative electrocorticogram in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweiphenning, W J E M; van 't Klooster, M A; van Diessen, E; van Klink, N E C; Huiskamp, G J M; Gebbink, T A; Leijten, F S S; Gosselaar, P H; Otte, W M; Stam, C J; Braun, K P J; Zijlmans, G J M

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs; > 80 Hz), especially fast ripples (FRs, 250-500 Hz), are novel biomarkers for epileptogenic tissue. The pathophysiology suggests enhanced functional connectivity within FR generating tissue. Our aim was to determine the relation between brain areas showing FRs and 'baseline' functional connectivity within EEG networks, especially in the high frequency bands. We marked FRs, ripples (80-250 Hz) and spikes in the electrocorticogram of 14 patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. We assessed 'baseline' functional connectivity in epochs free of epileptiform events within these recordings, using the phase lag index. We computed the Eigenvector Centrality (EC) per channel in the FR and gamma band network. We compared EC between channels that did or did not show events at other moments in time. FR-band EC was higher in channels with than without spikes. Gamma-band EC was lower in channels with ripples and FRs. We confirmed previous findings of functional isolation in the gamma-band and found a first proof of functional integration in the FR-band network of channels covering presumed epileptogenic tissue. 'Baseline' high-frequency network parameters might help intra-operative recognition of epileptogenic tissue without the need for waiting for events. These findings can increase our understanding of the 'architecture' of epileptogenic networks and help unravel the pathophysiology of HFOs.

  18. Power supply and impedance matching to drive technological radio-frequency plasmas with customized voltage waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, James; Brandt, Steven; Berger, Birk; Liese, Martin; Barthel, Matthias; Schüngel, Edmund; Schulze, Julian

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel radio-frequency (RF) power supply and impedance matching to drive technological plasmas with customized voltage waveforms. It is based on a system of phase-locked RF generators that output single frequency voltage waveforms corresponding to multiple consecutive harmonics of a fundamental frequency. These signals are matched individually and combined to drive a RF plasma. Electrical filters are used to prevent parasitic interactions between the matching branches. By adjusting the harmonics' phases and voltage amplitudes individually, any voltage waveform can be approximated as a customized finite Fourier series. This RF supply system is easily adaptable to any technological plasma for industrial applications and allows the commercial utilization of process optimization based on voltage waveform tailoring for the first time. Here, this system is tested on a capacitive discharge based on three consecutive harmonics of 13.56 MHz. According to the Electrical Asymmetry Effect, tuning the phases between the applied harmonics results in an electrical control of the DC self-bias and the mean ion energy at almost constant ion flux. A comparison with the reference case of an electrically asymmetric dual-frequency discharge reveals that the control range of the mean ion energy can be significantly enlarged by using more than two consecutive harmonics.

  19. Oscillation mode frequencies of 61 main-sequence and subgiant stars observed by Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appourchaux, T.; Chaplin, W. J.; García, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Solar-like oscillations have been observed by Kepler and CoRoT in several solar-type stars, thereby providing a way to probe the stars using asteroseismology Aims. We provide the mode frequencies of the oscillations of various stars required to perform a comparison with those obtained from stella...

  20. Constant Switching Frequency Self-Oscillating Controlled Class-D Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen-Duy, Khiem; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    The self-oscillating control approach has been used extensively in class-D amplifiers. It has several advantages such as high bandwidth and high audio performance. However, one of the primary disadvantages in a self-oscillating controlled system is that the switching frequency of the amplifier...

  1. Impact of luminescence quenching on relaxation-oscillation frequency in solid-state lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agazzi, L.; Bernhardi, Edward; Worhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus

    Measurement of the laser relaxation-oscillation frequency as a function of pump rate allows one to determine parameters of the laser medium or cavity. We show that luminescence quenching of a fraction of the rare-earth ions in a solid-state laser affects the relaxation oscillations, resulting in

  2. Changes in frequency of spontaneous oscillations in procerebrum correlate to behavioural choice in terrestrial snails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Samarova

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to understand functional significance of spontaneous oscillations of local field potential in the olfactory brain lobe of terrestrial snail, the procerebrum (PC. We compared changes in frequency of oscillations in semi-intact preparations from snails trained to percept the same conditioned odor as positive (associated with food reinforcement or negative (associated with noxious reinforcement. In vivo recordings in freely behaving naïve snails showed a significant decrease of spontaneous PC oscillations frequency during a stage of tentacle withdrawal to odor presentation. In in vitro preparations from naïve snails, a similar decrease in frequency of the PC oscillations to odor presentation was observed. Changes in frequency of the oscillations to cineole presentations in the “aversive” group of snails (demonstrating withdrawal were much more pronounced than in naïve snails. No significant difference in responses to 5 and 20% cineole was noted. Changes in the spontaneous oscillations frequency in the snails trained to respond with positive reaction (approach to cineole depended on the concentration of the applied odor, and these responses were qualitatively similar to responses of other groups during the first 10 s of responses to odor, but significantly different (increase in PC oscillations frequency from the responses of the aversively trained and naïve snails in the interval 11-30 s, which corresponds to the end of the tentacle withdrawal and timing of decision making (approach or escape in the free behaving snails. Obtained results suggest that frequency of the PC lobe spontaneous oscillations correlate to the choice of behavior in snails: withdrawal (decrease in frequency or approach (increase in frequency to the source of odor.

  3. Parkinsonian Rest Tremor Is Associated With Modulations of Subthalamic High-Frequency Oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Jan; Butz, Markus; Hartmann, Christian J; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Özkurt, Tolga E; Vesper, Jan; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2016-10-01

    High frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) have been observed in the basal ganglia of PD patients and were shown to be modulated by the administration of levodopa and voluntary movement. The objective of this study was to test whether the power of high-frequency oscillations in the STN is associated with spontaneous manifestation of parkinsonian rest tremor. The electromyogram of both forearms and local field potentials from the STN were recorded in 11 PD patients (10 men, age 58 [9.4] years, disease duration 9.2 [6.3] years). Patients were recorded at rest and while performing repetitive hand movements before and after levodopa intake. High-frequency oscillation power was compared across epochs containing rest tremor, tremor-free rest, or voluntary movement and related to the tremor cycle. We observed prominent slow (200-300 Hz) and fast (300-400 Hz) high-frequency oscillations. The ratio between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power increased when tremor became manifest. This increase was consistent across nuclei (94%) and occurred in medication ON and OFF. The ratio outperformed other potential markers of tremor, such as power at individual tremor frequency, beta power, or low gamma power. For voluntary movement, we did not observe a significant difference when compared with rest or rest tremor. Finally, rhythmic modulations of high-frequency oscillation power occurred within the tremor cycle. Subthalamic high-frequency oscillation power is closely linked to the occurrence of parkinsonian rest tremor. The balance between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power combines information on motor and medication state. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Transfer function-based modelling for voltage oscillation phenomena in PWM motor drives with long feeding cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Choel; Park, Ju H.

    2010-04-01

    In this article, a transfer function-based modelling is proposed to investigate voltage oscillation phenomena, i.e. over-voltage at the motor terminal, associated with pulse-width modulation (PWM) inverter-fed motor drives with long feeding cables. As such, the long feeding cable is assumed to be a distortionless transmission line; then, a bounce diagram and time-harmonic method are utilised to derive a simple model with a minimum computational burden that is easy to realise using the Matlab/Simulink software package. Furthermore, the model takes account of the inverter output and the motor terminal filters, which are commonly used to suppress the motor terminal over-voltage. The model accuracy is verified by a comparison with the circuit-oriented software, OrCAD/PSpice, simulation results.

  5. PD-Detection vs. Loss Measurements at High Voltages with variable frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Edin, Hans

    1999-01-01

    Partial discharge-activity (PD) in internal voids in epoxy plastic was measured at AC voltages from below inception to 3 times inception with variable frequencies in the range 0.1 to 100Hz.The results from phase/height analyses were compared to dielec-tric loss measurements and related to the app......Partial discharge-activity (PD) in internal voids in epoxy plastic was measured at AC voltages from below inception to 3 times inception with variable frequencies in the range 0.1 to 100Hz.The results from phase/height analyses were compared to dielec-tric loss measurements and related...

  6. SELF TUNING CONTROLLERS FOR DAMPING LOW FREQUENCY OSCILLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANGU RAVINDRA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new control methods based on adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy damping controller and adaptive Artificial Neural Networks damping controller techniques to control a Unified Power Flow controller (UPFC installed in a single machine infinite bus Power System. The objective of Neuro-Fuzzy and ANN based UPFC controller is to damp power system oscillations.Phillips-Herffron model of a single machine power system equipped with a UPFC is used to model the system. In order to damp power system oscillations, adaptive neuro-fuzzy damping controller and adaptive ANN damping controller for UPFC are designed and simulated. Simulation is performed for various types of loads and for different disturbances. Simulation results demonstrate that the developed adaptive ANN damping controller has an excellent capability in damping electromechanical oscillations which exhibits a superior damping performance in comparison to the neuro-fuzzy damping controller as well as conventional lead-lag controller.

  7. Locking of self-oscillation frequency by pump modulation in an erbium-doped fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarchik, A. N.; Barmenkov, Yu. O.

    2005-10-01

    Frequency locking of self-oscillations in a diode-pumped erbium-doped fiber laser by external modulation of the diode current is studied experimentally. The coexistence of locking and unlocking regimes is detected. The condition for onset of the bistability and dependences of the frequency detuning on the modulation frequency and amplitude are established. Transitions to torus-chaos are also demonstrated.

  8. Changing and predicting the frequency of double wall carbon nanotubes oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Double wall carbon nanotubes have been considered as potential candidate for ultra-high frequency oscillator. However, the exact frequency change versus the nanotubes’ shape has not been detailed discussed. In this article, a series of double wall carbon nanotubes oscillators are investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. We find that, by changing the tube length and radius, the oscillation frequency can be easily modified. To better understand the simulation result above, a theoretical model with maximum main force approximation is introduced. Then the tendency for the frequency change can be well interpreted. Moreover, we find the effective force increases linearly with the tube radius. After a careful derivation, a universal formula is given, which can predict the oscillation period with a good accuracy.

  9. Optical parametric amplification and oscillation assisted by low-frequency stimulated emission

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Optical parametric amplification/oscillation provide a powerful tool for coherent light generation in spectral regions inaccessible to lasers. Parametric gain is based on a frequency {\\it down-conversion} process, and thus it can not be realized for signal waves at a frequency $\\omega_3$ {\\it higher} than the frequency of the pump wave $\\omega_1$. In this work we suggest a route toward the realization of {\\it up-conversion} optical parametric amplification and oscillation, i.e. amplification of the signal wave by a coherent pump wave of lower frequency, assisted by stimulated emission of the auxiliary idler wave. When the signal field is resonated in an optical cavity, parametric oscillation is obtained. Design parameters for the observation of up-conversion optical parametric oscillation at $\\lambda_3=465$ nm are given for a periodically-poled lithium-niobate (PPLN) crystal doped with Nd$^{3+}$ ions.

  10. A low-phase-noise Ka-band push-push voltage-controlled oscillator using CMOS/glass-integrated passive device technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a Ka-band CMOS push-push voltage- controlled oscillator (VCO) integrated into a glass-integrated passive device (GIPD) process is presented. The transformer, λ/4 transmission line, and inductors of the VCO are realized in the GIPD process, achieving superior performances, and therefore improve the phase noise of the VCO. Moreover, the transformer-based VCO is a differential Hartley topology to further reduce the phase noise and chip area. Operating at 1.8 V supply voltage, the VCO core consumes merely 3.8 mW of dc power. The measured phase noise is -109.18 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from the 30.84 GHz oscillation frequency. The push-push VCO also demonstrates a 24.5 dB fundamental rejection, and exhibits an 8.4% tuning range. Compared with recently published CMOS-based VCOs, it is observed that the proposed VCO exhibits excellent performance under low power consumption.

  11. Application of active power sensitivity to frequency and voltage variations on load shedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girgis, Adly A. [Clemson University, 303 Riggs Hall, Clemson, SC 29634-0915 (United States); Mathure, Shruti [ITC Holdings, MI (United States)

    2010-03-15

    The occurrence of a large disturbance in a power system can lead to a decline in the system frequency and bus voltages due to a real and reactive power deficiency or due to the formation of islands with generation-load imbalance. Load shedding is an emergency control action that can prevent a blackout in the power system by relieving the overload in some parts of the system. This paper shows that rate of change of frequency can be utilized to determine the magnitude of generation-load imbalance, while the rate of change of voltage with respect to active power can be utilized to identify the sensitive bus for load shedding. The frequency, voltages and their rate of change can be obtained by means of measurements in real-time from various devices such as digital recorders or phasor measurement units or these parameters can be estimated from the voltage data by other means such as an optimal estimation method like Kalman filtering. The rate of change of system frequency, along with the equivalent system inertia may be used to estimate the magnitude of the disturbance prior to each load shedding step. The buses with a higher rate of change of voltage may be identified as the critical ones for load shedding and load can be first shed at these buses, depending on the change in the power flow at each bus. This application is tested on the IEEE 30 bus system and the preliminary results demonstrate that it is feasible to be used in load shedding to restore system voltage and frequency. (author)

  12. Fundamental properties of solar-like oscillating stars from frequencies of minimum $\\Delta \

    CERN Document Server

    Yıldız, M; Aksoy, Ç; Ok, S

    2015-01-01

    Low amplitude is the defining characteristic of solar-like oscillations. The space projects $Kepler$ and $CoRoT$ give us a great opportunity to successfully detect such oscillations in numerous targets. Achievements of asteroseismology depend on new discoveries of connections between the oscillation frequencies and stellar properties. In the previous studies, the frequency of the maximum amplitude and the large separation between frequencies were used for this purpose. In the present study, we confirm that the large separation between the frequencies has two minima at two different frequency values. These are the signatures of the He {\\small II} ionization zone, and as such have very strong diagnostic potential. We relate these minima to fundamental stellar properties such as mass, radius, luminosity, age and mass of convective zone. For mass, the relation is simply based on the ratio of the frequency of minimum $\\Delta \

  13. Design of an Output Feedback Controller for STATCOM in view of Low Frequency Oscillation Damping Using HBMO and PSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    masoud aliakbar golkar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays since the speed of reaching to response is getting more important, the random searching algorithms are mostly used instead of the overall search of the problem space. This paper presents the application and the performance comparison of HBMO and PSO optimization techniques for designing an output feedback damping controller for STATCOM in order to enhance the damping of power system. The problem of the damping controller design is considered as an optimization problem with a multi-purpose criterion function and it is solved by HBMO and PSO algorithms. This controller is designed in order to transmit unstable electromechanical modes to the specific area of the complex plane. The proposed controller performance is confirmed by the analysis of the eigenvalue and nonlinear time-domain simulation under various disturbances with both control parameters of STATCOM (capacitor voltage control and terminal voltage control. Simulation results illustrate that the designed controller by HBMO performs better than PSO in finding the solution. Moreover, the design of the controller based on the capacitor voltage control in comparison with terminal voltage control has better low frequency oscillation damping and it increases the dynamical stability of the power system.

  14. Observations of high-frequency and high-wavenumber solar oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, D. N.; Scherrer, P. H.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Doppler shift measurements of the Na D1 absorption line reveal solar oscillations in a new regime of frequency and wavenumber. Oscillations of vertical velocities in the temperature minimum and low chromosphere of the sun are observed with frequencies ranging up to 9.5 mHz. The fundamental modes appear with wavenumbers up to 5.33/Mm (equivalent spherical harmonic degree 3710). No evidence for chromospheric modes of 3-minute period is reported.

  15. Real Time Distributed Embedded Oscillator Operating Frequency Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Julie (Inventor); Oliver, Brett D. (Inventor); Brickner, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for clock monitoring in a network is provided. The method comprises receiving a first network clock signal at a network device and comparing the first network clock signal to a local clock signal from a primary oscillator coupled to the network device.

  16. Solid state Ka-band pulse oscillator with frequency electronic switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvornichenko V. P.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transmitting devices for small radars in the millimeter wavelength range with high resolution on range and noise immunity. The work presents the results of research and development of compact pulse oscillators with digital frequency switching from pulse to pulse. The oscillator consists of a frequency synthesizer and a synchronized amplifier on the IMPATT diode. Reference oscillator of synthesizer is synchronized by crystal oscillator with digital PLL system and contains a frequency multiplier and an amplifier operating in pulse mode. Small-sized frequency synthesizer of 8 mm wave lengths provides an output power of ~1.2 W per pulse with a frequency stability of no worse than 2•10–6. Radiation frequency is controlled by three-digit binary code in OOL levels. Synchronized amplifier made on IMPATT diodes provides microwave power up to 20 W in oscillator output with microwave pulse duration of 100—300 ns in an operating band. The oscillator can be used as a driving source for the synchronization of semiconductor and electro-vacuum devices of pulsed mode, and also as a transmitting device for small-sized radar of millimeter wave range.

  17. Suppressing high-frequency temperature oscillations in microchannels with surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yangying; Antao, Dion S.; Bian, David W.; Rao, Sameer R.; Sircar, Jay D.; Zhang, Tiejun; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2017-01-01

    Two-phase microchannel heat sinks are attractive for thermal management of high heat flux electronic devices, yet flow instability which can lead to thermal and mechanical fatigue remains a significant challenge. Much work has focused on long-timescale (˜seconds) flow oscillations which are usually related to the compressible volume in the loop. The rapid growth of vapor bubbles which can also cause flow reversal, however, occurs on a much shorter timescale (˜tens of milliseconds). While this high-frequency oscillation has often been visualized with high-speed imaging, its effect on the instantaneous temperature has not been fully investigated due to the typical low sampling rates of the sensors. Here, we investigate the temperature response as a result of the high-frequency flow oscillation in microchannels and the effect of surface microstructures on this temperature oscillation with a measurement data acquisition rate of 1000 Hz. For smooth surface microchannels, fluid flow oscillated between complete dry-out and rewetting annular flow due to the short-timescale flow instability, which caused high-frequency and large amplitude temperature oscillations (10 °C in 25 ms). In comparison, hydrophilic surface structures on the microchannel promoted capillary flow which delayed and suppressed dry-out in each oscillation cycle, and thus significantly reduced the temperature oscillation at high heat fluxes. This work suggests that promoting capillary wicking via surface structures is a promising technique to reduce thermal fatigue in high heat flux two-phase microchannel thermal management devices.

  18. Frequency control of a spin-torque oscillator using magnetostrictive anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Gyu Albert; Lee, Seok-Hee, E-mail: bgpark@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: shlee@kaist.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Seung-heon Chris [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byong-Guk, E-mail: bgpark@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: shlee@kaist.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-11

    We report the working principle of a spin-torque oscillator, of which the frequency is efficiently controlled by manipulating the magnetostrictive anisotropy. To justify the scheme, we simulate a conventional magnetic-tunnel junction-based oscillator which is fabricated on a piezoelectric material. By applying mechanical stress to a free layer using a piezoelectric material, the oscillation frequency can be controlled to ensure a broad tuning range without a significant reduction of the dynamic resistance variation. Such controllability, which appears in the absence of an external magnetic field, will not only enable the integration of spin-torque oscillators and conventional complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor technology but will also broaden the applicability of spin-torque oscillators.

  19. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT VOLTAGE AND FREQUENCY CONDITIONS IN BROILERS ELECRICAL STUNNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vecchini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of broiler stunning using different voltage and current frequency and the consequences on meat quality are reported. Loss of sensitivity was controlled in fifteen batches of medium and heavy broilers (i.e. corneal reflex, time for recover tension of neck muscles, quick beat of wings, head movements and frequency of these signs was related to the theoretical (calculated current that passed through the bird bodies. Prevalence of defects like pectoral muscles haemorrhages and coracoid’s or furculum’s fractures are not higher when frequency of current was reduced from 350 to 250 Hz and voltage maintained at 70-75 Volts, but the frequency of birds showing corneal reflex change from 91 to 33 percent and time for recover tension of neck muscles significantly increase. Any sign of reduced bleeding was observed and meat quality was similar in batches stunned at 250 and 350 Hz.

  20. Optimizing performance per watt on GPUs in High Performance Computing: temperature, frequency and voltage effects

    CERN Document Server

    Price, D C; Barsdell, B R; Babich, R; Greenhill, L J

    2014-01-01

    The magnitude of the real-time digital signal processing challenge attached to large radio astronomical antenna arrays motivates use of high performance computing (HPC) systems. The need for high power efficiency (performance per watt) at remote observatory sites parallels that in HPC broadly, where efficiency is an emerging critical metric. We investigate how the performance per watt of graphics processing units (GPUs) is affected by temperature, core clock frequency and voltage. Our results highlight how the underlying physical processes that govern transistor operation affect power efficiency. In particular, we show experimentally that GPU power consumption grows non-linearly with both temperature and supply voltage, as predicted by physical transistor models. We show lowering GPU supply voltage and increasing clock frequency while maintaining a low die temperature increases the power efficiency of an NVIDIA K20 GPU by up to 37-48% over default settings when running xGPU, a compute-bound code used in radio...

  1. Analysis of a Microgrid under Transient Conditions Using Voltage and Frequency Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation of voltage-and-frequency-(VF- based battery energy storage system (BESS controller used in micro grid for analyzing the optimum capability of plant. Microgrid is formed by using three hydropower plants feeding three-phase four-wire load. The proposed controller is used for load balancing, harmonic elimination, load leveling, and neutral current compensation. The proposed BESS controller permits the selection of an optimum voltage level of battery and allows independent current control of each phase. The main emphasis is given on maintaining constant voltage and frequency within the micro grid during transient conditions. Micro grid with power plant and its controller is modeled in MATLAB/Simulink using Power System Blockset (PSB toolboxes.

  2. A High Voltage High Frequency Resonant Inverter for Supplying DBD Devices with Short Discharge Current Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnin, Xavier; Brandelero, Julio; Videau, Nicolas; Piquet, Hubert; Meynard, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, the merits of a high-frequency resonant converter for supplying dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) devices are established. It is shown that, thanks to its high-frequency operating condition, such a converter allows to supply DBD devices with short discharge current pulses, a high repetition rate, and to control the injected power. In addition, such a topology eliminates the matter of connecting a high-voltage transformer directly across the DBD device ...

  3. Voltage and Frequency Control for Future Power Systems: the ELECTRA IRP Proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D’hulst, R.; Merino Fernandez, J.; Rikos, E.;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a high level functional architecture for frequency and voltage control for the future (2030+) power system is presented. The proposal suggests a decomposition of the present organization of power system operation into a ”web of cells”. Each cell in this web is managed by a single sy...

  4. Voltage and frequency control of wind-powered islanded microgrids based on induction generator and STATCOM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzid, Allal; Sicard, Pierre; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive modeling of a three-phase cage induction machine used as a self-excited squirrel-cage induction generator (SEIG), and discusses the regulation of the voltage and frequency of a self-excited SEIG based on the action of the static synchronous Compensator (STATCOM...

  5. Effect of a low voltage with a high frequency electrical stunning on unconsciousness in slaughter pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambooij, B.; Merkus, G.S.M.; Voorst, van N.; Pieterse, C.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of low voltage and high frequency electrical stunning of slaughter pigs was examined. Forty slaughter pigs were positioned for stunning while lying on a beam in a cage and stunned with 240 V with 800 Hz during 3 s passing the brain and 125 V with 50 Hz during 3 s passing the heart. Before th

  6. Power System Stability Using Decentralized Under Frequency and Voltage Load Shedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseinzadeh, Bakhtyar; Silva, Filipe Faria Da; Bak, Claus Leth

    2014-01-01

    of disturbance location. In this paper, to aim adaptive performance of the relays, the amount of load shed in each stage is determined proportional to the measured Rate of Change of Frequency (ROCOF). In order to localize the LS scheme close to the disturbance place, this scheme utilizes the voltage drop...

  7. Frequency tuning of polarization oscillations: Toward high-speed spin-lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Markus, E-mail: markus.lindemann@rub.de; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R. [Photonics and Terahertz Technology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Pusch, Tobias; Michalzik, Rainer [Institute of Optoelectronics, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2016-01-25

    Spin-controlled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (spin-VCSELs) offer a high potential to overcome several limitations of conventional purely charged-based laser devices. Presumably, the highest potential of spin-VCSELs lies in their ultrafast spin and polarization dynamics, which can be significantly faster than the intensity dynamics in conventional devices. Here, we experimentally demonstrate polarization oscillations in spin-VCSELs with frequencies up to 44 GHz. The results show that the oscillation frequency mainly depends on the cavity birefringence, which can be tuned by applying mechanical strain to the VCSEL structure. A tuning range of about 34 GHz is demonstrated. By measuring the polarization oscillation frequency and the birefringence governed mode splitting as a function of the applied strain simultaneously, we are able to investigate the correlation between birefringence and polarization oscillations in detail. The experimental findings are compared to numerical calculations based on the spin-flip model.

  8. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber.

  9. Flexible low-voltage organic integrated circuits with megahertz switching frequencies (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschieschang, Ute; Takimiya, Kazuo; Zaki, Tarek; Letzkus, Florian; Richter, Harald; Burghartz, Joachim N.; Klauk, Hagen

    2015-09-01

    A process for the fabrication of integrated circuits based on bottom-gate, top-contact organic thin-film transistors (TFTs) with channel lengths as short as 1 µm on flexible plastic substrates has been developed. In this process, all TFT layers (gate electrodes, organic semiconductors, source/drain contacts) are patterned with the help of high-resolution silicon stencil masks, thus eliminating the need for subtractive patterning and avoiding the exposure of the organic semiconductors to potentially harmful organic solvents or resists. The TFTs employ a low-temperature-processed gate dielectric that is sufficiently thin to allow the TFTs and circuits to operate with voltages of about 3 V. Using the vacuum-deposited small-molecule organic semiconductor 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10 DNTT), TFTs with an effective field-effect mobility of 1.2 cm2/Vs, an on/off current ratio of 107, a width-normalized transconductance of 1.2 S/m (with a standard deviation of 6%), and a signal propagation delay (measured in 11-stage ring oscillators) of 420 nsec per stage at a supply voltage of 3 V have been obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first time that megahertz operation has been achieved in flexible organic transistors at supply voltages of less than 10 V. In addition to flexible ring oscillators, we have also demonstrated a 6-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) in a binary-weighted current-steering architecture, based on TFTs with a channel length of 4 µm and fabricated on a glass substrate. This DAC has a supply voltage of 3.3 V, a circuit area of 2.6 × 4.6 mm2, and a maximum sampling rate of 100 kS/s.

  10. A Cs-Based Optical Frequency Measurement Using Cross-Linked Optical and Microwave Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Tamm, Chr; Lipphardt, B; Gerginov, V; Nemitz, N; Kazda, M; Weyers, S; Peik, E

    2013-01-01

    We describe a measurement of the frequency of the 2S1/2(F = 0) - 2D3/2(F' = 2) transition of 171Yb+ at the wavelength 436 nm (frequency 688 THz), using a single Yb+ ion confined in a Paul trap and two caesium fountains as references. In one of the fountains, the frequency of the microwave oscillator that interrogates the caesium atoms is stabilized by the laser that excites the Yb+ reference transition with a linewidth in the hertz range. The stability is transferred to the microwave oscillator with the use of a fiber laser based optical frequency comb generator that also provides the frequency conversion for the absolute frequency measurement. The frequency comb generator is configured as a transfer oscillator so that fluctuations of the pulse repetition rate and of the carrier offset frequency do not degrade the stability of the frequency conversion. The phase noise level of the generated ultrastable microwave signal is comparable to that of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator. For fountain operation with optic...

  11. Frequency Dependence of Δν of Solar-Like Oscillators Investigated: Influence of HeII Ionization Zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Hekker; S. Basu; Y. Elsworth; W.J. Chaplin

    2013-01-01

    Oscillations in solar-like oscillators tend to follow an approximately regular pattern in which oscillation modes of a certain degree and consecutive order appear at regular intervals in frequency, i.e. the so-called large frequency separation. This is true to first order approximation for acoustic

  12. A 3.01-3.82 GHz CMOS LC voltage-controlled oscillator with 6.29% VCO-gain variation for WLAN applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolong, Liu; Lei, Zhang; Li, Zhang; Yan, Wang; Zhiping, Yu

    2014-07-01

    A wideband low-phase-noise LC voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) with low VCO gain (KVCO) variation for WLAN fractional-N frequency synthesizer application is proposed and designed on a 0.13-μm CMOS process. In order to achieve a low KVCO variation, an extra switched varactor array was added to the LC tank with the conventional switched capacitor array. Based on the proposed switched varactor array compensation technique, the measured KVCO is 43 MHz/V with only 6.29% variation across the entire tuning range. The proposed VCO provides a tuning range of 23.7% from 3.01 to 3.82 GHz, while consuming 9 mA of quiescent current from a 2.3 V supply. The VCO shows a low phase noise of -121.94 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, from the 3.6 GHz carrier.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH-VOLTAGE HIGH-FREQUENCY POWER SUPPLY FOR OZONE GENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NACERA HAMMADI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A high-voltage high-frequency power supply for ozone generation is presented in this paper. Ozone generation is intended to be used in air and in water disinfection. A power stage consisting of a single-phase full bridge inverter for regulating the output power, a current push-pull inverter (driver and a control circuit are described and analyzed. This laboratory build power supply using a high voltage ferrite transformer and a PIC microcontroller was employed to energize a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD ozone generator. The inverter working on the basis of control strategy is of simple structure and has a variation range of the working frequency in order to obtain the optimal frequency value. The experimental results concerning electrical characterization and water treatment using a cylindrical DBD ozone generator supplied by this power supply are given in the end.

  14. On the application of radio frequency voltages to ion traps via helical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Siverns, J D; Weidt, S; Hensinger, W K

    2011-01-01

    Ions confined using a Paul trap require a stable, high voltage and low noise radio frequency (RF) potential. We present a guide for the design and construction of a helical coil resonator for a desired frequency that maximises the quality factor for a set of experimental constraints. We provide an in-depth analysis of the system formed from a shielded helical coil and an ion trap by treating the system as a lumped element model. This allows us to predict the resonant frequency and quality factor in terms of the physical parameters of the resonator and the properties of the ion trap. We also compare theoretical predictions with experimental data for different resonators, and predict the voltage applied to the ion trap as a function of the Q-factor, input power and the properties of the resonant circuit.

  15. Metabolic pathways reconstruction by frequency and amplitude response to forced glycolytic oscillations in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, William B

    2005-10-05

    The hypothesis that frequency and amplitude response can be used in a complicated metabolic pathway kinetics model for optimal parameter estimation, as speculated by its successful prior usage for a mechanical oscillator and a heterogeneous chemical system, is tested here. Given the complexity of the glycolysis model of yeast chosen, this question is limited to three kinetics parameters of the 87 in the in vitro model developed in the literature. The direct application of the approach, used with the uninformed selection of operating conditions for the oscillation of external glucose concentration, led to miring the data assimilation process in local minima. Application of linear systems theory, however, identified two natural resonant frequencies that, when excited by external forced oscillations of the same frequency, result in the expression of many harmonics in the Fourier spectra, that is, information-rich experiments. A single such information-rich experiment at one of the resonant frequencies was sufficient to break away from the local minima to find the optimum kinetics parameter estimates. The resonant frequencies themselves represent oscillation modes in glycolysis akin to those previously observed. Furthermore, operation of the bioreactor with large amplitude oscillations of glucose feed (25%) leads to enhanced ethanol average yield by 1.6% at the resonant frequency.

  16. Real-Time Distributed Embedded Oscillator Operating Frequency Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Julie; Oliver, Brett; Brickner, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses the utilization of embedded clocks inside of operating network data links as an auxiliary clock source to satisfy local oscillator monitoring requirements. Modem network interfaces, typically serial network links, often contain embedded clocking information of very tight precision to recover data from the link. This embedded clocking data can be utilized by the receiving device to monitor the local oscillator for tolerance to required specifications, often important in high-integrity fault-tolerant applications. A device can utilize a received embedded clock to determine if the local or the remote device is out of tolerance by using a single link. The local device can determine if it is failing, assuming a single fault model, with two or more active links. Network fabric components, containing many operational links, can potentially determine faulty remote or local devices in the presence of multiple faults. Two methods of implementation are described. In one method, a recovered clock can be directly used to monitor the local clock as a direct replacement of an external local oscillator. This scheme is consistent with a general clock monitoring function whereby clock sources are clocking two counters and compared over a fixed interval of time. In another method, overflow/underflow conditions can be used to detect clock relationships for monitoring. These network interfaces often provide clock compensation circuitry to allow data to be transferred from the received (network) clock domain to the internal clock domain. This circuit could be modified to detect overflow/underflow conditions of the buffering required and report a fast or slow receive clock, respectively.

  17. Impact of wind farms voltage regulation on the stability of the network frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, R.D. [Laboratorio de Electronica Industrial, Control e Instrumentacion (LEICI), Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC 91, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Laboratorio de Electronica. Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco, Ciudad Universitaria, Km. 4, 9000 Comodoro Rivadavia (Argentina); Battaiotto, P.E.; Mantz, R.J. [Laboratorio de Electronica Industrial, Control e Instrumentacion (LEICI), Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC 91, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    As it is well known, different kinds of wind farms can contribute to frequency and voltage regulation by means of active and reactive powers, respectively. This paper analyzes how the wind farm reactive power loop, which contribute to voltage regulation, modifies the location of the eigenvalues of a selected power system when the wind power penetration is increased. Previous to this analysis, aspects of the modeling of double fed induction generators in wind energy generation and power systems are discussed. Finally, simulations, which verify the theoretical results are presented. (author)

  18. Design of High Frequency Power Oscillator Board Based on Rotary Encoder Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Shifen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and stable high frequency pulse power supply is studied to improve high-speed wedm machine tool's efficiency. Regarding to the shortcomings of traditional digital circuit high frequency oscillator board, we design a high frequency power oscillator board based on rotary encoder control, control accuracy and high-frequency waveform by programming, adjusting the frequency and display. It has six brakes of processing function, it also includes feedback function of emulsification oil. The high frequency will be shutdown and the emulsification oil will be changed if there is too much metal dust in emulsification. It has been proved by practice that high-frequency circuit board is simple and reliable and can greatly increase efficiency of wire cutting.

  19. A comparison of MESFET and HEMT MMIC technologies using a compact Ka-band voltage-controlled oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swirhun, S.; Geddes, J.; Sokolov, Vladimir; Bosch, D.; Gawronski, M.; Anholt, R.

    1991-07-01

    To compare the capability of MESFET and HEMT technologies for monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) implementation we have fabricated and tested discrete field-effect transistors (FETs) and a novel Ka-band monolithic voltage controlled oscillator (VCO). We implemented the circuit with three different active devices: moderate- and high-doped ion-implanted MESFETs (metal-semiconductor FETs) and AlGaAs/GaAs HEMTs (high electron mobility transistors). A comparison of the measured oscillator phase-noise and an independent comparison of the temperature dependence of MESFET and HEMT RF equivalent circuits yields two general guidelines: MESFETs are preferred over HEMTs for applications requiring low phase-noise and temperature insensitive operation.

  20. Internal oscillation frequencies and anharmonic effects for the double sine-Gordon kink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salerno, M.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1989-01-01

    A simple derivation of the small oscillation frequency around 4π-kink solutions of the double sine-Gordon equation is presented. Small corrections to these frequencies due to anharmonic effects are also numerically and analytically investigated. The analysis is based on energetic considerations...

  1. Dynamic localization and Bloch oscillations in the spectrum of a frequency mode-locked laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2005-04-01

    It is shown that a frequency mode-locked laser with a sinusoidal sweep of modulation frequency around a mode-locking condition represents an ideal optical system for observing in the spectral domain the phenomena of dynamic localization and Bloch oscillations of electrons in an ideal solid placed in an external ac electric field.

  2. Investigation of switching frequency variations in self-oscillating class D amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Pfaffinger, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Class D audio amplifiers have gained significant influence in sound reproduction due to their high efficiency. One of the most commonly used control methods in class D amplifiers is known as self-oscillation. An parameter of key interest in self-oscillating class D amplifiers is the switching...... frequency, which can be directly related to the performance of the amplifier. This paper will clearify the myth of the switching frequency through investigation of its dependency on modulation index and reference frequency. Validation is done using simulations and an 50 W amplifier providing 0...

  3. Fast, precise, and widely tunable frequency control of an optical parametric oscillator referenced to a frequency comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prehn, Alexander; Glöckner, Rosa; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Optical frequency combs (OFCs) provide a convenient reference for the frequency stabilization of continuous-wave lasers. We demonstrate a frequency control method relying on tracking over a wide range and stabilizing the beat note between the laser and the OFC. The approach combines fast frequency ramps on a millisecond timescale in the entire mode-hop free tuning range of the laser and precise stabilization to single frequencies. We apply it to a commercially available optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and demonstrate tuning over more than 60 GHz with a ramping speed up to 3 GHz/ms. Frequency ramps spanning 15 GHz are performed in less than 10 ms, with the OPO instantly relocked to the OFC after the ramp at any desired frequency. The developed control hardware and software are able to stabilize the OPO to sub-MHz precision and to perform sequences of fast frequency ramps automatically.

  4. Damping of Low Frequency Power System Oscillations with Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamczyk, Andrzej Grzegorz

    In this thesis, the focus is given to low frequency power oscillations, which have been bothering power systems from their early days of existence. Among various types of oscillations the most bothering are inter-area oscillations, which have been involved in many blackout incidents that occurred...... oscillates against another coherent group located in another power system area, causing high power fluctuations on the tie-lines that interconnect the areas. The reason why inter-area oscillations compromise the power system stability is their poorly damped characteristic. It means that once triggered...... to continue. Especially wind power is seen as one of the main players on the energy markets of the future. However, to ensure seamless integration of high amount of non-synchronous generation, transmission system operators have specified a number of connection requirements. These requirements have pushed...

  5. Influences of Excess Oscillation of Voltage Pulse and Discharge Mode on NO Removal Using Barrier-Type Plasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Kazunori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Ihori, Haruo; Kitani, Isamu

    This paper presents experimental results of NO removal from a simulated exhausted-gas using a barrier type reactor with screw electrodes subjected to polarity-reversed voltage pulses. The polarity-reversed pulse was produced by direct grounding of a charged coaxial cable because a traveling wave voltage was negatively reflected at the grounding end with a change in its polarity and then it propagated to the plasma reactor at the opposite end. Influence of cable length on NO removal was studied for two kinds of cable connection, single-connected cable and parallel-connected cables. NO removal ratio for a 50m-long cable was lower than that for much shorter cables in both single and parallel connections when the applied voltage became high. Energy efficiency for NO removal also increased with decreasing the cable length. This was because excess discharges during the voltage oscillation caused by the large stored energy in the long cable resulted in reproduction of NO molecules. Energy efficiency was further improved by changing the discharge mode from dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) to surface discharge (SD). Energy efficiency was up to 110g/kWh with 55% NO removal ratio and 34g/kWh with 100% NO removal ratio by using a single 10m-long cable in SD mode.

  6. A HBAR-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Daugey, Thomas; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source. A 2.298~GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally-controlled two-port AlN-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24000 at 68$^{\\circ}$C, is frequency multiplied by 2 to 4.596~GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the HBAR is measured to be $-23$~ppm/$^{\\circ}$C at 2.298~GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596~GHz source is $-105$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 1~kHz offset and $-150$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 100~kHz offset. The 4.596~GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator (LO) in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter (VCPS) implemented in the 2.298~GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming...

  7. Characteristics of low-frequency oscillation intensity of air-sea turbulent heat fluxes over the northwest Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gen; REN BaoHua; ZHENG JianOiu; WANG Jun

    2009-01-01

    Based on the daily turbulent heat fluxes and related meteorological variables dataeets (1985-2006) from Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) Project of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), characteristics of low-frequency oscillation intensity of air-sea turbulent heat fluxes over the northwest Pacific are analyzed by linear perturbation method and correlation analysis. It can be concluded that: 1) the distribution of low-frequency oscillation intensity of latent heat flux (LHF) over the northwest Pacific is mainly affected by that of low-frequency oscillation intensity of anomalous air-eea humidity gradient (△q') as well as mean air-eea humidity gradient (△q), while the distribution of low-frequency oscillation Intensity of sensible heat flux (SHF) is mainly affected by that of low-frequency oscillation intensity of anomalous air-sea temperature gradient (△T'). 2) The low-frequency oscillation of turbulent heat fluxes over the northwest Pacific is the strongest in winter and the weakest in summer. And the seasonal transition of low-frequency oscillation intensity of LHF is jointly influenced by those of low-frequency oscillation intensity of △q', low-frequency oscillation intensity of anomalous wind speed (U'), △q and mean wind speed (U), while the seasonal transition of low-frequency oscillation intensity of SHF is mainly influenced by those of low-frequency oscillation Intensity of △T' and U. 3) Over the tropical west Pacific and sea areas north of 20ON, the low-frequency oscillation of LHF (SHF) is mainly influenced by atmospheric variables qa' (Ta') and U', indicating an oceanic response to overlying atmospheric forcing. In contrast, over the tropical eastern and central Pacific south of 20°N, qs' (Ts') also greatly influences the low-frequency oscillation of LHF (SHF).

  8. High frequency spin torque oscillators with composite free layer spin valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Kanimozhi; Arumugam, Brinda; Rajamani, Amuda

    2016-07-15

    We report the oscillations of magnetic spin components in a composite free layer spin valve. The associated Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert–Slonczewski (LLGS) equation is studied by stereographically projecting the spin on to a complex plane and the spin components were found. A fourth order Runge–Kutta numerical integration on LLGS equation also confirms the similar trajectories of the spin components. This study establishes the possibility of a Spin Torque Oscillator in a composite free layer spin valve, where the exchange coupling is ferromagnetic in nature. In-plane and out-of-plane precessional modes of magnetization oscillations were found in zero applied magnetic field and the frequencies of the oscillations were calculated from Fast Fourier Transform of the components of magnetization. Behavior of Power Spectral Density for a range of current density is studied. Finally our analysis shows the occurrence of highest frequency 150 GHz, which is in the second harmonics for the specific choice of system parameters.

  9. Dynamics of two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Terada, Yu

    2014-01-01

    A large variety of rhythms have been observed in nature. These rhythms can be often regarded to interact with each other, such as electroencephalogram (EEG) in the brain. To investigate the dynamical properties of such systems, in this paper, we consider two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions, particularly under the condition that the average frequency of fast oscillators is almost equal to the integral multiple of that of slow oscillators. What is the most important point is that we have to use the specific type of the coupling function derived from the phase reduction theory. Under some additional assumption, moreover, we can reduce the system consisting of two populations of coupled phase oscillators to a low-dimensional system in the continuum limit. As a result, we find chimera states in which clustering and incoherent states coexist. We also confirm that the behaviors of the derived low-dimensional model fairly agree with that of the original one.

  10. High frequency spin torque oscillators with composite free layer spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Kanimozhi; Arumugam, Brinda; Rajamani, Amuda

    2016-07-01

    We report the oscillations of magnetic spin components in a composite free layer spin valve. The associated Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski (LLGS) equation is studied by stereographically projecting the spin on to a complex plane and the spin components were found. A fourth order Runge-Kutta numerical integration on LLGS equation also confirms the similar trajectories of the spin components. This study establishes the possibility of a Spin Torque Oscillator in a composite free layer spin valve, where the exchange coupling is ferromagnetic in nature. In-plane and out-of-plane precessional modes of magnetization oscillations were found in zero applied magnetic field and the frequencies of the oscillations were calculated from Fast Fourier Transform of the components of magnetization. Behavior of Power Spectral Density for a range of current density is studied. Finally our analysis shows the occurrence of highest frequency 150 GHz, which is in the second harmonics for the specific choice of system parameters.

  11. An experimental investigation of low-frequency noise in 8-mm-band Gunn-diode oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, I. A.; Malyshev, V. M.; Meshcheriakov, A. V.

    1989-07-01

    The noise characteristics of Ka-band Gunn oscillators are studied. The dependences of the frequency fluctuations on the SWR and load phases are analyzed. A comparison of the noise characteristics of Ka- and X-band Gunn oscillators shows that their fluctuation levels are about the same if they are calculated at the same oscillation frequency. The amplitude fluctuation is 10 dB lower in Ka-band oscillators.

  12. Frequency and Phase Noise in Non-Linear Microwave Oscillator Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Tannous, C.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a new methodology and a time-domain software package for the estimation of the oscillation frequency and the phase noise spectrum of non-linear noisy microwave circuits based on the direct integration of the system of stochastic differential equations representing the circuit. Our theoretical evaluations can be used in order to make detailed comparisons with the experimental measurements of phase noise spectra in selected oscillating circuits.

  13. Spontaneous Low Frequency Oscillations in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2014-01-01

    patients admitted to the stroke unit with symptoms of ischemic stroke. 11/29 patients received thrombolytic therapy. NIRS examination was conducted 2 days (median time) from stroke onset. NIRS optodes were placed on each side of the head with a 3 cm source-detector distance. Using transfer function.......09-0.11 Hz range are affected by changes in cerebral autoregulation (CA), which is altered following stroke. We examined oxyHb LFOs at bed-side as a marker of CA in the subacute phase in stroke patients with or without recombinant tissue plasminogen activator thrombolytic therapy. Methods: We recruited 29...... analysis, inter-hemispheric phase shift and amplitude ratio of the oxyHb oscillations in the 0.09-0.11 Hz range were assessed. Results: The correlation between NIHSS scores at admission and oxyHb parameters revealed a significant positive correlation between stroke severity at admission and inter...

  14. Extracting Oscillation Frequencies in Spontaneous Emission Rate of an Atom Between Two Mirrors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hai-Jun; DU Meng-Li

    2007-01-01

    For an atom in a medium with refractive index n sandwiched between two parallel mirrors, we derive an analytical formula for the spontaneous emission rate based on Fermi's golden rule. The oscillations are not transparent in this formula. By performing Fourier transform on scaling variable measuring system size while holding system configuration fixed, we extracted the frequencies of many oscillations in this system. We show that these oscillations correspond to emitted photon closed-orbits going away from and returning to the emitting atom.

  15. Unprecedented High Long Term Frequency Stability with a Macroscopic Resonator Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Grop, Serge; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Bazin, Nicolas; Kersalé, Yann; Oxborrow, Mark; Rubiola, Enrico; Giordano, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the long-term frequency stabilty characterisation of a new type of cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an autonomous pulse-tube cryocooler as its cold source. This new design enables a relative frequency stability of better than 4.5e-15 over one day of integration. This represents to our knowledge the best long-term frequency stability ever obtained with a signal source based on a macroscopic resonator.

  16. High Current Multi-finger InGaAs/InP Double Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor with the Maximum Oscillation Frequency 253 GHz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Zhi; SU Yong-bo; CHENG Wei; LIU Xin-Yu; XU An-Huai; QI Ming

    2008-01-01

    @@ A four-finger InGaAs/InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor is designed and fabricated successfully by using planarization technology. The emitter area of each finger is 1 × 15 μm2. The breakdown voltage is more than 7V, the maximum collector current could be more than 100mA. The current gain cutoff frequency is as high as 155 GHz and the maximum oscillation frequency reaches 253 GHz. The heterostructure bipolar transistor can offer more than 70mW class-A maximum output power at W band and the maximum power density can be as high as 1.2 W/mm.

  17. Coherence stability and effect of random natural frequencies in populations of coupled oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomin, Giambattista; Poquet, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    We consider the (noisy) Kuramoto model, that is a population of N oscillators, or rotators, with mean-field interaction. Each oscillator has its own randomly chosen natural frequency (quenched disorder) and it is stirred by Brownian motion. In the limit N goes to infty this model is accurately described by a (deterministic) Fokker-Planck equation. We study this equation and obtain quantitatively sharp results in the limit of weak disorder. We show that, in general, even when the natural frequencies have zero mean the oscillators synchronize (for sufficiently strong interaction) around a common rotating phase, whose frequency is sharply estimated. We also establish the stability properties of these solutions (in fact, limit cycles). These results are obtained by identifying the stable hyperbolic manifold of stationary solutions of an associated non disordered model and by exploiting the robustness of hyperbolic structures under suitable perturbations. When the disorder distribution is symmetric the speed vanis...

  18. Comparison of Simulated and Measured Fluid-Surface Oscillation Frequencies in a Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapuzzano, Matthew; Pierre, Kiesha; Tufekcioglu, Emre; Guldiken, Rasim; Tejada-Martinez, Andres; Crane, Nathan

    2016-11-01

    Many important processes from agriculture to manufacturing depend on the wetting of fluids on rough or textured surfaces. This has traditionally been studied from a macro-perspective. The effects of these surface features can be dramatically altered by vibrations that overcome energy barriers to contact line motion caused by surface roughness. In order to study these effects in confined geometries and at different length scales, a validated model is required. This presentation will compare the measured and simulated frequencies of capillary vibrations in a cylindrical glass tube. Fluid surface vibrations are excited externally through deformation of the interface. The resulting surface oscillations are observed with a high speed video camera and the dominant oscillation frequencies are calculated. The measured oscillation frequencies are compared to predictions from transient CFD simulations across a range of interface diameters from 400 um to 1.5 mm. These results may be used to inform studies of wetting under vibration. NSF CMMI-1361919.

  19. Multiple-Time-Scales Hierarchical Frequency Stability Control Strategy of Medium-Voltage Isolated Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhuoli; Yang, Ping; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an islanded medium-voltage (MV) microgrid placed in Dongao Island is presented, which integrates renewable-energy-based distributed generations (DGs), energy storage system (ESS), and local loads. In an isolated microgrid without connection to the main grid to support the frequency...... of Zone B. Theoretical analysis, time-domain simulation and field test results under various conditions and scenarios in the Dongao Island microgrid are presented to prove the validity of the introduced control strategy....

  20. First observation of quasi-2-day oscillations in ionospheric plasma frequency at fixed heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Altadill

    Full Text Available The existence and development of the quasi-2-day oscillations in the plasma frequency variations of the F region at northern middle latitudes are investigated. A new approach to study the quasi-2-day oscillations is presented, using a methodology that allows us to do such a study at fixed heights. The hourly values of plasma frequency at fixed heights, from 170 km to 220 km at 10 km step, obtained at the Observatori de l'Ebre station (40.8°N, 0.5°E during 1995 are used for analysis. It is found that quasi-2-day oscillations exist and persisted in the ionospheric plasma frequency variations over the entire year 1995 for all altitudes investigated. The dominant period of oscillation ranges from 42 to 56 h. The amplitude of oscillation is from 0.1 MHz to 1 MHz. The activity of the quasi-2-day oscillation is better expressed during the summer half year when several enhancements, about 15–30 days in duration, were observed. The largest enhancements of the oscillation occurred during early June, July and early August; i. e., near and after the summer solstice when the 2-day wave in the middle neutral atmosphere typically displays its largest activity in the Northern Hemisphere. The results obtained may help us understand better the possible influencing mechanisms between the 2-day wave in the middle neutral atmosphere and the ionospheric quasi-2-day oscillations.

    Key words. Ionosphere (Ionosphere - atmosphere interactions; Mid-latitude ionosphere; Plasma waves and instabilities

  1. Compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for converter type modulator applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reghu, T; Mandloi, V; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-04-01

    The design and development of a compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for a converter type modulator of klystron amplifiers is presented. The transformer has been designed to operate at a frequency of 20 kHz and at a flux swing of ±0.6 T. Iron (Fe) based nanocrystalline material has been selected as a core for the construction of the transformer. The transformer employs a specially designed solid Teflon bobbin having 120 kV insulation for winding the high voltage secondary windings. The flux swing of the core has been experimentally found by plotting the hysteresis loop at actual operating conditions. Based on the design, a prototype transformer has been built which is per se a unique combination of high voltage, high frequency, and peak power specifications. The transformer was able to provide 58 kV (pk-pk) at the secondary with a peak power handling capability of 700 kVA. The transformation ratio was 1:17. The performance of the transformer is also presented and discussed.

  2. Effects of voltage errors caused by gap-voltage and automatic-frequency tuning in an alternating-phase-focused linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Y.; Yamada, S.; Murakami, T.; Fujimoto, T.; Fujisawa, T.; Ogawa, H.; Miyahara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Hojo, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Muramatsu, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Mitsumoto, T.; Tsutsui, H.; Watanabe, T.; Ueda, T.

    2008-05-01

    A compact injector for a heavy-ion medical-accelerator complex was developed. It consists of an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source (ECRIS) and two linacs, which are a radio-frequency-quadrupole (RFQ) linac and an Interdigital H-mode drift-tube-linac (IH-DTL). Beam acceleration tests of the compact injector were performed, and the designed beam quality was verified by the measured results, as reported earlier. Because the method of alternating-phase-focusing (APF) was used for beam focusing of the IH-DTL, the motion of beam ions would be sensitive to gap-voltage errors, caused during tuning of the gap-voltage distribution and by automatic-frequency tuning in actual operation. To study the effects of voltage errors to beam quality, further measurements were performed during acceleration tests. In this report, the effects of voltage errors for the APF IH-DTL are discussed.

  3. Low Voltage Power Supply Incorporating Ceramic Transformer

    CERN Document Server

    Imori, M

    2007-01-01

    A low voltage power supply provides the regulated output voltage of 1 V from the supply voltage around 48 V. The low voltage power supply incorporates a ceramic transformer which utilizes piezoelectric effect to convert voltage. The ceramic transformer isolates the secondary from the primary, thus providing the ground isolation between the supply and the output voltages. The ceramic transformer takes the place of the conventional magnetic transformer. The ceramic transformer is constructed from a ceramic bar and does not include any magnetic material. So the low voltage power supply can operate under a magnetic field. The output voltage is stabilized by feedback. A feedback loop consists of an error amplifier, a voltage controlled oscillator and a driver circuit. The amplitude ratio of the transformer has dependence on the frequency, which is utilized to stabilize the output voltage. The low voltage power supply is investigated on the analogy of the high voltage power supply similarly incorporating the cerami...

  4. Effects of noise on the frequency response of the monostable Duffing oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Edmon

    2017-03-01

    The influence of noise on the frequency response of the monostable, hardening Duffing oscillator is studied. These changes are studied via the averaged dynamics (using Euler-Maruyama simulations) as well as experiments. It is found that for intermediate noise amplitudes, the qualitative shape of the frequency response curve is changed. For large noise amplitudes, the upper and lower branches of the hysteresis curve collapse into one curve. These results could be of practical significance, if an oscillator is desired to be placed on the upper or lower branch of the hysteresis curve.

  5. ELISA: a cryocooled 10 GHz oscillator with 10-15 frequency stability

    CERN Document Server

    Grop, S; Bazin, N; Kersale, Y; Rubiola, E; Langham, C; Oxborrow, M; Clapton, D; Walker, S; De Vicente, J; Giordano, V

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the design, the breadboarding and the validation of an ultra-stable Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator operated in an autonomous cryocooler. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of a frequency stability of 3x10-15 between 1 s and 1,000 s for the European Space Agency deep space stations. This represents the lowest fractional frequency instability ever achieved with cryocoolers. The preliminary results presented in this paper validate the design we adopted for the sapphire resonator, the cold source and the oscillator loop.

  6. ELISA: a cryocooled 10 GHz oscillator with 10(-15) frequency stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grop, S; Bourgeois, P Y; Bazin, N; Kersalé, Y; Rubiola, E; Langham, C; Oxborrow, M; Clapton, D; Walker, S; De Vicente, J; Giordano, V

    2010-02-01

    This article reports the design, the breadboarding, and the validation of an ultrastable cryogenic sapphire oscillator operated in an autonomous cryocooler. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of a frequency stability of 3x10(-15) between 1 and 1000 s for the European Space Agency deep space stations. This represents the lowest fractional frequency instability ever achieved with cryocoolers. The preliminary results presented in this paper validate the design we adopted for the sapphire resonator, the cold source, and the oscillator loop.

  7. Millihertz Oscillation Frequency Drift Predicts the Occurrence of Type I X-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Altamirano, D; Wijnandsm, R; Cumming, A

    2007-01-01

    Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations reported in three neutron-star low mass X-ray binaries have been suggested to be a mode of marginally stable nuclear burning on the neutron star surface. In this Letter, we show that close to the transition between the island and the banana state, 4U~1636--53 shows mHz QPOs whose frequency systematically decreases with time until the oscillations disappear and a Type I X-ray burst occurs. There is a strong correlation between the QPO frequency $\

  8. Single frequency 1083nm ytterbium doped fiber master oscillator power amplifier laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shenghong; Qin, Guanshi; Shirakawa, Akira; Musha, Mitsuru; Ueda, Ken-Ichi

    2005-09-05

    Single frequency 1083nm ytterbium fiber master oscillator power amplifier system was demonstrated. The oscillator was a linear fiber cavity with loop mirror filter and polarization controller. The loop mirror with unpumped ytterbium fiber as a narrow bandwidth filter discriminated and selected laser longitudinal modes efficiently. Spatial hole burning effect was restrained by adjusting polarization controller appropriately in the linear cavity. The amplifier was 5 m ytterbium doped fiber pumped by 976nm pigtail coupled laser diode. The linewidth of the single frequency laser was about 2 KHz. Output power up to 177 mW was produced under the launched pump power of 332 mW.

  9. Low-frequency band gaps in chains with attached non-linear oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2007-01-01

    in structures with periodic or random inclusions are located mainly in the high frequency range, as the wavelength has to be comparable with the distance between the alternating parts. Band gaps may also exist in structures with locally attached oscillators. In the linear case the gap is located around......The aim of this article is to investigate the wave propagation in one-dimensional chains with attached non-linear local oscillators by using analytical and numerical models. The focus is on the influence of non-linearities on the filtering properties of the chain in the low frequency range...

  10. Surface acoustic wave opto-mechanical oscillator and frequency comb generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Ilchenko, V S; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2011-09-01

    We report on realization of an efficient triply resonant coupling between two long lived optical modes and a high frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode of the same monolithic crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator. The coupling results in an opto-mechanical oscillation and generation of a monochromatic SAW. A strong nonlinear interaction of this mechanical mode with other equidistant SAW modes leads to mechanical hyperparametric oscillation and generation of a SAW pulse train and associated frequency comb in the resonator. We visualized the comb by observing the modulation of the light escaping the resonator.

  11. Downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in transonic diffuser flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.

    1986-10-01

    Investigation of downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in two-dimensional, separated transonic diffuser flows were conducted numerically by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation with two equation turbulence models. It was found that the flow fields are very sensitive to the location of the downstream boundary. Extension of the diffuser downstream boundary significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of oscillations for pressure, velocity, and shock. The existence of a suction slot in the experimental setpup obscures the physical downstream boundary and therefore presents a difficulty for quantitative comparisons between computation and experiment.

  12. Structural and neurochemical correlates of individual differences in gamma frequency oscillations in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Siân E; Muthukumarawswamy, Suresh D; John Evans, C; Shaw, Alexander; Brealy, Jennifer; Davis, Brittany; McNamara, Grainne; Perry, Gavin; Singh, Krish D

    2015-10-01

    Neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency range play an important role in stimulus processing in the brain. The frequency of these oscillations can vary widely between participants and is strongly genetically determined, but the cause of this variability is not understood. Previous studies have reported correlations between individual differences in gamma frequency and the concentration of the inhibitory neurotransmitter, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), as well as with age and primary visual cortex (V1) area and thickness. This study assessed the relationships between all of these variables in the same group of participants. There were no significant correlations between gamma frequency and GABA+ concentration, V1 area or V1 thickness, although the relationship with GABA+/Cr approached significance. Considering age as a covariate further reduced the strength of all correlations and, in an additional dataset with a larger age range, gamma frequency was strongly inversely correlated with age but not V1 thickness or area, suggesting that age modulates gamma frequency via an additional, as yet unknown, mechanism. Consistent with other recent studies, these findings do not demonstrate a clear relationship between gamma frequency and GABA+ concentration. Further investigation of additional variables and the interactions between them will be necessary in order to more accurately determine predictors of the frequency of gamma oscillations. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  13. Force control is related to low-frequency oscillations in force and surface EMG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwasil Moon

    Full Text Available Force variability during constant force tasks is directly related to oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force. However, it is unknown whether such oscillations exist in muscle activity. The purpose of this paper, therefore, was to determine whether oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force are evident in the activation of muscle. Fourteen young adults (21.07 ± 2.76 years, 7 women performed constant isometric force tasks at 5% and 30% MVC by abducting the left index finger. We recorded the force output from the index finger and surface EMG from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI muscle and quantified the following outcomes: 1 variability of force using the SD of force; 2 power spectrum of force below 2 Hz; 3 EMG bursts; 4 power spectrum of EMG bursts below 2 Hz; and 5 power spectrum of the interference EMG from 10-300 Hz. The SD of force increased significantly from 5 to 30% MVC and this increase was significantly related to the increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R(2 = 0.82. For both force levels, the power spectrum for force and EMG burst was similar and contained most of the power from 0-0.5 Hz. Force and EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz were highly coherent (coherence = 0.68. The increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz from 5 to 30% MVC was related to an increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R(2 = 0.51. Finally, there was a strong association between the increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz and the interference EMG from 35-60 Hz (R(2 = 0.95. In conclusion, this finding demonstrates that bursting of the EMG signal contains low-frequency oscillations below 0.5 Hz, which are associated with oscillations in force below 0.5 Hz.

  14. A Compact Ka-Band PHEMT MMIC Voltage Controlled Oscillator%紧凑型Ka波段PHEMT微波单片集成VCO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余稳; 孙晓玮; 钱蓉; 张义门

    2005-01-01

    设计并流片制作了基于GaAs PHEMT工艺的Ka波段微波单片集成压控振荡器(MMIC VCO).该VCO具有紧凑、宽电调谐带宽及高输出功率的特点.提出了缩小芯片面积及增大调谐带宽的方法,同时还给出了设计MMIC VCO的基本步骤.该方法设计并流片制做的MMIC VCO的测量结果为:振荡频率为36±1.2GHz,输出功率为10士1dBm,芯片面积为1.3mm×1.0mm.%A compact Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit(MMIC) voltage controlled oscillator (VCO)with wide tuning range and high output power, which is based on GaAs PHEMT process,is presented. A method is introduced to reduce the chip size and to increase the bandwidth of operation. The procedure to design a MMIC VCO is also described here. The measured oscillating frequency of the MMIC VCO is 36±1.2GHz and the output power is 10±1dBm. The fabricated MMIC chip size is 1.3mm× 1.0mm.

  15. A novel photonic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  16. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON LOW FREQUENCY OSCILLATING NATURAL CONVECTION WITH PRESSURE GRADIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.C. Sharma; Madhu Jain; Mahesh Chandra

    2003-01-01

    The oscillating natural convection in the presence of transverse magnetic field with time depending pressure gradient is studied. The analysis of the problem is carried out by assuming that the fluid is flowing in a parallel plate configuration. The emphasis is on low frequency oscillating convective flows induced by g-jitter associated with micro gravity because of their importance to the space processing materials. A general solution for an oscillating flow in the presence of transverse magnetic field is carried out. Some special cases of the oscillating flow and its response to an applied magnetic field are performed. It was observed that the behavior of oscillating free convective flows depends on frequency, amplitude of the driving buoyancy forces, temperature gradient, magnetic field and the electric conditions of the channel walls. In the absence of magnetic field, buoyancy force plays a predominant role in driving the oscillatory flow pattern, and velocity magnitude is also affected by temperature gradients. To suppress the oscillating flow external magnetic field can be used. It is also found that the reduction of the velocity is inversely proportional to the square of the applied magnetic field with conducting wall but directly proportional to the inverse of the magnetic field with insulating wall. Detailed calculations and computational results are also carried out to depict the real situation.

  17. DDCC-Based Quadrature Oscillator with Grounded Capacitors and Resistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montree Kumngern

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new voltage-mode quadrature oscillator using two differential difference current conveyors (DDCCs, two grounded capacitors, and three grounded resistors is presented. The proposed oscillator provides the following advantages: the oscillation condition and oscillation frequency are orthogonally controlled; the oscillation frequency is controlled through a single grounded resistor; the use of only grounded capacitors and resistors makes the proposed circuit ideal for IC implementation; low passive and active sensitivities. Simulation results verifying the theoretical analysis are also included.

  18. Control of hippocampal gamma oscillation frequency by tonic inhibition and excitation of interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Edward O; Mody, Istvan

    2010-02-01

    Gamma-frequency oscillations depend on phasic synaptic GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated inhibition to synchronize spike timing. The spillover of synaptically released GABA can also activate extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs, and such tonic inhibition may also contribute to modulating network dynamics. In many neuronal cell types, tonic inhibition is mediated by delta subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs. We found that the frequency of in vitro cholinergically induced gamma oscillations in the mouse hippocampal CA3 region was increased by the activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) on interneurons. The NMDAR-dependent increase of gamma oscillation frequency was counteracted by the tonic inhibition of the interneurons mediated by delta subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs. Recordings of synaptic currents during gamma activity revealed that NMDAR-mediated increases in oscillation frequency correlated with a progressive synchronization of phasic excitation and inhibition in the network. Thus, the balance between tonic excitation and tonic inhibition of interneurons may modulate gamma frequency by shaping interneuronal synchronization.

  19. High frequency oscillations are associated with cognitive processing in human recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucewicz, Michal T; Cimbalnik, Jan; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Bower, Mark R; Vasoli, Vincent; Sulc, Vlastimil; Meyer, Fred; Marsh, W R; Stead, S M; Worrell, Gregory A

    2014-08-01

    High frequency oscillations are associated with normal brain function, but also increasingly recognized as potential biomarkers of the epileptogenic brain. Their role in human cognition has been predominantly studied in classical gamma frequencies (30-100 Hz), which reflect neuronal network coordination involved in attention, learning and memory. Invasive brain recordings in animals and humans demonstrate that physiological oscillations extend beyond the gamma frequency range, but their function in human cognitive processing has not been fully elucidated. Here we investigate high frequency oscillations spanning the high gamma (50-125 Hz), ripple (125-250 Hz) and fast ripple (250-500 Hz) frequency bands using intracranial recordings from 12 patients (five males and seven females, age 21-63 years) during memory encoding and recall of a series of affectively charged images. Presentation of the images induced high frequency oscillations in all three studied bands within the primary visual, limbic and higher order cortical regions in a sequence consistent with the visual processing stream. These induced oscillations were detected on individual electrodes localized in the amygdala, hippocampus and specific neocortical areas, revealing discrete oscillations of characteristic frequency, duration and latency from image presentation. Memory encoding and recall significantly modulated the number of induced high gamma, ripple and fast ripple detections in the studied structures, which was greater in the primary sensory areas during the encoding (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P = 0.002) and in the higher-order cortical association areas during the recall (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P = 0.001) of memorized images. Furthermore, the induced high gamma, ripple and fast ripple responses discriminated the encoded and the affectively charged images. In summary, our results show that high frequency oscillations, spanning a wide range of frequencies, are associated with memory processing and

  20. The Autonomous Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator: A Reference for Frequency Stability and Phase Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, V.; Grop, S.; Fluhr, C.; Dubois, B.; Kersalé, Y.; Rubiola, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) is the microwave oscillator which feature the highest short-term stability. Our best units exhibit Allan deviation σy (τ) of 4.5x10-16 at 1s, ≈ 1.5x10-16 at 100 s ≤ t ≤ 5,000 s (floor), and ≤ 5x10-15 at one day. The use of a Pulse-Tube cryocooler enables full two year operation with virtually no maintenance. Starting with a short history of the CSO in our lab, we go through the architecture and we provide more details about the resonator, the cryostat, the oscillator loop, and the servo electronics. We implemented three similar oscillators, which enable the evaluation of each with the three- cornered hat method, and provide the potential for Allan deviation measurements at parts of 10-17 level. One of our CSOs (ULISS) is transportable, and goes with a small customized truck. The unique feature of ULISS is that its σy (τ) can be validated at destination by measuring before and after the roundtrip. To this extent, ULISS can be regarded as a traveling standard of frequency stability. The CSOs are a part of the Oscillator IMP project, a platform dedicated to the measurement of noise and short-term stability of oscillators and devices in the whole radio spectrum (from MHz to THz), including microwave photonics. The scope spans from routine measurements to the research on new oscillators, components, and measurement methods.

  1. Nonlinear Vibration of Oscillation Systems using Frequency-Amplitude Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fereidoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the periodic solutions of free vibration of mechanical systems with third and fifth-order nonlinearity for two examples using He's Frequency-Amplitude Formulation (HFAF.The effectiveness and convenience of the method is illustrated in these examples. It will be shown that the solutions obtained with current method have a fabulous conformity with those achieved from time marching solution. HFAF is easy with powerful concepts and the high accuracy, so it can be found widely applicable in vibrations, especially strong nonlinearity oscillatory problems.

  2. Characteristics of low frequency oscillations of the atmosphere-ocean coupling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Randhir Singh; B Simon; P C Joshi

    2002-12-01

    The low frequency oscillation of latent heat flux over the tropical oceans has been studied. The NCEP reanalyzed fields of wind and humidity alongwith Reynolds SST are used to compute the instantaneous as well as monthly mean surface latent heat fluxes (LHF) for the year 1999. The procedure of LHF computation is based on bulk method. Spectral analysis shows that significant energy is contained in Madden Julian Oscillation band in the winds, SST, moisture and in the latent heat flux. The global distribution of wind, humidity, SST and LHF oscillation on the time scale of 30-50 days are analyzed. Maximum amplitude of oscillation on this time scale in all the above mentioned parameters were found over the Indian Ocean. The fluctuation of surface wind speed and moisture controls the latent heat flux on this time scale. The fluctuation of SST on this time scale does not seem to be important over most of the oceans.

  3. Spatial proximity effects on the excitation of sheath RF voltages by evanescent slow waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Laurent; Lu, Ling-Feng; Křivská, Alena; Jacquot, Jonathan; Hillairet, Julien; Helou, Walid; Goniche, Marc; Heuraux, Stéphane; Faudot, Eric

    2017-02-01

    We investigate theoretically how sheath radio-frequency (RF) oscillations relate to the spatial structure of the near RF parallel electric field E ∥ emitted by ion cyclotron (IC) wave launchers. We use a simple model of slow wave (SW) evanescence coupled with direct current (DC) plasma biasing via sheath boundary conditions in a 3D parallelepiped filled with homogeneous cold magnetized plasma. Within a ‘wide-sheath’ asymptotic regime, valid for large-amplitude near RF fields, the RF part of this simple RF  +  DC model becomes linear: the sheath oscillating voltage V RF at open field line boundaries can be re-expressed as a linear combination of individual contributions by every emitting point in the input field map. SW evanescence makes individual contributions all the larger as the wave emission point is located closer to the sheath walls. The decay of |V RF| with the emission point/sheath poloidal distance involves the transverse SW evanescence length and the radial protrusion depth of lateral boundaries. The decay of |V RF| with the emitter/sheath parallel distance is quantified as a function of the parallel SW evanescence length and the parallel connection length of open magnetic field lines. For realistic geometries and target SOL plasmas, poloidal decay occurs over a few centimeters. Typical parallel decay lengths for |V RF| are found to be smaller than IC antenna parallel extension. Oscillating sheath voltages at IC antenna side limiters are therefore mainly sensitive to E ∥ emission by active or passive conducting elements near these limiters, as suggested by recent experimental observations. Parallel proximity effects could also explain why sheath oscillations persist with antisymmetric strap toroidal phasing, despite the parallel antisymmetry of the radiated field map. They could finally justify current attempts at reducing the RF fields induced near antenna boxes to attenuate sheath oscillations in their vicinity.

  4. Ictal high frequency oscillations distinguish two types of seizure territories in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shennan A; Banks, Garrett P; McKhann, Guy M; Goodman, Robert R; Emerson, Ronald G; Trevelyan, Andrew J; Schevon, Catherine A

    2013-12-01

    High frequency oscillations have been proposed as a clinically useful biomarker of seizure generating sites. We used a unique set of human microelectrode array recordings (four patients, 10 seizures), in which propagating seizure wavefronts could be readily identified, to investigate the basis of ictal high frequency activity at the cortical (subdural) surface. Sustained, repetitive transient increases in high gamma (80-150 Hz) amplitude, phase-locked to the low-frequency (1-25 Hz) ictal rhythm, correlated with strong multi-unit firing bursts synchronized across the core territory of the seizure. These repetitive high frequency oscillations were seen in recordings from subdural electrodes adjacent to the microelectrode array several seconds after seizure onset, following ictal wavefront passage. Conversely, microelectrode recordings demonstrating only low-level, heterogeneous neural firing correlated with a lack of high frequency oscillations in adjacent subdural recording sites, despite the presence of a strong low-frequency signature. Previously, we reported that this pattern indicates a failure of the seizure to invade the area, because of a feedforward inhibitory veto mechanism. Because multi-unit firing rate and high gamma amplitude are closely related, high frequency oscillations can be used as a surrogate marker to distinguish the core seizure territory from the surrounding penumbra. We developed an efficient measure to detect delayed-onset, sustained ictal high frequency oscillations based on cross-frequency coupling between high gamma amplitude and the low-frequency (1-25 Hz) ictal rhythm. When applied to the broader subdural recording, this measure consistently predicted the timing or failure of ictal invasion, and revealed a surprisingly small and slowly spreading seizure core surrounded by a far larger penumbral territory. Our findings thus establish an underlying neural mechanism for delayed-onset, sustained ictal high frequency oscillations, and

  5. A fast continuation scheme for accurate tracing of nonlinear oscillator frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Dunne, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A new algorithm is proposed to combine the split-frequency harmonic balance method (SF-HBM) with arc-length continuation (ALC) for accurate tracing of the frequency response of oscillators with non-expansible nonlinearities. ALC is incorporated into the SF-HBM in a two-stage procedure: Stage I involves finding a reasonably accurate response frequency and solution using a relatively large number of low-frequency harmonics. This step is achieved using the SF-HBM in conjunction with ALC. Stage II uses the SF-HBM to obtain a very accurate solution at the frequency obtained in Stage I. To guarantee rapid path tracing, the frequency axis is appropriately subdivided. This gives high chance of success in finding a globally optimum set of harmonic coefficients. When approaching a turning point however, arc-lengths are adaptively reduced to obtain a very accurate solution. The combined procedure is tested on three hardening stiffness examples: a Duffing model; an oscillator with non-expansible stiffness and single harmonic forcing; and an oscillator with non-expansible stiffness and multiple-harmonic forcing. The results show that for non-expansible nonlinearities and multiple-harmonic forcing, the proposed algorithm is capable of tracing-out frequency response functions with high accuracy and efficiency.

  6. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, UFC, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe 25030 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  7. Damping of Inter-Area Low Frequency Oscillation Using an Adaptive Wide-Area Damping Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Wei; Jiang, L.; Fang, Jiakun

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive wide-area damping controller (WADC) based on generalized predictive control (GPC) and model identification for damping the inter-area low frequency oscillations in large-scale inter-connected power system. A recursive least-squares algorithm (RLSA) with a varying...... forgetting factor is applied to identify online the reduced-order linearlized model which contains dominant inter-area low frequency oscillations. Based on this linearlized model, the generalized predictive control scheme considering control output constraints is employed to obtain the optimal control signal...... in each sampling interval. Case studies are undertaken on a two-area fourmachine power system and the New England 10-machine 39-bus power system, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed adaptive WADC not only can damp the inter-area oscillations effectively under a wide range of operation...

  8. Measurement of acoustic glitches in solar-type stars from oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumdar, A; Ballot, J; Antia, H M; Basu, S; Houdek, G; Mathur, S; Cunha, M S; Aguirre, V Silva; Garcia, R A; Salabert, D; Verner, G A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Metcalfe, T S; Sanderfer, D T; Seader, S E; Smith, J C; Chaplin, W J

    2013-01-01

    For the very best and brightest asteroseismic solar-type targets observed by Kepler, the frequency precision is sufficient to determine the acoustic depths of the surface convective layer and the helium ionization zone. Such sharp features inside the acoustic cavity of the star, which we call acoustic glitches, create small oscillatory deviations from the uniform spacing of frequencies in a sequence of oscillation modes with the same spherical harmonic degree. We use these oscillatory signals to determine the acoustic locations of such features in 19 solar-type stars observed by the Kepler mission. Four independent groups of researchers utilized the oscillation frequencies themselves, the second differences of the frequencies and the ratio of the small and large separation to locate the base of the convection zone and the second helium ionization zone. Despite the significantly different methods of analysis, good agreement was found between the results of these four groups, barring a few cases. These results ...

  9. A note for the mechanism of high-frequency oscillation instability resulted from absorbing boundary conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Zhi-nan; LIAO Zhen-peng

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the explanation of the mechanism of high-frequency oscillation instability resulted from absorbing boundary conditions is further improved. And we analytically prove the proposition that for one dimensional dis- crete model of elastic wave motion, the module of reflection factor will be greater than 1 in high frequency band when artificial wave velocity is greater than 1.5 times the ratio of discrete space step to discrete time step. Based on the proof, the frequency band in which instability occurs is discussed in detail, showing such high-frequency waves are meaningless for the numerical simulation of wave motion.

  10. A microwave exciter for Cs frequency standards based on a sapphire-loaded cavity oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Y; McNeilage, C; Searls, J H; Ohshima, S

    2001-01-01

    A low noise and highly stable microwave exciter system has been built for Cs atomic frequency standards using a tunable sapphire-loaded cavity oscillator (SLCO), which works at room temperature. This paper discusses the successful implementation of a control system for locking the SLCO to a long-term reference signal and reports an upper limit of the achieved frequency tracking error 6 x 10(-15) at tau = 1 s.

  11. High frequency oscillations after median nerve stimulations in healthy children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Sergio; Del Piero, Ivana; Martucci, Lucia; Restuccia, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present research was to address somatosensory high frequency oscillations (400-800Hz) in healthy children and adolescents in comparison with healthy adults. We recorded somatosensory evoked potentials following median nerve stimulation in nineteen resting healthy children/adolescents and in nineteen resting healthy adults with eyes closed. We administered six consecutive stimulation blocks (500 sweeps each). The presynaptic component of high frequency oscillations amplitudes was smaller in healthy children/adolescents than in healthy adults (no difference between groups was found as far as the postsynaptic component was concerned). Healthy children/adolescents had smaller presynaptic component than the postsynaptic one (the postsynaptic component amplitude was 145% of the presynaptic one), while healthy adults showed the opposite (reduction of the postsynaptic component to 80% of the presynaptic one). No habituation phenomena concerning high frequency oscillation amplitudes were registered in neither healthy children/adolescents nor healthy adults. These findings suggest that healthy children/adolescents present with significantly different pattern of somatosensory high frequency oscillations compared with healthy adults' ones. This different pattern is reasonably expression of higher cortical excitability of the developing brain cortex. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Two pulse-coupled non-identical, frequency-different BZ oscillators with time delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrova, Anastasia I; Vanag, Vladimir K

    2014-04-14

    Two non-identical, frequency-different pulse-coupled oscillators with time delay have been systematically studied using four-variable model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction at mutual inhibitory, mutual excitatory, and mixed excitatory-inhibitory types of coupling. Different resonances like 1 : 2, 2 : 3, 1 : 3, etc., as well as complex rhythms and abrupt changes between them occur depending on the coupling strengths, time delay, and frequency ratio. Analogously to in-phase and anti-phase oscillations for 1 : 1 resonance, a similar phase locking exists for 1 : 2 resonance in the case of inhibitory coupling. For excitatory coupling, a bursting regime is found. The number of spikes in a single burst can be tuned by both the frequency ratio and time delay. For excitatory-inhibitory coupling, a region where one oscillator is suppressed (OS zone) has been found. Boundary of the OS zone depends on the frequency ratio. For weakly coupled oscillators, Farey sequence has been found for excitatory-inhibitory and mutual excitatory coupling.

  13. Symmetry Algebra of the Planar Anisotropic Quantum Harmonic Oscillator with Rational Ratio of Frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Kolokotronis, P; Lenis, D; Bonatsos, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    The symmetry algebra of the two-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator with rational ratio of frequencies is identified as a non-linear extension of the u(2) algebra. The finite dimensional representation modules of this algebra are studied and the energy eigenvalues are determined using algebraic methods of general applicability to quantum superintegrable systems.

  14. Frequency-Splitting-Free Synchronous Tuning of Close-Coupling Self-Oscillating Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The synchronous tuning of the self-oscillating wireless power transfer (WPT in a close-coupling condition is studied in this paper. The Hamel locus is applied to predict the self-oscillating points in the WPT system. In order to make the system operate stably at the most efficient point, which is the middle resonant point when there are middle resonant and split frequency points caused by frequency-splitting, the receiver (RX rather than the transmitter (TX current is chosen as the self-oscillating feedback variable. The automatic delay compensation is put forward to eliminate the influence of the intrinsic delay on frequency tuning for changeable parameters. In addition, the automatic circuit parameter tuning based on the phase difference is proposed to realize the synchronous tuning of frequency and circuit parameters. The experiments verified that the synchronous tuning proposed in this paper is effective, fully automatic, and more robust than the previous self-oscillating WPT system which use the TX current as the feedback variable.

  15. Automatic detection of high frequency oscillations during epilepsy surgery predicts seizure outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedele, Tommaso; van 't Klooster, Maryse; Burnos, Sergey; Zweiphenning, Willemiek; van Klink, Nicole; Leijten, Frans; Zijlmans, Maeike; Sarnthein, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High frequency oscillations (HFOs) and in particular fast ripples (FRs) in the post-resection electrocorticogram (ECoG) have recently been shown to be highly specific predictors of outcome of epilepsy surgery. FR visual marking is time consuming and prone to observer bias. We validate her

  16. Low phase noise oscillator design and simulation using large signal analysis and low frequency feedback networks

    OpenAIRE

    Güngör, Çağatay Ertürk

    2013-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering and the Graduate School of Engineering and Science of Bilkent University, 2013. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2013. Includes bibliographical references leaves 72-76. Spectral purity of oscillators is of great importance in both commercial and military systems. Implementing communication, radar, and Electronic Warfare systems with increasingly higher frequencies, wider bandwidths, greater data rates...

  17. Controlling Voltage and Frequency of a Power Network with Microgrid Using Droop Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Rahmati Kukandeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Microgrids (MG are new concept of electric power networks consisting of Distributed Generation (DG, renewable energy resources and sensitive loads. The goal of microgrid operation is to provide reliable and high-quality electric power regardless of faults or abnormal operating conditions. Many control methods have been employed to regulate the output power of DGs used in MGs. This paper presents a control scheme for DGs of a power system, especially with Voltage Source Inverter (VSI interface, for both grid connected and islanded modes. A comprehensive study has been performed through PSCAD simulations of the inverterfed MG behavior under both islanding and connected operation for different load conditions. The simulation results prove the droop method efficiency in controlling the voltage and frequency of the inverter output which is connected to the loads.

  18. Selective Dirac voltage engineering of individual graphene field-effect transistors for digital inverter and frequency multiplier integrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Onejae; Kim, Kyumin; Jung, Yungwoo; Choi, Eunsuk; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2017-09-01

    The ambipolar band structure of graphene presents unique opportunities for novel electronic device applications. A cycle of gate voltage sweep in a conventional graphene transistor produces a frequency-doubled output current. To increase the frequency further, we used various graphene doping control techniques to produce Dirac voltage engineered graphene channels. The various surface treatments and substrate conditions produced differently doped graphene channels that were integrated on a single substrate and multiple Dirac voltages were observed by applying a single gate voltage sweep. We applied the Dirac voltage engineering techniques to graphene field-effect transistors on a single chip for the fabrication of a frequency multiplier and a logic inverter demonstrating analog and digital circuit application possibilities.

  19. Pressures and Oscillation Frequencies Generated by Bubble-Positive Expiratory Pressure Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mary D; Milross, Maree A; Eisenhuth, John P; Alison, Jennifer A

    2017-04-01

    Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) devices are used to assist with airway clearance. Little is known about the therapist-made or commercially available bubble-PEP devices. The aim of this study was to determine the end-expiratory pressures (cm H2O) and oscillation frequencies (Hz) generated when a range of flows were applied to the therapist-made bubble-PEP devices (Bubble-PEP-3cm and Bubble-PEP-0cm) and commercial bubble-PEP devices (AguaPEP, Hydrapep, and Therabubble). This was a bench-top experimental study using a compressed air source, flow rotameter (flows of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 L/min), and pressure transducer. Data were collected using a data acquisition device with PhysioDAQxs software and analyzed with Breathalyser software to determine the pressures and oscillation frequencies generated by 5 bubble-PEP devices. Each flow was constant for a 30-s measurement period, and measurements were repeated in triplicate. The 5 devices were: a therapist-made Bubble-PEP-3cm device (filled with 13 cm of water, tubing resting 3 cm from the base of the container); the therapist-made Bubble-PEP-0cm (filled with 10 cm of water, tubing resting at the base of the container); and the AguaPEP, Hydrapep, and Therabubble devices with water to the 10 cm mark on the containers. Flows of 5-25 L/min produced the following mean ± SD PEP and oscillation frequencies (Hz): the Bubble-PEP-3cm produced PEP of 10.4 ± 0.14 to 10.8 ± 0.24 cm H2O, oscillations between 13 and 17 Hz; the Bubble-PEP-0cm produced PEP of 10.9 ± 0.01 to 12.9 ± 0.08 cm H2O, oscillations between 12 and 14 Hz; the AguaPEP produced PEP from 9.7 ± 0.02 to 11.5 ± 0.02 cm H2O, oscillations between 11 and 17 Hz; the Hydrapep produced PEP of 9.6 ± 0.35 to 10.7 ± 0.39 cm H2O, oscillations between 14 and 17 Hz; and the Therabubble produced PEP from 8.6 ± 0.01 to 12.8 ± 0.03 cm H2O, oscillations between 14 and 17 Hz. Bubble-PEP-3cm maintained the most stable pressure throughout the range of flows tested. All

  20. Frequency-Domain Maximum-Likelihood Estimation of High-Voltage Pulse Transformer Model Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Aguglia, D

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an offline frequency-domain nonlinear and stochastic identification method for equivalent model parameter estimation of high-voltage pulse transformers. Such kinds of transformers are widely used in the pulsed-power domain, and the difficulty in deriving pulsed-power converter optimal control strategies is directly linked to the accuracy of the equivalent circuit parameters. These components require models which take into account electric fields energies represented by stray capacitance in the equivalent circuit. These capacitive elements must be accurately identified, since they greatly influence the general converter performances. A nonlinear frequency-based identification method, based on maximum-likelihood estimation, is presented, and a sensitivity analysis of the best experimental test to be considered is carried out. The procedure takes into account magnetic saturation and skin effects occurring in the windings during the frequency tests. The presented method is validated by experim...

  1. Sinusoidal oscillators with lower gain requirements at higher frequencies based on an explicit tanh(x) nonlinearity

    KAUST Repository

    Elwakil, Ahmed S.

    2009-04-28

    Two novel sinusoidal oscillator structures with an explicit tanh(x) nonlinearity are proposed. The oscillators have the attractive feature: the higher the operating frequency, the lower the necessary gain required to start oscillations. A nonlinear model for the two oscillators is derived and verified numerically. Spice simulations using AMS BiCMOS 0.35 μ model parameters and experimental results are shown. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Transverse load sensing based on a dual-frequency optoelectronic oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanqi; Li, Wangzhe; Yao, Jianping

    2013-07-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a fiber-optic sensor implemented based on a dual-frequency optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) for transverse load sensing. In the OEO loop, a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) is employed to which a transverse load is applied to introduce a birefringence to create two orthogonally polarized notches, which leads to the generation of two oscillating frequencies. The beat frequency between the two oscillating frequencies is a function of the load force applied to the PS-FBG. The proposed sensor is experimentally demonstrated. The sensitivity and the minimal detectable load are measured to be as high as ~9.73 GHz/(N/mm) and 2.06×10(-4) N/mm, respectively. The high-frequency purity and stability of the generated microwave signal by the OEO permit extremely reliable and high-accuracy measurement. The frequency interrogation allows the system to operate at an ultra-high speed. In addition, the sensing signal is insensitive to the variations of both the environmental temperature and the optical carrier wavelength.

  3. Energy Efficiency of Induction Motors Running Off Frequency Converters with Pulse-Width Voltage Modulation{sup 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvetsov, N. K., E-mail: elmash@em.ispu.ru [V. I. Lenin Ivanovo State Power University (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The results of calculations of the increase in losses in an induction motor with frequency control and different forms of the supply voltage are presented. The calculations were performed by an analytic method based on harmonic analysis of the supply voltage as well as numerical calculation of the electromagnetic processes by the finite-element method.

  4. Wavelet transform analysis to assess oscillations in pial artery pulsation at the human cardiac frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklewski, P J; Gruszecki, M; Wolf, J; Swierblewska, E; Kunicka, K; Wszedybyl-Winklewska, M; Guminski, W; Zabulewicz, J; Frydrychowski, A F; Bieniaszewski, L; Narkiewicz, K

    2015-05-01

    Pial artery adjustments to changes in blood pressure (BP) may last only seconds in humans. Using a novel method called near-infrared transillumination backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) that allows for the non-invasive measurement of pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) in humans, we aimed to assess the relationship between spontaneous oscillations in BP and cc-TQ at frequencies between 0.5 Hz and 5 Hz. We hypothesized that analysis of very short data segments would enable the estimation of changes in the cardiac contribution to the BP vs. cc-TQ relationship during very rapid pial artery adjustments to external stimuli. BP and pial artery oscillations during baseline (70s and 10s signals) and the response to maximal breath-hold apnea were studied in eighteen healthy subjects. The cc-TQ was measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity, the pulsatility index and the resistive index were measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate and beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded using a Finometer; end-tidal CO2 was measured using a medical gas analyzer. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations. The recordings lasting 10s and representing 10 cycles with a frequency of ~1 Hz provided sufficient accuracy with respect to wavelet coherence and wavelet phase coherence values and yielded similar results to those obtained from approximately 70cycles (70s). A slight but significant decrease in wavelet coherence between augmented BP and cc-TQ oscillations was observed by the end of apnea. Wavelet transform analysis can be used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations at cardiac frequency using signals intervals as short as 10s. Apnea slightly decreases the contribution of cardiac activity to BP and cc-TQ oscillations.

  5. Single-frequency and tunable operation of a continuous intracavity-frequency-doubled singly resonant optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    My, Thu-Hien; Drag, Cyril; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2008-07-01

    A widely tunable continuous intracavity-frequency-doubled singly resonant optical parametric oscillator based on MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate crystal is described. The idler radiation resonating in the cavity is frequency doubled by an intracavity BBO crystal. Pumped in the green, this system can provide up to 485 mW of single-frequency orange radiation. The system is continuously temperature tunable between 1170 and 1355 nm for the idler, 876 and 975 nm for the signal, and between 585 and 678 nm for the doubled idler. The free-running power and frequency stability of the system have been observed to be better than those for a single-mode dye laser.

  6. How to record high-frequency oscillations in epilepsy: A practical guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, Maeike; Worrell, Gregory A; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Stieglitz, Thomas; Barborica, Andrei; Heers, Marcel; Ikeda, Akio; Usui, Naotaka; Le Van Quyen, Michel

    2017-08-01

    Technology for localizing epileptogenic brain regions plays a central role in surgical planning. Recent improvements in acquisition and electrode technology have revealed that high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) within the 80-500 Hz frequency range provide the neurophysiologist with new information about the extent of the epileptogenic tissue in addition to ictal and interictal lower frequency events. Nevertheless, two decades after their discovery there remain questions about HFOs as biomarkers of epileptogenic brain and there use in clinical practice. In this review, we provide practical, technical guidance for epileptologists and clinical researchers on recording, evaluation, and interpretation of ripples, fast ripples, and very high-frequency oscillations. We emphasize the importance of low noise recording to minimize artifacts. HFO analysis, either visual or with automatic detection methods, of high fidelity recordings can still be challenging because of various artifacts including muscle, movement, and filtering. Magnetoencephalography and intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) recordings are subject to the same artifacts. High-frequency oscillations are promising new biomarkers in epilepsy. This review provides interested researchers and clinicians with a review of current state of the art of recording and identification and potential challenges to clinical translation. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Antiferromagnetic THz-frequency Josephson-like Oscillator Driven by Spin Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khymyn, Roman; Lisenkov, Ivan; Tiberkevich, Vasyl; Ivanov, Boris A.; Slavin, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    The development of compact and tunable room temperature sources of coherent THz-frequency signals would open a way for numerous new applications. The existing approaches to THz-frequency generation based on superconductor Josephson junctions (JJ), free electron lasers, and quantum cascades require cryogenic temperatures or/and complex setups, preventing the miniaturization and wide use of these devices. We demonstrate theoretically that a bi-layer of a heavy metal (Pt) and a bi-axial antiferromagnetic (AFM) dielectric (NiO) can be a source of a coherent THz signal. A spin-current flowing from a DC-current-driven Pt layer and polarized along the hard AFM anisotropy axis excites a non-uniform in time precession of magnetizations sublattices in the AFM, due to the presence of a weak easy-plane AFM anisotropy. The frequency of the AFM oscillations varies in the range of 0.1–2.0 THz with the driving current in the Pt layer from 108 A/cm2 to 109 A/cm2. The THz-frequency signal from the AFM with the amplitude exceeding 1 V/cm is picked up by the inverse spin-Hall effect in Pt. The operation of a room-temperature AFM THz-frequency oscillator is similar to that of a cryogenic JJ oscillator, with the energy of the easy-plane magnetic anisotropy playing the role of the Josephson energy. PMID:28262731

  8. Antiferromagnetic THz-frequency Josephson-like Oscillator Driven by Spin Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khymyn, Roman; Lisenkov, Ivan; Tiberkevich, Vasyl; Ivanov, Boris A.; Slavin, Andrei

    2017-03-01

    The development of compact and tunable room temperature sources of coherent THz-frequency signals would open a way for numerous new applications. The existing approaches to THz-frequency generation based on superconductor Josephson junctions (JJ), free electron lasers, and quantum cascades require cryogenic temperatures or/and complex setups, preventing the miniaturization and wide use of these devices. We demonstrate theoretically that a bi-layer of a heavy metal (Pt) and a bi-axial antiferromagnetic (AFM) dielectric (NiO) can be a source of a coherent THz signal. A spin-current flowing from a DC-current-driven Pt layer and polarized along the hard AFM anisotropy axis excites a non-uniform in time precession of magnetizations sublattices in the AFM, due to the presence of a weak easy-plane AFM anisotropy. The frequency of the AFM oscillations varies in the range of 0.1–2.0 THz with the driving current in the Pt layer from 108 A/cm2 to 109 A/cm2. The THz-frequency signal from the AFM with the amplitude exceeding 1 V/cm is picked up by the inverse spin-Hall effect in Pt. The operation of a room-temperature AFM THz-frequency oscillator is similar to that of a cryogenic JJ oscillator, with the energy of the easy-plane magnetic anisotropy playing the role of the Josephson energy.

  9. Frequency-driven quantum oscillations in a graphene layer under circularly polarized ac fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega Monroy, R., E-mail: ricardovega@mail.uniatlantico.edu.co; Martinez Castro, O.; Salazar Cohen, G.

    2015-06-19

    In this paper we predict a new type of quantum oscillations driven by the frequency of a circularly polarized ac field in a monolayer of graphene placed inside an optical cavity. We show that the displacement of the structure of photon-dressed electron states near the Fermi level and the electron transitions, from extended states to bound photon-dressed electron states inside an energy gap, lead to a periodic change of singularities in the electron density of states, resulting in quantum oscillations in thermodynamic, transport and other properties in graphene.

  10. Structural control of metamaterial oscillator strength and electric field enhancement at terahertz frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiser, G. R.; Seren, H. R.; Strikwerda, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    The design of artificial nonlinear materials requires control over internal resonant charge densities and local electric field distributions. We present a MM design with a structurally controllable oscillator strength and local electric field enhancement at terahertz frequencies. The MM consists...... of a split ring resonator (SRR) array stacked above an array of closed conducting rings. An in-plane, lateral shift of a half unit cell between the SRR and closed ring arrays results in an increase of the MM oscillator strength by a factor of 4 and a 40% change in the amplitude of the resonant electric field...

  11. SST THERMAL FORCING - A DISCUSSION ON THE MECHANISM OF ATMOSPHERIC LOW-FREQUENCY OSCILLATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Dynamic and numerical methods are used to discuss the atmospheric response to SST thermal forcing. The results show that for planetary scale systems, the standing SST thermal forcing can quickly excite a stable atmospheric equilibrium state response, which is characterized by obvious large-scale teleconnection oscillation in east-west and south-north directions. For synoptic scale systems, the SST thermal forcing mainly excites the atmospheric low-frequency oscillation. Some basic relation and dynamic processes between SST thermal forcing and atmospheric response pattern are revealed and some new viewpoints are presented.

  12. Context-related frequency modulations of macaque motor cortical LFP beta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilavik, Bjørg Elisabeth; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Trachel, Romain; Confais, Joachim; Takerkart, Sylvain; Riehle, Alexa

    2012-09-01

    The local field potential (LFP) is a population measure, mainly reflecting local synaptic activity. Beta oscillations (12-40 Hz) occur in motor cortical LFPs, but their functional relevance remains controversial. Power modulation studies have related beta oscillations to a "resting" motor cortex, postural maintenance, attention, sensorimotor binding and planning. Frequency modulations were largely overlooked. We here describe context-related beta frequency modulations in motor cortical LFPs. Two monkeys performed a reaching task with 2 delays. The first delay demanded attention in time in expectation of the visual spatial cue, whereas the second delay involved visuomotor integration and movement preparation. The frequency in 2 beta bands (around 20 and 30 Hz) was systematically 2-5 Hz lower during cue expectancy than during visuomotor integration and preparation. Furthermore, the frequency was directionally selective during preparation, with about 3 Hz difference between preferred and nonpreferred directions. Direction decoding with frequency gave similar accuracy as with beta power, and decoding accuracy improved significantly when combining power and frequency, suggesting that frequency might provide an additional signal for brain-machine interfaces. In conclusion, multiple beta bands coexist in motor cortex, and frequency modulations within each band are as behaviorally meaningful as power modulations, reflecting the changing behavioral context and the movement direction during preparation.

  13. The Influence of Low-frequency Oscillation Propagation of the Tibetan Plateau Vortex on Rainstorm Downstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tiangui; Wang, Chao; La, Jia; Du, Jun; Zhang, Kairong

    2017-04-01

    Based on Tibetan Plateau vortex data, ERA-Interim and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, the characteristics of Tibetan Plateau vortex and the relationship with Low-Frequency Oscillation (LFO) from 2003 to 2012 were investigated. The heavy rainstorm occurred in Sichuan from June 29th to July 2nd in 2013, caused by the LFO, was studied. Besides, the signal of LFO, energy transmission and those influence to rainstorm were also investigate. The main conclusions are as follows: (1)Most of Tibetan Plateau vortex generate in eastern plateau, located at Tanggula Mountains, Zaduo, Dege, Qumalai and Qaidam. The moving-out Tibetan Plateau vortex mainly generate in Qumalai and most vortex occurrences during April to September. There are three directions of moving-out vortex paths: northeast, southeast and east. The areas which plateau vortex moving into are mainly distributed in Gansu, Sichuan, Shaanxi and Ningxia. (2)The zonal wind at 500hPa in plateau key region has a significant main 10-30d oscillation, with the secondly significant oscillation in 30-50d and the third in 70-90d. The relative vorticity at 500hPa in plateau key region has a significant main 30-50d oscillations, with the secondly significant oscillation in 10-30d. The 30-50d oscillation phase zone with weak westerly oscillation zone of 500hPa, and the 10-30d oscillation positive phase zone with weak oscillation zone of 500hPa are benefit to vortex generation. The 30-50d oscillation of zonal wind at 500hPa provides necessary circulation background for generation of plateau vortex, and positive phase region of 10-30d oscillation of relative vorticity at 500hPa provide necessary dynamic background conditions for it. (3) Comparing with the high frequency oscillation vortex, 10-25d low-frequency vortex is not significant at 500hPa before merging into the basin vortex. However, after merging into the basin vortex, there is a significant relationship between low-frequency vortex and the process of development, weakening and

  14. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cardini, Federica; Landucci, Norma; Lanata, Sergio; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Background High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways. HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15–57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20–30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing. The aim of this stu...

  15. Single-frequency mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator source for coherent laser radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, F; Poirier, P; Arbore, M A

    2001-11-15

    We report on the design and characterization of a highly coherent mid-IR source at 3.57mum based on a single-frequency optical parametric oscillator. Detailed frequency and amplitude noise spectra have been measured. The rms intensity noise from 1.2 to 1000 Hz was 0.03%, and a rms frequency drift of 8 kHz in 1 ms was observed. We have also demonstrated the utility of this source for coherent laser radar applications by measuring micro-Doppler spectra from vibrating targets.

  16. Experience with high frequency oscillation ventilation during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boots, R J; Lipman, J; Lassig-Smith, M; Stephens, D P; Thomas, J; Shehabi, Y; Bass, F; Anthony, A; Long, D; Seppelt, I M; Weisbrodt, L; Erickson, S; Beca, J; Sherring, C; McGuiness, S; Parke, R; Stachowski, E R; Boyd, R; Howet, B

    2011-09-01

    During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, large numbers of patients had severe respiratory failure. High frequency oscillation ventilation was used as a salvage technique for profound hypoxaemia. Our aim was to compare this experience with high frequency oscillation ventilation during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic with the same period in 2008 by performing a three-month period prevalence study in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units. The main study end-points were clinical demographics, care delivery and survival. Nine intensive care units contributed data. During 2009 there were 22 H1N1 patients (17 adults, five children) and 10 non-H1N1 patients (five adults, five children), while in 2008, 18 patients (two adults, 16 children) received high frequency oscillation ventilation. The principal non-H1N1 high frequency oscillation ventilation indication was bacterial or viral pneumonia (56%). For H1N1 patients, the median duration of high frequency oscillation ventilation was 3.7 days (interquartile range 1.8 to 5) with concomitant therapies including recruitment manoeuvres (22%), prone ventilation (41%), inhaled prostacyclins (18%) and inhaled nitric oxide (36%). Seven patients received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, six having H1N1. Three patients had extracorporeal membrane oxygenation concurrently, two as salvage therapy following the commencement of high frequency oscillation ventilation. In 2008, no high frequency oscillation ventilation patient received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Overall hospital survival was 77% in H1N1 patients, while survival in patients having adjunctive extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was similar to those receiving high frequency oscillation ventilation alone (65% compared to 71%, P = 1.00). Survival rates were comparable to published extracorporeal membrane oxygenation outcomes. High frequency oscillation ventilation was used successfully as a rescue therapy for severe respiratory failure. High frequency oscillation ventilation

  17. [High-frequency ventilation. I. Distribution of alveolar pressure amplitudes during high frequency oscillation in the lung model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen, J; Lunkenheimer, P P; Niederer, P; Bush, E; Frieling, G; Lawin, P

    1987-09-01

    The pattern of intrapulmonary pressure distribution was studied during high-frequency ventilation in order to explain the inconsistent results reported in the literature. Methods. Pressure and flow velocity (hot-wire anemometry) were measured in different lung compartments: 1. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of dried pig lungs; 2. In emphysema-simulating airbags sealed to the isolated bronchial trees of dried pig lungs; and 3. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of freshly excised pig lungs. Results. 1. The pressure amplitudes change from one area to another and depending on the exciting frequency. 2. High-frequency oscillation is associated with an increase in pressure amplitude when the exciting frequency rises, whereas with conventional high-frequency jet ventilation the pressure amplitude is more likely to decrease with frequency. 3. During high-frequency jet ventilation the local pressure amplitude changes with the position of the tube in the trachea rather than with the exciting frequency. 4. When the volume of the measuring chamber is doubled the resulting pressure amplitude falls to half the control value. 5. The pressure amplitude and mean pressure measured in the transalveolar chamber vary more or less independently from the peak flow velocity. High-frequency ventilation is thus seen to be a frequency-dependant, inhomogeneous mode of ventilation that can essentially be homogenized by systematically changing the exciting frequency. The frequency-dependant response to different lung areas to excitation is likely to result from an intrabronchially-localized aerodynamic effect rather than the mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma.

  18. High-Frequency and Type-C QPOs from Oscillating, Precessing Hot, Thick Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Fragile, P Chris; Blaes, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent studies showing an apparent correlation between the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the low-frequency, type-C QPO in low-mass, black hole X-ray binaries (LMXBs), we explore a model that explains all three QPOs in terms of an oscillating, precessing hot flow in the truncated-disk geometry. Our model favors attributing the two high-frequency QPOs, often occurring in a near 3:2 frequency ratio, to the breathing and vertical epicyclic frequency modes of the hot, thick flow, although we can not rule out the Keplerian and m=-1 radial epicyclic modes. In either case, the type-C QPO is attributed to precession. The correlation of the QPOs comes from the fact that all three frequencies are associated with the same geometrical structure. While the exact QPO frequencies are sensitive to the black hole mass and spin, their evolution over the course of an outburst is mainly tied to the truncation radius between the geometrically thin, optically thick disk and the inner, hot flow. ...

  19. The detection and characterization of high frequency and high wavenumber solar oscillations. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, David Neil

    1992-01-01

    Doppler shift measurements of the Na D(sub 1) absorption line have revealed solar oscillations in a new regime of frequency and wavenumber. Oscillations of vertical velocities in the temperature minimum and low chromosphere of the Sun are observed with frequencies ranging up to 9.5 mHz. There is no evidence for chromospheric modes of 3 minute period. This indicates that the chromosphere does not form a good cavity for acoustic waves. The fundamental-modes appear with wavenumbers up to 5.57 M per m (equivalent spherical harmonic degree, 3877). The frequencies lie below the predicted values at wavenumbers above 1 M per m. The values are in agreement with previous measurements that exist for wavenumbers up to 2.67 M per m. Spatial maps of velocity power show that high wavenumber oscillations are suppressed in active regions. The shape of the power depression indicates that wave motion is affected in the layer of atmosphere where the measurement is made. The f-modes are suppressed in the same way as p-modes, indicating that the mechanism for wave suppression affects velocity fluctuations. Mode frequencies are not affected by the magnetic fields by more than 50 micro Hz, the precision of the measurement.

  20. Analysis of transistor and snubber turn-off dynamics in high-frequency high-voltage high-power converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P. M.; Wilson, T. G.; Owen, H. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Dc to dc converters which operate reliably and efficiently at switching frequencies high enough to effect substantial reductions in the size and weight of converter energy storage elements are studied. A two winding current or voltage stepup (buck boost) dc-to-dc converter power stage submodule designed to operate in the 2.5-kW range, with an input voltage range of 110 to 180 V dc, and an output voltage of 250 V dc is emphasized. In order to assess the limitations of present day component and circuit technologies, a design goal switching frequency of 10 kHz was maintained. The converter design requirements represent a unique combination of high frequency, high voltage, and high power operation. The turn off dynamics of the primary circuit power switching transistor and its associated turn off snubber circuitry are investigated.

  1. Analysis of transistor and snubber turn-off dynamics in high-frequency high-voltage high-power converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P. M.; Wilson, T. G.; Owen, H. A., Jr.

    Dc to dc converters which operate reliably and efficiently at switching frequencies high enough to effect substantial reductions in the size and weight of converter energy storage elements are studied. A two winding current or voltage stepup (buck boost) dc-to-dc converter power stage submodule designed to operate in the 2.5-kW range, with an input voltage range of 110 to 180 V dc, and an output voltage of 250 V dc is emphasized. In order to assess the limitations of present day component and circuit technologies, a design goal switching frequency of 10 kHz was maintained. The converter design requirements represent a unique combination of high frequency, high voltage, and high power operation. The turn off dynamics of the primary circuit power switching transistor and its associated turn off snubber circuitry are investigated.

  2. A theoretical investigation of low frequency diameter oscillations of muscular arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achakri, H; Rachev, A; Stergiopulos, N; Meister, J J

    1994-01-01

    Spontaneous low frequency diameter oscillations have been observed in vivo in some muscular arteries. The aim of this paper is to propose a possible mechanism for their appearance. A lumped parameter mathematical model for the mechanical response of an artery perfused with constant flow is proposed, which takes into account the active behavior of the vascular smooth muscle. The system of governing equations is reduced into two nonlinear autonomous differential equations for the arterial circumferential stretch ratio, and the concentration of calcium ions, Ca2+, within the smooth muscle cells. Factors controlling the muscular tone are taken into account by assuming that the rate of change of Ca2+ depends on arterial pressure and on shear stress acting on the endothelium. Using the theory of dynamical systems, it was found that the stationary solution of the set of governing equations may become unstable and a periodic solution arises, yielding self-sustained diameter oscillations. It is found that a necessary condition for the appearance of diameter oscillations is the existence of a negative slope of the steady state pressure-diameter relationship, a phenomenon known to exist in arterioles. A numerical parametric study was performed and bifurcation diagrams were obtained for a typical muscular artery. Results show that low frequency diameter oscillations develop when the magnitude of the perfused inflow, the distal resistance, as well as the length of the artery are within a range of critical values.

  3. Low Frequency Plasma Oscillations in a 6-kW Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Hofery, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The oscillations from 0-100 kHz in a 6-kW magnetically shielded thruster are experimen- tally characterized. Changes in plasma parameters that result from the magnetic shielding of Hall thrusters have the potential to significantly alter thruster transients. A detailed investigation of the resulting oscillations is necessary both for the purpose of determin- ing the underlying physical processes governing time-dependent behavior in magnetically shielded thrusters as well as for improving thruster models. In this investigation, a high speed camera and a translating ion saturation probe are employed to examine the spatial extent and nature of oscillations from 0-100 kHz in the H6MS thruster. Two modes are identified at 8 kHz and 75-90 kHz. The low frequency mode is azimuthally uniform across the thruster face while the high frequency oscillation is concentrated close to the thruster centerline with an m = 1 azimuthal dependence. These experimental results are discussed in the context of wave theory as well as published observations from an unshielded variant of the H6MS thruster.

  4. Applications of wind generation for power system frequency control, inter-area oscillations damping and parameter identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilches-Bernal, Felipe

    Power systems around the world are experiencing a continued increase in wind generation as part of their energy mix. Because of its power electronics interface, wind energy conversion systems interact differently with the grid than conventional generation. These facts are changing the traditional dynamics that regulate power system behavior and call for a re-examination of traditional problems encountered in power systems like frequency response, inter-area oscillations and parameter identification. To address this need, realistic models for wind generation are necessary. The dissertation implements such models in a MATLAB-based flexible environment suited for power system research. The dissertation continues with an analysis of the frequency response of a test power system dependent mainly on a mode referred to as the frequency regulation mode. Using this test system it is shown that its frequency regulation capability is reduced with wind penetration levels of 25% and above. A controller for wind generation to restore the frequency response of the system is then presented. The proposed controller requires the WTG to operate in a deloaded mode, a condition that is obtained through pitching the wind turbine blades. Time simulations at wind penetration levels of 25% and 50% are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller. Next, the dissertation evaluates how the inter-area oscillation of a two-machine power system is affected by wind integration. The assessment is performed based on the positioning of the WTG, the level of wind penetration, and the loading condition of the system. It is determined that integrating wind reduces the damping of the inter-area mode of the system when performed in an area that imports power. For this worst-case scenario, the dissertation proposes two controllers for wind generation to improve the damping of the inter-area mode. The first controller uses frequency as feedback signal for the active power control

  5. Exoskeleton control for lower-extremity assistance based on adaptive frequency oscillators: adaptation of muscle activation and movement frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Ollinger, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we analyze a novel strategy for assisting the lower extremities based on adaptive frequency oscillators. Our aim is to use the control algorithm presented here as a building block for the control of powered lower-limb exoskeletons. The algorithm assists cyclic movements of the human extremities by synchronizing actuator torques with the estimated net torque exerted by the muscles. Synchronization is produced by a nonlinear dynamical system combining an adaptive frequency oscillator with a form of adaptive Fourier analysis. The system extracts, in real time, the fundamental frequency component of the net muscle torque acting on a specific joint. Said component, nearly sinusoidal in shape, is the basis for the assistive torque waveform delivered by the exoskeleton. The action of the exoskeleton can be interpreted as a virtual reduction in the mechanical impedance of the leg. We studied the ability of human subjects to adapt their muscle activation to the assistive torque. Ten subjects swung their extended leg while coupled to a stationary hip joint exoskeleton. The experiment yielded a significant decrease, with respect to unassisted movement, of the activation levels of an agonist/antagonist pair of muscles controlling the hip joint's motion, which suggests the exoskeleton control has potential for assisting human gait. A moderate increase in swing frequency was observed as well. We theorize that the increase in frequency can be explained by the impedance model of the assisted leg. Per this model, subjects adjust their swing frequency in order to control the amount of reduction in net muscle torque.

  6. Ferro-resonance in high and medium voltage networks - Part 4, elimination of ferromagnetic-resonance oscillation; Ferroresonanzschwingungen in Hoch- und Mittelspannungsnetzen. Teil 4: Behebung von Ferroresonanzschwingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeunlich, R.; Daeumling, H.; Hofstetter, M.; Prucker, U.; Schmid, J.; Schlierf, H.-W.; Minkner, R.

    2009-07-01

    This last article of a series of four articles takes a look at ferromagnetic-resonance oscillation in high-voltage grids and how it can be detected and the problems thus caused can be avoided. The causes of such non-linear oscillations are described and discussed. Their effect on instrumentation such as voltage transformers is discussed. If such effects are not detected, thermal overloads can lead to the destruction of the instruments. This article deals with the avoidance of such problems. An overview of measures that can be taken is provided. Also, the dimensioning of voltage transformers is examined. A comprehensive table provides information on single-phase and three-phase ferromagnetic-resonance, instrument configuration and the measures that are available for the elimination of ferromagnetic resonance.

  7. Exploration of solid helium 4 at multiple frequencies using a compound torsional oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiderling, Michael C.

    Apparent but controversial evidence of supersolidity, a coexistence of crystalline and superfluid states, was observed in 2004. Samples of solid 4He were grown, in a chamber, inside a torsion oscillator (TO). The samples showed evidence of apparent decoupling from their container in the form of a resonant frequency increase of the TO as the temperature was lowered. We have developed a Compound torsion oscillator (CTO), with two resonant modes, that allows us to observe a single solid helium sample at two frequencies simultaneously. This thesis will cover the first comprehensive study on the frequency dependence of the apparent supersolid effect. This includes a study of the effect of varying 3He concentrations (x3) on the frequency dependence. Additionally a study on how changes in x3 affect the dissipation, which previous studies of x3 dependence have not explored. Also studied is how varying x3 affected the hysteresis first observed by Aoki et al. The CTO has allowed the exploration of the amplitude dependent effects in new ways. By exciting the sample at both frequencies simultaneously and varying the driving amplitude of one mode one can see how excitations at one mode affect what is observed at the other. The studies of the effects of varying x3 show results that are consistent with the dislocation movement model proposed by Iwasa. The collected data was not consistent with the simple supersolid model initially proposed. The studies of hysteresis show that the onset of hysteresis was dependent on x3 but was not frequency dependent. This lends credit to the hysteresis being due to the pinning and unpinning of 3He impurities. The studies of the effect of amplitude dependent effects show an asymmetry between the two frequencies. The higher frequency has a larger effect on the lower frequency than the lower frequency has on the higher. This is also inconsistent with the initial simple supersolid model.

  8. Persistent hyperdopaminergia decreases the peak frequency of hippocampal theta oscillations during quiet waking and REM sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafui Dzirasa

    Full Text Available Long-term changes in dopaminergic signaling are thought to underlie the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric disorders. Several conditions are associated with cognitive deficits such as disturbances in attention processes and learning and memory, suggesting that persistent changes in dopaminergic signaling may alter neural mechanisms underlying these processes. Dopamine transporter knockout (DAT-KO mice exhibit a persistent five-fold increase in extracellular dopamine levels. Here, we demonstrate that DAT-KO mice display lower hippocampal theta oscillation frequencies during baseline periods of waking and rapid-eye movement sleep. These altered theta oscillations are not reversed via treatment with the antidopaminergic agent haloperidol. Thus, we propose that persistent hyperdopaminergia, together with secondary alterations in other neuromodulatory systems, results in lower frequency activity in neural systems responsible for various cognitive processes.

  9. Experimental observation of three-frequency quasiperiodic solution in a ring of unidirectionally coupled oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, L; Perlikowski, P; Kapitaniak, T; Stefanski, A

    2015-06-01

    The subject of the experimental research supported with numerical simulations presented in this paper is an analog electrical circuit representing the ring of unidirectionally coupled single-well Duffing oscillators. The research is concentrated on the existence of the stable three-frequency quasiperiodic attractor in this system. It is shown that such solution can be robustly stable in a wide range of parameters of the system under consideration in spite of a parameter mismatch which is unavoidable during experiment.

  10. Investigation of non-uniform airflow signal oscillation during high frequency chest compression

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Jongwon; Lee Yong W; Warwick Warren J; Sohn Kiwon; Holte James E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background High frequency chest compression (HFCC) is a useful and popular therapy for clearing bronchial airways of excessive or thicker mucus. Our observation of respiratory airflow of a subject during use of HFCC showed the airflow oscillation by HFCC was strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the respiratory system. We used a computational model-based approach to analyse the respiratory airflow during use of HFCC. Methods The computational model, which is based on previous ph...

  11. Structural Control of Metamaterial Oscillator Strength and Electric Field Enhancement at Terahertz Frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Keiser, George R.; Seren, Huseyin R.; Strikwerda, Andrew C.; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The design of artificial nonlinear materials requires control over the internal resonant charge densities and local electric field distributions. We present a MM design with a structurally controllable oscillator strength and local electric field enhancement at terahertz frequencies. The MM consists of a split ring resonator (SRR) array stacked above an array of nonresonant closed conducting rings. An in-plane, lateral shift of a half unit cell between the SRR and closed ring arrays results i...

  12. Experimental observation of three-frequency quasiperiodic solution in a ring of unidirectionally coupled oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, L.; Perlikowski, P.; Kapitaniak, T.; Stefanski, A.

    2015-06-01

    The subject of the experimental research supported with numerical simulations presented in this paper is an analog electrical circuit representing the ring of unidirectionally coupled single-well Duffing oscillators. The research is concentrated on the existence of the stable three-frequency quasiperiodic attractor in this system. It is shown that such solution can be robustly stable in a wide range of parameters of the system under consideration in spite of a parameter mismatch which is unavoidable during experiment.

  13. Control of grid integrated voltage source converters under unbalanced conditions: development of an on-line frequency-adaptive virtual flux-based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suul, Jon Are

    2012-03-15

    and reactive power flow, formulated as generalized equations for current reference calculation. A simple, but general, implementation is therefore achieved, where the control objective and the power flow characteristics can be selected according to the requirements of any particular application. Thus, the same control structure can be used to achieve for instance balanced sinusoidal currents or elimination of double frequency active power oscillations during unbalanced conditions. In case of voltage sags, current references corresponding to a specified active or reactive power flow might exceed the current capability of the converter. The limits for active and reactive power transfer during unbalanced conditions have therefore been analyzed, and generalized strategies for current reference calculation when operating under current limitations have been derived. The specified objectives for active and reactive power flow characteristics can therefore be maintained during unbalanced grid conditions, while the average active and reactive power flow is limited to keep the current references within safe values. All concepts and techniques proposed in this Thesis have been verified by simulations and laboratory experiments. The SOGI-based method for Virtual Flux estimation and the strategies for active and reactive power control with current limitation can also be easily adapted for a wide range of applications and can be combined with various types of inner loop control structures. Therefore, the proposed approach can potentially be used as a general basis for Virtual Flux-based voltage-sensor-less operation of VSCs under unbalanced grid voltage conditions.(Author)

  14. Trains of electrical stimulation of the trapezius muscles redistribute the frequencies of body oscillations during stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhouvannasak, V; Clément, S; Manto, M

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the postural effects of trains of electrical stimulation (TES) applied unilaterally or bilaterally on the trapezius muscle in 20 healthy subjects (mean age: 23.1 ± 1.33 years; F/M: 8/12). The anterior-posterior (AP) displacements (AP axis), medio-lateral displacements (ML axis) and total travelled distances (TTW) of the centre of pressure (COP) remained unchanged with TES. However, detailed spectral analysis of COP oscillations revealed a marked decrease of the magnitudes of peak power spectral density (peak PSD) following application of TES. Peak PSD was highly correlated with the intensity of stimulation (P 0.30) and the integrals of the sub-band 8-10 Hz were significantly increased (P < 0.001). The ratios of the integrals of sub-bands 8-10 Hz/0-3 Hz were markedly enhanced with bilateral TES (P < 0.001). For the ML axis, the effects were striking (P < 0.001) for the sub-bands 0-0.4, 0.4-1.5 and 8-10 Hz. For both the AP and ML axes, a significant inverse linear relationship was found between the intensity of TES and the average speed of COP. We show that TES applied over the trapezius muscles exerts significant and so far unrecognised effects upon oscillations of the COP, decreasing low-frequency oscillations and enhancing high-frequency oscillations. Our data unravel a novel property of the trapezius muscles upon postural control. We suggest that this muscle plays a role of a distributor of low-frequency versus high-frequency sub-bands of frequency during stance. Previous studies have shown that patients with supra-tentorial stroke show an increased peak PSD in low frequencies of body oscillations. Therefore, our findings provide a rationale to assess neurostimulation of the trapezius muscle in the rehabilitation of postural deficits in supra-tentorial stroke.

  15. High frequency oscillations in outbursts of Kerr-metric slim disks

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Li; Sadowski, Aleksander; Lu, Ju-Fu; Abramowicz, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We numerically investigate the thermally unstable accretion disks around black holes. We adopt an evolutionary viscous stress equation to replace the standard alpha-prescription based on the results of two MHD simulations. We find a kind of interesting oscillations on some running models in limit-cycle outburst state. The oscillations arise near the inner boundary and propagate radially outwards. We deem that they are the trapped $p$-mode oscillations excited by sonic-point instability. We directly integrate the local radiation cooling fluxes to construct the mimic bolometric light-curve. We find a series of overtones beside the fundamental harmonic on the power spectra of mimic light-curves. The frequency of the fundamental harmonic is very close to the maximum epicyclic frequency of the disk and the frequency ratio of the fundamental harmonic and overtones is a regular integer series. We suggest that the code for ray-tracing calculation must be time-dependent in virtual observation and point out the robustn...

  16. A dual resonant rectilinear-to-rotary oscillation converter for low frequency broadband electromagnetic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Wang, Ya

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports a dual resonant rectilinear-to-rotary oscillation converter (RROC) for low frequency broadband electromagnetic energy harvesting from ambient vibrations. An approximate theoretical model has been established to integrate the electromechanical coupling into a comprehensive electromagnetic-dynamic model of the dual resonant RROC. Numerical simulation has proved the nature of dual resonances by revealing that both the rectilinear resonance and the rotary resonance could be achieved when the stand-alone rectilinear oscillator (RLO) and the stand-alone rotary oscillator (RTO) were excited independently. Simulation on the magnetically coupled RROC has also shown that the rectilinear resonance and the rotary resonance could be obtained simultaneously in the low-frequency region (2-14 Hz) with well-defined restoring torque (M r ) and the initial rotation angle of the RLO (ψ). The magnetic interaction patterns between the rectilinear and the RTOs have been categorized based on aforementioned simulation results. Both simulation and experimental results have demonstrated broadband output attributing from the dual resonances. Experimental results have also indicated that the RROC could have wide bandwidth in a much lower frequency region (2-8 Hz) even without the rotary resonance as long as the system parameters are carefully tuned. Parameter analysis on different values of M r and ψ are experimentally carried out to provide a quantitative guidance of designing the RROC to achieve an optimal power density.

  17. [Organism as a functional unity of oscillation processes of varying frequency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galichiĭ, V A

    2013-01-01

    The present concept of organism as an oscillating system is discussed in light of the biological rhythms theory. The phenomenon of biological rhythm is viewed as a result of unity and mutual confrontation of the fundamental conflicts in the life process - destruction and creation. Consideration is given to the system-making role of diurnal rhythms keeping the organism functioning as integration. Possible mechanisms of interrelationships of rhythms with different frequencies based on the principles of ascending from simple to complicated, biological amortization, level destabilization, multiple ratios and frequency locking are dealt with. Emphasis is placed on the necessity of conceptualizing the physiological norm as a rhythmic phenomenon.

  18. Spectral characterization of a frequency comb based on cascaded quadratic nonlinearities inside an optical parametric oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Ulvila, Ville; Halonen, Lauri; Vainio, Markku

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental study of optical frequency comb generation based on cascaded quadratic nonlinearities inside a continuous-wave-pumped optical parametric oscillator. We demonstrate comb states which produce narrow-linewidth intermode beat note signals, and we verify the mode spacing uniformity of the comb at the Hz level. We also show that spectral quality of the comb can be improved by modulating the parametric gain at a frequency that corresponds to the comb mode spacing. We have reached a high average output power of over 4 W in the near-infrared region, at ~2 {\\mu}m.

  19. Effects of nicotine stimulation on spikes, theta frequency oscillations, and spike-theta oscillation relationship in rat medial septum diagonal band Broca slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong WEN; Ce PENG; Gao-xiang OU-YANG; Zainab HENDERSON; Xiao-li LI; Cheng-biao LU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Spiking activities and neuronal network oscillations in the theta frequency range have been found in many cortical areas during information processing.The aim of this study is to determine whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate neuronal network activity in rat medial septum diagonal band Broca (MSDB) slices.Methods:Extracellular field potentials were recorded in the slices using an Axoprobe 1A amplifier.Data analysis was performed offline.Spike sorting and local field potential (LFP) analyses were performed using Spike2 software.The role of spiking activity in the generation of LFP oscillations in the slices was determined by analyzing the phase-time relationship between the spikes and LFP oscillations.Circular statistic analysis based on the Rayleigh test was used to determine the significance of phase relationships between the spikes and LFP oscillations.The timing relationship was examined by quantifying the spike-field coherence (SFC).Results:Application of nicotine (250 nmol/L) induced prominent LFP oscillations in the theta frequency band and both small-and large-amplitude population spiking activity in the slices.These spikes were phase-locked to theta oscillations at specific phases.The Rayleigh test showed a statistically significant relationship in phase-locking between the spikes and theta oscillations.Larger changes in the SFC were observed for large-amplitude spikes,indicating an accurate timing relationship between this type of spike and LFP oscillations.The nicotine-induced spiking activity (large-amplitude population spikes) was suppressed by the nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (0.3 μmol/L).Conclusion:The results demonstrate that large-amplitude spikes are phase-locked to theta oscillations and have a high spike-timing accuracy,which are likely a main contributor to the theta oscillations generated in MSDB during nicotine receptor activation.

  20. Potential therapeutic mechanism of extremely low-frequency high-voltage electric fields in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ka-Eun; Park, Soon-Kwon; Nam, Sang-Yun; Han, Tae-Jong; Cho, Il-Young

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this survey was to provide background theory based on previous research to elucidate the potential pathway by which medical devices using extremely low-frequency high-voltage electric fields (ELF-HVEF) exert therapeutic effects on the human body, and to increase understanding of the AC high-voltage electrotherapeutic apparatus for consumers and suppliers of the relevant devices. Our review revealed that an ELF field as weak as 1-10 μ V/m can induce diverse alterations of membrane proteins such as transporters and channel proteins, including changes in Ca + + binding to a specific site of the cell surface, changes in ion (e.g., Ca + + ) influx or efflux, and alterations in the ligand-receptor interaction. These alterations then induce cytoplasmic responses within cells (Ca + + , cAMP, kinases, etc.) that can have impacts on cell growth, differentiation, and other functional properties by promoting the synthesis of macromolecules. Moreover, increased cytoplasmic Ca + + involves calmodulin-dependent signaling and consequent Ca + + /calmodulin-dependent stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. This event in turn induces the nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway, which may be an essential factor in the observed physiological and therapeutic responses.

  1. Ion-Acoustic Instability in the Presence of High Frequency Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sandu, D.; Schrittwieser, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements are presented of a standing ion-acoustic wave instability, which is excited by a positively biased grid inserted perpendicularly into the plasma column of a single-ended Q-machine, under the influence of a high frequency signal superimposed onto the positive voltage at the grid....... The experimental results show that in certain regions of the frequency and amplitude of the h.f. signal the ion wave instability is stabilized or destabilized. A possible explanation of these effects is presented....

  2. Instability of Wind Turbine Converters during Current Injection to Low Voltage Grid Faults and PLL Frequency Based Stability Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Ömer; Teodorescu, Remus; Bak, Claus Leth;

    2014-01-01

    In recent grid codes for wind power integration, wind turbines are required to stay connected during grid faults even when the grid voltage drops down to zero; and also to inject reactive current in proportion to the voltage drop. However, a physical fact, instability of grid-connected converters...... during current injection to very low (close to zero) voltage faults, has been omitted, i.e., failed to be noticed in the previous wind power studies and grid code revisions. In this paper, the instability of grid side converters of wind turbines defined as loss of synchronism (LOS), where the wind...... turbines lose synchronism with the grid fundamental frequency (e.g., 50 Hz) during very deep voltage sags, is explored with its theory, analyzed and a novel stability solution based on PLL frequency is proposed; and both are verified with power system simulations and by experiments on a grid...

  3. Distributed Secondary Voltage and Frequency Control for Islanded Microgrids with Uncertain Communication Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xinghuo; Lai, Jingang

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a robust distributed secondary control (DSC) scheme for inverter-based microgrids (MGs) in a distribution sparse network with uncertain communication links. By using the iterative learning mechanics, two discrete-time DSC controllers are designed, which enable all distributed...... energy resources (DERs) in a MG to achieve the voltage/frequency restoration and active power sharing accuracy, respectively. In special, the secondary control inputs are merely updated at the end of each round of iteration, and thus each DER only needs to share information with its neighbors...... intermittently in a low-bandwidth communication manner. This way, the communication costs are greatly reduced, and some sufficient conditions on the system stability and robustness to the uncertainties are also derived by using the tools of Lyapunov stability theory, algebraic graph theory, and matrix inequality...

  4. Nicotine induction of theta frequency oscillations in rodent hippocampus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C B; Henderson, Z

    2010-03-10

    The hippocampus is an area important for learning and memory and exhibits prominent and behaviourally relevant theta (4-12 Hz) and gamma (30-100 Hz) frequency oscillations in vivo. Hippocampal slices produce similar types of oscillatory activity in response to bath-application of neurotransmitter receptor agonists. The medial septum diagonal band area (MS/DB) provides both a cholinergic and GABAergic projection to the hippocampus, and although it plays a major role in the generation and maintenance of the hippocampal theta rhythm in vivo, there is evidence for intrinsic theta generation mechanisms in the hippocampus, especially in area CA3. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the nicotinic receptor (nAChR) in the induction of oscillatory field activity in the in vitro preparation of the rat hippocampus. Bath-application of a low concentration of nicotine (1 muM) to transversely-cut hippocampal slices produced persistent theta-frequency oscillations in area CA3 of the hippocampus. These oscillations were reduced by both GABA(A) receptor antagonists and ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating the involvement of local GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in the production of the rhythmic theta activity. The nicotine-induced theta activity was inhibited by non-selective nAChR antagonists and partially by an alpha7* nAChR antagonist. The induction of theta frequency oscillations in CA3 by nicotine was mimicked alpha7* nAChR agonists but not by non-alpha7* nAChR agonists. In conclusion, theta activity in the hippocampus may be promoted by tonic stimulation of alpha7* nAChRs, possibly via selective stimulation of theta-preferring interneurons in the hippocampus that express post-synaptic alpha7* nAChRs.

  5. Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling Simulator for Real Workflows Energy-Aware Management in Green Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes-Ruiz, Iván Tomás; Prado, Rocío P; García-Galán, Sebastián; Muñoz-Expósito, José Enrique; Ruiz-Reyes, Nicolás

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the growing computational capabilities of Cloud systems rely on the reduction of the consumed power of their data centers to make them sustainable and economically profitable. The efficient management of computing resources is at the heart of any energy-aware data center and of special relevance is the adaptation of its performance to workload. Intensive computing applications in diverse areas of science generate complex workload called workflows, whose successful management in terms of energy saving is still at its beginning. WorkflowSim is currently one of the most advanced simulators for research on workflows processing, offering advanced features such as task clustering and failure policies. In this work, an expected power-aware extension of WorkflowSim is presented. This new tool integrates a power model based on a computing-plus-communication design to allow the optimization of new management strategies in energy saving considering computing, reconfiguration and networks costs as well as quality of service, and it incorporates the preeminent strategy for on host energy saving: Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling (DVFS). The simulator is designed to be consistent in different real scenarios and to include a wide repertory of DVFS governors. Results showing the validity of the simulator in terms of resources utilization, frequency and voltage scaling, power, energy and time saving are presented. Also, results achieved by the intra-host DVFS strategy with different governors are compared to those of the data center using a recent and successful DVFS-based inter-host scheduling strategy as overlapped mechanism to the DVFS intra-host technique.

  6. The dark side of high-frequency oscillations in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Khalilov, Ilgam; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2006-07-01

    Adult brain networks generate a wide range of oscillations. Some of these are behaviourally relevant, whereas others occur during seizures and other pathological conditions. This raises the question of how physiological oscillations differ from pathogenic ones. In this review, this issue is discussed from a developmental standpoint. Indeed, both epileptic and physiological high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) appear progressively during maturation, and it is therefore possible to determine how this program corresponds to maturation of the neuronal populations that generate these oscillations. We review here important differences in the development of neuronal populations that might contribute to their different oscillatory properties. In particular, at an early stage, the density of glutamatergic synapses is too low for physiological HFOs but an additional drive can be provided by excitatory GABA, triggering epileptic HFOs and the cascades involved in long-lasting epileptogenic transformations. This review is part of the INMED/TINS special issue "Nature and nurture in brain development and neurological disorders", based on presentations at the annual INMED/TINS symposium (http://inmednet.com/).

  7. High frequency oscillations and high frequency functional network characteristics in the intraoperative electrocorticogram in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J.E.M. Zweiphenning

    2016-01-01

    Significance: ‘Baseline’ high-frequency network parameters might help intra-operative recognition of epileptogenic tissue without the need for waiting for events. These findings can increase our understanding of the ‘architecture’ of epileptogenic networks and help unravel the pathophysiology of HFOs.

  8. The use of (double) relaxation oscillation SQUIDs as a sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duuren, van M.J.; Brons, G.C.S.; Kattouw, H.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.

    1997-01-01

    Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs (ROSs) and Double Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) are based on relaxation oscillations that are induced in hysteretic dc SQUIDs by an external L-R shunt. The relaxation frequency of a ROS varies with the applied flux Φ, whereas the output of a DROS is a dc voltage

  9. High-frequency chest wall oscillation. Assistance to ventilation in spontaneously breathing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calverley, P M; Chang, H K; Vartian, V; Zidulka, A

    1986-02-01

    In five supine normal subjects breathing spontaneously, we studied the effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO), which was achieved by oscillating the pressure in an air-filled cuff wrapped around the lower thorax. Oscillations of 3.5 and 8 Hz (in randomized order) were applied for 15 minutes each at both maximal (mean of 90 to 102 cm H2O) and half-maximal peak tolerable cuff pressures. Fifteen minutes of control spontaneous ventilation preceded each HFCWO maneuver. The HFCWO resulted in a significant decrease in spontaneous minute ventilation (VES) at maximal and half-maximal pressures by 35 and 40 percent, respectively, at 3 Hz and by 26 and 35 percent, respectively, at 5 Hz, with little change in VES at 8 Hz. This occurred despite an unchanging arterial carbon dioxide tension at all frequencies. Arterial oxygen pressure increased at 3 Hz at maximal pressure but remained statistically unchanged at 3 Hz at half-maximal pressure and at 5 Hz and 8 Hz both at maximal and half-maximal pressures. We conclude that HFCWO may potentially assist ventilation in spontaneously breathing man without requiring an endotracheal tube.

  10. Symmetries and invariants of the oscillator and envelope equations with time-dependent frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The single-particle dynamics in a time-dependent focusing field is examined. The existence of the Courant-Snyder invariant, a fundamental concept in accelerator physics, is fundamentally a result of the corresponding symmetry admitted by the harmonic oscillator equation with linear time-dependent frequency. It is demonstrated that the Lie algebra of the symmetry group for the oscillator equation with time-dependent frequency is eight dimensional, and is composed of four independent subalgebras. A detailed analysis of the admitted symmetries reveals a deeper connection between the nonlinear envelope equation and the oscillator equation. A general theorem regarding the symmetries and invariants of the envelope equation, which includes the existence of the Courant-Snyder invariant as a special case, is demonstrated. As an application to accelerator physics, the symmetries of the envelope equation enable a fast numerical algorithm for finding matched solutions without using the conventional iterative Newton’s method, where the envelope equation needs to be numerically integrated once for every iteration, and the Jacobi matrix needs to be calculated for the envelope perturbation.

  11. First Direct Two-Sided Bound on the B_s^0 Oscillation Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Böhnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lesne, V; Lévêque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Nöding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Pérez, E; Peters, K; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Vanden Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A H; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J R; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V

    2006-01-01

    We report the first direct two-sided bound on the $B^0_s$ oscillation frequency using a large sample of $B^0_s$ semileptonic decays corresponding to approximately 1 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected by the \\dzer\\ experiment in 2002--2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The flavor (i.e., $B^0_s$ or $\\bar{B}^0_s$) of the \\bs meson at the time of production was found using an opposite-side tagging technique, and the flavor at the time of decay was determined from the charge of the muon in the partially reconstructed decay $\\bs\\to \\mu^{+}D_{s}^{-}X$, $D_{s}^{-}\\to \\phi \\pi^{-}$, $\\phi\\to K^{+}K^{-}$. A likelihood scan over the oscillation frequency, $\\Delta m_s$, gives a most probable value of 19 ps$^{-1}$ and a range of $17 < \\Delta m_s < 21$ ps$^{-1}$ at the 90% C.L. At $\\Delta m_s=19$ ps$^{-1}$, the amplitude method yields a result that deviates from the hypothesis of an oscillation amplitude of zero by 2.5 standard deviations, corresponding to a two-sided C.L. of 1%.

  12. Detection of high frequency oscillations and damping from multi-slit spectroscopic observations of the corona

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, T; Sindhuja, G; Banerjee, D

    2015-01-01

    During the total solar eclipse of 11 July 2010, multi-slit spectroscopic observations of the solar corona were performed from Easter Island, Chile. To search for high-frequency waves, observations were taken at a high cadence in the green line at 5303 A due to [Fe xiv] and the red line at 6374 A due to [Fe x]. The data are analyzed to study the periodic variations in the intensity, Doppler velocity and line width using wavelet analysis. The data with high spectral and temporal resolution enabled us to study the rapid dynamical changes within coronal structures. We find that at certain locations each parameter shows significant oscillation with periods ranging from 6 - 25 s. For the first time, we could detect damping of high-frequency oscillations with periods of the order of 10 s. If the observed damped oscillations are due to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves then they can contribute significantly in the heating of the corona. From a statistical study we try to characterize the nature of the observed oscillat...

  13. Semianalytical calculation of the zonal-flow oscillation frequency in stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal, Pedro; Sánchez, Edilberto; Calvo, Iván; Bustos, Andrés; Parra, Félix I.; Mishchenko, Alexey; Könies, Axel; Kleiber, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    Due to their capability to reduce turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas, understanding the dynamics of zonal flows is an important problem in the fusion program. Since the pioneering work by Rosenbluth and Hinton in axisymmetric tokamaks, it is known that studying the linear and collisionless relaxation of zonal flow perturbations gives valuable information and physical insight. Recently, the problem has been investigated in stellarators and it has been found that in these devices the relaxation process exhibits a characteristic feature: a damped oscillation. The frequency of this oscillation might be a relevant parameter in the regulation of turbulent transport, and therefore its efficient and accurate calculation is important. Although an analytical expression can be derived for the frequency, its numerical evaluation is not simple and has not been exploited systematically so far. Here, a numerical method for its evaluation is considered, and the results are compared with those obtained by calculating the frequency from gyrokinetic simulations. This ‘semianalytical’ approach for the determination of the zonal-flow frequency is revealed to be accurate and faster than the one based on gyrokinetic simulations.

  14. Measurement of acoustic glitches in solar-type stars from oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumdar, A. [Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, TIFR, V. N. Purav Marg, Mankhurd, Mumbai 400088 (India); Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Cunha, M. S. [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Ballot, J. [CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Basu, S. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 065208101 (United States); Houdek, G.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Metcalfe, T. S. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Mathur, S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); García, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM, CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Salabert, D. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, F-06304 Nice (France); Verner, G. A.; Chaplin, W. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Sanderfer, D. T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Seader, S. E.; Smith, J. C. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    For the very best and brightest asteroseismic solar-type targets observed by Kepler, the frequency precision is sufficient to determine the acoustic depths of the surface convective layer and the helium ionization zone. Such sharp features inside the acoustic cavity of the star, which we call acoustic glitches, create small oscillatory deviations from the uniform spacing of frequencies in a sequence of oscillation modes with the same spherical harmonic degree. We use these oscillatory signals to determine the acoustic locations of such features in 19 solar-type stars observed by the Kepler mission. Four independent groups of researchers utilized the oscillation frequencies themselves, the second differences of the frequencies and the ratio of the small and large separation to locate the base of the convection zone and the second helium ionization zone. Despite the significantly different methods of analysis, good agreement was found between the results of these four groups, barring a few cases. These results also agree reasonably well with the locations of these layers in representative models of the stars. These results firmly establish the presence of the oscillatory signals in the asteroseismic data and the viability of several techniques to determine the location of acoustic glitches inside stars.

  15. Surface plasmon polaritons on soft-boundary graphene nanoribbons and their application as voltage controlled plasmonic switches and frequency demultiplexers

    CERN Document Server

    Forati, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    A graphene sheet gated with a ridged ground plane, creating a soft-boundary (SB) graphene nanoribbon, is considered. By adjusting the ridge parameters and bias voltage a channel can be created on the graphene which can guide TM surface plasmon polaritons (SPP). Two types of modes are found; fundemental and higher-order modes with no apparent cutoff frequency and with energy distributed over the created channel, and edge modes with energy concen-trated at the soft-boundary edge. Dispersion curves, electric near-field patterns, and current distributions of these modes are determined. Since the location where energy is concentrated in the edge modes can be easily controlled electronically by the bias voltage and frequency, the edge-mode phenomena is used to propose a novel voltage controlled plasmonic switch and a plasmonic frequency demultiplexer.

  16. Specific frequency bands of amplitude low-frequency oscillation encodes personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Luqing; Duan, Xujun; Zheng, Chunyan; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Qing; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Huafu

    2014-01-01

    The biological model of extraversion and neuroticism identified by Eysenck has stimulated increasing interest in uncovering neurobiological substrate of the two fundamental dimensions. Here we aim to explore brain disturbances underlying extraversion and neuroticism in 87 healthy individuals using fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (LFF) on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two different frequency bands, Slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) exhibiting higher power and involving larger brain regions, and Slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) exhibiting less power and emerging locally, were analyzed. Our results showed a positive correlation between LFF amplitude at Slow-5 and extraversion in medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus, important portions of the default mode network, thus suggesting a link between default network activity and personality traits. LFF amplitude at Slow-5 was correlated positively with neuroticism in right posterior portion of the frontal lobe, further validating neuroticism with frontal lateralization. In addition, LFF amplitude at Slow-4 was negatively associated with extraversion and neuroticism in left hippocampus (HIP) and bilateral superior temporal cortex (STC) respectively, supporting the hypothesized (inverse) relationship between extraversion and resting arousal, also implying neural circuit underlying emotional process influencing on personality. Overall, these findings suggest the important relationships, between personality and LFF amplitude dynamic, depend on specific frequency bands.

  17. Effects of Changes in Lung Volume on Oscillatory Flow Rate During High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Butcher

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO in mucolysis and mucous clearance is thought to be dependant on oscillatory flow rate (Fosc. Therefore, increasing Fosc during HFCWO may have a clinical benefit.

  18. Luminescence quenching in rare-earth-ion-doped $Al_2O_3$ lasers and its influence on relaxation oscillation frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agazzi, L.; Bernhardi, E.H.; Wörhoff, K.; Pollnau, M.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of luminescence quenching on rare-earth-ion doped lasers is investigated, and we show that the expression for the relaxation oscillation frequency needs to be modified to take the quenching properly into account.

  19. Altered low frequency oscillations of cortical vessels in patients with cerebrovascular occlusive disease – a NIRS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Iversen, Helle K; Schytz, Henrik W

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of cerebral autoregulation by measuring spontaneous oscillations in the low frequency spectrum of cerebral cortical vessels might be a useful tool for assessing risk and investigating different treatment strategies in carotid artery disease and stroke. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS...

  20. Luminescence quenching in rare-earth-ion-doped Al2O3 lasers and its influence on relaxation oscillation frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agazzi, L.; Bernhardi, Edward; Worhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus

    The impact of luminescence quenching on rare-earth-ion doped lasers is investigated, and we show that the expression for the relaxation oscillation frequency needs to be modified to take the quenching properly into account.

  1. Low Frequency Oscillations of the Heat Distribution in the Global Upper Ocean Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The heat distributions in the upper layers of the ocean have been studied and some important low frequency oscillations (LFOs) are already found and quantified by using various characteristic factors. In this paper, the 'heat center' of a sea area is defined with a simple method. Then the temperature data set of the upper layer of the global ocean (from surface down to 400 m, 1955 - 2003) is analyzed to detect the possible LFOs. Not only some zonal LFOs, which were reported early, but also some strong LFOs of the vertical and meridional heat distribution, which might imply some physical sense, are detected. It should be noted that the similar vertical oscillation pattern can be found in the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean and Indian Ocean. Results from some preliminary studies show that the vertical LFO might be caused by the solar irradiance anomalies. This study may help reveal some unknown dynamical processes in the global oceans and may also benefit other related studies.

  2. Structural control of metamaterial oscillator strength and electric field enhancement at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, G. R.; Seren, H. R.; Strikwerda, A. C.; Zhang, X.; Averitt, R. D.

    2014-08-01

    The design of artificial nonlinear materials requires control over internal resonant charge densities and local electric field distributions. We present a MM design with a structurally controllable oscillator strength and local electric field enhancement at terahertz frequencies. The MM consists of a split ring resonator (SRR) array stacked above an array of closed conducting rings. An in-plane, lateral shift of a half unit cell between the SRR and closed ring arrays results in an increase of the MM oscillator strength by a factor of 4 and a 40% change in the amplitude of the resonant electric field enhancement in the SRR capacitive gap. We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and numerical simulations to confirm our results. We show that the observed electromagnetic response in this MM is the result of image charges and currents induced in the closed rings by the SRR.

  3. Structural Control of Metamaterial Oscillator Strength and Electric Field Enhancement at Terahertz Frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Keiser, George R; Strikwerda, Andrew C; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    The design of artificial nonlinear materials requires control over the internal resonant charge densities and local electric field distributions. We present a MM design with a structurally controllable oscillator strength and local electric field enhancement at terahertz frequencies. The MM consists of a split ring resonator (SRR) array stacked above an array of nonresonant closed conducting rings. An in-plane, lateral shift of a half unit cell between the SRR and closed ring arrays results in a decrease of the MM oscillator strength by a factor of 4 and a 40% change in the amplitude of the resonant electric field enhancement in the SRR capacitive gap. We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and numerical simulations to confirm our results and we propose a qualitative inductive coupling model to explain the observed electromagnetic reponse.

  4. Measurement of the B^0-anti-B^0 oscillation frequency in hadronic B^0 Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    B^0-anti-B^0 flavor oscillations have been studied in 20.7 fb-1 of e^+e^- annihilation data collected in 1999 and 2000 with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. The event sample consists of one B^0 meson fully reconstructed in a hadronic decay mode, while the flavor of the recoiling B^0 in the event is determined with a tagging algorithm that exploits the correlation between the flavor of the heavy quark and the charges of its decay products. By fitting the time development of the observed mixed and unmixed final states, the B^0-anti-B^0 oscillation frequency, Delta_md, is determined to be 0.519+/- 0.020+/- 0.016 ps^{-1}.

  5. High-frequency oscillations in small magnetic elements observed with Sunrise/SuFI

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarzadeh, Shahin; Stangalini, M; Steiner, O; Cameron, R H; Danilovic, S

    2016-01-01

    We characterize waves in small magnetic elements and investigate their propagation in the lower solar atmosphere from observations at high spatial and temporal resolution. We use the wavelet transform to analyze oscillations of both horizontal displacement and intensity in magnetic bright points found in the 300 nm and the Ca II H 396.8 nm passbands of the filter imager on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. Phase differences between the oscillations at the two atmospheric layers corresponding to the two passbands reveal upward propagating waves at high-frequencies (up to 30 mHz). Weak signatures of standing as well as downward propagating waves are also obtained. Both compressible and incompressible (kink) waves are found in the small-scale magnetic features. The two types of waves have different, although overlapping, period distributions. Two independent estimates give a height difference of approximately 450+-100 km between the two atmospheric layers sampled by the employed spectral bands. ...

  6. Broadband electromagnetic power harvester from vibrations via frequency conversion by impact oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuksek, N. S.; Almasri, M. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Feng, Z. C. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we propose an electromagnetic power harvester that uses a transformative multi-impact approach to achieve a wide bandwidth response from low frequency vibration sources through frequency-up conversion. The device consists of a pick-up coil, fixed at the free edge of a cantilever beam with high resonant frequency, and two cantilever beams with low excitation frequencies, each with an impact mass attached at its free edge. One of the two cantilevers is designed to resonate at 25 Hz, while the other resonates at 50 Hz within the range of ambient vibration frequency. When the device is subjected to a low frequency vibration, the two low-frequency cantilevers responded by vibrating at low frequencies, and thus their thick metallic masses made impacts with the high resonance frequency cantilever repeatedly at two locations. This has caused it along with the pick-up coil to oscillate, relative to the permanent magnet, with decaying amplitude at its resonance frequency, and results in a wide bandwidth response from 10 to 63 Hz at 2 g. A wide bandwidth response between 10–51 Hz and 10–58 Hz at acceleration values of 0.5 g and 2 g, respectively, were achieved by adjusting the impact cantilever frequencies closer to each other (25 Hz and 45 Hz). A maximum output power of 85 μW was achieved at 5 g at 30 Hz across a load resistor, 2.68 Ω.

  7. An impedance analyzer method to simulate the oscillating characteristic of a series piezoelectric sensor in oscillators with zero or non-zero phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazhong, S; Yuanjin, X; Lihua, N; Shouzhuo, Y

    1994-11-01

    An impedance analyzer method is employed to simulate the oscillation frequency of a series piezoelectric quartz crystal (SPQC) in electrolyte or non-electrolyte solutions. The influence of the oscillator phase on the oscillation frequency and response sensitivity are theoretically derived and experimentally verified. In non-electrolyte liquids, the oscillator phase has little effect on both the oscillation frequency and the response to the permittivity. But in electrolyte solutions, the oscillator phase has a significant influence on the oscillation frequency and the response sensitivity to the conductivity. Depending on the oscillator phase, the oscillation frequency of the SPQC may increase, be maintained or decrease with increasing conductivity in low or high conductive solutions. The dependence of the oscillation frequency of the SPQC on the supply voltage is explained. As an example of the applications, the SPQC is applied to the determination of the critical micelle concentration of ionic surfactants in aqueous solutions.

  8. Effects of changes in lung volume on oscillatory flow rate during high-frequency chest wall oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    Scott J Butcher; Pasiorowski, Michal P; Jones, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in mucolysis and mucous clearance is thought to be dependant on oscillatory flow rate (Fosc). Therefore, increasing Fosc during HFCWO may have a clinical benefit.OBJECTIVES: To examine effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on Fosc at two oscillation frequencies in healthy subjects and patients with airway obstruction.METHODS: Five healthy subjects and six patients with airway obstruction underwent 1...

  9. An Analysis of Decentralized Demand Response as Frequency Control Support under CriticalWind Power Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Villena

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In power systems with high wind energy penetration, the conjunction of wind power fluctuations and power system inertia reduction can lead to large frequency excursions, where the operating reserves of conventional power generation may be insufficient to restore the power balance. With the aim of evaluating the demand-side contribution to frequency control, a complete process to determine critical wind oscillations in power systems with high wind penetration is discussed and described in this paper. This process implies thousands of wind power series simulations, which have been carried out through a validated offshore wind farm model. A large number of different conditions have been taken into account, such as frequency dead bands, the percentages of controllable demand and seasonal factor influence on controllable loads. Relevant results and statistics are also included in the paper.

  10. High frequency optoelectronic oscillators based on the optical feedback of semiconductor mode-locked laser diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Mohsin; Hou, Lianping; Kelly, Anthony E; Akbar, Jehan; Marsh, John H; Arnold, John M; Ironside, Charles N

    2012-01-30

    Optical self seeding feedback techniques can be used to improve the noise characteristics of passively mode-locked laser diodes. External cavities such as fiber optic cables can increase the memory of the phase and subsequently improve the timing jitter. In this work, an improved optical feedback architecture is proposed using an optical fiber loop delay as a cavity extension of the mode-locked laser. We investigate the effect of the noise reduction as a function of the loop length and feedback power. The well known composite cavity technique is also implemented for suppressing supermode noise artifacts presented due to harmonic mode locking effects. Using this method, we achieve a record low radio frequency linewidth of 192 Hz for any high frequency (>1 GHz) passively mode-locked laser to date (to the best of the authors' knowledge), making it promising for the development of high frequency optoelectronic oscillators.

  11. Impacts of SST and SST Anomalies on Low-Frequency Oscillation in the Tropical Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jinhai; YU Jingjing; SHEN Xinyong

    2007-01-01

    Considering the multiscale character of LFO (low-frequency oscillation) in the tropical atmosphere, the effects of SST on LFO in the tropical atmosphere are discussed by using an absolute ageostrophic, baroclinic model. Here, SST effects include sea surface heating and forcing of SST anomalies (SSTAs). Studies of the influences of sea surface heating on LFO frequency and stability show that sea surface heating can slow the speed of waves and lower their frequency when SST is comparatively low; while higher SST leads to unstable waves and less periods of LFO. Since the impact of a SSTA on ultra-long waves is more evident than that on kilometer-scale waves, long-wave approximation is used when we continue to study the effect of SSTAs. Results indicate that SSTAs can lead to a longer period of LFO, and make waves unstable. In other words,positive (negative) SSTAs can make waves decay (grow).

  12. Lung pressures and gas transport during high-frequency airway and chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M C; Ye, T H; Tran, N H

    1989-09-01

    The major goal of this study was to compare gas exchange, tidal volume (VT), and dynamic lung pressures resulting from high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO) with the corresponding effects in high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). Eight anesthetized paralyzed dogs were maintained eucapnic with HFAO and HFCWO at frequencies ranging from 1 to 16 Hz in the former and 0.5 to 8 Hz in the latter. Tracheal (delta Ptr) and esophageal (delta Pes) pressure swings, VT, and arterial blood gases were measured in addition to respiratory impedance and static pressure-volume curves. Mean positive pressure (25-30 cmH2O) in the chest cuff associated with HFCWO generation decreased lung volume by approximately 200 ml and increased pulmonary impedance significantly. Aside from this decrease in functional residual capacity (FRC), no change in lung volume occurred as a result of dynamic factors during the course of HFCWO application. With HFAO, a small degree of hyperinflation occurred only at 16 Hz. Arterial PO2 decreased by 5 Torr on average during HFCWO. VT decreased with increasing frequency in both cases, but VT during HFCWO was smaller over the range of frequencies compared with HFAO. delta Pes and delta Ptr between 1 and 8 Hz were lower than the corresponding pressure swings obtained with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) applied at 0.25 Hz. delta Pes was minimized at 1 Hz during HFCWO; however, delta Ptr decreased continuously with decreasing frequency and, below 2 Hz, became progressively smaller than the corresponding values obtained with HFAO and CMV.

  13. Analysis of a modular generator for high-voltage, high-frequency pulsed applications, using low voltage semiconductors (series connected step-up (1:10) transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, L. M.; Fernando Silva, J.; Margato, E.

    2007-03-01

    This article discusses the operation of a modular generator topology, which has been developed for high-frequency (kHz), high-voltage (kV) pulsed applications. The proposed generator uses individual modules, each one consisting of a pulse circuit based on a modified forward converter, which takes advantage of the required low duty cycle to operate with a low voltage clamp reset circuit for the step-up transformer. This reduces the maximum voltage on the semiconductor devices of both primary and secondary transformer sides. The secondary winding of each step-up transformer is series connected, delivering a fraction of the total voltage. Each individual pulsed module is supplied via an isolation transformer. The assembled modular laboratorial prototype, with three 5kV modules, 800V semiconductor switches, and 1:10 step-up transformers, has 80% efficiency, and is capable of delivering, into resistive loads, -15kV/1A pulses with 5μs width, 10kHz repetition rate, with less than 1μs pulse rise time. Experimental results for resistive loads are presented and discussed.

  14. Analysis of a modular generator for high-voltage, high-frequency pulsed applications, using low voltage semiconductors (series connected step-up (1:10) transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, L M; Fernando Silva, J; Margato, E

    2007-03-01

    This article discusses the operation of a modular generator topology, which has been developed for high-frequency (kHz), high-voltage (kV) pulsed applications. The proposed generator uses individual modules, each one consisting of a pulse circuit based on a modified forward converter, which takes advantage of the required low duty cycle to operate with a low voltage clamp reset circuit for the step-up transformer. This reduces the maximum voltage on the semiconductor devices of both primary and secondary transformer sides. The secondary winding of each step-up transformer is series connected, delivering a fraction of the total voltage. Each individual pulsed module is supplied via an isolation transformer. The assembled modular laboratorial prototype, with three 5 kV modules, 800 V semiconductor switches, and 1:10 step-up transformers, has 80% efficiency, and is capable of delivering, into resistive loads, -15 kV1 A pulses with 5 micros width, 10 kHz repetition rate, with less than 1 micros pulse rise time. Experimental results for resistive loads are presented and discussed.

  15. A LC Voltage-Controlled Oscillator Design and Simulation%低相位噪声压控振荡器的设计及仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁爽; 曹娟

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid improvement on the communication technology of RF transceiver , high performance voltage-controlled oscillator has been the key link of analog integrated circuit design , production and implementation .Focus on the problem of phase noise ,a design for a 1 .115 GHz LC VCO is proposed in TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process .The circuit is simulated by the SpectreRF in Cadence .The simulation results presented that the VCO voltage adjustment range is 4 V to 6 V ,and output frequency range is 1 .114 69 GHz to 1 .115 38 GHz .Phase noise at an offset of 10 kHz ,100 kHz and 1M Hz are -90 .9 dBc/Hz ,-118 .6 dBc/Hz and -141 .3 dBc/Hz ,respectively .In order to enhance the VCO noise performance ,the paper’s purpose is as much as possible to exchange narrow frequency for good phase noise .%随着通信技术对射频收发机性能要求的提高,高性能压控振荡器已成为模拟集成电路设计、生产和实现的关键环节.针对压控振荡器设计过程中存在相位噪声这一核心问题,采用STMC 0.18μm CMOS工艺,提出了一种1.115 GHz的电感电容压控振荡器电路,利用Cadence中的SpectreRF对电路进行仿真.仿真结果表明:在4~6 V的电压调节范围内,压控振荡器的输出频率范围为1.11469~1.11538 G Hz ,振荡频率为1.115 G Hz时,在偏离中心频率10 kHz处、100 kHz处以及1M Hz处的相位噪声分别为-90.9 dBc/Hz ,-118.6 dBc/Hz ,-141.3 dBc/Hz ,以较窄的频率调节范围换取较好的相位噪声抑制,从而提高了压控振荡器的噪声性能.

  16. Frequency stabilization of the non resonant wave of a continuous-wave singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Ly, Aliou; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental technique allowing to stabilize the frequency of the non resonant wave in a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) down to the kHz level, much below the pump frequency noise level. By comparing the frequency of the non resonant wave with a reference cavity, the pump frequency noise is imposed to the frequency of the resonant wave, and is thus subtracted from the frequency of the non resonant wave. This permits the non resonant wave obtained from such a SRO to be simultaneously powerful and frequency stable, which is usually impossible to obtain when the resonant wave frequency is stabilized.

  17. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashutosh, E-mail: asingh.rs.ece@iitbhu.ac.in [Faculty of Physical Sciences, Institute of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Lucknow-Deva Road, Uttar Pradesh 225003 (India); Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Jain, P. K. [Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  18. A noninvasive high frequency oscillation ventilator: Achieved by utilizing a blower and a valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, YueYang; Sun, JianGuo; Wang, Baicun; Feng, Pei; Yang, ChongChang

    2016-02-01

    After the High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (HFOV) has been applied in the invasive ventilator, the new technique of noninvasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (nHFOV) which does not require opening the patient's airway has attracted much attention from the field. This paper proposes the design of an experimental positive pressure-controlled nHFOV ventilator which utilizes a blower and a special valve and has three ventilation modes: spontaneous controlled ventilation combining HFOV, time-cycled ventilation combining HFOV (T-HFOV), and continuous positive airway pressure ventilation combining HFOV. Experiments on respiratory model are conducted and demonstrated the feasibility of using nHFOV through the control of fan and valve. The experimental ventilator is able to produce an air flow with small tidal volume (VT) and a large minute ventilation volume (MV) using regular breath tubes and nasal mask (e.g., under T-HFOV mode, with a maximum tidal volume of 100 ml, the minute ventilation volume reached 14,400 ml). In the process of transmission, there is only a minor loss of oscillation pressure. (Under experimental condition and with an oscillation frequency of 2-10 Hz, peak pressure loss was around 0%-50% when it reaches the mask.).

  19. FREQUENCY CATASTROPHE AND CO-EXISTING ATTRACTORS IN A CELL Ca2+ NONLINEAR OSCILLATION MODEL WITH TIME DELAY*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应阳君; 黄祖洽

    2001-01-01

    Frequency catastrophe is found in a cell Ca2+ nonlinear oscillation model with time delay. The relation of the frequency transition to the time delay is studied by numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. There is a range of parameters in which two kinds of attractors with great frequency differences co-exist in the system. Along with parameter changes, a critical phenomenon occurs and the oscillation frequency changes greatly. This mechanism helps us to deepen the understanding of the complex dynamics of delay systems, and might be of some meaning in cell signalling.

  20. Evidence of Gate Voltage Oscillations during Short Circuit of Commercial 1.7 kV/ 1 kA IGBT Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigosa, Paula Diaz; Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco;

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evidence of critical gate voltage oscillations in 1.7 kV/1 kA Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) power modules under short circuit conditions. A 6 kA/1.1 kV Non-Destructive Test (NDT) set up for repeatable short circuit tests has been built with a 40 nH stray inducta...

  1. Evidence of Gate Voltage Oscillations during Short Circuit of Commercial 1.7 kV/ 1 kA IGBT Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigosa, Paula Diaz; Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evidence of critical gate voltage oscillations in 1.7 kV/1 kA Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) power modules under short circuit conditions. A 6 kA/1.1 kV Non-Destructive Test (NDT) set up for repeatable short circuit tests has been built with a 40 nH stray inducta...

  2. Fundamental properties of solar-like oscillating stars from frequencies of minimum $\\Delta \

    CERN Document Server

    Yıldız, M; Kayhan, C

    2015-01-01

    The large separations between the oscillation frequencies of solar-like stars are measures of stellar mean density. The separations have been thought to be mostly constant in the observed range of frequencies. However, detailed investigation shows that they are not constant, and their variations are not random but have very strong diagnostic potential for our understanding of stellar structure and evolution. In this regard, frequencies of the minimum large separation are very useful tools. From these frequencies, in addition to the large separation and frequency of maximum amplitude, Y\\i ld\\i z et al. recently have developed new methods to find almost all the fundamental stellar properties. In the present study, we aim to find metallicity and helium abundances from the frequencies, and generalize the relations given by Y\\i ld\\i z et al. for a wider stellar mass range and arbitrary metallicity ($Z$) and helium abundance ($Y$). We show that the effect of metallicity is { significant} for most of the fundamental...

  3. Low frequency oscillations in cephalic vessels assessed by near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik W; Selb, Juliette

    2012-01-01

    of oxygenated haemoglobin (oxyHb) and the velocity of the middle cerebral artery (Vmca) to the arterial blood pressure (ABP). The direct left-right phase shifts of oxyHb and Vmca were also assessed. We examined 44 healthy volunteers by simultaneous recordings of ABP, oxyHb and Vmca during spontaneous and paced......BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Low frequency oscillations (LFO) of cerebral vessels are believed to reflect cerebral autoregulation. We investigated day-to-day and hemispheric variations in 0.1 Hz LFO with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and transcranial Doppler (TCD) to determine phase shift and gain...

  4. Simultaneous Measurement of the Neutral B Lifetime and Oscillation Frequency Using Semileptonic Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roethel, Wilhelm

    2003-04-01

    Data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory at SLAC are used for a simultaneous measurement of the lifetime and oscillation frequency of neutral B mesons. One B is fully reconstructed in a semileptonic decay mode and the flavor of the other B in the event is determined with a flavor tagging algorithm that exploits charge correlations between the heavy quark and its decay products. The sample consists of 20.7/fb collected at the Y(4S) resonance.

  5. Oscillation frequencies for 35 \\Kepler solar-type planet-hosting stars using Bayesian techniques and machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, G R; Bedding, T R; Handberg, R; Lund, M N; Chaplin, W J; Huber, D; White, T R; Benomar, O; Hekker, S; Basu, S; Campante, T L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Elsworth, Y; Karoff, C; Kjeldsen, H; Lundkvist, M S; Metcalfe, T S; Stello, D

    2015-01-01

    \\Kepler has revolutionised our understanding of both exoplanets and their host stars. Asteroseismology is a valuable tool in the characterisation of stars and \\Kepler is an excellent observing facility to perform asteroseismology. Here we select a sample of 35 \\Kepler solar-type stars which host transiting exoplanets (or planet candidates) with detected solar-like oscillations. Using available \\Kepler short cadence data up to Quarter 16 we create power spectra optimised for asteroseismology of solar-type stars. We identify modes of oscillation and estimate mode frequencies by ``peak bagging'' using a Bayesian MCMC framework. In addition, we expand the methodology of quality assurance using a Bayesian unsupervised machine learning approach. We report the measured frequencies of the modes of oscillation for all 35 stars and frequency ratios commonly used in detailed asteroseismic modelling. Due to the high correlations associated with frequency ratios we report the covariance matrix of all frequencies measured ...

  6. New Realizations of Single OTRA-Based Sinusoidal Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chun Chien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes three new sinusoidal oscillators based on an operational transresistance amplifier (OTRA. Each of the proposed oscillator circuits consists of one OTRA combined with a few passive components. The first circuit is an OTRA-based minimum RC oscillator. The second circuit is capable of providing independent control on the condition of oscillation without affecting the oscillation frequency. The third circuit exhibits independent control of oscillation frequency through a capacitor. This study first introduces the OTRA and the related formulations of the proposed oscillator circuits, and then discusses the nonideal effects, sensitivity analyses, and frequency stability of the presented circuits. The proposed oscillators exhibit low sensitivities and good frequency stability. Because the presented circuits feature low impedance output, they can be connected directly to the next stage without cascading additional voltage buffers. HSPICE simulations and experimental results confirm the feasibility of the new oscillator circuits.

  7. Electro-opto-mechanical radio-frequency oscillator driven by guided acoustic waves in standard single-mode fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef London

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An opto-electronic radio-frequency oscillator that is based on forward scattering by the guided acoustic modes of a standard single-mode optical fiber is proposed and demonstrated. An optical pump wave is used to stimulate narrowband, resonant guided acoustic modes, which introduce phase modulation to a co-propagating optical probe wave. The phase modulation is converted to an intensity signal at the output of a Sagnac interferometer loop. The intensity waveform is detected, amplified, and driven back to modulate the optical pump. Oscillations are achieved at a frequency of 319 MHz, which matches the resonance of the acoustic mode that provides the largest phase modulation of the probe wave. Oscillations at the frequencies of competing acoustic modes are suppressed by at least 40 dB. The linewidth of the acoustic resonance is sufficiently narrow to provide oscillations at a single longitudinal mode of the hybrid cavity. Competing longitudinal modes are suppressed by at least 38 dB as well. Unlike other opto-electronic oscillators, no radio-frequency filtering is required within the hybrid cavity. The frequency of oscillations is entirely determined by the fiber opto-mechanics.

  8. Electro-opto-mechanical radio-frequency oscillator driven by guided acoustic waves in standard single-mode fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Yosef; Diamandi, Hilel Hagai; Zadok, Avi

    2017-04-01

    An opto-electronic radio-frequency oscillator that is based on forward scattering by the guided acoustic modes of a standard single-mode optical fiber is proposed and demonstrated. An optical pump wave is used to stimulate narrowband, resonant guided acoustic modes, which introduce phase modulation to a co-propagating optical probe wave. The phase modulation is converted to an intensity signal at the output of a Sagnac interferometer loop. The intensity waveform is detected, amplified, and driven back to modulate the optical pump. Oscillations are achieved at a frequency of 319 MHz, which matches the resonance of the acoustic mode that provides the largest phase modulation of the probe wave. Oscillations at the frequencies of competing acoustic modes are suppressed by at least 40 dB. The linewidth of the acoustic resonance is sufficiently narrow to provide oscillations at a single longitudinal mode of the hybrid cavity. Competing longitudinal modes are suppressed by at least 38 dB as well. Unlike other opto-electronic oscillators, no radio-frequency filtering is required within the hybrid cavity. The frequency of oscillations is entirely determined by the fiber opto-mechanics.

  9. Oscillations Go the Distance: Low-Frequency Human Hippocampal Oscillations Code Spatial Distance in the Absence of Sensory Cues during Teleportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Lindsay K; Copara, Milagros S; Seyal, Masud; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Farias, Sarah Tomaszewski; Shen, Peter Y; Ekstrom, Arne D

    2016-03-16

    Low-frequency (delta/theta band) hippocampal neural oscillations play prominent roles in computational models of spatial navigation, but their exact function remains unknown. Some theories propose they are primarily generated in response to sensorimotor processing, while others suggest a role in memory-related processing. We directly recorded hippocampal EEG activity in patients undergoing seizure monitoring while they explored a virtual environment containing teleporters. Critically, this manipulation allowed patients to experience movement through space in the absence of visual and self-motion cues. The prevalence and duration of low-frequency hippocampal oscillations were unchanged by this manipulation, indicating that sensorimotor processing was not required to elicit them during navigation. Furthermore, the frequency-wise pattern of oscillation prevalence during teleportation contained spatial information capable of classifying the distance teleported. These results demonstrate that movement-related sensory information is not required to drive spatially informative low-frequency hippocampal oscillations during navigation and suggest a specific function in memory-related spatial updating.

  10. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  11. Pressure oscillation induced by composite fluid flow - Physical picture generating low frequency earthquake -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, S.; Kurita, K.

    2006-12-01

    Recently low frequency (LF) earthquakes have been found to occur in various geophysical settings. Structural inspection of the source region and analysis of focal mechanism suggest the possible role of fluid in the generation process. The nature of fluid expected in the source region should be characterized by multiphase system such as magma and gas bubble, magma and crystal and aqueous fluid and gas bubble, for example. In this system the physical properties of this composite depends on the mutual volume fraction. The volume fraction is variable depending on the flow situation. We consider the link between the flow situation and the volume fraction is an essential part of the composite flow. Here based on the concept that nature of the composite flow plays a central role in the generation of pressure oscillation, we report a simple laboratory model to demonstrate LF earthquakes. The multiphase system in the source region of the LF earthquakes is modeled here as a composite of viscous fluid and incompressible granular phase. plastic particles made of polystyrene (0.5 mm in diameter) and glycerol solution is packed into a cylindrical case (60 mm in diameter). The packing state of the solid phase is near random closed packing state. The glycerol solution flows into the case from the pressure reservoir and it goes out from exit tube with 60 mm in length and 3 mm in diameter. The pressure is measured using a pressure sensor. The control parameter is fluid pressure (1 atm plus 300 Pa to 1500 Pa) and its viscosity (30 mPas to 100 mPas) in this experiment. When the pressure difference between the case is low, the flow is characterized as a permeable flow. Only the interstitial fluid of the glycerol solution flows out depending on the pressure difference. When the pressure difference is above the critical value, both fluid and particles flow out as a composite flow. In this state the output pressure was observed to oscillate. In the diagram of power spectrum of the

  12. Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chenchen

    Optical frequency combs are coherent light sources consist of thousands of equally spaced frequency lines. Frequency combs have achieved success in applications of metrology, spectroscopy and precise pulse manipulation and control. The most common way to generate frequency combs is based on mode-locked lasers which has the output spectrum of comb structures. To generate stable frequency combs, the output from mode-locked lasers need to be phase stabilized. The whole comb lines will be stabilized if the pulse train repetition rate corresponding to comb spacing and the pulse carrier envelope offset (CEO) frequency are both stabilized. The output from a laser always has fluctuations in parameters known as noise. In laser applications, noise is an important factor to limit the performance and often need to be well controlled. For example in precision measurement such as frequency metrology and precise spectroscopy, low laser intensity and phase noise is required. In mode-locked lasers there are different types of noise like intensity noise, pulse temporal position noise also known as timing jitter, optical phase noise. In term for frequency combs, these noise dynamics is more complex and often related. Understanding the noise behavior is not only of great interest in practical applications but also help understand fundamental laser physics. In this dissertation, the noise of frequency combs and mode-locked lasers will be studied in two projects. First, the CEO frequency phase noise of a synchronously pumped doubly resonant optical parametric oscillators (OPO) will be explored. This is very important for applications of the OPO as a coherent frequency comb source. Another project will focus on the intensity noise coupling in a soliton fiber oscillator, the finding of different noise coupling in soliton pulses and the dispersive waves generated from soliton perturbation can provide very practical guidance for low noise soliton laser design. OPOs are used to generate

  13. 24 GHz Low Phase Noise MMIC Voltage Controlled Oscillator%24 GHz低相位噪声单片集成VCO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭超

    2013-01-01

    The 24 GHz MMIC voltage controlled oscillator (VCO)based on the GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (GaAs HBT) technology was introduced.The MMIC VCO integrated 1/2 harmonic output and divided-by-8 high speed prescaler for the 1/2 and 1/16 harmonic output frequency.The design of the VCO used push-push structure,the 24 GHz VCO have lower phase noise compared to the traditional design which used the low frequency VCO chips and frequency multiplier cascade technology.The measured results show that the phase noise is-92 dBc/Hz@100 kHz.The VCO can provide frequency from 23 GHz to 25.5 GHz with the tuning voltage from 0 V to 13 V.Output power is 9 dBm with 5 V DC supply.The VCO's phase noise performance is excellent over different temperature,shock and other conditions due to the VCO's monolithic push-push structure.The 1/2 harmonic and divided-by-8 high speed prescaler for a 1/16 harmonic output frequency also provide excellent performance.%介绍了一款基于砷化镓异质结双极晶体管(GaAs HBT)工艺的24 GHz单片压控振荡器(VCO),VCO芯片上同时集成了1/2次谐波输出及八分频器电路,可提供1/2和1/16次谐波输出.由于振荡器采用了推-推压控振荡器(push-push VCO)结构,相比传统的通过低频VCO芯片和倍频器级联技术实现的24 GHz VCO具有更低的相位噪声,测试结果表明芯片在不同温度、振动以及其他条件下表现出良好的相位噪声,在0~13V的电调电压条件下输出频率为23~25.5 GHz,输出功率在5 V直流工作电压条件下为9 dBm,相位噪声低至-92 dBc/Hz@100 kHz.同时1/2次谐波输出及八分频器电路提供的1/16次谐波输出性能良好.

  14. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for solar models evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    CERN Document Server

    Guzik, Joyce A; Walczak, P; Wood, S R; Mussack, K; Farag, E

    2016-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities (OPLIB data using the ATOMIC code) for elements with atomic number Z=1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of standard solar models including these new opacities, and compare with models evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL (Iglesias and Rogers 1996) opacities. We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund et al. (2009). The new Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities have steeper opacity derivatives than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities of the solar interior radiative zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. The calculated sound-speed profiles are similar for models evolved using either the updated Iben evolution code (see \\cite{Guzik2010}), or ...

  15. CHARACTERISTICS OF FREQUENCY SPECTRUM VARIATION OF INTRASEASONAL OSCILLATION OF CONVECTION DURING SOUTH CHINA SEA SUMMER MONSOON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Ai-lan; LIANG Jian-yin; LI Chun-hui

    2006-01-01

    Datasets of equivalent temperature of black body (TBB) and sea surface temperature (SST) ranging from 1980 to 1997 are used to diagnose and analyze the characteristics of frequency spectrum and strength of intraseasonal variation of convection. The relationship between the strength of intraseasonal oscillation of convection, strength of convection itself and SST in the South China Sea (SCS) is studied. It is shown that, there are distinguishable annual, interannual and interdecadal variations in both strength and frequency spectrum of intraseasonal variation of convection in SCS. There are connections between strength of convection, strength of ISO1 in the summer half (s.h.) year and SST in ensuing winter half (w.h.) year in SCS.The strong (weak) convection and strong (weak) ISO1 are associated with negative (positive) bias of SST in ensuing w.h. year in SCS.

  16. Oscillations of hot, young neutron stars: Gravitational wave frequencies and damping times

    CERN Document Server

    Burgio, G F; Gualtieri, L; Schulze, H J

    2011-01-01

    We study how the frequencies and damping times of oscillations of a newly born, hot proto-neutron star depend on the physical quantities which characterize the star quasi-stationary evolution which follows the bounce. Stellar configurations are modeled using a microscopic equation of state obtained within the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock, nuclear many-body approach, extended to the finite-temperature regime. We discuss the mode frequency behaviour as function of the lepton composition, and of the entropy gradients which prevail in the interior of the star. We find that, in the very early stages, gravitational wave emission efficiently competes with neutrino processes in dissipating the star mechanical energy residual of the gravitational collapse.

  17. Nonlinear oscillation and interfacial stability of an encapsulated microbubble under dual-frequency ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunqiao; Calvisi, Michael L.; Wang, Qianxi

    2017-04-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles (EMBs) are widely used in medical ultrasound imaging as contrast-enhanced agents. However, the potential damaging effects of violent collapsing EMBs to cells and tissues in clinical settings have remained a concern. Dual-frequency ultrasound is a promising technique for improving the efficacy and safety of sonography. The system modeled consists of the external liquid, membrane and internal gases of an EMB. The microbubble dynamics are simulated using a simple nonlinear interactive theory, considering the compressibility of the internal gas, viscosity of the liquid flow and viscoelasticity of the membrane. The radial oscillation and interfacial stability of an EMB under single- and dual-frequency excitations are compared. The simulation results show that the dual-frequency technique produces larger backscatter pressure at higher harmonics of the primary driving frequency—this enriched acoustic spectrum can enhance blood-tissue contrast and improve the quality of sonographic images. The results further show that the acoustic pressure threshold associated with the onset of shape instability is greater for dual-frequency driving. This suggests that the dual-frequency technique stabilizes the encapsulated bubble, thereby improving the efficacy and safety of contrast-enhanced agents.

  18. Frequency quadrupling optoelectronic oscillator using a single polarization modulator in a Sagnac loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen Ting; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel and cost efficient method to generating a frequency quadrupling optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) using a single polarization modulator (PolM) in a Sagnac loop. The OEO loop and the Sagnac loop share the same PolM. In the OEO loop, the PolM is used to generate the fundamental microwave signal. In the Sagnac loop, the joint use of the PolM, a polarization controller (PC), and a polarization beam splitter (PBS) is equivalent to an intensity modulator. The odd order sidebands of the modulated signal are suppressed by biasing the equivalent intensity modulator at the maximum transmission point. Moreover, the undesired optical carrier is also eliminated by bidirectional use of the PolM. As a result, only the two second order sidebands are left. The beating between the two second order sidebands in a photodetector (PD) generates a microwave signal at the frequency corresponding to four times of the fundamental tone. A frequency quadrupling microwave signal at the frequency of 39.74 GHz with a phase noise of -100.14 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz frequency offset was experimentally generated.

  19. Frequency dependent rectifier memristor bridge used as a programmable synaptic membrane voltage generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Pabst

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Reasoned by its dynamical behavior, the memristor enables a lot of new applications in analog circuit design. Since some realizations have been shown (e.g. 2007 by Hewlett Packard, the development of applications with memristors becomes more and more interesting. Besides applications in neural networks and storage devices, analog memristive circuits also promise further applications. Therefore, this article proposes a frequency dependent rectifier memristor bridge for different purposes, for example, using as a programmable synaptic membrane voltage generator for Spike-Time-Dependent-Plasticity and describes the circuit theory. In this context it is shown that the Picard Iteration is one possibility to analytically solve the system of nonlinear state equations of memristor circuits. An intuitive picture of how a memristor works in a network in general is given as well and in this context some research on the dynamical behavior of a HP memristor should be done. After all it is suggested to use the memristor bridge as a neuron.

  20. Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for on-demand performance and availability of biomedical embedded systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskovic, Dejan; Giessel, David

    2009-11-01

    The goal of the study presented in this paper is to develop an embedded biomedical system capable of delivering maximum performance on demand, while maintaining the optimal energy efficiency whenever possible. Several hardware and software solutions are presented allowing the system to intelligently change the power supply voltage and frequency in runtime. The resulting system allows use of more energy-efficient components, operates most of the time in its most battery-efficient mode, and provides means to quickly change the operation mode while maintaining reliable performance. While all of these techniques extend battery life, the main benefit is on-demand availability of computational performance using a system that is not excessive. Biomedical applications, perhaps more than any other application, require battery operation, favor infrequent battery replacements, and can benefit from increased performance under certain conditions (e.g., when anomaly is detected) that makes them ideal candidates for this approach. In addition, if the system is a part of a body area network, it needs to be light, inexpensive, and adaptable enough to satisfy changing requirements of the other nodes in the network.

  1. Intracranial EEG seizure onset-patterns correlate with high-frequency oscillations in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Perucca, Piero; Dubeau, Francois; Gotman, Jean

    2016-11-01

    High-frequency oscillations (80-500Hz; HFOs) have been shown to be a specific biomarker of the seizure-onset zone. The relationship of HFOs with seizures having different intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) morphological onsets, however, has shown significant relationships in experimental animals but has not been studied in humans. We investigated how interictal and ictal HFOs relate to different seizure-onset morphological patterns. We analyzed the most representative seizure type of 37 patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy who underwent iEEG for diagnostic evaluation. According to the morphology, 211 seizure-onset zone channels were classified in six patterns (low-voltage fast activity; sharp activity at ≤13Hz; low-frequency high-amplitude periodic spikes; burst of high-amplitude polyspikes; spike-and-wave activity; and delta brush). Interictal and ictal HFOs were compared between the six seizure-onset patterns. Interictal ripple and fast ripple rates differed significantly across seizure-onset patterns (ppatterns (ppattern is more likely to be generated in a region of seizure spread. Regarding the difference in HFO density between pre-ictal baseline and seizure-onset section across the six patterns, burst of high-amplitude polyspikes and delta brushes had the highest densities of both ripples and fast ripples (ppatterns correlate specific interictal and ictal HFO profiles confirming that seizures with different morphological patterns likely have different mechanisms of generation. This study emphazises that, in clinical practice, seizure-onset patterns should be distinguished and specified when analyzing HFOs, particularly if they are used in presurgical evaluation to better localize the seizure-onset zone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cardini, Federica; Landucci, Norma; Lanata, Sergio; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2013-04-04

    High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways.HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15-57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20-30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing.The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis. 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups: - 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System; - 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure); - 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group). To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p airway clearance, this treatment should be included among the principal options in chest physiotherapy. The study was registered as ChiCTR-TRC-12002134 at http://www.chictr.org.

  3. High-Frequency QPOs and Overstable Oscillations of Black-Hole Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Dong; Tsang, David; Horak, Jiri; Yu, Cong

    2012-01-01

    The physical origin of high-frequency QPOs (HFQPOs) in black-hole X-ray binaries remains an enigma despite many years of detailed observational studies. Although there exists a number of models for HFQPOs, many of these are simply "notions" or "concepts" without actual calculation derived from fluid or disk physics. Future progress requires a combination of numerical simulations and semi-analytic studies to extract physical insights. We review recent works on global oscillation modes in black-hole accretion disks, and explain how, with the help of general relativistic effects, the energy stored in the disk differential rotation can be pumped into global spiral density modes in the disk, making these modes grow to large amplitudes under certain conditions ("corotational instability"). These modes are robust in the presence of disk magnetic fields and turbulence. The computed oscillation mode frequencies are largely consistent with the observed values for HFQPOs in BH X-ray binaries. The approximate 2:3 frequen...

  4. Four-Phase Oscillators Employing Two Active Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Biolkova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Two novel four-phase voltage-output oscillators are proposed. These circuits can also be utilized as quadrature oscillators with floating outputs. Each oscillator employs two DO-CIBA (Differential Output- Current Inverter Buffered Amplifier, two grounded capacitors, and four or three resistors. Independent control of the oscillation frequency (OF and oscillation condition is practicable in both oscillators. Real measurements on the oscillator specimens confirm the ability of easy OF control and extra low THD, which is less than 0.07%.

  5. Self-Oscillation-Based Frequency Tracking for the Drive and Detection of Resonance Magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zheng; Ren, Dahai; You, Zheng

    2016-05-21

    This paper reports a drive and detection method for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based Lorentz-force resonance magnetometers. Based on the proposed MEMS magnetometer, a drive and detection method was developed by using self-oscillation to adjust the mismatch between the mechanical resonance frequency and the coil drive frequency as affected by temperature fluctuations and vibration amplitude changes. Not only was the signal-to-noise ratio enhanced by the proposed method compared to the traditional method, but the test system automatically reached resonance frequency very rapidly when powered on. Moreover, the linearity and the measurement range were improved by the magnetic feedback generated by the coil. Test results indicated that the sensitivity of the proposed magnetometer is 59.6 mV/μT and its noise level is 0.25 μT. When operating in ±65 μT, its nonlinearity is 2.5‰-only one-tenth of the former prototype. Its power consumption is only about 250 mW and its size is only 28 mm × 28 mm × 10 mm, or about one-eighth of the original sensor; further, unlike the former device, it can distinguish both positive and negative magnetic fields. The proposed method can also be applied in other MEMS sensors such as gyroscopes and micromirrors to enhance their frequency tracking ability.

  6. Neonatal total liquid ventilation: is low-frequency forced oscillation technique suitable for respiratory mechanics assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Dominick; Beaulieu, Alexandre; Avoine, Olivier; Micheau, Philippe; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Hervé

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to implement low-frequency forced oscillation technique (LFFOT) in neonatal total liquid ventilation (TLV) and to provide the first insight into respiratory impedance under this new modality of ventilation. Thirteen newborn lambs, weighing 2.5 + or - 0.4 kg (mean + or - SD), were premedicated, intubated, anesthetized, and then placed under TLV using a specially design liquid ventilator and a perfluorocarbon. The respiratory mechanics measurements protocol was started immediately after TLV initiation. Three blocks of measurements were first performed: one during initial respiratory system adaptation to TLV, followed by two other series during steady-state conditions. Lambs were then divided into two groups before undergoing another three blocks of measurements: the first group received a 10-min intravenous infusion of salbutamol (1.5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) after continuous infusion of methacholine (9 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)), while the second group of lambs was chest strapped. Respiratory impedance was measured using serial single-frequency tests at frequencies ranging between 0.05 and 2 Hz and then fitted with a constant-phase model. Harmonic test signals of 0.2 Hz were also launched every 10 min throughout the measurement protocol. Airway resistance and inertance were starkly increased in TLV compared with gas ventilation, with a resonant frequency ventilation. We show that LFFOT is an effective tool to track respiratory mechanics under TLV.

  7. High-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from GRS 1915+105

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, Tomaso M

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of a systematic timing analysis of all archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bright black-hole binary GRS 1915+105 in order to detect high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPO). We produced power-density spectra in two energy bands and limited the analysis to the frequency range 30-1000 Hz. We found 51 peaks with a single trial significance larger than 3 sigma. As all but three have centroid frequencies that are distributed between 63 and 71 Hz, we consider most of them significant regardless of the number of trials involved. The average centroid frequency and FWHM are 67.3 +/- 2.0 Hz and 4.4 +/- 2.4 Hz respectively. Their fractional rms varies between 0.4% and 2% (total band detections) and between 0.5% and 3% (hard ban detections). As GRS 1915+105 shows large variability on time scales longer than 1s, we analysed the data in 16s intervals and found that the detections are limited to a specific region in the colour-colour diagram, corresponding to state...

  8. Cross-frequency synchronization connects networks of fast and slow oscillations during visual working memory maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenhühner, Felix; Wang, Sheng H; Palva, J Matias; Palva, Satu

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity in sensory and fronto-parietal (FP) areas underlies the representation and attentional control, respectively, of sensory information maintained in visual working memory (VWM). Within these regions, beta/gamma phase-synchronization supports the integration of sensory functions, while synchronization in theta/alpha bands supports the regulation of attentional functions. A key challenge is to understand which mechanisms integrate neuronal processing across these distinct frequencies and thereby the sensory and attentional functions. We investigated whether such integration could be achieved by cross-frequency phase synchrony (CFS). Using concurrent magneto- and electroencephalography, we found that CFS was load-dependently enhanced between theta and alpha–gamma and between alpha and beta-gamma oscillations during VWM maintenance among visual, FP, and dorsal attention (DA) systems. CFS also connected the hubs of within-frequency-synchronized networks and its strength predicted individual VWM capacity. We propose that CFS integrates processing among synchronized neuronal networks from theta to gamma frequencies to link sensory and attentional functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13451.001 PMID:27669146

  9. Five-Level Converter with Low Switching Frequency Applied as DC Voltage Supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tonny Wederberg

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a multi-level converter as a DC supply. Equations for the converter will be deduced in the nondissipative case. The equations provide solutions to DC voltage and the angle of converter voltage. In addition the spectrum for the harmonics after the elimination...

  10. Determination of frequencies of oscillations of cloud cavitation on a 2-D hydro- foil from high-speed camera observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrik ZIMA; Tom FRST; Milan SEDL; Martin KOMREK; Rostislav HUZLK

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to determine significant frequencies of oscillations of cavitation structures from high-speed camera recordings of a flow around a 2-D hydrofoil. The top view of the suction side of an NACA 2412 hydrofoil is studied in a transparent test section of a cavitation tunnel for selected cloud cavitation regimes with strong oscillations induced by the leading-edge cavity shedding. The ability of the method to accurately determine the dominant oscillation frequencies is confirmed by pressure measure- ments. The method can resolve subtle flow characteristics that are not visible to the naked eye. The method can be used for non- invasive experimental studies of oscillations in cavitating flows with adequate visual access when pressure measurements are not available or when such measurements would disturb the flow.

  11. High-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations induced by heating in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintani, Seine A.; Oyama, Kotaro [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Fukuda, Norio, E-mail: noriof@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Cell Physiology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ishiwata, Shin’ichi, E-mail: ishiwata@waseda.jp [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); WASEDA Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABIOS) (Singapore)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • We tested the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on cardiac sarcomere dynamics. • A rise in temperature (>∼38 °C) induced high-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations. • These oscillations occurred with and without blockade of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores. • Cardiac sarcomeres can play a role as a temperature-dependent rhythm generator. - Abstract: In the present study, we investigated the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on sarcomere dynamics in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat. A rapid increase in temperature to >∼38 °C induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-independent high-frequency (∼5–10 Hz) sarcomeric auto-oscillations (Hyperthermal Sarcomeric Oscillations; HSOs). In myocytes with the intact sarcoplasmic reticular functions, HSOs coexisted with [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent spontaneous beating in the same sarcomeres, with markedly varying frequencies (∼10 and ∼1 Hz for the former and latter, respectively). HSOs likewise occurred following blockade of the sarcoplasmic reticular functions, with the amplitude becoming larger and the frequency lower in a time-dependent manner. The present findings suggest that in the mammalian heart, sarcomeres spontaneously oscillate at higher frequencies than the sinus rhythm at temperatures slightly above the physiologically relevant levels.

  12. Interplay of intrinsic and synaptic conductances in the generation of high-frequency oscillations in interneuronal networks with irregular spiking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Baroni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency oscillations (above 30 Hz have been observed in sensory and higher-order brain areas, and are believed to constitute a general hallmark of functional neuronal activation. Fast inhibition in interneuronal networks has been suggested as a general mechanism for the generation of high-frequency oscillations. Certain classes of interneurons exhibit subthreshold oscillations, but the effect of this intrinsic neuronal property on the population rhythm is not completely understood. We study the influence of intrinsic damped subthreshold oscillations in the emergence of collective high-frequency oscillations, and elucidate the dynamical mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon. We simulate neuronal networks composed of either Integrate-and-Fire (IF or Generalized Integrate-and-Fire (GIF neurons. The IF model displays purely passive subthreshold dynamics, while the GIF model exhibits subthreshold damped oscillations. Individual neurons receive inhibitory synaptic currents mediated by spiking activity in their neighbors as well as noisy synaptic bombardment, and fire irregularly at a lower rate than population frequency. We identify three factors that affect the influence of single-neuron properties on synchronization mediated by inhibition: i the firing rate response to the noisy background input, ii the membrane potential distribution, and iii the shape of Inhibitory Post-Synaptic Potentials (IPSPs. For hyperpolarizing inhibition, the GIF IPSP profile (factor iii exhibits post-inhibitory rebound, which induces a coherent spike-mediated depolarization across cells that greatly facilitates synchronous oscillations. This effect dominates the network dynamics, hence GIF networks display stronger oscillations than IF networks. However, the restorative current in the GIF neuron lowers firing rates and narrows the membrane potential distribution (factors i and ii, respectively, which tend to decrease synchrony. If inhibition is shunting instead

  13. Multi-resonance orbital model applied to high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations observed in Sgr A*

    CERN Document Server

    Kotrlova, Andrea; Torok, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The multi-resonance orbital model of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) enables precise determination of the black hole dimensionless spin a if observed set of oscillations demonstrates three (or more) commensurable frequencies. The black hole spin is related to the frequency ratio only, while its mass M is related to the frequency magnitude. The model is applied to the triple frequency set of HF QPOs observed in Sgr A* source with frequency ratio 3:2:1. Acceptable versions of the multi-resonance model are determined by the restrictions on the Sgr A* supermassive black hole mass. Among the best candidates the version of strong resonances related to the black hole "magic" spin a=0.983 belongs. However, the version demonstrating the best agreement with the mass restrictions predicts spin a=0.980.

  14. Effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure on sleep quality in high voltage substations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsam, Tayebeh; Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Ghotbi, Mohammad Reza; Dehghan, Somayeh Farhang

    2012-11-30

    This study aims to investigate the effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields exposure on sleep quality in high voltage substations (132, 230 and 400 KV) in Kerman city and the suburbs. For this purpose, the electric field intensity and magnetic flux density were measured in different parts of substations, and then the occupational exposure was estimated by averaging electric field intensity and magnetic flux density in a shift work. The cases comprised 67 workers who had been exposed to electromagnetic fields in age range of 24-57 and the controls were 110 persons the age ranged 24-50 years. Sleep quality of both groups was evaluated by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire (PSQI). Finally, these data were subjected to statistical analysis. The results indicated that 90.5% of cases and 85.3% of controls had the poor quality sleep according to PSQI (P-value=0.615). Total sleep quality score mean for the case and control groups were 10.22 ± 3.4 and 9.74 ± 3.62 (P-value=0.415) ,respectively. Meantime to fall asleep for cases(35.68 ± 26.25 min) was significantly higher than for controls (28.89 ± 20.18 min) (P-value=0.002). Cases had average sleep duration of 5.49 ± 1.31 hours, which was lower ascompared with control subjects (5.90 ± 1.67hours). Although there was a higher percentage for the case group with poor sleep quality than the control group, but no statistically significant difference was observed.

  15. Effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure on sleep quality in high voltage substations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barsam Tayebeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aims to investigate the effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields exposure on sleep quality in high voltage substations (132, 230 and 400 KV in Kerman city and the suburbs. For this purpose, the electric field intensity and magnetic flux density were measured in different parts of substations, and then the occupational exposure was estimated by averaging electric field intensity and magnetic flux density in a shift work. The cases comprised 67 workers who had been exposed to electromagnetic fields in age range of 24–57 and the controls were 110 persons the age ranged 24–50 years. Sleep quality of both groups was evaluated by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire (PSQI. Finally, these data were subjected to statistical analysis. The results indicated that 90.5% of cases and 85.3% of controls had the poor quality sleep according to PSQI (P-value=0.615. Total sleep quality score mean for the case and control groups were 10.22 ± 3.4 and 9.74 ± 3.62 (P-value=0.415 ,respectively. Meantime to fall asleep for cases(35.68 ± 26.25 min was significantly higher than for controls (28.89 ± 20.18 min (P-value=0.002. Cases had average sleep duration of 5.49 ± 1.31 hours, which was lower ascompared with control subjects (5.90 ± 1.67hours. Although there was a higher percentage for the case group with poor sleep quality than the control group, but no statistically significant difference was observed.

  16. Systematic Review of the Exposure Assessment and Epidemiology of High-Frequency Voltage Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eDe Vocht

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Conclusions of epidemiological studies describing adverse health effects as a result of exposure to electromagnetic fields are not unanimous and often contradictory. It has been proposed that an explanation could be that high frequency voltage transients (dirty electricity [DE] which are superimposed on 50/60Hz fields, but are generally not measured, is the real causal agent. DE has been linked to many different health and wellbeing effects, and on the basis of this an industry selling measurement and filtering equipment is growing. We reviewed the available peer-reviewed evidence for DE as a causal agent for adverse human health effects.A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar and additional publications were obtained from reference lists and from the grey literature. This search resulted in 25 publications; 16 included primary epidemiological and/or exposure data. All studies were reviewed by both authors independently, and including a re-review of studies included in a review of data available up to July 31 2009 by one of the authors. DE has been measured differently in different studies and comparison data are not available. There is no evidence for 50 Graham/Stetzer (G/S units as a safety threshold being anything more than arbitrary. The epidemiological evidence on human health effects of DE is primarily based on, often re-used, case descriptions. Quantitative evidence relies on self-reporting in non-blinded interventions, ecological associations, and one cross-sectional cohort study of cancer risk which does not point to DE as the causal agent. The available evidence for DE as an exposure affecting human health at present does not stand up to scientific scrutiny.

  17. Classical and quantum harmonic oscillators with time dependent mass and frequency: A new class of exactly solvable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Swapan

    2017-03-01

    The classical harmonic oscillator with time dependent mass and frequency is investigated to obtain a closed form exact analytical solution. It is found that the closed form analytical solutions are indeed possible if the time dependent mass of the oscillator is inversely proportional to the time dependent frequency. The scaled wronskian obtained from the linearly independent solutions of the equation of motion of the classical oscillator is used to obtain the solution corresponding to its quantum mechanical counterpart. The analytical solution of the present oscillator is used to obtain the squeezing effects of the input coherent light. In addition to the possibilities of getting the squeezed states, the present solution will be of use for investigating various quantum statistical properties of the radiation fields. As an example, we investigate the antibunching of the input thermal (chaotic) light coupled to the oscillator. Therefore, the appearance of the photon antibunching does not warrant the squeezing and vice-versa. The exact solution is obtained at the cost of the stringent condition where the product of time dependent mass and frequency of the oscillator is time invariant.

  18. Measurement of the Bs anti-Bs oscillation frequency using semileptonic decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Vivek [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2007-05-01

    This thesis reports a time dependent measurement of the B$0\\atop{s}$-$\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency Δms using semileptonic decays B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ℓ+X. We use a data sample of 1 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider to reconstruct ~ 61, 500 semileptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ decays. This analysis of B$0\\atop{s}$-$\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mixing has a sensitivity of 19.4 ps-1 and shows an evidence of B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations at Δms ~17.75 ps-1 with an amplitude significance of ~2. In combination with the analyses of ~ 8,700 hadronic B$0\\atop{s}$ decays at CDF, we have made the first direct observation of time-dependent B$0\\atop{s}$-$\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ flavor oscillations measuring Δms = 17.77$+0.09\\atop{-0.10}$ (stat) ± 0.07 (syst) ps -1. The obtained value of Δms agrees with the Standard Model expectation. When combined with the world average values for Δmd, m$\\bar{B}$0s and m $\\bar{B}$0s, along with other theoretical input, this result yields the ratio of CKM matrix elements |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2060 ± 0.0007 (exp)$+0.0081\\atop{-0.0060}$ (theor).

  19. The effect of high voltage, high frequency pulsed electric field on slain ovine cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgarifar, Hajarossadat; Oloyede, Adekunle; Zare, Firuz

    2014-04-01

    High power, high frequency pulsed electric fields known as pulsed power (PP) has been applied recently in biology and medicine. However, little attention has been paid to investigate the application of pulse power in musculoskeletal system and its possible effect on functional behavior and biomechanical properties of bone tissue. This paper presents the first research investigating whether or not PP can be applied safely on bone tissue as a stimuli and what will be the possible effect of these signals on the characteristics of cortical bone by comparing the mechanical properties of this type of bone pre and post expose to PP and in comparison with the control samples. A positive buck-boost converter was applied to generate adjustable high voltage, high frequency pulses (up to 500 V and 10 kHz). The functional behavior of bone in response to pulse power excitation was elucidated by applying compressive loading until failure. The stiffness, failure stress (strength) and the total fracture energy (bone toughness) were determined as a measure of the main bone characteristics. Furthermore, an ultrasonic technique was applied to determine and comprise bone elasticity before and after pulse power stimulation. The elastic property of cortical bone samples appeared to remain unchanged following exposure to pulse power excitation for all three orthogonal directions obtained from ultrasonic technique and similarly from the compression test. Nevertheless, the compressive strength and toughness of bone samples were increased when they were exposed to 66 h of high power pulsed electromagnetic field compared to the control samples. As the toughness and the strength of the cortical bone tissue are directly associated with the quality and integrity of the collagen matrix whereas its stiffness is primarily related to bone mineral content these overall results may address that although, the pulse power stimulation can influence the arrangement or the quality of the collagen network

  20. Exploiting knowledge of jump-up and jump-down frequencies to determine the parameters of a Duffing oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Roszaidi; Brennan, Michael J.; Kovacic, Ivana; Mace, Brian R.; Burrow, Stephen G.

    2016-08-01

    This work concerns the application of certain non-linear phenomena - jump frequencies in a base-excited Duffing oscillator - to the estimation of the parameters of the system. First, approximate analytical expressions are derived for the relationships between the jump-up and jump-down frequencies, the damping ratio and the cubic stiffness coefficient. Then, experimental results, together with the results of numerical simulations, are presented to show how knowledge of these frequencies can be exploited.

  1. Manifestation of large-scale kink oscillations of coronal loops in the low frequency modulations of solar microwave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodachenko, Maxim; Kislyakova, Kristina; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Kislyakov, Albert; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Zaitsev, Valerii; Rucker, Helmut

    Very-low-frequency fluctuations (¡ 0.01 Hz) of solar microwave radiation were analysed by means of a "sliding window" Fourier transform combined with the Wigner-Ville technique. In view of the fact that slow variations of the magnetic field in the radiation source, as well as a large-scale motion of the source, can modulate the intensity of the received radio signal, we considered large-scale kink-type oscillatory motions of coronal loops which were accompanied also by periodic magnetic stress, created near the loops footpoints during each inclination of loop, i.e. two times per the oscillation cycle. In such cases a properly located observer, besides of the modulation caused by motion of the emission diagram pattern at the main oscillation frequency, may see also modulation at a double frequency of the loop oscillation as well as much weaker higher harmonics. Therefore, the presence in the very-low-frequency spectra of the lines at the main and double frequency of the loop oscillation ("modulation pairs") may indicate about a kink-type oscillatory dynamics of the loop. Special attention in the present study has been paid to the analysis of modulations of microwave emission recorded at the same time when TRACE EUV telescope observed large scale oscillations of coronal loops. The applied data analysis technique, besides of the modulations connected with loop kink oscillations seen by TRACE, enables to detect also the modulations associated with kink oscillations of smaller (invisible for TRACE) loops. Acknowledgements: MLK and TZ acknowledge Austrian Fond zur Fürderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung (project P21197-N16); MP and HOR acknowledge Austrian Fond zur Fürderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung (project P20680-N16).

  2. Investigation and Improvement of Transient Response of DVR at Medium Voltage Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Wei Li, Yun; Chaing Loh, Poh;

    2007-01-01

    An area of interest for dynamic voltage restorer (DVR) research is the damping of transient oscillations initiated at the start and at the recovery instant from a voltage sag. Nonlinear loads, with harmonic currents close to the DVR filter resonance frequency, can also excite the resonance...... oscillations. To compensate voltage sags and dampen high-frequency oscillations simultaneously, an investigation of the transient response of DVR is first carried out. Possible control schemes and their effects on the oscillation attenuation are also studied. Such studied control schemes include the commonly...... used single voltage loop control, voltage feedback plus reference feedforward control, and double-loop control with an outer voltage loop and an inner current loop. Subsequently, an effective and simple resonance damping method is proposed by employing a closed-loop control with an embedded two...

  3. Generalization of experimental data on amplitude and frequency of oscillations induced by steam injection into a subcooled pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva, Walter; Li, Hua [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Puustinen, Markku [Nuclear Engineering, LUT School of Energy Systems, Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT), FIN-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Available data on steam injection into subcooled pool is generalized. • Scaling approach is proposed on amplitude and frequency of chugging oscillations. • The scaled amplitude has a maximum at Froude number Fr ≈ 2.8. • The scaled frequency has a minimum at Fr ≈ 6. • Both amplitude and frequency has a strong dependence on pool bulk temperature. - Abstract: Steam venting and condensation into a subcooled pool of water through a blowdown pipe can undergo a phenomenon called chugging, which is an oscillation of the steam–water interface inside the blowdown pipe. The momentum that is generated by the oscillations is directly proportional to the oscillations’ amplitude and frequency, according to the synthetic jet theory. Higher momentum can enhance pool mixing and positively affect the pool's pressure suppression capacity by reducing thermal stratification. In this paper, we present a generalization of available experimental data on the amplitude and frequency of oscillations during chugging. We use experimental data obtained in different facilities at different scales to suggest a scaling approach for non-dimensional amplitude and frequency of the oscillations. We demonstrate that the Froude number Fr (which relates the inertial forces to gravitational forces) can be used as a scaling criterion in this case. The amplitude has maximum at Fr ≈ 2.8. There is also a strong dependence of the amplitude on temperature; the lower the bulk temperature is the higher the scaled amplitude. A known analytical theory can only capture the decreasing trend in amplitude for Fr > 2.8 and fails to capture the increasing trend and the temperature dependence. Similarly, there is a minimum of the non-dimensional frequency at Fr ≈ 6. A strong dependence on temperature is also observed for Fr > 6; the lower the bulk temperature is the higher the scaled frequency. The known analytical theory is able to capture qualitatively the general trend in

  4. High-frequency oscillations in distributed neural networks reveal the dynamics of human decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian G Guggisberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We examine the relative timing of numerous brain regions involved in human decisions that are based on external criteria, learned information, personal preferences, or unconstrained internal considerations. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG and advanced signal analysis techniques, we were able to non-invasively reconstruct oscillations of distributed neural networks in the high-gamma frequency band (60–150 Hz. The time course of the observed neural activity suggested that two-alternative forced choice tasks are processed in four overlapping stages: processing of sensory input, option evaluation, intention formation, and action execution. Visual areas are activated fi rst, and show recurring activations throughout the entire decision process. The temporo-occipital junction and the intraparietal sulcus are active during evaluation of external values of the options, 250–500 ms after stimulus presentation. Simultaneously, personal preference is mediated by cortical midline structures. Subsequently, the posterior parietal and superior occipital cortices appear to encode intention, with different subregions being responsible for different types of choice. The cerebellum and inferior parietal cortex are recruited for internal generation of decisions and actions, when all options have the same value. Action execution was accompanied by activation peaks in the contralateral motor cortex. These results suggest that high-gamma oscillations as recorded by MEG allow a reliable reconstruction of decision processes with excellent spatiotemporal resolution.

  5. Simultaneous Oscillation of Annular Solid ^4He Samples at Two Mode Frequencies in Compound Torsion Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiderling, Michael C.; Kojima, Harry

    2009-03-01

    We have extended our studies on the non-classical behavior of solid ^4He contained in compound torsional oscillator (TO) cell below 1 K. Our unique TO design allows observations on the identical sample at two distinct frequencies(f1=493 and f2=1165 Hz). The sample was grown by blocked capillary method in an annular cell(id = 8.0 mm, od = 10.0 mm, height = 9.0 mm). We focus here on experiments in which the two modes are excited simultaneously. While keeping the drive of f2 mode at a very low level, the drive of f1 mode was varied from high to low levels to produce substantial variations in the non-classical rotation inertia fraction (NCRIf). When the NCRIf seen by f1 mode is reduced by 89, 91 and 94 % at 9.7, 23.5 and 56.5 mK, respectively, the NCRIf seen by f2 mode (driven at low level) is reduced by 62, 68 and 80 %. The discrepancies and their temperature dependence in the observed reductions in NCRIf are not yet understood. Similar Measurements with the roles of the drive levels of the modes reversed as well as the changes in the dissipation of the torsional oscillator during the simultaneous drive will be reported.

  6. High-frequency Oscillations in Small Magnetic Elements Observed with Sunrise/SuFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, S.; Solanki, S. K.; Stangalini, M.; Steiner, O.; Cameron, R. H.; Danilovic, S.

    2017-04-01

    We characterize waves in small magnetic elements and investigate their propagation in the lower solar atmosphere from observations at high spatial and temporal resolution. We use the wavelet transform to analyze oscillations of both horizontal displacement and intensity in magnetic bright points found in the 300 nm and the Ca ii H 396.8 nm passbands of the filter imager on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. Phase differences between the oscillations at the two atmospheric layers corresponding to the two passbands reveal upward propagating waves at high frequencies (up to 30 mHz). Weak signatures of standing as well as downward propagating waves are also obtained. Both compressible and incompressible (kink) waves are found in the small-scale magnetic features. The two types of waves have different, though overlapping, period distributions. Two independent estimates give a height difference of approximately 450 ± 100 km between the two atmospheric layers sampled by the employed spectral bands. This value, together with the determined short travel times of the transverse and longitudinal waves provide us with phase speeds of 29 ± 2 km s‑1 and 31 ± 2 km s‑1, respectively. We speculate that these phase speeds may not reflect the true propagation speeds of the waves. Thus, effects such as the refraction of fast longitudinal waves may contribute to an overestimate of the phase speed.

  7. Low-frequency blood pressure oscillations and inotrope treatment failure in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesoulis, Zachary A; Hao, Jessica; McPherson, Christopher; El Ters, Nathalie M; Mathur, Amit M

    2017-07-01

    The underlying mechanism as to why some hypotensive preterm infants do not respond to inotropic medications remains unclear. For these infants, we hypothesize that impaired vasomotor function is a significant factor and is manifested through a decrease in low-frequency blood pressure variability across regulatory components of vascular tone. Infants born ≤28 wk estimated gestational age underwent prospective recording of mean arterial blood pressure for 72 h after birth. After error correction, root-mean-square spectral power was calculated for each valid 10-min data frame across each of four frequency bands (B1, 0.005-0.0095 Hz; B2, 0.0095-0.02 Hz; B3, 0.02-0.06 Hz; and B4, 0.06-0.16) corresponding to different components of vasomotion control. Forty infants (twenty-nine normotensive control and eleven inotrope-exposed) were included with a mean ± SD estimated gestational age of 25.2 ± 1.6 wk and birth weight 790 ± 211 g. 9.7/11.8 Million (82%) data points were error-free and used for analysis. Spectral power across all frequency bands increased with time, although the magnitude was 20% less in the inotrope-exposed infants. A statistically significant increase in spectral power in response to inotrope initiation was noted across all frequency bands. Infants with robust blood pressure response to inotropes had a greater increase compared with those who had limited or no blood pressure response. In this study, hypotensive infants who require inotropes have decreased low-frequency variability at baseline compared with normotensive infants, which increases after inotrope initiation. Low-frequency spectral power does not change for those with inotrope treatment failure, suggesting dysfunctional regulation of vascular tone as a potential mechanism of treatment failure.NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this study, we examine patterns of low-frequency oscillations in blood pressure variability across regulatory components of vascular tone in normotensive and

  8. The Digital Simulation of Synchronous Motors Fed by Voltage-Source Inverters Over Wide Speed and Frequency Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowihal, Said Soliman

    Both voltage-source and current-source inverters are widely used for supplying three-phase power to induction motor drives, each having their advantages and disadvantages. For high power drives and applications requiring accurate speed and tracking coordination, the synchronous motors are the optimum choice. For constant speed applications of synchronous motor drives, current-source inverters tend to be favored as the motor can usually be operated in the overexcited leading power factor region, thus providing the inverter with sufficient electro-motive force to allow natural commutation. Generally speaking low speed operation of synchronous motors is not satisfactory from naturally commutated current-source inverters. To provide a dynamic range of speed and frequency would require expensive control circuitry and complicates the performance of the drive. The advantage of the voltage-source inverter for the wide range of speed and frequency control herein envisaged is that forced commutation is employed throughout the range and the commutating circuits have been well developed and established. On balance, voltage-source inverters represent a viable compromise for variable-speed three -phase synchronous motor drives including start-up. To investigate the transient response of the voltage -source fed-synchronous motor drives, a digital computer program is developed. The program is based on two models --machine model and inverter model. The machine is represented by a detailed two-axis model which includes the effects due to saliency, damper windings, and machine resistances. The inverter model represents a forced-commutated voltage-source inverter assuming ideal switching devices (thyristors and diodes). To cope with the wide variations of power factor during start-up, a thyristor with a reverse connected parallel diode are integrated as a bidirectional switch. The digital program provides the machine variables of interest (phase currents, field current, damper winding

  9. Novel high-frequency, high-power, pulsed oscillator based on a transmission line transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdt, R; Curry, R D

    2007-07-01

    Recent analysis and experiments have demonstrated the potential for transmission line transformers to be employed as compact, high-frequency, high-power, pulsed oscillators with variable rise time, high output impedance, and high operating efficiency. A prototype system was fabricated and tested that generates a damped sinusoidal wave form at a center frequency of 4 MHz into a 200 Omega load, with operating efficiency above 90% and peak power on the order of 10 MW. The initial rise time of the pulse is variable and two experiments were conducted to demonstrate initial rise times of 12 and 3 ns, corresponding to a spectral content from 4-30 and from 4-100 MHz, respectively. A SPICE model has been developed to accurately predict the circuit behavior and scaling laws have been identified to allow for circuit design at higher frequencies and higher peak power. The applications, circuit analysis, test stand, experimental results, circuit modeling, and design of future systems are all discussed.

  10. Two generalized algorithms measuring phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling in neuronal oscillations network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Zheng, Chen-Guang; Cheng, Ning; Wang, Yi-Yi; Yin, Tao; Zhang, Tao

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of studies pays attention to cross-frequency coupling in neuronal oscillations network, as it is considered to play an important role in exchanging and integrating of information. In this study, two generalized algorithms, phase-amplitude coupling-evolution map approach and phase-amplitude coupling-conditional mutual information which have been developed and applied originally in an identical rhythm, are generalized to measure cross-frequency coupling. The effectiveness of quantitatively distinguishing the changes of coupling strength from the measurement of phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is demonstrated based on simulation data. The data suggest that the generalized algorithms are able to effectively evaluate the strength of PAC, which are consistent with those traditional approaches, such as PAC-PLV and PAC-MI. Experimental data, which are local field potentials obtained from anaesthetized SD rats, have also been analyzed by these two generalized approaches. The data show that the theta-low gamma PAC in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 network is significantly decreased in the glioma group compared to that in the control group. The results, obtained from either simulation data or real experimental signals, are consistent with that of those traditional approaches PAC-MI and PAC-PLV. It may be considered as a proper indicator for the cross frequency coupling in sub-network, such as the hippocampal CA3 and CA1.

  11. APPswe mutation increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+-oscillations in rat hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloskowska, Ewa; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Winblad, Bengt;

    2008-01-01

    Altered calcium homeostasis is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Much effort has been put into understanding the association between protein mutations causative of this devastating neurodegenerative disease and perturbed calcium signaling. Whereas the presenilin mutations...... have received most attention in the context of neuronal calcium signaling, we focused on the effects of APP with the so-called Swedish mutation (APPswe) on spontaneous neuronal activity. We observed that primary hippocampal neurons from an APPswe transgenic rat showed increased frequency and unaltered...... amplitude of spontaneous calcium oscillations as compared to wild-type neurons. We found that the altered calcium signaling of APPswe transgenic neurons was unlikely to be due to modulation of the NMDA or nicotinic neurotransmitter systems, and did not depend on secreted APP derivates. The implications...

  12. Approximation of the Duffing oscillator frequency response function using the FPK equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, E J; Worden, K, E-mail: k.worden@sheffield.ac.u [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin St Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    Although a great deal of work has been carried out on structural dynamic systems under random excitation, there has been a comparatively small amount of this work concentrating on the calculation of the quantities commonly measured in structural dynamic tests. Perhaps the most fundamental of these quantities is the Frequency Response Function (FRF). A number of years ago, Yar and Hammond took an interesting approach to estimating the FRF of a Duffing oscillator system which was based on an approximate solution of the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorow equation. Despite reproducing the general features of the statistical linearization estimate, the approximation failed to show the presence of the poles at odd multiples of the primary resonance which are known to occur experimentally. The current paper simply extends the work of Yar and Hammond to a higher order of approximation and is thus able to show the existence of a third 'harmonic' in the FRF.

  13. Detecting and characterizing high-frequency oscillations in epilepsy: a case study of big data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Ni, Xuan; Ditto, William L; Spano, Mark; Carney, Paul R; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    We develop a framework to uncover and analyse dynamical anomalies from massive, nonlinear and non-stationary time series data. The framework consists of three steps: preprocessing of massive datasets to eliminate erroneous data segments, application of the empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert transform paradigm to obtain the fundamental components embedded in the time series at distinct time scales, and statistical/scaling analysis of the components. As a case study, we apply our framework to detecting and characterizing high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) from a big database of rat electroencephalogram recordings. We find a striking phenomenon: HFOs exhibit on-off intermittency that can be quantified by algebraic scaling laws. Our framework can be generalized to big data-related problems in other fields such as large-scale sensor data and seismic data analysis.

  14. High-Power Blue Light Generation by External Frequency Doubling of an Optical Parametric Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕勇; 张鸿博; 孙志培; 包照日格图; 李惠清; 孔宇鹏; 林学春; 王桂玲; 张杰; 侯玮; 李瑞宁; 崔大复; 许祖彦; 宋立维; 章萍; 崔建峰; 樊仲维

    2003-01-01

    We report on an all-solid-state high-power quasi-continuous blue light source by the frequency doubling of a signal wave from an optical parametric oscillator(OPO).A 50-mm-long LiB3O5(LBO)crystal is used for the OPO,which is pumped by a diode-pumped Nd:YAG green laser(10kHz,50ns).Tunable blue emission in a new nonlinear crystal BiB3O6(BiBO)is obtained with a wavelength range from 450 to 495 nm.The average power of the signal output is as high as 9.3 W from 924 to 970nm.The maximum output of the blue laser with the second harmonic walk-off compensation is 1.3 W average power at 470nm for 6.2 W of OPO signal light at 940nm.

  15. Detecting and characterizing high-frequency oscillations in epilepsy: a case study of big data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Ni, Xuan; Ditto, William L.; Spano, Mark; Carney, Paul R.; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    We develop a framework to uncover and analyse dynamical anomalies from massive, nonlinear and non-stationary time series data. The framework consists of three steps: preprocessing of massive datasets to eliminate erroneous data segments, application of the empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert transform paradigm to obtain the fundamental components embedded in the time series at distinct time scales, and statistical/scaling analysis of the components. As a case study, we apply our framework to detecting and characterizing high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) from a big database of rat electroencephalogram recordings. We find a striking phenomenon: HFOs exhibit on-off intermittency that can be quantified by algebraic scaling laws. Our framework can be generalized to big data-related problems in other fields such as large-scale sensor data and seismic data analysis.

  16. Viscosity profile and Quasi Periodic Oscillation frequency of few transient black hole candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit; Molla, Aslam Ali

    2016-07-01

    Matters enter into the potential well formed by the compact objects due to the transport of angular momentum by viscosity. We compute the amount of viscosity during the outburst time of the transient sources. In the progressive days as the viscosity increases inner edge of the Keplerian disc moves closer to the black holes. Thus the size of the Compton cloud reduces and the frequency of the Quasi Periodic Oscillations increases. We also compute the Compton cooling day by day, which is responsible for the movement of the shock both in rising and declining phases of the outburst. Our viscosity value rises/decays monotonically during the rising/declining phases of the outburst, well within the range proposed by magneto-rotational instability. For that we solve the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and derive the condition of shock formation in presence of Compton cooling.

  17. High-Frequency Oscillations in a Solar Active Region observed with the Rapid Dual Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Mathioudakis, M; Bloomfield, D S; Keenan, F P

    2007-01-01

    High-cadence, synchronized, multiwavelength optical observations of a solar active region (NOAA 10794) are presented. The data were obtained with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak using a newly developed camera system : the Rapid Dual Imager. Wavelet analysis is undertaken to search for intensity related oscillatory signatures, and periodicities ranging from 20 to 370 s are found with significance levels exceeding 95%. Observations in the H-alpha blue wing show more penumbral oscillatory phenomena when compared to simultaneous G-band observations. The H-alpha oscillations are interpreted as the signatures of plasma motions with a mean velocity of 20 km/s. The strong oscillatory power over H-alpha blue-wing and G-band penumbral bright grains is an indication of the Evershed flow with frequencies higher than previously reported.

  18. Relationships between the North Pacific Oscillation and the typhoon/hurricane frequencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Relationships between the North Pacific Oscillation (NPO) and the typhoon as well as hurricane frequencies are documented. The correlation between NPO index in June-July-August-September and the annual typhoon number in the western North Pacific is 0.37 for the period of 1949―1998. The NPO is correlated with the annual hurricane number in the tropical Atlantic at - 0.28 for the same period. The variability of NPO is found to be concurrent with the changes of the magnitude of vertical zonal wind shear, sea-level pressure patterns, as well as the sea surface temperature, which are physically associated with the typhoons and hurricanes genesis. The NPO associated atmospheric circulation variability is analyzed to explain how NPO is linked with variability of the tropical atmospheric circulation in the western Pacific and the tropical Atlantic, via the atmospheric teleconnection.

  19. Measurement of the $B_{d}^{0} - \\overline{B}_{d}^{0}$ oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rind, O; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1998-01-01

    Time-dependent ${\\mathrm{B^{0}}\\mbox{-}\\bar{\\mathrm{B}} ^{0}}$ mixing is studied using about two million hadronic Z decays registered by L3 in 1994 and 1995. For this study three techniques are used. Tagging of the b-quark charge at decay time is performed by identifying leptons from semileptonic B decays. The flavour of the b quark at production time is determined from the charge of the lepton in the opposite hemisphere or by using a jet-charge technique. The proper time of the B-particle decay is obtained by reconstructing the production and decay vertices or by a measurement of the lepton impact parameter. The combined result for the frequency of ${\\mathrm{B_d^0}}$ meson oscillations is \\begin{displaymath} {\\Delta m_d} = 0.444 \\pm 0.040 \\ \\mathrm{ps}^{-1}. \\end{displaymath} \\end{abstract} \\end{document}

  20. Temporal Characteristics of High-Frequency Lower-Limb Oscillation during Freezing of Gait in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don A. Yungher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A cardinal feature of freezing of gait (FOG is high frequency (3–8 Hz oscillation of the legs, and this study aimed to quantify the temporal pattern of lower-body motion prior to and during FOG. Acceleration data was obtained from sensors attached to the back, thighs, shanks, and feet in 14 Parkinson’s disease patients performing timed-up-and-go tasks, and clinical assessment of FOG was performed by two experienced raters from video. A total of 23 isolated FOG events, defined as occurring at least 5 s after gait initiation and with no preceding FOG, were identified from the clinical ratings. The corresponding accelerometer records were analyzed within a 4 s window centered at the clinical onset of freezing. FOG-related high-frequency oscillation (an increase in power in the 3–8 Hz band >3 SD from baseline followed a distal to proximal onset pattern, appearing at the feet, shanks, thighs, and then back over a period of 250 ms. Peak power tended to decrease as the focus of oscillation moved from feet to back. There was a consistent delay (mean 872 ms between the onset of high frequency oscillation at the feet and clinical onset of FOG. We infer that FOG is characterized by high frequency oscillation at the feet, which progresses proximally and is mechanically damped at the torso.

  1. Temporal Characteristics of High-Frequency Lower-Limb Oscillation during Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungher, Don A.; Morris, Tiffany R.; Dilda, Valentina; Shine, James M.; Naismith, Sharon L.; Lewis, Simon J. G.; Moore, Steven T.

    2014-01-01

    A cardinal feature of freezing of gait (FOG) is high frequency (3–8 Hz) oscillation of the legs, and this study aimed to quantify the temporal pattern of lower-body motion prior to and during FOG. Acceleration data was obtained from sensors attached to the back, thighs, shanks, and feet in 14 Parkinson's disease patients performing timed-up-and-go tasks, and clinical assessment of FOG was performed by two experienced raters from video. A total of 23 isolated FOG events, defined as occurring at least 5 s after gait initiation and with no preceding FOG, were identified from the clinical ratings. The corresponding accelerometer records were analyzed within a 4 s window centered at the clinical onset of freezing. FOG-related high-frequency oscillation (an increase in power in the 3–8 Hz band >3 SD from baseline) followed a distal to proximal onset pattern, appearing at the feet, shanks, thighs, and then back over a period of 250 ms. Peak power tended to decrease as the focus of oscillation moved from feet to back. There was a consistent delay (mean 872 ms) between the onset of high frequency oscillation at the feet and clinical onset of FOG. We infer that FOG is characterized by high frequency oscillation at the feet, which progresses proximally and is mechanically damped at the torso. PMID:25101189

  2. High frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with chronic air-flow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquet, J; Brochard, L; Isabey, D; de Cremoux, H; Chang, H K; Bignon, J; Harf, A

    1987-12-01

    In order to assess high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) as a way to assist spontaneous breathing in obstructive lung disease, we studied 12 patients with severe and stable COPD. HFCWO at 5 Hz were applied by means of an inflatable vest. In order to avoid any discomfort, oscillations were applied only during the expiratory phase of the spontaneous breathing cycle. We compared gas exchange and pattern of breathing during control and HFCWO periods, each lasting 15 min. Minute ventilation did not change, but the pattern of breathing was markedly altered during HFCWO: breathing frequency decreased (p less than 0.001) from 18 +/- 6/min during control to 14 +/- 5/min, whereas tidal volume increased (p less than 0.01) from 600 +/- 200 ml during control to 860 +/- 400 ml. Secondary to this change in the pattern of breathing, arterial PO2 increased slightly (p less than 0.01) from 54 +/- 7 mm Hg during control to 57 +/- 8 mm Hg during HFCWO, and arterial PCO2 significantly (p less than 0.01) decreased from 46 +/- 6 mm Hg during control to 43 +/- 7 mm Hg during HFCWO. In addition, duty cycle (Ti/Ttot) decreased (p less than 0.001) from 0.37 +/- 0.03 s during control to 0.29 +/- 0.05 s during HFCWO. Such a decrease in duty cycle suggest that inspiratory muscle work was facilitated under HFCWO. In 8 patients, we obtained the tension-time index (TTdi), or the product of duty cycle and Pdi/Pdimax, and found that this index significantly decreased (p less than 0.05) from 0.06 +/- 0.03 during control to 0.04 +/- 0.02 during HFCWO.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. A Fixed-Frequency Bidirectional Resonant DC-DC Converter Suitable for Wide Voltage Gain Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Wang, Huai; Al-Durra, Ahmed;

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new bidirectional resonant dc-dc converter suitable for wide voltage gain range applications (e.g., energy storage systems). The proposed converter overcomes the narrow voltage gain range of conventional resonant DC-DC converters, and meanwhile achieves high efficiency...... and characteristics of the proposed converter are analyzed. Finally, a 1-kW converter prototype is built and the experimental results verify the theoretical analyses....

  4. The effects of spike frequency adaptation and negative feedback on the synchronization of neural oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermentrout, B; Pascal, M; Gutkin, B

    2001-06-01

    There are several different biophysical mechanisms for spike frequency adaptation observed in recordings from cortical neurons. The two most commonly used in modeling studies are a calcium-dependent potassium current I(ahp) and a slow voltage-dependent potassium current, I(m). We show that both of these have strong effects on the synchronization properties of excitatorily coupled neurons. Furthermore, we show that the reasons for these effects are different. We show through an analysis of some standard models, that the M-current adaptation alters the mechanism for repetitive firing, while the afterhyperpolarization adaptation works via shunting the incoming synapses. This latter mechanism applies with a network that has recurrent inhibition. The shunting behavior is captured in a simple two-variable reduced model that arises near certain types of bifurcations. A one-dimensional map is derived from the simplified model.

  5. Analytical calculation of the frequency shift in phase oscillators driven by colored noise: implications for electrical engineering and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Roberto F

    2009-09-01

    We provide an analytical expression for the mean frequency shift in phase oscillators as a function of the standard deviation, sigma and the autocorrelation time, tau of small random perturbations. We show that the frequency shift is negative and proportional to sigma;{2} . Its absolute value increases monotonically with tau , approaching an asymptote determined by the L2 -norm of the phase-response curve. We validate our theoretical predictions with computer simulations and discuss their implications for the design of electronic oscillators and for the encoding of information in biological neural networks.

  6. MIPAS observations of longitudinal oscillations in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere: climatology of odd-parity daily frequency modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Comas, Maya; González-Galindo, Francisco; Funke, Bernd; Gardini, Angela; Jurado-Navarro, Aythami; López-Puertas, Manuel; Ward, William E.

    2016-09-01

    MIPAS global Sun-synchronous observations are almost fixed in local time. Subtraction of the descending and ascending node measurements at each longitude only includes the longitudinal oscillations with odd daily frequencies nodd from the Sun's perspective at 10:00. Contributions from the background atmosphere, daily-invariant zonal oscillations and tidal modes with even-parity daily frequencies vanish. We have determined longitudinal oscillations in MIPAS temperature with nodd and wavenumber k = 0-4 from the stratosphere to 150 km from April 2007 to March 2012. To our knowledge, this is the first time zonal oscillations in temperature have been derived pole to pole in this altitude range from a single instrument. The major findings are the detection of (1) migrating tides at northern and southern high latitudes; (2) significant k = 1 activity at extratropical and high latitudes, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere; (3) k = 3 and k = 4 eastward-propagating waves that penetrate the lower thermosphere with a significantly larger vertical wavelength than in the mesosphere; and (4) a migrating tide quasi-biennial oscillation in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere. MIPAS global measurements of longitudinal oscillations are useful for testing tide modeling in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region and as a lower boundary for models extending higher up in the atmosphere.

  7. A 12 GHz 30 mW 130 nm CMOS Rotary Travelling Wave Voltage Controlled Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jacquemod

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a 12 GHz rotary travelling wave (RTW voltage controlled oscillator designed in a 130 nm CMOS technology. The phase noise and power consumption performances were compared with the literature and with telecommunication standards for broadcast satellite applications. The RTW VCO exhibits a −106 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz and a 30 mW power consumption with a sensibility of 400 MHz/V. Finally, requirements are given for a PLL implementation of the RTW VCO and simulated results are presented.

  8. A Novel High-Frequency Voltage Standing-Wave Ratio-Based Grounding Electrode Line Fault Supervision in Ultra-High Voltage DC Transmission Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Teng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the fault monitoring performance of grounding electrode lines in ultra-high voltage DC (UHVDC transmission systems, a novel fault monitoring approach based on the high-frequency voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR is proposed in this paper. The VSWR is defined considering a lossless transmission line, and the characteristics of the VSWR under different conditions are analyzed. It is shown that the VSWR equals 1 when the terminal resistance completely matches the characteristic impedance of the line, and when a short circuit fault occurs on the grounding electrode line, the VSWR will be greater than 1. The VSWR will approach positive infinity under metallic earth fault conditions, whereas the VSWR in non-metallic earth faults will be smaller. Based on these analytical results, a fault supervision criterion is formulated. The effectiveness of the proposed VSWR-based fault supervision technique is verified with a typical UHVDC project established in Power Systems Computer Aided Design/Electromagnetic Transients including DC(PSCAD/EMTDC. Simulation results indicate that the proposed strategy can reliably identify the grounding electrode line fault and has strong anti-fault resistance capability.

  9. Resection of ictal high-frequency oscillations leads to favorable surgical outcome in pediatric epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hisako; Greiner, Hansel M.; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Holland-Bouley, Katherine D.; Seo, Joo Hee; Arthur, Todd; Mangano, Francesco T.; Leach, James L.; Rose, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose Intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) is performed as part of an epilepsy surgery evaluation when noninvasive tests are incongruent or the putative seizure-onset zone is near eloquent cortex. Determining the seizure-onset zone using intracranial EEG has been conventionally based on identification of specific ictal patterns with visual inspection. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs, >80 Hz) have been recognized recently as highly correlated with the epileptogenic zone. However, HFOs can be difficult to detect because of their low amplitude. Therefore, the prevalence of ictal HFOs and their role in localization of epileptogenic zone on intracranial EEG are unknown. Methods We identified 48 patients who underwent surgical treatment after the surgical evaluation with intracranial EEG, and 44 patients met criteria for this retrospective study. Results were not used in surgical decision making. Intracranial EEG recordings were collected with a sampling rate of 2,000 Hz. Recordings were first inspected visually to determine ictal onset and then analyzed further with time-frequency analysis. Forty-one (93%) of 44 patients had ictal HFOs determined with time-frequency analysis of intracranial EEG. Key Findings Twenty-two (54%) of the 41 patients with ictal HFOs had complete resection of HFO regions, regardless of frequency bands. Complete resection of HFOs (n = 22) resulted in a seizure-free outcome in 18 (82%) of 22 patients, significantly higher than the seizure-free outcome with incomplete HFO resection (4/19, 21%). Significance Our study shows that ictal HFOs are commonly found with intracranial EEG in our population largely of children with cortical dysplasia, and have localizing value. The use of ictal HFOs may add more promising information compared to interictal HFOs because of the evidence of ictal propagation and followed by clinical aspect of seizures. Complete resection of HFOs is a favorable prognostic indicator for surgical outcome. PMID

  10. Comparing origins of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations with spectral-timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Abigail L.; Uttley, Phil

    2017-08-01

    The light curves of low-mass X-ray binaries show variability on timescales from milliseconds to months. The rapid (sub-second) variability is particularly interesting because it is thought to probe the inner region of the accretion disk and the central compact object. Observations suggest that different types of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are associated with different emitting-region geometries (e.g., disk-like or jet-like) in the innermost part of the X-ray binary, that are varying possibly due to general relativistic precession. A new way to analyze QPOs is with spectral-timing, which seeks to investigate how matter behaves in the strong gravitational field around the compact object by causally linking the variations from different spectral components. We developed a technique for phase-resolved spectroscopy of QPOs, and are applying it to two types of low-frequency QPOs from the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4. Over a QPO “period”, we find that the energy spectrum changes not only in normalization, but also in spectral shape. We can quantify how the spectral shape changes as a function of QPO phase, and the two different QPOs show markedly different spectral changes. The "Type B" low-frequency QPO shows evidence of a large-scale-height (jet-like) power-law- emitting precessing region, while in the same outburst the "Type C" low-frequency QPO shows evidence of a small-scale-height (disk-like) power-law-emitting precessing region. These interpretations can be used to look into the evolution of matter in the strong-gravity regime.

  11. Multi-frequency excitation of stiffened triangular plates for large amplitude oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, H.; Saadatnia, Z.; Esmailzadeh, E.; Younesian, D.

    2014-10-01

    Free and forced vibrations of triangular plate are investigated. Diverse types of stiffeners were attached onto the plate to suppress the undesirable large-amplitude oscillations. The governing equation of motion for a triangular plate, based on the von Kármán theory, is developed and the nonlinear ordinary differential equation of the system using Galerkin approach is obtained. Closed-form expressions for the free undamped and large-amplitude vibration of an orthotropic triangular elastic plate are presented using the two well-known analytical methods, namely, the energy balance method and the variational approach. The frequency responses in the closed-form are presented and their sensitivities with respect to the initial amplitudes are studied. An error analysis is performed and the vibration behavior, as well as the accuracy of the solution methods, is evaluated. Different types of the stiffened triangular plates are considered in order to cover a wide range of practical applications. Numerical simulations are carried out and the validity of the solution procedure is explored. It is demonstrated that the two methods of energy balance and variational approach have been quite straightforward and reliable techniques to solve those nonlinear differential equations. Subsequently, due to the importance of multiple resonant responses in engineering design, multi-frequency excitations are considered. It is assumed that three periodic forces are applied to the plate in three specific positions. The multiple time scaling method is utilized to obtain approximate solutions for the frequency resonance cases. Influences of different parameters, namely, the position of applied forces, geometry and the number of stiffeners on the frequency response of the triangular plates are examined.

  12. Quality Control of Extruded HVDC Cables: Detection of Critical Flaws Using Low Frequency Voltage Endurance Testing%Quality Control of Extruded HVDC Cables: Detection of Critical Flaws Using Low Frequency Voltage Endurance Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erling Ildstad; Frank Mauseth; Mildrid Selsjord; Roll Hegerberg

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of the work presented here is to evaluate different methods for quality control of polymer- ic insulated HVDC cables. The insight gained can be used to evaluate proposed test methods for quality assurance of long lengths of polymer insulated power cables. Laboratory experiments were performed using both Rogowski shaped test objects and model cables, insulated with XLPE containing imbedded spherically shaped particles. Tests were per- formed by stressing the test object with AC (50 Hz), VLF (0.1 Hz) and DC voltages and measuring time to break- down at the different voltages. The slope of the voltage-time curve for 0. land 50 Hz were found to be parallel show- ing higher breakdown strength for 0.1 Hz than 50 Hz. The number of periods to breakdown is somewhat higher for 0.1 Hz than for 50 Hz. The breakdown strength for DC was~ much higher than for both AC 50 Hz and 0.1 Hz. The results indicate that the VLF test voltage needs to be 2 to 3 times higher than at 50 Hz power frequency in order to eliminate the same defects within a comparable time.

  13. A Current-Mode Buck DC-DC Converter with Frequency Characteristics Independent of Input and Output Voltages Using a Quadratic Compensation Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Toru; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro

    By using a quadratic compensation slope, a CMOS current-mode buck DC-DC converter with constant frequency characteristics over wide input and output voltage ranges has been developed. The use of a quadratic slope instead of a conventional linear slope makes both the damping factor in the transfer function and the frequency bandwidth of the current feedback loop independent of the converter's output voltage settings. When the coefficient of the quadratic slope is chosen to be dependent on the input voltage settings, the damping factor in the transfer function and the frequency bandwidth of the current feedback loop both become independent of the input voltage settings. Thus, both the input and output voltage dependences in the current feedback loop are eliminated, the frequency characteristics become constant, and the frequency bandwidth is maximized. To verify the effectiveness of a quadratic compensation slope with a coefficient that is dependent on the input voltage in a buck DC-DC converter, we fabricated a test chip using a 0.18µm high-voltage CMOS process. The evaluation results show that the frequency characteristics of both the total feedback loop and the current feedback loop are constant even when the input and output voltages are changed from 2.5V to 7V and from 0.5V to 5.6V, respectively, using a 3MHz clock.

  14. Noninvasive optical evaluation of low frequency oscillations in prefrontal cortex hemodynamics during verbal working memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Li, Kai; Sun, Yunlong

    2014-03-01

    The low frequency oscillation (LFO) around 0.1 Hz has been observed recently in cerebral hemodynamic signals during rest/sleep, enhanced breathing, and head- up-tilting, showing that cerebral autoregulation can be accessed by LFOs. However, many brain function researches require direct measurement of LFOs during specified brain function activities. This pilot study explored using near-infrared spectroscopy/imaging (NIRS) to noninvasively and simultaneously detect LFOs of prefrontal cerebral hemodynamics (i.e., oxygenated/deoxygenated/total hemoglobin concentration: △[oxy-Hb]/ △[deoxy-Hb]/ △[tot-Hb]) during N-back visual verbal working memory task. The LFOs were extracted from the measured variables using power spectral analysis. We found the brain activation sites struck clear LFOs while other sites did not. The LFO of △[deoxy-Hb] acted as a negative pike and ranged in (0.05, 0.1) Hz, while LFOs of △[oxy-Hb] and △[tot-Hb] acted as a positive pike and ranged in (0.1, 0.15) Hz. The amplitude difference and frequency lag between △[deoxy-Hb] and △[oxy-Hb]/ △[tot-Hb] produced a more focused and sensitive activation map compare to hemodynamic amplitude-quantified activation maps. This study observed LFOs in brain activities and showed strong potential of LFOs in accessing brain functions.

  15. Constraining black holes with light boson hair and boson stars using epicyclic frequencies and quasiperiodic oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Nicola; Pani, Paolo; Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen; Ferrari, Valeria

    2017-06-01

    Light bosonic fields are ubiquitous in extensions of the Standard Model. Even when minimally coupled to gravity, these fields might evade the assumptions of the black-hole no-hair theorems and give rise to spinning black holes which can be drastically different from the Kerr metric. Furthermore, they allow for self-gravitating compact solitons, known as (scalar or Proca) boson stars. The quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the x-ray flux emitted by accreting compact objects carry information about the strong-field region, thus providing a powerful tool to constrain deviations from Kerr's geometry and to search for exotic compact objects. By using the relativistic precession model as a proxy to interpret the QPOs in terms of geodesic frequencies, we investigate how the QPO frequencies could be used to test the no-hair theorem and the existence of light bosonic fields near accreting compact objects. We show that a detection of two QPO triplets with current sensitivity can already constrain these models and that the future eXTP mission or a LOFT-like mission can set very stringent constraints on black holes with bosonic hair and on (scalar or Proca) boson stars. The peculiar geodesic structure of compact scalar/Proca boson stars implies that these objects can easily be ruled out as alternative models for x-ray source GRO J1655-40.

  16. High frequency capacitor-diode voltage multiplier dc-dc converter development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, J. J.; Martinelli, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    A power conditioner was developed which used a capacitor diode voltage multiplier to provide a high voltage without the use of a step-up transformer. The power conditioner delivered 1200 Vdc at 100 watts and was operated from a 120 Vdc line. The efficiency was in excess of 90 percent. The component weight was 197 grams. A modified boost-add circuit was used for the regulation. A short circuit protection circuit was used which turns off the drive circuit upon a fault condition, and recovers within 5 ms after removal of the short. High energy density polysulfone capacitors and high speed diodes were used in the multiplier circuit.

  17. Flow reversal at low voltage and low frequency in a microfabricated ac electrokinetic pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Brask, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidic chips have been fabricated in Pyrex glass to study electrokinetic pumping generated by a low-voltage ac bias applied to an in-channel asymmetric metallic electrode array. A measurement procedure has been established and followed carefully resulting in a high degree of reproducibility...... of the measurements over several days. A large coverage fraction of the electrode array in the microfluidic channels has led to an increased sensitivity allowing for pumping measurements at low bias voltages. Depending on the ionic concentration a hitherto unobserved reversal of the pumping direction has been...

  18. [Transient high frequency nodal rhythm after a high voltage electric shock. Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supervía, August; Del Baño, Francisco; Aguirre, Alfons; Membrilla, Estela

    2013-09-01

    Electrical shock can cause a direct myocardial damage and different types of arrhythmias, which are uncommon and occur more often when there is a high voltage exposure. We report a 19-year-old male that received a high voltage shock, falling thereafter from an altitude of four meters. On admission to the emergency room, he had second and third degree burns in the right hand and the left thigh. The electrocardiogram showed a nodal rhythm of 72 beats per minute. After four hours of monitoring, sinus rhythm returned spontaneously.

  19. A Low Power Low Phase Noise Oscillator for MICS Transceivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dawei; Liu, Dongsheng; Kang, Chaojian; Zou, Xuecheng

    2017-01-12

    A low-power, low-phase-noise quadrature oscillator for Medical Implantable Communications Service (MICS) transceivers is presented. The proposed quadrature oscillator generates 349~689 MHz I/Q (In-phase and Quadrature) signals covering the MICS band. The oscillator is based on a differential pair with positive feedback. Each delay cell consists of a few transistors enabling lower voltage operation. Since the oscillator is very sensitive to disturbances in the supply voltage and ground, a self-bias circuit for isolating the voltage disturbance is proposed to achieve bias voltages which can track the disturbances from the supply and ground. The oscillation frequency, which is controlled by the bias voltages, is less sensitive to the supply and ground noise, and a low phase noise is achieved. The chip is fabricated in the UMC (United Microelectronics Corporation) 0.18 μm CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) process; the core just occupies a 28.5 × 22 μm² area. The measured phase noise is -108.45 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset with a center frequency of 540 MHz. The gain of the oscillator is 0.309 MHz/mV with a control voltage from 0 V to 1.1 V. The circuit can work with a supply voltage as low as 1.2 V and the power consumption is only 0.46 mW at a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  20. Analysis and modeling of time-variant amplitude-frequency couplings of and between oscillations of EEG bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Herbert; Putsche, Peter; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Schelenz, Christoph; Leistritz, Lutz

    2008-08-01

    Low-frequency (0.5-2.5 Hz) and individually defined high-frequency (7-11 or 8-12 Hz; 11-15 or 14-18 Hz) oscillatory components of the electroencephalogram (EEG) burst activity derived from thiopental-induced burst-suppression patterns (BSP) were investigated in seven sedated patients (17-26 years old) with severe head injury. The predominant high-frequency burst oscillations (>7 Hz) were detected for each patient by means of time-variant amplitude spectrum analysis. Thereafter, the instantaneous envelope (IE) and the instantaneous frequency (IF) were computed for these low- and high-frequency bands to quantify amplitude-frequency dependencies (envelope-envelope, envelope-frequency, and frequency-frequency correlations). Time-variant phase-locking, phase synchronization, and quadratic phase couplings are associated with the observed amplitude-frequency characteristics. Additionally, these time-variant analyses were carried out for modeled burst patterns. Coupled Duffing oscillators were adapted to each EEG burst and by means of these models data-based burst simulations were generated. Results are: (1) strong envelope-envelope correlations (IE courses) can be demonstrated; (2) it can be shown that a rise of the IE is associated with an increase of the IF (only for the frequency bands 0.5-2.5 and 7-11 or 8-12 Hz); (3) the rise characteristics of all individually averaged envelope-frequency courses (IE-IF) are strongly correlated; (4) for the 7-11 or 8-12 Hz oscillation these associations are weaker and the variation between the time courses of the patients is higher; (5) for both frequency ranges a quantitative amplitude-frequency dependency can be shown because higher IE peak maxima are accompanied by stronger IF changes; (6) the time range of significant phase-locking within the 7-11 or 8-12 Hz frequency bands and of the strongest quadratic phase couplings (between 0.5-2.5 and 7-11 or 8-12 Hz) is between 0 and 1,000 ms; (7) all phase coupling characteristics of the

  1. A utility piezoelectric energy harvester with low frequency and high-output voltage: Theoretical model, experimental verification and energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangyi; Gao, Shiqiao; Liu, Haipeng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a utility piezoelectric energy harvester with low frequency and high-output voltage is presented. Firstly, the harvester's three theoretical models are presented, namely the static model, the quasi static model and the dynamic vibration model. By analyzing the influence of the mass ratio of the mass block to the beam on output characteristics of the harvester, we compare the quasi static model and the dynamic vibration model and then define their applicable ranges. Secondly, simulation and experiments are done to verify the models, using the harvester with PZT-5H piezoelectric material, which are proved to be consistent with each other. The experimental results show that the output open-circuit voltage and the output power can reach up to 86.36V and 27.5mW respectively. The experiments are conducted when this harvester system is excited by the first modal frequency (58.90Hz) with the acceleration 10m/s2. In this low frequency vibration case, it is easy to capture the energy in the daily environment. In addition, LTC 3588-1 chip (Linear Technology Corporation) is used as the medium energy circuit to transfer charges from the PZT-5H electrode to the 0.22F 5V super capacitor and ML621 rechargeable button battery. For this super-capacitor, it takes about 100min for the capacitor voltage to rise from 0V to 3.6V. For this button battery, it takes about 200min to increase the battery voltage from 2.5V to 3.48V.

  2. A utility piezoelectric energy harvester with low frequency and high-output voltage: Theoretical model, experimental verification and energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyi Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a utility piezoelectric energy harvester with low frequency and high-output voltage is presented. Firstly, the harvester’s three theoretical models are presented, namely the static model, the quasi static model and the dynamic vibration model. By analyzing the influence of the mass ratio of the mass block to the beam on output characteristics of the harvester, we compare the quasi static model and the dynamic vibration model and then define their applicable ranges. Secondly, simulation and experiments are done to verify the models, using the harvester with PZT-5H piezoelectric material, which are proved to be consistent with each other. The experimental results show that the output open-circuit voltage and the output power can reach up to 86.36V and 27.5mW respectively. The experiments are conducted when this harvester system is excited by the first modal frequency (58.90Hz with the acceleration 10m/s2. In this low frequency vibration case, it is easy to capture the energy in the daily environment. In addition, LTC 3588-1 chip (Linear Technology Corporation is used as the medium energy circuit to transfer charges from the PZT-5H electrode to the 0.22F 5V super capacitor and ML621 rechargeable button battery. For this super-capacitor, it takes about 100min for the capacitor voltage to rise from 0V to 3.6V. For this button battery, it takes about 200min to increase the battery voltage from 2.5V to 3.48V.

  3. Investigation of non-uniform airflow signal oscillation during high frequency chest compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jongwon

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High frequency chest compression (HFCC is a useful and popular therapy for clearing bronchial airways of excessive or thicker mucus. Our observation of respiratory airflow of a subject during use of HFCC showed the airflow oscillation by HFCC was strongly influenced by the nonlinearity of the respiratory system. We used a computational model-based approach to analyse the respiratory airflow during use of HFCC. Methods The computational model, which is based on previous physiological studies and represented by an electrical circuit analogue, was used for simulation of in vivo protocol that shows the nonlinearity of the respiratory system. Besides, airflow was measured during use of HFCC. We compared the simulation results to either the measured data or the previous research, to understand and explain the observations. Results and discussion We could observe two important phenomena during respiration pertaining to the airflow signal oscillation generated by HFCC. The amplitudes of HFCC airflow signals varied depending on spontaneous airflow signals. We used the simulation results to investigate how the nonlinearity of airway resistance, lung capacitance, and inertance of air characterized the respiratory airflow. The simulation results indicated that lung capacitance or the inertance of air is also not a factor in the non-uniformity of HFCC airflow signals. Although not perfect, our circuit analogue model allows us to effectively simulate the nonlinear characteristics of the respiratory system. Conclusion We found that the amplitudes of HFCC airflow signals behave as a function of spontaneous airflow signals. This is due to the nonlinearity of the respiratory system, particularly variations in airway resistance.

  4. Frequency domain phase noise analysis of dual injection-locked optoelectronic oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakht, Sajad

    2016-10-01

    Dual injection-locked optoelectronic oscillators (DIL-OEOs) have been introduced as a means to achieve very low-noise microwave oscillations while avoiding the large spurious peaks that occur in the phase noise of the conventional single-loop OEOs. In these systems, two OEOs are inter-injection locked to each other. The OEO with the longer optical fiber delay line is called the master OEO, and the other is called the slave OEO. Here, a frequency domain approach for simulating the phase noise spectrum of each of the OEOs in a DIL-OEO system and based on the conversion matrix approach is presented. The validity of the new approach is verified by comparing its results with previously published data in the literature. In the new approach, first, in each of the master or slave OEOs, the power spectral densities (PSDs) of two white and 1/f noise sources are optimized such that the resulting simulated phase noise of any of the master or slave OEOs in the free-running state matches the measured phase noise of that OEO. After that, the proposed approach is able to simulate the phase noise PSD of both OEOs at the injection-locked state. Because of the short run-time requirements, especially compared to previously proposed time domain approaches, the new approach is suitable for optimizing the power injection ratios (PIRs), and potentially other circuit parameters, in order to achieve good performance regarding the phase noise in each of the OEOs. Through various numerical simulations, the optimum PIRs for achieving good phase noise performance are presented and discussed; they are in agreement with the previously published results. This further verifies the applicability of the new approach. Moreover, some other interesting results regarding the spur levels are also presented.

  5. The Effect of Doppler Frequency Shift, Frequency Offset of the Local Oscillators, and Phase Noise on the Performance of Coherent OFDM Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fuqin; Andro, Monty

    2001-01-01

    This paper first shows that the Doppler frequency shift affects the frequencies of the RF carrier, subcarriers, envelope, and symbol timing by the same percentage in an Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) signal or any other modulated signals. Then the SNR degradation of an OFDM system due to Doppler frequency shift, frequency offset of the local oscillators and phase noise is analyzed. Expressions are given and values for 4-, 16-, 64-, and 256-QAM OFDM systems are calculated and plotted. The calculations show that the Doppler shift of the D3 project is about 305 kHz, and the degradation due to it is about 0.01 to 0.04 dB, which is negligible. The degradation due to frequency offset and phase noise of local oscillators will be the main source of degradation. To keep the SNR degradation under 0.1 dB, the relative frequency offset due to local oscillators must be below 0.01 for the 16 QAM-OFDM. This translates to an offset of 1.55 MHz (0.01 x 155 MHz) or a stability of 77.5 ppm (0.01 x 155 MHz/20 GHz) for the DI project. To keep the SNR degradation under 0.1 dB, the relative linewidth (0) due to phase noise of the local oscillators must be below 0.0004 for the 16 QAM-OFDM. This translates to a linewidth of 0.062 MHz (0.0004 x 155 MHz) of the 20 GHz RIF carrier. For a degradation of 1 dB, beta = 0.04, and the linewidth can be relaxed to 6.2 MHz.

  6. Detection of High Frequency Oscillations by Hybrid Depth Electrodes in Standard Clinical Intracranial EEG Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios D Kondylis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillations (HFOs have been proposed as a novel marker for epileptogenic tissue, spurring tremendous research interest into the characterization of these transient events. A wealth of continuously recorded intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG data is currently available from patients undergoing invasive monitoring for the surgical treatment of epilepsy. In contrast to data recorded on research-customized recording systems, data from clinical acquisition systems remain an underutilized resource for HFO detection in most centers. The effective and reliable use of this clinically obtained data would be an important advance in the ongoing study of HFOs and their relationship to ictogenesis. The diagnostic utility of HFOs ultimately will be limited by the ability of clinicians to detect these brief, sporadic, and low amplitude events in an electrically noisy clinical environment. Indeed, one of the most significant factors limiting the use of such clinical recordings for research purposes is their low signal to noise ratio, especially in the higher frequency bands. In order to investigate the presence of HFOs in clinical data, we first obtained continuous intracranial recordings in a typical clinical environment using a commercially available, commonly utilized data acquisition system and off the shelf hybrid macro/micro depth electrodes. This data was then inspected for the presence of HFOs using semi-automated methods and expert manual review. With targeted removal of noise frequency content, HFOs were detected on both macro- and micro-contacts, and preferentially localized to seizure onset zones. HFOs detected by the offline, semi-automated method were also validated in the clinical viewer, demonstrating that 1 this clinical system allows for the visualization of HFOs, and 2 with effective signal processing, clinical recordings can yield valuable information for offline analysis.

  7. Yellow nanosecond sum-frequency generating optical parametric oscillator using periodically poled LiNbO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Bruun-Larsen, M.; Balle-Petersen, O.;

    2008-01-01

    Nanosecond yellow light has been generated through simultaneously phase matched sum-frequency generation and optical parametric oscillation in a periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal. 300 mW of yellow light at a wavelength of 586 nm has been generated from 1.3 W of laser power from a Q-switched Yb...

  8. Ultra-low vibration pulse-tube cryocooler stabilized cryogenic sapphire oscillator with 10^-16 fractional frequency stability

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett, John G

    2010-01-01

    A low maintenance long-term operational cryogenic sapphire oscillator has been implemented at 11.2 GHz using an ultra-low-vibration cryostat and pulse-tube cryocooler. It is currently the world's most stable microwave oscillator employing a cryocooler. Its performance is explained in terms of temperature and frequency stability. The phase noise and the Allan deviation of frequency fluctuations have been evaluated by comparing it to an ultra-stable liquid-helium cooled cryogenic sapphire oscillator in the same laboratory. Assuming both contribute equally, the Allan deviation evaluated for the cryocooled oscillator is sigma_y = 1 x 10^-15 tau^-1/2 for integration times 1 < tau < 10 s with a minimum sigma_y = 3.9 x 10^-16 at tau = 20 s. The long term frequency drift is less than 5 x 10^-14/day. From the measured power spectral density of phase fluctuations the single side band phase noise can be represented by L_phi(f) = 10^-14.0/f^4+10^-11.6/f^3+10^-10.0/f^2+10^-10.2/f+ 10^-11.0 for Fourier frequencies 10...

  9. The piezoelectronic stress transduction switch for very large-scale integration, low voltage sensor computation, and radio frequency applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdǎu, I.-B.; Liu, X.-H.; Kuroda, M. A.; Shaw, T. M.; Crain, J.; Solomon, P. M.; Newns, D. M.; Martyna, G. J.

    2015-08-01

    The piezoelectronic transduction switch is a device with potential as a post-CMOS transistor due to its predicted multi-GHz, low voltage performance on the VLSI-scale. However, the operating principle of the switch has wider applicability. We use theory and simulation to optimize the device across a wide range of length scales and application spaces and to understand the physics underlying its behavior. We show that the four-terminal VLSI-scale switch can operate at a line voltage of 115 mV while as a low voltage-large area device, ≈200 mV operation at clock speeds of ≈2 GHz can be achieved with a desirable 104 On/Off ratio—ideal for on-board computing in sensors. At yet larger scales, the device is predicted to operate as a fast (≈250 ps) radio frequency (RF) switch exhibiting high cyclability, low On resistance and low Off capacitance, resulting in a robust switch with a RF figure of merit of ≈4 fs. These performance benchmarks cannot be approached with CMOS which has reached fundamental limits. In detail, a combination of finite element modeling and ab initio calculations enables prediction of switching voltages for a given design. A multivariate search method then establishes a set of physics-based design rules, discovering the key factors for each application. The results demonstrate that the piezoelectronic transduction switch can offer fast, low power applications spanning several domains of the information technology infrastructure.

  10. Design of a constant-voltage and constant-current controller with dual-loop and adaptive switching frequency control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingping, Chen; Zhiqian, Li

    2015-05-01

    A 5.0-V 2.0-A flyback power supply controller providing constant-voltage (CV) and constant-current (CC) output regulation without the use of an optical coupler is presented. Dual-close-loop control is proposed here due to its better regulation performance of tolerance over process and temperature compared with open loop control used in common. At the same time, the two modes, CC and CV, could switch to each other automatically and smoothly according to the output voltage level not sacrificing the regulation accuracy at the switching phase, which overcomes the drawback of the digital control scheme depending on a hysteresis comparator to change the mode. On-chip compensation using active capacitor multiplier technique is applied to stabilize the voltage loop, eliminate an additional package pin, and save on the die area. The system consumes as little as 100 mW at no-load condition without degrading the transient response performance by utilizing the adaptive switching frequency control mode. The proposed controller has been implemented in a commercial 0.35-μm 40-V BCD process, and the active chip area is 1.5 × 1.0 mm2. The total error of the output voltage due to line and load variations is less than ±1.7%.

  11. Investigating Enhancement Mode Gallium Nitride Power FETs in High Voltage, High Frequency Soft Switching Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nour, Yasser; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2016-01-01

    An increased attention has been detected to develop smaller and lighter high voltage power converters in the range of 50V to 400V domain. The main applications for these converters are mainly focused for Power over Ethernet (PoE), LED lighting and AC adapters. This work will discuss a study...

  12. Investigating Enhancement Mode Gallium Nitride Power FETs in High Voltage, High Frequency Soft Switching Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nour, Yasser; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2016-01-01

    An increased attention has been detected to develop smaller and lighter high voltage power converters in the range of 50V to 400V domain. The main applications for these converters are mainly focused for Power over Ethernet (PoE), LED lighting and AC adapters. This work will discuss a study of us...

  13. Challenges and opportunities for multi-functional oxide thin films for voltage tunable radio frequency/microwave components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Guru; Cole, M. W.; Sun, Nian X.; Kalkur, Thottam S.; Sbrockey, Nick M.; Tompa, Gary S.; Guo, Xiaomei; Chen, Chonglin; Alpay, S. P.; Rossetti, G. A.; Dayal, Kaushik; Chen, Long-Qing; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2013-11-01

    There has been significant progress on the fundamental science and technological applications of complex oxides and multiferroics. Among complex oxide thin films, barium strontium titanate (BST) has become the material of choice for room-temperature-based voltage-tunable dielectric thin films, due to its large dielectric tunability and low microwave loss at room temperature. BST thin film varactor technology based reconfigurable radio frequency (RF)/microwave components have been demonstrated with the potential to lower the size, weight, and power needs of a future generation of communication and radar systems. Low-power multiferroic devices have also been recently demonstrated. Strong magneto-electric coupling has also been demonstrated in different multiferroic heterostructures, which show giant voltage control of the ferromagnetic resonance frequency of more than two octaves. This manuscript reviews recent advances in the processing, and application development for the complex oxides and multiferroics, with the focus on voltage tunable RF/microwave components. The over-arching goal of this review is to provide a synopsis of the current state-of the-art of complex oxide and multiferroic thin film materials and devices, identify technical issues and technical challenges that need to be overcome for successful insertion of the technology for both military and commercial applications, and provide mitigation strategies to address these technical challenges.

  14. Challenges and opportunities for multi-functional oxide thin films for voltage tunable radio frequency/microwave components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanyam, Guru, E-mail: gsubramanyam1@udayton.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States); Cole, M. W., E-mail: melanie.w.cole.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Sun, Nian X. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Kalkur, Thottam S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States); Sbrockey, Nick M.; Tompa, Gary S. [Structured Materials Industries, Inc., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Guo, Xiaomei [Boston Applied Technologies, Inc., Woburn, Massachusetts 01801 (United States); Chen, Chonglin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States); Alpay, S. P.; Rossetti, G. A. [Institute of Materials Science and Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Dayal, Kaushik [Mechanics, Materials and Computing, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chen, Long-Qing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Schlom, Darrell G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    There has been significant progress on the fundamental science and technological applications of complex oxides and multiferroics. Among complex oxide thin films, barium strontium titanate (BST) has become the material of choice for room-temperature-based voltage-tunable dielectric thin films, due to its large dielectric tunability and low microwave loss at room temperature. BST thin film varactor technology based reconfigurable radio frequency (RF)/microwave components have been demonstrated with the potential to lower the size, weight, and power needs of a future generation of communication and radar systems. Low-power multiferroic devices have also been recently demonstrated. Strong magneto-electric coupling has also been demonstrated in different multiferroic heterostructures, which show giant voltage control of the ferromagnetic resonance frequency of more than two octaves. This manuscript reviews recent advances in the processing, and application development for the complex oxides and multiferroics, with the focus on voltage tunable RF/microwave components. The over-arching goal of this review is to provide a synopsis of the current state-of the-art of complex oxide and multiferroic thin film materials and devices, identify technical issues and technical challenges that need to be overcome for successful insertion of the technology for both military and commercial applications, and provide mitigation strategies to address these technical challenges.

  15. Induction generator produces constant-frequency voltage from variable-speed drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, M.

    1970-01-01

    Two-stage polyphase generator is usable as induction motor operable over range of speeds while powered from constant frequency source. It requires neither slip rings nor special adjustable-frequency power supplies or external reactive sources.

  16. Modulation of Cortical Oscillations by Low-Frequency Direct Cortical Stimulation Is State-Dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaraleengam Alagapan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical oscillations play a fundamental role in organizing large-scale functional brain networks. Noninvasive brain stimulation with temporally patterned waveforms such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS have been proposed to modulate these oscillations. Thus, these stimulation modalities represent promising new approaches for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses in which these oscillations are impaired. However, the mechanism by which periodic brain stimulation alters endogenous oscillation dynamics is debated and appears to depend on brain state. Here, we demonstrate with a static model and a neural oscillator model that recurrent excitation in the thalamo-cortical circuit, together with recruitment of cortico-cortical connections, can explain the enhancement of oscillations by brain stimulation as a function of brain state. We then performed concurrent invasive recording and stimulation of the human cortical surface to elucidate the response of cortical oscillations to periodic stimulation and support the findings from the computational models. We found that (1 stimulation enhanced the targeted oscillation power, (2 this enhancement outlasted stimulation, and (3 the effect of stimulation depended on behavioral state. Together, our results show successful target engagement of oscillations by periodic brain stimulation and highlight the role of nonlinear interaction between endogenous network oscillations and stimulation. These mechanistic insights will contribute to the design of adaptive, more targeted stimulation paradigms.

  17. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake-sleep cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-08-16

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake-sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS.

  18. Capture of instantaneous temperature in oscillating flows: use of constant-voltage anemometry to correct the thermal lag of cold wires operated by constant-current anemometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Poignand, Gaëlle; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure for the instantaneous correction of the thermal inertia of cold wires operated by a constant-current anemometer is proposed for oscillating flows. The thermal inertia of cold wires depends both on the wire properties and on the instantaneous incident flow velocity. Its correction is challenging in oscillating flows because no relationship between flow velocity and heat transfer around the wire is available near flow reversal. The present correction procedure requires neither calibration data for velocity nor thermophysical or geometrical properties of the wires. The method relies on the splitting of the time lag of cold wires into two factors, which are obtained using a constant-voltage anemometer in the heated mode. The first factor, which is intrinsic to the wire, is deduced from time-constant measurements performed in a low-turbulence flow. The second factor, which depends on the instantaneous flow velocity, is acquired in situ. In oscillating flows, data acquisition can be synchronized with a reference signal so that the same wire is alternatively operated in the cold mode by a constant-current anemometer and in the heated mode by a constant-voltage anemometer. Validation experiments are conducted in an acoustic standing-wave resonator, for which the fluctuating temperature field along the resonator axis is known independently from acoustic pressure measurements, so that comparisons can be made with cold-wire measurements. It is shown that despite the fact that the wire experiences flow reversal, the new procedure recovers accurately the instantaneous temperature of the flow.

  19. Update on the frequency of Ile1016 mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Quetzaly; Ponce, Gustavo; Lozano, Saul; Flores, Adriana E

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed 790 Aedes aegypti from 14 localities of Mexico in 2009 to update information on the frequency of the Ile1016 allele in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene that confers resistance to pyrethroids and DDT. The Ile1016 mutation was present in all 17 collections, and was close to fixation in Acapulco (frequency = 0.97), Iguala (0.93), and San Nicolas (0.90). Genotypes at the 1016 locus were not in Hardy-Weinberg proportions in collections from Panuco, Veracruz, Cosoleacaque, Coatzacoalcos, Tantoyuca, and Monterrey due in every case to an excess of homozygotes. The high frequencies of this mutation in Ae. aegypti are probably due to selection pressure from pyrethroid insecticides, particularly permethrin, which has been used in mosquito control programs for >10 years in Mexico.

  20. Electron power absorption dynamics in capacitive radio frequency discharges driven by tailored voltage waveforms in CF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, S.; Berger, B.; Schüngel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Bruneau, B.; Johnson, E.; Lafleur, T.; O'Connell, D.; Koepke, M.; Gans, T.; Booth, J.-P.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-08-01

    The power absorption dynamics of electrons and the electrical asymmetry effect in capacitive radio-frequency plasmas operated in CF4 and driven by tailored voltage waveforms are investigated experimentally in combination with kinetic simulations. The driving voltage waveforms are generated as a superposition of multiple consecutive harmonics of the fundamental frequency of 13.56 MHz. Peaks/valleys and sawtooth waveforms are used to study the effects of amplitude and slope asymmetries of the driving voltage waveform on the electron dynamics and the generation of a DC self-bias in an electronegative plasma at different pressures. Compared to electropositive discharges, we observe strongly different effects and unique power absorption dynamics. At high pressures and high electronegativities, the discharge is found to operate in the drift-ambipolar (DA) heating mode. A dominant excitation/ionization maximum is observed during sheath collapse at the edge of the sheath which collapses fastest. High negative-ion densities are observed inside this sheath region, while electrons are confined for part of the RF period in a potential well formed by the ambipolar electric field at this sheath edge and the collapsed (floating potential) sheath at the electrode. For specific driving voltage waveforms, the plasma becomes divided spatially into two different halves of strongly different electronegativity. This asymmetry can be reversed electrically by inverting the driving waveform. For sawtooth waveforms, the discharge asymmetry and the sign of the DC self-bias are found to reverse as the pressure is increased, due to a transition of the electron heating mode from the α-mode to the DA-mode. These effects are interpreted with the aid of the simulation results.

  1. Low-Frequency Flow Oscillations on Stalled Wings Exhibiting Cellular Separation Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disotell, Kevin James

    One of the most pervasive threats to aircraft controllability is wing stall, a condition associated with loss of lift due to separation of air flow from the wing surface at high angles of attack. A recognized need for improved upset recovery training in extended-envelope flight simulators is a physical understanding of the post-stall aerodynamic environment, particularly key flow phenomena which influence the vehicle trajectory. Large-scale flow structures known as stall cells, which scale with the wing chord and are spatially-periodic along the span, have been previously observed on post-stall airfoils with trailing-edge separation present. Despite extensive documentation of stall cells in the literature, the physical mechanisms behind their formation and evolution have proven to be elusive. The undertaken study has sought to characterize the inherently turbulent separated flow existing above the wing surface with cell formation present. In particular, the question of how the unsteady separated flow may interact with the wing to produce time-averaged cellular surface patterns is considered. Time-resolved, two-component particle image velocimetry measurements were acquired at the plane of symmetry of a single stall cell formed on an extruded NACA 0015 airfoil model at chord Reynolds number of 560,000 to obtain insight into the time-dependent flow structure. The evolution of flow unsteadiness was analyzed over a static angle-of-attack range covering the narrow post-stall regime in which stall cells have been observed. Spectral analysis of velocity fields acquired near the stall angle confirmed a low-frequency flow oscillation previously detected in pointwise surface measurements by Yon and Katz (1998), corresponding to a Strouhal number of 0.042 based on frontal projected chord height. Probability density functions of the streamwise velocity component were used to estimate the convective speed of this mode at approximately half the free-stream velocity, in agreement

  2. Nitrogen washout during tidal breathing with superimposed high-frequency chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, A; Zidulka, A; Chang, H K

    1985-08-01

    In order to assess the efficacy of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) superimposed on tidal ventilation, multiple-breath nitrogen washout curves were obtained in 7 normal seated subjects. To maintain a regular breathing pattern throughout the study, the subjects breathed synchronously with a Harvard ventilator set at a constant tidal volume and frequency for each subject during a trial period. Washout curves were obtained during 3 different maneuvers performed in random order. Series A was the control condition with no superimposed HFCWO. In Series B and C, HFCWO at 5 Hz was superimposed on the regulated tidal breathing; the magnitude of the oscillatory tidal volume measured at the airway opening was 20 ml for Series B and 40 ml for Series C. The nitrogen washout was clearly faster in Series C than in Series A for each subject. In Series B, there was an interindividual variability, with a washout rate either equal to that in Maneuver A or in Maneuver C, or intermediate between the two. When these washout curves were analyzed in terms of a simple monocompartment model, the time constant of the washout was found to decrease by 16 +/- 11% in Series B, and 25 +/- 7% in Series C compared with that in Series A. In this group of normal subjects, the correction of any inhomogeneity in the distribution of the ventilation is unlikely to explain these results because of the close fit of all washout curves to a monoexponential model. It is postulated that during inspiration HFCWO enhances gas mixing in the lung periphery and that during expiration it improves gas mixing in the airways.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for a solar model evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Fontes, Christopher; Walczak, Przemyslaw; Wood, Suzannah R.; Mussack, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Los Alamos has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities for elements with atomic number Z=1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of a standard solar model including these new opacities, and compare with a model evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities released about 1996. We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval, and Scott (2009), including 2015 updates. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a,b) are somewhat higher than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities near the base of the solar convection zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. We discuss the potential for increased opacities to partially mitigate the ‘solar abundance problem’.References:J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr., G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, Eighth International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications: ICAMDATA, Gaithersburg, MD 2012, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1545, (AIP, New York, 2013a), pp. 17-26.J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr, G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, High Energy Density Physics 9, 369 (2013b).

  4. Spatio-temporal analysis of stimuli-modulated spontaneous low frequency oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming; LIU YaDong; HU DeWen; WANG YuCheng; LIU FaYi; FENG GuiYu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the spatio-temporal architecture of the stimulation-modulated spontaneous low frequency oscillation (LFO) in the SD rat's somatosensory cortex is studied by optical imaging (OI) technology.After the electrical stimulation, it is observed that the phases of the LFO signals are changed, the amplitudes are increased, and most importantly, the signals in the bilateral somatosensory cortex tend to be synchronized. Based on these phenomena, the origin of the LFO signals is discussed. It is argued that the arteriole vasomotion may be the major contribution to the LFO signals under green illumination (546±10 nm). The phase relationship among the LFO signals of arteries, veins and cortex has also been studied. It is found that there are phase differences between the LFO signal of veins and that of cortex under red illumination (605±10 nm), the signal of cortex leads that of veins by 0.6-1.0 s, while under green illumination, no obvious differences are observed and the reason may be that the mechanism of the LFO signals of cortexes and vessels are different.

  5. COMPARISON OF HIGH-FREQUENCY OSCILLATION VENTILATION WITH CONVENTIONAL MANDATORY VENTILATION IN ANIMAL ARDS MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Guo-chao; HUANG Shao-guang; LI Min; DENG Wei-wu; WAN Huan-ying

    2005-01-01

    Objective To compare effect of high-frequency oscillation ventilation (HFOV) and conventional mandatory ventilation (CMV) on lung injury development in rabbit with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods Animals that underwent saline lung lavage to produce lung injury were randomized to one of the two treatment groups (HFOV or CMV, n=6). PaCO2 was maintained between 35-45mmHg and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) was maintain >88% by adjusting corresponding ventilator parameters. Ventilation period was 6h. Lung fluids were aspirated before and at the end of ventilation for cell analysis. Then the animals were euthanized, lung tissue was removed for wet/dry weight measurement, light and electron microscopic examination.Results The difference of artery blood gas analyses(pH, PaO2, PaCO2) between HFOV and CMV was insignificant. The difference between HFOV and CMV in cytological examination of lung fluids, wet/dry weight measurement was also insignificant. But compared with CMV,HFOV not only reduced the area of lung injury, but also reduced lung injury score in light and electron microscopic examination. Conclusion When same artery blood gas analysis was obtained, HFOV significantly reduced lung injury development in ARDS animal than CMV. As a lung protection strategy, HFOV can be used in the treatment of ARDS.

  6. Epileptiform synchronization and high-frequency oscillations in brain slices comprising piriform and entorhinal cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, S; Lévesque, M; Avoli, M

    2014-12-05

    We employed field potential recordings in extended in vitro brain slices form Sprague-Dawley rats containing the piriform and entorhinal cortices (PC and EC, respectively) to identify the characteristics of epileptiform discharges and concomitant high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, ripples: 80-200Hz, fast ripples: 250-500Hz) during bath application of 4-aminopyridine (4AP, 50μM). Ictal-like discharges occurred in PC and EC either synchronously or independently of each other; synchronous ictal discharges always emerged from a synchronous "fast" interictal background whereas asynchronous ictal discharges were preceded by a "slow" interictal event. In addition, asynchronous ictal discharges had longer duration and interval of occurrence than synchronous ictal discharges, and contained a higher proportion of ripples and fast ripples. Cutting the connections between PC and EC made synchronicity disappear and increased ictal discharges duration in the EC but failed in changing HFO occurrence in both areas. Finally, antagonizing ionotropic glutamatergic receptors abolished ictal activity in all experiments, increased the duration and rate of occurrence of interictal discharges occurring in PC-EC interconnected slices while it did not influence the slow asynchronous interictal discharges in both areas. Our results identify some novel in vitro interactions between olfactory (PC) and limbic (EC) structures that presumably contribute to in vivo ictogenesis as well.

  7. Neurosteroids modulate epileptiform activity and associated high-frequency oscillations in the piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, R; Lévesque, M; Avoli, M

    2014-01-03

    Allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) belongs to a class of pregnane neurosteroidal compounds that enhance brain inhibition by interacting directly with GABAA signaling, mainly through an increase in tonic inhibitory current. Here, we addressed the role of THDOC in the modulation of interictal- and ictal-like activity and associated high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, 80-500 Hz; ripples: 80-200 Hz, fast ripples: 250-500 Hz) recorded in vitro in the rat piriform cortex, a highly excitable brain structure that is implicated in seizure generation and maintenance. We found that THDOC: (i) increased the duration of interictal discharges in the anterior piriform cortex while decreasing ictal discharge duration in both anterior and posterior piriform cortices; (ii) reduced the occurrence of HFOs associated to both interictal and ictal discharges; and (iii) prolonged the duration of 4-aminopyridine-induced, glutamatergic independent synchronous field potentials that are known to mainly result from the activation of GABAA receptors. Our results indicate that THDOC can modulate epileptiform synchronization in the piriform cortex presumably by potentiating GABAA receptor-mediated signaling. This evidence supports the view that neurosteroids regulate neuronal excitability and thus control the occurrence of seizures.

  8. Automatic Detection and Classification of High-Frequency Oscillations in Depth-EEG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jrad, Nisrine; Kachenoura, Amar; Merlet, Isabelle; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Nica, Anca; Biraben, Arnaud; Wendling, Fabrice

    2017-09-01

    Interictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs [30-600 Hz]) have proven to be relevant biomarkers in epilepsy. In this paper, four categories of HFOs are considered: Gamma ([30-80 Hz]), high-gamma ([80-120 Hz]), ripples ([120-250 Hz]), and fast-ripples ([250-600 Hz]). A universal detector of the four types of HFOs is proposed. It has the advantages of 1) classifying HFOs, and thus, being robust to inter and intrasubject variability; 2) rejecting artefacts, thus being specific. Gabor atoms are tuned to cover the physiological bands. Gabor transform is then used to detect HFOs in intracerebral electroencephalography (iEEG) signals recorded in patients candidate to epilepsy surgery. To extract relevant features, energy ratios, along with event duration, are investigated. Discriminant ratios are optimized so as to maximize among the four types of HFOs and artefacts. A multiclass support vector machine (SVM) is used to classify detected events. Pseudoreal signals are simulated to measure the performance of the method when the ground truth is known. Experiments are conducted on simulated and on human iEEG signals. The proposed method shows high performance in terms of sensitivity and false discovery rate. The methods have the advantages of detecting and discriminating all types of HFOs as well as avoiding false detections caused by artefacts. Experimental results show the feasibility of a robust and universal detector.

  9. Self-oscillating loop based piezoelectric power converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a piezoelectric power converter comprising an input driver electrically coupled directly to an input or primary electrode of the piezoelectric transformer without any intervening series or parallel inductor. A feedback loop is operatively coupled between an output...... voltage of the piezoelectric transformer and the input driver to provide a self-oscillation loop around a primary section of the piezoelectric transformer oscillating at an excitation frequency. Electrical characteristics of the feedback loop are configured to set the excitation frequency of the self......- oscillation loop within a zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) operation range of the piezoelectric transformer....

  10. Oscilaciones de Potencia, Tensión y Corriente en Unidades de Generación Distribuida; Power, Voltage and Current Oscillations in Distributed Generation Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alberto de Armas Teyra

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available En las plantas de generación distribuidas accionadas por motores reciprocantes es necesario conocer las fluctuaciones de tensión, corriente y potencia para evaluar la calidad de la energía que entregan estos grupos electrógenos y como criterio de diagnóstico técnico. Las causas de estas fluctuaciones son diversas. La fundamental se debe a la presencia de oscilaciones forzadas producidas por el momento irregular de los motores primarios. Otras razones se encuentran en las excentricidades constructivas, el desbalance de corriente, los armónicos espaciales y de tiempo, la variación de la configuración del sistema, etc. En este trabajo fueron evaluadas satisfactoriamente las oscilaciones de una máquina conectada a la red mediante la instalación de un analizador de redes de 32 cortes por ciclo a la salida del generador de una de estas unidades. Se expone como caso de estudio las oscilaciones observadas en un generador de 425 kVA480 V accionado por un motor Diesel de seis cilindros y cuatro tiempos en la Provincia de Cienfuegos, Cuba.  In distributed and standby power plants driven by reciprocating motors, is important to know the voltage, current and power oscillation as a delivery power quality and diagnostic criteria. There are several oscillation causes. The fundamental is due to the irregular torque of primary motors. Other causes are due to constructive eccentricities, current unbalance, time and spatial harmonics, changes in systems configuration, etc. In this paper the fundamental oscillations of a grid connected machine were evaluated with a power analyzer installed in one generating power plant. As a case there are shown the observed oscillations in 425 kVA generator driven by a four times, six cylinders Diesel motor in Cienfuegos Province of Cuba.

  11. Oscilaciones de Potencia, Tensión y Corriente en Unidades de Generación Distribuida: Power, Voltage and Current Oscillations in Distributed Generation Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alberto de Armas Teyra

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available En las plantas de generación distribuidas accionadas por motores reciprocantes es necesario conocer las fluctuaciones de tensión, corriente y potencia para evaluar la calidad de la energía que entregan estos grupos electrógenos y como criterio de diagnóstico técnico. Las causas de estas fluctuaciones son diversas. La fundamental se debe a la presencia de oscilaciones forzadas producidas por el momento irregular de los motores primarios. Otras razones se encuentran en las excentricidades constructivas, el desbalance de corriente, los armónicos espaciales y de tiempo, la variación de la configuración del sistema, etc. En este trabajo fueron evaluadas satisfactoriamente las oscilaciones de una máquina conectada a la red mediante la instalación de un analizador de redes de 32 cortes por ciclo a la salida del generador de una de estas unidades. Se expone como caso de estudio las oscilaciones observadas en un generador de 425 kVA480 V accionado por un motor Diesel de seis cilindros y cuatro tiempos en la Provincia de Cienfuegos, Cuba.In distributed and standby power plants driven by reciprocating motors, is important to know the voltage, current and power oscillation as a delivery power quality and diagnostic criteria. There are several oscillation causes. The fundamental is due to the irregular torque of primary motors. Other causes are due to constructive eccentricities, current unbalance, time and spatial harmonics, changes in systems configuration, etc. In this paper the fundamental oscillations of a grid connected machine were evaluated with a power analyzer installed in one generating power plant. As a case there are shown the observed oscillations in 425 kVA generator driven by a four times, six cylinders Diesel motor in Cienfuegos Province of Cuba.

  12. Active power control with undead-band voltage & frequency droop applied to a meshed DC grid test system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrana, Til Kristian; Zeni, Lorenzo; Fosso, Olav Bjarte

    2012-01-01

    A new method for controlling active power in HVDC grids has been tested on the meshed CIGRE B4 DC grid test system. The control strategy is based on the recently proposed undead-band droop control, which combines DC voltage and AC frequency droop. It provides sufficient roomm for optimisation...... for both normal and disturbed operation. Its main features are flexibility, reliability due to distributed control, easy expandability of the system and minimisation of communication needs. The control technique has been tested and its effectiveness has been verified to demonstrate its suitability...

  13. Adaptive Tuning of Frequency Thresholds Using Voltage Drop Data in Decentralized Load Shedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseinzadeh, Bakhtyar; Faria Da Silva, Filipe Miguel; Bak, Claus Leth

    2015-01-01

    Load shedding (LS) is the last firewall and the most expensive control action against power system blackout. In the conventional under frequency LS (UFLS) schemes, the load drop locations are already determined independently of the event location. Furthermore, the frequency thresholds of LS relays...

  14. A survey of strong high-frequency sea level oscillations along the US East Coast between 2006 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pasquet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A systematic survey of high-frequency sea level oscillations (<6 h measured between 2006 and 2011 along the US East Coast is performed. Raw 1-min resolution sea level data is used. After performing a data quality check, the nine most intense events, with maximum recorded wave heights ranging from 40 to 100 cm, are identified. Focusing on three of these events enables us to recognize two different generation mechanisms: (i topographically-trapped edge waves which are found to be a significant contributor to the strongest observed oscillations, and (ii standing waves, which occur over enclosed shallow waters and may result in significant wave heights of up to 100 cm. A reproduction of the observed oscillations is a part of a future work, which will include an assessment of a generating force in the atmosphere, allowing for a better prevention of potential flooding along the US East Coast.

  15. Enhanced detection of a low-frequency signal by using broad squeezed light and a bichromatic local oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Jin, Yuanbin; Yu, Xudong; Zhang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    We experimentally study a protocol of using the broadband high-frequency squeezed vacuum to detect the low-frequency signal. In this scheme, the lower sideband field of the squeezed light carries the low-frequency modulation signal, and the two strong coherent light fields are applied as the bichromatic local oscillator in the homodyne detection to measure the quantum entanglement of the upper and lower sideband for the broadband squeezed light. The power of one of the local oscillators for detecting the upper sideband can be adjusted to optimize the conditional variance in the low-frequency regime by subtracting the photocurrent of the upper sideband field of the squeezed light from that of the lower sideband field. By means of the quantum correlation of the upper and lower sideband for the broadband squeezed light, the low-frequency signal beyond the standard quantum limit is measured. This scheme is appropriate for enhancing the sensitivity of the low-frequency signal by the aid of the broad squeezed light, such as gravitational waves detection, and does not need to directly produce the low-frequency squeezing in an optical parametric process.

  16. Low-frequency oscillations of a cylinder in a viscous fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Norsarahaida

    1988-05-01

    The flow induced by a circular cylinder oscillating in a viscous fluid when the amplitude of the oscillation is small and the frequecy is low is considered. This solution, obtained by the method of matched asymptotic expansions, is compared with the solution obtained from an Oseen approximation to the governing equations by Andres and Ingard (1953).

  17. Frequency-dependent entrainment of neocortical slow oscillation to repeated optogenetic stimulation in the anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuki, Toshinobu; Ohshiro, Tomokazu; Ito, Shin; Ji, Zhi-Gang; Fukazawa, Yugo; Matsuzaka, Yoshiya; Yawo, Hiromu; Mushiake, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Local field potential (LFP) slow oscillation (entrained to repeated external sensory stimuli. To better understand the neural mechanism underlying slow-oscillation generation and its entrainment to external stimuli, we delivered optical stimulation to the cortex of anesthetized rats that exogenously expressed the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and simultaneously monitored LFPs across cortical layers. We found that the LFPs could be effectively entrained to repeated optical stimulation at 1Hz in deep layers. A stimulus-triggered current-source density (CSD) analysis showed that the evoked oscillation had the same depth and temporal profile as the slow oscillations, indicating that both oscillations have the same neural mechanism. Optical stimulation primarily induced the transition from the cortical up to down state. These results suggest that the anesthetized rat cortex has an intrinsic mechanism that leads to oscillation near 1Hz; effective entrainment to the 1Hz stimulation reflects the resonated state of the cortex to that stimulus. Our study is the first to demonstrate optogenetic manipulation of cortical slow oscillation and provides a mechanistic explanation for slow-oscillation entrainment.

  18. Predicting the onset of high-frequency self-excited oscillations in a channel with an elastic wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Thomas; Whittaker, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Flow-induced oscillations of fluid-conveying elastic-walled channels arise in many industrial and biological systems including the oscillation of the vocal cords during phonation. We derive a system of equations that describes the wall displacement in response to the steady and oscillatory components of the fluid pressure derived by Whittaker et al. (2010). We show that the steady pressure component results in a base state deformation assumed to be small in magnitude relative to the length of the channel. The oscillation frequency of the elastic wall is determined by an eigenvalue problem paramterised by the shape of the base state deformation, the strength of axial tension relative to azimuthal bending, F , and the size of non-linear stretching effects from the wall's initial deformation, K . We determine the slow growth or decay of the normal modes in each by considering the energy budget of the system. The amplitude of the oscillations grow or decay exponentially with a growth rate Λ, which may be expressed in terms of a critical Reynolds number Rec . We use numerical simulations to identify three distinct regions in parameter regimes space and determine the stability of oscillations in each.

  19. Low frequency voltage noise in current biased HTCS thin films. [BiSrCaCuO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierlowski, P. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland)); Jung, G. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland) Physics Dept., Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel) Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Salerno (Italy)); Kula, W. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland) Electrical Engineering Dept., Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)); Lewandowski, S.J. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland)); Savo, B. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Salerno (Italy)); Sobolewski, R. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland) Electrical Engineering Dept., Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)); Tebano, A. (Dipt. di Ingegneria Meccanica, Univ. di Roma Tor-Vergata (Italy)); Vecchione, A. (Physics Dept., Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel) Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Salerno (Italy))

    1994-02-01

    Pronounced changes in low-frequency noise power spectra have been observed, close to the transition temperature, in current biased high-T[sub c] superconducting thin films. Generally, the spectra scale as 1/f[sup [alpha

  20. Low frequency magnetic emissions and resulting induced voltages in a pacemaker by iPod portable music players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassen Howard

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, malfunctioning of a cardiac pacemaker electromagnetic, caused by electromagnetic interference (EMI by fields emitted by personal portable music players was highly publicized around the world. A clinical study of one patient was performed and two types of interference were observed when the clinicians placed a pacemaker programming head and an iPod were placed adjacent to the patient's implanted pacemaker. The authors concluded that "Warning labels may be needed to avoid close contact between pacemakers and iPods". We performed an in-vitro study to evaluate these claims of EMI and present our findings of no-effects" in this paper. Methods We performed in-vitro evaluations of the low frequency magnetic field emissions from various models of the Apple Inc. iPod music player. We measured magnetic field emissions with a 3-coil sensor (diameter of 3.5 cm placed within 1 cm of the surface of the player. Highly localized fields were observed (only existing in a one square cm area. We also measured the voltages induced inside an 'instrumented-can' pacemaker with two standard unipolar leads. Each iPod was placed in the air, 2.7 cm above the pacemaker case. The pacemaker case and leads were placed in a saline filled torso simulator per pacemaker electromagnetic compatibility standard ANSI/AAMI PC69:2000. Voltages inside the can were measured. Results Emissions were strongest (≈ 0.2 μT pp near a few localized points on the cases of the two iPods with hard drives. Emissions consisted of 100 kHz sinusoidal signal with lower frequency (20 msec wide pulsed amplitude modulation. Voltages induced in the iPods were below the noise level of our instruments (0.5 mV pp in the 0 – 1 kHz band or 2 mV pp in the 0 – 5 MHz bandwidth. Conclusion Our measurements of the magnitude and the spatial distribution of low frequency magnetic flux density emissions by 4 different models of iPod portable music players. Levels of less than 0.2