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Sample records for voltage gated sodium

  1. Excitability Constraints on Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

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    Brenner, Michael; Angelino, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    We study how functional constraints bound and shape evolution through an analysis of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels. The primary function of sodium channels is to allow the propagation of action potentials. Since Hodgkin and Huxley, mathematical models have suggested that sodium channel properties need to be tightly constrained for an action potential to propagate. There are nine mammalian genes encoding voltage-gated sodium channels, many of which are more than approximately 90% ide...

  2. Voltage-gated sodium channels: action players with many faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmann, Tamara T.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the upstroke of the action potential and thereby play an important role in propagation of the electrical impulse in excitable tissues like muscle, nerve and the heart. Duplication of the sodium channels encoding genes during evolution generated the

  3. Unusual Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents as Targets for Pain.

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    Barbosa, C; Cummins, T R

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a serious health problem that impacts the lives of many individuals. Hyperexcitability of peripheral sensory neurons contributes to both acute and chronic pain syndromes. Because voltage-gated sodium currents are crucial to the transmission of electrical signals in peripheral sensory neurons, the channels that underlie these currents are attractive targets for pain therapeutics. Sodium currents and channels in peripheral sensory neurons are complex. Multiple-channel isoforms contribute to the macroscopic currents in nociceptive sensory neurons. These different isoforms exhibit substantial variations in their kinetics and pharmacology. Furthermore, sodium current complexity is enhanced by an array of interacting proteins that can substantially modify the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Resurgent sodium currents, atypical currents that can enhance recovery from inactivation and neuronal firing, are increasingly being recognized as playing potentially important roles in sensory neuron hyperexcitability and pain sensations. Here we discuss unusual sodium channels and currents that have been identified in nociceptive sensory neurons, describe what is known about the molecular determinants of the complex sodium currents in these neurons. Finally, we provide an overview of therapeutic strategies to target voltage-gated sodium currents in nociceptive neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Excitability constraints on voltage-gated sodium channels.

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    Elaine Angelino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We study how functional constraints bound and shape evolution through an analysis of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels. The primary function of sodium channels is to allow the propagation of action potentials. Since Hodgkin and Huxley, mathematical models have suggested that sodium channel properties need to be tightly constrained for an action potential to propagate. There are nine mammalian genes encoding voltage-gated sodium channels, many of which are more than approximately 90% identical by sequence. This sequence similarity presumably corresponds to similarity of function, consistent with the idea that these properties must be tightly constrained. However, the multiplicity of genes encoding sodium channels raises the question: why are there so many? We demonstrate that the simplest theoretical constraints bounding sodium channel diversity--the requirements of membrane excitability and the uniqueness of the resting potential--act directly on constraining sodium channel properties. We compare the predicted constraints with functional data on mammalian sodium channel properties collected from the literature, including 172 different sets of measurements from 40 publications, wild-type and mutant, under a variety of conditions. The data from all channel types, including mutants, obeys the excitability constraint; on the other hand, channels expressed in muscle tend to obey the constraint of a unique resting potential, while channels expressed in neuronal tissue do not. The excitability properties alone distinguish the nine sodium channels into four different groups that are consistent with phylogenetic analysis. Our calculations suggest interpretations for the functional differences between these groups.

  5. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by sumatriptan bioisosteres

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    Roberta eCarbonara

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to play a pivotal role in perception and transmission of pain sensations. Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the peripheral neuronal sodium channels, hNav1.7-1.9, cause human painful diseases. Thus while treatment of chronic pain remains an unmet clinical need, sodium channel blockers are considered as promising druggable targets. In a previous study, we evaluated the analgesic activity of sumatriptan, an agonist of serotonin 5HT1B/D receptors, and some new chiral bioisosteres, using the hot plate test in the mouse. Interestingly, we observed that the analgesic effectiveness was not necessarily correlated to serotonin agonism. In this study, we evaluated whether sumatriptan and its congeners may inhibit heterologously-expressed hNav1.7 sodium channels using the patch-clamp method. We show that sumatriptan blocks hNav1.7 channels only at very high, supratherapeutic concentrations. In contrast, its three analogues, namely 20b, (R-31b, and (S-22b, exert a dose and use-dependent sodium channel block. At 0.1 and 10 Hz stimulation frequencies, the most potent compound, (S-22b, was 4.4 and 1.7 fold more potent than the well-known sodium channel blocker mexiletine. The compound induces a negative shift of voltage dependence of fast inactivation, suggesting higher affinity to the inactivated channel. Accordingly, we show that (S-22b likely binds the conserved local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels. Combining these results with the previous ones, we hypothesize that use-dependent sodium channel blockade contributes to the analgesic activity of (R-31b and (S-22b. These later compounds represent promising lead compounds for the development of efficient analgesics, the mechanism of action of which may include a dual action on sodium channels and 5HT1D receptors.

  6. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by sumatriptan bioisosteres.

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    Carbonara, Roberta; Carocci, Alessia; Roussel, Julien; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Buonavoglia, Canio; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni; Camerino, Diana Conte; Desaphy, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to play a pivotal role in perception and transmission of pain sensations. Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the peripheral neuronal sodium channels, hNav1.7-1.9, cause human painful diseases. Thus while treatment of chronic pain remains an unmet clinical need, sodium channel blockers are considered as promising druggable targets. In a previous study, we evaluated the analgesic activity of sumatriptan, an agonist of serotonin 5HT1B/D receptors, and some new chiral bioisosteres, using the hot plate test in the mouse. Interestingly, we observed that the analgesic effectiveness was not necessarily correlated to serotonin agonism. In this study, we evaluated whether sumatriptan and its congeners may inhibit heterologously expressed hNav1.7 sodium channels using the patch-clamp method. We show that sumatriptan blocks hNav1.7 channels only at very high, supratherapeutic concentrations. In contrast, its three analogs, namely 20b, (R)-31b, and (S)-22b, exert a dose and use-dependent sodium channel block. At 0.1 and 10 Hz stimulation frequencies, the most potent compound, (S)-22b, was 4.4 and 1.7 fold more potent than the well-known sodium channel blocker mexiletine. The compound induces a negative shift of voltage dependence of fast inactivation, suggesting higher affinity to the inactivated channel. Accordingly, we show that (S)-22b likely binds the conserved local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels. Combining these results with the previous ones, we hypothesize that use-dependent sodium channel blockade contributes to the analgesic activity of (R)-31b and (S)-22b. These later compounds represent promising lead compounds for the development of efficient analgesics, the mechanism of action of which may include a dual action on sodium channels and 5HT1D receptors.

  7. Voltage-gated sodium channels in taste bud cells

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    Williams Mark E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste bud cells transmit information regarding the contents of food from taste receptors embedded in apical microvilli to gustatory nerve fibers innervating basolateral membranes. In particular, taste cells depolarize, activate voltage-gated sodium channels, and fire action potentials in response to tastants. Initial cell depolarization is attributable to sodium influx through TRPM5 in sweet, bitter, and umami cells and an undetermined cation influx through an ion channel in sour cells expressing PKD2L1, a candidate sour taste receptor. The molecular identity of the voltage-gated sodium channels that sense depolarizing signals and subsequently initiate action potentials coding taste information to gustatory nerve fibers is unknown. Results We describe the molecular and histological expression profiles of cation channels involved in electrical signal transmission from apical to basolateral membrane domains. TRPM5 was positioned immediately beneath tight junctions to receive calcium signals originating from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation, while PKD2L1 was positioned at the taste pore. Using mouse taste bud and lingual epithelial cells collected by laser capture microdissection, SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel transcripts were expressed in taste tissue. SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A were expressed beneath tight junctions in subsets of taste cells. SCN3A and SCN9A were expressed in TRPM5 cells, while SCN2A was expressed in TRPM5 and PKD2L1 cells. HCN4, a gene previously implicated in sour taste, was expressed in PKD2L1 cells and localized to cell processes beneath the taste pore. Conclusion SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channels are positioned to sense initial depolarizing signals stemming from taste receptor activation and initiate taste cell action potentials. SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A gene products likely account for the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents in taste receptor cells.

  8. Voltage-gated sodium channels: therapeutic targets for pain.

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    Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2009-10-01

    To provide an overview of the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in pathophysiology of acquired and inherited pain states, and of recent developments that validate these channels as therapeutic targets for treating chronic pain. Neuropathic and inflammatory pain conditions are major medical needs worldwide with only partial or low efficacy treatment options currently available. An important role of voltage-gated sodium channels in many different pain states has been established in animal models and, empirically, in humans, where sodium channel blockers partially ameliorate pain. Animal studies have causally linked changes in sodium channel expression and modulation that alter channel gating properties or current density in nociceptor neurons to different pain states. Biophysical and pharmacological studies have identified the sodium channel isoforms Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.7, Na(v)1.8, and Na(v)1.9 as particularly important in the pathophysiology of different pain syndromes. Recently, gain-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene which encodes Na(v)1.7, have been linked to two human-inherited pain syndromes, inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A have been linked to complete insensitivity to pain. Studies on firing properties of sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia demonstrate that the effects of gain-of-function mutations in Na(v)1.7 on the excitability of these neurons depend on the presence of Na(v)1.8, which suggests a similar physiological interaction of these two channels in humans carrying the Na(v)1.7 pain mutation. These studies suggest that isoform-specific blockers of these channels or targeting of their modulators may provide novel approaches to treatment of pain.

  9. The crystal structure of a voltage-gated sodium channel.

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    Payandeh, Jian; Scheuer, Todd; Zheng, Ning; Catterall, William A

    2011-07-10

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels initiate electrical signalling in excitable cells and are the molecular targets for drugs and disease mutations, but the structural basis for their voltage-dependent activation, ion selectivity and drug block is unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of a voltage-gated Na(+) channel from Arcobacter butzleri (NavAb) captured in a closed-pore conformation with four activated voltage sensors at 2.7 Å resolution. The arginine gating charges make multiple hydrophilic interactions within the voltage sensor, including unanticipated hydrogen bonds to the protein backbone. Comparisons to previous open-pore potassium channel structures indicate that the voltage-sensor domains and the S4-S5 linkers dilate the central pore by pivoting together around a hinge at the base of the pore module. The NavAb selectivity filter is short, ∼4.6 Å wide, and water filled, with four acidic side chains surrounding the narrowest part of the ion conduction pathway. This unique structure presents a high-field-strength anionic coordination site, which confers Na(+) selectivity through partial dehydration via direct interaction with glutamate side chains. Fenestrations in the sides of the pore module are unexpectedly penetrated by fatty acyl chains that extend into the central cavity, and these portals are large enough for the entry of small, hydrophobic pore-blocking drugs. This structure provides the template for understanding electrical signalling in excitable cells and the actions of drugs used for pain, epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia at the atomic level.

  10. Biophysical Adaptations of Prokaryotic Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

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    Vien, T N; DeCaen, P G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptive features found in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These two families are distinct, having diverged early in evolutionary history but maintain a surprising degree of convergence in function. While prokaryotic NaVs are required for growth and motility, eukaryotic NaVs selectively conduct fast electrical currents for short- and long-range signaling across cell membranes in mammalian organs. Current interest in prokaryotic NaVs is stoked by their resolved high-resolution structures and functional features which are reminiscent of eukaryotic NaVs. In this chapter, comparisons between eukaryotic and prokaryotic NaVs are made to highlight the shared and unique aspects of ion selectivity, voltage sensitivity, and pharmacology. Examples of prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV convergent evolution will be discussed within the context of their structural features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Shellfish Toxins Targeting Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

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    Fan Zhang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management.

  12. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

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    Robert J. French

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10-70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  13. [Pain and analgesia : Mutations of voltage-gated sodium channels].

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    Eberhardt, M J; Leffler, A

    2017-02-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) are crucial for the generation and propagation of action potentials in all excitable cells, and therefore for the function of sensory neurons as well. Preclinical research over the past 20 years identified three Nav-isoforms in sensory neurons, namely Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9. A specific role for the function of nociceptive neurons was postulated for each. Whereas no selective sodium channel inhibitors have been established in the clinic so far, the relevance of all three isoforms regarding the pain sensitivity in humans is currently undergoing a remarkable verification through the translation of preclinical data into clinically manifest pictures. For the last ten years, Nav1.7 has been the main focus of clinical interest, as a large number of hereditary mutants were identified. The so-called "gain-of-function" mutations of Nav1.7 cause the pain syndromes hereditary erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder. In addition, several Nav1.7 mutants were shown to be associated with small-fiber neuropathies. On the contrary, "loss-of-function" Nav1.7 mutants lead to a congenital insensitivity to pain. Recently, several gain-of-function mutations in Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 have been identified in patients suffering from painful peripheral neuropathies. However, another gain-of-function Nav1.9 mutation is associated with congenital insensitivity to pain. This review offers an overview of published work on painful Nav mutations with clinical relevance, and proposes possible consequences for the therapy of different pain symptoms resulting from these findings.

  14. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Evolutionary History and Distinctive Sequence Features.

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    Kasimova, M A; Granata, D; Carnevale, V

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are responsible for the rising phase of the action potential. Their role in electrical signal transmission is so relevant that their emergence is believed to be one of the crucial factors enabling development of nervous system. The presence of voltage-gated sodium-selective channels in bacteria (BacNav) has raised questions concerning the evolutionary history of the ones in animals. Here we review some of the milestones in the field of Nav phylogenetic analysis and discuss some of the most important sequence features that distinguish these channels from voltage-gated potassium channels and transient receptor potential channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Annotation of functional impact of voltage?gated sodium channel mutations

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    Hinard, Valérie; Britan, Aurore; Schaeffer, Mathieu; Zahn, Monique; Thomet, Urs; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Bairoch, Amos Marc; Abriel, Hugues; Gaudet, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Voltage?gated sodium channels are pore?forming transmembrane proteins that selectively allow sodium ions to flow across the plasma membrane according to the electro?chemical gradient thus mediating the rising phase of action potentials in excitable cells and playing key roles in physiological processes such as neurotransmission, skeletal muscle contraction, heart rhythm, and pain sensation. Genetic variations in the nine human genes encoding these channels are known to cause a large ...

  16. Lacosamide: A New Approach to Target Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents in Epileptic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Curia, Giulia; Biagini, Giuseppe; Perucca, Emilio; Avoli, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of action of several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) rests on their ability to modulate the activity of voltage-gated sodium currents that are responsible for fast action potential generation. Recent data indicate that lacosamide (a compound with analgesic and anticonvulsant effects in animal models) shares a similar mechanism. When compared with other AEDs, lacosamide has the unique ability to interact with sodium channel slow inactivation without affecting fast inactivation. This a...

  17. The sialic acid component of the beta1 subunit modulates voltage-gated sodium channel function.

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    Johnson, Daniel; Montpetit, Marty L; Stocker, Patrick J; Bennett, Eric S

    2004-10-22

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are responsible for initiation and propagation of nerve, skeletal muscle, and cardiac action potentials. Nav are composed of a pore-forming alpha subunit and often one to several modulating beta subunits. Previous work showed that terminal sialic acid residues attached to alpha subunits affect channel gating. Here we show that the fully sialylated beta1 subunit induces a uniform, hyperpolarizing shift in steady state and kinetic gating of the cardiac and two neuronal alpha subunit isoforms. Under conditions of reduced sialylation, the beta1-induced gating effect was eliminated. Consistent with this, mutation of beta1 N-glycosylation sites abolished all effects of beta1 on channel gating. Data also suggest an interaction between the cis effect of alpha sialic acids and the trans effect of beta1 sialic acids on channel gating. Thus, beta1 sialic acids had no effect gating on the of the heavily glycosylated skeletal muscle alpha subunit. However, when glycosylation of the skeletal muscle alpha subunit was reduced through chimeragenesis such that alpha sialic acids did not impact gating, beta1 sialic acids caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift in channel gating. Together, the data indicate that beta1 N-linked sialic acids can modulate Nav gating through an apparent saturating electrostatic mechanism. A model is proposed in which a spectrum of differentially sialylated Nav can directly modulate channel gating, thereby impacting cardiac, skeletal muscle, and neuronal excitability.

  18. Distribution and function of voltage-gated sodium channels in the nervous system.

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    Wang, Jun; Ou, Shao-Wu; Wang, Yun-Jie

    2017-09-18

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are the basic ion channels for neuronal excitability, which are crucial for the resting potential and the generation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. To date, at least nine distinct sodium channel isoforms have been detected in the nervous system. Recent studies have identified that voltage-gated sodium channels not only play an essential role in the normal electrophysiological activities of neurons but also have a close relationship with neurological diseases. In this study, the latest research findings regarding the structure, type, distribution, and function of VGSCs in the nervous system and their relationship to neurological diseases, such as epilepsy, neuropathic pain, brain tumors, neural trauma, and multiple sclerosis, are reviewed in detail.

  19. Voltage-gated sodium channels in pain states: role in pathophysiology and targets for treatment.

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    Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Binshtok, Alexander M; Cummins, Theodore R; Jarvis, Michael F; Samad, Tarek; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2009-04-01

    Pain is a major unmet medical need which has been causally linked to changes in sodium channel expression, modulation, or mutations that alter channel gating properties or current density in nociceptor neurons. Voltage-gated sodium channels activate (open) then rapidly inactivate in response to a depolarization of the plasma membrane of excitable cells allowing the transient flow of sodium ions thus generating an inward current which underlies the generation and conduction of action potentials (AP) in these cells. Activation and inactivation, as well as other gating properties, of sodium channel isoforms have different kinetics and voltage-dependent properties, so that the ensemble of channels that are present determine the electrogenic properties of specific neurons. Biophysical and pharmacological studies have identified the peripheral-specific sodium channels Na(v)1.7, Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 as particularly important in the pathophysiology of different pain syndromes, and isoform-specific blockers of these channels or targeting their modulators hold the promise of a future effective therapy for treatment of pain.

  20. Involvement of voltage-gated sodium channels blockade in the analgesic effects of orphenadrine.

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    Desaphy, Jean-François; Dipalma, Antonella; De Bellis, Michela; Costanza, Teresa; Gaudioso, Christelle; Delmas, Patrick; George, Alfred L; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2009-04-01

    Orphenadrine is a drug acting on multiple targets, including muscarinic, histaminic, and NMDA receptors. It is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and in musculoskeletal disorders. It is also used as an analgesic, although its mechanism of action is still unknown. Both physiological and pharmacological results have demonstrated a critical role for voltage-gated sodium channels in many types of chronic pain syndromes. We tested the hypothesis that orphenadrine may block voltage-gated sodium channels. By using patch-clamp experiments, we evaluated the effects of the drug on whole-cell sodium currents in HEK293 cells expressing the skeletal muscle (Nav1.4), cardiac (Nav1.5) and neuronal (Nav1.1 and Nav1.7) subtypes of human sodium channels, as well as on whole-cell tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium currents likely conducted by Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 channel subtypes in primary culture of rat DRG sensory neurons. The results indicate that orphenadrine inhibits sodium channels in a concentration-, voltage- and frequency-dependent manner. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we further show that orphenadrine binds to the same receptor as the local anesthetics. Orphenadrine affinities for resting and inactivated sodium channels were higher compared to those of known sodium channels blockers, such as mexiletine and flecainide. Low, clinically relevant orphenadrine concentration produces a significant block of Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 channels, which are critical for experiencing pain sensations, indicating a role for sodium channel blockade in the clinical efficacy of orphenadrine as analgesic compound. On the other hand, block of Nav1.1 and Nav1.5 may contribute to the proconvulsive and proarrhythmic adverse reactions, especially observed during overdose.

  1. Molecular and functional characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm.

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    Pinto, Francisco M; Ravina, Cristina G; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Gallardo-Castro, Manuel; Cejudo-Román, Antonio; Candenas, Luz

    2009-07-16

    We have investigated the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in human spermatozoa and characterized their role in sperm motility. Freshly ejaculated semen was collected from thirty normozoospermic human donors, with each donor supplying 2 different samples. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence techniques were used to detect the mRNAs and proteins of interest. Sperm motility was measured by a computer-assisted sperm analysis system (CASA). Cytosolic free calcium was determined by fluorimetry in cells loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator Fura-2. The mRNAs that encode the different Nav alpha subunits (Nav1.1-1.9) were all expressed in capacitated human spermatozoa. The mRNAs of the auxiliary subunits beta1, beta3 and beta4 were also present. Immunofluorescence studies showed that, with the exception of Nav1.1 and Nav1.3, the Nav channel proteins were present in sperm cells and show specific and different sites of localization. Veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, caused time- and concentration-dependent increases in progressive sperm motility. In sperm suspensions loaded with Fura-2, veratridine did not modify intracellular free calcium levels. This research shows the presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm and supports a role for these channels in the regulation of mature sperm function.

  2. Molecular and functional characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm

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    Cejudo-Román Antonio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have investigated the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in human spermatozoa and characterized their role in sperm motility. Methods Freshly ejaculated semen was collected from thirty normozoospermic human donors, with each donor supplying 2 different samples. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and immunofluorescence techniques were used to detect the mRNAs and proteins of interest. Sperm motility was measured by a computer-assisted sperm analysis system (CASA. Cytosolic free calcium was determined by fluorimetry in cells loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator Fura-2. Results The mRNAs that encode the different Nav alpha subunits (Nav1.1-1.9 were all expressed in capacitated human spermatozoa. The mRNAs of the auxiliary subunits beta1, beta3 and beta4 were also present. Immunofluorescence studies showed that, with the exception of Nav1.1 and Nav1.3, the Nav channel proteins were present in sperm cells and show specific and different sites of localization. Veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, caused time- and concentration-dependent increases in progressive sperm motility. In sperm suspensions loaded with Fura-2, veratridine did not modify intracellular free calcium levels. Conclusion This research shows the presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm and supports a role for these channels in the regulation of mature sperm function.

  3. On the multiple roles of the voltage gated sodium channel β1 subunit in genetic diseases

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    Debora eBaroni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels are intrinsic plasma membrane proteins that initiate the action potential in electrically excitable cells. They are composed of a pore-forming α-subunit and associated β-subunits. The β1-subunit was the first accessory subunit to be cloned. It can be important for controlling cell excitability and modulating multiple aspects of sodium channel physiology. Mutations of β1 are implicated in a wide variety of inherited pathologies, including epilepsy and cardiac conduction diseases. This review summarizes β1-subunit related channelopathies pointing out the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and their underlying molecular mechanisms.

  4. Functionalized Fullerene Targeting Human Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, hNav1.7.

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    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Robinson, Anna; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2017-08-16

    Mutations of hNa v 1.7 that cause its activities to be enhanced contribute to severe neuropathic pain. Only a small number of hNa v 1.7 specific inhibitors have been identified, most of which interact with the voltage-sensing domain of the voltage-activated sodium ion channel. In our previous computational study, we demonstrated that a [Lys 6 ]-C 84 fullerene binds tightly (affinity of 46 nM) to Na v Ab, the voltage-gated sodium channel from the bacterium Arcobacter butzleri. Here, we extend this work and, using molecular dynamics simulations, demonstrate that the same [Lys 6 ]-C 84 fullerene binds strongly (2.7 nM) to the pore of a modeled human sodium ion channel hNa v 1.7. In contrast, the fullerene binds only weakly to a mutated model of hNa v 1.7 (I1399D) (14.5 mM) and a model of the skeletal muscle hNa v 1.4 (3.7 mM). Comparison of one representative sequence from each of the nine human sodium channel isoforms shows that only hNa v 1.7 possesses residues that are critical for binding the fullerene derivative and blocking the channel pore.

  5. Sensory neuron voltage-gated sodium channels as analgesic drug targets.

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    Momin, Aliakmal; Wood, John N

    2008-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are crucial determinants of neuronal excitability and signalling; some specific channel subtypes have been implicated in a number of chronic pain conditions. Human genetic studies show gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutations in Na(V)1.7 lead to an enhancement or lack of pain, respectively, whilst transgenic mouse and knockdown studies have implicated Na(V)1.3, Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in peripheral pain pathways. The development of subtype-specific sodium channel blockers, though clearly desirable, has been technically challenging. Recent advances exploiting both natural products and small molecule selective channel blockers have demonstrated that this approach to pain control is feasible. These observations provide a rationale for the development of new analgesics without the side effect profile of broad spectrum sodium channel blockers.

  6. The hitchhiker’s guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy

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    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure–function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na+ selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts. PMID:26712848

  7. Neurotoxins and their binding areas on voltage-gated sodium channels

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    Marijke eStevens

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Sodium Channels (VGSCs are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Genetic defects in sodium channel genes therefore can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called ‘channelopathies’.The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. Until now, these concepts still form the basis for understanding the functioning of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and will generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start inactivating and currents decrease. In the inactivated state channels stay refractory for any new stimulus and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to any new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX and saxitoxin (STX also contributed largely to our today’s understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and specifically of VGSCs. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable tools in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt®, Elan. The original peptide, -MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMEA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in neurons.This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the

  8. The voltage-gated sodium channel nav1.8 is expressed in human sperm.

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    Antonio Cejudo-Roman

    Full Text Available The role of Na(+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na(+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM, the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca(2+-containing or Ca(2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na(+, [Na(+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na(+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function.

  9. The Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.8 Is Expressed in Human Sperm

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    Cejudo-Roman, Antonio; Pinto, Francisco M.; Subirán, Nerea; Ravina, Cristina G.; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Natalia; Pérez, Ricardo; Pacheco, Alberto; Irazusta, Jon; Candenas, Luz

    2013-01-01

    The role of Na+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM), the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca2+-containing or Ca2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na+, [Na+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:24086692

  10. Sea anemone toxins affecting voltage-gated sodium channels--molecular and evolutionary features.

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    Moran, Yehu; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2009-12-15

    The venom of sea anemones is rich in low molecular weight proteinaceous neurotoxins that vary greatly in structure, site of action, and phyletic (insect, crustacean or vertebrate) preference. This toxic versatility likely contributes to the ability of these sessile animals to inhabit marine environments co-habited by a variety of mobile predators. Among these toxins, those that show prominent activity at voltage-gated sodium channels and are critical in predation and defense, have been extensively studied for more than three decades. These studies initially focused on the discovery of new toxins, determination of their covalent and folded structures, understanding of their mechanisms of action on different sodium channels, and identification of the primary sites of interaction of the toxins with their channel receptors. The channel binding site for Type I and the structurally unrelated Type III sea anemone toxins was identified as neurotoxin receptor site 3, a site previously shown to be targeted by scorpion alpha-toxins. The bioactive surfaces of toxin representatives from these two sea anemone types have been characterized by mutagenesis. These analyses pointed to heterogeneity of receptor site 3 at various sodium channels. A turning point in evolutionary studies of sea anemone toxins was the recent release of the genome sequence of Nematostella vectensis, which enabled analysis of the genomic organization of the corresponding genes. This analysis demonstrated that Type I toxins in Nematostella and other species are encoded by gene families and suggested that these genes developed by concerted evolution. The current review provides a brief historical description of the discovery and characterization of sea anemone toxins that affect voltage-gated sodium channels and delineates recent advances in the study of their structure-activity relationship and evolution.

  11. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4-Induced Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Hippocampal Neurons.

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    Hong, Zhiwen; Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to control the resting membrane potential and increase excitability in many types of cells. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play an important role in initiating action potentials in neurons. However, whether VGSCs can be modulated by the activation of TRPV4 in hippocampal pyramidal neurons remains unknown. In this study, we tested the effect of TRPV4 agonists (GSK1016790A and 4α-PDD) on voltage-gated sodium current (I Na) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and the protein levels of α/β-subunit of VGSCs in the hippocampus of mice subjected to intracerebroventricular (icv.) injection of GSK1016790A (GSK-injected mice). Herein, we report that I Na was inhibited by acute application of GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD. In the presence of TRPV4 agonists, the voltage-dependent inactivation curve shifted to the hyperpolarization, whereas the voltage-dependent activation curve remained unchanged. The TRPV4 agonist-induced inhibition of I Na was blocked by the TRPV4 antagonist or tetrodotoxin. Moreover, blocking protein kinase A (PKA) markedly attenuated the GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I Na, whereas antagonism of protein kinase C or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not change GSK1016790A action. Finally, the protein levels of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, and Nav1.6 in the hippocampus increased in GSK-injected mice, whereas those of Nav1.3 and Navβ1 remained nearly unchanged. We conclude that I Na is inhibited by the acute activation of TRPV4 through PKA signaling pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, but protein expression of α-subunit of VGSCs is increased by sustained TRPV4 activation, which may compensate for the acute inhibition of I Na and provide a possibility for hyper-excitability upon sustained TRPV4 activation.

  12. Voltage-gated sodium channels confer excitability to human odontoblasts: possible role in tooth pain transmission.

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    Allard, Bruno; Magloire, Henry; Couble, Marie Lise; Maurin, Jean Christophe; Bleicher, Françoise

    2006-09-29

    Odontoblasts are responsible for the dentin formation. They are suspected to play a role in tooth pain transmission as sensor cells because of their close relationship with nerve, but this role has never been evidenced. We demonstrate here that human odontoblasts in vitro produce voltage-gated tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) currents in response to depolarization under voltage clamp conditions and are able to generate action potentials. Odontoblasts express neuronal isoforms of alpha2 and beta2 subunits of sodium channels. Co-cultures of odontoblasts with trigeminal neurons indicate a clustering of alpha2 and beta2 sodium channel subunits and, at the sites of cell-cell contact, a co-localization of odontoblasts beta2 subunits with peripherin. In vivo, sodium channels are expressed in odontoblasts. Ankyrin(G) and beta2 co-localize, suggesting a link for signal transduction between axons and odontoblasts. Evidence for excitable properties of odontoblasts and clustering of key molecules at the site of odontoblast-nerve contact strongly suggest that odontoblasts may operate as sensor cells that initiate tooth pain transmission.

  13. Structure-based assessment of disease-related mutations in human voltage-gated sodium channels

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    Weiyun Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Voltage-gated sodium (Nav channels are essential for the rapid upstroke of action potentials and the propagation of electrical signals in nerves and muscles. Defects of Nav channels are associated with a variety of channelopathies. More than 1000 disease-related mutations have been identified in Nav channels, with Nav1.1 and Nav1.5 each harboring more than 400 mutations. Nav channels represent major targets for a wide array of neurotoxins and drugs. Atomic structures of Nav channels are required to understand their function and disease mechanisms. The recently determined atomic structure of the rabbit voltage-gated calcium (Cav channel Cav1.1 provides a template for homology-based structural modeling of the evolutionarily related Nav channels. In this Resource article, we summarized all the reported disease-related mutations in human Nav channels, generated a homologous model of human Nav1.7, and structurally mapped disease-associated mutations. Before the determination of structures of human Nav channels, the analysis presented here serves as the base framework for mechanistic investigation of Nav channelopathies and for potential structure-based drug discovery.

  14. Structure-based assessment of disease-related mutations in human voltage-gated sodium channels.

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    Huang, Weiyun; Liu, Minhao; Yan, S Frank; Yan, Nieng

    2017-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na v ) channels are essential for the rapid upstroke of action potentials and the propagation of electrical signals in nerves and muscles. Defects of Na v channels are associated with a variety of channelopathies. More than 1000 disease-related mutations have been identified in Na v channels, with Na v 1.1 and Na v 1.5 each harboring more than 400 mutations. Na v channels represent major targets for a wide array of neurotoxins and drugs. Atomic structures of Na v channels are required to understand their function and disease mechanisms. The recently determined atomic structure of the rabbit voltage-gated calcium (Ca v ) channel Ca v 1.1 provides a template for homology-based structural modeling of the evolutionarily related Na v channels. In this Resource article, we summarized all the reported disease-related mutations in human Na v channels, generated a homologous model of human Na v 1.7, and structurally mapped disease-associated mutations. Before the determination of structures of human Na v channels, the analysis presented here serves as the base framework for mechanistic investigation of Na v channelopathies and for potential structure-based drug discovery.

  15. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

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    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  16. Carisbamate, a novel neuromodulator, inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels and action potential firing of rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Yohrling, George J; Wang, Yan; Hutchinson, Tasha L; Brenneman, Douglas E; Flores, Christopher M; Zhao, Boyu

    2009-01-01

    Carisbamate (RWJ-333369; (S)-2-O-carbamoyl-1-o-chlorophenyl-ethanol) is a novel investigational antiepileptic drug that exhibits a broad-spectrum of activity in a number of animal models of seizure and drug refractory epilepsy. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanism by which carisbamate produces its antiepileptic actions, we studied its effects on the function of voltage-gated, rat brain sodium and potassium channels and on the repetitive firing of action potentials in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. In whole-cell patch clamp recording, carisbamate resulted in a concentration-, voltage- and use-dependent inhibition of rat Nav1.2, with an IC(50) value of 68 microM at -67 mV. In rat hippocampal neurons, carisbamate similarly blocked voltage-gated sodium channels, with an IC(50) value of 89 microM at -67 mV, and inhibited repetitive firing of action potentials in a concentration-dependent manner (by 46% at 30 microM and 87% at 100 microM, respectively). Carisbamate had no effect on the steady-state membrane potential or voltage-gated potassium channels (K(v)) in these neurons. These inhibitory effects of carisbamate occurred at therapeutically relevant concentrations in vivo, raising the possibility that block of voltage-gated sodium channels by carisbamate contributes to its antiepileptic activity.

  17. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI-DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI-DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII-DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  18. Inhibitory effect of the recombinant Phoneutria nigriventer Tx1 toxin on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anita O; Peigneur, Steve; Diniz, Marcelo R V; Tytgat, Jan; Beirão, Paulo S L

    2012-12-01

    Phoneutria nigriventer toxin Tx1 (PnTx1, also referred to in the literature as Tx1) exerts inhibitory effect on neuronal (Na(V)1.2) sodium channels in a way dependent on the holding potential, and competes with μ-conotoxins but not with tetrodotoxin for their binding sites. In the present study we investigated the electrophysiological properties of the recombinant toxin (rPnTx1), which has the complete amino acid sequence of the natural toxin with 3 additional residues: AM on the N-terminal and G on the C-terminal. At the concentration of 1.5 μM, the recombinant toxin inhibits Na(+) currents of dorsal root ganglia neurons (38.4 ± 6.1% inhibition at -80 mV holding potential) and tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) currents (26.2 ± 4.9% at the same holding potential). At -50 mV holding potential the inhibition of the total current reached 71.3 ± 2.3% with 1.5 μM rPnTx1. The selectivity of rPnTx1 was investigated on ten different isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The order of potency for rPnTx1 was: rNa(V)1.2 > rNa(V)1.7 ≈ rNa(V)1.4 ≥ rNa(V)1.3 > mNa(V)1.6 ≥ hNa(V)1.8. No effect was seen on hNa(V)1.5 and on the arthropods isoforms (DmNa(V)1, BGNa(V)1.1a and VdNa(V)1). The IC(50) for Na(V)1.2 was 33.7 ± 2.9 nM with a maximum inhibition of 83.3 ± 1.9%. The toxin did not alter the voltage-dependence of channel gating and was effective on Na(V)1.2 channels devoid of inactivation. It was ineffective on neuronal calcium channels. We conclude that rPnTx1 has a promising selectivity, and that it may be a valuable model to achieve pharmacological activities of interest for the treatment of channelopathies and neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of an insect heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel with unique alternative splicing mode.

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    Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Pei, Yu-Xia; Lei, Wei; Wang, Ke-Yi; Shang, Feng; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Recent discovery of the heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channels (Na v ) in two aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae, aroused interest in exploring whether this kind of channel is conserved for aphids. Herewith, we aim to provide evidence for the conservation of heterodimeric Na v s in aphids and investigate whether they have unique splicing patterns. We found that the only identifiable Na v from Toxoptera citricida consisted of two subunits, forming a heterodimeric Na v , which carried an atypical "DENS" ion selectivity filter and a conventional "MFM" inactivation gate, confirming the heterodimeric Na v s' conservation within aphids. These unique heterodimeric channels may form a new Na v subfamily, specific to aphids. A more ancient member of four-domain Na v homolog was well preserved in T. citricida, carrying a typical "DEEA" and "MFL" motif. The presence of "DENS" in mammalian Na x s and "DEKT" in a fungus Na v suggested that the heterodimeric Na v s may still preserve Na + permeability. Sequencing 46 clones from nymphs and adults exposed unique splicing patterns for this heterodimeric Na v from T. citricida, revealing 7 alternatively spliced exons, evidencing that exon 5 was no longer unique to Bombyx mori, and exon k/l was semi-mutually exclusive. Two previously undescribed optional exons and a SNP site seemingly unique to aphids were identified. In conclusion, the dimeric Na v s might form a new aphids-specific heterodimeric N a v subfamily. This dimeric Na v from T. citricida was characterized with distinguishable alternative splicing modes, exemplified by the discovery of two novel alternative exons and unique usage patterns of alternative exons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Blocking voltage-gated sodium channels as a strategy to suppress pathological cough.

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    Sun, Hui; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J

    2017-12-01

    Pathological cough is thought to be secondary to inappropriate activation of vagal sensory nerves. Sensory nerves can be activated by a large number of disparate stimuli. The most relevant stimuli to block for effective anti-tussive therapy likely depend on the specific underlying pathology that is leading to the coughing. Blocking voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) will prevent action potential initiation and conduction and therefore prevent sensory communication between the airways and brainstem. In so doing, they would be expected to inhibit evoked cough independently of the nature of the stimulus and underlying pathology. There are nine subtypes of NaVs each with distinct pore-forming alpha subunits referred to NaV1.1-1.9. Among these channels, based on functional and genetic analysis of cough causing vagal afferent nerve subtypes, we hypothesize that targeting NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 is a rational strategy forward for the effective treatment of pathological cough. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV 1.9 in visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, J R F; Winchester, W J; Bulmer, D C

    2016-03-01

    Visceral pain is a common symptom for patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disease. It is unpleasant, debilitating, and represents a large unmet medical need for effective clinical treatments. Recent studies have identified NaV 1.9 as an important regulator of afferent sensitivity in visceral pain pathways to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that NaV 1.9 could represent an important therapeutic target for the treatment of visceral pain. This potential has been highlighted by the identification of patients who have an insensitivity to pain or painful neuropathies associated with mutations in SCN11A, the gene encoding voltage-gated sodium channel subtype 1.9 (NaV 1.9). Here, we address the role of NaV 1.9 in visceral pain and what known human NaV 1.9 mutants can tell us about NaV 1.9 function in gut physiology and pathophysiology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mechanism of Ion Permeation in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

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    Somayeh Mahdavi

    Full Text Available Recent determination of the crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated sodium (NaV channels have raised hopes that modeling of the mammalian counterparts could soon be achieved. However, there are substantial differences between the pore domains of the bacterial and mammalian NaV channels, which necessitates careful validation of mammalian homology models constructed from the bacterial NaV structures. Such a validated homology model for the NaV1.4 channel was constructed recently using the extensive mutagenesis data available for binding of μ-conotoxins. Here we use this NaV1.4 model to study the ion permeation mechanism in mammalian NaV channels. Linking of the DEKA residues in the selectivity filter with residues in the neighboring domains is found to be important for keeping the permeation pathway open. Molecular dynamics simulations and potential of mean force calculations reveal that there is a binding site for a Na+ ion just inside the DEKA locus, and 1-2 Na+ ions can occupy the vestibule near the EEDD ring. These sites are separated by a low free energy barrier, suggesting that inward conduction occurs when a Na+ ion in the vestibule goes over the free energy barrier and pushes the Na+ ion in the filter to the intracellular cavity, consistent with the classical knock-on mechanism. The NaV1.4 model also provides a good description of the observed Na+/K+ selectivity.

  3. Conotoxins Targeting Neuronal Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes: Potential Analgesics?

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    Jeffrey R. McArthur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC are the primary mediators of electrical signal amplification and propagation in excitable cells. VGSC subtypes are diverse, with different biophysical and pharmacological properties, and varied tissue distribution. Altered VGSC expression and/or increased VGSC activity in sensory neurons is characteristic of inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. Therefore, VGSC modulators could be used in prospective analgesic compounds. VGSCs have specific binding sites for four conotoxin families: μ-, μO-, δ- and ί-conotoxins. Various studies have identified that the binding site of these peptide toxins is restricted to well-defined areas or domains. To date, only the μ- and μO-family exhibit analgesic properties in animal pain models. This review will focus on conotoxins from the μ- and μO-families that act on neuronal VGSCs. Examples of how these conotoxins target various pharmacologically important neuronal ion channels, as well as potential problems with the development of drugs from conotoxins, will be discussed.

  4. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

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    Bao, Lan

    2015-09-30

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons.

  5. Actions of sea anemone type 1 neurotoxins on voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms.

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    Wanke, Enzo; Zaharenko, André Junqueira; Redaelli, Elisa; Schiavon, Emanuele

    2009-12-15

    As voltage-gated Na(+) channels are responsible for the conduction of electrical impulses in most excitable tissues in the majority of animals (except nematodes), they have become important targets for the toxins of venomous animals, from sea anemones to molluscs, scorpions, spiders and even fishes. During their evolution, different animals have developed a set of cysteine-rich peptides capable of binding different extracellular sites of this channel protein. A fundamental question concerning the mechanism of action of these toxins is whether they act at a common receptor site in Na(+) channels when exerting their different pharmacological effects, or at distinct receptor sites in different Na(v) channels subtypes whose particular properties lead to these pharmacological differences. The alpha-subunits of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Na(v)1.x) have been divided into at least nine subtypes on the basis of amino acid sequences. Sea anemones have been extensively studied from the toxinological point of view for more than 40 years. There are about 40 sea anemone type 1 peptides known to be active on Na(v)1.x channels and all are 46-49 amino acid residues long, with three disulfide bonds and their molecular weights range between 3000 and 5000 Da. About 12 years ago a general model of Na(v)1.2-toxin interaction, developed for the alpha-scorpion toxins, was shown to fit also to action of sea anemone toxin such as ATX-II. According to this model these peptides are specifically acting on the type 3 site known to be between segments 3 and 4 in domain IV of the Na(+) channel protein. This region is indeed responsible for the normal Na(+) currents fast inactivation that is potently slowed by these toxins. This fundamental "gain-of-function" mechanism is responsible for the strong increase in the action potential duration. They constitute a class of tools by means of which physiologists and pharmacologists can study the structure/function relationships of channel proteins. As

  6. Guanidinium Toxins and Their Interactions with Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channels

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    Lorena M. Durán-Riveroll

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Guanidinium toxins, such as saxitoxin (STX, tetrodotoxin (TTX and their analogs, are naturally occurring alkaloids with divergent evolutionary origins and biogeographical distribution, but which share the common chemical feature of guanidinium moieties. These guanidinium groups confer high biological activity with high affinity and ion flux blockage capacity for voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV. Members of the STX group, known collectively as paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs, are produced among three genera of marine dinoflagellates and about a dozen genera of primarily freshwater or brackish water cyanobacteria. In contrast, toxins of the TTX group occur mainly in macrozoa, particularly among puffer fish, several species of marine invertebrates and a few terrestrial amphibians. In the case of TTX and analogs, most evidence suggests that symbiotic bacteria are the origin of the toxins, although endogenous biosynthesis independent from bacteria has not been excluded. The evolutionary origin of the biosynthetic genes for STX and analogs in dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria remains elusive. These highly potent molecules have been the subject of intensive research since the latter half of the past century; first to study the mode of action of their toxigenicity, and later as tools to characterize the role and structure of NaV channels, and finally as therapeutics. Their pharmacological activities have provided encouragement for their use as therapeutants for ion channel-related pathologies, such as pain control. The functional role in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems for both groups of toxins is unproven, although plausible mechanisms of ion channel regulation and chemical defense are often invoked. Molecular approaches and the development of improved detection methods will yield deeper understanding of their physiological and ecological roles. This knowledge will facilitate their further biotechnological exploitation and point the way towards

  7. The pharmacology of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurones.

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    Docherty, Reginald J; Farmer, Clare E

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are vital for the normal functioning of most excitable cells. At least nine distinct functional subtypes of VGSCs are recognized, corresponding to nine genes for their pore-forming alpha-subunits. These have different developmental expression patterns, different tissue distributions in the adult and are differentially regulated at the cellular level by receptor-coupled cell signalling systems. Unsurprisingly, VGSC blockers are found to be useful as drugs in diverse clinical applications where excessive excitability of tissue leads to pathological dysfunction, e.g. epilepsy or cardiac tachyarrhythmias. The effects of most clinically useful VGSC blockers are use-dependent, i.e. their efficacy depends on channel activity. In addition, many natural toxins have been discovered that interact with VGSCs in complex ways and they have been used as experimental probes to study the structure and function of the channels and to better understand how drugs interact with the channels. Here we have attempted to summarize the properties of VGSCs in sensory neurones, discuss how they are regulated by cell signalling systems and we have considered briefly current concepts of their physiological function. We discuss in detail how drugs and toxins interact with archetypal VGSCs and where possible consider how they act on VGSCs in peripheral sensory neurones. Increasingly, drugs that block VGSCs are being used as systemic analgesic agents in chronic pain syndromes, but the full potential for VGSC blockers in this indication is yet to be realized and other applications in sensory dysfunction are also possible. Drugs targeting VGSC subtypes in sensory neurones are likely to provide novel systemic analgesics that are tissue-specific and perhaps even disease-specific, providing much-needed novel therapeutic approaches for the relief of chronic pain.

  8. Changes of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory nerve regeneration and neuropathic pain models.

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    Casals-Díaz, Laura; Casas, Caty; Navarro, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine changes in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) α-subunits after nerve injury and their relation with development of neuropathic pain. We used the crush injury model of regeneration of the sciatic nerve (Crush) and the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in the rat. Measurements of thermal and mechanical pain thresholds were performed until 3 months after injury. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry of VGSC α-subunits were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression in the DRG. Both nerve injuries induced similar alterations in the VGSCs expression at 7 dpi, with upregulation of Nav1.3, and downregulation of Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9. These changes persisted until 28 days, when hyperalgesia was still present in SNI but not in Crush rats. At 90 days, mRNA expression of all analyzed α-subunits returned to basal levels in the Crush group. However, SNI rats still showed altered expression of VGSCs, and neuropathic pain responses. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 were widely expressed in IB4-positive neurons of the DRG, relevant in pain processing. The population of neurons coexpressing each α-subunit and IB4 was also affected by the injury, more markedly after the Crush. Shifts in VGSCs expression occur in parallel to neuropathic pain behavior in rats early after injury, while at later times they appear to be more related to sensory nerve degeneration and regeneration processes.

  9. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium (Nav channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions, a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group.

  10. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes.

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    Cédric James Laedermann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs is a very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential. Navs are composed of 9 different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the action potential and consequently modify pain transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions.Post-translational modification (PTM of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e. peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with the subunit of Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological

  11. The Segregated Expression of Voltage-Gated Potassium and Sodium Channels in Neuronal Membranes: Functional Implications and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duménieu, Maël; Oulé, Marie; Kreutz, Michael R; Lopez-Rojas, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with apparent functional and morphological differences between dendrites and axon. A critical determinant for the molecular and functional identity of axonal and dendritic segments is the restricted expression of voltage-gated ion channels (VGCs). Several studies show an uneven distribution of ion channels and their differential regulation within dendrites and axons, which is a prerequisite for an appropriate integration of synaptic inputs and the generation of adequate action potential (AP) firing patterns. This review article will focus on the signaling pathways leading to segmented expression of voltage-gated potassium and sodium ion channels at the neuronal plasma membrane and the regulatory mechanisms ensuring segregated functions. We will also discuss the relevance of proper ion channel targeting for neuronal physiology and how alterations in polarized distribution contribute to neuronal pathology.

  12. Predictive 3D modelling of the interactions of pyrethroids with the voltage-gated sodium channels of ticks and mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrias O; Williamson, Martin S; González-Cabrera, Joel; Turberg, Andreas; Field, Linda M; Wallace, B A; Davies, T G Emyr

    2014-03-01

    The pyrethroid insecticides are a very successful group of compounds that target invertebrate voltage-gated sodium channels and are widely used in the control of insects, ticks and mites. It is well established that some pyrethroids are good insecticides whereas others are more effective as acaricides. This species specificity is advantageous for controlling particular pest(s) in the presence of another non-target invertebrate, for example controlling the Varroa mite in honeybee colonies. We applied in silico techniques to compare the voltage-gated sodium channels of insects versus ticks and mites and their interactions with a range of pyrethroids and DDT analogues. We identified a single amino acid difference within the pyrethroid binding pocket of ticks/mites that may have significant impact on the effectiveness of pyrethroids as acaricides. Other individual amino acid differences within the binding pocket in distinct tick and mite species may provide a basis for future acaricidal selectivity. Three-dimensional modelling of the pyrethroid/DDT receptor site has led to a new hypothesis to explain the preferential binding of acaricidal pyrethroids to the sodium channels of ticks/mites. This is important for understanding pyrethroid selectivity and the potential effects of mutations that can give rise to resistance to pyrethroids in commercially-important pest species. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. The voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9 is an effector of peripheral inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Wang, Haibin; Costigan, Michael; Allchorne, Andrew J; Hatcher, Jon P; Egerton, Julie; Stean, Tania; Morisset, Valerie; Grose, David; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Chessell, Iain P; Tate, Simon; Green, Paula J; Woolf, Clifford J

    2006-12-13

    We used a mouse with deletion of exons 4, 5, and 6 of the SCN11A (sodium channel, voltage-gated, type XI, alpha) gene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9 to assess its contribution to pain. Na(v)1.9 is present in nociceptor sensory neurons that express TRPV1, bradykinin B2, and purinergic P2X3 receptors. In Na(v)1.9-/- mice, the non-inactivating persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium TTXr-Per current is absent, whereas TTXr-Slow is unchanged. TTXs currents are unaffected by the mutation of Na(v)1.9. Pain hypersensitivity elicited by intraplantar administration of prostaglandin E2, bradykinin, interleukin-1beta, capsaicin, and P2X3 and P2Y receptor agonists, but not NGF, is either reduced or absent in Na(v)1.9-/- mice, whereas basal thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity is unchanged. Thermal, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity produced by peripheral inflammation (intraplanatar complete Freund's adjuvant) is substantially diminished in the null allele mutant mice, whereas hypersensitivity in two neuropathic pain models is unchanged in the Na(v)1.9-/- mice. Na(v)1.9 is, we conclude, an effector of the hypersensitivity produced by multiple inflammatory mediators on nociceptor peripheral terminals and therefore plays a key role in mediating peripheral sensitization.

  14. Electrophysiological and Pharmacological Analyses of Nav1.9 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel by Establishing a Heterologous Expression System

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Zhou; Zhen Xiao; Yan Xu; Yunxiao Zhang; Dongfang Tang; Xinzhou Wu; Cheng Tang; Minzhi Chen,; Xiaoliu Shi; Ping Chen; Songping Liang; Zhonghua Liu

    2017-01-01

    Nav1. 9 voltage-gated sodium channel is preferentially expressed in peripheral nociceptive neurons. Recent progresses have proved its role in pain sensation, but our understanding of Nav1.9, in general, has lagged behind because of limitations in heterologous expression in mammal cells. In this work, functional expression of human Nav1.9 (hNav1.9) was achieved by fusing GFP to the C-terminal of hNav1.9 in ND7/23 cells, which has been proved to be a reliable method to the electrophysiological ...

  15. Regulatory role of voltage-gated sodium channel β subunits in sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed eChahine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Na+ channels are transmembrane-bound proteins incorporating aqueous conduction pores that are highly selective for Na+. The opening of these channels results in the rapid influx of Na+ ions that depolarize the cell and drive the rapid upstroke of nerve and muscle action potentials. While the concept of a Na+-selective ion channel had been formulated in the 1940s, it was not until the 1980s that the biochemical properties of the 260-kDa and 36-kDa auxiliary β subunits (β1, β2 were first described. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression studies revealed that the  subunit forms the core of the channel and is responsible for both voltage-dependent gating and ionic selectivity. To date, ten isoforms of the Na+ channel α subunit have been identified that vary in their primary structures, tissue distribution, biophysical properties, and sensitivity to neurotoxins. Four β subunits (β1-β4 and two splice variants (β1A, β1B have been identified that modulate the subcellular distribution, cell surface expression, and functional properties of the α subunits. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad overview of β subunit expression and function in peripheral sensory neurons and examine their contributions to neuropathic pain.

  16. Selective Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Peptide Toxins from Animal Venom: Pharmacological Probes and Analgesic Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Chunlei; Zou, Xiaohan; Cao, Zhengyu

    2017-12-08

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) play critical roles in action potential generation and propagation. Nav channelopathy as well as pathological sensitization contribute to allodynia and hyperalgesia. Recent evidence has demonstrated the significant roles of Nav subtypes (Nav1.3, 1.7, 1.8, and 1.9) in nociceptive transduction, and therefore these Navs may represent attractive targets for analgesic drug discovery. Animal toxins are structurally diverse peptides that are highly potent yet selective on ion channel subtypes and therefore represent valuable probes to elucidate the structures, gating properties, and cellular functions of ion channels. In this review, we summarize recent advances on peptide toxins from animal venom that selectively target Nav1.3, 1.7, 1.8, and 1.9, along with their potential in analgesic drug discovery.

  17. Recent developments regarding voltage-gated sodium channel blockers for the treatment of inherited and acquired neuropathic pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W. Theile

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and neuropathic pain constitute significant health problems affecting millions of individuals each year. Pain sensations typically originate in sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS which relay information to the central nervous system (CNS. Pathological pain sensations can arise as result of changes in excitability of these peripheral sensory neurons. Voltage-gated sodium channels are key determinants regulating action-potential generation and propagation; thus, changes in sodium channel function can have profound effects on neuronal excitability and pain signaling. At present, most of the clinically available sodium channel blockers used to treat pain are non-selective across sodium channel isoforms and can contribute to cardio-toxicity, motor impairments and CNS side effects. Numerous strides have been made over the last decade in an effort to develop more selective and efficacious sodium channel blockers to treat pain. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of the more recent developments put forth by research universities and pharmaceutical companies alike in the pursuit of developing more targeted sodium channel therapies for the treatment of a variety of neuropathic pain conditions.

  18. Menthol pain relief through cumulative inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Hao, Jizhe; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Gabriac, Mélanie; Delmas, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Menthol is a natural compound of plant origin known to produce cool sensation via the activation of the TRPM8 channel. It is also frequently part of topical analgesic drugs available in a pharmacy, although its mechanism of action is still unknown. Compelling evidence indicates that voltage-gated Na(+) channels are critical for experiencing pain sensation. We tested the hypothesis that menthol may block voltage-gated Na(+) channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. By use of a patch clamp, we evaluated the effects of menthol application on tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 channel subtypes in DRG neurons, and on TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels in immortalized DRG neuron-derived F11 cells. The results indicate that menthol inhibits Na(+) channels in a concentration-, voltage-, and frequency-dependent manner. Menthol promoted fast and slow inactivation states, causing use-dependent depression of Na(+) channel activity. In current clamp recordings, menthol inhibited firing at high-frequency stimulation with minimal effects on normal neuronal activity. We found that low concentrations of menthol cause analgesia in mice, relieving pain produced by a Na(+) channel-targeting toxin. We conclude that menthol is a state-selective blocker of Nav1.8, Nav1.9, and TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels, indicating a role for Na(+) channel blockade in the efficacy of menthol as topical analgesic compound. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lack of variation in voltage-gated sodium channels of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) exposed to neurotoxic algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammen, Kristina M; Rosel, Patricia E; Wells, Randall S; Read, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    In coastal marine ecosystems, neurotoxins produced by harmful algal blooms (HABs) often result in large-scale mortality events of many marine species. Historical and frequent exposure to HABs therefore may provide a strong selective pressure for adaptations that result in toxin resistance. Neurotoxin resistance has independently evolved in a variety of terrestrial and marine species via mutations in genes encoding the toxin binding sites within the voltage-gated sodium channel gene complex. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in the putative binding site of brevetoxins in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) explains differences among individuals or populations in resistance to harmful Karenia brevis blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. We found very little variation in the sodium channel exons encoding the putative brevetoxin binding site among bottlenose dolphins from central-west Florida and the Florida Panhandle. Our study included samples from several bottlenose dolphin mortality events associated with HABs, but we found no association between genetic variation and survival. We observed a significant effect of geographic region on genetic variation for some sodium channel isoforms, but this can be primarily explained by rare private alleles and is more likely a reflection of regional genetic differentiation than the cause of different levels of HAB resistance between regions. In contrast to many other previously studied neurotoxin-resistant species, we conclude that bottlenose dolphins have not evolved resistance to HABs via mutations in genes encoding the brevetoxin binding site on the voltage-gated sodium channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Lidocaine reduces the transition to slow inactivation in Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Patrick L; Jarecki, Brian W; Cummins, Theodore R

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The primary use of local anaesthetics is to prevent or relieve pain by reversibly preventing action potential propagation through the inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. The tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel subtype Nav1.7, abundantly expressed in pain-sensing neurons, plays a crucial role in perception and transmission of painful stimuli and in inherited chronic pain syndromes. Understanding the interaction of lidocaine with Nav1.7 channels could provide valuable insight into the drug's action in alleviating pain in distinct patient populations. The aim of this study was to determine how lidocaine interacts with multiple inactivated conformations of Nav1.7 channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We investigated the interactions of lidocaine with wild-type Nav1.7 channels and a paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutation (I1461T) that destabilizes fast inactivation. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were used to examine the activity of channels expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. KEY RESULTS Depolarizing pulses that increased slow inactivation of Nav1.7 channels also reduced lidocaine inhibition. Lidocaine enhanced recovery of Nav1.7 channels from prolonged depolarizing pulses by decreasing slow inactivation. A paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutation that destabilizes fast inactivation of Nav1.7 channels decreased lidocaine inhibition. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Lidocaine decreased the transition of Nav1.7 channels to the slow inactivated state. The fast inactivation gate (domain III–IV linker) is important for potentiating the interaction of lidocaine with the Nav1.7 channel. PMID:21232038

  2. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by emulsified isoflurane may contribute to its subarachnoid anesthetic effect in beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cheng; Wu, Wei; Liu, Jin; Liao, Da-qing; Kang, Yi; Chen, Xiang-dong

    2011-01-01

    Volatile anesthetics, in addition to their general anesthesia action, have been proven to produce regional anesthetic effect in various animal models. The major aim of this study was to examine whether emulsified isoflurane (EI) could also produce subarachnoid anesthesia and to investigate its possible mechanism. Beagle dogs were randomly assigned into 5 groups (n = 6/group): intrathecally receiving 1% lidocaine 0.1 mL/kg, 30% intralipid 0.1 mL/kg (control), or 8% EI at doses of 0.05, 0.075, or 0.1 mL/kg, respectively. Consciousness state, motor function of limbs, and response to nociceptive stimulus were observed after drug administration. The effect of EI on voltage-gated Na channel was recorded from isolated spinal neurons of rats, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Inhibition of peak sodium currents and effect of EI on Na channel gating were analyzed. Emulsified isoflurane produced subarachnoid anesthesia in a dose-dependent manner, and at the dose of 0.1 mL/kg, the effect of 8% EI was similar to 1% lidocaine. Sodium channel currents were inhibited by EI at clinically relevant concentrations, with the IC50 (median inhibitory concentration) at 0.69 ± 0.08 mM. Voltage activation of Na channels was positive, shifted by isoflurane at the concentration of 0.77 mM, and V½ of activation (voltage for half-maximal activation) shifted from -12.4 ± 2.7 mV to -7.3 ± 2.3 mV (P channels in the spinal cord.

  3. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular insights into the local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels using hydroxylated analogues of mexiletine

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    Jean-François eDesaphy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that the β-adrenoceptor modulators, clenbuterol and propranolol, directly blocked voltage-gated sodium channels, whereas salbutamol and nadolol did not (Desaphy et al., 2003, suggesting the presence of two hydroxyl groups on the aromatic moiety of the drugs as a molecular requisite for impeding sodium channel block. To verify such an hypothesis, we synthesized five new mexiletine analogues by adding one or two hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of the sodium channel blocker and tested these compounds on hNav1.4 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Concentration-response relationships were constructed using an holding potential of -120 mV at 0.1 Hz (tonic block and 10 Hz (use-dependent block stimulation frequencies. The half-maximum inhibitory concentrations (IC50 were linearly correlated to drug lipophilicity: the less lipophilic the drug, minor was the block. The same compounds were also tested on F1586C and Y1593C hNav1.4 channel mutants, to gain further information on the molecular interactions of mexiletine with its receptor within the sodium channel pore. Alteration of tonic block suggests that the aryl moiety of mexiletine may interact either directly or indirectly with Phe1586 in the closed sodium channel to produce low-affinity binding block, and that this interaction depends on the electrostatic potential of the drug aromatic tail. Alteration of use-dependent block suggests that addition of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety may modify high-affinity binding of the drug ammine terminal to Phe1586 through cooperativity between the two pharmacophores, this effect being mainly related to drug lipophilicity. Mutation of Tyr1593 further impaired such cooperativity. In conclusion, these results confirm our former hypothesis showing that the presence of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of mexiletine greatly reduced sodium channel block, and provide molecular insights into the intimate interaction of local anesthetics with

  5. Voltage-gated sodium channels in nociceptive versus non-nociceptive nodose vagal sensory neurons innervating guinea pig lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Kevin; Carr, Michael J; Gibbard, Anna; Savage, Tony J; Singh, Kuljit; Jing, Junping; Meeker, Sonya; Undem, Bradley J

    2008-01-01

    Lung vagal sensory fibres are broadly categorized as C fibres (nociceptors) and A fibres (non-nociceptive; rapidly and slowly adapting low-threshold stretch receptors). These afferent fibre types differ in degree of myelination, conduction velocity, neuropeptide content, sensitivity to chemical and mechanical stimuli, as well as evoked reflex responses. Recent studies in nociceptive fibres of the somatosensory system indicated that the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are preferentially expressed in the nociceptive fibres of the somatosensory system (dorsal root ganglia). Whereas TTX-R sodium currents have been documented in lung vagal sensory nerves fibres, a rigorous comparison of their expression in nociceptive versus non-nociceptive vagal sensory neurons has not been carried out. Using multiple approaches including patch clamp electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and single-cell gene expression analysis in the guinea pig, we obtained data supporting the hypothesis that the TTX-R sodium currents are similarly distributed between nodose ganglion A-fibres and C-fibres innervating the lung. Moreover, mRNA and immunoreactivity for the TTX-R VGSC molecules NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 were present in nearly all neurons. We conclude that contrary to findings in the somatosensory neurons, TTX-R VGSCs are not preferentially expressed in the nociceptive C-fibre population innervating the lungs. PMID:18187475

  6. The voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.9 is required for inflammation-based urinary bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Amy M; Martin, William J; Thorneloe, Kevin S

    2009-03-06

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium channels are found in small diameter primary sensory neurons and are thought to be important in the maintenance of inflammatory pain. Here we examined bladder urodynamics of Nav1.9 voltage-gated sodium channel knock out (KO) mice, and the contribution of Nav1.9 to the development of inflammation-based bladder dysfunction. Basal urodynamics were not different between wildtype (WT) mice and those lacking Nav1.9. Peripheral nerve recordings from pelvic afferents in Nav1.9 KO mice revealed a lack of sensitization to intravesicularly applied prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Consistent with this, cyclophosphamide treatment in vivo, which is associated with an enhancement of PGE2 production, evoked a reduction in bladder capacity of WT, but not Nav1.9 KO mice. We conclude that the Nav1.9 sodium channel provides an important link between inflammatory processes and changes in urodynamic properties that occur during urinary bladder inflammation.

  7. Molecular dissection of lubeluzole use-dependent block of voltage-gated sodium channels discloses new therapeutic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaphy, Jean-François; Carbonara, Roberta; Costanza, Teresa; Lentini, Giovanni; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Bruno, Claudio; Franchini, Carlo; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2013-02-01

    Lubeluzole, which acts on various targets in vitro, including voltage-gated sodium channels, was initially proposed as a neuroprotectant. The lubeluzole structure contains a benzothiazole moiety [N-methyl-1,3-benzothiazole-2-amine (R-like)] related to riluzole and a phenoxy-propranol-amine moiety [(RS)-1-(3,4-difluorophenoxy)-3-(piperidin-1-yl)propan-2-ol (A-core)] recalling propranolol. Both riluzole and propranolol are efficient sodium channel blockers. We studied in detail the effects of lubeluzole (racemic mixture and single isomers), the aforementioned lubeluzole moieties, and riluzole on sodium channels to increase our knowledge of drug-channel molecular interactions. Compounds were tested on hNav1.4 sodium channels, and on F1586C or Y1593C mutants functionally expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, using the patch-clamp technique. Lubeluzole blocked sodium channels with a remarkable effectiveness. No stereoselectivity was found. Compared with mexiletine, the dissociation constant for inactivated channels was ~600 times lower (~11 nM), conferring to lubeluzole a huge use-dependence of great therapeutic value. The F1586C mutation only partially impaired the use-dependent block, suggesting that additional amino acids are critically involved in high-affinity binding. Lubeluzole moieties were modest sodium channel blockers. Riluzole blocked sodium channels efficiently but lacked use dependence, similar to R-like. F1586C fully abolished A-core use dependence, suggesting that A-core binds to the local anesthetic receptor. Thus, lubeluzole likely binds to the local anesthetic receptor through its phenoxy-propranol-amine moiety, with consequent use-dependent behavior. Nevertheless, compared with other known sodium channel blockers, lubeluzole adds a third pharmacophoric point through its benzothiazole moiety, which greatly enhances high-affinity binding and use-dependent block. If sufficient isoform specificity can be attained, the huge use-dependent block

  8. Direct interaction with contactin targets voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9/NaN to the cell membrane

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, C J; Dib-Hajj, S D; Black, J A; Greenwood, J; Lian, Z; Waxman, S G

    2001-01-01

    .... To examine this issue we studied the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9/NaN, which is preferentially expressed in small sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglia and the nonmyelinated axons that arise...

  9. Differential expression of neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel mRNAs during the development of the rat trigeminal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Jonas; Persson, Anna-Karin; Fried, Kaj

    2009-05-07

    The developmental pattern of sodium channel expression in neurons of primary sensory ganglia is likely reflected in the electrical behavior of these cells. Little information is available on how voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurons are expressed during development in the trigeminal-innervated craniofacial region, where sensitivity is fundamental during early stages of life. Using in situ hybridization, we here demonstrate a differential both regional and transcript-dependent distribution of sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunits between Embryonic day (E)15 and Postnatal day (P)5/6 in the rat trigeminal ganglion. Na(v)1.3 mRNA was strongly expressed at E15, but declined to low levels at P5/P6. Na(v)1.8 was expressed at E15, increased to reach maximum levels at P1 and then decreased. Na(v)1.9 mRNA was detected at E19, reached a maximum at P1, and was then reduced. beta1 mRNA showed a steady rise in expression from E17, while beta2 mRNA was widely expressed from P1. beta 3 mRNA was detected at E15, reached a maximum at E19 followed by a decrease in expression. In the ophthalmic TG portion, there was a higher expression level of Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 between E19 and P5/P6 as compared to the maxillary/mandibular part, indicating an unexpected positional difference in channel distribution. mRNA levels of p11, which facilitates the expression of Na(v)1.8, were high at all stages. These findings show that trigeminal ganglion sodium channel transcripts mature in steps that are specific for each transcript. They also raise the possibility that different facial regions could differ in the ability to transmit sensory signals during early life.

  10. Distribution of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory endings of mammalian muscle spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Dario I; Vincent, Jacob A; Cope, Timothy C

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying signaling of mechanical stimuli by muscle spindles remains incomplete. In particular, the ionic conductances that sustain tonic firing during static muscle stretch are unknown. We hypothesized that tonic firing by spindle afferents depends on sodium persistent inward current (INaP) and tested for the necessary presence of the appropriate voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels in primary sensory endings. The NaV 1.6 isoform was selected for both its capacity to produce INaP and for its presence in other mechanosensors that fire tonically. The present study shows that NaV 1.6 immunoreactivity (IR) is concentrated in heminodes, presumably where tonic firing is generated, and we were surprised to find NaV 1.6 IR strongly expressed also in the sensory terminals, where mechanotransduction occurs. This spatial pattern of NaV 1.6 IR distribution was consistent for three mammalian species (rat, cat, and mouse), as was tonic firing by primary spindle afferents. These findings meet some of the conditions needed to establish participation of INaP in tonic firing by primary sensory endings. The study was extended to two additional NaV isoforms, selected for their sensitivity to TTX, excluding TTX-resistant NaV channels, which alone are insufficient to support firing by primary spindle endings. Positive immunoreactivity was found for NaV 1.1 , predominantly in sensory terminals together with NaV 1.6 and for NaV 1.7 , mainly in preterminal axons. Differential distribution in primary sensory endings suggests specialized roles for these three NaV isoforms in the process of mechanosensory signaling by muscle spindles. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The molecular mechanisms underlying mechanosensory signaling responsible for proprioceptive functions are not completely elucidated. This study provides the first evidence that voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are expressed in the spindle primary sensory ending, where NaVs are found at every site

  11. Effects of dragon's blood resin and its component loureirin B on tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangming, Liu; Su, Chen; Shijin, Yin; Zhinan, Mei

    2004-08-01

    Using whole-cell patch clamp technique on the membrane of freshly isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, the effects of dragon's blood resin and its important component loureirin B on tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) voltage-gated sodium currents were observed. The results show that both blood resin and loureirin B could suppress TTX-S voltage-gated sodium currents in a dose-dependent way. The peak current amplitudes and the steady-state activation and inactivation curves are also made to shift by 0.05% blood resin and 0.2 mmol/L loureirin B. These results demonstrate that the effects of blood resin on TTX-S sodium current may contribute to loureirin B in blood resin. Perhaps the analgesic effect of blood resin is caused partly by loureirin B directly interfering with the nociceptive transmission of primary sensory neurons.

  12. Molecular Insights into the Local Anesthetic Receptor within Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels Using Hydroxylated Analogs of Mexiletine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaphy, Jean-François; Dipalma, Antonella; Costanza, Teresa; Carbonara, Roberta; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Lentini, Giovanni; Franchini, Carlo; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that the β-adrenoceptor modulators, clenbuterol and propranolol, directly blocked voltage-gated sodium channels, whereas salbutamol and nadolol did not (Desaphy et al., 2003), suggesting the presence of two hydroxyl groups on the aromatic moiety of the drugs as a molecular requisite for impeding sodium channel block. To verify such an hypothesis, we synthesized five new mexiletine analogs by adding one or two hydroxyl groups to the aryloxy moiety of the sodium channel blocker and tested these compounds on hNav1.4 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Concentration-response relationships were constructed using 25-ms-long depolarizing pulses at -30 mV applied from an holding potential of -120 mV at 0.1 Hz (tonic block) and 10 Hz (use-dependent block) stimulation frequencies. The half-maximum inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) were linearly correlated to drug lipophilicity: the less lipophilic the drug, minor was the block. The same compounds were also tested on F1586C and Y1593C hNav1.4 channel mutants, to gain further information on the molecular interactions of mexiletine with its receptor within the sodium channel pore. In particular, replacement of Phe1586 and Tyr1593 by non-aromatic cysteine residues may help in the understanding of the role of π-π or π-cation interactions in mexiletine binding. Alteration of tonic block suggests that the aryloxy moiety of mexiletine may interact either directly or indirectly with Phe1586 in the closed sodium channel to produce low-affinity binding block, and that this interaction depends on the electrostatic potential of the drug aromatic tail. Alteration of use-dependent block suggests that addition of hydroxyl groups to the aryloxy moiety may modify high-affinity binding of the drug amine terminal to Phe1586 through cooperativity between the two pharmacophores, this effect being mainly related to drug lipophilicity. Mutation of Tyr1593 further impaired such cooperativity. In conclusion, these

  13. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV 1.9 in visceral pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hockley, J R F; Winchester, W J; Bulmer, D C

    2016-01-01

    ... sodium channel subtype 1.9 (NaV 1.9). Here, we address the role of NaV 1.9 in visceral pain and what known human NaV 1.9 mutants can tell us about NaV 1.9 function in gut physiology and pathophysiology.

  14. SCN9A mutations define primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder of voltage gated sodium channels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Guillet, G.; Taieb, A.; Kirby, R.L.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of red, warm and painful hands, and/or feet. We previously localized the gene for primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM region on chromosome 2q. Recently, Yang et al identified two missense mutations of the sodium channel alpha

  15. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Davies, T G Emyr; Field, Linda M; Schmehl, Daniel; Ellis, James D; Krieger, Klemens; Williamson, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V) of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes.

  16. Anaesthetic tricaine acts preferentially on neural voltage-gated sodium channels and fails to block directly evoked muscle contraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharamaiah Attili

    Full Text Available Movements in animals arise through concerted action of neurons and skeletal muscle. General anaesthetics prevent movement and cause loss of consciousness by blocking neural function. Anaesthetics of the amino amide-class are thought to act by blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels. In fish, the commonly used anaesthetic tricaine methanesulphonate, also known as 3-aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester, metacaine or MS-222, causes loss of consciousness. However, its role in blocking action potentials in distinct excitable cells is unclear, raising the possibility that tricaine could act as a neuromuscular blocking agent directly causing paralysis. Here we use evoked electrical stimulation to show that tricaine efficiently blocks neural action potentials, but does not prevent directly evoked muscle contraction. Nifedipine-sensitive L-type Cav channels affecting movement are also primarily neural, suggesting that muscle Nav channels are relatively insensitive to tricaine. These findings show that tricaine used at standard concentrations in zebrafish larvae does not paralyse muscle, thereby diminishing concern that a direct action on muscle could mask a lack of general anaesthesia.

  17. Voltage-gated sodium channels: (NaV )igating the field to determine their contribution to visceral nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Andelain; Deiteren, Annemie; Harrington, Andrea M; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Castro, Joel; Caldwell, Ashlee; Grundy, Luke; Brierley, Stuart M

    2018-01-09

    Chronic visceral pain, altered motility and bladder dysfunction are common, yet poorly managed symptoms of functional and inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts. Recently, numerous human channelopathies of the voltage-gated sodium (NaV ) channel family have been identified, which induce either painful neuropathies, an insensitivity to pain, or alterations in smooth muscle function. The identification of these disorders, in addition to the recent utilisation of genetically modified NaV mice and specific NaV channel modulators, has shed new light on how NaV channels contribute to the function of neuronal and non-neuronal tissues within the gastrointestinal tract and bladder. Here we review the current pre-clinical and clinical evidence to reveal how the nine NaV channel family members (NaV 1.1 - NaV 1.9) contribute to abdominal visceral function in normal and disease states. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes.

  19. Structure and function of splice variants of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Annett; Walzik, Stefan; Blechschmidt, Steve; Haufe, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the rapid upstroke of the action potential in excitable tissues. The tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant isoform Na(v)1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is the predominant isoform in the heart. This channel plays a key role for excitability of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and for rapid impulse propagation through the specific conduction system. During recent years, strong evidence has been accumulated in support of the expression of several Na(v)1.5 splice variants in the heart, and in various other tissues and cell lines including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells and neuronal stem cell lines. This review summarizes our knowledge on the structure and putative function of nine Na(v)1.5 splice variants detected so far. Attention will be paid to the distinct biophysical properties of the four functional splice variants, to the pronounced tissue- and species-specific expression, and to the developmental regulation of Na(v)1.5 splicing. The implications of alternative splicing for SCN5A channelopathies, and for a better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, are discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  1. Voltage-gated sodium channels contribute to action potentials and spontaneous contractility in isolated human lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telinius, Niklas; Majgaard, Jens; Kim, Sukhan; Katballe, Niels; Pahle, Einar; Nielsen, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Donna Briggs

    2015-07-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) play a key role for initiating action potentials (AP) in excitable cells. VGSC in human lymphatic vessels have not been investigated. In the present study, we report the electrical activity and APs of small human lymphatic collecting vessels, as well as mRNA expression and function of VGSC in small and large human lymphatic vessels. The VGSC blocker TTX inhibited spontaneous contractions in six of 10 spontaneously active vessels, whereas ranolazine, which has a narrower VGSC blocking profile, had no influence on spontaneous activity. TTX did not affect noradrenaline-induced contractions. The VGSC opener veratridine induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1-30 μm) eliciting a stable tonic contraction and membrane depolarization to -18 ± 0.6 mV. Veratridine-induced depolarizations and contractions were reversed ∼80% by TTX, and were dependent on Ca(2+) influx via L-type calcium channels and the sodium-calcium exchanger in reverse mode. Molecular analysis determined NaV 1.3 to be the predominantly expressed VGSC isoform. Electrophysiology of mesenteric lymphatics determined the resting membrane potential to be -45 ± 1.7 mV. Spontaneous APs were preceded by a slow depolarization of 5.3 ± 0.6 mV after which a spike was elicited that almost completely repolarized before immediately depolarizing again to plateau. Vessels transiently hyperpolarized prior to returning to the resting membrane potential. TTX application blocked APs. We have shown that VGSC are necessary for initiating and maintaining APs and spontaneous contractions in human lymphatic vessels and our data suggest the main contribution from comes NaV 1.3. We have also shown that activation of these channels augments the contractile activity of the vessels. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  2. Contribution of the tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.9 to sensory transmission and nociceptive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Priest, Birgit T.; Murphy, Beth A.; Lindia, Jill A.; Diaz, Carmen; Abbadie, Catherine; Ritter, Amy M.; Liberator, Paul; Iyer, Leslie M.; Kash, Shera F.; Kohler, Martin G.; Kaczorowski, Gregory J.; MacIntyre, D. Euan; Martin, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The transmission of pain signals after injury or inflammation depends in part on increased excitability of primary sensory neurons. Nociceptive neurons express multiple subtypes of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1s), each of which possesses unique features that may influence primary afferent excitability. Here, we examined the contribution of NaV1.9 to nociceptive signaling by studying the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice with a disruption of the SCN11A gene, which en...

  3. Action potential changes associated with the inhibitory effects on voltage-gated sodium current of hippocampal CA1 neurons by silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaowei; Ren, Guogang; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2009-10-29

    Nano-sized materials are now being used in medicine, biotechnology, energy, and environmental technology. Although a wide and growing number of applications for nanomaterials exist, there are limited studies available on toxicity of nanoparticles for their human risk and environmental assessment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of silver nanoparticles (nano-Ag) on voltage-activated sodium currents in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Nano-Ag was tested at increasing concentrations (10(-6), 5 x 10(-6), 10(-5) g/ml). The research results showed that only nano-Ag (10(-5) g/ml) reduced the amplitude of voltage-gated sodium current (I(Na)). The nano-Ag particles produced a hyperpolarizing shift in the activation-voltage curve of I(Na) and also delayed the recovery of I(Na) from inactivation. Action potential properties and the pattern of repetitive firing were examined using whole cell current-clamp recordings. Peak amplitude and overshoot of the evoked single action potential were decreased and half-width was increased in the present of the 10(-5) g/ml nano-Ag solution, and the firing rate of repetitive firing had no change. The results suggest that nano-Ag may alter the action potential of hippocampal CA1 neurons by depressing voltage-gated sodium current.

  4. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels by Conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brad R; Gajewiak, Joanna; Chhabra, Sandeep; Skalicky, Jack J; Zhang, Min-Min; Rivier, Jean E; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-03-25

    Cone snail toxins are well known blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels, a property that is of broad interest in biology and therapeutically in treating neuropathic pain and neurological disorders. Although most conotoxin channel blockers function by direct binding to a channel and disrupting its normal ion movement, conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ channel blocking is unique, using both favorable binding interactions with the channel and a direct tether via an intermolecular disulfide bond. Disulfide exchange is possible because conotoxin μO§-GVIIJ contains anS-cysteinylated Cys-24 residue that is capable of exchanging with a free cysteine thiol on the channel surface. Here, we present the solution structure of an analog of μO§-GVIIJ (GVIIJ[C24S]) and the results of structure-activity studies with synthetic μO§-GVIIJ variants. GVIIJ[C24S] adopts an inhibitor cystine knot structure, with two antiparallel β-strands stabilized by three disulfide bridges. The loop region linking the β-strands (loop 4) presents residue 24 in a configuration where it could bind to the proposed free cysteine of the channel (Cys-910, rat NaV1.2 numbering; at site 8). The structure-activity study shows that three residues (Lys-12, Arg-14, and Tyr-16) located in loop 2 and spatially close to residue 24 were also important for functional activity. We propose that the interaction of μO§-GVIIJ with the channel depends on not only disulfide tethering via Cys-24 to a free cysteine at site 8 on the channel but also the participation of key residues of μO§-GVIIJ on a distinct surface of the peptide. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Reduced expression and activation of voltage-gated sodium channels contributes to blunted baroreflex sensitivity in heart failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Huiyin; Zhang, Libin; Tran, Thai P; Muelleman, Robert L; Li, Yu-Long

    2010-11-15

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channels are responsible for initiation and propagation of action potential in the neurons. To explore the mechanisms of chronic heart failure (CHF)-induced baroreflex dysfunction, we measured the expression and current density of Na(v) channel subunits (Na(v)1.7, Na(v)1.8, and Na(v)1.9) in the aortic baroreceptor neurons and investigated the role of Na(v) channels in aortic baroreceptor neuron excitability and baroreflex sensitivity in sham and CHF rats. CHF was induced by left coronary artery ligation. The development of CHF (6-8 weeks after the coronary ligation) was confirmed by hemodynamic and morphological characteristics. Immunofluorescent data indicated that Na(v)1.7 was expressed in A-type (myelinated) and C-type (unmyelinated) nodose neurons, but Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 were expressed only in C-type nodose neurons. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot data showed that CHF reduced mRNA and protein expression levels of Na(v) channels in nodose neurons. In addition, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we found that Na(v) current density and cell excitability of the aortic baroreceptor neurons were lower in CHF rats than that in sham rats. Aortic baroreflex sensitivity was blunted in anesthetized CHF rats, compared with that in sham rats. Furthermore, Na(v) channel activator (rATX II, 100 nM) significantly enhanced Na(v) current density and cell excitability of aortic baroreceptor neurons and improved aortic baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. These results suggest that reduced expression and activation of the Na(v) channels are involved in the attenuation of baroreceptor neuron excitability, which subsequently contributes to the impairment of baroreflex in CHF state.

  6. Electrophysiological and Pharmacological Analyses of Nav1.9 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel by Establishing a Heterologous Expression System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xi; Xiao, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yunxiao; Tang, Dongfang; Wu, Xinzhou; Tang, Cheng; Chen, Minzhi; Shi, Xiaoliu; Chen, Ping; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    Nav1. 9 voltage-gated sodium channel is preferentially expressed in peripheral nociceptive neurons. Recent progresses have proved its role in pain sensation, but our understanding of Nav1.9, in general, has lagged behind because of limitations in heterologous expression in mammal cells. In this work, functional expression of human Nav1.9 (hNav1.9) was achieved by fusing GFP to the C-terminal of hNav1.9 in ND7/23 cells, which has been proved to be a reliable method to the electrophysiological and pharmacological studies of hNav1.9. By using the hNav1.9 expression system, we investigated the electrophysiological properties of four mutations of hNav1.9 (K419N, A582T, A842P, and F1689L), whose electrophysiological functions have not been determined yet. The four mutations significantly caused positive shift of the steady-state fast inactivation and therefore increased hNav1.9 activity, consistent with the phenotype of painful peripheral neuropathy. Meanwhile, the effects of inflammatory mediators on hNav1.9 were also investigated. Impressively, histamine was found for the first time to enhance hNav1.9 activity, indicating its vital role in hNav1.9 modulating inflammatory pain. Taken together, our research provided a useful platform for hNav1.9 studies and new insight into mechanism of hNav1.9 linking to pain.

  7. Electrophysiological and Pharmacological Analyses of Nav1.9 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel by Establishing a Heterologous Expression System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nav1. 9 voltage-gated sodium channel is preferentially expressed in peripheral nociceptive neurons. Recent progresses have proved its role in pain sensation, but our understanding of Nav1.9, in general, has lagged behind because of limitations in heterologous expression in mammal cells. In this work, functional expression of human Nav1.9 (hNav1.9 was achieved by fusing GFP to the C-terminal of hNav1.9 in ND7/23 cells, which has been proved to be a reliable method to the electrophysiological and pharmacological studies of hNav1.9. By using the hNav1.9 expression system, we investigated the electrophysiological properties of four mutations of hNav1.9 (K419N, A582T, A842P, and F1689L, whose electrophysiological functions have not been determined yet. The four mutations significantly caused positive shift of the steady-state fast inactivation and therefore increased hNav1.9 activity, consistent with the phenotype of painful peripheral neuropathy. Meanwhile, the effects of inflammatory mediators on hNav1.9 were also investigated. Impressively, histamine was found for the first time to enhance hNav1.9 activity, indicating its vital role in hNav1.9 modulating inflammatory pain. Taken together, our research provided a useful platform for hNav1.9 studies and new insight into mechanism of hNav1.9 linking to pain.

  8. Bromodomain-containing Protein 4 Activates Voltage-gated Sodium Channel 1.7 Transcription in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Mediate Thermal Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Ho, Yu-Cheng; Lai, Cheng-Yuan; Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Lee, An-Sheng; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chau, Yat-Pang; Peng, Hsien-Yu

    2017-11-01

    Bromodomain-containing protein 4 binds acetylated promoter histones and promotes transcription; however, the role of bromodomain-containing protein 4 in inflammatory hyperalgesia remains unclear. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received hind paw injections of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce hyperalgesia. The dorsal root ganglia were examined to detect changes in bromodomain-containing protein 4 expression and the activation of genes involved in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7, which is a key pain-related ion channel. The intraplantar complete Freund's adjuvant injections resulted in thermal hyperalgesia (4.0 ± 1.5 s; n = 7). The immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting results demonstrated an increase in the bromodomain-containing protein 4-expressing dorsal root ganglia neurons (3.78 ± 0.38 fold; n = 7) and bromodomain-containing protein 4 protein levels (2.62 ± 0.39 fold; n = 6). After the complete Freund's adjuvant injection, histone H3 protein acetylation was enhanced in the voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 promoter, and cyclin-dependent kinase 9 and phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II were recruited to this area. Furthermore, the voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7-mediated currents were enhanced in neurons of the complete Freund's adjuvant rats (55 ± 11 vs. 19 ± 9 pA/pF; n = 4 to 6 neurons). Using bromodomain-containing protein 4-targeted antisense small interfering RNA to the complete Freund's adjuvant-treated rats, the authors demonstrated a reduction in the expression of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (0.68 ± 0.16 fold; n = 7), a reduction in thermal hyperalgesia (7.5 ± 1.5 s; n = 7), and a reduction in the increased voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 currents (21 ± 4 pA/pF; n = 4 to 6 neurons). Complete Freund's adjuvant triggers enhanced bromodomain-containing protein 4 expression, ultimately leading to the enhanced excitability of nociceptive neurons and thermal hyperalgesia. This effect is

  9. Rufinamide attenuates mechanical allodynia in a model of neuropathic pain in the mouse and stabilizes voltage-gated sodium channel inactivated state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Marc R; Kirschmann, Guylène; Laedermann, Cedric J; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels dysregulation is important for hyperexcitability leading to pain persistence. Sodium channel blockers currently used to treat neuropathic pain are poorly tolerated. Getting new molecules to clinical use is laborious. We here propose a drug already marketed as anticonvulsant, rufinamide. We compared the behavioral effect of rufinamide to amitriptyline using the Spared Nerve Injury neuropathic pain model in mice. We compared the effect of rufinamide on sodium currents using in vitro patch clamp in cells expressing the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 isoform and on dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons to amitriptyline and mexiletine. In naive mice, amitriptyline (20 mg/kg) increased withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation from 1.3 (0.6-1.9) (median [95% CI]) to 2.3 g (2.2-2.5) and latency of withdrawal to heat stimulation from 13.1 (10.4-15.5) to 30.0 s (21.8-31.9), whereas rufinamide had no effect. Rufinamide and amitriptyline alleviated injury-induced mechanical allodynia for 4 h (maximal effect: 0.10 ± 0.03 g (mean ± SD) to 1.99 ± 0.26 g for rufinamide and 0.25 ± 0.22 g to 1.92 ± 0.85 g for amitriptyline). All drugs reduced peak current and stabilized the inactivated state of voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, with similar effects in dorsal root ganglion neurons. At doses alleviating neuropathic pain, amitriptyline showed alteration of behavioral response possibly related to either alteration of basal pain sensitivity or sedative effect or both. Side-effects and drug tolerance/compliance are major problems with drugs such as amitriptyline. Rufinamide seems to have a better tolerability profile and could be a new alternative to explore for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  10. Molecular diversity of voltage-gated sodium channel alpha and beta subunit mRNAs in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candenas, Luz; Seda, Marian; Noheda, Pedro; Buschmann, Helmut; Cintado, Cristina G; Martin, Julio D; Pinto, Francisco M

    2006-07-10

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are composed of one alpha subunit and one or more auxiliary beta subunits. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay was used to analyse the expression of the nine known alpha subunits (Na(v)1.1-Na(v)1.9) in 20 different human tissues. The mRNA expression of the currently known beta subunits (beta1, beta2, beta3 and beta4) was also assessed. The mRNAs of voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha and beta subunits were found in a wide variety of human tissues assayed and were present in neuronal and non-neuronal types of cells. These data suggest that, in addition to its well-established role in skeletal muscle, cardiac cells and neurons, voltage-gated Na+ channels might play important, still undetermined local roles in the regulation of cellular functions. These channels could emerge in the next future as potential, new therapeutic targets in the treatment of visceral diseases.

  11. Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of anophelines and their association with resistance to pyrethroids - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Paula B; Santos, Joselita Maria M; Martins, Ademir J

    2014-10-07

    Constant and extensive use of chemical insecticides has created a selection pressure and favored resistance development in many insect species worldwide. One of the most important pyrethroid resistance mechanisms is classified as target site insensitivity, due to conformational changes in the target site that impair a proper binding of the insecticide molecule. The voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) is the target of pyrethroids and DDT insecticides, used to control insects of medical, agricultural and veterinary importance, such as anophelines. It has been reported that the presence of a few non-silent point mutations in the NaV gene are associated with pyrethroid resistance, termed as 'kdr' (knockdown resistance) for preventing the knockdown effect of these insecticides. The presence of these mutations, as well as their effects, has been thoroughly studied in Anopheles mosquitoes. So far, kdr mutations have already been detected in at least 13 species (Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles arabiensis, Anopheles sinensis, Anopheles stephensi, Anopheles subpictus, Anopheles sacharovi, Anopheles culicifacies, Anopheles sundaicus, Anopheles aconitus, Anopheles vagus, Anopheles paraliae, Anopheles peditaeniatus and Anopheles albimanus) from populations of African, Asian and, more recently, American continents. Seven mutational variants (L1014F, L1014S, L1014C, L1014W, N1013S, N1575Y and V1010L) were described, with the highest prevalence of L1014F, which occurs at the 1014 site in NaV IIS6 domain. The increase of frequency and distribution of kdr mutations clearly shows the importance of this mechanism in the process of pyrethroid resistance. In this sense, several species-specific and highly sensitive methods have been designed in order to genotype individual mosquitoes for kdr in large scale, which may serve as important tolls for monitoring the dynamics of pyrethroid resistance in natural populations. We also briefly discuss investigations concerning the course of Plasmodium

  12. [Expression of voltage gated sodium channel Nav1.9 in experimental pulpal lesions in the rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Le; Zhu, Xinwei; Chen, Qingfeng; Hu, Yuanping; Zhu, Ling; Jiang, Yong

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between pulpitis pain and voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.9) by detecting the expression of Nav1.9 at different time points of the rat pulpal lesion model. Thirty-six SD pulpal lesions rat models were divided into three experimental groups, 1 d (n = 12), 3 d (n = 12) and 5 d group(n = 12).Normal SD rats served as control(n = 12). Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and Nav1.9 mRNA expressions were evaluated by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) .Nav1.9 protein expressions were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The expression of TNF-α in the experimental group (1 d:0.514 ± 0.098, 3 d:0.739 ± 0.104, 5 d:1.238 ± 0.082) was higher than those in the control group (0.147 ± 0.016) (P Nav1.9 mRNA was up-regulated markedly in experimental groups (1 d: 0.296 ± 0.038, 3 d:0.409 ± 0.013, 5 d: 0.487 ± 0.028) , compare with control group (0.223 ± 0.020) (P Nav1.9 in control pulp tissue was (4.013 ± 0.292) µg/L, in painful pulp tissue of 1 d group was (5.143 ± 0.101) µg/L, in painful pulp tissue of 3 d group was (5.835 ± 0.088) µg/L and in painful pulp tissue of 5 d group was (6.307 ± 0.137) µg/L (P Nav1.9 in experimental groups (1 d: 0.106 ± 0.007, 3 d:0.170 ± 0.013, 5 d:0.238 ± 0.004) was up-regulated significantly compared with control group (0.073 ± 0.004)(P Nav1.9 had a significant increase in painful pulp tissue. Moreover, with the degree of pain aggravation, the expression of Nav1.9 increased in pulp tissue.It suggests that Nav1.9 may play an important role in the development of pulpitis pain.

  13. Odontoblasts in developing, mature and ageing rat teeth have multiple phenotypes that variably express all nine voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Margaret R; Westenbroek, Ruth E

    2011-11-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the expression patterns for voltage gated sodium channels in odontoblasts of developing and mature rat teeth. We analysed immunoreactivity (IR) of the alpha subunit for all nine voltage gated sodium channels (Nav1.1-1.9) in teeth of immature (4 weeks), young adult (7 weeks), fully mature adult (3 months), and old rats (6-12 months). We were interested in developmental changes, crown/root differences, tetrodotoxin sensitivity or resistance, co-localization with nerve regions, occurrence in periodontium, and coincidence with other expression patterns by odontoblasts such as for transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1). We found that Nav1.1-1.9-IR each had unique odontoblast patterns in mature molars that all differed from developmental stages and from incisors. Nav1.4- and Nav1.7-IR were intense in immature odontoblasts, becoming limited to specific zones in adults. Crown odontoblasts lost Nav1.7-IR and gained Nav1.8-IR where dentine became innervated. Odontoblast staining for Nav1.1- and Nav1.5-IR increased in crown with age but decreased in roots. Nav1.9-IR was especially intense in regularly scattered odontoblasts. Two tetrodotoxin-resistant isoforms (Nav1.5, Nav1.8) had strong expression in odontoblasts near dentinal innervation zones. Nav1.6-IR was concentrated at intercusp and cervical odontoblasts in adults as was TRPA1-IR. Nav1.3-IR gradually became intense in all odontoblasts during development except where dentinal innervation was dense. All nine voltage-gated sodium channels could be expressed by odontoblasts, depending on intradental location and tooth maturity. Our data reveal much greater complexity and niche-specific specialization for odontoblasts than previously demonstrated, with implications for tooth sensitivity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Voltage-gated sodium channel expression and action potential generation in differentiated NG108-15 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxu; Tu, Huiyin; Zhang, Dongze; Zheng, Hong; Li, Yu-Long

    2012-10-25

    The generation of action potential is required for stimulus-evoked neurotransmitter release in most neurons. Although various voltage-gated ion channels are involved in action potential production, the initiation of the action potential is mainly mediated by voltage-gated Na+ channels. In the present study, differentiation-induced changes of mRNA and protein expression of Na+ channels, Na+ currents, and cell membrane excitability were investigated in NG108-15 cells. Whole-cell patch-clamp results showed that differentiation (9 days) didn't change cell membrane excitability, compared to undifferentiated state. But differentiation (21 days) induced the action potential generation in 45.5% of NG108-15 cells (25/55 cells). In 9-day-differentiated cells, Na+ currents were mildly increased, which was also found in 21-day differentiated cells without action potential. In 21-day differentiated cells with action potential, Na+ currents were significantly enhanced. Western blot data showed that the expression of Na+ channels was increased with differentiated-time dependent manner. Single-cell real-time PCR data demonstrated that the expression of Na+ channel mRNA was increased by 21 days of differentiation in NG108-15 cells. More importantly, the mRNA level of Na+ channels in cells with action potential was higher than that in cells without action potential. Differentiation induces expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels and action potential generation in NG108-15 cells. A high level of the Na+ channel density is required for differentiation-triggered action potential generation.

  15. Estradiol upregulates voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 in trigeminal ganglion contributing to hyperalgesia of inflamed TMJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Rui-Yun; Meng, Zhen; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Xue-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have the highest prevalence in women of reproductive age. The role of estrogen in TMDs and especially in TMDs related pain is not fully elucidated. Voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) plays a prominent role in pain perception and Nav1.7 in trigeminal ganglion (TG) is involved in the hyperalgesia of inflamed Temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Whether estrogen could upregulate trigeminal ganglionic Nav1.7 expression to enhance hyperalgesia of inflamed TMJ remains to be explored. Methods Estrous cycle and plasma levels of 17β-estradiol in female rats were evaluated with vaginal smear and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Female rats were ovariectomized and treated with 17β-estradiol at 0 μg, 20 μg and 80 μg, respectively, for 10 days. TMJ inflammation was induced using complete Freund’s adjuvant. Head withdrawal thresholds and food intake were measured to evaluate the TMJ nociceptive responses. The expression of Nav1.7 in TG was examined using real-time PCR and western blot. The activity of Nav1.7 promoter was examined using luciferase reporter assay. The locations of estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ), the G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30), and Nav1.7 in TG were examined using immunohistofluorescence. Results Upregulation of Nav1.7 in TG and decrease in head withdrawal threshold were observed with the highest plasma 17β-estradiol in the proestrus of female rats. Ovariectomized rats treated with 80 μg 17β-estradiol showed upregulation of Nav1.7 in TG and decrease in head withdrawal threshold as compared with that of the control or ovariectomized rats treated with 0 μg or 20 μg. Moreover, 17β-estradiol dose-dependently potentiated TMJ inflammation-induced upregulation of Nav1.7 in TG and also enhanced TMJ inflammation-induced decrease of head withdrawal threshold in ovariectomized rats. In addition, the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, partially blocked the 17

  16. Molecular Surface of JZTX-V (β-Theraphotoxin-Cj2a Interacting with Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtype NaV1.4

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    Ji Luo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs; NaV1.1–NaV1.9 have been proven to be critical in controlling the function of excitable cells, and human genetic evidence shows that aberrant function of these channels causes channelopathies, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, paralytic myotonia, and pain. The effects of peptide toxins, especially those isolated from spider venom, have shed light on the structure–function relationship of these channels. However, most of these toxins have not been analyzed in detail. In particular, the bioactive faces of these toxins have not been determined. Jingzhaotoxin (JZTX-V (also known as β-theraphotoxin-Cj2a is a 29-amino acid peptide toxin isolated from the venom of the spider Chilobrachys jingzhao. JZTX-V adopts an inhibitory cysteine knot (ICK motif and has an inhibitory effect on voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. Previous experiments have shown that JZTX-V has an inhibitory effect on TTX-S and TTX-R sodium currents on rat DRG cells with IC50 values of 27.6 and 30.2 nM, respectively, and is able to shift the activation and inactivation curves to the depolarizing and the hyperpolarizing direction, respectively. Here, we show that JZTX-V has a much stronger inhibitory effect on NaV1.4, the isoform of voltage-gated sodium channels predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle cells, with an IC50 value of 5.12 nM, compared with IC50 values of 61.7–2700 nM for other heterologously expressed NaV1 subtypes. Furthermore, we investigated the bioactive surface of JZTX-V by alanine-scanning the effect of toxin on NaV1.4 and demonstrate that the bioactive face of JZTX-V is composed of three hydrophobic (W5, M6, and W7 and two cationic (R20 and K22 residues. Our results establish that, consistent with previous assumptions, JZTX-V is a Janus-faced toxin which may be a useful tool for the further investigation of the structure and function of sodium channels.

  17. Sensory renal innervation: a kidney-specific firing activity due to a unique expression pattern of voltage-gated sodium channels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freisinger, Wolfgang; Schatz, Johannes; Ditting, Tilmann; Lampert, Angelika; Heinlein, Sonja; Lale, Nena; Schmieder, Roland; Veelken, Roland

    2013-03-01

    Sensory neurons with afferent axons from the kidney are extraordinary in their response to electrical stimulation. More than 50% exhibit a tonic firing pattern, i.e., sustained action potential firing throughout depolarizing, pointing to an increased excitability, whereas nonrenal neurons show mainly a phasic response, i.e., less than five action potentials. Here we investigated whether these peculiar firing characteristics of renal afferent neurons are due to differences in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs). Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from rats (Th11-L2) were recorded by the current-clamp technique and distinguished as "tonic" or "phasic." In voltage-clamp recordings, Navs were characterized by their tetrodotoxoxin (TTX) sensitivity, and their molecular identity was revealed by RT-PCR. The firing pattern of 66 DRG neurons (41 renal and 25 nonrenal) was investigated. Renal neurons exhibited more often a tonic firing pattern (56.1 vs. 12%). Tonic neurons showed a more positive threshold (-21.75 ± 1.43 vs.-29.33 ± 1.63 mV; P sodium currents. Interestingly, mRNA expression of TTX-resistant sodium channels was significantly increased in renal, predominantly tonic, DRG neurons. Hence, under physiological conditions, renal sensory neurons exhibit predominantly a firing pattern associated with higher excitability. Our findings support that this is due to an increased expression and activation of TTX-resistant Navs.

  18. The tarantula toxin jingzhaotoxin-XI (κ-theraphotoxin-Cj1a) regulates the activation and inactivation of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Huang, Yin; Zhang, Yunxiao; Hu, Zhaotun; Wang, Meichi; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2014-12-15

    Specific peptide toxins interact with voltage-gated sodium channels by regulating the activation or inactivation of targeted channels. However, few toxins possessing dual effects have been identified. In the present study, we showed that jingzhaotoxin-XI/κ-theraphotoxin-Cj1a (JZTX-XI), a 34-residue peptide from the venom of the Chinese spider Chilobrachys jingzhao, inhibits the sodium conductance (IC50 = 124 ± 26 nM) and slows the fast inactivation (EC50 = 1.18 ± 0.2 μM) of Nav1.5 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. JZTX-XI significantly shifted the activation to more depolarized voltages and decreased the deactivation of Nav1.5 currents upon extreme depolarization, but only slightly affected voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation. In addition, JZTX-XI caused an approximately five-fold decrease in the rate of recovery from inactivation and an approximately 1.9-fold reduction in the closed-state inactivation rate. Our data suggest that JZTX-XI integrates the functions of site 3 toxins (α-scorpion toxins) with site 4 toxins (β-scorpion and spider toxins) by targeting multiple sites on Nav1.5. The unique properties displayed by JZTX-XI in its inhibitory activity on Nav1.5 suggest that its mechanism of action is distinct from those of site 3 and site 4 toxins, making JZTX-XI a useful probe for investigating the gating mechanism of Nav1.5 and toxin-channel interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-country Survey Revealed Prevalent and Novel F1534S Mutation in Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC) Gene in Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiabao; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Zhong, Daibin; Zhou, Guofa; Cai, Songwu; Li, Yiji; Wang, Xiaoming; Lo, Eugenia; Lee, Rebecca; Sheen, Roger; Duan, Jinhua; Yan, Guiyun; Chen, Xiao-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Aedes albopictus is an important dengue vector because of its aggressive biting behavior and rapid spread out of its native home range in Southeast Asia. Pyrethroids are widely used for adult mosquito control, and resistance to pyrethroids should be carefully monitored because vector control is the only effective method currently available to prevent dengue transmission. The voltage-gated sodium channel gene is the target site of pyrethroids, and mutations in this gene cause knockdown resistance (kdr). Previous studies reported various mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene, but the spatial distribution of kdr mutations in Ae. albopictus has not been systematically examined, and the association between kdr mutation and phenotypic resistance has not been established. A total of 597 Ae. albopictus individuals from 12 populations across Asia, Africa, America and Europe were examined for mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene. Three domains for a total of 1,107 bp were sequenced for every individual. Two populations from southern China were examined for pyrethroid resistance using the World Health Organization standard tube bioassay, and the association between kdr mutations and phenotypic resistance was tested. A total of 29 synonymous mutations were found across domain II, III and IV of the VGSC gene. Non-synonymous mutations in two codons of the VGSC gene were detected in 5 populations from 4 countries. A novel mutation at 1532 codon (I1532T) was found in Rome, Italy with a frequency of 19.7%. The second novel mutation at codon 1534 (F1534S) was detected in southern China and Florida, USA with a frequency ranging from 9.5-22.6%. The WHO insecticide susceptibility bioassay found 90.1% and 96.1% mortality in the two populations from southern China, suggesting resistance and probable resistance. Positive association between kdr mutations with deltamethrin resistance was established in these two populations. Two novel kdr mutations, I1532T

  20. Multi-country Survey Revealed Prevalent and Novel F1534S Mutation in Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC Gene in Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabao Xu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus is an important dengue vector because of its aggressive biting behavior and rapid spread out of its native home range in Southeast Asia. Pyrethroids are widely used for adult mosquito control, and resistance to pyrethroids should be carefully monitored because vector control is the only effective method currently available to prevent dengue transmission. The voltage-gated sodium channel gene is the target site of pyrethroids, and mutations in this gene cause knockdown resistance (kdr. Previous studies reported various mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC gene, but the spatial distribution of kdr mutations in Ae. albopictus has not been systematically examined, and the association between kdr mutation and phenotypic resistance has not been established.A total of 597 Ae. albopictus individuals from 12 populations across Asia, Africa, America and Europe were examined for mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene. Three domains for a total of 1,107 bp were sequenced for every individual. Two populations from southern China were examined for pyrethroid resistance using the World Health Organization standard tube bioassay, and the association between kdr mutations and phenotypic resistance was tested.A total of 29 synonymous mutations were found across domain II, III and IV of the VGSC gene. Non-synonymous mutations in two codons of the VGSC gene were detected in 5 populations from 4 countries. A novel mutation at 1532 codon (I1532T was found in Rome, Italy with a frequency of 19.7%. The second novel mutation at codon 1534 (F1534S was detected in southern China and Florida, USA with a frequency ranging from 9.5-22.6%. The WHO insecticide susceptibility bioassay found 90.1% and 96.1% mortality in the two populations from southern China, suggesting resistance and probable resistance. Positive association between kdr mutations with deltamethrin resistance was established in these two populations.Two novel kdr

  1. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  2. The AMPK Activator A769662 Blocks Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Discovery of a Novel Pharmacophore with Potential Utility for Analgesic Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiedu, Marina N; Han, Chongyang; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Price, Theodore J; Dussor, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) regulate neuronal excitability by governing action potential (AP) generation and propagation. Recent studies have revealed that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators decrease sensory neuron excitability, potentially by preventing sodium (Na+) channel phosphorylation by kinases such as ERK or via modulation of translation regulation pathways. The direct positive allosteric modulator A769662 displays substantially greater efficacy than other AMPK activators in decreasing sensory neuron excitability suggesting additional mechanisms of action. Here, we show that A769662 acutely inhibits AP firing stimulated by ramp current injection in rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. PT1, a structurally dissimilar AMPK activator that reduces nerve growth factor (NGF) -induced hyperexcitability, has no influence on AP firing in TG neurons upon acute application. In voltage-clamp recordings, application of A769662 reduces VGSC current amplitudes. These findings, based on acute A769662 application, suggest a direct channel blocking effect. Indeed, A769662 dose-dependently blocks VGSC in rat TG neurons and in Nav1.7-transfected cells with an IC50 of ~ 10 μM. A769662 neither displayed use-dependent inhibition nor interacted with the local anesthetic (LA) binding site. Popliteal fossa administration of A769662 decreased noxious thermal responses with a peak effect at 5 mins demonstrating an analgesic effect. These data indicate that in addition to AMPK activation, A769662 acts as a direct blocker/modulator of VGSCs, a potential mechanism enhancing the analgesic property of this compound.

  3. Targeting voltage gated sodium channels NaV1.7, Na V1.8, and Na V1.9 for treatment of pathological cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1-NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively blocking these channels on the cough reflex is limited, their biophysical properties indicate that each may contribute to the hypertussive and allotussive state that typifies subacute and chronic nonproductive cough.

  4. Bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) from the soil, sea, and salt lakes enlighten molecular mechanisms of electrical signaling and pharmacology in the brain and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh, Jian; Minor, Daniel L

    2015-01-16

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) provide the initial electrical signal that drives action potential generation in many excitable cells of the brain, heart, and nervous system. For more than 60years, functional studies of Na(V)s have occupied a central place in physiological and biophysical investigation of the molecular basis of excitability. Recently, structural studies of members of a large family of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) prevalent in soil, marine, and salt lake environments that bear many of the core features of eukaryotic Na(V)s have reframed ideas for voltage-gated channel function, ion selectivity, and pharmacology. Here, we analyze the recent advances, unanswered questions, and potential of BacNa(V)s as templates for drug development efforts. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Induction of pseudo-periodic oscillation in voltage-gated sodium channel properties is dependent on the duration of prolonged depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sriparna; Foster, Grant; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2004-07-01

    The neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels play a vital role in the action potential waveform shaping and propagation. Here, we report the effects of prolonged depolarization (1-160 s) on the detailed kinetics of activation, fast inactivation and recovery from slow inactivation in the rNa(v)1.2a voltage-gated sodium channel alpha-subunit expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Wavelet analysis revealed that the duration and amplitude of a prolonged sustained depolarization altered all the steady state and kinetic parameters of the channel in a pseudo-oscillatory fashion with time-variable period and amplitude, often superimposed on a linear trend. The half steady state activation potential showed a reversible depolarizing shift of 5-10 mV with duration of prolonged depolarization, while half steady state inactivation potential showed a hyperpolarizing shift of 43-55 mV. The time periods for most of the parameters relating to activation and fast and slow inactivation, lie close to 28-30 s, suggesting coupling of these kinetic processes through an oscillatory mechanism. Co-expression of the beta1-subunit affected the time periods of oscillation (close to 22 s for alpha + beta1) in steady state activation parameters. Application of a pulse protocol that mimicked paroxysmal depolarizing shift (PDS), a kind of depolarization seen in epileptic discharges, instead of a sustained depolarization, also caused oscillatory behaviour in the rNav1.2a alpha-subunit. This inherent pseudo-oscillatory mechanism may regulate excitability of the neurons, account for the epileptic discharges and subthreshold membrane potential oscillation and offer a molecular memory mechanism intrinsic to the neurons, independent of synaptic plasticity.

  6. Direct interaction with contactin targets voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9/NaN to the cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C J; Dib-Hajj, S D; Black, J A; Greenwood, J; Lian, Z; Waxman, S G

    2001-12-07

    The mechanisms that target various sodium channels within different regions of the neuronal membrane, which they endow with different physiological properties, are not yet understood. To examine this issue we studied the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9/NaN, which is preferentially expressed in small sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglia and the nonmyelinated axons that arise from them. Our results show that the cell adhesion molecule contactin binds directly to Na(v)1.9/NaN and recruits tenascin to the protein complex in vitro. Na(v)1.9/NaN and contactin co-immunoprecipitate from dorsal root ganglia and transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and co-localize in the C-type neuron soma and along nonmyelinated C-fibers and at nerve endings in the skin. Co-transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with Na(v)1.9/NaN and contactin enhances the surface expression of the sodium channel over that of Na(v)1.9/NaN alone. Thus contactin binds directly to Na(v)1.9/NaN and participates in the surface localization of this channel along nonmyelinated axons.

  7. Tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channels Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 are expressed in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Brendan J; Caldwell, John H; Ehring, George R; Bumsted O'Brien, Keely M; Luo, Songjiang; Levinson, S Rock

    2008-06-20

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are one of the fundamental building blocks of electrically excitable cells in the nervous system. These channels are responsible for the generation of action potentials that are required for the communication of neuronal signals over long distances within a cell. VGSCs are encoded by a family of nine genes whose products have widely varying biophysical properties. In this study, we have detected the expression of two atypical VGSCs (Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9) in the retina. Compared with more common VGSCs, Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 have unusual biophysical and pharmacological properties, including persistent sodium currents and resistance to the canonical sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX). Our molecular biological and immunohistochemical data derived from mouse (Mus musculus) retina demonstrate expression of Na(v)1.8 by retinal amacrine and ganglion cells, whereas Na(v)1.9 is expressed by photoreceptors and Müller glia. The fact that these channels exist in the central nervous system (CNS) and exhibit robust TTX resistance requires a re-evaluation of prior physiological, pharmacological, and developmental data in the visual system, in which the diversity of VGSCs has been previously underestimated. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels and Their Relations with Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Bioaccumulation in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

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    Floriane Boullot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paralytic shellfish toxins (PST bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav and block conduction of action potential in excitable cells. This study aimed to (i characterize Nav sequences in Crassostrea gigas and (ii investigate a putative relation between Nav and PST-bioaccumulation in oysters. The phylogenetic analysis highlighted two types of Nav in C. gigas: a Nav1 (CgNav1 and a Nav2 (CgNav2 with sequence properties of sodium-selective and sodium/calcium-selective channels, respectively. Three alternative splice transcripts of CgNav1 named A, B and C, were characterized. The expression of CgNav1, analyzed by in situ hybridization, is specific to nervous cells and to structures corresponding to neuromuscular junctions. Real-time PCR analyses showed a strong expression of CgNav1A in the striated muscle while CgNav1B is mainly expressed in visceral ganglia. CgNav1C expression is ubiquitous. The PST binding site (domain II of CgNav1 variants possess an amino acid Q that could potentially confer a partial saxitoxin (STX-resistance to the channel. The CgNav1 genotype or alternative splicing would not be the key point determining PST bioaccumulation level in oysters.

  9. Effects of (−-Gallocatechin-3-Gallate on Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Min Jiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The (−-gallocatechin-3-gallate (GCG concentration in some tea beverages can account for as much as 50% of the total catechins. It has been shown that catechins have analgesic properties. Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav mediate neuronal action potentials. Tetrodotoxin inhibits all Nav isoforms, but Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are relatively tetrodotoxin-resistant compared to other isoforms and functionally linked to nociception. In this study, the effects of GCG on tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ currents were investigated in rat primary cultures of dorsal root ganglion neurons via the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that 1 μM GCG reduced the amplitudes of peak current density of tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ currents significantly. Furthermore, the inhibition was accompanied by a depolarizing shift of the activation voltage and a hyperpolarizing shift of steady-state inactivation voltage. The percentage block of GCG (1 μM on tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ current was 45.1% ± 1.1% in 10 min. In addition, GCG did not produce frequency-dependent block of tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ currents at stimulation frequencies of 1 Hz, 2 Hz and 5 Hz. On the basis of these findings, we propose that GCG may be a potential analgesic agent.

  10. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Phosphorylation at Ser571 Regulates Late Current, Arrhythmia, and Cardiac Function In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Patric; Musa, Hassan; Wu, Xiangqiong; Unudurthi, Sathya D; Little, Sean; Qian, Lan; Wright, Patrick J; Radwanski, Przemyslaw B; Gyorke, Sandor; Mohler, Peter J; Hund, Thomas J

    2015-08-18

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) are essential for myocyte membrane excitability and cardiac function. Nav current (INa) is a large-amplitude, short-duration spike generated by rapid channel activation followed immediately by inactivation. However, even under normal conditions, a small late component of INa (INa,L) persists because of incomplete/failed inactivation of a subpopulation of channels. Notably, INa,L is directly linked with both congenital and acquired disease states. The multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) has been identified as an important activator of INa,L in disease. Several potential CaMKII phosphorylation sites have been discovered, including Ser571 in the Nav1.5 DI-DII linker, but the molecular mechanism underlying CaMKII-dependent regulation of INa,L in vivo remains unknown. To determine the in vivo role of Ser571, 2 Scn5a knock-in mouse models were generated expressing either: (1) Nav1.5 with a phosphomimetic mutation at Ser571 (S571E), or (2) Nav1.5 with the phosphorylation site ablated (S571A). Electrophysiology studies revealed that Ser571 regulates INa,L but not other channel properties previously linked to CaMKII. Ser571-mediated increases in INa,L promote abnormal repolarization and intracellular Ca(2+) handling and increase susceptibility to arrhythmia at the cellular and animal level. Importantly, Ser571 is required for maladaptive remodeling and arrhythmias in response to pressure overload. Our data provide the first in vivo evidence for the molecular mechanism underlying CaMKII activation of the pathogenic INa,L. Relevant for improved rational design of potential therapies, our findings demonstrate that Ser571-dependent regulation of Nav1.5 specifically tunes INa,L without altering critical physiological components of the current. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. TNF-α enhances the currents of voltage gated sodium channels in uninjured dorsal root ganglion neurons following motor nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Pang, Rui-Ping; Shen, Kai-Feng; Zimmermann, Manfred; Xin, Wen-Jun; Li, Yong-Yong; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2011-02-01

    The ectopic discharges observed in uninjured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following various lesions of spinal nerves have been attributed to functional alterations of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Such mechanisms may be important for the development of neuropathic pain. However, the pathophysiology underlying the functional modulation of VGSCs following nerve injury is largely unknown. Here, we studied this issue with use of a selective lumbar 5 ventral root transection (L5-VRT) model, in which dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons remain intact. We found that the L5-VRT increased the current densities of TTX-sensitive Na channels as well as currents in Nav1.8, but not Nav1.9 channels in uninjured DRG neurons. The thresholds of action potentials decreased and firing rates increased in DRG neurons following L5-VRT. As we found that levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) increased in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in DRG tissue after L5-VRT, we tested whether the increased TNF-α might result in the changes in sodium channels. Indeed, recombinant rat TNF (rrTNF) enhanced the current densities of TTX-S and Nav1.8 in cultured DRG neurons dose-dependently. Furthermore, genetic deletion of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR-1) in mice attenuated the mechanical allodynia and prevented the increase in sodium currents in DRG neurons induced by L5-VRT. These data suggest that the increase in sodium currents in uninjured DRG neurons following nerve injury might be mediated by over-production of TNF-α. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A single Markov-type kinetic model accounting for the macroscopic currents of all human voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2017-01-01

    Modelling ionic channels represents a fundamental step towards developing biologically detailed neuron models. Until recently, the voltage-gated ion channels have been mainly modelled according to the formalism introduced by the seminal works of Hodgkin and Huxley (HH). However, following the continuing achievements in the biophysical and molecular comprehension of these pore-forming transmembrane proteins, the HH formalism turned out to carry limitations and inconsistencies in reproducing the ion-channels electrophysiological behaviour. At the same time, Markov-type kinetic models have been increasingly proven to successfully replicate both the electrophysiological and biophysical features of different ion channels. However, in order to model even the finest non-conducting molecular conformational change, they are often equipped with a considerable number of states and related transitions, which make them computationally heavy and less suitable for implementation in conductance-based neurons and large networks of those. In this purely modelling study we develop a Markov-type kinetic model for all human voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). The model framework is detailed, unifying (i.e., it accounts for all ion-channel isoforms) and computationally efficient (i.e. with a minimal set of states and transitions). The electrophysiological data to be modelled are gathered from previously published studies on whole-cell patch-clamp experiments in mammalian cell lines heterologously expressing the human VGSC subtypes (from NaV1.1 to NaV1.9). By adopting a minimum sequence of states, and using the same state diagram for all the distinct isoforms, the model ensures the lightest computational load when used in neuron models and neural networks of increasing complexity. The transitions between the states are described by original ordinary differential equations, which represent the rate of the state transitions as a function of voltage (i.e., membrane potential). The

  13. A single Markov-type kinetic model accounting for the macroscopic currents of all human voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Balbi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Modelling ionic channels represents a fundamental step towards developing biologically detailed neuron models. Until recently, the voltage-gated ion channels have been mainly modelled according to the formalism introduced by the seminal works of Hodgkin and Huxley (HH. However, following the continuing achievements in the biophysical and molecular comprehension of these pore-forming transmembrane proteins, the HH formalism turned out to carry limitations and inconsistencies in reproducing the ion-channels electrophysiological behaviour. At the same time, Markov-type kinetic models have been increasingly proven to successfully replicate both the electrophysiological and biophysical features of different ion channels. However, in order to model even the finest non-conducting molecular conformational change, they are often equipped with a considerable number of states and related transitions, which make them computationally heavy and less suitable for implementation in conductance-based neurons and large networks of those. In this purely modelling study we develop a Markov-type kinetic model for all human voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs. The model framework is detailed, unifying (i.e., it accounts for all ion-channel isoforms and computationally efficient (i.e. with a minimal set of states and transitions. The electrophysiological data to be modelled are gathered from previously published studies on whole-cell patch-clamp experiments in mammalian cell lines heterologously expressing the human VGSC subtypes (from NaV1.1 to NaV1.9. By adopting a minimum sequence of states, and using the same state diagram for all the distinct isoforms, the model ensures the lightest computational load when used in neuron models and neural networks of increasing complexity. The transitions between the states are described by original ordinary differential equations, which represent the rate of the state transitions as a function of voltage (i.e., membrane

  14. Assessment of the effect of etomidate on voltage-gated sodium channels and action potentials in rat primary sensory cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; He, Jiong-ce; Liu, Xing-kui; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Tian

    2014-08-05

    Although it is known that general anesthetics can suppress cortical neurons׳ activity, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood, especially the kinetic changes of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, which are mostly related to neuronal excitability. Some general anesthetics have been reported to affect the voltage-gated Na(+) channels in cell culture derived from humans and animals. However no one has ever investigated the effects of etomidate on voltage-gated Na(+) channels in pyramidal neurons using a brain slice. The present study uses a whole cell patch-clamp technique to investigate the changes of voltage-gated Na(+) channels on primary somatosensory cortex pyramidal neurons under the influence of etomidate. We found that etomidate dose-dependently inhibited Na(+) currents of primary somatosensory cortex pyramidal neurons, while shifted the steady-state inactivation curve towards the left and prolonged the recovery time from inactivation. Conversely, etomidate has no effects on the steady-state activation curve. We demonstrated the detailed suppression process of neural voltage-gated Na(+) channels by etomidate on slice condition. This may offer new insights into the mechanical explanation for the etomidate anesthesia. Finding the effects of anesthetics on primary somatosensory cortex also provides evidence to help elucidate the potential mechanism by which tactile information integrates during general anesthesia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nav1.7 and other voltage-gated sodium channels as drug targets for pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Edward C; Luiz, Ana Paula; Wood, John N

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pain is a massive clinical problem. We discuss the potential of subtype selective sodium channel blockers that may provide analgesia with limited side effects. Sodium channel subtypes have been linked to human pain syndromes through genetic studies. Gain of function mutations in Nav1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 can cause pain, whilst loss of function Nav1.7 mutations lead to loss of pain in otherwise normal people. Intriguingly, both human and mouse Nav1.7 null mutants have increased opioid drive, because naloxone, an opioid antagonist, can reverse the analgesia associated with the loss of Nav1.7 expression. We believe there is a great future for sodium channel antagonists, particularly Nav1.7 antagonists in treating most pain syndromes. This review deals with recent attempts to develop specific sodium channel blockers, the mechanisms that underpin the Nav1.7 null pain-free phenotype and new routes to analgesia using, for example, gene therapy or combination therapy with subtype specific sodium channel blockers and opioids. The use of selective Nav1.7 antagonists together with either enkephalinase inhibitors or low dose opioids has the potential for side effect-free analgesia, as well as an important opioid sparing function that may be clinically very significant.

  16. Aptiom (eslicarbazepine acetate) as a dual inhibitor of β-secretase and voltage-gated sodium channel: advancement in Alzheimer's disease-epilepsy linkage via an enzoinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Rizvi, Syed M D; Hameed, Nida; Biswas, Deboshree; Khan, Mahiuddin; Shakil, Shazi; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are increasingly identified as one of the major causes of epilepsy. The relationship of epileptic activity to Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of clinical importance. Voltage-gated sodium channel (VSC) is one of the best targets in the treatment of epilepsy while β-secretase (BACE) has long been observed as a curative target for AD. To explore a possible link between the treatment of AD and epilepsy, the molecular interactions of recently Food and Drug Administration approved antiepileptic drug Aptiom (Eslicarbazepine acetate) with BACE and VSC were studied. Docking study was performed using 'Autodock4.2'. Hydrophobic and pi-pi interactions play critical role in the correct positioning of Eslicarbazepine acetate within the catalytic site of VSC and BACE enzyme to permit docking. Free energy of binding (ΔG) of 'Eslicarbazepine acetate-VSC' interaction and 'Eslicarbazepine acetate-CAS domain of BACE' interaction was found to be -5.97 and -7.19 kcal/mol, respectively. Hence, Eslicarbazepine acetate might act as a potent dual inhibitor of BACE and VSC. However, scope still remains in the determination of the three-dimensional structure of BACE-Eslicarbazepine acetate and VSC-Eslicarbazepine acetate complexes by X-ray crystallography to validate the described data. Further, Aptiom (Eslicarbazepine acetate) could be expected to form the basis of future dual therapy against epilepsy associated neurological disorders.

  17. Docking Simulation of the Binding Interactions of Saxitoxin Analogs Produced by the Marine Dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum to the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M. Durán-Riveroll

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Saxitoxin (STX and its analogs are paralytic alkaloid neurotoxins that block the voltage-gated sodium channel pore (Nav, impeding passage of Na+ ions into the intracellular space, and thereby preventing the action potential in the peripheral nervous system and skeletal muscle. The marine dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum produces an array of such toxins, including the recently discovered benzoyl analogs, for which the mammalian toxicities are essentially unknown. We subjected STX and its analogs to a theoretical docking simulation based upon two alternative tri-dimensional models of the Nav1.4 to find a relationship between the binding properties and the known mammalian toxicity of selected STX analogs. We inferred hypothetical toxicities for the benzoyl analogs from the modeled values. We demonstrate that these toxins exhibit different binding modes with similar free binding energies and that these alternative binding modes are equally probable. We propose that the principal binding that governs ligand recognition is mediated by electrostatic interactions. Our simulation constitutes the first in silico modeling study on benzoyl-type paralytic toxins and provides an approach towards a better understanding of the mode of action of STX and its analogs.

  18. Epidermal growth factor potentiates in vitro metastatic behaviour of human prostate cancer PC-3M cells: involvement of voltage-gated sodium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uysal-Onganer Pinar

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a high level of functional voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC expression has been found in strongly metastatic human and rat prostate cancer (PCa cells, the mechanism(s responsible for the upregulation is unknown. The concentration of epidermal growth factor (EGF, a modulator of ion channels, in the body is highest in prostatic fluid. Thus, EGF could be involved in the VGSC upregulation in PCa. The effects of EGF on VGSC expression in the highly metastatic human PCa PC-3M cell line, which was shown previously to express both functional VGSCs and EGF receptors, were investigated. A quantitative approach, from gene level to cell behaviour, was used. mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. Protein expression was studied by Western blots and immunocytochemistry and digital image analysis. Functional assays involved measurements of transverse migration, endocytic membrane activity and Matrigel invasion. Results Exogenous EGF enhanced the cells' in vitro metastatic behaviours (migration, endocytosis and invasion. Endogenous EGF had a similar involvement. EGF increased VGSC Nav1.7 (predominant isoform in PCa mRNA and protein expressions. Co-application of the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX suppressed the effect of EGF on all three metastatic cell behaviours studied. Conclusion 1 EGF has a major involvement in the upregulation of functional VGSC expression in human PCa PC-3M cells. (2 VGSC activity has a significant intermediary role in potentiating effect of EGF in human PCa.

  19. Detection and Distribution of V1016Ikdr Mutation in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Gene in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations From Sergipe State, Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolabella, S S; Santos, R L C; Silva, M C N; Steffler, L M; Ribolla, P E M; Cavalcanti, S C H; Jain, S; Martins, A J

    2016-07-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) resistance to pyrethroids was recorded in Brazil few years after its introduction as the adulticide in the National Dengue Control Program campaigns. Altered susceptibility to pyrethroids had been reported in the state of Sergipe, northeast Brazil, through biological assays, even before its use against Ae. aegypti in the state. Metabolic and target-site resistance mechanisms were also revealed in samples from Aracaju, the capital of Sergipe. Herein, we investigated the presence and distribution of the kdr mutation V1016Ikdr in Ae. aegypti populations from different municipalities of the state. Aedes aegypti eggs were collected from seven municipalities located in areas showing different climatic types and infestation levels. Approximately 20 Ae. aegypti females from each municipality (total of 135 subjects) were individually submitted to allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) for the 1016 site of the voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV). The V1016Ikdr mutation was found in subjects from all the municipalities under study with a high frequency of heterozygotes in several locations. Homozygous recessive subjects (resistant kdr genotype) were found only in one municipality. The results suggest a wide distribution of the V1016Ikdr mutation in the northeast Brazil, which indicates urgent need for monitoring the effectiveness of the pyrethroids currently used for vector control. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Frequency of V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene in Aedes aegypti in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Leslie C; Ponce, Gustavo; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Lopez, Beatriz; Flores, Adriana E

    2015-06-01

    The V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene have been associated with resistance to pyrethroids and DDT in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. A study was carried out to determine the frequency of I1016 and C1534 by real-time PCR in five natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela during 2008, 2010 and 2012, as well as in a strain selected with 0.14 µg of deltamethrin for 15 generations. In natural populations, frequencies of I1016 varied between 0.01 and 0.37, and frequencies of C1534 between 0.35 and 1.0. In the Pampanito strain, the frequency of I1016 increased from 0.02 in F1 up to 0.5 in F15 and from 0.35 up to fixation for C1534 after selection with deltamethrin. The results showed that C1534 frequencies are higher than I1016 frequencies in natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela, and that deltamethrin selected the C1534 more rapidly than I1016. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. A recombinant fusion protein containing a spider toxin specific for the insect voltage-gated sodium ion channel shows oral toxicity towards insects of different orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2014-04-01

    Recombinant fusion protein technology allows specific insecticidal protein and peptide toxins to display activity in orally-delivered biopesticides. The spider venom peptide δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a, which targets insect voltage-gated sodium channels, was fused to the "carrier" snowdrop lectin (GNA) to confer oral toxicity. The toxin itself (PI1a) and an amaurobitoxin/GNA fusion protein (PI1a/GNA) were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. Although both proteins caused mortality when injected into cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae) larvae, the PI1a/GNA fusion was approximately 6 times as effective as recombinant PI1a on a molar basis. PI1a alone was not orally active against cabbage moth larvae, but a single 30 μg dose of the PI1a/GNA fusion protein caused 100% larval mortality within 6 days when fed to 3rd instar larvae, and caused significant reductions in survival, growth and feeding in 4th - 6th instar larvae. Transport of fusion protein from gut contents to the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae, and binding to the nerve chord, was shown by Western blotting. The PI1a/GNA fusion protein also caused mortality when delivered orally to dipteran (Musca domestica; housefly) and hemipteran (Acyrthosiphon pisum; pea aphid) insects, making it a promising candidate for development as a biopesticide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Contribution of the tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.9 to sensory transmission and nociceptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Birgit T; Murphy, Beth A; Lindia, Jill A; Diaz, Carmen; Abbadie, Catherine; Ritter, Amy M; Liberator, Paul; Iyer, Leslie M; Kash, Shera F; Kohler, Martin G; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; MacIntyre, D Euan; Martin, William J

    2005-06-28

    The transmission of pain signals after injury or inflammation depends in part on increased excitability of primary sensory neurons. Nociceptive neurons express multiple subtypes of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1s), each of which possesses unique features that may influence primary afferent excitability. Here, we examined the contribution of NaV1.9 to nociceptive signaling by studying the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice with a disruption of the SCN11A gene, which encodes NaV1.9. Our results confirm that NaV1.9 underlies the persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant current in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons but suggest that this current contributes little to mechanical thermal responsiveness in the absence of injury or to mechanical hypersensitivity after nerve injury or inflammation. However, the expression of NaV1.9 contributes to the persistent thermal hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain behavior after peripheral inflammation. These results suggest that inflammatory mediators modify the function of NaV1.9 to maintain inflammation-induced hyperalgesia.

  3. A comparison of 15 Hz sine on-line and off-line magnetic stimulation affecting the voltage-gated sodium channel currents of prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Dong, Lei; Gao, Yang; Dou, Jun-Rong; Li, Ze-yan

    2016-10-01

    Combined with the use of patch-clamp techniques, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has proven to be a noninvasive neuromodulation tool that can inhibit or facilitate excitability of neurons after extensive research. The studies generally focused on the method: the neurons are first stimulated in an external standard magnetic exposure device, and then moved to the patch-clamp to record electrophysiological characteristics (off-line magnetic exposure). Despite its universality, real-time observation of the effects of magnetic stimulation on the neurons is more effective (on-line magnetic stimulation). In this study, we selected a standard exposure device for magnetic fields acting on mouse prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons, and described a new method that a patch-clamp setup was modified to allow on-line magnetic stimulation. By comparing the off-line exposure and on-line stimulation of the same magnetic field intensity and frequency affecting the voltage-gated sodium channel currents, we succeeded in proving the feasibility of the new on-line stimulation device. We also demonstrated that the sodium channel currents of prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons increased significantly under the 15 Hz sine 1 mT, and 2 mT off-line magnetic field exposure and under the 1 mT and 2 mT on-line magnetic stimulation, and the rate of acceleration was most significant on 2 mT on-line magnetic stimulation. This study described the development of a new on-line magnetic stimulator and successfully demonstrated its practicability for scientific stimulation of neurons.

  4. Comparative study of voltage-gated sodium channel α-subunits in non-overlapping four neuronal populations in the rat dorsal root ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Tetsuo; Noguchi, Koichi

    2011-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel α-subunit (Nav) is the major determinant of neuronal electrophysiological characters. In order to compare the composition of Navs among neurochemically different neurons in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG), we examined the expression of Nav transcripts in four non-overlapping neuronal populations, with (+) or without (-) N52 immunoreactivity, a marker of neurons with myelinated axons, and TrkA mRNA identified by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Both N52-/TrkA+ and N52-/TrkA- populations had high levels of signals for Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 mRNAs, but rarely expressed Nav1.1 or Nav1.6. There was no significant difference in these signals, suggesting that C-fiber peptidergic and non-peptidergic neurons have similar electrophysiological characters with regard to sodium currents. N52+/TrkA+ neurons (putative A-fiber nociceptors) had similar high levels of signals for Nav1.7 and Nav1.8, but a significantly lower level of Nav1.9 signals, as compared to N52- neurons. Although, almost no N52+/TrkA- neurons had Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, half of this population expressed Nav1.7 at similar levels to other three populations and the other half completely lacked this channel. These data suggest that Nav1.8 is a common channel for both C- and A-fiber nociceptors, and Nav1.9 is rather selective for C-fiber nociceptors. Nav1.7 is the most universal channel while some functionally unknown N52+/TrkA- subpopulation selectively lacks it. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Neonatal maternal deprivation sensitizes voltage-gated sodium channel currents in colon-specific dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shufen; Xiao, Ying; Zhu, Liyan; Li, Lin; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-02-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain in association with altered bowel movements. The underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain elusive. This study was designed to examine the role for sodium channels in a rat model of chronic visceral hyperalgesia induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD). Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores were performed on adult male rats. Colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were labeled with DiI and acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel current under whole-cell patch-clamp configurations. The expression of Na(V)1.8 was analyzed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR. NMD significantly increased AWR scores, which lasted for ~6 wk in an association with hyperexcitability of colon DRG neurons. TTX-resistant but not TTX-sensitive sodium current density was greatly enhanced in colon DRG neurons in NMD rats. Compared with controls, activation curves showed a leftward shift in NMD rats whereas inactivation curves did not differ significantly. NMD markedly accelerated the activation time of peak current amplitude without any changes in inactivation time. Furthermore, NMD remarkably enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels but not at mRNA levels in colon-related DRGs. The expression of Na(V)1.9 was not altered after NMD. These data suggest that NMD enhances TTX-resistant sodium activity of colon DRG neurons, which is most likely mediated by a leftward shift of activation curve and by enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels, thus identifying a specific molecular mechanism underlying chronic visceral pain and sensitization in patients with IBS.

  6. Activity-dependent formation and location of voltage-gated sodium channel clusters at a CNS nerve terminal during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Berret, Emmanuelle; Kim, Jun Hee

    2017-02-01

    In auditory pathways, the precision of action potential (AP) propagation depends on axon myelination and high densities of voltage-gated Na (Nav) channels clustered at nodes of Ranvier. Changes in Nav channel expression at the heminode, the final node before the nerve terminal, can alter AP invasion into the presynaptic terminal. We studied the activity-dependent formation of Nav channel clusters before and after hearing onset at postnatal day 12 in the rat and mouse auditory brain stem. In rats, the Nav channel cluster at the heminode formed progressively during the second postnatal week, around hearing onset, whereas the Nav channel cluster at the nodes was present before hearing onset. Initiation of heminodal Nav channel clustering was correlated with the expression of scaffolding protein ankyrinG and paranodal protein Caspr. However, in whirler mice with congenital deafness, heminodal Nav channels did not form clusters and maintained broad expression, but Nav channel clustering was normal at the nodes. In addition, a clear difference in the distance from the heminodal Nav channel to the calyx across the mediolateral axis of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) developed after hearing onset. In the medial MNTB, where neurons respond best to high-frequency sounds, the heminodal Nav channel cluster was located closer to the terminal than in the lateral MNTB, where neurons respond best to low-frequency sounds. Thus sound-mediated neuronal activities are potentially associated with the refinement of the heminode adjacent to the presynaptic terminal in the auditory brain stem. Clustering of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels and their distribution along the axon, specifically at the unmyelinated axon segment next to the nerve terminal, are essential for tuning propagated action potentials. Nav channel clusters near the nerve terminal and their location as a function of neuronal position along the mediolateral axis are controlled by auditory inputs after

  7. Congenital Insensitivity To Pain: Fracturing Without Apparent Skeletal Pathobiology Caused By An Autosomal Dominant, Second Mutation in SCN11A Encoding Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel 1.9

    OpenAIRE

    Phatarakijnirund, Voraluck; Mumm, Steven; McAlister, William H.; Novack, Deborah; Wenkert, Deborah; Clements, Karen L.; Whyte, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) comprises the rare heritable disorders without peripheral neuropathy that feature inability to feel pain. Fracturing and joint destruction are common complications, but lack detailed studies of mineral and skeletal homeostasis and bone histology. In 2013, discovery of a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in SCN11A encoding voltage-gated sodium channel 1.9 (Nav1.9) established a distinctive CIP in three unrelated patients who suffered multiple painles...

  8. Molecular determinants of voltage-gated sodium channel regulation by the Nedd4/Nedd4-like proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Bruce, M Christine

    2004-01-01

    -ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family. We recently reported that cardiac Na(v)1.5 is regulated by Nedd4-2. In this study, we further investigated the molecular determinants of regulation of Na(v) proteins. When expressed in HEK-293 cells and studied using whole cell voltage clamping, the neuronal Na(v)1.2 and Na...... to Na(v)1.5 PY motif, only Nedd4-2 robustly ubiquitinated and downregulated Na(v)1.5. Interestingly, coexpression of WWP2 competed with the effect of Nedd4-2. Finally, using brefeldin A, we found that Nedd4-2 accelerated internalization of Na(v)1.5 stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. This study shows...

  9. Coordinated role of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger in sustaining microglial activation during inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Muhammad M. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sonsalla, Patricia K. [Department of Neurology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R., E-mail: jricha3@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Persistent neuroinflammation and microglial activation play an integral role in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. We investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers (NHE) in the activation of immortalized microglial cells (BV-2) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. LPS (10 and 100 ng/ml) caused a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na{sup +}){sub i}] in BV-2 cells. Pre-treatment of cells with the VGSC antagonist tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μM) abolished short-term Na{sup +} influx, but was unable to prevent the accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} observed at 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. The NHE inhibitor cariporide (1 μM) significantly reduced accumulation of (Na{sup +}){sub i} 6 and 24 h after LPS exposure. Furthermore, LPS increased the mRNA expression and protein level of NHE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced after co-treatment with TTX and/or cariporide. LPS increased production of TNF-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and expression of gp91{sup phox}, an active subunit of NADPH oxidase, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX or TTX + cariporide. Collectively, these data demonstrate a closely-linked temporal relationship between VGSC and NHE-1 in regulating function in activated microglia, which may provide avenues for therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neuroinflammation. - Highlights: • LPS causes immediate increase in sodium through VGSC and subsequently through the NHE-1. • Inhibition of VGSC reduces increases in NHE-1 and gp91{sup phox}. • Inhibition of VGSC and NHE-1 reduces NADPH oxidase-mediated Tnf-α, ROS, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. • NHE-1 and Na{sub v}1.6 may be viable targets for therapeutic interventions to reduce neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disease.

  10. Α- and β-subunit composition of voltage-gated sodium channels investigated with μ-conotoxins and the recently discovered μO§-conotoxin GVIIJ.

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    Wilson, Michael J; Zhang, Min-Min; Gajewiak, Joanna; Azam, Layla; Rivier, Jean E; Olivera, Baldomero M; Yoshikami, Doju

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the identities of the isoforms of the α (NaV1)- and β (NaVβ)-subunits of voltage-gated sodium channels, including those responsible for action potentials in rodent sciatic nerves. To examine α-subunits, we used seven μ-conotoxins, which target site 1 of the channel. With the use of exogenously expressed channels, we show that two of the μ-conotoxins, μ-BuIIIB and μ-SxIIIA, are 50-fold more potent in blocking NaV1.6 from mouse than that from rat. Furthermore, we observed that μ-BuIIIB and μ-SxIIIA are potent blockers of large, myelinated A-fiber compound action potentials (A-CAPs) [but not small, unmyelinated C-fiber CAPs (C-CAPs)] in the sciatic nerve of the mouse (unlike A-CAPs of the rat, previously shown to be insensitive to these toxins). To investigate β-subunits, we used two synthetic derivatives of the recently discovered μO§-conotoxin GVIIJ that define site 8 of the channel, as previously characterized with cloned rat NaV1- and NaVβ-subunits expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, where it was shown that μO§-GVIIJ is a potent inhibitor of several NaV1-isoforms and that coexpression of NaVβ2 or -β4 (but not NaVβ1 or -β3) totally protects against block by μO§-GVIIJ. We report here the effects of μO§-GVIIJ on 1) sodium currents of mouse NaV1.6 coexpressed with various combinations of NaVβ-subunits in oocytes; 2) A- and C-CAPs of mouse and rat sciatic nerves; and 3) sodium currents of small and large neurons dissociated from rat dorsal root ganglia. Our overall results lead us to conclude that action potentials in A-fibers of the rodent sciatic nerve are mediated primarily by NaV1.6 associated with NaVβ2 or NaVβ4. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Role of voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels in the development of cocaine-associated cardiac arrhythmias

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    O'Leary, Michael E; Hancox, Jules C

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine is a highly active stimulant that alters dopamine metabolism in the central nervous system resulting in a feeling of euphoria that with time can lead to addictive behaviours. Cocaine has numerous deleterious effects in humans including seizures, vasoconstriction, ischaemia, increased heart rate and blood pressure, cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. The cardiotoxic effects of cocaine are indirectly mediated by an increase in sympathomimetic stimulation to the heart and coronary vasculature and by a direct effect on the ion channels responsible for maintaining the electrical excitability of the heart. The direct and indirect effects of cocaine work in tandem to disrupt the co-ordinated electrical activity of the heart and have been associated with life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. This review focuses on the direct effects of cocaine on cardiac ion channels, with particular focus on sodium, potassium and calcium channels, and on the contributions of these channels to cocaine-induced arrhythmias. Companion articles in this edition of the journal examine the epidemiology of cocaine use (Wood & Dargan [1]) and the treatment of cocaine-associated arrhythmias (Hoffmann [2]). PMID:20573078

  12. Cell-autonomous axon growth of young motoneurons is triggered by a voltage-gated sodium channel.

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    Wetzel, Andrea; Jablonka, Sibylle; Blum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity preceding synapse formation contributes to the precise regulation of neuronal development. Examining the origins of spontaneous activity revealed roles for neurotransmitters that depolarize neurons and activate ion channels. Recently, we identified a new molecular mechanism underlying fluctuations in spontaneous neuronal excitability. We found that embryonic motoneurons with a genetic loss of the low-threshold sodium channel NaV1.9 show fewer fluctuations in intracellular calcium in axonal compartments and growth cones than wild-type littermates. As a consequence, axon growth of NaV1.9-deficient motoneurons in cell culture is drastically reduced while dendritic growth and cell survival are not affected. Interestingly, NaV1.9 function is observed under conditions that would hardly allow a ligand- or neurotransmitter-dependent depolarization. Thus, NaV1.9 may serve as a cell-autonomous trigger for neuronal excitation. In this addendum, we discuss a model for the interplay between cell-autonomous local neuronal activity and local cytoskeleton dynamics in growth cone function.

  13. Development and function of the voltage-gated sodium current in immature mammalian cochlear inner hair cells.

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    Tobias Eckrich

    Full Text Available Inner hair cells (IHCs, the primary sensory receptors of the mammalian cochlea, fire spontaneous Ca(2+ action potentials before the onset of hearing. Although this firing activity is mainly sustained by a depolarizing L-type (Ca(V1.3 Ca(2+ current (I(Ca, IHCs also transiently express a large Na(+ current (I(Na. We aimed to investigate the specific contribution of I(Na to the action potentials, the nature of the channels carrying the current and whether the biophysical properties of I(Na differ between low- and high-frequency IHCs. We show that I(Na is highly temperature-dependent and activates at around -60 mV, close to the action potential threshold. Its size was larger in apical than in basal IHCs and between 5% and 20% should be available at around the resting membrane potential (-55 mV/-60 mV. However, in vivo the availability of I(Na could potentially increase to >60% during inhibitory postsynaptic potential activity, which transiently hyperpolarize IHCs down to as far as -70 mV. When IHCs were held at -60 mV and I(Na elicited using a simulated action potential as a voltage command, we found that I(Na contributed to the subthreshold depolarization and upstroke of an action potential. We also found that I(Na is likely to be carried by the TTX-sensitive channel subunits Na(V1.1 and Na(V1.6 in both apical and basal IHCs. The results provide insight into how the biophysical properties of I(Na in mammalian cochlear IHCs could contribute to the spontaneous physiological activity during cochlear maturation in vivo.

  14. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive α-subunits of voltage-gated sodium channels are relevant for inhibition of cardiac sodium currents by local anesthetics.

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    Stoetzer, C; Doll, T; Stueber, T; Herzog, C; Echtermeyer, F; Greulich, F; Rudat, C; Kispert, A; Wegner, F; Leffler, A

    2016-06-01

    The sodium channel α-subunit (Nav) Nav1.5 is regarded as the most prevalent cardiac sodium channel required for generation of action potentials in cardiomyocytes. Accordingly, Nav1.5 seems to be the main target molecule for local anesthetic (LA)-induced cardiotoxicity. However, recent reports demonstrated functional expression of several "neuronal" Nav's in cardiomyocytes being involved in cardiac contractility and rhythmogenesis. In this study, we examined the relevance of neuronal tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Nav's for inhibition of cardiac sodium channels by the cardiotoxic LAs ropivacaine and bupivacaine. Effects of LAs on recombinant Nav1.2, 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 expressed in human embryonic kidney cell line 293 (HEK-293) cells, and on sodium currents in murine, cardiomyocytes were investigated by whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Expression analyses were performed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal mice express messenger RNA (mRNA) for Nav1.2, 1.3, 1.5, 1.8, and 1.9 and generate TTX-sensitive sodium currents. Tonic and use-dependent block of sodium currents in cardiomyocytes by ropivacaine and bupivacaine were enhanced by 200 nM TTX. Inhibition of recombinant Nav1.5 channels was similar to that of TTX-resistant currents in cardiomyocytes but stronger as compared to inhibition of total sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Recombinant Nav1.2, 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 channels displayed significant differences in regard to use-dependent block by ropivacaine. Finally, bupivacaine blocked sodium currents in cardiomyocytes as well as recombinant Nav1.5 currents significantly stronger in comparison to ropivacaine. Our data demonstrate for the first time that cardiac TTX-sensitive sodium channels are relevant for inhibition of cardiac sodium currents by LAs.

  15. Co-occurrence of point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar.

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    Kawada, Hitoshi; Oo, Sai Zaw Min; Thaung, Sein; Kawashima, Emiko; Maung, Yan Naung Maung; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Minakawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Single amino acid substitutions in the voltage-gated sodium channel associated with pyrethroid resistance constitute one of the main causative factors of knockdown resistance in insects. The kdr gene has been observed in several mosquito species; however, point mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar have not been fully characterized. The aim of the present study was to determine the types and frequencies of mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti collected from used tires in Yangon City, Myanmar. We determined high pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti larvae at all collection sites in Yangon City, by using a simplified knockdown bioassay. We showed that V1016G and S989P mutations were widely distributed, with high frequencies (84.4% and 78.8%, respectively). By contrast, we were unable to detect I1011M (or I1011V) or L1014F mutations. F1534C mutations were also widely distributed, but with a lower frequency than the V1016G mutation (21.2%). High percentage of co-occurrence of the homozygous V1016G/S989P mutations was detected (65.7%). Additionally, co-occurrence of homozygous V1016G/F1534C mutations (2.9%) and homozygous V1016G/F1534C/S989P mutations (0.98%) were detected in the present study. Pyrethroid insecticides were first used for malaria control in 1992, and have since been constantly used in Myanmar. This intensive use may explain the strong selection pressure toward Aedes aegypti, because this mosquito is generally a domestic and endophagic species with a preference for indoor breeding. Extensive use of DDT for malaria control before the use of this chemical was banned may also explain the development of pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti.

  16. Discovery of Point Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel from African Aedes aegypti Populations: Potential Phylogenetic Reasons for Gene Introgression.

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    Kawada, Hitoshi; Higa, Yukiko; Futami, Kyoko; Muranami, Yuto; Kawashima, Emiko; Osei, Joseph H N; Sakyi, Kojo Yirenkyi; Dadzie, Samuel; de Souza, Dziedzom K; Appawu, Maxwell; Ohta, Nobuo; Suzuki, Takashi; Minakawa, Noboru

    2016-06-01

    Yellow fever is endemic in some countries in Africa, and Aedes aegpyti is one of the most important vectors implicated in the outbreak. The mapping of the nation-wide distribution and the detection of insecticide resistance of vector mosquitoes will provide the beneficial information for forecasting of dengue and yellow fever outbreaks and effective control measures. High resistance to DDT was observed in all mosquito colonies collected in Ghana. The resistance and the possible existence of resistance or tolerance to permethrin were suspected in some colonies. High frequencies of point mutations at the voltage-gated sodium channel (F1534C) and one heterozygote of the other mutation (V1016I) were detected, and this is the first detection on the African continent. The frequency of F1534C allele and the ratio of F1534C homozygotes in Ae. aegypti aegypti (Aaa) were significantly higher than those in Ae. aegypti formosus (Aaf). We could detect the two types of introns between exon 20 and 21, and the F1534C mutations were strongly linked with one type of intron, which was commonly found in South East Asian and South and Central American countries, suggesting the possibility that this mutation was introduced from other continents or convergently selected after the introgression of Aaa genes from the above area. The worldwide eradication programs in 1940s and 1950s might have caused high selection pressure on the mosquito populations and expanded the distribution of insecticide-resistant Ae. aegypti populations. Selection of the F1534C point mutation could be hypothesized to have taken place during this period. The selection of the resistant population of Ae. aegypti with the point mutation of F1534C, and the worldwide transportation of vector mosquitoes in accordance with human activity such as trading of used tires, might result in the widespread distribution of F1534C point mutation in tropical countries.

  17. Co-occurrence of point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar.

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    Hitoshi Kawada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Single amino acid substitutions in the voltage-gated sodium channel associated with pyrethroid resistance constitute one of the main causative factors of knockdown resistance in insects. The kdr gene has been observed in several mosquito species; however, point mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar have not been fully characterized. The aim of the present study was to determine the types and frequencies of mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti collected from used tires in Yangon City, Myanmar. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined high pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti larvae at all collection sites in Yangon City, by using a simplified knockdown bioassay. We showed that V1016G and S989P mutations were widely distributed, with high frequencies (84.4% and 78.8%, respectively. By contrast, we were unable to detect I1011M (or I1011V or L1014F mutations. F1534C mutations were also widely distributed, but with a lower frequency than the V1016G mutation (21.2%. High percentage of co-occurrence of the homozygous V1016G/S989P mutations was detected (65.7%. Additionally, co-occurrence of homozygous V1016G/F1534C mutations (2.9% and homozygous V1016G/F1534C/S989P mutations (0.98% were detected in the present study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Pyrethroid insecticides were first used for malaria control in 1992, and have since been constantly used in Myanmar. This intensive use may explain the strong selection pressure toward Aedes aegypti, because this mosquito is generally a domestic and endophagic species with a preference for indoor breeding. Extensive use of DDT for malaria control before the use of this chemical was banned may also explain the development of pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti.

  18. Comparative study of the distribution of the alpha-subunits of voltage-gated sodium channels in normal and axotomized rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Obata, Koichi; Dai, Yi; Noguchi, Koichi

    2008-09-10

    We compared the distribution of the alpha-subunit mRNAs of voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.1-1.3 and Nav1.6-1.9 and a related channel, Nax, in histochemically identified neuronal subpopulations of the rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In the naïve DRG, the expression of Nav1.1 and Nav1.6 was restricted to A-fiber neurons, and they were preferentially expressed by TrkC neurons, suggesting that proprioceptive neurons possess these channels. Nav1.7, -1.8, and -1.9 mRNAs were more abundant in C-fiber neurons compared with A-fiber ones. Nax was evenly expressed in both populations. Although Nav1.8 and -1.9 were preferentially expressed by TrkA neurons, other alpha-subunits were expressed independently of TrkA expression. Actually, all IB4(+) neurons expressed both Nav1.8 and -1.9, and relatively limited subpopulations of IB4(+) neurons (3% and 12%, respectively) expressed Nav1.1 and/or Nav1.6. These findings provide useful information in interpreting the electrophysiological characteristics of some neuronal subpopulations of naïve DRG. After L5 spinal nerve ligation, Nav1.3 mRNA was up-regulated mainly in A-fiber neurons in the ipsilateral L5 DRG. Although previous studies demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) reversed this up-regulation, the Nav1.3 induction was independent of either TrkA or GFRalpha1 expression, suggesting that the induction of Nav1.3 may be one of the common responses of axotomized DRG neurons without a direct relationship to NGF/GDNF supply. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Discovery of Point Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel from African Aedes aegypti Populations: Potential Phylogenetic Reasons for Gene Introgression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Kawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yellow fever is endemic in some countries in Africa, and Aedes aegpyti is one of the most important vectors implicated in the outbreak. The mapping of the nation-wide distribution and the detection of insecticide resistance of vector mosquitoes will provide the beneficial information for forecasting of dengue and yellow fever outbreaks and effective control measures.High resistance to DDT was observed in all mosquito colonies collected in Ghana. The resistance and the possible existence of resistance or tolerance to permethrin were suspected in some colonies. High frequencies of point mutations at the voltage-gated sodium channel (F1534C and one heterozygote of the other mutation (V1016I were detected, and this is the first detection on the African continent. The frequency of F1534C allele and the ratio of F1534C homozygotes in Ae. aegypti aegypti (Aaa were significantly higher than those in Ae. aegypti formosus (Aaf. We could detect the two types of introns between exon 20 and 21, and the F1534C mutations were strongly linked with one type of intron, which was commonly found in South East Asian and South and Central American countries, suggesting the possibility that this mutation was introduced from other continents or convergently selected after the introgression of Aaa genes from the above area.The worldwide eradication programs in 1940s and 1950s might have caused high selection pressure on the mosquito populations and expanded the distribution of insecticide-resistant Ae. aegypti populations. Selection of the F1534C point mutation could be hypothesized to have taken place during this period. The selection of the resistant population of Ae. aegypti with the point mutation of F1534C, and the worldwide transportation of vector mosquitoes in accordance with human activity such as trading of used tires, might result in the widespread distribution of F1534C point mutation in tropical countries.

  20. Sodium Channel Voltage-Gated Beta 2 Plays a Vital Role in Brain Aging Associated with Synaptic Plasticity and Expression of COX5A and FGF-2.

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    XiYang, Yan-Bin; Wang, You-Cui; Zhao, Ya; Ru, Jin; Lu, Bing-Tuan; Zhang, Yue-Ning; Wang, Nai-Chao; Hu, Wei-Yan; Liu, Jia; Yang, Jin-Wei; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Hao, Chun-Guang; Feng, Zhong-Tang; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Dong, Wei; Quan, Xiong-Zhi; Zhang, Lian-Feng; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The role of sodium channel voltage-gated beta 2 (SCN2B) in brain aging is largely unknown. The present study was therefore designed to determine the role of SCN2B in brain aging by using the senescence-accelerated mice prone 8 (SAMP8), a brain senescence-accelerated animal model, together with the SCN2B transgenic mice. The results showed that SAMP8 exhibited impaired learning and memory functions, assessed by the Morris water maze test, as early as 8 months of age. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of SCN2B were also upregulated in the prefrontal cortex at this age. Treatment with traditional Chinese anti-aging medicine Xueshuangtong (Panax notoginseng saponins, PNS) significantly reversed the SCN2B expressions in the prefrontal cortex, resulting in improved learning and memory. Moreover, SCN2B knockdown transgenic mice were generated and bred to determine the roles of SCN2B in brain senescence. A reduction in the SCN2B level by 60.68% resulted in improvement in the hippocampus-dependent spatial recognition memory and long-term potential (LTP) slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP), followed by an upregulation of COX5A mRNA levels and downregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) mRNA expression. Together, the present findings indicated that SCN2B could play an important role in the aging-related cognitive deterioration, which is associated with the regulations of COX5A and FGF-2. These findings could provide the potential strategy of candidate target to develop antisenescence drugs for the treatment of brain aging.

  1. Lithium-Responsive Seizure-Like Hyperexcitability Is Caused by a Mutation in the Drosophila Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Gene paralytic

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    Kasuya, Junko; Ueda, Atsushi; Iyengar, Atulya; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Shudderer (Shu) is an X-linked dominant mutation in Drosophila melanogaster identified more than 40 years ago. A previous study showed that Shu caused spontaneous tremors and defects in reactive climbing behavior, and that these phenotypes were significantly suppressed when mutants were fed food containing lithium, a mood stabilizer used in the treatment of bipolar disorder (Williamson, 1982). This unique observation suggested that the Shu mutation affects genes involved in lithium-responsive neurobiological processes. In the present study, we identified Shu as a novel mutant allele of the voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel gene paralytic (para). Given that hypomorphic para alleles and RNA interference–mediated para knockdown reduced the severity of Shu phenotypes, Shu was classified as a para hypermorphic allele. We also demonstrated that lithium could improve the behavioral abnormalities displayed by other Nav mutants, including a fly model of the human generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus. Our electrophysiological analysis of Shu showed that lithium treatment did not acutely suppress Nav channel activity, indicating that the rescue effect of lithium resulted from chronic physiological adjustments to this drug. Microarray analysis revealed that lithium significantly alters the expression of various genes in Shu, including those involved in innate immune responses, amino acid metabolism, and oxidation-reduction processes, raising the interesting possibility that lithium-induced modulation of these biological pathways may contribute to such adjustments. Overall, our findings demonstrate that Nav channel mutants in Drosophila are valuable genetic tools for elucidating the effects of lithium on the nervous system in the context of neurophysiology and behavior. PMID:27844061

  2. 17β-Estradiol regulates the gene expression of voltage-gated sodium channels: role of estrogen receptor α and estrogen receptor β.

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    Hu, Fang; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Peizhi; Wang, Wenjuan; Qian, Wenyi; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Lin

    2012-04-01

    Estradiol (E2) plays a key role in pain modulation, and the biological effects of E2 are transduced by binding estrogen receptors (ERs). Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in the membranes of most neurons and excitable cells. Adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons can express the ERs (ERα and ERβ), and Nav channels (TTX-S: Nav1.1, Nav1.6, and Nav1.7; and TTX-R: Nav1.8, and Nav1.9). Although E2 modulates Nav channel currents, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. In this study, we investigate the mRNA expressions of Nav channel subtypes mediated differentially by the ERs in the DRGs of wild-type (WT) and estrogen receptor knockout (αERKO and βERKO) mice. By means of quantitative real-time PCR, we found that the expressions of Nav1.1, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 subtypes were elevated in αERKO and βERKO mice, whereas Nav1.6 mRNA decreased in αERKO, but not in βERKO mice. The mRNA expressions of Nav subtypes were increased in E2-treated WT ovariectomized animals. We also found that E2-regulation of Nav1.1 and Nav1.9 mRNA expressions is dependent on ERα, ERβ, and another ER, whereas E2-regulation of Nav1.8 appears to be in an ERβ-dependent manner.

  3. Hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

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    Villalba-Galea, Carlos A

    2017-03-04

    Ion channels constitute a superfamily of membrane proteins found in all living creatures. Their activity allows fast translocation of ions across the plasma membrane down the ion's transmembrane electrochemical gradient, resulting in a difference in electrical potential across the plasma membrane, known as the membrane potential. A group within this superfamily, namely voltage-gated channels, displays activity that is sensitive to the membrane potential. The activity of voltage-gated channels is controlled by the membrane potential, while the membrane potential is changed by these channels' activity. This interplay produces variations in the membrane potential that have evolved into electrical signals in many organisms. These signals are essential for numerous biological processes, including neuronal activity, insulin release, muscle contraction, fertilization and many others. In recent years, the activity of the voltage-gated channels has been observed not to follow a simple relationship with the membrane potential. Instead, it has been shown that the activity of voltage-gated channel displays hysteresis. In fact, a growing number of evidence have demonstrated that the voltage dependence of channel activity is dynamically modulated by activity itself. In spite of the great impact that this property can have on electrical signaling, hysteresis in voltage-gated channels is often overlooked. Addressing this issue, this review provides examples of voltage-gated ion channels displaying hysteretic behavior. Further, this review will discuss how Dynamic Voltage Dependence in voltage-gated channels can have a physiological role in electrical signaling. Furthermore, this review will elaborate on the current thoughts on the mechanism underlying hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

  4. Mechanism of electromechanical coupling in voltage-gated potassium channels

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    Rikard eBlunck

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated ion channels play a central role in the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. They are selective for one type of ion – sodium, calcium or potassium. Voltage-gated ion channels are composed of a central pore that allows ions to pass through the membrane and four peripheral voltage sensing domains that respond to changes in the membrane potential. Upon depolarization, voltage sensors in voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv undergo conformational changes driven by positive charges in the S4 segment and aided by pairwise electrostatic interactions with the surrounding voltage sensor. Structure-function relations of Kv channels have been investigated in detail, and the resulting models on the movement of the voltage sensors now converge to a consensus; the S4 segment undergoes a combined movement of rotation, tilt and vertical displacement in order to bring 3-4 e+ each through the electric field focused in this region. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the voltage sensor movement leads to pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, is still not fully understood. Thus, recently, electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels has been investigated with a multitude of techniques including electrophysiology, 3D crystal structures, fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Evidently, the S4-S5 linker, the covalent link between the voltage sensor and pore, plays a crucial role. The linker transfers the energy from the voltage sensor movement to the pore domain via an interaction with the S6 C-termini, which are pulled open during gating. In addition, other contact regions have been proposed. This review aims to provide (i an in-depth comparison of the molecular mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels; (ii insight as to how the voltage sensor and pore domain influence one another; and (iii theoretical predictions on the movement of the cytosolic face of the KV channels

  5. VKCDB: Voltage-gated potassium channel database

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    Gallin Warren J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of voltage-gated potassium channels comprises a functionally diverse group of membrane proteins. They help maintain and regulate the potassium ion-based component of the membrane potential and are thus central to many critical physiological processes. VKCDB (Voltage-gated potassium [K] Channel DataBase is a database of structural and functional data on these channels. It is designed as a resource for research on the molecular basis of voltage-gated potassium channel function. Description Voltage-gated potassium channel sequences were identified by using BLASTP to search GENBANK and SWISSPROT. Annotations for all voltage-gated potassium channels were selectively parsed and integrated into VKCDB. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data for the channels were collected from published journal articles. Transmembrane domain predictions by TMHMM and PHD are included for each VKCDB entry. Multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains of channels of the four Kv families and the KCNQ family are also included. Currently VKCDB contains 346 channel entries. It can be browsed and searched using a set of functionally relevant categories. Protein sequences can also be searched using a local BLAST engine. Conclusions VKCDB is a resource for comparative studies of voltage-gated potassium channels. The methods used to construct VKCDB are general; they can be used to create specialized databases for other protein families. VKCDB is accessible at http://vkcdb.biology.ualberta.ca.

  6. Elevated neuronal excitability due to modulation of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.6 by Aβ1-42

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    Xi eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant increases in neuronal network excitability may contribute to the cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, the mechanisms underlying hyperexcitability are not fully understood. Such overexcitation of neuronal networks has been detected in the brains of APP/PS1 mice. In the present study, using current-clamp recording techniques, we observed that 12 days in vitro (DIV primary cultured pyramidal neurons from P0 APP/PS1 mice exhibited a more prominent action potential burst and a lower threshold than WT littermates. Moreover, after treatment with Aβ1-42 peptide, 12 DIV primary cultured neurons showed similar changes, to a greater degree than in controls. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed that the voltage-dependent sodium current density of neurons incubated with Aβ1-42 was significantly increased, without change in the voltage-dependent sodium channel kinetic characteristics. Immunohistochemistry and western blot results showed that, after treatment with Aβ1-42, expressions of Nav and Nav1.6 subtype increased in cultured neurons or APP/PS1 brains compared to control groups. The intrinsic neuronal hyperexcitability of APP/PS1 mice might thus be due to an increased expression of voltage-dependent sodium channels induced by Aβ1-42. These results may illuminate the mechanism of aberrant neuronal networks in AD.

  7. Effect of gender on the pharmacokinetics of eslicarbazepine acetate (BIA 2-093), a new voltage-gated sodium channel blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Amílcar; Maia, Joana; Almeida, Luis; Mazur, Dago; Gellert, Manfred; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2007-07-01

    To determine the effect of gender on the pharmacokinetics of eslicarbazepine acetate, a novel voltage-gated sodium channel blocker in the development for the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Single-centre, open-label, parallel-group study in 12 female and 12 male healthy subjects. The study consisted of a single-dose (600 mg) period and a multiple-dose (600 mg, once-daily, for 8 days) period, separated by 4 days. Eslicarbazepine acetate was rapidly and extensively metabolized to eslicarbazepine (S-licarbazepine), the main active metabolite. Following a single-dose, arithmetic mean eslicarbazepine maximum plasma concentrations (C(max)) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve over 24 h (AUC(0-24)) and from 0 to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) were, respectively, 9.3 microg/ml, 128.5 microg h/ml and 171.9 microg h/ml in male subjects and 10.1 microg/ml, 150.1 microg h/ml and 205.0 microg h/ml in female subjects. At steady-state, C(max), AUC(0-24) and AUC(0-infinity) were 15.5 microg/ml, 207.8 microg h/ml and 295.8 microg h/ml in male subjects, and 16.8 microg/ml, 214.5 microg h/ml and 295.2 microg h/ml in female subjects. Steady-state plasma concentrations were attained at 4 to 5 days of administration in both groups. Eslicarbazepine C(max), AUC(0-24) and AUC(0-infinity) female:male geometric mean ratios (90%CI) were, respectively, 1.09 (0.94; 1.24), 1.16 (1.00; 1.33) and 1.17 (0.99; 1.38) following single-dose, and 1.10 (0.97; 1.25), 1.04 (0.92; 1.17) and 1.01 (0.88; 1.16) at steady-state. At steady-state, the pharmacokinetic profile of eslicarbazepine acetate was not affected by gender. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Developmental expression of the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.8 (SNS) and Nav1.9 (SNS2) in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, S C; Costigan, M; Tate, S; Fitzgerald, M; Woolf, C J

    2001-08-15

    The development of neuronal excitability involves the coordinated expression of different voltage-gated ion channels. We have characterized the expression of two sensory neuron-specific tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel alpha subunits, Na(v)1. (SNS/PN3) and Na(v)1.9 (SNS2/NaN), in developing rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). Expression of both Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 increases with age, beginning at embryonic day (E) 15 and E17, respectively, and reaching adult levels by postnatal day 7. Their distribution is restricted mainly to those subpopulations of primary sensory neurons in developing and adult DRGs that give rise to unmyelinated C-fibers (neurofilament 200 negative). Na(v)1.8 is expressed in a higher proportion of neuronal profiles than Na(v)1.9 at all stages during development, as in the adult. At E17, almost all Na(v)1.8-expressing neurons also express the high-affinity NGF receptor TrkA, and only a small proportion bind to IB4, a marker for c-ret-expressing (glial-derived neurotrophic factor-responsive) neurons. Because IB4 binding neurons differentiate from TrkA neurons in the postnatal period, the proportion of Na(v)1.8 cells that bind to IB4 increases, in parallel with a decrease in the proportion of Na(v)1.8-TrkA co-expressing cells. In contrast, an equal number of Na(v)1.9 cells bind IB4 and TrkA in embryonic life. The differential expression of Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 in late embryonic development, with their distinctive kinetic properties, may contribute to the development of spontaneous and stimulus-evoked excitability in small diameter primary sensory neurons in the perinatal period and the activity-dependent changes in differentiation they produce.

  9. Colonic inflammation up-regulates voltage-gated sodium channels in bladder sensory neurons via activation of peripheral transient potential vanilloid 1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Q; Malykhina, A P

    2012-06-01

    Primary sensory neurons express several types of ion channels including transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Our previous studies showed an increased excitability of bladder primary sensory and spinal neurons triggered by inflammation in the distal colon as a result of pelvic organ cross-sensitization. The goal of this work was to determine the effects of TRPV1 receptor activation by potent agonists and/or colonic inflammation on voltage-gated Na(+) channels expressed in bladder sensory neurons. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with intracolonic saline (control), resiniferatoxin (RTX, 10(-7 ) mol L(-1)), TNBS (colonic irritant) or double treatment (RTX followed by TNBS). TNBS-induced colitis increased the amplitude of total Na(+) current by two-fold and of tetrodotoxin resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) current by 78% (P ≤ 0.05 to control) in lumbosacral bladder neurons during acute phase (3 days post-TNBS). Instillation of RTX in the distal colon caused an enhancement in the amplitude of total Na(+) current at -20 mV from -112.1 ± 18.7 pA/pF (control) to -183.6 ± 27.8 pA/pF (3 days post-RTX, P ≤ 0.05) without changes in TTX resistant component. The amplitude of net Na(+) current was also increased by 119% at day 3 in the group with double treatment (RTX followed by TNBS, P ≤ 0.05 to control) which was significantly higher than in either group with a single treatment. These results provide evidence that colonic inflammation activates TRPV1 receptors at the peripheral sensory terminals leading to an up-regulation of voltage gated Na(+) channels on the cell soma of bladder sensory neurons. This mechanism may underlie the occurrence of peripheral cross-sensitization in the pelvis and functional chronic pelvic pain. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Targeting Voltage Gated Sodium Channels NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9 for Treatment of Pathological Cough

    OpenAIRE

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1–NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively bloc...

  11. Coevolution of the Ile1,016 and Cys1,534 Mutations in the Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Z Vera-Maloof

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L. is the principal urban vector of dengue viruses. Currently 2.5 billion people are at risk for infection and reduction of Ae. aegypti populations is the most effective means to reduce the risk of transmission. Pyrethroids are used extensively for adult mosquito control, especially during dengue outbreaks. Pyrethroids promote activation and prolong the activation of the voltage gated sodium channel protein (VGSC by interacting with two distinct pyrethroid receptor sites [1], formed by the interfaces of the transmembrane helix subunit 6 (S6 of domains II and III. Mutations of S6 in domains II and III synergize so that double mutants have higher pyrethroid resistance than mutants in either domain alone. Computer models predict an allosteric interaction between mutations in the two domains. In Ae. aegypti, a Ile1,016 mutation in the S6 of domain II was discovered in 2006 and found to be associated with pyrethroid resistance in field populations in Mexico. In 2010 a second mutation, Cys1,534 in the S6 of domain III was discovered and also found to be associated with pyrethroid resistance and correlated with the frequency of Ile1,016.A linkage disequilibrium analysis was performed on Ile1,016 and Cys1,534 in Ae. aegypti collected in Mexico from 2000-2012 to test for statistical associations between S6 in domains II and III in natural populations. We estimated the frequency of the four dilocus haplotypes in 1,016 and 1,534: Val1,016/Phe1,534 (susceptible, Val1,016/Cys1,534, Ile1,016/Phe1,534, and Ile1,016/Cys1,534 (resistant. The susceptible Val1,016/Phe1,534 haplotype went from near fixation to extinction and the resistant Ile1,016/Cys1,534 haplotype increased in all collections from a frequency close to zero to frequencies ranging from 0.5-0.9. The Val1,016/Cys1,534 haplotype increased in all collections until 2008 after which it began to decline as Ile1,016/Cys1,534 increased. However, the Ile1,016/Phe1

  12. N-propyl-2,2-diphenyl-2-hydroxyacetamide, a novel α-hydroxyamide with anticonvulsant, anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects that inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Valentina; Wasowski, Cristina; Martin, Pedro; Enrique, Andrea; Higgs, Josefina; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E; Milesi, Veronica; Marder, Mariel

    2018-01-15

    In patients with epilepsy, anxiety and depression are the most frequent psychiatric comorbidities but they often remain unrecognized and untreated. We report herein the antidepressant-like activity in two animal models, tail suspension and forced swimming tests, of six anticonvulsants α-hydroxyamides. From these, N-propyl-2,2-diphenyl-2-hydroxyacetamide (compound 5) emerged not only as the most active as anticonvulsant (ED 50 = 2.5mg/kg, MES test), but it showed the most remarkable antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests (0.3-30mg/kg, i.p.); and, also, anxiolytic-like action in the plus maze test (3-10mg/kg, i.p.) in mice. Studies of its mechanism of action, by means of its capacity to act via the GABA A receptor ([ 3 H]-flunitrazepam binding assay); the 5-HT 1A receptor ([ 3 H]-8-OH-DPAT binding assay) and the voltage-gated sodium channels (either using the patch clamp technique in hNa v 1.2 expressed in HEK293 cell line or using veratrine, in vivo) were attempted. The results demonstrated that its effects are not likely related to 5-HT 1A or GABA A ergic receptors and that its anticonvulsant and antidepressant-like effect could be due to its voltage-gated sodium channel blocking properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Voltage-gated lipid ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2013-01-01

    probability as a function of voltage. The voltage-dependence of the lipid pores is found comparable to that of protein channels. Lifetime distributions of open and closed events indicate that the channel open distribution does not follow exponential statistics but rather power law behavior for long open times......Synthetic lipid membranes can display channel-like ion conduction events even in the absence of proteins. We show here that these events are voltage-gated with a quadratic voltage dependence as expected from electrostatic theory of capacitors. To this end, we recorded channel traces and current...... histograms in patch-experiments on lipid membranes. We derived a theoretical current-voltage relationship for pores in lipid membranes that describes the experimental data very well when assuming an asymmetric membrane. We determined the equilibrium constant between closed and open state and the open...

  14. Voltage-gated proton (H(v)1) channels, a singular voltage sensing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Karen; Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Contreras, Gustavo F; Morera, Francisco J; Neely, Alan; Latorre, Ramon; Gonzalez, Carlos

    2015-11-14

    The main role of voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is to extrude protons from the intracellular milieu when, mediated by different cellular processes, the H(+) concentration increases. Hv1 are exquisitely selective for protons and their structure is homologous to the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of other voltage-gated ion channels like sodium, potassium, and calcium channels. In clear contrast to the classical voltage-dependent channels, Hv1 lacks a pore domain and thus permeation necessarily occurs through the voltage sensing domain. Hv1 channels are activated by depolarizing voltages, and increases in internal proton concentration. It has been proposed that local conformational changes of the transmembrane segment S4, driven by depolarization, trigger the molecular rearrangements that open Hv1. However, it is still unclear how the electromechanical coupling is achieved between the VSD and the potential pore, allowing the proton flux from the intracellular to the extracellular side. Here we provide a revised view of voltage activation in Hv1 channels, offering a comparative scenario with other voltage sensing channels domains. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. TPEN, a Specific Zn2+Chelator, Inhibits Sodium Dithionite and Glucose Deprivation (SDGD)-Induced Neuronal Death by Modulating Apoptosis, Glutamate Signaling, and Voltage-Gated K+and Na+Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Ma, Xue-Ling; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Xie, Lai-Hua; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia-induced neuronal death is an important pathophysiological process that accompanies ischemic stroke and represents a major challenge in preventing ischemic stroke. To elucidate factors related to and a potential preventative mechanism of hypoxia-ischemia-induced neuronal death, primary neurons were exposed to sodium dithionite and glucose deprivation (SDGD) to mimic hypoxic-ischemic conditions. The effects of N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), a specific Zn 2+ -chelating agent, on SDGD-induced neuronal death, glutamate signaling (including the free glutamate concentration and expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor (GluR2) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits (NR2B), and voltage-dependent K + and Na + channel currents were also investigated. Our results demonstrated that TPEN significantly suppressed increases in cell death, apoptosis, neuronal glutamate release into the culture medium, NR2B protein expression, and I K as well as decreased GluR2 protein expression and Na + channel activity in primary cultured neurons exposed to SDGD. These results suggest that TPEN could inhibit SDGD-induced neuronal death by modulating apoptosis, glutamate signaling (via ligand-gated channels such as AMPA and NMDA receptors), and voltage-gated K + and Na + channels in neurons. Hence, Zn 2+ chelation might be a promising approach for counteracting the neuronal loss caused by transient global ischemia. Moreover, TPEN could represent a potential cell-targeted therapy.

  16. The fibroblast growth factor 14·voltage-gated sodium channel complex is a new target of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavkunov, Alexander S; Wildburger, Norelle C; Nenov, Miroslav N; James, Thomas F; Buzhdygan, Tetyana P; Panova-Elektronova, Neli I; Green, Thomas A; Veselenak, Ronald L; Bourne, Nigel; Laezza, Fernanda

    2013-07-05

    The FGF14 protein controls biophysical properties and subcellular distribution of neuronal voltage-gated Na(+) (Nav) channels through direct binding to the channel C terminus. To gain insights into the dynamic regulation of this protein/protein interaction complex, we employed the split luciferase complementation assay to screen a small molecule library of kinase inhibitors against the FGF14·Nav1.6 channel complex and identified inhibitors of GSK3 as hits. Through a combination of a luminescence-based counter-screening, co-immunoprecipitation, patch clamp electrophysiology, and quantitative confocal immunofluorescence, we demonstrate that inhibition of GSK3 reduces the assembly of the FGF14·Nav channel complex, modifies FGF14-dependent regulation of Na(+) currents, and induces dissociation and subcellular redistribution of the native FGF14·Nav channel complex in hippocampal neurons. These results further emphasize the role of FGF14 as a critical component of the Nav channel macromolecular complex, providing evidence for a novel GSK3-dependent signaling pathway that might control excitability through specific protein/protein interactions.

  17. Targeting Voltage Gated Sodium Channels NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9 for Treatment of Pathological Cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1–NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively blocking these channels on the cough reflex is limited, their biophysical properties indicate that each may contribute to the hypertussive and allotussive state that typifies subacute and chronic nonproductive cough. PMID:24272479

  18. Philosophy of voltage-gated proton channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E; Hosler, Jonathan

    2014-03-06

    In this review, voltage-gated proton channels are considered from a mainly teleological perspective. Why do proton channels exist? What good are they? Why did they go to such lengths to develop several unique hallmark properties such as extreme selectivity and ΔpH-dependent gating? Why is their current so minuscule? How do they manage to be so selective? What is the basis for our belief that they conduct H(+) and not OH(-)? Why do they exist in many species as dimers when the monomeric form seems to work quite well? It is hoped that pondering these questions will provide an introduction to these channels and a way to logically organize their peculiar properties as well as to understand how they are able to carry out some of their better-established biological functions.

  19. Method for voltage-gated protein fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Anson [Tracy, CA; Singh, Anup K [Danville, CA

    2012-04-24

    We report unique findings on the voltage dependence of protein exclusion from the pores of nanoporous polymer exclusion membranes. The pores are small enough that proteins are excluded from passage with low applied electric fields, but increasing the field enables proteins to pass through. The requisite field necessary for a change in exclusion is protein-specific with a correlation to protein size. The field-dependence of exclusion is important to consider for preconcentration applications. The ability to selectively gate proteins at exclusion membranes is also a promising means for manipulating and characterizing proteins. We show that field-gated exclusion can be used to selectively remove proteins from a mixture, or to selectively trap protein at one exclusion membrane in a series.

  20. Ciguatoxins Evoke Potent CGRP Release by Activation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes NaV1.9, NaV1.7 and NaV1.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Touska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatoxins (CTXs are marine toxins that cause ciguatera fish poisoning, a debilitating disease dominated by sensory and neurological disturbances that include cold allodynia and various painful symptoms as well as long-lasting pruritus. Although CTXs are known as the most potent mammalian sodium channel activator toxins, the etiology of many of its neurosensory symptoms remains unresolved. We recently described that local application of 1 nM Pacific Ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1 into the skin of human subjects induces a long-lasting, painful axon reflex flare and that CTXs are particularly effective in releasing calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP from nerve terminals. In this study, we used mouse and rat skin preparations and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA to study the molecular mechanism by which P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release. We show that P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release more effectively in mouse as compared to rat skin, exhibiting EC50 concentrations in the low nanomolar range. P-CTX-1-induced CGRP release from skin is dependent on extracellular calcium and sodium, but independent from the activation of various thermosensory transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels. In contrast, lidocaine and tetrodotoxin (TTX reduce CGRP release by 53–75%, with the remaining fraction involving L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC. Using transgenic mice, we revealed that the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8 or NaV1.7 alone and the combined activation of the TTX-sensitive VGSC subtypes NaV1.7 and NaV1.1 carry the largest part of the P-CTX-1-caused CGRP release of 42% and 34%, respectively. Given the contribution of CGRP to nociceptive and itch sensing pathways, our findings contribute to a better understanding of sensory symptoms of acute and chronic ciguatera that may help in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  1. Ciguatoxins Evoke Potent CGRP Release by Activation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes NaV1.9, NaV1.7 and NaV1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touska, Filip; Sattler, Simon; Malsch, Philipp; Lewis, Richard J; Reeh, Peter W; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2017-08-30

    Ciguatoxins (CTXs) are marine toxins that cause ciguatera fish poisoning, a debilitating disease dominated by sensory and neurological disturbances that include cold allodynia and various painful symptoms as well as long-lasting pruritus. Although CTXs are known as the most potent mammalian sodium channel activator toxins, the etiology of many of its neurosensory symptoms remains unresolved. We recently described that local application of 1 nM Pacific Ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) into the skin of human subjects induces a long-lasting, painful axon reflex flare and that CTXs are particularly effective in releasing calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) from nerve terminals. In this study, we used mouse and rat skin preparations and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to study the molecular mechanism by which P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release. We show that P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release more effectively in mouse as compared to rat skin, exhibiting EC50 concentrations in the low nanomolar range. P-CTX-1-induced CGRP release from skin is dependent on extracellular calcium and sodium, but independent from the activation of various thermosensory transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. In contrast, lidocaine and tetrodotoxin (TTX) reduce CGRP release by 53-75%, with the remaining fraction involving L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Using transgenic mice, we revealed that the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8 or NaV1.7 alone and the combined activation of the TTX-sensitive VGSC subtypes NaV1.7 and NaV1.1 carry the largest part of the P-CTX-1-caused CGRP release of 42% and 34%, respectively. Given the contribution of CGRP to nociceptive and itch sensing pathways, our findings contribute to a better understanding of sensory symptoms of acute and chronic ciguatera that may help in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  2. Voltage-dependent gating of hERG potassium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen May eCheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which voltage-gated channels sense changes in membrane voltage and energetically couple this with opening of the ion conducting pore has been the source of significant interest. In voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels, much of our knowledge in this area comes from Shaker-type channels, for which voltage-dependent gating is quite rapid. In these channels, activation and deactivation are associated with rapid reconfiguration of the voltage-sensing domain unit that is electromechanically coupled, via the S4-S5 linker helix, to the rate-limiting opening of an intracellular pore gate. However, fast voltage-dependent gating kinetics are not typical of all Kv channels, such as Kv11.1 (human ether-a-go-go related gene, hERG, which activates and deactivates very slowly. Compared to Shaker channels, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying slow hERG gating is much poorer. Here, we present a comparative review of the structure-function relationships underlying voltage-dependent gating in Shaker and hERG channels, with a focus on the roles of the voltage sensing domain and the S4-S5 linker that couples voltage sensor movements to the pore. Measurements of gating current kinetics and fluorimetric analysis of voltage sensor movement are consistent with models suggesting that the hERG activation pathway contains a voltage independent step, which limits voltage sensor transitions. Constraints upon hERG voltage sensor movement may result from loose packing of the S4 helices and additional intra-voltage sensor counter charge interactions. More recent data suggest that key amino acid differences in the hERG voltage sensing unit and S4-S5 linker, relative to fast activating Shaker-type Kv channels, may also contribute to the increased stability of the resting state of the voltage sensor.

  3. Voltage-Dependent Gating of hERG Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yen May; Claydon, Tom W.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which voltage-gated channels sense changes in membrane voltage and energetically couple this with opening of the ion conducting pore has been the source of significant interest. In voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, much of our knowledge in this area comes from Shaker-type channels, for which voltage-dependent gating is quite rapid. In these channels, activation and deactivation are associated with rapid reconfiguration of the voltage-sensing domain unit that is electromechanically coupled, via the S4–S5 linker helix, to the rate-limiting opening of an intracellular pore gate. However, fast voltage-dependent gating kinetics are not typical of all Kv channels, such as Kv11.1 (human ether-à-go-go related gene, hERG), which activates and deactivates very slowly. Compared to Shaker channels, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying slow hERG gating is much poorer. Here, we present a comparative review of the structure–function relationships underlying activation and deactivation gating in Shaker and hERG channels, with a focus on the roles of the voltage-sensing domain and the S4–S5 linker that couples voltage sensor movements to the pore. Measurements of gating current kinetics and fluorimetric analysis of voltage sensor movement are consistent with models suggesting that the hERG activation pathway contains a voltage independent step, which limits voltage sensor transitions. Constraints upon hERG voltage sensor movement may result from loose packing of the S4 helices and additional intra-voltage sensor counter-charge interactions. More recent data suggest that key amino acid differences in the hERG voltage-sensing unit and S4–S5 linker, relative to fast activating Shaker-type Kv channels, may also contribute to the increased stability of the resting state of the voltage sensor. PMID:22586397

  4. Effects of 15 Hz square wave magnetic fields on the voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Dou, Jun-Rong; Gao, Yang; Dong, Lei; Li, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Although magnetic fields have significant effects on neurons, little is known about the mechanisms behind their effects. The present study aimed to measure the effects of magnetic fields on ion channels in cortical pyramidal neurons. Cortical pyramidal neurons of Kunming mice were isolated and then subjected to 15 Hz, 1 mT square wave (duty ratio 50%) magnetic fields stimulation. Sodium currents (INa), transient potassium currents (IA) and delayed rectifier potassium currents (IK) were recorded by whole-cell patch clamp method. We found that magnetic field exposure depressed channel current densities, and altered the activation kinetics of sodium and potassium channels. The inactivation properties of INa and IA were also altered. Magnetic field exposure alters ion channel function in neurons. It is likely that the structures of sodium and potassium channels were influenced by the applied field. Sialic acid, which is an important component of the channels, could be the molecule responsible for the reported results.

  5. Changes in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in rat trigeminal ganglia following chronic constriction injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yuanyin; Wang, Liecheng; Wang, Xuxia

    2016-08-17

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), especially the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav1.3 and Nav1.7, and the tetrodotoxin-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9, have been implicated in acute and chronic neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of VGSC Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 after nerve injury and their roles in the development of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We used the infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury model of TN in the rat. The time course of changes in the mechanical pain threshold was examined. In addition, real-time PCR and double immunofluorescence staining of VGSC α subunits were used to evaluate messenger RNA and protein expression, respectively, in the trigeminal ganglion. Behavioral tests showed that the mechanical pain threshold decreased significantly 4-42 days after surgery and reached the lowest observed value by day 12. Compared with sham-operated controls, we found that trigeminal ganglion in rats subjected to an infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury showed upregulation of Nav1.3 and downregulation of Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 messenger RNA and protein levels. Our findings suggest that VGSC may participate in the regulation of TN.

  6. Deletion of cytosolic gating ring decreases gate and voltage sensor coupling in BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohui; Geng, Yanyan; Jin, Yakang; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Magleby, Karl L; Salkoff, Lawrence; Cui, Jianmin

    2017-03-06

    Large conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + channels (BK channels) gate open in response to both membrane voltage and intracellular Ca 2+ The channel is formed by a central pore-gate domain (PGD), which spans the membrane, plus transmembrane voltage sensors and a cytoplasmic gating ring that acts as a Ca 2+ sensor. How these voltage and Ca 2+ sensors influence the common activation gate, and interact with each other, is unclear. A previous study showed that a BK channel core lacking the entire cytoplasmic gating ring (Core-MT) was devoid of Ca 2+ activation but retained voltage sensitivity (Budelli et al. 2013. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1313433110). In this study, we measure voltage sensor activation and pore opening in this Core-MT channel over a wide range of voltages. We record gating currents and find that voltage sensor activation in this truncated channel is similar to WT but that the coupling between voltage sensor activation and gating of the pore is reduced. These results suggest that the gating ring, in addition to being the Ca 2+ sensor, enhances the effective coupling between voltage sensors and the PGD. We also find that removal of the gating ring alters modulation of the channels by the BK channel's β1 and β2 subunits. © 2017 Zhang et al.

  7. Harnessing the Flow of Excitation: TRP, Voltage-Gated Na(+), and Voltage-Gated Ca(2+) Channels in Contemporary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Roman V; Weckström, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Cellular signaling in both excitable and nonexcitable cells involves several classes of ion channels. Some of them are of minor importance, with very specialized roles in physiology, but here we concentrate on three major channel classes: TRP (transient receptor potential channels), voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), and voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav). Here, we first propose a conceptual framework binding together all three classes of ion channels, a "flow-of-excitation model" that takes into account the inputs mediated by TRP and other similar channels, the outputs invariably provided by Cav channels, and the regenerative transmission of signals in the neural networks, for which Nav channels are responsible. We use this framework to examine the function, structure, and pharmacology of these channel classes both at cellular and also at whole-body physiological level. Building on that basis we go through the pathologies arising from the direct or indirect malfunction of the channels, utilizing ion channel defects, the channelopathies. The pharmacological interventions affecting these channels are numerous. Part of those are well-established treatments, like treatment of hypertension or some forms of epilepsy, but many other are deeply problematic due to poor drug specificity, ion channel diversity, and widespread expression of the channels in tissues other than those actually targeted. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  9. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modification of voltage-dependent sodium channels by local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Muroi, Yukiko; Chowdhury, Sandipan; Chanda, Baron

    2010-11-01

    The hallmark of many intracellular pore blockers such as tetra-alkylammonium compounds and local anesthetics is their ability to allosterically modify the movement of the voltage sensors in voltage-dependent ion channels. For instance, the voltage sensor of domain III is specifically stabilized in the activated state when sodium currents are blocked by local anesthetics. The molecular mechanism underlying this long-range interaction between the blocker-binding site in the pore and voltage sensors remains poorly understood. Here, using scanning mutagenesis in combination with voltage clamp fluorimetry, we systematically evaluate the role of the internal gating interface of domain III of the sodium channel. We find that several mutations in the S4-S5 linker and S5 and S6 helices dramatically reduce the stabilizing effect of lidocaine on the activation of domain III voltage sensor without significantly altering use-dependent block at saturating drug concentrations. In the wild-type skeletal muscle sodium channel, local anesthetic block is accompanied by a 21% reduction in the total gating charge. In contrast, point mutations in this critical intracellular region reduce this charge modification by local anesthetics. Our analysis of a simple model suggests that these mutations in the gating interface are likely to disrupt the various coupling interactions between the voltage sensor and the pore of the sodium channel. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the mechanisms underlying allosteric interactions between a drug-binding site and voltage sensors.

  10. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modification of voltage-dependent sodium channels by local anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Muroi, Yukiko; Chowdhury, Sandipan

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark of many intracellular pore blockers such as tetra-alkylammonium compounds and local anesthetics is their ability to allosterically modify the movement of the voltage sensors in voltage-dependent ion channels. For instance, the voltage sensor of domain III is specifically stabilized in the activated state when sodium currents are blocked by local anesthetics. The molecular mechanism underlying this long-range interaction between the blocker-binding site in the pore and voltage sensors remains poorly understood. Here, using scanning mutagenesis in combination with voltage clamp fluorimetry, we systematically evaluate the role of the internal gating interface of domain III of the sodium channel. We find that several mutations in the S4–S5 linker and S5 and S6 helices dramatically reduce the stabilizing effect of lidocaine on the activation of domain III voltage sensor without significantly altering use-dependent block at saturating drug concentrations. In the wild-type skeletal muscle sodium channel, local anesthetic block is accompanied by a 21% reduction in the total gating charge. In contrast, point mutations in this critical intracellular region reduce this charge modification by local anesthetics. Our analysis of a simple model suggests that these mutations in the gating interface are likely to disrupt the various coupling interactions between the voltage sensor and the pore of the sodium channel. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the mechanisms underlying allosteric interactions between a drug-binding site and voltage sensors. PMID:20937693

  11. Voltage-Dependent Gating: Novel Insights from KCNQ1 Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent cation channels involves three general molecular processes: voltage sensor activation, sensor-pore coupling, and pore opening. KCNQ1 is a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel whose distinctive properties have provided novel insights on fundamental principles of voltage-dependent gating. 1) Similar to other Kv channels, KCNQ1 voltage sensor activation undergoes two resolvable steps; but, unique to KCNQ1, the pore opens at both the intermediate and activated state of voltage sensor activation. The voltage sensor-pore coupling differs in the intermediate-open and the activated-open states, resulting in changes of open pore properties during voltage sensor activation. 2) The voltage sensor-pore coupling and pore opening require the membrane lipid PIP2 and intracellular ATP, respectively, as cofactors, thus voltage-dependent gating is dependent on multiple stimuli, including the binding of intracellular signaling molecules. These mechanisms underlie the extraordinary KCNE1 subunit modification of the KCNQ1 channel and have significant physiological implications. PMID:26745405

  12. The pattern of expression of the voltage-gated sodium channels Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 does not change in uninjured primary sensory neurons in experimental neuropathic pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decosterd, Isabelle; Ji, Ru-Rong; Abdi, Salahadin; Tate, Simon; Woolf, Clifford J

    2002-04-01

    A spared nerve injury of the sciatic nerve (SNI) or a segmental lesion of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves (SNL) lead to behavioral signs of neuropathic pain in the territory innervated by adjacent uninjured nerve fibers, while a chronic constriction injury (CCI) results in pain sensitivity in the affected area. While alterations in voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) have been shown to contribute to the generation of ectopic activity in the injured neurons, little is known about changes in VGSCs in the neighboring intact dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, even though these cells begin to fire spontaneously. We have now investigated changes in the expression of the TTX-resistant VGSCs, Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3) and Nav1.9 (SNS2/NaN) by immunohistochemistry in rat models of neuropathic pain both with an intermingling of intact and degenerated axons in the nerve stump (SNL and CCI) and with a co-mingling in the same DRG of neurons with injured and uninjured axons (sciatic axotomy and SNI). The expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 protein was abolished in all injured DRG neurons, in all models. In intact DRGs and in neighboring non-injured neurons, the expression and the distribution among the A- and C-fiber neuronal populations of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 was, however, unchanged. While it is unlikely, therefore, that a change in the expression of TTX-resistant VGSCs in non-injured neurons contributes to neuropathic pain, it is essential that molecular alterations in both injured and non-injured neurons in neuropathic pain models are investigated.

  13. Structure of the voltage-gated K+ channel Eag1 reveals an alternative voltage sensing mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicher, Jonathan R.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) are gated by the movement of the transmembrane voltage sensor, which is coupled, through the helical S4–S5 linker, to the potassium pore. We determined the single-particle cryo-EM structure of mammalian Kv10.1 or Eag1, bound to the channel inhibitor calmodulin, at 3.78Å resolution. Unlike previous Kv structures, the S4–S5 linker of Eag1 is a 5-residue loop and the transmembrane segments are not domain swapped, suggesting an alternative mechanism of voltage-dependent gating. Additionally, the structure and position of the S4–S5 linker allows calmodulin to bind to the intracellular domains and close the potassium pore independent of voltage sensor position. The structure reveals an alternative gating mechanism for Kv channels and provides a template to further understand the gating properties of Eag1 and related channels. PMID:27516594

  14. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari [Department of Integrative Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Developmental Neurophysiology, Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, Higashiyama 5-1, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan); Iwasaki, Hirohide [Department of Developmental Neurophysiology, Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, Higashiyama 5-1, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan); Okamura, Yasushi, E-mail: yokamura@phys2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Integrative Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Developmental Neurophysiology, Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, Higashiyama 5-1, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan)

    2009-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  15. Congenital insensitivity to pain: Fracturing without apparent skeletal pathobiology caused by an autosomal dominant, second mutation in SCN11A encoding voltage-gated sodium channel 1.9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatarakijnirund, Voraluck; Mumm, Steven; McAlister, William H; Novack, Deborah V; Wenkert, Deborah; Clements, Karen L; Whyte, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) comprises the rare heritable disorders without peripheral neuropathy that feature inability to feel pain. Fracturing and joint destruction are common complications, but lack detailed studies of mineral and skeletal homeostasis and bone histology. In 2013, discovery of a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in SCN11A encoding voltage-gated sodium channel 1.9 (Nav1.9) established a distinctive CIP in three unrelated patients who suffered multiple painless fractures, self-inflicted mutilation, chronic diarrhea, and hyperhidrosis. Here, we studied a mother and two children with CIP by physical examination, biochemical testing, radiological imaging including DXA, iliac crest histology, and mutation analysis. She suffered fractures primarily of her lower extremities beginning at age two years, and had Charcot deformity of both ankles and joint hypermobility. Nerve conduction velocity together with electromyography were normal. Her children had recurrent major fractures beginning in early childhood, joint hypermobility, and chronic diarrhea. She had an excoriated external nare, and both children had hypertrophic scars from scratching. Skin collagen studies were normal. Radiographs revealed fractures and deformities. However, lumbar spine and total hip BMD Z-scores, biochemical parameters of mineral and skeletal homeostasis, and iliac crest histology of the mother (after in vivo tetracycline labeling) were normal. Genomic DNA from the children revealed a unique heterozygous missense mutation in exon 23 (c.3904C>T, p.Leu1302Phe) of SCN11A that is absent in SNP databases and alters an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. This autosomal dominant CIP reflects the second gain-of-function mutation of SCN11A. Perhaps joint hypermobility is an unreported feature. How mutation of Nav1.9 causes fracturing remains unexplained. Lack of injury awareness is typically offered as the reason, and was supported by our unremarkable biochemical

  16. Differential effect of brief electrical stimulation on voltage-gated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Morven A; Al Abed, Amr; Buskila, Yossi; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H; Morley, John W

    2017-05-01

    Electrical stimulation of neuronal tissue is a promising strategy to treat a variety of neurological disorders. The mechanism of neuronal activation by external electrical stimulation is governed by voltage-gated ion channels. This stimulus, typically brief in nature, leads to membrane potential depolarization, which increases ion flow across the membrane by increasing the open probability of these voltage-gated channels. In spiking neurons, it is activation of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na V channels) that leads to action potential generation. However, several other types of voltage-gated channels are expressed that also respond to electrical stimulation. In this study, we examine the response of voltage-gated potassium channels (K V channels) to brief electrical stimulation by whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and computational modeling. We show that nonspiking amacrine neurons of the retina exhibit a large variety of responses to stimulation, driven by different K V -channel subtypes. Computational modeling reveals substantial differences in the response of specific K V -channel subtypes that is dependent on channel kinetics. This suggests that the expression levels of different K V -channel subtypes in retinal neurons are a crucial predictor of the response that can be obtained. These data expand our knowledge of the mechanisms of neuronal activation and suggest that K V -channel expression is an important determinant of the sensitivity of neurons to electrical stimulation. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This paper describes the response of various voltage-gated potassium channels (K V channels) to brief electrical stimulation, such as is applied during prosthetic electrical stimulation. We show that the pattern of response greatly varies between K V channel subtypes depending on activation and inactivation kinetics of each channel. Our data suggest that problems encountered when artificially stimulating neurons such as cessation in firing at high frequencies, or

  17. Effect of Turkish propolis extracts on expression of voltage-gated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and water extracts of Turkish propolis (WEP) on mRNA expression of Nav 1.5 and 1.7 α isoforms of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC) proteins in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. Methods: DMSO and WEP (20 μg/mL each) were incubated for 24 h with ...

  18. Mapping of voltage sensor positions in resting and inactivated mammalian sodium channels by LRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tomoya; Durek, Thomas; Dang, Bobo; Finol-Urdaneta, Rocio K; Craik, David J; Kent, Stephen B H; French, Robert J; Bezanilla, Francisco; Correa, Ana M

    2017-03-07

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) play crucial roles in excitable cells. Although vertebrate Nav function has been extensively studied, the detailed structural basis for voltage-dependent gating mechanisms remain obscure. We have assessed the structural changes of the Nav voltage sensor domain using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET) between the rat skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.4) and fluorescently labeled Nav1.4-targeting toxins. We generated donor constructs with genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tags (LBTs) inserted at the extracellular end of the S4 segment of each domain (with a single LBT per construct). Three different Bodipy-labeled, Nav1.4-targeting toxins were synthesized as acceptors: β-scorpion toxin (Ts1)-Bodipy, KIIIA-Bodipy, and GIIIA-Bodipy analogs. Functional Nav-LBT channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes were voltage-clamped, and distinct LRET signals were obtained in the resting and slow inactivated states. Intramolecular distances computed from the LRET signals define a geometrical map of Nav1.4 with the bound toxins, and reveal voltage-dependent structural changes related to channel gating.

  19. Multifunctional Logic Gate Controlled by Supply Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Zebulum, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    A complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic circuit functions as a NAND gate at a power-supply potential (V(sub dd)) of 3.3 V and as NOR gate for V(sub dd) = 1.8 V. In the intermediate V(sub dd) range of 1.8 to 3.3 V, this circuit performs a function intermediate between NAND and NOR with degraded noise margin. Like the circuit of the immediately preceding article, this circuit serves as a demonstration of the evolutionary approach to design of polymorphic electronics -- a technological discipline that emphasizes evolution of the design of a circuit to perform different analog and/or digital functions under different conditions. In this instance, the different conditions are different values of V(sub dd).

  20. Photocontrol of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Azobenzene Trimethylammonium Bromide in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheyda R Frolova

    Full Text Available The ability of azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB to sensitize cardiac tissue excitability to light was recently reported. The dark, thermally relaxed trans- isomer of azoTAB suppressed spontaneous activity and excitation propagation speed, whereas the cis- isomer had no detectable effect on the electrical properties of cardiomyocyte monolayers. As the membrane potential of cardiac cells is mainly controlled by activity of voltage-gated ion channels, this study examined whether the sensitization effect of azoTAB was exerted primarily via the modulation of voltage-gated ion channel activity. The effects of trans- and cis- isomers of azoTAB on voltage-dependent sodium (INav, calcium (ICav, and potassium (IKv currents in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The experiments showed that azoTAB modulated ion currents, causing suppression of sodium (Na+ and calcium (Ca2+ currents and potentiation of net potassium (K+ currents. This finding confirms that azoTAB-effect on cardiac tissue excitability do indeed result from modulation of voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential.

  1. Anestésicos locais: interação com membranas biológicas e com o canal de sódio voltagem-dependente Local anesthetics: interaction with biological membranes and with the voltage-gated sodium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Ribeiro de Araujo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA are described in the literature. Two types of theories can be distinguished: those that focus on the direct effects of LA on their target protein in the axon membranes, i.e. the voltage-gated sodium channel and the ones that take into account the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase for the reversible nerve blockage. Since there is a direct correlation between LA hydrophobicity and potency, it is crucial to take this physico-chemical property into account to understand the mechanism of action of LA, be it on the sodium channel protein, lipid(s, or on the whole membrane phase.

  2. Voltage-gated Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The human genome contains 40 voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal or cardiac action potentials, over regulating calcium signaling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs for cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This review first discusses pharmacologi...

  3. Gating motions in voltage-gated potassium channels revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treptow, W.; Marrink, S.J.; Tarek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are ubiquitous transmembrane proteins involved in electric signaling of excitable tissues. A fundamental property of these channels is the ability to open or close in response to changes in the membrane potential. To date, their structure-based activation

  4. Tracking voltage-dependent conformational changes in skeletal muscle sodium channel during activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Baron; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2002-11-01

    The primary voltage sensor of the sodium channel is comprised of four positively charged S4 segments that mainly differ in the number of charged residues and are expected to contribute differentially to the gating process. To understand their kinetic and steady-state behavior, the fluorescence signals from the sites proximal to each of the four S4 segments of a rat skeletal muscle sodium channel were monitored simultaneously with either gating or ionic currents. At least one of the kinetic components of fluorescence from every S4 segment correlates with movement of gating charge. The fast kinetic component of fluorescence from sites S216C (S4 domain I), S660C (S4 domain II), and L1115C (S4 domain III) is comparable to the fast component of gating currents. In contrast, the fast component of fluorescence from the site S1436C (S4 domain IV) correlates with the slow component of gating. In all the cases, the slow component of fluorescence does not have any apparent correlation with charge movement. The fluorescence signals from sites reflecting the movement of S4s in the first three domains initiate simultaneously, whereas the fluorescence signals from the site S1436C exhibit a lag phase. These results suggest that the voltage-dependent movement of S4 domain IV is a later step in the activation sequence. Analysis of equilibrium and kinetic properties of fluorescence over activation voltage range indicate that S4 domain III is likely to move at most hyperpolarized potentials, whereas the S4s in domain I and domain II move at more depolarized potentials. The kinetics of fluorescence changes from sites near S4-DIV are slower than the activation time constants, suggesting that the voltage-dependent movement of S4-DIV may not be a prerequisite for channel opening. These experiments allow us to map structural features onto the kinetic landscape of a sodium channel during activation.

  5. Sialic Acids Attached to O-Glycans Modulate Voltage-gated Potassium Channel Gating*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwetz, Tara A.; Norring, Sarah A.; Ednie, Andrew R.; Bennett, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal, cardiac, and skeletal muscle action potentials are produced and conducted through the highly regulated activity of several types of voltage-gated ion channels. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are responsible for action potential repolarization. Glycans can be attached to glycoproteins through N- and O-linkages. Previous reports described the impact of N-glycans on voltage-gated ion channel function. Here, we show that sialic acids attached through O-linkages modulate gating of Kv2.1, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3. The conductance-voltage (G-V) relationships for each isoform were shifted uniquely by a depolarizing 8–16 mV under conditions of reduced sialylation. The data indicate that sialic acids modulate Kv channel activation through apparent electrostatic mechanisms that promote channel activity. Voltage-dependent steady-state inactivation was unaffected by changes in sialylation. N-Linked sialic acids cannot be responsible for the G-V shifts because Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 cannot be N-glycosylated, and immunoblot analysis confirmed Kv2.1 is not N-glycosylated. Glycosidase gel shift analysis suggested that Kv2.1, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3 were O-glycosylated and sialylated. To confirm this, azide-modified sugar residues involved specifically in O-glycan and sialic acid biosynthesis were shown to incorporate into all three Kv channel isoforms using Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition chemistry. Together, the data indicate that sialic acids attached to O-glycans uniquely modulate gating of three Kv channel isoforms that are not N-glycosylated. These data provide the first evidence that external O-glycans, with core structures distinct from N-glycans in type and number of sugar residues, can modulate Kv channel function and thereby contribute to changes in electrical signaling that result from regulated ion channel expression and/or O-glycosylation. PMID:21115483

  6. Phylogeny unites animal sodium leak channels with fungal calcium channels in an ancient, voltage-insensitive clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J; Hillis, David M; Zakon, Harold H

    2012-12-01

    Proteins in the superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels mediate behavior across the tree of life. These proteins regulate the movement of ions across cell membranes by opening and closing a central pore that controls ion flow. The best-known members of this superfamily are the voltage-gated potassium, calcium (Ca(v)), and sodium (Na(v)) channels, which underlie impulse conduction in nerve and muscle. Not all members of this family are opened by changes in voltage, however. NALCN (NA(+) leak channel nonselective) channels, which encode a voltage-insensitive "sodium leak" channel, have garnered a growing interest. This study examines the phylogenetic relationship among Na(v)/Ca(v) voltage-gated and voltage-insensitive channels in the eukaryotic group Opisthokonta, which includes animals, fungi, and their unicellular relatives. We show that NALCN channels diverged from voltage-gated channels before the divergence of fungi and animals and that the closest relatives of NALCN channels are fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble.

  7. Molecular mechanism of voltage sensing in voltage-gated proton channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo, Santiago; Perez, Marta E.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton (Hv) channels play an essential role in phagocytic cells by generating a hyperpolarizing proton current that electrically compensates for the depolarizing current generated by the NADPH oxidase during the respiratory burst, thereby ensuring a sustained production of reactive oxygen species by the NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to neutralize engulfed bacteria. Despite the importance of the voltage-dependent Hv current, it is at present unclear which residues in Hv channels are responsible for the voltage activation. Here we show that individual neutralizations of three charged residues in the fourth transmembrane domain, S4, all reduce the voltage dependence of activation. In addition, we show that the middle S4 charged residue moves from a position accessible from the cytosolic solution to a position accessible from the extracellular solution, suggesting that this residue moves across most of the membrane electric field during voltage activation of Hv channels. Our results show for the first time that the charge movement of these three S4 charges accounts for almost all of the measured gating charge in Hv channels. PMID:23401575

  8. Voltage Gated Ion Channel Function: Gating, Conduction, and the Role of Water and Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariev, Alisher M.; Green, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels, which are found in every biological cell, regulate the concentration of electrolytes, and are responsible for multiple biological functions, including in particular the propagation of nerve impulses. The channels with the latter function are gated (opened) by a voltage signal, which allows Na+ into the cell and K+ out. These channels have several positively charged amino acids on a transmembrane domain of their voltage sensor, and it is generally considered, based primarily on two lines of experimental evidence, that these charges move with respect to the membrane to open the channel. At least three forms of motion, with greatly differing extents and mechanisms of motion, have been proposed. There is a “gating current”, a capacitative current preceding the channel opening, that corresponds to several charges (for one class of channel typically 12–13) crossing the membrane field, which may not require protein physically crossing a large fraction of the membrane. The coupling to the opening of the channel would in these models depend on the motion. The conduction itself is usually assumed to require the “gate” of the channel to be pulled apart to allow ions to enter as a section of the protein partially crosses the membrane, and a selectivity filter at the opposite end of the channel determines the ion which is allowed to pass through. We will here primarily consider K+ channels, although Na+ channels are similar. We propose that the mechanism of gating differs from that which is generally accepted, in that the positively charged residues need not move (there may be some motion, but not as gating current). Instead, protons may constitute the gating current, causing the gate to open; opening consists of only increasing the diameter at the gate from approximately 6 Å to approximately 12 Å. We propose in addition that the gate oscillates rather than simply opens, and the ion experiences a barrier to its motion across the channel that is tuned

  9. Three-Function Logic Gate Controlled by Analog Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebulum, Ricardo; Stoica, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    The figure is a schematic diagram of a complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic circuit that performs one of three different logic functions, depending on the level of an externally applied control voltage, V(sub sel). Specifically, the circuit acts as A NAND gate at V(sub sel) = 0.0 V, A wire (the output equals one of the inputs) at V(sub sel) = 1.0 V, or An AND gate at V(sub sel) = -1.8 V. [The nominal power-supply potential (VDD) and logic "1" potential of this circuit is 1.8 V.] Like other multifunctional circuits described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, this circuit was synthesized following an automated evolutionary approach that is so named because it is modeled partly after the repetitive trial-and-error process of biological evolution. An evolved circuit can be tested by computational simulation and/or tested in real hardware, and the results of the test can provide guidance for refining the design through further iteration. The evolutionary synthesis of electronic circuits can now be implemented by means of a software package Genetic Algorithms for Circuit Synthesis (GACS) that was developed specifically for this purpose. GACS was used to synthesize the present trifunctional circuit. As in the cases of other multifunctional circuits described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the multiple functionality of this circuit, the use of a single control voltage to select the function, and the automated evolutionary approach to synthesis all contribute synergistically to a combination of features that are potentially advantageous for the further development of robust, multiple-function logic circuits, including, especially, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). These advantages include the following: This circuit contains only 9 transistors about half the number of transistors that would be needed to obtain equivalent NAND/wire/AND functionality by use of components from a standard digital design library. If

  10. n-Alcohols Inhibit Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horishita, Takafumi; Harris, R. Adron

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells and are known as a target of local anesthetics. In addition, inhibition of sodium channels by volatile anesthetics has been proposed as a mechanism of general anesthesia. The n-alcohols produce anesthesia, and their potency increases with carbon number until a “cut-off” is reached. In this study, we examined effects of a range of n-alcohols on Nav1.2 subunits to determine the alcohol cut-off for this channel. We also studied the effect of a short-chain alcohol (ethanol) and a long-chain alcohol (octanol) on Nav1.2, Nav1.4, Nav1.6, and Nav1.8 subunits, and we investigated the effects of alcohol on channel kinetics. Ethanol and octanol inhibited sodium currents of all subunits, and the inhibition of the Nav1.2 channel by n-alcohols indicated a cut-off at nonanol. Ethanol and octanol produced open-channel block, which was more pronounced for Nav1.8 than for the other sodium channels. Inhibition of Nav1.2 was due to decreased activation and increased inactivation. These results suggest that sodium channels may have a hydrophobic binding site for n-alcohols and demonstrate the differences in the kinetic mechanisms of inhibition for n-alcohols and inhaled anesthetics. PMID:18434586

  11. Voltage-gated Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The human genome contains 40 voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal or cardiac action potentials, over regulating calcium signaling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs for cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This review first discusses pharmacological strategies for targeting KV channels with venom peptides, antibodies and small molecules and then highlights recent progress in the preclinical and clinical development of drugs targeting KV1.x, KV7.x (KCNQ), KV10.1 (EAG1) and KV11.1 (hERG) channels. PMID:19949402

  12. Low Gate Voltage Operated Multi-emitter-dot H+ Ion-Sensitive Gated Lateral Bipolar Junction Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heng; Zhang, Ji-Xing; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Li-Xia; Ding, Ming; Patrick, J. Clarke

    2015-02-01

    A low gate voltage operated multi-emitter-dot gated lateral bipolar junction transistor (BJT) ion sensor is proposed. The proposed device is composed of an arrayed gated lateral BJT, which is driven in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET)-BJT hybrid operation mode. Further, it has multiple emitter dots linked to each other in parallel to improve ionic sensitivity. Using hydrogen ionic solutions as reference solutions, we conduct experiments in which we compare the sensitivity and threshold voltage of the multi-emitter-dot gated lateral BJT with that of the single-emitter-dot gated lateral BJT. The multi-emitter-dot gated lateral BJT not only shows increased sensitivity but, more importantly, the proposed device can be operated under very low gate voltage, whereas the conventional ion-sensitive field-effect transistors cannot. This special characteristic is significant for low power devices and for function devices in which the provision of a gate voltage is difficult.

  13. Voltage-gated channel mechanosensitivity: Fact or Friction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Morris

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The heart is a continually active pulsatile fluid pump that generates forces by precisely timed and spaced engagement of contractile nano-machinery. This pump largely generates its own control signals, the most crucial of which involve precisely timed and spaced transmembrane ion fluxes. The timely opening and closing of the diverse voltage-gated channel (VGC sub-types is indispensible for pulsatile pumping with the appropriate rhythm. VGCs are large membrane proteins with four voltagesensors around a central ion-selective pore that opens and closes under the influence of membrane voltage (Fig 1. The operation of VGCs is tuned, in a secondary fashion, by the mechanical state of the bilayers in which they are embedded{18},{36},{44}. I focus here on the possibility that in the highly mechanically active environment of the myocardium and its vasculature, VGCs feel and respond to changing bilayer structures. Do they collectively transduce mechanical signals and tune rhythmicity? I suggest that tools now available could help answer this question. Some might wish to first peruse a section at the end of this essay summarizing a few fundamentals about VGC kinetics and about the modulation of their kinetics by mechanical factors; see Basic operation of a VGC.... That section is preceded by a list of abbreviations used in the essay and by lists of situations that might be expected to reversibly or irreversibly alter VGC-bearing membranes in the heart.

  14. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Nguyen, Phuong Tran; Zhang, Yunxiao; Hu, Zhaotun; Zhang, Changxin; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; DeCaen, Paul G; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2017-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na V s) are activated by transiting the voltage sensor from the deactivated to the activated state. The crystal structures of several bacterial Na V s have captured the voltage sensor module (VSM) in an activated state, but structure of the deactivated voltage sensor remains elusive. In this study, we sought to identify peptide toxins stabilizing the deactivated VSM of bacterial Na V s. We screened fractions from several venoms and characterized a cystine knot toxin called JZTx-27 from the venom of tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao as a high-affinity antagonist of the prokaryotic Na V s Ns V Ba (nonselective voltage-gated Bacillus alcalophilus ) and NaChBac (bacterial sodium channel from Bacillus halodurans ) (IC 50 = 112 nM and 30 nM, respectively). JZTx-27 was more efficacious at weaker depolarizing voltages and significantly slowed the activation but accelerated the deactivation of Ns V Ba, whereas the local anesthetic drug lidocaine was shown to antagonize Ns V Ba without affecting channel gating. Mutation analysis confirmed that JZTx-27 bound to S3-4 linker of Ns V Ba, with F98 being the critical residue in determining toxin affinity. All electrophysiological data and in silico analysis suggested that JZTx-27 trapped VSM of Ns V Ba in one of the deactivated states. In mammalian Na V s, JZTx-27 preferably inhibited the inactivation of Na V 1.5 by targeting the fourth transmembrane domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peptide antagonist for prokaryotic Na V s. More important, we proposed that JZTx-27 stabilized the Ns V Ba VSM in the deactivated state and may be used as a probe to determine the structure of the deactivated VSM of Na V s.-Tang, C., Zhou, X., Nguyen, P. T., Zhang, Y., Hu, Z., Zhang, C., Yarov-Yarovoy, V., DeCaen, P. G., Liang, S., Liu, Z. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel. © FASEB.

  15. LRRK2 regulates voltage-gated calcium channel function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cade eBedford

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV channels enable Ca2+ influx in response to membrane depolarization. CaV2.1 channels are localized to the presynaptic membrane of many types of neurons where they are involved in triggering neurotransmitter release. Several signaling proteins have been identified as important CaV2.1 regulators including protein kinases, G-proteins and Ca2+ binding proteins. Recently, we discovered that leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2, a protein associated with inherited Parkinson’s disease, interacts with specific synaptic proteins and influences synaptic transmission. Since synaptic proteins functionally interact with CaV2.1 channels and synaptic transmission is triggered by Ca2+ entry via CaV2.1, we investigated whether LRRK2 could impact CaV2.1 channel function. CaV2.1 channel properties were measured using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology in HEK293 cells transfected with CaV2.1 subunits and various LRRK2 constructs. Our results demonstrate that both wild type LRRK2 and the G2019S LRRK2 mutant caused a significant increase in whole cell Ca2+ current density compared to cells expressing only the CaV2.1 channel complex. In addition, LRRK2 expression caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation while having no significant effect on inactivation properties. These functional changes in CaV2.1 activity are likely due to a direct action of LRRK2 as we detected a physical interaction between LRRK2 and the β3 CaV channel subunit via coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, effects on CaV2.1 channel function are dependent on LRRK2 kinase activity as these could be reversed via treatment with a LRRK2 inhibitor. Interestingly, LRRK2 also augmented endogenous voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in PC12 cells suggesting other CaV channels could also be regulated by LRRK2. Overall, our findings support a novel physiological role for LRRK2 in regulating CaV2.1 function that could have implications for how

  16. A thermosensitive mutation alters the effects of lacosamide on slow inactivation in neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels, NaV 1.2.Mena Abdelsayed1, Stanislav Sokolov1, Peter C. Ruben*1 - These authors contributed equally to this work* - Corresponding author

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena eAbdelsayed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels (NaVs. The C121W mutation of the β1 subunit, in particular, gives rise to the thermosensitive generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ phenotype. Lacosamide is used to treat epileptic seizures and is distinct from other anti-seizure drugs by targeting NaV slow-inactivation. We studied the effects of 100 µM lacosamide on the biophysical properties of NaV1.2 channels associated with either WT-β1 or the mutant C121W-β1 subunit. Biophysical parameters were measured at both normal (22 °C and elevated (34 °C temperatures to elicit the differential temperature-sensitivity of C121W. Lacosamide was less effective in NaV1.2 associated with the C121W-β1 at either temperature than in NaV1.2 + WT-β1. There is also a more potent effect by lacosamide on slow inactivation at elevated temperatures. Our data suggest a modulatory role is imparted by the β1 subunit in the interaction between the drug and the channel.

  17. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antagonists and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Lyeth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Despite more than 30 years of research, no pharmacological agents have been identified that improve neurological function following TBI. However, several lines of research described in this review provide support for further development of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. Following TBI, neurons and astrocytes experience a rapid and sometimes enduring increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. These fluxes in [Ca2+]i drive not only apoptotic and necrotic cell death, but also can lead to long-term cell dysfunction in surviving cells. In a limited number of in vitro experiments, both L-type and N-type VGCC antagonists successfully reduced calcium loads as well as neuronal and astrocytic cell death following mechanical injury. In rodent models of TBI, administration of VGCC antagonists reduced cell death and improved cognitive function. It is clear that there is a critical need to find effective therapeutics and rational drug delivery strategies for the management and treatment of TBI, and we believe that further investigation of VGCC antagonists should be pursued before ruling out the possibility of successful translation to the clinic.

  18. Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Cancer Cell Proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Vidhya R.; Perez-Neut, Mathew [Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Loyola University Chicago 2160 S. 1st Ave, Maywood, IL 60153 (United States); Kaja, Simon [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2411 Holmes St., Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Gentile, Saverio, E-mail: sagentile@luc.edu [Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Loyola University Chicago 2160 S. 1st Ave, Maywood, IL 60153 (United States)

    2015-05-22

    Changes of the electrical charges across the surface cell membrane are absolutely necessary to maintain cellular homeostasis in physiological as well as in pathological conditions. The opening of ion channels alter the charge distribution across the surface membrane as they allow the diffusion of ions such as K{sup +}, Ca{sup ++}, Cl{sup −}, Na{sup +}. Traditionally, voltage-gated ion channels (VGIC) are known to play fundamental roles in controlling rapid bioelectrical signaling including action potential and/or contraction. However, several investigations have revealed that these classes of proteins can also contribute significantly to cell mitotic biochemical signaling, cell cycle progression, as well as cell volume regulation. All these functions are critically important for cancer cell proliferation. Interestingly, a variety of distinct VGICs are expressed in different cancer cell types, including metastasis but not in the tissues from which these tumors were generated. Given the increasing evidence suggesting that VGIC play a major role in cancer cell biology, in this review we discuss the role of distinct VGIC in cancer cell proliferation and possible therapeutic potential of VIGC pharmacological manipulation.

  19. Gate-Voltage Control of Borophene Structure Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuhua; Shirodkar, Sharmila N; Yang, Yang; Yakobson, Boris I

    2017-11-27

    Boron nanostructures are easily charged but how charge carriers affect their structural stability is unknown. We combined cluster expansion methods with first-principles calculations to analyze the dependence of the preferred structure of two-dimensional (2D) boron, or "borophene", on charge doping controlled by a gate voltage. At a reasonable doping level of 3.12×1014  cm-2 , the hollow hexagon concentration in the ground state of 2D boron increases to 1/7 from 1/8 in its charge-neutral state. The numerical result for the dependence of hollow hexagon concentration on the doping level is well described by an analytical method based on an electron-counting rule. Aside from in-plane electronic bonding, the hybridization among out-of-plane boron orbitals is crucial for determining the relative stability of different sheets at a given doping level. Our results offer new insight into the stability mechanism of 2D boron and open new ways for the control of the lattice structure during formation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Use of voltage clamp fluorimetry in understanding potassium channel gating: a review of Shaker fluorescence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, A J; Fedida, D

    2009-06-01

    Voltage clamp fluorimetry (VCF) utilizes fluorescent probes that covalently bind to cysteine residues introduced into proteins and emit light as a function of their environment. Measurement of this emitted light during membrane depolarization reveals changes in the emission level as the environment of the labelled residue changes. This allows for the correlation of channel gating events with movement of specific protein moieties, at nanosecond time resolution. Since the pioneering use of this technique to investigate Shaker potassium channel activation movements, VCF has become an invaluable technique used to understand ion channel gating. This review summarizes the theory and some of the data on the application of the VCF technique. Although its usage has expanded beyond voltage-gated potassium channels and VCF is now used in a number of other voltage- and ligand-gated channels, we will focus on studies conducted in Shaker potassium channels, and what they have told us about channel activation and inactivation gating.

  1. Threshold voltage adjustment of organic thin film transistor by introducing a polysilicon floating gate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Chenglong; Yang Jianhong; Cai Xueyuan; Shan Xiaofeng, E-mail: wuchenglongwuli@163.co [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-03-15

    The structure of organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) is optimized by introducing a floating gate into the gate dielectric to reduce the threshold voltage of OTFTs. Then the optimized device is simulated, and the simulation results show that the threshold voltage of optimized device is reduced by about 10 V. The reduction of the threshold voltage is helpful and useful for the application of OTFTs in many areas. In addition, this way of reducing the threshold voltage of OTFT is compatible with traditional silicon technology and can be used in manufacturing. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  2. PIST (GOPC) modulates the oncogenic voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrmann, Solveig; Ninkovic, Milena; Kohl, Tobias; Pardo, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    .... In the case of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1, this is determinant not only for its physiological function in brain, but also for its pathophysiology in tumors and possible use as a therapeutic target...

  3. Regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels by proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn, ABELE; Jian, YANG

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are multi-subunit membrane proteins present in a variety of tissues and control many essential physiological processes. Due to their vital importance, VGCCs are regulated by a myriad of proteins and signaling pathways. Here we review the literature on the regulation of VGCCs by proteolysis of the pore-forming α1 subunit, Cavα1. This form of regulation modulates channel function and degradation and affects cellular gene expression and excitability. L-type Ca2+ channels are proteolyzed in two ways, depending on tissue localization. In the heart and skeletal muscle, the distal C-terminus of Cavα1 is cleaved and acts as an autoinhibitor when it reassociates with the proximal C-terminus. Relief of this autoinhibition underlies the β-adrenergic stimulation-induced enhancement of cardiac and skeletal muscle calcium currents, part of the “fight or flight” response. Proteolysis of the distal C-terminus of L-type channels also occurs in the brain and is probably catalyzed by a calpain-like protease. In some brain regions, the entire C-terminus of L-type Ca2+ channels can be cleaved by an unknown protease and translocates to the nucleus acting as a transcription factor. The distal C-terminus of P/Q-channel Cavα1 is also proteolyzed and translocates to the nucleus. Truncated forms of the PQ-channel Cavα1 are produced by many disease-causing mutations and interfere with the function of full-length channels. Truncated forms of N-type channel Cavα1, generated by mutagenesis, affect the expression of full-length channels. New forms of proteolysis of VGCC subunits remain to be discovered and may represent a fruitful area of VGCC research. PMID:23090491

  4. Voltage-gated calcium channels of Paramecium cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodh, Sukanya; Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S; Van Houten, Judith L

    2016-10-01

    Paramecium cells swim by beating their cilia, and make turns by transiently reversing their power stroke. Reversal is caused by Ca2+ entering the cilium through voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels that are found exclusively in the cilia. As ciliary Ca2+ levels return to normal, the cell pivots and swims forward in a new direction. Thus, the activation of the CaV channels causes cells to make a turn in their swimming paths. For 45 years, the physiological characteristics of the Paramecium ciliary CaV channels have been known, but the proteins were not identified until recently, when the P. tetraurelia ciliary membrane proteome was determined. Three CaVα1 subunits that were identified among the proteins were cloned and confirmed to be expressed in the cilia. We demonstrate using RNA interference that these channels function as the ciliary CaV channels that are responsible for the reversal of ciliary beating. Furthermore, we show that Pawn (pw) mutants of Paramecium that cannot swim backward for lack of CaV channel activity do not express any of the three CaV1 channels in their ciliary membrane, until they are rescued from the mutant phenotype by expression of the wild-type PW gene. These results reinforce the correlation of the three CaV channels with backward swimming through ciliary reversal. The PwB protein, found in endoplasmic reticulum fractions, co-immunoprecipitates with the CaV1c channel and perhaps functions in trafficking. The PwA protein does not appear to have an interaction with the channel proteins but affects their appearance in the cilia. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Magnetic skyrmion transistor: skyrmion motion in a voltage-gated nanotrack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko; Zhao, G P; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-06-18

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized and topologically protected spin configurations, which are of both fundamental and applied interests for future electronics. In this work, we propose a voltage-gated skyrmion transistor within the well-established framework of micromagnetics. Its operating conditions and processes have been theoretically investigated and demonstrated, in which the gate voltage can be used to switch on/off a circuit. Our results provide the first time guidelines for practical realization of hybrid skyrmionic-electronic devices.

  6. Magnetic skyrmion transistor: skyrmion motion in a voltage-gated nanotrack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko; Zhao, G. P.; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized and topologically protected spin configurations, which are of both fundamental and applied interests for future electronics. In this work, we propose a voltage-gated skyrmion transistor within the well-established framework of micromagnetics. Its operating conditions and processes have been theoretically investigated and demonstrated, in which the gate voltage can be used to switch on/off a circuit. Our results provide the first time guidelines for practical realization of hybrid skyrmionic-electronic devices.

  7. Magnetic skyrmion transistor: skyrmion motion in a voltage-gated nanotrack

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko; Zhao, G. P.; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized and topologically protected spin configurations, which are of both fundamental and applied interests for future electronics. In this work, we propose a voltage-gated skyrmion transistor within the well-established framework of micromagnetics. Its operating conditions and processes have been theoretically investigated and demonstrated, in which the gate voltage can be used to switch on/off a circuit. Our results provide the first time guidelines for practical r...

  8. Magnetic skyrmion transistor: skyrmion motion in a voltage-gated nanotrack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko; Zhao, G. P.; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized and topologically protected spin configurations, which are of both fundamental and applied interests for future electronics. In this work, we propose a voltage-gated skyrmion transistor within the well-established framework of micromagnetics. Its operating conditions and processes have been theoretically investigated and demonstrated, in which the gate voltage can be used to switch on/off a circuit. Our results provide the first time guidelines for practical realization of hybrid skyrmionic-electronic devices. PMID:26087287

  9. Liquid–Solid Dual-Gate Organic Transistors with Tunable Threshold Voltage for Cell Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2017-10-17

    Liquid electrolyte-gated organic field effect transistors and organic electrochemical transistors have recently emerged as powerful technology platforms for sensing and simulation of living cells and organisms. For such applications, the transistors are operated at a gate voltage around or below 0.3 V because prolonged application of a higher voltage bias can lead to membrane rupturing and cell death. This constraint often prevents the operation of the transistors at their maximum transconductance or most sensitive regime. Here, we exploit a solid–liquid dual-gate organic transistor structure, where the threshold voltage of the liquid-gated conduction channel is controlled by an additional gate that is separated from the channel by a metal-oxide gate dielectric. With this design, the threshold voltage of the “sensing channel” can be linearly tuned in a voltage window exceeding 0.4 V. We have demonstrated that the dual-gate structure enables a much better sensor response to the detachment of human mesenchymal stem cells. In general, the capability of tuning the optimal sensing bias will not only improve the device performance but also broaden the material selection for cell-based organic bioelectronics.

  10. Low Noise Bias Current/Voltage References Based on Floating-Gate MOS Transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igor, Mucha

    1997-01-01

    The exploitation of floating-gate MOS transistors as reference current and voltage sources is investigated. Test structures of common source and common drain floating-gate devices have been implemented in a commercially available 0.8 micron double-poly CMOS process. The measurements performed pro...... promise a good maintenance of the operating point of the floating-gate devices. Examples of utilizing of such bias sources in low-noise sensor preamplifiers are discussed....

  11. Effects of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel on Cell Proliferation in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the effects and underlying mechanisms of voltage-gated K+ channels on the proliferation of multiple myeloma cells. Methods. RPMI-8226 MM cell line was used for the experiments. Voltage-gated K+ currents and the resting potential were recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. RT-PCR detected Kv channel mRNA expression. Cell viability was analyzed with MTT assay. Cell counting system was employed to monitor cell proliferation. DNA contents and cell volume were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results. Currents recorded in RPMI-8226 cells were confirmed to be voltage-gated K+ channels. A high level of Kv1.3 mRNA was detected but no Kv3.1 mRNA was detected in RPMI-8226 cells. Voltage-gated K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP (2 mM depolarized the resting potential from −42 ± 1.7 mV to −31.8 ± 2.8 mV (P0.05. Conclusions. In RPMI-8226, voltage-gated K+ channels are involved in proliferation and cell cycle progression its influence on the resting potential and cell volume may be responsible for this process; the inhibitory effect of the voltage-gated K+ channel blocker on RPMI-8226 cell proliferation is a phase-specific event.

  12. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andrew eFrank

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response – homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors.There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies – such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other

  13. Digital-circuit analysis of short-gate tunnel FETs for low-voltage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Jing; Verhulst, Anne S.; Vandenberghe, William G.; Dehaene, Wim; Huang, Ru; Wang, Yangyuan; Groeseneken, Guido

    2011-08-01

    This paper investigates the potential of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), with emphasis on short-gate TFETs, by simulation for low-power digital applications having a supply voltage lower than 0.5 V. A transient study shows that the tunneling current has a negligible contribution in charging and discharging the gate capacitance of TFETs. In spite of a higher resistance region in the short-gate TFET, the gate (dis)charging speed still meets low-voltage application requirements. A circuit analysis is performed on short-gate TFETs with different materials, such as Si, Ge and heterostructures in terms of voltage overshoot, delay, static power, energy consumption and energy delay product (EDP). These results are compared to MOSFET and full-gate TFET performance. It is concluded that short-gate heterostructure TFETs (Ge-source for nTFET, In0.6Ga0.4As-source for pTFET) are promising candidates to extend the supply voltage to lower than 0.5 V because they combine the advantage of a low Miller capacitance, due to the short-gate structures, and strong drive current in TFETs, due to the narrow bandgap material in the source. At a supply voltage of 0.4 V and for an EOT and channel length of 0.6 nm and 40 nm, respectively, a three-stage inverter chain based on short-gate heterostructure TFETs saves 40% energy consumption per cycle at the same delay and shows 60%-75% improvement of EDP at the same static power, compared to its full-gate counterpart. When compared to the MOSFET, better EDP can be achieved in the heterostructure TFET especially at low static power consumption.

  14. Energetic role of the paddle motif in voltage gating of Shaker K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanping; Ramu, Yajamana; Shin, Hyeon-Gyu; Yamakaze, Jayden; Lu, Zhe

    2013-05-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels underlie rapid electric signaling in excitable cells. Electrophysiological studies have established that the N-terminal half of the fourth transmembrane segment ((NT)S4) of these channels is the primary voltage sensor, whereas crystallographic studies have shown that (NT)S4 is not located within a proteinaceous pore. Rather, (NT)S4 and the C-terminal half of S3 ((CT)S3 or S3b) form a helix-turn-helix motif, termed the voltage-sensor paddle. This unexpected structural finding raises two fundamental questions: does the paddle motif also exist in voltage-gated channels in a biological membrane, and, if so, what is its function in voltage gating? Here, we provide evidence that the paddle motif exists in the open state of Drosophila Shaker voltage-gated K(+) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes and that (CT)S3 acts as an extracellular hydrophobic 'stabilizer' for (NT)S4, thus biasing the gating chemical equilibrium toward the open state.

  15. Targeting sodium channels in cardiac arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remme, Carol Ann; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for proper electrical conduction in the heart. During acquired pathological conditions and inherited sodium channelopathies, altered sodium channel function causes conduction disturbances and ventricular arrhythmias. Although the clinical,

  16. Voltage-gated calcium flux mediatesEscherichia colimechanosensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Giancarlo N; Weekley, R Andrew; Dodd, Benjamin J T; Kralj, Joel M

    2017-08-29

    Electrically excitable cells harness voltage-coupled calcium influx to transmit intracellular signals, typically studied in neurons and cardiomyocytes. Despite intense study in higher organisms, investigations of voltage and calcium signaling in bacteria have lagged due to their small size and a lack of sensitive tools. Only recently were bacteria shown to modulate their membrane potential on the timescale of seconds, and little is known about the downstream effects from this modulation. In this paper, we report on the effects of electrophysiology in individual bacteria. A genetically encoded calcium sensor expressed in Escherichia coli revealed calcium transients in single cells. A fusion sensor that simultaneously reports voltage and calcium indicated that calcium influx is induced by voltage depolarizations, similar to metazoan action potentials. Cytoplasmic calcium levels and transients increased upon mechanical stimulation with a hydrogel, and single cells altered protein concentrations dependent on the mechanical environment. Blocking voltage and calcium flux altered mechanically induced changes in protein concentration, while inducing calcium flux reproduced these changes. Thus, voltage and calcium relay a bacterial sense of touch and alter cellular lifestyle. Although the calcium effectors remain unknown, these data open a host of new questions about E. coli , including the identity of the underlying molecular players, as well as other signals conveyed by voltage and calcium. These data also provide evidence that dynamic voltage and calcium exists as a signaling modality in the oldest domain of life, and therefore studying electrophysiology beyond canonical electrically excitable cells could yield exciting new findings.

  17. Voltage-driven spintronic logic gates in graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WenXing

    2014-09-10

    Electronic devices lose efficacy due to quantum effect when the line-width of gate decreases to sub-10 nm. Spintronics overcome this bottleneck and logic gates are building blocks of integrated circuits. Thus, it is essential to control electronic transport of opposite spins for designing a spintronic logic gate, and spin-selective semiconductors are natural candidates such as zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNR) whose edges are ferromagnetically ordered and antiferromagnetically coupled with each other. Moreover, it is necessary to sandwich ZGNR between two ferromagnetic electrodes for making a spintronic logic gate and also necessary to apply magnetic field to change the spin orientation for modulating the spin transport. By first principle calculations, we propose a method to manipulate the spin transport in graphene nanoribbons with electric field only, instead of magnetic field. We find that metal gates with specific bias nearby edges of ZGNR build up an in-plane inhomogeneous electric field which modulates the spin transport by localizing the spin density in device. The specific manipulation of spin transport we have proposed doesn't need spin-charge conversion for output and suggests a possible base for designing spintronic integrated circuit in atomic scale.

  18. Species-specific voltage-gating properties of connexin-45 junctions expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, L C; Capel, J; Jarillo, J A; Castro, C; Revilla, A

    1997-08-01

    Gap junctions composed of connexin-45 (Cx45) homologs from four species, zebrafish, chicken, mouse, and human, were expressed in pairs of Xenopus oocytes. The macroscopic conductance (gj) of all Cx45 junctions was modulated by transjunctional voltage (Vj) and by the inside-outside voltage (Vm), and the modulation was species specific. Although their gating characteristics varied in voltage sensitivity and kinetics, the four Cx45 junctions shared 1) maximum conductance at Vj = 0 and symmetrical gj reduction in response to positive and negative Vj of low amplitude, with little residual conductance; and 2) gj increases in response to simultaneous depolarization of the paired cells. The formation of hybrid channels, comprising Cx45 hemichannels from different species, allowed us to infer that two separate gates exist, one in each hemichannel, and that each Cx45 hemichannel is closed by the negativity of Vj on its cytoplasmic side. Interestingly, the Vm dependence of hybrid channels also suggests the presence of two gates in series, one Vm gate in each hemichannel. Thus the Vj and Vm dependence provides evidence that two independent voltage gates in each Cx45 hemichannel exist, reacting through specific voltage sensors and operating by different mechanisms, properties that have evolved divergently among species.

  19. Controlling the threshold voltage of SnO2 nanowire transistors with dual in-plane-gate structures gated by chitosan proton conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huixuan; Tan, Rongri

    2017-05-01

    We fabricated novel dual in-plane-gate electric-double-layer (EDL) SnO2 nanowire transistors gated by chitosan using only one transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nickel grid mask at room temperature, and we successfully controlled its threshold voltage. By changing the second in-plane gate bias from 1.0 to -1.0 V, we tuned the threshold voltage of these transistors from -0.35 to 0.21 V. Their operation voltage was 1.0 V, because the EDL gate dielectric can lead to high gate dielectric capacitance (4.24 µF/cm2). These dual in-plane-gate nanowire transistors could pave the way to useful low-voltage nanoelectronic devices.

  20. Calcium binding and voltage gating in Cx46 hemichannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Bernardo I; Pupo, Amaury; García, Isaac E; Mena-Ulecia, Karel; Martínez, Agustín D; Latorre, Ramón; Gonzalez, Carlos

    2017-11-20

    The opening of connexin (Cx) hemichannels in the membrane is tightly regulated by calcium (Ca 2+ ) and membrane voltage. Electrophysiological and atomic force microscopy experiments indicate that Ca 2+ stabilizes the hemichannel closed state. However, structural data show that Ca 2+ binding induces an electrostatic seal preventing ion transport without significant structural rearrangements. In agreement with the closed-state stabilization hypothesis, we found that the apparent Ca 2+ sensitivity is increased as the voltage is made more negative. Moreover, the voltage and Ca 2+ dependence of the channel kinetics indicate that the voltage sensor movement and Ca 2+ binding are allosterically coupled. An allosteric kinetic model in which the Ca 2+ decreases the energy necessary to deactivate the voltage sensor reproduces the effects of Ca 2+ and voltage in Cx46 hemichannels. In agreement with the model and suggesting a conformational change that narrows the pore, Ca 2+ inhibits the water flux through Cx hemichannels. We conclude that Ca 2+ and voltage act allosterically to stabilize the closed conformation of Cx46 hemichannels.

  1. Characterization of voltage-gated Ca(2+ conductances in layer 5 neocortical pyramidal neurons from rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Almog

    Full Text Available Neuronal voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels are involved in electrical signalling and in converting these signals into cytoplasmic calcium changes. One important function of voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels is generating regenerative dendritic Ca(2+ spikes. However, the Ca(2+ dependent mechanisms used to create these spikes are only partially understood. To start investigating this mechanism, we set out to kinetically and pharmacologically identify the sub-types of somatic voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels in pyramidal neurons from layer 5 of rat somatosensory cortex, using the nucleated configuration of the patch-clamp technique. The activation kinetics of the total Ba(2+ current revealed conductance activation only at medium and high voltages suggesting that T-type calcium channels were not present in the patches. Steady-state inactivation protocols in combination with pharmacology revealed the expression of R-type channels. Furthermore, pharmacological experiments identified 5 voltage-gated Ca(2+ channel sub-types - L-, N-, R- and P/Q-type. Finally, the activation of the Ca(2+ conductances was examined using physiologically derived voltage-clamp protocols including a calcium spike protocol and a mock back-propagating action potential (mBPAP protocol. These experiments enable us to suggest the possible contribution of the five Ca(2+ channel sub-types to Ca(2+ current flow during activation under physiological conditions.

  2. Gating of Connexin Channels by transjunctional-voltage: Conformations and models of open and closed states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiello, Thaddeus A; Oh, Seunghoon; Tang, Qingxiu; Bargiello, Nicholas K; Dowd, Terry L; Kwon, Taekyung

    2018-01-01

    Voltage is an important physiologic regulator of channels formed by the connexin gene family. Connexins are unique among ion channels in that both plasma membrane inserted hemichannels (undocked hemichannels) and intercellular channels (aggregates of which form gap junctions) have important physiological roles. The hemichannel is the fundamental unit of gap junction voltage-gating. Each hemichannel displays two distinct voltage-gating mechanisms that are primarily sensitive to a voltage gradient formed along the length of the channel pore (the transjunctional voltage) rather than sensitivity to the absolute membrane potential (V m or V i-o ). These transjunctional voltage dependent processes have been termed V j - or fast-gating and loop- or slow-gating. Understanding the mechanism of voltage-gating, defined as the sequence of voltage-driven transitions that connect open and closed states, first and foremost requires atomic resolution models of the end states. Although ion channels formed by connexins were among the first to be characterized structurally by electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction in the early 1980's, subsequent progress has been slow. Much of the current understanding of the structure-function relations of connexin channels is based on two crystal structures of Cx26 gap junction channels. Refinement of crystal structure by all-atom molecular dynamics and incorporation of charge changing protein modifications has resulted in an atomic model of the open state that arguably corresponds to the physiologic open state. Obtaining validated atomic models of voltage-dependent closed states is more challenging, as there are currently no methods to solve protein structure while a stable voltage gradient is applied across the length of an oriented channel. It is widely believed that the best approach to solve the atomic structure of a voltage-gated closed ion channel is to apply different but complementary experimental and computational methods and to use

  3. Threshold voltage modeling and performance comparison of a novel linearly graded binary metal alloy gate junctionless double gate metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhel, S.; Manna, B.; Sarkar, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    Keeping pace with the current research trend dominated by development of junctionless devices, in this work, we have incorporated the innovative concept of work function engineering by continuous horizontal variation of mole fraction in a binary metal alloy gate into a junctionless double gate metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor. We have thereby presented a new structure, a junctionless work function engineered gate double gate metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor. A detailed analytical modeling of this novel transistor structure has been done based on the solution of two dimensional Poisson's equation presenting a simplified expression for short channel threshold voltage. Based on analytical calculations, an overall performance comparison of junctionless work function engineered gate double gate and normal junctionless double gate metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor has been investigated to establish the superiority of our proposed structure over its normal junctionless double gate counterpart in terms of reduced short channel effects, threshold voltage roll-off and drain induced barrier lowering.

  4. Mutations in the voltage sensors of domains I and II of Nav1.5 that are associated with arrhythmias and dilated cardiomyopathy generate gating pore currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien eMoreau

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Voltage gated sodium channels (Nav are transmembrane proteins responsible for action potential initiation. Mutations mainly located in the voltage sensor domain (VSD of Nav1.5, the cardiac sodium channel, have been associated with the development of arrhythmias combined with dilated cardiomyopathy. Gating pore currents have been observed with three unrelated mutations associated with similar clinical phenotypes. However, gating pores have never been associated with mutations outside the first domain of Nav1.5.The aim of this study was to explore the possibility that gating pore currents might be caused by the Nav1.5 R225P and R814W mutations (R3, S4 in DI and DII, respectively, which are associated with rhythm disturbances and dilated cardiomyopathy.Nav1.5 WT and mutant channels were transiently expressed in tsA201 cells. The biophysical properties of the alpha pore currents and the presence of gating pore currents were investigated using the patch-clamp technique.We confirmed the previously reported gain of function of the alpha pores of the mutant channels, which mainly consisted of increased window currents mostly caused by shifts in the voltage dependence of activation. We also observed gating pore currents associated with the R225P and R814W mutations. This novel permeation pathway was open under depolarized conditions and remained temporarily open at hyperpolarized potentials after depolarization periods.Gating pore currents could represent a molecular basis for the development of uncommon electrical abnormalities and changes in cardiac morphology. We propose that this biophysical defect be routinely evaluated in the case of Nav1.5 mutations on the VSD.

  5. Identification of an HV 1 voltage-gated proton channel in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Gustavo; Derst, Christian; Franzen, Arne; Mashimo, Yuta; Machida, Ryuichiro; Musset, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The voltage-gated proton channel 1 (HV 1) is an important component of the cellular proton extrusion machinery and is essential for charge compensation during the respiratory burst of phagocytes. HV 1 has been identified in a wide range of eukaryotes throughout the animal kingdom, with the exception of insects. Therefore, it has been proposed that insects do not possess an HV 1 channel. In the present study, we report the existence of an HV 1-type proton channel in insects. We searched insect transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequence databases and found putative HV 1 orthologues in various polyneopteran insects. To confirm that these putative HV 1 orthologues were functional channels, we studied the HV 1 channel of Nicoletia phytophila (NpHV 1), an insect of the Zygentoma order, in more detail. NpHV 1 comprises 239 amino acids and is 33% identical to the human voltage-gated proton channel 1. Patch clamp measurements in a heterologous expression system showed proton selectivity, as well as pH- and voltage-dependent gating. Interestingly, NpHV 1 shows slightly enhanced pH-dependent gating compared to the human channel. Mutations in the first transmembrane segment at position 66 (Asp66), the presumed selectivity filter, lead to a loss of proton-selective conduction, confirming the importance of this aspartate residue in voltage-gated proton channels. Nucleotide sequence data have been deposited in the GenBank database under accession number KT780722. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Nonlinearity of a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Revealed by the Mechanical Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix operates by coupling the voltage-driven motion of a charged group of amino acids to the opening and closing of the pore. In this experiment, we drive this charged group with an ac field and observe the effect on the gating. The measurements for different frequencies and amplitudes of the forcing reveal an essential nonlinearity in the mechanical behavior of the molecule. Within a continuum-mechanics description, we extract the effective dissipation parameter γ for this conformational motion and find γ≈0.2g/s, similar to recent nanorheology measurements on the conformational motion of an enzyme.

  7. Physical implication of transition voltage in organic nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shun; Gao, Xu, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: gaoxu@suda.edu.cn; Zhong, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Zhong-Da; Xu, Jian-Long; Wang, Sui-Dong, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: gaoxu@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2016-07-11

    High-performance pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories, using polystyrene as a tunneling dielectric and Au nanoparticles as a nano-floating-gate, show parallelogram-like transfer characteristics with a featured transition point. The transition voltage at the transition point corresponds to a threshold electric field in the tunneling dielectric, over which stored electrons in the nano-floating-gate will start to leak out. The transition voltage can be modulated depending on the bias configuration and device structure. For p-type active layers, optimized transition voltage should be on the negative side of but close to the reading voltage, which can simultaneously achieve a high ON/OFF ratio and good memory retention.

  8. Low voltage copper phthalocyanine organic thin film transistors with a polymer layer as the gate insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xueqiang; Bi Weihong [College of Information Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang Tong, E-mail: liuxq003@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Low voltage organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) were created using polymethyl-methacrylate-co g-lyciclyl-methacrylate (PMMA-GMA) as the gate dielectric. The OTFTs performed acceptably at supply voltages of about 10 V. From a densely packed copolymer brush, a leakage current as low as 2 x 10{sup -8} A/cm{sup 2} was obtained. From the measured capacitance-insulator frequency characteristics, a dielectric constant in the range 3.9-5.0 was obtained. By controlling the thickness of the gate dielectric, the threshold voltage was reduced from -3.5 to -2.0 V. The copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) based organic thin film transistor could be operated at low voltage and 1.2 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/(V{center_dot}s) mobility. (semiconductor devices)

  9. The NH2terminus regulates voltage-dependent gating of CALHM ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Jessica E; Ma, Zhongming; Foskett, J Kevin

    2017-08-01

    Calcium homeostasis modulator protein-1 (CALHM1) and its Caenorhabditis elegans (ce) homolog, CLHM-1, belong to a new family of physiologically important ion channels that are regulated by voltage and extracellular Ca 2+ (Ca 2+ o ) but lack a canonical voltage-sensing domain. Consequently, the intrinsic voltage-dependent gating mechanisms for CALHM channels are unknown. Here, we performed voltage-clamp experiments on ceCLHM-1 chimeric, deletion, insertion, and point mutants to assess the role of the NH 2 terminus (NT) in CALHM channel gating. Analyses of chimeric channels in which the ceCLHM-1 and human (h)CALHM1 NH 2 termini were interchanged showed that the hCALHM1 NT destabilized channel-closed states, whereas the ceCLHM-1 NT had a stabilizing effect. In the absence of Ca 2+ o , deletion of up to eight amino acids from the ceCLHM-1 NT caused a hyperpolarizing shift in the conductance-voltage relationship with little effect on voltage-dependent slope. However, deletion of nine or more amino acids decreased voltage dependence and induced a residual conductance at hyperpolarized voltages. Insertion of amino acids into the NH 2 -terminal helix also decreased voltage dependence but did not prevent channel closure. Mutation of ceCLHM-1 valine 9 and glutamine 13 altered half-maximal activation and voltage dependence, respectively, in 0 Ca 2+ In 2 mM Ca 2+ o , ceCLHM-1 NH 2 -terminal deletion and point mutant channels closed completely at hyperpolarized voltages with apparent affinity for Ca 2+ o indistinguishable from wild-type ceCLHM-1, although the ceCLHM-1 valine 9 mutant exhibited an altered conductance-voltage relationship and kinetics. We conclude that the NT plays critical roles modulating voltage dependence and stabilizing the closed states of CALHM channels. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. The isolated voltage sensing domain of the Shaker potassium channel forms a voltage-gated cation channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Blunck, Rikard

    2016-10-06

    Domains in macromolecular complexes are often considered structurally and functionally conserved while energetically coupled to each other. In the modular voltage-gated ion channels the central ion-conducting pore is surrounded by four voltage sensing domains (VSDs). Here, the energetic coupling is mediated by interactions between the S4-S5 linker, covalently linking the domains, and the proximal C-terminus. In order to characterize the intrinsic gating of the voltage sensing domain in the absence of the pore domain, the Shaker Kv channel was truncated after the fourth transmembrane helix S4 (Shaker-iVSD). Shaker-iVSD showed significantly altered gating kinetics and formed a cation-selective ion channel with a strong preference for protons. Ion conduction in Shaker-iVSD developed despite identical primary sequence, indicating an allosteric influence of the pore domain. Shaker-iVSD also displays pronounced 'relaxation'. Closing of the pore correlates with entry into relaxation suggesting that the two processes are energetically related.

  11. Implementation of floating gate MOSFET in inverter for threshold voltage tunability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, F. A. S.; Nurulain, D.; Ahmad, N.; Mohamad Isa, M.; Ramli, Muhammad M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the ability of floating gate MOSFET (FGMOS) threshold voltage to be programmed or tuned which is exploited to improve the performance of electronic circuit design. This special characteristic owns by FGMOS is definitely contributes towards low voltage and low power circuit design. The comparison of threshold voltage between FGMOS and conventional NMOS is done in order to prove that FGMOS is able to produce a lower threshold voltage compared to conventional NMOS. In addition, in this paper, an implementation of FGMOS into inverter circuit is also done to show the programmability of FGMOS threshold voltage. The operations of the inverter circuits are verified using Sypnopsys simulation in 0.1μm CMOS technology with supply voltage of 1.8V.

  12. Implementation of floating gate MOSFET in inverter for threshold voltage tunability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa F.A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the ability of floating gate MOSFET (FGMOS threshold voltage to be programmed or tuned which is exploited to improve the performance of electronic circuit design. This special characteristic owns by FGMOS is definitely contributes towards low voltage and low power circuit design. The comparison of threshold voltage between FGMOS and conventional NMOS is done in order to prove that FGMOS is able to produce a lower threshold voltage compared to conventional NMOS. In addition, in this paper, an implementation of FGMOS into inverter circuit is also done to show the programmability of FGMOS threshold voltage. The operations of the inverter circuits are verified using Sypnopsys simulation in 0.1μm CMOS technology with supply voltage of 1.8V.

  13. SGK3 Sensitivity of Voltage Gated K+ Channel Kv1.5 (KCNA5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaab Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The serum & glucocorticoid inducible kinase isoform SGK3 is a powerful regulator of several transporters, ion channels and the Na+/K+ ATPase. Targets of SGK3 include the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2, which is in turn a known regulator of the voltage gated K+ channel Kv1.5 (KCNA5. The present study thus explored whether SGK3 modifies the activity of the voltage gated K+ channel KCNA5, which participates in the regulation of diverse functions including atrial cardiac action potential, activity of vascular smooth muscle cells, insulin release and tumour cell proliferation. Methods: cRNA encoding KCNA5 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with and without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type SGK3, constitutively active S419DSGK3, inactive K191NSGK3 and/or wild type Nedd4-2. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was quantified utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp. Results: Voltage gated current in KCNA5 expressing Xenopus oocytes was significantly enhanced by wild-type SGK3 and S419DSGK3, but not by K191NSGK3. SGK3 was effective in the presence of ouabain (1 mM and thus did not require Na+/K+ ATPase activity. Coexpression of Nedd4-2 decreased the voltage gated current in KCNA5 expressing Xenopus oocytes, an effect largely reversed by additional coexpression of SGK3. Conclusion: SGK3 is a positive regulator of KCNA5, which is at least partially effective by abrogating the effect of Nedd4-2.

  14. T-type voltage-gated calcium channels regulate the tone of mouse efferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian B; Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Cribbs, Leanne L

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the regulation of renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate. Excitation-contraction coupling in afferent arterioles is known to require activation of these channels and we studied their role in the regulation of cortical efferent arteriol...... publication, 10 November 2010; doi:10.1038/ki.2010.429....

  15. How Do RIM-BPs Link Voltage-Gated Ca(2+) Channels to Evoked Neurotransmitter Release?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying C; Kavalali, Ege T

    2015-09-23

    Coupling between voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx and synaptic vesicle exocytosis is essential for rapid evoked neurotransmission. Acuna et al. show that the knockout of RIM-BPs, which are key structural components of this coupling, decreases the reliability of evoked neurotransmitter release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. IMPROVING BANDWIDTH OF FLIPPED VOLTAGE FOLLOWER USING GATE-BODY DRIVEN TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VANDANA NIRANJAN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new approach to enhance the bandwidth of flipped voltage follower is explored. The proposed approach is based on gate-body driven technique. This technique boosts the transconductance in a MOS transistor as both gate and body/bulk terminals are tied together and used as signal input. This novel technique appears as a good solution to merge the advantages of gate-driven and bulk-driven techniques and suppress their disadvantages. The gate-body driven technique utilizes body effect to enable low voltage low power operation and improves the overall performance of flipped voltage follower, providing it with low output impedance, high input impedance and bandwidth extension ratio of 2.614. The most attractive feature is that bandwidth enhancement has been achieved without use of any passive component or extra circuitry. Simulations in PSpice environment for 180 nm CMOS technology verified the predicted theoretical results. The improved flipped voltage follower is particularly interesting for high frequency low noise signal processing applications.

  17. New Role of P/Q-type Voltage-gated Calcium Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the depolarization-evoked contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), with L-type channels being the classical channel involved in this mechanism. However, it has been demonstrated that the CaV2.1 subunit, which encodes a neuronal isoform o...

  18. Functional voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in muscle fibers of the platyhelminth Dugesia tigrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbett, Peter; Day, Timothy A

    2003-03-01

    The presence and function of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels were examined in individual muscle fibers freshly dispersed from the triclad turbellarian Dugesia tigrina. Individual muscle fibers contracted in response to elevated extracellular K(+) in a concentration-dependent fashion. These depolarization-induced contractions were blocked by extracellular Co(2+) (2.5 mM), suggesting that they were dependent on depolarization-induced Ca(2+) influx across the sarcolemma. A voltage-gated inward current was apparent in whole cell recordings when the outward K(+) current was abolished by replacement of intracellular K(+) by Cs(+). This inward current was amplified with increasing concentration (voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Further, and supporting the hypothesis that the inward current was mediated by these Ca(2+) channels, the Ba(2+) current was blocked by extracellular Co(2+) (2.5 mM) but not by tetrodotoxin (5 microM). Action potentials were generated by the muscle fibers in the presence of, but not in the absence of, extracellular Ba(2+) (5 mM). These data are the first clear demonstration of a voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel current in platyhelminth muscle, and they demonstrate a role for Ca(2+) influx in depolarization-induced contractions of muscle in these organisms.

  19. The voltage-gated potassium channel subunit, Kv1.3, is expressed in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The Shaker-type voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.3, is believed to be restricted in distribution to lymphocytes and neurons. In lymphocytes, this channel has gained intense attention since it has been proven that inhibition of Kv1.3 channels compromise T lymphocyte activation. To investigate...

  20. Full gate voltage range Lambert-function based methodology for FDSOI MOSFET parameter extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatsori, T. A.; Theodorou, C. G.; Ioannidis, E. G.; Haendler, S.; Josse, E.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2015-09-01

    A new full gate voltage range methodology using a Lambert W function based inversion charge model, for extracting the electrical parameters in FDSOI nano-MOSFET devices, has been developed. Split capacitance-voltage measurements carried out on 14 nm technology FDSOI devices show that the inversion charge variation with gate voltage can be well described by a Lambert W function. Based on the drain current equation in the linear region including the inversion charge described by the Lambert function of gate voltage and the standard mobility equation enables five electrical MOSFET parameters to be extracted from experimental Id-Vg measurements (ideality factor, threshold voltage, low field mobility, first and second order mobility attenuation factors). The extracted parameters were compared with those extracted by the well-known Y-function in strong inversion region. The present methodology for extracting the electrical MOSFET parameters was verified over a wide range of channel lengths on nano-scale FDSOI devices, demonstrating its simplicity, accuracy and robustness.

  1. Fast sodium channel gating supports localized and efficient axonal action potential initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hieber, Christoph; Bischofberger, Josef

    2010-07-28

    Action potentials (APs) are initiated in the proximal axon of most neurons. In myelinated axons, a 50-times higher sodium channel density in the initial segment compared to the soma may account for this phenomenon. However, little is known about sodium channel density and gating in proximal unmyelinated axons. To study the mechanisms underlying AP initiation in unmyelinated hippocampal mossy fibers of adult mice, we recorded sodium currents in axonal and somatic membrane patches. We demonstrate that sodium channel density in the proximal axon is approximately 5 times higher than in the soma. Furthermore, sodium channel activation and inactivation are approximately 2 times faster. Modeling revealed that the fast activation localized the initiation site to the proximal axon even upon strong synaptic stimulation, while fast inactivation contributed to energy-efficient membrane charging during APs. Thus, sodium channel gating and density in unmyelinated mossy fiber axons appear to be specialized for robust AP initiation and propagation with minimal current flow.

  2. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Alan Zaydman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD and pore-gate (PGD structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7 channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1 channels. In this review, we put these findings in the context of the current understanding of voltage-dependent gating, lipid modulation of Kv channel activation, and PIP2-regulation of KCNQ channels. We suggest that lipid-mediated coupling of functional domains is a common mechanism among KCNQ channels that may be applicable to other Kv channels and membrane proteins.

  3. S1-S3 counter charges in the voltage sensor module of a mammalian sodium channel regulate fast inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groome, James R; Winston, Vern

    2013-05-01

    The movement of positively charged S4 segments through the electric field drives the voltage-dependent gating of ion channels. Studies of prokaryotic sodium channels provide a mechanistic view of activation facilitated by electrostatic interactions of negatively charged residues in S1 and S2 segments, with positive counterparts in the S4 segment. In mammalian sodium channels, S4 segments promote domain-specific functions that include activation and several forms of inactivation. We tested the idea that S1-S3 countercharges regulate eukaryotic sodium channel functions, including fast inactivation. Using structural data provided by bacterial channels, we constructed homology models of the S1-S4 voltage sensor module (VSM) for each domain of the mammalian skeletal muscle sodium channel hNaV1.4. These show that side chains of putative countercharges in hNaV1.4 are oriented toward the positive charge complement of S4. We used mutagenesis to define the roles of conserved residues in the extracellular negative charge cluster (ENC), hydrophobic charge region (HCR), and intracellular negative charge cluster (INC). Activation was inhibited with charge-reversing VSM mutations in domains I-III. Charge reversal of ENC residues in domains III (E1051R, D1069K) and IV (E1373K, N1389K) destabilized fast inactivation by decreasing its probability, slowing entry, and accelerating recovery. Several INC mutations increased inactivation from closed states and slowed recovery. Our results extend the functional characterization of VSM countercharges to fast inactivation, and support the premise that these residues play a critical role in domain-specific gating transitions for a mammalian sodium channel.

  4. Ultra Low Voltage Class AB Switched Current Memory Cells Based on Floating Gate Transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mucha, Igor

    1999-01-01

    A with a supply voltage down to 1 V, and relatively small device dimensions. In spite of the relatively large signal processing range, the class AB operation of the cell enabled a very low quiescent current consumption, 1 mu A in this design, resulting in a very high current efficiency and effective power......A proposal for a class AB switched current memory cell, suitable for ultra-low-voltage applications is presented. The proposal employs transistors with floating gates, allowing to build analog building blocks for ultralow supply voltage operation also in CMOS processes with high threshold voltages...... current memory cells were designed using a CMOS process with threshold voltages V-T0n = \\V-T0p\\ = 0.9 V for the n- and p-channel devices. Both hand calculations and PSPICE simulations showed that the designed example switched current memory cell allowed a maximum signal range better than +/-18 mu...

  5. Calcium-induced voltage gating in single conical nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwy, Zuzanna S; Powell, Matthew R; Petrov, Alexander; Kalman, Eric; Trautmann, Christina; Eisenberg, Robert S

    2006-08-01

    We examine time signals of ion current through single conically shaped nanopores in the presence of sub-millimolar concentrations of calcium ions. We show that calcium induces voltage-dependent ion current fluctuations in time in addition to the previously reported negative incremental resistance (Nano Lett. 2006, 6, 473-477). These current fluctuations occur on the millisecond time scale at voltages at which the effect of negative incremental resistance was observed. We explain the fluctuations as results of transient binding of calcium ions to carboxyl groups on the pore walls that cause transient changes in electric potential inside a conical nanopore. We support this explanation by recordings of ion current in the presence of manganese ions that bind to carboxyl groups 3 orders of magnitude more tightly than calcium ions. The system of a single conical nanopore with calcium ions is compared to a semiconductor device of a unijunction transistor in electronic circuits. A unijunction transistor also exhibits negative incremental resistance and current instabilities.

  6. Studies of alpha-helicity and intersegmental interactions in voltage-gated Na+ channels: S2D4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Ma

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Much data, including crystallographic, support structural models of sodium and potassium channels consisting of S1-S4 transmembrane segments (the "voltage-sensing domain" clustered around a central pore-forming region (S5-S6 segments and the intervening loop. Voltage gated sodium channels have four non-identical domains which differentiates them from the homotetrameric potassium channels that form the basis for current structural models. Since potassium and sodium channels also exhibit many different functional characteristics and the fourth domain (D4 of sodium channels differs in function from other domains (D1-D3, we have explored its structure in order to determine whether segments in D4 of sodium channels differ significantly from that determined for potassium channels. We have probed the secondary and tertiary structure and the role of the individual amino acid residues of the S2D4 of Na(v1.4 by employing cysteine-scanning mutagenesis (with tryptophan and glutamine substituted for native cysteine. A Fourier transform power spectrum of perturbations in free energy of steady-state inactivation gating (using midpoint potentials and slopes of Boltzmann equation fits of channel availability, h(infinity-V plots indicates a substantial amount of alpha-helical structure in S2D4 (peak at 106 degrees, alpha-Periodicity Index (alpha-PI of 3.10, This conclusion is supported by alpha-PI values of 3.28 and 2.84 for the perturbations in rate constants of entry into (beta and exit from (alpha fast inactivation at 0 mV for mutant channels relative to WT channels assuming a simple two-state model for transition from the open to inactivated state. The results of cysteine substitution at the two most sensitive sites of the S2D4 alpha-helix (N1382 and E1392C support the existence of electrostatic network interactions between S2 and other transmembrane segments within Na(v1.4D4 similar to but not identical to those proposed for K+ channels.

  7. Polarized localization of voltage-gated Na+ channels is regulated by concerted FGF13 and FGF14 action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablo, Juan Lorenzo; Wang, Chaojian; Presby, Matthew M; Pitt, Geoffrey S

    2016-05-10

    Clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) within the neuronal axon initial segment (AIS) is critical for efficient action potential initiation. Although initially inserted into both somatodendritic and axonal membranes, VGSCs are concentrated within the axon through mechanisms that include preferential axonal targeting and selective somatodendritic endocytosis. How the endocytic machinery specifically targets somatic VGSCs is unknown. Here, using knockdown strategies, we show that noncanonical FGF13 binds directly to VGSCs in hippocampal neurons to limit their somatodendritic surface expression, although exerting little effect on VGSCs within the AIS. In contrast, homologous FGF14, which is highly concentrated in the proximal axon, binds directly to VGSCs to promote their axonal localization. Single-point mutations in FGF13 or FGF14 abrogating VGSC interaction in vitro cannot support these specific functions in neurons. Thus, our data show how the concerted actions of FGF13 and FGF14 regulate the polarized localization of VGSCs that supports efficient action potential initiation.

  8. MoS{sub 2} oxygen sensor with gate voltage stress induced performance enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yu; Lin, Zhenhua; Thong, John T. L.; Chan, Daniel S. H.; Zhu, Chunxiang, E-mail: elezhucx@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2015-09-21

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have recently attracted wide attention and rapidly established themselves in various applications. In particular, 2D materials are regarded as promising building blocks for gas sensors due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, ease in miniaturization, and flexibility in enabling wearable electronics. Compared with other 2D materials, MoS{sub 2} is particularly intriguing because it has been widely researched and exhibits semiconducting behavior. Here, we have fabricated MoS{sub 2} resistor based O{sub 2} sensors with a back gate configuration on a 285 nm SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The effects of applying back gate voltage stress on O{sub 2} sensing performance have been systematically investigated. With a positive gate voltage stress, the sensor response improves and the response is improved to 29.2% at O{sub 2} partial pressure of 9.9 × 10{sup −5} millibars with a +40 V back-gate bias compared to 21.2% at O{sub 2} partial pressure of 1.4 × 10{sup −4} millibars without back-gate bias; while under a negative gate voltage stress of −40 V, a fast and full recovery can be achieved at room temperature. In addition, a method in determining O{sub 2} partial pressure with a detectability as low as 6.7 × 10{sup −7} millibars at a constant vacuum pressure is presented and its potential as a vacuum gauge is briefly discussed.

  9. Voltage-Gated Proton Channels: Molecular Biology, Physiology, and Pathophysiology of the HV Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels (HV) are unique, in part because the ion they conduct is unique. HV channels are perfectly selective for protons and have a very small unitary conductance, both arguably manifestations of the extremely low H+ concentration in physiological solutions. They open with membrane depolarization, but their voltage dependence is strongly regulated by the pH gradient across the membrane (ΔpH), with the result that in most species they normally conduct only outward current. The HV channel protein is strikingly similar to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD, the first four membrane-spanning segments) of voltage-gated K+ and Na+ channels. In higher species, HV channels exist as dimers in which each protomer has its own conduction pathway, yet gating is cooperative. HV channels are phylogenetically diverse, distributed from humans to unicellular marine life, and perhaps even plants. Correspondingly, HV functions vary widely as well, from promoting calcification in coccolithophores and triggering bioluminescent flashes in dinoflagellates to facilitating killing bacteria, airway pH regulation, basophil histamine release, sperm maturation, and B lymphocyte responses in humans. Recent evidence that hHV1 may exacerbate breast cancer metastasis and cerebral damage from ischemic stroke highlights the rapidly expanding recognition of the clinical importance of hHV1. PMID:23589829

  10. Expression and distribution of voltage-gated ion channels in ferret sinoatrial node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmajothi, Mulugu V; Morales, Michael J; Campbell, Donald L; Steenbergen, Charles; Strauss, Harold C

    2010-10-01

    Spontaneous diastolic depolarization in the sinoatrial (SA) node enables it to serve as pacemaker of the heart. The variable cell morphology within the SA node predicts that ion channel expression would be heterogeneous and different from that in the atrium. To evaluate ion channel heterogeneity within the SA node, we used fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine ion channel expression in the ferret SA node region and atrial appendage. SA nodal cells were distinguished from surrounding cardiac myocytes by expression of the slow (SA node) and cardiac (surrounding tissue) forms of troponin I. Nerve cells in the sections were identified by detection of GAP-43 and cytoskeletal middle neurofilament. Transcript expression was characterized for the 4 hyperpolarization-activated cation channels, 6 voltage-gated Na(+) channels, 3 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, 24 voltage-gated K(+) channel α-subunits, and 3 ancillary subunits. To ensure that transcript expression was representative of protein expression, immunofluorescence was used to verify localization patterns of voltage-dependent K(+) channels. Colocalizations were performed to observe any preferential patterns. Some overlapping and nonoverlapping binding patterns were observed. Measurement of different cation channel transcripts showed heterogeneous expression with many different patterns of expression, attesting to the complexity of electrical activity in the SA node. This study provides insight into the possible role ion channel heterogeneity plays in SA node pacemaker activity.

  11. Evidence for functional diversity between the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 and its closest related protein HVRP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris H Kim

    Full Text Available The Hv1 channel and voltage-sensitive phosphatases share with voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels the ability to detect changes in membrane potential through voltage-sensing domains (VSDs. However, they lack the pore domain typical of these other channels. NaV, KV, and CaV proteins can be found in neurons and muscles, where they play important roles in electrical excitability. In contrast, VSD-containing proteins lacking a pore domain are found in non-excitable cells and are not involved in neuronal signaling. Here, we report the identification of HVRP1, a protein related to the Hv1 channel (from which the name Hv1 Related Protein 1 is derived, which we find to be expressed primarily in the central nervous system, and particularly in the cerebellum. Within the cerebellar tissue, HVRP1 is specifically expressed in granule neurons, as determined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Analysis of subcellular distribution via electron microscopy and immunogold labeling reveals that the protein localizes on the post-synaptic side of contacts between glutamatergic mossy fibers and the granule cells. We also find that, despite the similarities in amino acid sequence and structural organization between Hv1 and HVRP1, the two proteins have distinct functional properties. The high conservation of HVRP1 in vertebrates and its cellular and subcellular localizations suggest an important function in the nervous system.

  12. Mapping the Interaction Site for a β-Scorpion Toxin in the Pore Module of Domain III of Voltage-gated Na+ Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Joel Z.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels initiates and propagates action potentials in electrically excitable cells. β-Scorpion toxins, including toxin IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssIV), enhance activation of NaV channels. CssIV stabilizes the voltage sensor in domain II in its activated state via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. Amino acid residues required for the action of CssIV have been identified in the S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of domain II. The extracellular loops of domain III are also involved in toxin action, but individual amino acid residues have not been identified. We used site-directed mutagenesis and voltage clamp recording to investigate amino acid residues of domain III that are involved in CssIV action. In the IIISS2-S6 loop, five substitutions at four positions altered voltage-sensor trapping by CssIVE15A. Three substitutions (E1438A, D1445A, and D1445Y) markedly decreased voltage-sensor trapping, whereas the other two substitutions (N1436G and L1439A) increased voltage-sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that residues in IIISS2-S6 make both positive and negative interactions with CssIV. N1436G enhanced voltage-sensor trapping via increased binding affinity to the resting state, whereas L1439A increased voltage-sensor trapping efficacy. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the toxin-channel interaction was developed using the Rosetta modeling method. These data provide additional molecular insight into the voltage-sensor trapping mechanism of toxin action and define a three-point interaction site for β-scorpion toxins on NaV channels. Binding of α- and β-scorpion toxins to two distinct, pseudo-symmetrically organized receptor sites on NaV channels acts synergistically to modify channel gating and paralyze prey. PMID:22761417

  13. Comprehensive behavioral model of dual-gate high voltage JFET and pinch resistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banáš, Stanislav; Paňko, Václav; Dobeš, Josef; Hanyš, Petr; Divín, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Many analog technologies operate in large voltage range and therefore include at least one or more high voltage devices built from low doped layers. Such devices exhibit effects not covered by standard compact models, namely pinching (depletion) effects, in high voltage FETs often called quasisaturation. For example, the conventional compact JFET model is insufficient and oversimplified. Its scalability is controlled by the area factor, which only multiplies currents and capacitances but does not take into account existing 3-D effects. Also the optional second independent gate is missing. Therefore, the customized four terminal (4T) model written in Verilog-A (FitzPatrick and Miller, 2007; Sagdeo, 2007) was developed. It converges very well, its simulation speed is comparable with conventional compact models, and contains all required phenomena, including parasitic effects as, for example, impact ionization. This model has universal usage for many types of devices in various high voltage technologies such as stand-alone voltage dependent resistor, pinch resistor, drift area of power FET, part of special high side or start-up devices, and dual-gate JFET.

  14. Nonlinearity of a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Revealed by the Mechanical Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amila Ariyaratne

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix operates by coupling the voltage-driven motion of a charged group of amino acids to the opening and closing of the pore. In this experiment, we drive this charged group with an ac field and observe the effect on the gating. The measurements for different frequencies and amplitudes of the forcing reveal an essential nonlinearity in the mechanical behavior of the molecule. Within a continuum-mechanics description, we extract the effective dissipation parameter γ for this conformational motion and find γ≈0.2  g/s, similar to recent nanorheology measurements on the conformational motion of an enzyme.

  15. Axonal voltage-gated ion channels as pharmacological targets for pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Romer Rosberg, Mette

    2013-01-01

    maladaptive leading to a persistent and debilitating pain state referred to as chronic pain corresponding to the clinical description of neuropathic/chronic inflammatory pain. There is little agreement to what causes peripheral chronic pain other than hyperactivity of the nociceptive DRG neurons which......-gated K(+) channels and blockers of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels that were found to reduce neuronal activity were also found to be effective in neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. The isoforms of these channels present on nociceptive axons have limited specificity....... The rationale for considering axonal voltage-gated ion channels as targets for pain treatment comes from the accumulating evidence that chronic pain states are associated with a dysregulation of these channels that could alter their specificity and make them more susceptible to pharmacological modulation...

  16. Effect of gate voltage polarity on the ionic liquid gating behavior of NdNiO3/NdGaO3 heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqi Dong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of gate voltage polarity on the behavior of NdNiO3 epitaxial thin films during ionic liquid gating is studied using in situ synchrotron X-ray techniques. We show that while negative biases have no discernible effect on the structure or composition of the films, large positive gate voltages result in the injection of a large concentration of oxygen vacancies (∼3% and pronounced lattice expansion (0.17% in addition to a 1000-fold increase in sheet resistance at room temperature. Despite the creation of large defect densities, the heterostructures exhibit a largely reversible switching behavior when sufficient time is provided for the vacancies to migrate in and out of the thin film surface. The results confirm that electrostatic gating takes place at negative gate voltages for p-type complex oxides while positive voltages favor the electrochemical reduction of Ni3+. Switching between positive and negative gate voltages therefore involves a combination of electronic and ionic doping processes that may be utilized in future electrochemical transistors.

  17. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC with cerebellar involvement in a teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Langille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  18. Glycosylation of voltage-gated calcium channels in health and disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lazniewska, Joanna; Weiss, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1859, č. 5 (2017), s. 662-668 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : calcium channels * voltage-gated calcium channels * N-glycosylation * ancillary subunit * trafficking * stability Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  19. Cortactin Controls Surface Expression of the Voltage-gated Potassium Channel KV10.1

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Solveig; Ninkovic, Milena; Kohl, Tobias; Lörinczi, Éva; Pardo, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel aberrantly expressed in many cases of cancer, and participates in cancer initiation and tumor progression. Its action as an oncoprotein can be inhibited by a functional monoclonal antibody, indicating a role for channels located at the plasma membrane, accessible to the antibody. Cortactin is an actin-interacting protein implicated in cytoskeletal architecture and often amplified in several types of cancer. In this study, we describe a physical and ...

  20. PIST (GOPC) modulates the oncogenic voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Solveig; Ninkovic, Milena; Kohl, Tobias; Pardo, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Although crucial for their correct function, the mechanisms controlling surface expression of ion channels are poorly understood. In the case of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1, this is determinant not only for its physiological function in brain, but also for its pathophysiology in tumors and possible use as a therapeutic target. The Golgi resident protein PIST binds several membrane proteins, thereby modulating their expression. Here we describe a PDZ domain-mediated interaction ...

  1. PIST (GOPC) modulates the oncogenic voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1

    OpenAIRE

    Solveig eHerrmann; Milena eNinkovic; Tobias eKohl; Pardo, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Although crucial for their correct function, the mechanisms controlling surface expression of ion channels are poorly understood. In the case of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1,this is determinant not only for its physiological function in brain, but also for its pathophysiology in tumors and possible use as a therapeutic target. The Golgi resident protein PIST binds several membrane proteins, thereby modulating their expression. Here we describe a PDZ domain-mediated interaction o...

  2. Ephaptic coupling rescues conduction failure in weakly coupled cardiac tissue with voltage-gated gap junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    Electrical conduction in cardiac tissue is usually considered to be primarily facilitated by gap junctions, providing a pathway between the intracellular spaces of neighboring cells. However, recent studies have highlighted the role of coupling via extracellular electric fields, also known as ephaptic coupling, particularly in the setting of reduced gap junction expression. Further, in the setting of reduced gap junctional coupling, voltage-dependent gating of gap junctions, an oft-neglected biophysical property in computational studies, produces a positive feedback that promotes conduction failure. We hypothesized that ephaptic coupling can break the positive feedback loop and rescue conduction failure in weakly coupled cardiac tissue. In a computational tissue model incorporating voltage-gated gap junctions and ephaptic coupling, we demonstrate that ephaptic coupling can rescue conduction failure in weakly coupled tissue. Further, ephaptic coupling increased conduction velocity in weakly coupled tissue, and importantly, reduced the minimum gap junctional coupling necessary for conduction, most prominently at fast pacing rates. Finally, we find that, although neglecting gap junction voltage-gating results in negligible differences in well coupled tissue, more significant differences occur in weakly coupled tissue, greatly underestimating the minimal gap junctional coupling that can maintain conduction. Our study suggests that ephaptic coupling plays a conduction-preserving role, particularly at rapid heart rates.

  3. Dynamic PIP2 interactions with voltage sensor elements contribute to KCNQ2 channel gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiansen; Zhou, Pingzheng; Chen, Zhuxi; Li, Min; Jiang, Hualiang; Gao, Zhaobing; Yang, Huaiyu

    2013-01-01

    The S4 segment and the S4–S5 linker of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are crucial for voltage sensing. Previous studies on the Shaker and Kv1.2 channels have shown that phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) exerts opposing effects on Kv channels, up-regulating the current amplitude, while decreasing the voltage sensitivity. Interactions between PIP2 and the S4 segment or the S4–S5 linker in the closed state have been highlighted to explain the effects of PIP2 on voltage sensitivity. Here, we show that PIP2 preferentially interacts with the S4–S5 linker in the open-state KCNQ2 (Kv7.2) channel, whereas it contacts the S2–S3 loop in the closed state. These interactions are different from the PIP2–Shaker and PIP2–Kv1.2 interactions. Consistently, PIP2 exerts different effects on KCNQ2 relative to the Shaker and Kv1.2 channels; PIP2 up-regulates both the current amplitude and voltage sensitivity of the KCNQ2 channel. Disruption of the interaction of PIP2 with the S4–S5 linker by a single mutation decreases the voltage sensitivity and current amplitude, whereas disruption of the interaction with the S2–S3 loop does not alter voltage sensitivity. These results provide insight into the mechanism of PIP2 action on KCNQ channels. In the closed state, PIP2 is anchored at the S2–S3 loop; upon channel activation, PIP2 interacts with the S4–S5 linker and is involved in channel gating. PMID:24277843

  4. Fast voltage gating of Ca2+ release in frog skeletal muscle revealed by supercharging pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A M; Vergara, J L

    1998-09-01

    1. In single frog skeletal muscle fibres, we utilized supercharging voltage clamp command pulses to boost the rate of depolarization in the transverse tubular system (T-system) such that 95 % of steady-state potential is achieved in muscle fibres indicate that peripheral regions of the T-system are not significantly overcompensated under these conditions. 2. We explored the impact of accelerating T-system depolarization on voltage-dependent events of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling by measuring charge movement currents (CMCs) and Ca2+ fluorescence transients in response to both supercharging and conventional step pulses. 3. When compared with CMCs elicited by step pulses, supercharging CMCs are larger, and their kinetics more closely resemble those of gating current records reported for ionic channels. Furthermore, they decay bi-exponentially (tau fast range, 1.3-1.8 ms; tau slow range, 7.3-11.9 ms), whereas step CMCs fall with a single exponential time course (tau range, 12.5-26.7 ms). 4. Similarly, supercharging produces a distinct acceleration in Ca2+ release transients, which show little evidence of the voltage-dependent onset latencies previously encountered using step pulses. 5. The use of this novel methodology in skeletal muscle unveils a previously undetected component of charge movement, the rapid, voltage-dependent recruitment of which may provide the basis for understanding the fast gating of physiological E-C coupling.

  5. Analytical modeling of threshold voltage for Cylindrical Gate All Around (CGAA MOSFET using center potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P. Pradhan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analytical threshold voltage model is proposed for a cylindrical gate-all-around (CGAA MOSFET by solving the 2-D Poisson’s equation in the cylindrical coordinate system. A comparison is made for both the center and the surface potential model of CGAA MOSFET. This paper claims that the calculation of threshold voltage using center potential is more accurate rather than the calculation from surface potential. The effects of the device parameters like the drain bias (VDS, oxide thickness (tox, channel thickness (r, etc., on the threshold voltage are also studied in this paper. The model is verified with 3D numerical device simulator Sentaurus from Synopsys Inc.

  6. Regulation of Voltage Gated K+ Channel KCNE1/KCNQ1 by the Janus Kinase JAK3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshed Warsi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Janus kinase 3 (JAK3, a kinase mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells, has been shown to down-regulate the Na+/K+ ATPase and participate in the regulation of several ion channels and carriers. Channels expressed in thymus and regulating the abundance of T lymphocytes include the voltage gated K+ channel KCNE1/KCNQ1. The present study explored whether JAK3 contributes to the regulation of KCNE1/KCNQ1. Methods: cRNA encoding KCNE1/KCNQ1 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type JAK3, constitutively active A568VJAK3, or inactive K851AJAK3. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was measured utilizing two electrode voltage clamp. Results: KCNE1/KCNQ1 activity was significantly increased by wild-type JAK3 and A568VJAK3, but not by K851AJAK3. The difference between oocytes expressing KCNE1/KCNQ1 alone and oocytes expressing KCNE1/KCNQ1 with A568VJAK3 was virtually abrogated by JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154 (22 µM but not by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin D (50 nM. Inhibition of KCNE1/KCNQ1 protein insertion into the cell membrane by brefeldin A (5 µM resulted in a decline of the voltage gated current, which was similar in the absence and presence of A568VJAK3, suggesting that A568VJAK3 did not accelerate KCNE1/KCNQ1 protein retrieval from the cell membrane. Conclusion: JAK3 contributes to the regulation of membrane KCNE1/KCNQ1 activity, an effect sensitive to JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154.

  7. Regulation of Voltage Gated K+ Channel KCNE1/KCNQ1 by the Janus Kinase JAK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsi, Jamshed; Abousaab, Abeer; Fezai, Myriam; Elvira, Bernat; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Janus kinase 3 (JAK3), a kinase mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells, has been shown to down-regulate the Na+/K+ ATPase and participate in the regulation of several ion channels and carriers. Channels expressed in thymus and regulating the abundance of T lymphocytes include the voltage gated K+ channel KCNE1/KCNQ1. The present study explored whether JAK3 contributes to the regulation of KCNE1/KCNQ1. cRNA encoding KCNE1/KCNQ1 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type JAK3, constitutively active A568VJAK3, or inactive K851AJAK3. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was measured utilizing two electrode voltage clamp. KCNE1/KCNQ1 activity was significantly increased by wild-type JAK3 and A568VJAK3, but not by K851AJAK3. The difference between oocytes expressing KCNE1/KCNQ1 alone and oocytes expressing KCNE1/KCNQ1 with A568VJAK3 was virtually abrogated by JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154 (22 µM) but not by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin D (50 nM). Inhibition of KCNE1/KCNQ1 protein insertion into the cell membrane by brefeldin A (5 µM) resulted in a decline of the voltage gated current, which was similar in the absence and presence of A568VJAK3, suggesting that A568VJAK3 did not accelerate KCNE1/KCNQ1 protein retrieval from the cell membrane. JAK3 contributes to the regulation of membrane KCNE1/KCNQ1 activity, an effect sensitive to JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Low-voltage organic transistors based on solution processed semiconductors and self-assembled monolayer gate dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woebkenberg, Paul H.; Ball, James; Kooistra, Floris B.; Hummelen, Jan C.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Reduction in the operating voltage of organic transistors is of high importance for successful implementation in low-power electronic applications. Here we report on low-voltage n-channel transistors fabricated employing a combination of soluble organic semiconductors and a self-assembled gate

  9. Solution processed self-assembled monolayer gate dielectrics for low-voltage organic transistors. : Section Title: Electric Phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ball, James; Wobkenberg, Paul H.; Colleaux, Florian; Kooistra, Floris B.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Low-voltage org. transistors are sought for implementation in high vol. low-power portable electronics of the future. Here we assess the suitability of three phosphonic acid based self-assembling mols. for use as ultra-thin gate dielecs. in low-voltage soln. processable org. field-effect

  10. Chondroitin sulfates act as extracellular gating modifiers on voltage-dependent ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigetti, Davide; Andrini, Olga; Clerici, Moira; Negrini, Daniela; Passi, Alberto; Moriondo, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfates are glycosaminoglycans bound to core proteins of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix and perineuronal nets surrounding many types of neurones. Chondroitin 4- and chondroitin 6- sulfate can bind calcium ions with different affinities, depending on their sulfation position. Extracellular calcium plays a key role in determining the transmembrane potential sensed by voltage-operated ion channels (VOCs) by means of the "surface screening effect" theory (Gouy-Chapman-Stern theory). We wanted to test whether chondroitin sulfates at physiological concentration can effectively modulate the gating properties of VOCs. We recorded in patch-clamp experiments the shift of h and voltage-dependent calcium currents activation curves of Xenopus laevis photoreceptors perfused with chondroitin sulfate solutions in physiological extracellular calcium concentration. We found that chondroitin 4- and 6- sulfate, with different capabilities, can shift the activation curve of h and voltage-dependent calcium channels, compatibly with the surface screening effect theory. We conclude that chondroitin sulfates can alter VOCs gating by modulating the calcium concentration in the extracellular microenvironment. This phenomenon may explain why alterations in the chondroitin sulfation and abundance in the extracellular matrix are found along with altered neuronal function in pathological conditions. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Samira; Stein, Matthias; Elinder, Fredrik; Andersson, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD), the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA) and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins.

  12. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (KV channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD, the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins.

  13. Tunable Radiation Response in Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Gate Dielectrics for Low-Voltage Graphene Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Heather N; Cress, Cory D; McMorrow, Julian J; Schmucker, Scott W; Sangwan, Vinod K; Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Kumar, Rajan; Puntambekar, Kanan P; Luck, Kyle A; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-03-02

    Solution-processed semiconductor and dielectric materials are attractive for future lightweight, low-voltage, flexible electronics, but their response to ionizing radiation environments is not well understood. Here, we investigate the radiation response of graphene field-effect transistors employing multilayer, solution-processed zirconia self-assembled nanodielectrics (Zr-SANDs) with ZrOx as a control. Total ionizing dose (TID) testing is carried out in situ using a vacuum ultraviolet source to a total radiant exposure (RE) of 23.1 μJ/cm(2). The data reveal competing charge density accumulation within and between the individual dielectric layers. Additional measurements of a modified Zr-SAND show that varying individual layer thicknesses within the gate dielectric tuned the TID response. This study thus establishes that the radiation response of graphene electronics can be tailored to achieve a desired radiation sensitivity by incorporating hybrid organic-inorganic gate dielectrics.

  14. Anomalous positive flatband voltage shifts in metal gate stacks containing rare-earth oxide capping layers

    KAUST Repository

    Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.

    2012-03-09

    It is shown that the well-known negative flatband voltage (VFB) shift, induced by rare-earth oxide capping in metal gate stacks, can be completely reversed in the absence of the silicon overlayer. Using TaN metal gates and Gd2O3-doped dielectric, we measure a ∼350 mV negative shift with the Si overlayer present and a ∼110 mV positive shift with the Si overlayer removed. This effect is correlated to a positive change in the average electrostatic potential at the TaN/dielectric interface which originates from an interfacial dipole. The dipole is created by the replacement of interfacial oxygen atoms in the HfO2 lattice with nitrogen atoms from TaN.

  15. Stochastic Nonlinear Equations Describing the Mesoscopic Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Tejo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a stochastic nonlinear system to model the gating activity coupled with the membrane potential for a typical neuron. It distinguishes two different levels: a macroscopic one, for the membrane potential, and a mesoscopic one, for the gating process through the movement of its voltage sensors. Such a nonlinear system can be handled to form a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model, which links those two levels unlike the original deterministic Hodgkin-Huxley model which is positioned at a macroscopic scale only. Also, we show that an interacting particle system can be used to approximate our model, which is an approximation technique similar to the jump Markov processes, used to approximate the original Hodgkin-Huxley model.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Voltage Gated Cation Channels: Insights on Voltage-Sensor Domain Function and Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie eDelemotte

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery in the 1950s, the structure and function of voltage gated cation channels (VGCC has been largely understood thanks to results stemming from electrophysiology, pharmacology, spectroscopy and structural biology. Over the past decade, computational methods such as molecular dynamics (MD simulations have also contributed, providing molecular level information that can be tested against experimental results, thereby allowing the validation of the models and protocols. Importantly, MD can shed light on elements of VGCC function that cannot be easily accessed through classical experiments. Here, we review the results of recent MD simulations addressing key questions that pertain to the function and modulation of the VGCC’s voltage sensor domain (VSD highlighting: 1 the movement of the S4-helix basic residues during channel activation, articulating how the electrical driving force acts upon them; 2 the nature of the VSD intermediate states on transitioning between open and closed states of the VGCC; and 3 the molecular level effects on the VSD arising from mutations of specific S4 positively charged residues involved in certain genetic diseases.

  17. Direct evidence of conformational changes associated with voltage gating in a voltage sensor protein by time-resolved X-ray/neutron interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronin, Andrey Y; Nordgren, C Erik; Strzalka, Joseph W; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Worcester, David L; Lauter, Valeria; Freites, J Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J; Blasie, J Kent

    2014-04-29

    The voltage sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-gated cation (e.g., Na(+), K(+)) channels central to neurological signal transmission can function as a distinct module. When linked to an otherwise voltage-insensitive, ion-selective membrane pore, the VSD imparts voltage sensitivity to the channel. Proteins homologous with the VSD have recently been found to function themselves as voltage-gated proton channels or to impart voltage sensitivity to enzymes. Determining the conformational changes associated with voltage gating in the VSD itself in the absence of a pore domain thereby gains importance. We report the direct measurement of changes in the scattering-length density (SLD) profile of the VSD protein, vectorially oriented within a reconstituted phospholipid bilayer membrane, as a function of the transmembrane electric potential by time-resolved X-ray and neutron interferometry. The changes in the experimental SLD profiles for both polarizing and depolarizing potentials with respect to zero potential were found to extend over the entire length of the isolated VSD's profile structure. The characteristics of the changes observed were in qualitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of a related membrane system, suggesting an initial interpretation of these changes in terms of the VSD's atomic-level 3-D structure.

  18. 18F-FDG PET/CT findings in voltage-gated potassium channel limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppuswamy; Iyer, Rajesh Shankar; Antony, Joppy; Radhakrishnan, Edathuruthy Kalarickal; Shinto, Ajit

    2013-05-01

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) can be associated with cancer, viral infection, or be idiopathic. One such rare but treatable form is associated with voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies. Typical abnormalities are seen in FDG PET/CT. We report a 39-year-old female patient who presented with 3 months of progressive faciobrachial dystonic seizures and limbic encephalitis. Her serum and cerebrospinal fluid Lgi1 antibody titers were elevated. FDG PET/CT showed basal ganglial hypermetabolism and associated abnormalities. Serial MRI demonstrated atrophic changes predominantly involving the temporal lobes. She is on immunosuppressive therapy and shows clinical improvement with lowering of antibody titers.

  19. A semi-floating gate transistor for low-voltage ultrafast memory and sensing operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Fei; Lin, Xi; Liu, Lei; Sun, Qing-Qing; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Liu, Wei; Gong, Yi; Zhang, David Wei

    2013-08-09

    As the semiconductor devices of integrated circuits approach the physical limitations of scaling, alternative transistor and memory designs are needed to achieve improvements in speed, density, and power consumption. We report on a transistor that uses an embedded tunneling field-effect transistor for charging and discharging the semi-floating gate. This transistor operates at low voltages (≤2.0 volts), with a large threshold voltage window of 3.1 volts, and can achieve ultra-high-speed writing operations (on time scales of ~1 nanosecond). A linear dependence of drain current on light intensity was observed when the transistor was exposed to light, so possible applications include image sensing with high density and performance.

  20. Low Voltage Floating Gate MOS Transistor Based Four-Quadrant Multiplier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Srivastava

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a four-quadrant multiplier based on square-law characteristic of floating gate MOSFET (FGMOS in saturation region. The proposed circuit uses square-difference identity and the differential voltage squarer proposed by Gupta et al. to implement the multiplication function. The proposed multiplier employs eight FGMOS transistors and two resistors only. The FGMOS implementation of the multiplier allows low voltage operation, reduced power consumption and minimum transistor count. The second order effects caused due to mobility degradation, component mismatch and temperature variations are discussed. Performance of the proposed circuit is verified at ±0.75 V in TSMC 0.18 µm CMOS, BSIM3 and Level 49 technology by using Cadence Spectre simulator.

  1. CaV2.2 Gates Calcium-Independent but Voltage-Dependent Secretion in Mammalian Sensory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Zuying; Wang, Changhe; Huang, Rong; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Qihui; Wang, Yeshi; Wu, Xi; Zheng, Lianghong; Zhang, Chen; Guo, Wei; Xiong, Wei; Ding, Jiuping; Zhu, Feipeng; Zhou, Zhuan

    2017-12-20

    Action potential induces membrane depolarization and triggers intracellular free Ca 2+ concentration (Ca 2+ )-dependent secretion (CDS) via Ca 2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels. We report a new type of somatic exocytosis triggered by the action potential per se-Ca 2+ -independent but voltage-dependent secretion (CiVDS)-in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Here we uncovered the molecular mechanism of CiVDS, comprising a voltage sensor, fusion machinery, and their linker. Specifically, the voltage-gated N-type Ca 2+ channel (Ca V 2.2) is the voltage sensor triggering CiVDS, the SNARE complex functions as the vesicle fusion machinery, the "synprint" of Ca V 2.2 serves as a linker between the voltage sensor and the fusion machinery, and ATP is a cargo of CiVDS vesicles. Thus, CiVDS releases ATP from the soma while CDS releases glutamate from presynaptic terminals, establishing the Ca V 2.2-SNARE "voltage-gating fusion pore" as a novel pathway co-existing with the canonical "Ca 2+ -gating fusion pore" pathway for neurotransmitter release following action potentials in primary sensory neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A new mechanism of voltage-dependent gating exposed by KV10.1 channels interrupted between voltage sensor and pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Adam P; Fernández-Trillo, Jorge; Bharill, Shashank; Papp, Ferenc; Panyi, Gyorgy; Stühmer, Walter; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Pardo, Luis A

    2017-05-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels couple transmembrane potential changes to ion flow. Conformational changes in the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the channel are thought to be transmitted to the pore domain (PD) through an α-helical linker between them (S4-S5 linker). However, our recent work on channels disrupted in the S4-S5 linker has challenged this interpretation for the KCNH family. Furthermore, a recent single-particle cryo-electron microscopy structure of KV10.1 revealed that the S4-S5 linker is a short loop in this KCNH family member, confirming the need for an alternative gating model. Here we use "split" channels made by expression of VSD and PD as separate fragments to investigate the mechanism of gating in KV10.1. We find that disruption of the covalent connection within the S4 helix compromises the ability of channels to close at negative voltage, whereas disconnecting the S4-S5 linker from S5 slows down activation and deactivation kinetics. Surprisingly, voltage-clamp fluorometry and MTS accessibility assays show that the motion of the S4 voltage sensor is virtually unaffected when VSD and PD are not covalently bound. Finally, experiments using constitutively open PD mutants suggest that the presence of the VSD is structurally important for the conducting conformation of the pore. Collectively, our observations offer partial support to the gating model that assumes that an inward motion of the C-terminal S4 helix, rather than the S4-S5 linker, closes the channel gate, while also suggesting that control of the pore by the voltage sensor involves more than one mechanism. © 2017 Tomczak et al.

  3. DNA Motion Induced by Electrokinetic Flow near an Au Coated Nanopore Surface as Voltage Controlled Gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Kato, Yuta; Ishida, Kentaro; Hyun, Changbae; Li, Jiali

    2014-01-01

    The diffusion and drift motion of λ DNA molecules on Au coated membrane surface near nanopores prior to their translocation through solid-state nanopores are investigated using fluorescence microscopy. With the capability of controlling electric potential at the Au surface as a gate voltage, Vgate, the motions of DNA molecules vary dramatically near the nanopores in our observations, presumably generated by electrokinetic flow. We carefully investigate theses DNA motions with different values of Vgate in order to alter the densities and polarities of counterions; which are expected to change the flow speed or direction, respectively. Depending on Vgate, our observations have revealed the critical distance from a nanopore for DNA molecules to be attracted or to be repelled, DNA’s anisotropic and unsteady drifting motions and accumulations of DNA molecules near the nanopore entrance. Further finite element method (FEM) numerical simulations indicate that the electrokinetic flow could explain these unusual DNA motions near metal collated gated nanopores qualitatively. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility to control the speed and direction of DNA motion near or through a nanopore, for example, recapturing a single DNA molecule multiple times with AC voltages on the Vgate. PMID:25611963

  4. Developmental expression of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels in the avian hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doczi, Megan A; Vitzthum, Carl M; Forehand, Cynthia J

    2016-03-11

    Specialized hypothalamic neurons integrate the homeostatic balance between food intake and energy expenditure, processes that may become dysregulated during the development of diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders. Shaker family voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1) contribute to the maintenance of resting membrane potential, action potential characteristics, and neurotransmitter release in many populations of neurons, although hypothalamic Kv1 channel expression has been largely unexplored. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from avian hypothalamic brain slices demonstrate a developmental shift in the electrophysiological properties of avian arcuate nucleus neurons, identifying an increase in outward ionic current that corresponds with action potential maturation. Additionally, RT-PCR experiments identified the early expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.3, and Kv1.5 mRNA in the embryonic avian hypothalamus, suggesting that these channels may underlie the electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis on intact microdissections of embryonic hypothalamic tissue revealed a concomitant increase in Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 gene expression at key electrophysiological time points during development. This study is the first to demonstrate hypothalamic mRNA expression of Kv1 channels in developing avian embryos and may suggest a role for voltage-gated ion channel regulation in the physiological patterning of embryonic hypothalamic circuits governing energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na(+) channel function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Martini, Rudolf; Krarup, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na(+) channels on motor axons aggravating the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice. With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform expression was found by immunohistochemistry. The depolarizing excitability features were absent in Nav1.8 null mice, and they were counteracted in WT mice by a Nav1.8 blocker. Our data suggest that alteration in voltage-gated Na(+) channel isoform expression contributes to changes in motor axon function during aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-dependent sodium channels in identified muscle afferent neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie Y.; Baxter, James C.; Kiveric, Esad; Elmslie, Keith S.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle afferents are critical regulators of motor function (Group I and II) and cardiovascular responses to exercise (Group III and IV). However, little is known regarding the expressed voltage-dependent ion channels. We identified muscle afferent neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), using retrograde labeling to examine voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. In patch-clamp recordings, we found that the dominant NaV current in the majority of identified neurons was insensitive to tetrodoto...

  7. Structure of the inactivating gate from the Shaker voltage gated K{sup +} channel analyzed by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schott, M.K.; Antz, C. [Institute of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)]|[Department of Biophysics, Max-Planck-Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Frank, R. [Center of Molecular Biology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ruppersberg, J.P. [Institute of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Kalbitzer, H.R. [Department of Biophysics, University of Regensburg (Germany)]|[Department of Biophysics, Max-Planck-Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1998-04-01

    Rapid inactivation of voltage-gated K{sup +} (K{sub V}) channels is mediated by an N-terminal domain (inactivating ball domain) which blocks the open channel from the cytoplasmic side. Inactivating ball domains of various K{sub V} channels are also biologically active when synthesized separately and added as a peptide to the solution. Synthetic inactivating ball domains from different K{sub V} channels with hardly any sequence homology mediate quite similar effects even on unrelated K{sub V} channel subtypes whose inactivation domain has been deleted. The solution structure of the inactivating ball peptide from Shaker (Sh-P22) was analyzed with NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data indicate a non-random structure in an aqueous environment. However, while other inactivating ball peptides showed well-defined three-dimensional structures under these conditions, Sh-P22 does not have a unique, compactly folded structure in solution. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 34 refs.

  8. Preferential targeting of Nav1.6 voltage-gated Na+ Channels to the axon initial segment during development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J Akin

    Full Text Available During axonal maturation, voltage-gated sodium (Nav channels accumulate at the axon initial segment (AIS at high concentrations. This localization is necessary for the efficient initiation of action potentials. The mechanisms underlying channel trafficking to the AIS during axonal development have remained elusive due to a lack of Nav reagents suitable for high resolution imaging of channels located specifically on the cell surface. Using an optical pulse-chase approach in combination with a novel Nav1.6 construct containing an extracellular biotinylation domain we demonstrate that Nav1.6 channels are preferentially inserted into the AIS membrane during neuronal development via direct vesicular trafficking. Single-molecule tracking illustrates that axonal channels are immediately immobilized following delivery, while channels delivered to the soma are often mobile. Neither a Nav1.6 channel lacking the ankyrin-binding motif nor a chimeric Kv2.1 channel containing the Nav ankyrinG-binding domain show preferential AIS insertion. Together these data support a model where ankyrinG-binding is required for preferential Nav1.6 insertion into the AIS plasma membrane. In contrast, ankyrinG-binding alone does not confer the preferential delivery of proteins to the AIS.

  9. A high-voltage rechargeable magnesium-sodium hybrid battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yifei; An, Qinyou; Cheng, Yingwen; Liang, Yanliang; Ren, Yang; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Dong, Hui; Tang, Zhongjia; Li, Guosheng; Yao, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Growing global demand of safe and low-cost energy storage technology triggers strong interests in novel battery concepts beyond state-of-art Li-ion batteries. Here we report a high-voltage rechargeable Mg–Na hybrid battery featuring dendrite-free deposition of Mg anode and Na-intercalation cathode as a low-cost and safe alternative to Li-ion batteries for large-scale energy storage. A prototype device using a Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode, a Mg anode, and a Mg–Na dual salt electrolyte exhibits the highest voltage (2.60 V vs. Mg) and best rate performance (86% capacity retention at 10C rate) among reported hybrid batteries. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), atomic-pair distribution function (PDF), and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) studies reveal the chemical environment and structural change of Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode during the Na ion insertion/deinsertion process. XANES study shows a clear reversible shift of vanadium K-edge and HRXRD and PDF studies reveal a reversible two-phase transformation and V–O bond length change during cycling. The energy density of the hybrid cell could be further improved by developing electrolytes with a higher salt concentration and wider electrochemical window. This work represents a significant step forward for practical safe and low-cost hybrid batteries.

  10. Electron Transport in Graphene Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistor under Bias and Gate Voltages: Isochemical Potential Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeonghun; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-07-07

    Zigzag graphene nanoribbon (zGNR) of narrow width has a moderate energy gap in its antiferromagnetic ground state. So far, first-principles electron transport calculations have been performed using nonequilibrium Green function (NEGF) method combined with density functional theory (DFT). However, the commonly practiced bottom-gate control has not been studied computationally due to the need to simulate an electron reservoir that fixes the chemical potential of electrons in the zGNR and electrodes. Here, we present the isochemical potential scheme to describe the top/back-gate effect using external potential. Then, we examine the change in electronic state under the modulation of chemical potential and the subsequent electron transport phenomena in zGNR transistor under substantial top-/back-gate and bias voltages. The gate potential can activate the device states resulting in a boosted current. This gate-controlled current-boosting could be utilized for designing novel zGNR field effect transistors (FETs).

  11. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects

    OpenAIRE

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gat...

  12. Differential distribution of voltage-gated ion channels in cortical neurons: implications for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Nicholas D; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2014-03-18

    Neurons contain different functional somatodendritic and axonal domains, each with a characteristic distribution of voltage-gated ion channels, synaptic inputs, and function. The dendritic tree of a cortical pyramidal neuron has 2 distinct domains, the basal and the apical dendrites, both containing dendritic spines; the different domains of the axon are the axonal initial segment (AIS), axon proper (which in myelinated axons includes the node of Ranvier, paranodes, juxtaparanodes, and internodes), and the axon terminals. In the cerebral cortex, the dendritic spines of the pyramidal neurons receive most of the excitatory synapses; distinct populations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons target specific cellular domains and thus exert different influences on pyramidal neurons. The multiple synaptic inputs reaching the somatodendritic region and generating excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) sum and elicit changes in membrane potential at the AIS, the site of initiation of the action potential.

  13. Analytical threshold voltage modeling of ion-implanted strained-Si double-material double-gate (DMDG) MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ekta; Singh, Balraj; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Kunal; Jit, Satyabrata

    2017-04-01

    Two dimensional threshold voltage model of ion-implanted strained-Si double-material double-gate MOSFETs has been done based on the solution of two dimensional Poisson's equation in the channel region using the parabolic approximation method. Novelty of the proposed device structure lies in the amalgamation of the advantages of both the strained-Si channel and double-material double-gate structure with a vertical Gaussian-like doping profile. The effects of different device parameters (such as device channel length, gate length ratios, germanium mole fraction) and doping parameters (such as projected range, straggle parameter) on threshold voltage of the proposed structure have been investigated. It is observed that the subthreshold performance of the device can be improved by simply controlling the doping parameters while maintaining other device parameters constant. The modeling results show a good agreement with the numerical simulation data obtained by using ATLAS™, a 2D device simulator from SILVACO.

  14. Post-translational palmitoylation controls the voltage gating and lipid raft association of the CALHM1 channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taruno, Akiyuki; Sun, Hongxin; Nakajo, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    contribution in vivo. The different gating properties of CALHM1 in vivo and in vitro suggest undiscovered regulatory mechanisms. Here, in searching for post-translational regulatory mechanisms, we discovered the regulation of CALHM1 gating and association with lipid microdomains via protein S......-palmitoylation, the only reversible lipid modification of proteins on cysteine residues. CALHM1 is palmitoylated at two intracellular cysteines located in the juxtamembrane regions of the third and fourth transmembrane domains. Enzymes that catalyse CALHM1 palmitoylation were identified by screening 23 members of the DHHC...... of the palmitoylation sites has a profound impact on CALHM1 gating, shifting the conductance–voltage relationship to more negative voltages and accelerating the activation kinetics. The same mutation also reduces CALHM1 association with detergent-resistant membranes. Our results comprehensively uncover a post-translational...

  15. A CMOS Micro-power, Class-AB “Flipped” Voltage Follower using the quasi floating-gate technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jesus Ocampo-Hidalgo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and characterization of a new analog voltage follower for low-voltage applications. The main idea is based on the “Flipped” Voltage Follower and the use of the quasi-floating gate technique for achieving class AB operation. A test cell was simulated and fabricated using a 0,5 μm CMOS technology. When the proposed circuit is supplied with VDD = 1,5 V, it presents a power consumption of only 413 μW. Measurement and experimental results show a gain bandwidth product of 10 MHz and a total harmonic distortion of 1,12 % at 1 MHz.

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying pimaric acid-induced modulation of voltage-gated K+channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kazuho; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Ohya, Susumu; Muraki, Katsuhiko; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2017-04-01

    Voltage-gated K + (K V ) channels, which control firing and shape of action potentials in excitable cells, are supposed to be potential therapeutic targets in many types of diseases. Pimaric acid (PiMA) is a unique opener of large conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + channel. Here, we report that PiMA modulates recombinant rodent K V channel activity. The enhancement was significant at low potentials (voltage-activation relationships (V 1/2 ) of rodent K V 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6 and 2.1 channels (K V 1.1-K V 2.1) but K V 4.3 to lower potentials and prolonged their half-decay times of the deactivation (T 1/2D ). The amino acid sequence which is responsible for the difference in response to PiMA was examined between K V 1.1-K V 2.1 and K V 4.3 by site-directed mutagenesis of residues in S5 and S6 segments of Kv1.1. The point mutation of Phe 332 into Tyr mimics the effects of PiMA on V 1/2 and T 1/2D and also abolished the further change by addition of PiMA. The results indicate that PiMA enhances voltage sensitivity of K V 1.1-K V 2.1 channels and suggest that the lipophilic residues including Phe 332 in S5 of K V 1.1-K V 2.1 channels may be critical for the effects of PiMA, providing beneficial information for drug development of K V channel openers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Protonic/electronic hybrid oxide transistor gated by chitosan and its full-swing low voltage inverter applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Jin Yu [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory High Gravity Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhu, Li Qiang, E-mail: lqzhu@nimte.ac.cn; Xiao, Hui [Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Yuan, Zhi Guo, E-mail: ncityzg@163.com [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory High Gravity Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China)

    2015-12-21

    Modulation of charge carrier density in condensed materials based on ionic/electronic interaction has attracted much attention. Here, protonic/electronic hybrid indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) transistors gated by chitosan based electrolyte were obtained. The chitosan-based electrolyte illustrates a high proton conductivity and an extremely strong proton gating behavior. The transistor illustrates good electrical performances at a low operating voltage of ∼1.0 V such as on/off ratio of ∼3 × 10{sup 7}, subthreshold swing of ∼65 mV/dec, threshold voltage of ∼0.3 V, and mobility of ∼7 cm{sup 2}/V s. Good positive gate bias stress stabilities are obtained. Furthermore, a low voltage driven resistor-loaded inverter was built by using an IZO transistor in series with a load resistor, exhibiting a linear relationship between the voltage gain and the supplied voltage. The inverter is also used for decreasing noises of input signals. The protonic/electronic hybrid IZO transistors have potential applications in biochemical sensors and portable electronics.

  18. Structural characterization of the voltage-sensor domain and voltage-gated K+-channel proteins vectorially oriented within a single bilayer membrane at the solid/vapor and solid/liquid interfaces via neutron interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Dura, J A; Freites, J A; Tobias, D J; Blasie, J K

    2012-07-17

    The voltage-sensor domain (VSD) is a modular four-helix bundle component that confers voltage sensitivity to voltage-gated cation channels in biological membranes. Despite extensive biophysical studies and the recent availability of X-ray crystal structures for a few voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels and a voltage-gate sodium (Nav) channel, a complete understanding of the cooperative mechanism of electromechanical coupling, interconverting the closed-to-open states (i.e., nonconducting to cation conducting) remains undetermined. Moreover, the function of these domains is highly dependent on the physical-chemical properties of the surrounding lipid membrane environment. The basis for this work was provided by a recent structural study of the VSD from a prokaryotic Kv-channel vectorially oriented within a single phospholipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)) membrane investigated by X-ray interferometry at the solid/moist He (or solid/vapor) and solid/liquid interfaces, thus achieving partial to full hydration, respectively (Gupta et al. Phys. Rev. E2011, 84, 031911-1-15). Here, we utilize neutron interferometry to characterize this system in substantially greater structural detail at the submolecular level, due to its inherent advantages arising from solvent contrast variation coupled with the deuteration of selected submolecular membrane components, especially important for the membrane at the solid/liquid interface. We demonstrate the unique vectorial orientation of the VSD and the retention of its molecular conformation manifest in the asymmetric profile structure of the protein within the profile structure of this single bilayer membrane system. We definitively characterize the asymmetric phospholipid bilayer solvating the lateral surfaces of the VSD protein within the membrane. The profile structures of both the VSD protein and phospholipid bilayer depend upon the hydration state of the membrane. We also determine the distribution of

  19. Current-voltage curve of sodium channels and concentration dependence of sodium permeability in frog skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, W; Larsen, Erik Hviid; Lindemann, B

    1977-01-01

    transport through open Na-selective channels of the outward facing membrane of the stratum granulosum cells can be described as an electrodiffusion process which as such does not saturate with increasing (Na)(o). However, when added to the outer border of the membrane Na causes a decrease of P(Na) within...... was recorded. This procedure was repeated after blocking the Na channels with amiloride to obtain the current-voltage curve of transmembrane and paracellular shunt pathways. The current-voltage curve of the Na channels was computed by subtracting the shunt current from the total current.4. The instantaneous I...... several seconds. It is considered that binding of Na results in closure of Na channels....

  20. Effects of acidic pH on voltage-gated ion channels in rat trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Eon; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Choi, In-Sun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Jang, Il-Sung

    2017-03-01

    The effects of acidic pH on several voltage-dependent ion channels, such as voltage-dependent K + and Ca 2+ channels, and hyperpolarization-gated and cyclic nucleotide-activated cation (HCN) channels, were examined using a whole-cell patch clamp technique on mechanically isolated rat mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons. The application of a pH 6.5 solution had no effect on the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K + currents. A pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K + currents. The pH 6.0 also shifted both the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The application of a pH 6.5 solution scarcely affected the peak amplitude of membrane currents mediated by HCN channels, which were profoundly inhibited by the general HCN channel blocker Cs + (1 mM). However, the pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of HCN-mediated currents. Although the pH 6.0 solution showed complex modulation of the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships, the midpoint voltages for the activation of HCN channels were not changed by acidic pH. On the other hand, voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channels were significantly inhibited by an acidic pH. The application of an acidic pH solution significantly shifted the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The modulation of several voltage-dependent ion channels by an acidic pH might affect the excitability of mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons, and thus physiological functions mediated by the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus could be affected in acidic pH conditions.

  1. Analytical model of threshold voltage degradation due to localized charges in gate material engineered Schottky barrier cylindrical GAA MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Haldar, Subhasis; Gupta, Mridula; Gupta, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    The threshold voltage degradation due to the hot carrier induced localized charges (LC) is a major reliability concern for nanoscale Schottky barrier (SB) cylindrical gate all around (GAA) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The degradation physics of gate material engineered (GME)-SB-GAA MOSFETs due to LC is still unexplored. An explicit threshold voltage degradation model for GME-SB-GAA-MOSFETs with the incorporation of localized charges (N it) is developed. To accurately model the threshold voltage the minimum channel carrier density has been taken into account. The model renders how +/- LC affects the device subthreshold performance. One-dimensional (1D) Poisson’s and 2D Laplace equations have been solved for two different regions (fresh and damaged) with two different gate metal work-functions. LCs are considered at the drain side with low gate metal work-function as N it is more vulnerable towards the drain. For the reduction of carrier mobility degradation, a lightly doped channel has been considered. The proposed model also includes the effect of barrier height lowering at the metal-semiconductor interface. The developed model results have been verified using numerical simulation data obtained by the ATLAS-3D device simulator and excellent agreement is observed between analytical and simulation results.

  2. The Physiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels and Their Future Therapeutic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamponi, Gerald W.; Striessnig, Joerg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are required for many key functions in the body. In this review, the different subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels are described and their physiologic roles and pharmacology are outlined. We describe the current uses of drugs interacting with the different calcium channel subtypes and subunits, as well as specific areas in which there is strong potential for future drug development. Current therapeutic agents include drugs targeting L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels, particularly 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. T-type (CaV3) channels are a target of ethosuximide, widely used in absence epilepsy. The auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 is the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are of value in certain epilepsies and chronic neuropathic pain. The limited use of intrathecal ziconotide, a peptide blocker of N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channels, as a treatment of intractable pain, gives an indication that these channels represent excellent drug targets for various pain conditions. We describe how selectivity for different subtypes of calcium channels (e.g., CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 L-type channels) may be achieved in the future by exploiting differences between channel isoforms in terms of sequence and biophysical properties, variation in splicing in different target tissues, and differences in the properties of the target tissues themselves in terms of membrane potential or firing frequency. Thus, use-dependent blockers of the different isoforms could selectively block calcium channels in particular pathologies, such as nociceptive neurons in pain states or in epileptic brain circuits. Of important future potential are selective CaV1.3 blockers for neuropsychiatric diseases, neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease, and resistant hypertension. In addition, selective or nonselective T-type channel blockers are considered potential therapeutic targets in epilepsy, pain, obesity, sleep, and

  3. Activation of Ih and TTX-sensitive sodium current at subthreshold voltages during CA1 pyramidal neuron firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-10-01

    We used dynamic clamp and action potential clamp techniques to explore how currents carried by tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and HCN channels (Ih) regulate the behavior of CA1 pyramidal neurons at resting and subthreshold voltages. Recording from rat CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we found that the apparent input resistance and membrane time constant were strongly affected by both conductances, with Ih acting to decrease apparent input resistance and time constant and sodium current acting to increase both. We found that both Ih and sodium current were active during subthreshold summation of artificial excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) generated by dynamic clamp, with Ih dominating at less depolarized voltages and sodium current at more depolarized voltages. Subthreshold sodium current-which amplifies EPSPs-was most effectively recruited by rapid voltage changes, while Ih-which blunts EPSPs-was maximal for slow voltage changes. The combined effect is to selectively amplify rapid EPSPs. We did similar experiments in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, doing voltage-clamp experiments using experimental records of action potential firing of CA1 neurons previously recorded in awake, behaving animals as command voltages to quantify flow of Ih and sodium current at subthreshold voltages. Subthreshold sodium current was larger and subthreshold Ih was smaller in mouse neurons than in rat neurons. Overall, the results show opposing effects of subthreshold sodium current and Ih in regulating subthreshold behavior of CA1 neurons, with subthreshold sodium current prominent in both rat and mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons and additional regulation by Ih in rat neurons. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Effect of dielectric interface on charge aggregation in the voltage-gated K+ ion channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, Lipika; Mapder, Tarunendu; Adhya, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is experimental evidence of many cases of stable macromolecular conformations with charged amino-acids facing lipid, an arrangement thought to be energetically unfavourable. Methods and Objectives: Employing classical electrostatics, we show that, this is not necessarily the case and studied the physical basis of the specific role of proximity of charges to the dielectric interface between two different environments. We illustrate how self and induced energies due to the dielectric medium polarization, on either side of the interface, contribute differentially to the stability of a pair of charges and hence the mutual conformation of the S3b-S4 α-helix pair of the voltage-gated K+ channel. Results and Conclusion: We show that (1) a pair of opposite charges on either side of lipid-protein interface confers significant stability; (2) hydrophobic media has an important role in holding together two similar repelling charges; (3) dielectric interface has stabilizing effect on a pair of charges, when an ion is closer to its interface than its neighboring charge; (4) in spite of the presence of dielectric interface, there is a nonexistence of any dielectric effect, when an ion is equidistant from its image and neighboring charge. We also demonstrate that, variation in dielectric media of the surrounding environment confers new mutual conformations to S3b-S4 α-helices of voltage sensor domain at zero potential, especially lipid environment on the helix side, which improved stability to the configuration by lowering the potential energy. Our results provide an answer to the long standing question of why charges face hydrophobic lipid membranes in the stable conformation of a protein. PMID:25810659

  5. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eMesirca

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3-/- or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1-/- channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias.

  6. Modulation of voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels by pumiliotoxin 251D: a "joint venture" alkaloid from arthropods and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriessche, Thomas; Abdel-Mottaleb, Yousra; Maertens, Chantal; Cuypers, Eva; Sudau, Alexander; Nubbemeyer, Udo; Mebs, Dietrich; Tytgat, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Certain amphibians provide themselves with a chemical defense by accumulating lipophilic alkaloids into skin glands from dietary arthropods. Examples of such alkaloids are pumiliotoxins (PTXs). In general, PTXs are known as positive modulators of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Unlike other PTXs, PTX 251D does not share this characteristic. However, mice and insect studies showed that PTX 251D is highly toxic and to date the basis of its toxicity remains unknown. In this work, we searched for the possible target of PTX 251D. The toxin was therefore made synthetically and tested on four VGSCs (mammalian rNa(v)1.2/beta(1), rNa(v)1.4/beta(1), hNa(v)1.5/beta(1) and insect Para/tipE) and five voltage-gated potassium channels (VGPCs) (mammalian rK(v)1.1-1.2, hK(v)1.3, hK(v)11.1 (hERG) and insect Shaker IR) expressed heterologously in Xenopus laevis oocytes, using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. PTX 251D not only inhibited the Na(+) influx through the mammalian VGSCs but also affected the steady-state activation and inactivation. Interestingly, in the insect ortholog, the inactivation process was dramatically affected. Additionally, PTX 251D inhibited the K(+) efflux through all five tested VGPCs and slowed down the deactivation kinetics of the mammalian VGPCs. hK(v)1.3 was the most sensitive channel, with an IC(50) value 10.8+/-0.5 microM. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a PTX affecting VGPCs.

  7. Biophysical and Pharmacological Characterization of Nav1.9 Voltage Dependent Sodium Channels Stably Expressed in HEK-293 Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Zhixin; Santos, Sonia; Padilla, Karen; Printzenhoff, David; Castle, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The voltage dependent sodium channel Nav1.9, is expressed preferentially in peripheral sensory neurons and has been linked to human genetic pain disorders, which makes it target of interest for the development of new pain therapeutics...

  8. Biogenesis of the T1-S1 linker of voltage-gated K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, LiWei; Wang, Jing; Deutsch, Carol

    2007-07-10

    In the model derived from the crystal structure of Kv1.2, a six-transmembrane voltage-gated potassium channel, the linker between a cytosolic tetramerization domain, T1, and the first transmembrane segment, S1, is projected radially outward from the channel's central axis. This T1-S1 linker was modeled as two polyglycine helices to accommodate the residues between T1 and S1 [Long et al. (2005) Science 309, 897-903]; however, the structure of this linker is not known. Here, we investigate whether a compact secondary structure of the T1-S1 linker exists at an early stage of Kv channel biogenesis. We have used a mass-tagging accessibility assay to report the biogenesis of secondary structure for three consecutive regions of Kv1.3, a highly homologous isoform of Kv1.2. The three regions include the T1-S1 linker and its two flanking regions, alpha5 of the T1 domain and S1. Both alpha5 and S1 manifest compact structures (helical) inside the ribosomal exit tunnel, whereas the T1-S1 linker does not. Moreover, the location of the peptide in the tunnel influences compaction.

  9. Is there a role for voltage-gated Na+ channels in the aggressiveness of breast cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rhana

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and its metastatic potential is responsible for numerous deaths. Thus, the need to find new targets for improving treatment, and even finding the cure, becomes increasingly greater. Ion channels are known to participate in several physiological functions, such as muscle contraction, cell volume regulation, immune response and cell proliferation. In breast cancer, different types of ion channels have been associated with tumorigenesis. Recently, voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSC have been implicated in the processes that lead to increased tumor aggressiveness. To explain this relationship, different theories, associated with pH changes, gene expression and intracellular Ca2+, have been proposed in an attempt to better understand the role of these ion channels in breast cancer. However, these theories are having difficulty being accepted because most of the findings are contrary to the present scientific knowledge. Several studies have shown that VGSC are related to different types of cancer, making them a promising pharmacological target against this debilitating disease. Molecular biology and cell electrophysiology have been used to look for new forms of treatment aiming to reduce aggressiveness and the disease progress.

  10. Voltage gated calcium channels negatively regulate protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers to evade protective immune responses. Calcium release from voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC regulates immune responses to pathogens. In this study, we investigated the roles of VGCC in regulating protective immunity to mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting L-type or R-type VGCC in dendritic cells (DCs either using antibodies or by siRNA increased calcium influx in an inositol 1,4,5-phosphate and calcium release calcium activated channel dependent mechanism that resulted in increased expression of genes favoring pro-inflammatory responses. Further, VGCC-blocked DCs activated T cells that in turn mediated killing of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages. Likewise, inhibiting VGCC in infected macrophages and PBMCs induced calcium influx, upregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and resulted in enhanced killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Importantly, compared to healthy controls, PBMCs of tuberculosis patients expressed higher levels of both VGCC, which were significantly reduced following chemotherapy. Finally, blocking VGCC in vivo in M. tuberculosis infected mice using specific antibodies increased intracellular calcium and significantly reduced bacterial loads. These results indicate that L-type and R-type VGCC play a negative role in M. tuberculosis infection by regulating calcium mobilization in cells that determine protective immunity.

  11. Supratentorial white matter blurring associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex limbic encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H.; Mader, I. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rauer, S.; Baumgartner, A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neurology, Freiburg (Germany); Paus, S. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Wagner, J. [University Medical Center, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany); Malter, M.P. [University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Pruess, H. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Lewerenz, J.; Kassubek, J. [Ulm University, Department of Neurology, Ulm (Germany); Hegen, H.; Auer, M.; Deisenhammer, F. [University Innsbruck, Department of Neurology, Innsbruck (Austria); Ufer, F. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Bien, C.G. [Epilepsy Centre Bethel, Bielefeld-Bethel (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies (VGKC-LE) is frequently non-paraneoplastic and associated with marked improvement following corticosteroid therapy. Mesial temporal lobe abnormalities are present in around 80 % of patients. If associated or preceded by faciobrachial dystonic seizures, basal ganglia signal changes may occur. In some patients, blurring of the supratentorial white matter on T2-weighted images (SWMB) may be seen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of SWMB and whether it is specific for VGKC-LE. Two experienced neuroradiologists independently evaluated signal abnormalities on FLAIR MRI in 79 patients with LE while unaware on the antibody type. SWMB was independently assessed as present in 10 of 36 (28 %) compared to 2 (5 %) of 43 non-VGKC patients (p = 0.009). It was not related to the presence of LGI1 or CASPR2 proteins of VGKC antibodies. MRI showed increased temporomesial FLAIR signal in 22 (61 %) VGKC compared to 14 (33 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.013), and extratemporomesial structures were affected in one VGKC (3 %) compared to 11 (26 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.005). SWMB is a newly described MRI sign rather specific for VGKC-LE. (orig.)

  12. Selectivity Mechanism of the Voltage-gated Proton Channel, HV1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Smith, Susan M. E.; Mazmanian, Karine; Decoursey, Thomas E.; Lim, Carmay

    2015-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, trigger bioluminescence in dinoflagellates, enable calcification in coccolithophores, and play multifarious roles in human health. Because the proton concentration is minuscule, exquisite selectivity for protons over other ions is critical to HV1 function. The selectivity of the open HV1 channel requires an aspartate near an arginine in the selectivity filter (SF), a narrow region that dictates proton selectivity, but the mechanism of proton selectivity is unknown. Here we use a reduced quantum model to elucidate how the Asp-Arg SF selects protons but excludes other ions. Attached to a ring scaffold, the Asp and Arg side chains formed bidentate hydrogen bonds that occlude the pore. Introducing H3O+ protonated the SF, breaking the Asp-Arg linkage and opening the conduction pathway, whereas Na+ or Cl- was trapped by the SF residue of opposite charge, leaving the linkage intact, thus preventing permeation. An Asp-Lys SF behaved like the Asp-Arg one and was experimentally verified to be proton-selective, as predicted. Hence, interacting acidic and basic residues form favorable AspH0-H2O0-Arg+ interactions with hydronium but unfavorable Asp--X-/X+-Arg+ interactions with anions/cations. This proposed mechanism may apply to other proton-selective molecules engaged in bioenergetics, homeostasis, and signaling.

  13. Cortactin Controls Surface Expression of the Voltage-gated Potassium Channel KV10.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Solveig; Ninkovic, Milena; Kohl, Tobias; Lörinczi, Éva; Pardo, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel aberrantly expressed in many cases of cancer, and participates in cancer initiation and tumor progression. Its action as an oncoprotein can be inhibited by a functional monoclonal antibody, indicating a role for channels located at the plasma membrane, accessible to the antibody. Cortactin is an actin-interacting protein implicated in cytoskeletal architecture and often amplified in several types of cancer. In this study, we describe a physical and functional interaction between cortactin and KV10.1. Binding of these two proteins occurs between the C terminus of KV10.1 and the proline-rich domain of cortactin, regions targeted by many post-translational modifications. This interaction is specific for KV10.1 and does not occur with KV10.2. Cortactin controls the abundance of KV10.1 at the plasma membrane and is required for functional expression of KV10.1 channels. PMID:23144454

  14. Persistent Sodium Current and Its Role in Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Stafstrom, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium currents are essential for the initiation and propagation of neuronal firing. Alterations of sodium currents can lead to abnormal neuronal activity, such as occurs in epilepsy. The transient voltage-gated sodium current mediates the upstroke of the action potential. A small fraction of sodium current, termed the persistent sodium current (INaP), fails to inactivate significantly, even with prolonged depolarization. INaP is activated in the subthreshold voltage range and is capable of a...

  15. Impact of Low-Variability SOTB Process on Ultra-Low-Voltage Operation of 1 Million Logic Gates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogasahara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we demonstrate near-0.1 V minimum operating voltage of a low-variability Silicon on Thin Buried Oxide (SOTB process for one million logic gates on silicon. Low process variability is required to obtain higher energy efficiency during ultra-low-voltage operation with steeper subthreshold slope transistors. In this study, we verify the decrease in operating voltage of logic circuits via a variability-suppressed SOTB process. In our measurement results with test chips fabricated in 65-nm SOTB and bulk processes, the operating voltage at which the first failure is observed was lowered from 0.2 to 0.125 V by introducing a low-variability SOTB process. Even at 0.115 V, over 40% yield can be expected as per our measurement results on SOTB test chips.

  16. Synthesis, Structure, and Sodium Mobility of Sodium Vanadium Nitridophosphate: A Zero-Strain and Safe High Voltage Cathode Material for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Herein, the nitridophosphate Na3V(PO33N is synthesized by solid state method. X-ray diffraction (XRD and Rietveld refinement confirm the cubic symmetry with P213 space group. The material exhibits very good thermal stability and high operating voltage of 4.0 V vs. Na/Na+ due to V3+/V4+ redox couple. In situ X-ray diffraction studies confirm the two-phase (de-sodiation process to occur with very low volume changes. The refinement of the sodium occupancies reveal the low accessibility of sodium cations in the Na2 and Na3 sites as the main origin for the lower experimental capacity (0.38 eq. Na+, 28 mAh g−1 versus the theoretical one (1.0 eq. Na+, 74 mAh g−1. These observations provide valuable information for the further optimization of this materials class in order to access their theoretical electrochemical performance as a potentially interesting zero-strain and safe high-voltage cathode material for sodium-ion batteries.

  17. Low-voltage and hysteresis-free organic thin-film transistors employing solution-processed hybrid bilayer gate dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Tae-Jun [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-28

    This study presents a promising approach to realize low-voltage (<3 V) organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) exhibiting improved electrical and optical stability. Such device performance results from the use of solution-processed hybrid bilayer gate dielectrics consisting of zirconium dioxide (high-k dielectric) and amorphous fluoropolymer, CYTOP{sup ®} (low-k dielectric). Employing a very thin amorphous fluoropolymer film reduces interfacial defect-states by repelling water molecules and other aqueous chemicals from an organic semiconductor active layer due to the hydrophobic surface-property. The chemically clean interface, stemming from decrease in density of trap states improves all the key device properties such as field-effect mobility, threshold voltage, and sub-threshold swing. Furthermore, degradation by electrical bias-stress and photo-induced hysteresis were suppressed in OTFTs employing hybrid bilayer gate dielectrics.

  18. Dataset for a Dugesia japonica de novo transcriptome assembly, utilized for defining the voltage-gated like ion channel superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Chan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article provides a transcriptomic resource for the free living planarian flatworm Dugesia japonica related to the research article entitled ‘Utilizing the planarian voltage-gated ion channel transcriptome to resolve a role for a Ca2+ channel in neuromuscular function and regeneration (J.D. Chan, D. Zhang, X. Liu, M. Zarowiecki, M. Berriman, J.S. Marchant, 2016 [1]. Data provided in this submission comprise sequence information for the unfiltered de novo assembly, the filtered assembly and a curated analysis of voltage-gated like (VGL ion channel sequences mined from this resource. Availability of this data should facilitate further adoption of this model by laboratories interested in studying the role of individual genes of interest in planarian physiology and regenerative biology.

  19. Atom-by-atom engineering of voltage-gated ion channels: Magnified insights into function and pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Kim, Robin Y; Ahern, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Unnatural amino acid incorporation into ion channels has proven to be a valuable approach to interrogate detailed hypotheses arising from atomic resolution structures. In this short review, we provide a brief overview of some of the basic principles and methods for incorporation of unnatural amin...... acids into proteins. We also review insights into the function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels that have emerged from unnatural amino acid mutagenesis approaches....

  20. Cyclic expression of the voltage?gated potassium channel KV10.1 promotes disassembly of the primary cilium

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, A.; Urrego, D.; Pardo, L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The primary cilium, critical for morphogenic and growth factor signaling, is assembled upon cell cycle exit, but the links between ciliogenesis and cell cycle progression are unclear. KV10.1 is a voltage?gated potassium channel frequently overexpressed in tumors. We have previously reported that expression of KV10.1 is temporally restricted to a time period immediately prior to mitosis in healthy cells. Here, we provide microscopical and biochemical evidence that KV10.1 localizes to ...

  1. Clinical features of neuromuscular disorders in patients with N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Totzeck

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular junction disorders affect the pre- or postsynaptic nerve to muscle transmission due to autoimmune antibodies. Members of the group like myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton syndrome have pathophysiologically distinct characteristics. However, in practice, distinction may be difficult. We present a series of three patients with a myasthenic syndrome, dropped-head syndrome, bulbar and respiratory muscle weakness and positive testing for anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. In two cases anti-acetylcholin receptor antibodies were elevated, anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. All patients initially responded to pyridostigmine with a non-response in the course of the disease. While one patient recovered well after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, 3,4-diaminopyridine, steroids and later on immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil, a second died after restriction of treatment due to unfavorable cancer diagnosis, the third patient declined treatment. Although new antibodies causing neuromuscular disorders were discovered, clinical distinction has not yet been made. Our patients showed features of pre- and postsynaptic myasthenic syndrome as well as severe dropped-head syndrome and bulbar and axial muscle weakness, but only anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were positive. When administered, one patient benefited from 3,4-diaminopyridine. We suggest that this overlap-syndrome should be considered especially in patients with assumed seronegative myasthenia gravis and lack of improvement under standard therapy.

  2. Mesoscale-duration activated states gate spiking in response to fast rises in membrane voltage in the awake brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Annabelle C; Talei Franzesi, Giovanni; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Flores, Francisco J; Cohen, Jeremy D; Lee, Albert K; Borgers, Christoph; Forest, Craig R; Kopell, Nancy J; Boyden, Edward S

    2017-08-01

    Seconds-scale network states, affecting many neurons within a network, modulate neural activity by complementing fast integration of neuron-specific inputs that arrive in the milliseconds before spiking. Nonrhythmic subthreshold dynamics at intermediate timescales, however, are less well characterized. We found, using automated whole cell patch clamping in vivo, that spikes recorded in CA1 and barrel cortex in awake mice are often preceded not only by monotonic voltage rises lasting milliseconds but also by more gradual (lasting tens to hundreds of milliseconds) depolarizations. The latter exert a gating function on spiking, in a fashion that depends on the gradual rise duration: the probability of spiking was higher for longer gradual rises, even when controlled for the amplitude of the gradual rises. Barrel cortex double-autopatch recordings show that gradual rises are shared across some, but not all, neurons. The gradual rises may represent a new kind of state, intermediate both in timescale and in proportion of neurons participating, which gates a neuron's ability to respond to subsequent inputs.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We analyzed subthreshold activity preceding spikes in hippocampus and barrel cortex of awake mice. Aperiodic voltage ramps extending over tens to hundreds of milliseconds consistently precede and facilitate spikes, in a manner dependent on both their amplitude and their duration. These voltage ramps represent a "mesoscale" activated state that gates spike production in vivo. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Small-cell lung cancer with voltage-gated calcium channel antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaira, Kyoichi; Okamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Norio; Sunaga, Noriaki; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-04-08

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome and clinically characterized by cognitive dysfunction, memory impairment, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is most frequently found in small-cell lung cancer, among various malignancies, and antineuronal antibodies are related to the autoimmune mechanism. We experienced a rare case of a patient with small-cell lung cancer with anti-voltage-gated calcium channel antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. A 61-year-old Japanese man with a history of smoking cigarettes presented with seizure, confusion and personality change in acute onset. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted image in his right temporal lobe, suggestive of limbic encephalitis. A mediastinoscopy of the lymph node revealed small-cell lung carcinoma, and he was staged as having limited stage disease. Antibodies against P/Q-type and N-type voltage-gated calcium channel were positive and Hu antibody was negative. He was started on chemotherapy of carboplatin plus etoposide with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Neurological symptoms were gradually improved after systemic chemotherapy. We should be alert to the potential of malignant neoplasms associated with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis when we examine a patient with cancer with neurological disorders such as personality change, disorientation, unconsciousness and memory loss. A clinical marker such as voltage-gated calcium channel antibody may help our diagnosis in clinical practice.

  4. Modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ current in vestibular hair cells by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, Angélica; Navarrete, Francisco; Vega, Rosario; Soto, Enrique

    2007-02-01

    The structural elements of the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) signaling pathway have been described in the vestibular peripheral system. However, the functions of NO in the vestibular endorgans are still not clear. We evaluated the action of NO on the Ca(2+) currents in hair cells isolated from the semicircular canal crista ampullaris of the rat (P14-P18) by using the whole cell and perforated-cell patch-clamp technique. The NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and (+/-)-(E)-4-ethyl-2-[(Z)-hydroxyimino]-5-nitro-3-hexen-1-yl-nicotinamide (NOR-4) inhibited the Ca(2+) current in hair cells in a voltage-independent manner. The NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO) prevented the inhibitory effect of SNP on the Ca(2+) current. The selective inhibitor of the soluble form of the enzyme guanylate cyclase (sGC), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), also decreased the SNP-induced inhibition of the Ca(2+) current. The membrane-permeant cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP mimicked the SNP effect. KT-5823, a specific inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PGK), prevented the inhibition of the Ca(2+) current by SNP and 8-Br-cGMP. In the presence of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), a sulfhydryl alkylating agent that prevents the S-nitrosylation reaction, the SNP effect on the Ca(2+) current was significantly diminished. These results demonstrated that NO inhibits in a voltage-independent manner the voltage-activated Ca(2+) current in rat vestibular hair cells by the activation of a cGMP-signaling pathway and through a direct action on the channel protein by a S-nitrosylation reaction. The inhibition of the Ca(2+) current by NO may contribute to the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and hair-cell synaptic transmission.

  5. Tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-dependent sodium channels in identified muscle afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie Y; Baxter, James C; Kiveric, Esad; Elmslie, Keith S

    2012-10-01

    Muscle afferents are critical regulators of motor function (Group I and II) and cardiovascular responses to exercise (Group III and IV). However, little is known regarding the expressed voltage-dependent ion channels. We identified muscle afferent neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), using retrograde labeling to examine voltage-dependent sodium (Na(V)) channels. In patch-clamp recordings, we found that the dominant Na(V) current in the majority of identified neurons was insensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX-R), with Na(V) current in only a few (14%) neurons showing substantial (>50%) TTX sensitivity (TTX-S). The TTX-R current was sensitive to a Na(V)1.8 channel blocker, A803467. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated labeling of muscle afferent neurons by a Na(V)1.8 antibody, which further supported expression of these channels. A portion of the TTX-R Na(V) current appeared to be noninactivating during our 25-ms voltage steps, which suggested activity of Na(V)1.9 channels. The majority of the noninactivating current was insensitive to A803467 but sensitive to extracellular sodium. Immunocytochemistry showed labeling of muscle afferent neurons by a Na(V)1.9 channel antibody, which supports expression of these channels. Further examination of the muscle afferent neurons showed that functional TTX-S channels were expressed, but were largely inactivated at physiological membrane potentials. Immunocytochemistry showed expression of the TTX-S channels Na(V)1.6 and Na(V)1.7 but not Na(V)1.1. Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 appear to be the dominant functional sodium channels in small- to medium-diameter muscle afferent neurons. The expression of these channels is consistent with the identification of these neurons as Group III and IV, which mediate the exercise pressor reflex.

  6. Altered voltage-gated calcium channels in rat inferior colliculus neurons contribute to alcohol withdrawal seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    N’Gouemo, Prosper

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that enhanced susceptibility to alcohol withdrawal seizures (AWS) parallels the enhancement of the current density of high-threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels in rat inferior colliculus (IC) neurons. However, whether this increased current density is a cause or consequence of AWS is unclear. Here, I report changes in the current density of CaV channels in IC neurons during the course of alcohol withdrawal and the potential anticonvulsant effect of intra-IC infusions of L- and P-type CaV channel antagonists. Whole-cell currents were activated by depolarizing pulses using barium as the charge carrier. Currents and seizure susceptibility were evaluated in control animals 3 h after alcohol intoxication, as well as 3 h (before AWS), 24 h (when AWS susceptibility is maximal), and 48 h (when AWS susceptibility is no longer present) after alcohol withdrawal. Nifedipine, nimodipine (L-type antagonists) or ω-agatoxin TK (P-type antagonist) were infused intra-IC to probe the role of CaV channels in the pathogenesis of AWS. CaV current density and conductance in IC neurons were significantly increased 3 and 24 h after alcohol withdrawal compared with the control group or the group tested 3 h following ethanol intoxication. Blockade of L-type CaV channels within the IC completely suppressed AWS, and inhibition of P-type channels reduced AWS severity. These findings suggest that the enhancement of CaV currents in IC neurons occurs prior to AWS onset and that alterations in L- and P-type CaV channels in these neurons may underlie the pathogenesis of AWS. PMID:25914156

  7. Clinical utility of seropositive voltage-gated potassium channel–complex antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammoul, Adham; Shayya, Luay; Mente, Karin; Li, Jianbo; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)–complex are implicated in the pathogenesis of acquired neuromyotonia, limbic encephalitis, faciobrachial dystonic seizure, and Morvan syndrome. Outside these entities, the clinical value of VGKC-complex antibodies remains unclear. Methods: We conducted a single-center review of patients positive for VGKC-complex antibodies over an 8-year period. Results: Among 114 patients positive for VGKC-complex antibody, 11 (9.6%) carrying the diagnosis of limbic encephalitis (n = 9) or neuromyotonia (n = 2) constituted the classic group, and the remaining 103 cases of various neurologic and non-neurologic disorders comprised the nonclassic group. The median titer for the classic group was higher than the nonclassic group (p 0.25 nM) VGKC-complex antibody levels (p < 0.0001). A total of 75.0% of the patients in the high-level group had definite or probable autoimmune basis, while nonautoimmune disorders were seen in 75.6% of patients from the low-level group (p < 0.0001). A total of 26.3% of patients were found with active or remote solid organ or hematologic malignancy, but no antibody titer difference was observed among subgroups of absent, active, or remote malignancy. Compared to age-matched US national census, rates of active cancer in our cohort were higher in patients older than 45 years. Conclusions: High VGKC-complex antibody titers are more likely found in patients with classically associated syndromes and other autoimmune conditions. Low-level VGKC-complex antibodies can be detected in nonspecific and mostly nonautoimmune disorders. The presence of VGKC-complex antibody, rather than its level, may serve as a marker of malignancy. PMID:27847683

  8. PIST (GOPC) modulates the oncogenic voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Solveig; Ninkovic, Milena; Kohl, Tobias; Pardo, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Although crucial for their correct function, the mechanisms controlling surface expression of ion channels are poorly understood. In the case of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1, this is determinant not only for its physiological function in brain, but also for its pathophysiology in tumors and possible use as a therapeutic target. The Golgi resident protein PIST binds several membrane proteins, thereby modulating their expression. Here we describe a PDZ domain-mediated interaction of KV10.1 and PIST, which enhances surface levels of KV10.1. The functional, but not the physical interaction of both proteins is dependent on the coiled-coil and PDZ domains of PIST; insertion of eight amino acids in the coiled-coil domain to render the neural form of PIST (nPIST) and the corresponding short isoform in an as-of-yet unknown form abolishes the effect. In addition, two new isoforms of PIST (sPIST and nsPIST) lacking nearly the complete PDZ domain were cloned and shown to be ubiquitously expressed. PIST and KV10.1 co-precipitate from native and expression systems. nPIST also showed interaction, but did not alter the functional expression of the channel. We could not document physical interaction between KV10.1 and sPIST, but it reduced KV10.1 functional expression in a dominant-negative manner. nsPIST showed weak physical interaction and no functional effect on KV10.1. We propose these isoforms to work as modulators of PIST function via regulating the binding on interaction partners.

  9. PIST (GOPC modulates the oncogenic voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig eHerrmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although crucial for their correct function, the mechanisms controlling surface expression of ion channels are poorly understood. In the case of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1,this is determinant not only for its physiological function in brain, but also for its pathophysiology in tumors and possible use as a therapeutic target. The Golgi resident protein PIST binds several membrane proteins, thereby modulating their expression. Here we describe a PDZ domain-mediated interaction of KV10.1and PIST, which enhances surface levels ofKV10.1. The functional, but not the physical interaction of both proteins is dependent on the coiled-coil and PDZ domains of PIST; insertion of eight amino acids in the coiled-coil domain to render the neural form of PIST (nPIST and the corresponding short isoform in an as-of-yet unknown form abolishes the effect. In addition, two new isoforms of PIST (sPIST and nsPIST lacking nearly the complete PDZ domain were cloned and shown to be ubiquitously expressed. PIST and KV10.1 co-precipitate from native and expression systems. nPISTalso showed interaction, but did not alter the functional expression of the channel. We could not document physical interaction betweenKV10.1 and sPIST, but it reduced KV10.1 functional expression in a dominant-negative manner. nsPIST showed weak physical interaction and no functional effect on KV10.1. We propose these isoforms to work as modulators of PIST function via regulating the binding on interaction partners.

  10. Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels: regulation by cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopico, Alejandro M; Bukiya, Anna N; Singh, Aditya K

    2012-08-01

    Cholesterol (CLR) is an essential component of eukaryotic plasma membranes. CLR regulates the membrane physical state, microdomain formation and the activity of membrane-spanning proteins, including ion channels. Large conductance, voltage- and Ca²⁺-gated K⁺ (BK) channels link membrane potential to cell Ca²⁺ homeostasis. Thus, they control many physiological processes and participate in pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. Because plasmalemma BK channels cluster in CLR-rich membrane microdomains, a major driving force for studying BK channel-CLR interactions is determining how membrane CLR controls the BK current phenotype, including its pharmacology, channel sorting, distribution, and role in cell physiology. Since both BK channels and CLR tissue levels play a pathophysiological role in human disease, identifying functional and structural aspects of the CLR-BK channel interaction may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the studies documenting membrane CLR-BK channel interactions, dissecting out the many factors that determine the final BK current response to changes in membrane CLR content. We also summarize work in reductionist systems where recombinant BK protein is studied in artificial lipid bilayers, which documents a direct inhibition of BK channel activity by CLR and builds a strong case for a direct interaction between CLR and the BK channel-forming protein. Bilayer lipid-mediated mechanisms in CLR action are also discussed. Finally, we review studies of BK channel function during hypercholesterolemia, and underscore the many consequences that the CLR-BK channel interaction brings to cell physiology and human disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Insect sodium channels and insecticide resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Ke

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the generation and propagation of action potentials (i.e., electrical impulses) in excitable cells. Although most of our knowledge about sodium channels is derived from decades of studies of mammalian isoforms, research on insect sodium channels is revealing both common and unique aspects of sodium channel biology. In particular, our understanding of the molecular dynamics and pharmacology of insect sodium channels has advanced greatly in recent...

  12. Modulation of voltage-gated conductances of retinal horizontal cells by UV-excited TiO2nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshik, Xenia; Choi, Min; Baker, Adam; Malchow, R Paul; Covnot, Leigha; Doan, Samuel; Mukherjee, Souvik; Farid, Sidra; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the ability of optically-excited titanium dioxide nanoparticles to influence voltage-gated ion channels in retinal horizontal cells. Voltage clamp recordings were obtained in the presence and absence of TiO 2 and ultraviolet laser excitation. Significant current changes were observed in response to UV light, particularly in the -40 mV to +40 mV region where voltage-gated Na + and K + channels have the highest conductance. Cells in proximity to UV-excited TiO 2 exhibited a left-shift in the current-voltage relation of around 10 mV in the activation of Na + currents. These trends were not observed in control experiments where cells were excited with UV light without being exposed to TiO 2 . Electrostatic force microscopy confirmed that electric fields can be induced in TiO 2 with UV light. Simulations using the Hodgkin-Huxley model yielded results which agreed with the experimental data and showed the I-V characteristics of individual ion channels in the presence of UV-excited TiO 2 . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sodium channels and mammalian sensory mechanotransduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Raouf, R.; Rugiero, F.; Kiesewetter, H.; Hatch, R.; Hummler, E; Nassar, M. A.; Wang, F.; Wood, J.N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Members of the degenerin/epithelial (DEG/ENaC) sodium channel family are mechanosensors in C elegans, and Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 voltage-gated sodium channel knockout mice have major deficits in mechanosensation. β and γENaC sodium channel subunits are present with acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mammalian sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The extent to which epithelial or voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in transduction of mechanical stimuli is u...

  14. Evidence of Gate Voltage Oscillations during Short Circuit of Commercial 1.7 kV/ 1 kA IGBT Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigosa, Paula Diaz; Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evidence of critical gate voltage oscillations in 1.7 kV/1 kA Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) power modules under short circuit conditions. A 6 kA/1.1 kV Non-Destructive Test (NDT) set up for repeatable short circuit tests has been built with a 40 nH stray...... inductance. A large amount of measurements have been acquired on commercial IGBT modules evidencing gate voltage oscillations under short circuit conditions. To tackle this problem, similar tests have been performed on a modified version of the same modules with two parallel sections and one single section...

  15. A thermalization energy analysis of the threshold voltage shift in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors under positive gate bias stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niang, K.M.; Barquinha, P.M.C.; Martins, R.F.P.; Cobb, B.; Powell, M.J.; Flewitt, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) employing an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) channel layer exhibit a positive shift in the threshold voltage under the application of positive gate bias stress (PBS). The time and temperature dependence of the threshold voltage shift was measured and

  16. Alcohol Dependence Disrupts Amygdalar L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varodayan, Florence P; de Guglielmo, Giordano; Logrip, Marian L; George, Olivier; Roberto, Marisa

    2017-04-26

    L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LTCCs) are implicated in several psychiatric disorders that are comorbid with alcoholism and involve amygdala dysfunction. Within the amygdala, the central nucleus (CeA) is critical in acute alcohol's reinforcing actions, and its dysregulation in human alcoholics drives their negative emotional state and motivation to drink. Here we investigated the specific role of CeA LTCCs in the effects of acute alcohol at the molecular, cellular physiology, and behavioral levels, and their potential neuroadaptation in alcohol-dependent rats. Alcohol increases CeA activity (neuronal firing rates and GABA release) in naive rats by engaging LTCCs, and intra-CeA LTCC blockade reduces alcohol intake in nondependent rats. Alcohol dependence reduces CeA LTCC membrane abundance and disrupts this LTCC-based mechanism; instead, corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptors (CRF1s) mediate alcohol's effects on CeA activity and drive the escalated alcohol intake of alcohol-dependent rats. Collectively, our data indicate that alcohol dependence functionally alters the molecular mechanisms underlying the CeA's response to alcohol (from LTCC- to CRF1-driven). This mechanistic switch contributes to and reflects the prominent role of the CeA in the negative emotional state that drives excessive drinking.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The central amygdala (CeA) plays a critical role in the development of alcohol dependence. As a result, much preclinical alcohol research aims to identify relevant CeA neuroadaptions that promote the transition to dependence. Here we report that acute alcohol increases CeA neuronal activity in naive rats by engaging L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and that intra-CeA LTCC blockade reduces alcohol intake in nondependent rats. Alcohol dependence disrupts this LTCC-based mechanism; instead, corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptors (CRF1s) mediate alcohol's effects on CeA activity and drive the escalated alcohol intake of alcohol

  17. Mutations in voltage-gated potassium channel KCNC3 cause degenerative and developmental central nervous system phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Michael F; Minassian, Natali A; Stevanin, Giovanni; Figueroa, Karla P; Bannister, John P A; Nolte, Dagmar; Mock, Allan F; Evidente, Virgilio Gerald H; Fee, Dominic B; Müller, Ulrich; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Papazian, Diane M; Pulst, Stefan M

    2006-04-01

    Potassium channel mutations have been described in episodic neurological diseases. We report that K+ channel mutations cause disease phenotypes with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative features. In a Filipino adult-onset ataxia pedigree, the causative gene maps to 19q13, overlapping the SCA13 disease locus described in a French pedigree with childhood-onset ataxia and cognitive delay. This region contains KCNC3 (also known as Kv3.3), encoding a voltage-gated Shaw channel with enriched cerebellar expression. Sequencing revealed two missense mutations, both of which alter KCNC3 function in Xenopus laevis expression systems. KCNC3(R420H), located in the voltage-sensing domain, had no channel activity when expressed alone and had a dominant-negative effect when co-expressed with the wild-type channel. KCNC3(F448L) shifted the activation curve in the negative direction and slowed channel closing. Thus, KCNC3(R420H) and KCNC3(F448L) are expected to change the output characteristics of fast-spiking cerebellar neurons, in which KCNC channels confer capacity for high-frequency firing. Our results establish a role for KCNC3 in phenotypes ranging from developmental disorders to adult-onset neurodegeneration and suggest voltage-gated K+ channels as candidates for additional neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. An LMS Programming Scheme and Floating-Gate Technology Enabled Trimmer-Less and Low Voltage Flame Detection Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Gomez-Castañeda, Felipe; Moreno-Cadenas, Jose Antonio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a Least Mean Square (LMS) programming scheme is used to set the offset voltage of two operational amplifiers that were built using floating-gate transistors, enabling a 0.95 VRMS trimmer-less flame detection sensor. The programming scheme is capable of setting the offset voltage over a wide range of values by means of electron injection. The flame detection sensor consists of two programmable offset operational amplifiers; the first amplifier serves as a 26 μV offset voltage follower, whereas the second amplifier acts as a programmable trimmer-less voltage comparator. Both amplifiers form the proposed sensor, whose principle of functionality is based on the detection of the electrical changes produced by the flame ionization. The experimental results show that it is possible to measure the presence of a flame accurately after programming the amplifiers with a maximum of 35 LMS-algorithm iterations. Current commercial flame detectors are mainly used in absorption refrigerators and large industrial gas heaters, where a high voltage AC source and several mechanical trimmings are used in order to accurately measure the presence of the flame. PMID:28613250

  19. An LMS Programming Scheme and Floating-Gate Technology Enabled Trimmer-Less and Low Voltage Flame Detection Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Gomez-Castañeda, Felipe; Moreno-Cadenas, Jose Antonio

    2017-06-14

    In this paper, a Least Mean Square (LMS) programming scheme is used to set the offset voltage of two operational amplifiers that were built using floating-gate transistors, enabling a 0.95 VRMS trimmer-less flame detection sensor. The programming scheme is capable of setting the offset voltage over a wide range of values by means of electron injection. The flame detection sensor consists of two programmable offset operational amplifiers; the first amplifier serves as a 26 μV offset voltage follower, whereas the second amplifier acts as a programmable trimmer-less voltage comparator. Both amplifiers form the proposed sensor, whose principle of functionality is based on the detection of the electrical changes produced by the flame ionization. The experimental results show that it is possible to measure the presence of a flame accurately after programming the amplifiers with a maximum of 35 LMS-algorithm iterations. Current commercial flame detectors are mainly used in absorption refrigerators and large industrial gas heaters, where a high voltage AC source and several mechanical trimmings are used in order to accurately measure the presence of the flame.

  20. Interface Defect Hydrogen Depassivation and Capacitance-Voltage Hysteresis of Al2O3/InGaAs Gate Stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kechao; Palumbo, Felix Roberto; Zhang, Liangliang; Droopad, Ravi; McIntyre, Paul C

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effects of pre- and postatomic layer deposition (ALD) defect passivation with hydrogen on the trap density and reliability of Al2O3/InGaAs gate stacks. Reliability is characterized by capacitance-voltage hysteresis measurements on samples prepared using different fabrication procedures and having different initial trap densities. Despite its beneficial capability to passivate both interface and border traps, a final forming gas (H2/N2) anneal (FGA) step is correlated with a significant hysteresis. This appears to be caused by hydrogen depassivation of defects in the gate stack under bias stress, supported by the observed bias stress-induced increase of interface trap density, and strong hydrogen isotope effects on the measured hysteresis. On the other hand, intentional air exposure of the InGaAs surface prior to Al2O3 ALD increases the initial interface trap density (Dit) but considerably lowers the hysteresis.

  1. Application of stochastic automata networks for creation of continuous time Markov chain models of voltage gating of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipas, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Paulauskas, Nerijus; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC) of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ) channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs), which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ~20 times.

  2. Application of Stochastic Automata Networks for Creation of Continuous Time Markov Chain Models of Voltage Gating of Gap Junction Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Snipas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs, which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ∼20 times.

  3. Self-consistent Capacitance-Voltage Characterization of Gate-all-around Graded Nanowire Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Saeed Uz Zaman; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Hossen, Md. Obaidul; Rahman, Fahim Ur; Zaman, Rifat; Khosru, Quazi D. M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent numerical model for calculating the charge profile and gate capacitance and therefore obtaining C-V characterization for a gate-all-around graded nanowire MOSFET with a high mobility axially graded In0.75Ga0.25As + In0.53Ga0.47As channel incorporating strain and atomic layer deposited Al2O3/20nm Ti gate. C-V characteristics with introduction and variation of In-composition grading and also grading in doping concentration are explored.Finite element method...

  4. Opposite effects of the S4-S5 linker and PIP2 on voltage-gated channel function: KCNQ1/KCNE1 and other channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S Choveau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels are tetramers, each subunit presenting six transmembrane segments (S1-S6, with each S1-S4 segments forming a voltage-sensing domain (VSD and the four S5-S6 forming both the conduction pathway and its gate. S4 segments control the opening of the intracellular activation gate in response to changes in membrane potential. Crystal structures of several voltage-gated ion channels in combination with biophysical and mutagenesis studies highlighted the critical role of the S4-S5 linker (S4S5L and of the S6 C-terminal part (S6T in the coupling between the VSD and the activation gate. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe the coupling at a molecular scale. This review summarizes the mechanisms suggested for various voltage-gated ion channels, including a mechanism that we described for KCNQ1, in which S4S5L is acting like a ligand binding to S6T to stabilize the channel in a closed state. As discussed in this review, this mechanism may explain the reverse response to depolarization in HCN-like channels. As opposed to S4S5L, the phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2, stabilizes KCNQ1 channel in an open state. Many other ion channels (not only voltage-gated require PIP2 to function properly, confirming its crucial importance as an ion channel co-factor. This is highlighted in cases in which an altered regulation of ion channels by PIP2 leads to channelopathies, as observed for KCNQ1. This review summarizes the state of the art on the two regulatory mechanisms that are critical for KCNQ1 and other voltage-gated channels function (PIP2 and S4-S5L, and assesses their potential physiological and pathophysiological roles.

  5. Post-translational cleavage of Hv1 in human sperm tunes pH- and voltage-dependent gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas K; Fußhöller, David M; Goodwin, Normann; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Müller, Astrid; Dokani Khesroshahi, Nasim; Brenker, Christoph; Wachten, Dagmar; Krause, Eberhard; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Strünker, Timo

    2017-03-01

    In human sperm, proton flux across the membrane is controlled by the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1. We show that sperm harbour both Hv1 and an N-terminally cleaved isoform termed Hv1Sper. The pH-control of Hv1Sper and Hv1 is distinctively different. Hv1Sper and Hv1 can form heterodimers that combine features of both constituents. Cleavage and heterodimerization of Hv1 might represent an adaptation to the specific requirements of pH control in sperm. In human sperm, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 controls the flux of protons across the flagellar membrane. Here, we show that sperm harbour Hv1 and a shorter isoform, termed Hv1Sper. Hv1Sper is generated from Hv1 by removal of 68 amino acids from the N-terminus by post-translational proteolytic cleavage. The pH-dependent gating of the channel isoforms is distinctly different. In both Hv1 and Hv1Sper, the conductance-voltage relationship is determined by the pH difference across the membrane (∆pH). However, simultaneous changes in intracellular and extracellular pH that leave ΔpH constant strongly shift the activation curve of Hv1Sper but not that of Hv1, demonstrating that cleavage of the N-terminus tunes pH sensing in Hv1. Moreover, we show that Hv1 and Hv1Sper assemble as heterodimers that combine features of both constituents. We suggest that cleavage and heterodimerization of Hv1 represents an adaptation to the specific requirements of pH control in sperm. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  6. Lung adenocarcinoma with Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome indicated by voltage-gated calcium channel: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai Hiromasa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome is a rare disorder and it is known as a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Small cell lung cancer often accompanies this syndrome. Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome associated with lung adenocarcinoma is extremely rare; there are only a few reported cases worldwide. Case presentation A 75-year-old Japanese man with a past history of chronic rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed with Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome by electromyography and serum anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibody level preceding the diagnosis of lung cancer. A chest computed tomography to screen for malignant lesions revealed an abnormal shadow in the lung. Although a histopathological examination by bronchoscopic study could not reveal the malignancy, lung cancer was mostly suspected after the results of a chest computed tomography and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. An intraoperative diagnosis based on the frozen section obtained by tumor biopsy was adenocarcinoma so the patient underwent a lobectomy of the right lower lobe and lymph node dissection with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The permanent pathological examination was the same as the frozen diagnosis (pT2aN1M0: Stage IIa: TNM staging 7th edition. Immunohistochemistry revealed that most of the cancer cells were positive for P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel. Conclusions Our case is a rare combination of Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome associated with lung adenocarcinoma, rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren syndrome, and to the best of our knowledge it is the first report that indicates the presence of voltage-gated calcium channel in lung adenocarcinoma by immunostaining.

  7. Gating mechanism of Kv11.1 (hERG) K+channels without covalent connection between voltage sensor and pore domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Pilar; Domínguez, Pedro; Barros, Francisco

    2018-03-01

    Kv11.1 (hERG, KCNH2) is a voltage-gated potassium channel crucial in setting the cardiac rhythm and the electrical behaviour of several non-cardiac cell types. Voltage-dependent gating of Kv11.1 can be reconstructed from non-covalently linked voltage sensing and pore modules (split channels), challenging classical views of voltage-dependent channel activation based on a S4-S5 linker acting as a rigid mechanical lever to open the gate. Progressive displacement of the split position from the end to the beginning of the S4-S5 linker induces an increasing negative shift in activation voltage dependence, a reduced z g value and a more negative ΔG 0 for current activation, an almost complete abolition of the activation time course sigmoid shape and a slowing of the voltage-dependent deactivation. Channels disconnected at the S4-S5 linker near the S4 helix show a destabilization of the closed state(s). Furthermore, the isochronal ion current mode shift magnitude is clearly reduced in the different splits. Interestingly, the progressive modifications of voltage dependence activation gating by changing the split position are accompanied by a shift in the voltage-dependent availability to a methanethiosulfonate reagent of a Cys introduced at the upper S4 helix. Our data demonstrate for the first time that alterations in the covalent connection between the voltage sensor and the pore domains impact on the structural reorganizations of the voltage sensor domain. Also, they support the hypothesis that the S4-S5 linker integrates signals coming from other cytoplasmic domains that constitute either an important component or a crucial regulator of the gating machinery in Kv11.1 and other KCNH channels.

  8. A threshold-voltage model for small-scaled GaAs nMOSFET with stacked high-k gate dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaowen, Liu; Jingping, Xu; Lu, Liu; Hanhan, Lu; Yuan, Huang

    2016-02-01

    A threshold-voltage model for a stacked high-k gate dielectric GaAs MOSFET is established by solving a two-dimensional Poisson's equation in channel and considering the short-channel, DIBL and quantum effects. The simulated results are in good agreement with the Silvaco TCAD data, confirming the correctness and validity of the model. Using the model, impacts of structural and physical parameters of the stack high-k gate dielectric on the threshold-voltage shift and the temperature characteristics of the threshold voltage are investigated. The results show that the stacked gate dielectric structure can effectively suppress the fringing-field and DIBL effects and improve the threshold and temperature characteristics, and on the other hand, the influence of temperature on the threshold voltage is overestimated if the quantum effect is ignored. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61176100).

  9. Low-Voltage Organic Transistors on Plastic Comprising High-Dielectric Constant Gate Insulators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C. D. Dimitrakopoulos; S. Purushothaman; J. Kymissis; A. Callegari; J. M. Shaw

    1999-01-01

    .... This understanding was used to design and fabricate IGFETs with mobility of more than 0.3 square centimeter per volt per second and current modulation of 10 5 , with the use of amorphous metal oxide gate insulators...

  10. A single charged voltage sensor is capable of gating the Shaker K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Dominique G; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2009-05-01

    We sought to determine the contribution of an individual voltage sensor to Shaker's function. Concatenated heterotetramers of Shaker zH4 Delta(6-46) wild type (wt) in combination with a neutral S4 segment Shaker mutant (mut) with stoichiometries 2wt/2mut and 1wt/3mut were studied and compared with the 4wt concatenated homotetramer. A single charged voltage sensor is sufficient to open Shaker conductance with reduced delay (Shaker's subunit is voltage insensitive and its voltage sensor is in the activated position (i.e., ready for pore opening), and provide experimental support to the proposed model of independent voltage sensors with a final, almost voltage-independent concerted step.

  11. The effect of gate voltage on the electrical transport properties in the contacts of C60 to carbon nanotube leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Shokri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, we examined the effect of gate voltage, bias voltage, contact geometries and the different bond lengths on the electrical transport properties in a nanostructure consisting of C60 molecule attached to two semi-infinite leads made of single wall carbon nanotubes in the coherent regime. Our calculation was based on the Green’s function method within nearest-neighbour tight-binding approximation. After the calculation was of transmission, the electrical current was obtained by the Landauer-Buttiker formula. Next, the effect of the mentioned factors was investigated in the nanostructure. The application of the present results may be useful in designing devices based on molecular electronics in nanoscale.

  12. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol depresses inward sodium current in mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkanis, S A; Partlow, L M; Karler, R

    1991-01-01

    Whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques were used in order to define the effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the voltage-gated sodium current in neuroblastoma cells. With regard to the inward sodium current, THC decreased the peak amplitude and increased both the time to peak and tau for recovery. The reversal potential was unchanged, suggesting that channel selectivity for sodium was not altered by the drug. With regard to the outward sodium current, THC had no effect on the peak amplitude, time to peak or tau for recovery. This functional alteration of the voltage-gated sodium channel may contribute to the depressant effects of the cannabinoid.

  13. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  14. Functional Properties and Toxin Pharmacology of a Dorsal Root Ganglion Sodium Channel Viewed through its Voltage Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Bosmans, Frank; Puopolo, Michelino; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Swartz, Kenton J.; Bean, Bruce Palmer

    2011-01-01

    The voltage-activated sodium (Nav) channel Nav1.9 is expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons where it is believed to play an important role in nociception. Progress in revealing the functional properties and pharmacological sensitivities of this non-canonical Nav channel has been slow because attempts to express this channel in a heterologous expression system have been unsuccessful. Here, we use a protein engineering approach to dissect the contributions of the four Nav1.9 voltage se...

  15. Differential distribution of voltage-gated channels in myelinated and unmyelinated baroreceptor afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, John H; Kunze, Diana L

    2012-12-24

    Voltage gated ion channels (VGC) make possible the frequency coding of arterial pressure and the neurotransmission of this information along myelinated and unmyelinated fiber pathways. Although many of the same VGC isoforms are expressed in both fiber types, it is the relative expression of each that defines the unique discharge properties of myelinated A-type and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptors. For example, the fast inward Na⁺ current is a major determinant of the action potential threshold and the regenerative transmembrane current needed to sustain repetitive discharge. In A-type baroreceptors the TTX-sensitive Na(v)1.7 VGC contributes to the whole cell Na⁺ current. Na(v)1.7 is expressed at a lower density in C-type neurons and in conjunction with TTX-insensitive Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 VGC. As a result, action potentials of A-type neurons have firing thresholds that are 15-20 mV more negative and upstroke velocities that are 5-10 times faster than unmyelinated C-type neurons. A more depolarized threshold in conjunction with a broader complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC subtypes produces C-type action potentials that are 3-4 times longer in duration than A-type neurons and at markedly lower levels of cell excitability. Unmyelinated baroreceptors also express KCa1.1 which provides approximately 25% of the total outward K⁺ current. KCa1.1 plays a critically important role in shaping the action potential profile of C-type neurons and strongly impacts neuronal excitability. A-type neurons do not functionally express the KCa1.1 channel despite having a whole cell Ca(V) current quite similar to that of C-type neurons. As a result, A-type neurons do not have the frequency-dependent braking forces of KCa1.1. Lack of a KCa current and only a limited complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC in addition to a hyperpolarization activated HCN1 current that is nearly 10 times larger than in C-type neurons leads to elevated levels of discharge in A-type neurons, a

  16. Amitriptyline and carbamazepine utilize voltage-gated ion channel suppression to impair excitability of sensory dorsal horn neurons in thin tissue slice: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Matthias; Czorlich, Patrick; Nagaraj, Chandran; Schnöbel-Ehehalt, Rose; Li, Yingji; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Olschewski, Horst; Heschl, Stefan; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Amitriptyline, carbamazepine and gabapentin are often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, their analgesic action on central sensory neurons is still not fully understood. Moreover, the expression pattern of their target ion channels is poorly elucidated in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Thus, we performed patch-clamp investigations in visualized neurons of lamina I-III of the spinal cord. The expression of the different voltage-gated ion channels, as the targets of these drugs, was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Neurons of the lamina I-III express the TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na(+) as well as voltage-gated K(+) subunits assembling the fast inactivating (A-type) currents and the delayed rectifier K(+) currents. Our pharmacological studies show that tonically-firing, adapting-firing and single spike neurons responded dose-dependently to amitriptyline and carbamazepine. The ion channel inhibition consecutively reduced the firing rate of tonically-firing and adapting-firing neurons. This study provides evidence for the distribution of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) subunits in lamina I-III of the spinal cord and for the action of drugs used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our work confirms that modulation of voltage-gated ion channels in the central nervous system contributes to the antinociceptive effects of these drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Coercive Voltage and Charge Injection on Performance of a Ferroelectric-Gate Thin-Film Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Tue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We adopted a lanthanum oxide capping layer between semiconducting channel and insulator layers for fabrication of a ferroelectric-gate thin-film transistor memory (FGT which uses solution-processed indium-tin-oxide (ITO and lead-zirconium-titanate (PZT film as a channel layer and a gate insulator, respectively. Good transistor characteristics such as a high “on/off” current ratio, high channel mobility, and a large memory window of 108, 15.0 cm2 V−1 s−1, and 3.5 V were obtained, respectively. Further, a correlation between effective coercive voltage, charge injection effect, and FGT’s memory window was investigated. It is found that the charge injection from the channel to the insulator layer, which occurs at a high electric field, dramatically influences the memory window. The memory window’s enhancement can be explained by a dual effect of the capping layer: (1 a reduction of the charge injection and (2 an increase of effective coercive voltage dropped on the insulator.

  18. Excessive blinking and ataxia in a child with occult neuroblastoma and voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Nicholas M

    2012-05-01

    A previously healthy 9-year-old girl presented with a 10-day history of slowly progressive unsteadiness, slurred speech, and behavior change. On examination there was cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria, excessive blinking, subtle perioral myoclonus, and labile mood. The finding of oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid prompted paraneoplastic serological evaluation and search for an occult neural crest tumor. Antineuronal nuclear autoantibody type 1 (anti-Hu) and voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies were detected in serum. Metaiodobenzylguanidine scan and computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed a localized abdominal mass in the region of the porta hepatis. A diagnosis of occult neuroblastoma was made. Resection of the stage 1 neuroblastoma and treatment with pulsed corticosteroids resulted in resolution of all symptoms and signs. Excessive blinking has rarely been described with neuroblastoma, and, when it is not an isolated finding, it may be a useful clue to this paraneoplastic syndrome. Although voltage-gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity has not been described previously in the setting of neuroblastoma, it is associated with a spectrum of paraneoplastic neurologic manifestations in adults, including peripheral nerve hyperexcitability disorders.

  19. Bickerstaff's encephalitis and Miller Fisher syndrome associated with voltage-gated potassium channel and novel anti-neuronal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, E; Kürtüncü, M; Lang, B; Içöz, S; Akman-Demir, G; Eraksoy, M; Vincent, A

    2010-10-01

    GQ1b antibody (GQ1b-Ab) is detected in approximately two-thirds of sera of patients with Bickerstaffs encephalitis (BE). Whilst some of the remaining patients have antibodies to other gangliosides, many patients with BE are reported to be seronegative. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody (VGKC-Ab) at high titer was detected during the diagnostic work-up of one patient with BE. Sera of an additional patient with BE and nine patients with Miller Fisher syndrome (MF) (all GQ1b-Ab positive) were investigated for VGKC-Ab and other anti-neuronal antibodies by radioimmunoprecipitation using 125I-dendrotoxin-VGKC and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Two patients with MF exhibited moderate titer VGKC-Abs. Regardless of positivity for VGKC or GQ1b antibodies, serum IgG of all patients with BE and MF reacted with the molecular layer and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in a distinctive pattern. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies might be involved in some cases of BE or MF. The common staining pattern despite different antibody results suggests that there might be other, as yet unidentified, antibodies associated with BE and MF.

  20. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i......Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons...... and are involved in the release of these peptides to different stimuli. We have examined the presence and importance of VGCCs in controlling the CGRP release from rat dura mater, freshly isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Each of the four VGCCs, P/Q-, N-, and L- and T...... the potassium induced CGRP release. In the absence of calcium ions (Ca2+) and in the presence of a cocktail of blockers, the stimulated CGRP release from dura mater was reduced almost to the same level as basal CGRP release. In the TG ¿-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the potassium induced CGRP release significantly...

  1. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i......Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons...... and are involved in the release of these peptides to different stimuli. We have examined the presence and importance of VGCCs in controlling the CGRP release from rat dura mater, freshly isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Each of the four VGCCs, P/Q-, N-, and L- and T...... the potassium induced CGRP release. In the absence of calcium ions (Ca2+) and in the presence of a cocktail of blockers, the stimulated CGRP release from dura mater was reduced almost to the same level as basal CGRP release. In the TG ω-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the potassium induced CGRP release significantly...

  2. Two methods of tuning threshold voltage of bulk FinFETs with replacement high-k metal-gate stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Miao; Zhu, Huilong; Zhang, Yanbo; Xu, Qiuxia; Zhang, Yongkui; Qin, Changliang; Zhang, Qingzhu; Yin, Huaxiang; Xu, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Luo, Jun; Li, Chunlong; Zhao, Chao; Ye, Tianchun

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we propose two threshold voltage (VTH) tuning methods for bulk FinFETs with replacement high-k metal gate. The first method is to perform a vertical implantation into fin structure after dummy gate removal, self-aligned forming halo & punch through stop pocket (halo & PTSP) doping profile. The second method is to execute P+/BF2+ ion implantations into the single common work function (WF) layer in N-/P-FinFETs, respectively. These two methods have been investigated by TCAD simulations and MOS-capacitor experiments respectively, and then integrated into FinFET fabrication successfully. Experimental results show that the halo & PTSP doping profile can reduce VTH roll off and total variation. With P+/BF2+ doped WF layer, the VTH-sat shift -0.43 V/+1.26 V for N-FinFETs and -0.75 V/+0.11 V for P-FinFETs, respectively, with gate length of 500 nm. The proposed two methods are simple and effective for FinFET VTH tuning, and have potential for future application of massive production.

  3. Sodium Channel (Dys)Function and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remme, Carol Ann; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2010-01-01

    P>Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels are transmembrane proteins located in the cell membrane of cardiomyocytes. Influx of sodium ions through these ion channels is responsible for the initial fast upstroke of the cardiac action potential. This inward sodium current thus triggers the initiation

  4. Characterization of high-dose and high-energy implanted gate and source diode and analysis of lateral spreading of p gate profile in high voltage SiC static induction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onose, Hidekatsu; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Onuki, Jin

    2017-03-01

    The effect of the p gate dose on the characteristics of the gate-source diode in SiC static induction transistors (SIT) was investigated. It was found that a dose of 1.5 × 1014 cm-2 yields a pn junction breakdown voltage higher than 60 V and good forward characteristics. A normally on SiC SIT was fabricated and demonstrated. A blocking voltage higher than 2.0 kV at a gate-source voltage of -50 V and on-resistance of 70 mΩ cm2 were obtained. Device simulations were performed to investigate the effect of the lateral spreading. By comparing the measured I-V curves with simulation results, the lateral spreading factor was estimated to be about 0.5. The lateral spreading detrimentally affected the electrical properties of the SIT made using implantations at energies higher than 1 MeV.

  5. Optimized expression and purification of NavAb provide the structural insight into the voltage dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Katsumasa; Haga, Yukari; Shimomura, Takushi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2018-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are crucial for electro-signalling in living systems. Analysis of the molecular mechanism requires both fine electrophysiological evaluation and high-resolution channel structures. Here, we optimized a dual expression system of NavAb, which is a well-established standard of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels, for E. coli and insect cells using a single plasmid vector to analyse high-resolution protein structures and measure large ionic currents. Using this expression system, we evaluated the voltage dependence and determined the crystal structures of NavAb wild-type and two mutants, E32Q and N49K, whose voltage dependence were positively shifted and essential interactions were lost in voltage sensor domain. The structural and functional comparison elucidated the molecular mechanisms of the voltage dependence of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Manipulating the voltage drop in graphene nanojunctions using a gate potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papior, Nick Rübner; Gunst, Tue; Stradi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    to be independent of device length when carriers are induced either by the gate or dopant atoms, indicating a general effect for electronic circuitry based on graphene electrodes. We envision this could be used to control the spatial distribution of Joule heating in graphene nanostructures, and possibly...

  7. High Radiation Tolerant Ceramic Voltage Isolator (Non-optical Gate Driver) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the Phase I effort is to design, develop and demonstrate a novel solid-state ceramic-based voltage isolator and demonstrate its potential to provide a...

  8. Gate-voltage control of equal-spin Andreev reflection in half-metal/semiconductor/superconductor junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiuqiang, E-mail: xianqiangzhe@126.com [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Meng, Hao, E-mail: menghao1982@shu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, Shanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong 723001 (China)

    2016-04-22

    With the Blonder–Tinkham–Klapwijk (BTK) approach, we investigate conductance spectrum in Ferromagnet/Semiconductor/Superconductor (FM/Sm/SC) double tunnel junctions where strong Rashba spin–orbit interaction (RSOI) is taken into account in semiconductors. For the half-metal limit, we find that the in-gap conductance becomes finite except at zero voltage when inserting a ferromagnetic insulator (FI) at the Sm/SC interface, which means that the appearance of a long-range triplet states in the half-metal. This is because of the emergence of the unconventional equal-spin Andreev reflection (ESAR). When the FI locates at the FM/Sm interface, however, we find the vanishing in-gap conductance due to the absence of the ESAR. Moreover, the non-zero in-gap conductance shows a nonmonotonic dependence on RSOI which can be controlled by applying an external gate voltage. Our results can be used to generate and manipulate the long-range spin triplet correlation in the nascent field of superconducting spintronics. - Highlights: • We study the equal-spin Andreev reflection in half-metal/semiconductor/superconductor (HM/Sm/SC) junctions. • The equal-spin Andreev reflection appearance when inserting a ferromagnetic insulator at the Sm/SC interface. • The finite in-gap conductance is attributed to the emergence of the equal-spin Andreev reflection. • The finite in-gap conductance shows a nonmonotonic dependence on Rashba spin–orbit interaction. • The finite in-gap conductance can be controlled by applying an external gate voltage.

  9. Clathrodin, hymenidin and oroidin, and their synthetic analogues as inhibitors of the voltage-gated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidar, Nace; Žula, Aleš; Tomašič, Tihomir; Rogers, Marc; Kirby, Robert W; Tytgat, Jan; Peigneur, Steve; Kikelj, Danijel; Ilaš, Janez; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin

    2017-10-20

    We have prepared three alkaloids from the Agelas sponges, clathrodin, hymenidin and oroidin, and a series of their synthetic analogues, and evaluated their inhibitory effect against six isoforms of the Kv1 subfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels, Kv1.1-Kv1.6, expressed in Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cells using automated patch clamp electrophysiology assay. The most potent inhibitor was the (E)-N-(3-(2-amino-1H-imidazol-4-yl)allyl)-4,5-dichloro-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxamide (6g) with IC50 values between 1.4 and 6.1 μM against Kv1.3, Kv1.4, Kv1.5 and Kv1.6 channels. All compounds tested displayed selectivity against Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 channels. For confirmation of their activity and selectivity, compounds were additionally evaluated in the second independent system against Kv1.1-Kv1.6 and Kv10.1 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes under voltage clamp conditions where IC50 values against Kv1.3-Kv1.6 channels for the most active analogues (e.g. 6g) were lower than 1 μM. Because of the observed low sub-micromolar IC50 values and fairly low molecular weights, the prepared compounds represent good starting points for further optimisation towards more potent and selective voltage-gated potassium channel inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Meet me on the other side: trans-bilayer modulation of a model voltage-gated ion channel activity by membrane electrostatics asymmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Mereuta

    Full Text Available While it is accepted that biomembrane asymmetry is generated by proteins and phospholipids distribution, little is known about how electric changes manifested in a monolayer influence functional properties of proteins localized on the opposite leaflet. Herein we used single-molecule electrophysiology and investigated how asymmetric changes in the electrostatics of an artificial lipid membrane monolayer, generated oppositely from where alamethicin--a model voltage-gated ion channel--was added, altered peptide activity. We found that phlorizin, a membrane dipole potential lowering amphiphile, augmented alamethicin activity and transport features, whereas the opposite occurred with RH-421, which enhances the monolayer dipole potential. Further, the monolayer surface potential was decreased via adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate, and demonstrated that vectorial modification of it also affected the alamethicin activity in a predictive manner. A new paradigm is suggested according to which asymmetric changes in the monolayer dipole and surface potential extend their effects spatially by altering the intramembrane potential, whose gradient is sensed by distantly located peptides.

  11. Meet Me on the Other Side: Trans-Bilayer Modulation of a Model Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Membrane Electrostatics Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereuta, Loredana; Asandei, Alina; Luchian, Tudor

    2011-01-01

    While it is accepted that biomembrane asymmetry is generated by proteins and phospholipids distribution, little is known about how electric changes manifested in a monolayer influence functional properties of proteins localized on the opposite leaflet. Herein we used single-molecule electrophysiology and investigated how asymmetric changes in the electrostatics of an artificial lipid membrane monolayer, generated oppositely from where alamethicin - a model voltage-gated ion channel - was added, altered peptide activity. We found that phlorizin, a membrane dipole potential lowering amphiphile, augmented alamethicin activity and transport features, whereas the opposite occurred with RH-421, which enhances the monolayer dipole potential. Further, the monolayer surface potential was decreased via adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate, and demonstrated that vectorial modification of it also affected the alamethicin activity in a predictive manner. A new paradigm is suggested according to which asymmetric changes in the monolayer dipole and surface potential extend their effects spatially by altering the intramembrane potential, whose gradient is sensed by distantly located peptides. PMID:21980414

  12. Voltage dependence of the apparent affinity for external Na(+) of the backward-running sodium pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Weer, P; Gadsby, D C; Rakowski, R F

    2001-04-01

    The steady-state voltage and [Na(+)](o) dependence of the electrogenic sodium pump was investigated in voltage-clamped internally dialyzed giant axons of the squid, Loligo pealei, under conditions that promote the backward-running mode (K(+)-free seawater; ATP- and Na(+)-free internal solution containing ADP and orthophosphate). The ratio of pump-mediated (42)K(+) efflux to reverse pump current, I(pump) (both defined by sensitivity to dihydrodigitoxigenin, H(2)DTG), scaled by Faraday's constant, was -1.5 +/- 0.4 (n = 5; expected ratio for 2 K(+)/3 Na(+) stoichiometry is -2.0). Steady-state reverse pump current-voltage (I(pump)-V) relationships were obtained either from the shifts in holding current after repeated exposures of an axon clamped at various V(m) to H(2)DTG or from the difference between membrane I-V relationships obtained by imposing V(m) staircases in the presence or absence of H(2)DTG. With the second method, we also investigated the influence of [Na(+)](o) (up to 800 mM, for which hypertonic solutions were used) on the steady-state reverse I(pump)-V relationship. The reverse I(pump)-V relationship is sigmoid, I(pump) saturating at large negative V(m), and each doubling of [Na(+)](o) causes a fixed (29 mV) rightward parallel shift along the voltage axis of this Boltzmann partition function (apparent valence z = 0.80). These characteristics mirror those of steady-state (22)Na(+) efflux during electroneutral Na(+)/Na(+) exchange, and follow without additional postulates from the same simple high field access channel model (Gadsby, D.C., R.F. Rakowski, and P. De Weer, 1993. Science. 260:100-103). This model predicts valence z = nlambda, where n (1.33 +/- 0.05) is the Hill coefficient of Na binding, and lambda (0.61 +/- 0.03) is the fraction of the membrane electric field traversed by Na ions reaching their binding site. More elaborate alternative models can accommodate all the steady-state features of the reverse pumping and electroneutral Na

  13. Conotoxins as Tools to Understand the Physiological Function of Voltage-Gated Calcium (CaV Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ramírez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium (CaV channels are widely expressed and are essential for the completion of multiple physiological processes. Close regulation of their activity by specific inhibitors and agonists become fundamental to understand their role in cellular homeostasis as well as in human tissues and organs. CaV channels are divided into two groups depending on the membrane potential required to activate them: High-voltage activated (HVA, CaV1.1–1.4; CaV2.1–2.3 and Low-voltage activated (LVA, CaV3.1–3.3. HVA channels are highly expressed in brain (neurons, heart, and adrenal medulla (chromaffin cells, among others, and are also classified into subtypes which can be distinguished using pharmacological approaches. Cone snails are marine gastropods that capture their prey by injecting venom, “conopeptides”, which cause paralysis in a few seconds. A subset of conopeptides called conotoxins are relatively small polypeptides, rich in disulfide bonds, that target ion channels, transporters and receptors localized at the neuromuscular system of the animal target. In this review, we describe the structure and properties of conotoxins that selectively block HVA calcium channels. We compare their potency on several HVA channel subtypes, emphasizing neuronal calcium channels. Lastly, we analyze recent advances in the therapeutic use of conotoxins for medical treatments.

  14. Sodium channels gone wild: resurgent current from neuronal and muscle channelopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, Stephen C.; Bean, Bruce P.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-dependent sodium channels are the central players in the excitability of neurons, cardiac muscle, and skeletal muscle. Hundreds of mutations in sodium channels have been associated with human disease, particularly genetic forms of epilepsy, arrhythmias, myotonia, and periodic paralysis. In this issue of the JCI, Jarecki and colleagues present evidence suggesting that many such mutations alter the gating of sodium channels to produce resurgent sodium current, an unusual form of gating ...

  15. Voltage-gated sodium channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells of mormyrid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. de Ruiter (Martijn); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar Purkinje cells of mormyrid fish differ in some morphological as well as physiological parameters from their counterparts in mammals. Morphologically, Purkinje cells of mormyrids have larger dendrites that are characterized by a lower degree of branching in the molecular layer.

  16. A compact quasi 3D threshold voltage modeling and performance analysis of a novel linearly graded binary metal alloy quadruple gate MOSFET for subdued short channel effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhel, Saheli; Sarkar, Subir Kumar

    2015-06-01

    In the present era of low power devices, to keep pace with the aggressive scaling demands, the concept of surrounding gate MOS geometry is gradually being popular among the researchers for enhancing the performance of nanoscale MOSFETs due to the inherent benefit of the gate-all-around geometry compared to the conventional planar structures. In this research endeavour, we have, for the first time, incorporated the novel theory of work function engineering of a binary metal alloy gate with continuous horizontal variation of mole fraction in a fully depleted quadruple gate MOSFET, thereby proposing a new structure namely Work Function Engineered Gate Quadruple Gate MOSFET (WFEG QG MOSFET). A detailed analytical modeling of this novel WFEG QG MOS structure has been formulated to present a quasi 3D threshold voltage model based on 3D scaling equation instead of the tedious solution of 3D Poisson's equation. The device short channel effects have been included by calculating the natural length of the proposed QG device using the effective number of gate (ENG) concept. An overall comparative performance analysis of the WFEG QG MOS and normal QG MOSFET has been done to establish the superiority of the proposed WFEG structure over its QG equivalent in terms of reduced Short Channel Effects (SCEs), Drain Induced Barrier Lowering (DIBL) and Threshold Voltage Roll Off (TVRO). The results of our analytical modeling are found to be in good agreement with the simulation results, thereby establishing the accuracy of our modeling.

  17. Deltamethrin affects the expression of voltage-gated calcium channel α1 subunits and the locomotion, egg-laying, foraging behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rune; Yu, Xing; Tan, Xing; Ye, Shan; Ding, Zhong

    2017-05-01

    Deltamethrin belongs to the class of synthetic pyrethroids, which are being widely used as insecticides in agricultural practices. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are the primary targets of these chemicals for toxicity to insects. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) does not have VGSCs but is susceptible to deltamethrin. Recent findings have suggested that pyrethroids can affect voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). However, it remains elusive whether deltamethrin induces toxicity to C. elegans via modulating the activity of VGCCs. To identify the potential target of deltamethrin, we exposed C. elegans to different concentrations of deltamethrin and Ca(2+) channel blockers for different times, characterized the behavioral toxicity of deltamethrin on C. elegans, and determined the expression of egl-19, unc-2, and cca-1, which encode the α1-subunit of the L-, R/N/P/Q-, and T-type VGCC, respectively. We found that deltamethrin inhibited the locomotion, egg-laying and foraging ability of C. elegans in a concentration dependent manner. We also showed that body length of worms on agar plates containing 200mgL(-1) deltamethrin for 12h was not significantly different from controls, whereas the cholinesterase inhibitor carbofuran caused hypercontraction which is a characteristic of organophosphates and carbamates, suggesting that deltamethrin's mode of action is distinct from those nematicides. In addition, unc-2 was significantly up-regulated following 0.05mgL(-1) deltamethrin exposure for 24h; while egl-19 and cca-1 were significantly up-regulated following 5 and 50mgL(-1) deltamethrin exposure for 24h. Further tests of worms' sensitivity and expression of three α1-subunits of VGCC to Ca(2+) channel blockers indicate that deltamethrin may induce toxic behavior C. elegans via modulation of the expression of the α1-subunits of VGCC. This study provides insights into the linkage between deltamethrin-induced toxic behavior and the regulation of α1-subunits of VGCC

  18. Source-gated transistors for power-efficient low-voltage integrateded lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, N.D.; Sporea, R.A.; Shannon, J.M.; Silva, S.R.P.; Trainor, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated, flat-panel lighting systems require high efficiency linear drivers which are stable under electrical stress and candeliver uniform performance across a large area. Owing to their lowsaturation voltage and flat saturation characteristic, source-gatedtransistors (SGTs) are ideally suited

  19. Input Stage for Low-Voltage, Low-Noise Preamplifiers Based on a Floating-Gate MOS Transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igor, Mucha

    1997-01-01

    degradation of the performance of the circuit and without the need for a repeating programming. In this way the noise originating from any resistance previously used for the definition of the operating point is avoided completely and, moreover, by avoiding the input high-pass filter both the saturation......A novel input stage for low-voltage, low-noise preamplifiers for integrated capacitive sensors is presented. The input stage of the preamplifier employs floating-gate MOS transistors which are capable of storing the operation point of the input stage over several years without any severe...... of the input stage is abolished and very-low-frequency signal can be handled. A preamplifier using the proposed input stage, optimized for lowest white noise operation has been fabricated in a 0.8 micron CMOS process. The circuit operates with a power supply of 1.5V and consumes only a little bias current....

  20. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells and regulates insulin secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qing [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Che, Yongzhe [School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shangrong [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Gao, Ying-Tang [Key Laboratory of Artificial Cell, Third Central Clinical College of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300170 (China); Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xudong; Xi, Wang; Zuo, Weiyan [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Shu Jie, E-mail: shujieli@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a potent acid extruder that participates in the extrusion of the intracellular acid. Here, we showed for the first time, Hv1 is highly expressed in mouse and human pancreatic islet β-cells, as well as β-cell lines. Imaging studies demonstrated that Hv1 resides in insulin-containing granules in β-cells. Knockdown of Hv1 with RNA interference significantly reduces glucose- and K{sup +}-induced insulin secretion in isolated islets and INS-1 (832/13) β-cells and has an impairment on glucose- and K{sup +}-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. Our data demonstrated that the expression of Hv1 in pancreatic islet β-cells regulates insulin secretion through regulating Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis.

  1. Functional and pharmacological consequences of the distribution of voltage-gated calcium channels in the renal blood vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B L

    2013-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers are widely used to treat hypertension because they inhibit voltage-gated calcium channels that mediate transmembrane calcium influx in, for example, vascular smooth muscle and cardiomyocytes. The calcium channel family consists of several subfamilies, of which the L......-type is usually associated with vascular contractility. However, the L-, T- and P-/Q-types of calcium channels are present in the renal vasculature and are differentially involved in controlling vascular contractility, thereby contributing to regulation of kidney function and blood pressure. In the preglomerular...... vascular bed, all the three channel families are present. However, the T-type channel is the only channel in cortical efferent arterioles which is in contrast to the juxtamedullary efferent arteriole, and that leads to diverse functional effects of L- and T-type channel inhibition. Furthermore...

  2. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-08-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca(2+) /calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca(2+) -mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects. © 2013 The Author. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine Published by Foundation for Cellular and Molecular

  3. Sigma-1 receptor agonist increases axon outgrowth of hippocampal neurons via voltage-gated calcium ions channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Shu-Zhuo; Yao, Yu-Hong; Xiang, Yun; Ma, Xiao-Yun; Wei, Xiao-Li; Yan, Hai-Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2017-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that have been implicated in both neurodegenerative and ischemic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Accumulating evidence has suggested that Sig-1R plays a role in neuroprotection and axon outgrowth. The underlying mechanisms of Sig-1R-mediated neuroprotection have been well elucidated. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of Sig-1R on axon outgrowth are not fully understood. To clarify this issue, we utilized immunofluorescence to compare the axon lengths of cultured naïve hippocampal neurons before and after the application of the Sig-1R agonist, SA4503. Then, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence were used to examine voltage-gated calcium ion channel (VGCCs) currents in the cell membranes and growth cones. We found that Sig-1R activation dramatically enhanced the axonal length of the naïve hippocampal neurons. Application of the Sig-1R antagonist NE100 and gene knockdown techniques both demonstrated the effects of Sig-1R. The growth-promoting effect of SA4503 was accompanied by the inhibition of voltage-gated Ca2+ influx and was recapitulated by incubating the neurons with the L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type VGCC blockers, nimodipine, MVIIA and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively. This effect was unrelated to glial cells. The application of SA4503 transformed the growth cone morphologies from complicated to simple, which favored axon outgrowth. Sig-1R activation can enhance axon outgrowth and may have a substantial influence on neurogenesis and neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Carrier Density Modulation over an Exceptional Voltage Window in BaSnO3 Films via Ion Gel Gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Helin; Walter, Jeff; Ganguly, Koustav; Prakash, Abhinav; Jalan, Bharat; Leighton, Chris

    BaSnO3 has drawn interest recently due to its outstanding room temperature mobility and potential applications in oxide transistors, transparent conductors, etc. Here we report effective control of the electronic transport properties of sputtered oxygen-vacancy-doped BaSnO3 (BaSnO3-δ) films via ion gel gating in electric double layer transistor structures. The electron densities of the starting films is tuned by thickness, from 4 × 1019 cm-3 at 13 nm to much lower densities at lower thickness. The response to gate voltage is found to be notably robust, with largely reversible response (even in vacuum) over an exceptionally wide window from -4 to +4 V, even at 300 K. The data support predominantly electrostatic response, unlike many other oxides, which we ascribe to Sn redox stability. In this manner the sheet resistance of 13-nm-thick BaSnO3 films can be modulated by a factor of 50 at 300 K, increasing to almost 103 at low temperatures. Similar measurements at lower thickness/electron density will also be discussed. Work supported by the NSF MRSEC under DMR-1420013.

  5. Aerosol jet printed, low voltage, electrolyte gated carbon nanotube ring oscillators with sub-5 μs stage delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Mingjing; Seo, Jung-Woo T; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L; Zhang, Wei; Geier, Michael L; Renn, Michael J; Kim, Chris H; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2013-03-13

    A central challenge for printed electronics is to achieve high operating frequencies (short transistor switching times) at low supply biases compatible with thin film batteries. In this report, we demonstrate partially printed five-stage ring oscillators with >20 kHz operating frequencies and stage delays inverter stages in these ring oscillators were based on ambipolar thin film transistors (TFTs) employing semiconducting, single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) networks and a high capacitance (∼1 μF/cm(2)) ion gel electrolyte as the gate dielectric. All materials except the source and drain electrodes were aerosol jet printed. The TFTs exhibited high electron and hole mobilities (∼20 cm(2)/(V s)) and ON/OFF current ratios (up to 10(5)). Inverter switching times t were systematically characterized as a function of transistor channel length and ionic conductivity of the gel dielectric, demonstrating that both the semiconductor and the ion gel play a role in switching speed. Quantitative scaling analysis suggests that with suitable optimization low voltage, printed ion gel gated CNT inverters could operate at frequencies on the order of 1 MHz.

  6. Gate voltage modulation of spin-Hall-torque-driven magnetic switching

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Luqiao; Pai, Chi-Feng; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Two promising strategies for achieving efficient control of magnetization in future magnetic memory and non-volatile spin logic devices are spin transfer torque from spin polarized currents and voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA). Spin transfer torque is in widespread development as the write mechanism for next-generation magnetic memory, while VCMA offers the potential of even better energy performance due to smaller Ohmic losses. Here we introduce a 3-terminal magnetic tunnel junc...

  7. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca [subscript V] 1.2 Mediates Fear Extinction and Modulates Synaptic Tone in the Lateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Stephanie J.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2017-01-01

    L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs) have been implicated in both the formation and the reduction of fear through Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. Despite the implication of LVGCCs in fear learning and extinction, studies of the individual LVGCC subtypes, Ca[subscript V]1.2 and Ca[subscript V] 1.3, using transgenic mice have…

  8. GABA(A) Increases Calcium in Subventricular Zone Astrocyte-Like Cells Through L- and T-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Stephanie Z; Platel, Jean-Claude; Nielsen, Jakob V

    2010-01-01

    induced Ca(2+) increases in 40-50% of SVZ astrocytes. GABA(A)-induced Ca(2+) increases were prevented with nifedipine and mibefradil, blockers of L- and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). The L-type Ca(2+) channel activator BayK 8644 increased the percentage of GABA(A)-responding astrocyte...

  9. L- and T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in human granulosa cells: functional characterization and cholinergic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platano, Daniela; Magli, M Cristina; Ferraretti, Anna Pia; Gianaroli, Luca; Aicardi, Giorgio

    2005-04-01

    Using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique, we have characterized two types of ionic currents through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in human granulosa cells. One is long-lasting, activates at approximately -20 mV, reaches the peak at approximately +20 mV, has an inactivation time constant of 132.5 +/- 5.6 msec at 20 mV, and is sensitive to dihydropyridines. The other is transient, activates at approximately -40 mV, peaks at approximately -10 mV, has an inactivation time constant of 38.8 +/- 1.8 msec at -10 mV, displays a voltage-dependent inactivation, and is sensitive to 100 microm Ni2+, but not to dihydropyridines. Biophysical and pharmacological properties of these currents indicate that they are gated through L- and T-type calcium channels, respectively. The cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (50 microm) reduces the amplitude of the currents through both L-type (-34.7 +/- 6.4%; n = 10) and T-type (-52.6 +/- 7.4%; n = 8) channels, suggesting a possible role of these channels in the cholinergic regulation of human ovarian functions.

  10. Low-voltage organic electronics based on a gate-tunable injection barrier in vertical graphene-organic semiconductor heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Htay; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Carta, Fabio; Nam, Chang-Yong; Barton, Rob A; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2015-01-14

    The vertical integration of graphene with inorganic semiconductors, oxide semiconductors, and newly emerging layered materials has recently been demonstrated as a promising route toward novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we report organic thin film transistors based on vertical heterojunctions of graphene and organic semiconductors. In these thin heterostructure devices, current modulation is accomplished by tuning of the injection barriers at the semiconductor/graphene interface with the application of a gate voltage. N-channel devices fabricated with a thin layer of C60 show a room temperature on/off ratio >10(4) and current density of up to 44 mAcm(-2). Because of the ultrashort channel intrinsic to the vertical structure, the device is fully operational at a driving voltage of 200 mV. A complementary p-channel device is also investigated, and a logic inverter based on two complementary transistors is demonstrated. The vertical integration of graphene with organic semiconductors via simple, scalable, and low-temperature fabrication processes opens up new opportunities to realize flexible, transparent organic electronic, and optoelectronic devices.

  11. H2O2augments cytosolic calcium in nucleus tractus solitarii neurons via multiple voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Tim D; Dantzler, Heather A; Polo-Parada, Luis; Kline, David D

    2017-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a profound role in cardiorespiratory function under normal physiological conditions and disease states. ROS can influence neuronal activity by altering various ion channels and transporters. Within the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS), a vital brainstem area for cardiorespiratory control, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) induces sustained hyperexcitability following an initial depression of neuronal activity. The mechanism(s) associated with the delayed hyperexcitability are unknown. Here we evaluate the effect(s) of H 2 O 2 on cytosolic Ca 2+ (via fura-2 imaging) and voltage-dependent calcium currents in dissociated rat nTS neurons. H 2 O 2 perfusion (200 µM; 1 min) induced a delayed, slow, and moderate increase (~27%) in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ). The H 2 O 2 -mediated increase in [Ca 2+ ] i prevailed during thapsigargin, excluding the endoplasmic reticulum as a Ca 2+ source. The effect, however, was abolished by removal of extracellular Ca 2+ or the addition of cadmium to the bath solution, suggesting voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels (VGCCs) as targets for H 2 O 2 modulation. Recording of the total voltage-dependent Ca 2+ current confirmed H 2 O 2 enhanced Ca 2+ entry. Blocking VGCC L, N, and P/Q subtypes decreased the number of cells and their calcium currents that respond to H 2 O 2 The number of responder cells to H 2 O 2 also decreased in the presence of dithiothreitol, suggesting the actions of H 2 O 2 were dependent on sulfhydryl oxidation. In summary, here, we have shown that H 2 O 2 increases [Ca 2+ ] i and its Ca 2+ currents, which is dependent on multiple VGCCs likely by oxidation of sulfhydryl groups. These processes presumably contribute to the previously observed delayed hyperexcitability of nTS neurons in in vitro brainstem slices. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Biophysical and Pharmacological Characterization of Nav1.9 Voltage Dependent Sodium Channels Stably Expressed in HEK-293 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhixin Lin; Sonia Santos; Karen Padilla; David Printzenhoff; Castle, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    The voltage dependent sodium channel Nav1.9, is expressed preferentially in peripheral sensory neurons and has been linked to human genetic pain disorders, which makes it target of interest for the development of new pain therapeutics. However, characterization of Nav1.9 pharmacology has been limited due in part to the historical difficulty of functionally expressing recombinant channels. Here we report the successful generation and characterization of human, mouse and rat Nav1.9 stably expre...

  13. Functional properties and toxin pharmacology of a dorsal root ganglion sodium channel viewed through its voltage sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puopolo, Michelino; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Bean, Bruce P.

    2011-01-01

    The voltage-activated sodium (Nav) channel Nav1.9 is expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons where it is believed to play an important role in nociception. Progress in revealing the functional properties and pharmacological sensitivities of this non-canonical Nav channel has been slow because attempts to express this channel in a heterologous expression system have been unsuccessful. Here, we use a protein engineering approach to dissect the contributions of the four Nav1.9 voltage sensors to channel function and pharmacology. We define individual S3b–S4 paddle motifs within each voltage sensor, and show that they can sense changes in membrane voltage and drive voltage sensor activation when transplanted into voltage-activated potassium channels. We also find that the paddle motifs in Nav1.9 are targeted by animal toxins, and that these toxins alter Nav1.9-mediated currents in DRG neurons. Our results demonstrate that slowly activating and inactivating Nav1.9 channels have functional and pharmacological properties in common with canonical Nav channels, but also show distinctive pharmacological sensitivities that can potentially be exploited for developing novel treatments for pain. PMID:21670206

  14. Functional properties and toxin pharmacology of a dorsal root ganglion sodium channel viewed through its voltage sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Frank; Puopolo, Michelino; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Bean, Bruce P; Swartz, Kenton J

    2011-07-01

    The voltage-activated sodium (Nav) channel Nav1.9 is expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons where it is believed to play an important role in nociception. Progress in revealing the functional properties and pharmacological sensitivities of this non-canonical Nav channel has been slow because attempts to express this channel in a heterologous expression system have been unsuccessful. Here, we use a protein engineering approach to dissect the contributions of the four Nav1.9 voltage sensors to channel function and pharmacology. We define individual S3b-S4 paddle motifs within each voltage sensor, and show that they can sense changes in membrane voltage and drive voltage sensor activation when transplanted into voltage-activated potassium channels. We also find that the paddle motifs in Nav1.9 are targeted by animal toxins, and that these toxins alter Nav1.9-mediated currents in DRG neurons. Our results demonstrate that slowly activating and inactivating Nav1.9 channels have functional and pharmacological properties in common with canonical Nav channels, but also show distinctive pharmacological sensitivities that can potentially be exploited for developing novel treatments for pain.

  15. EXPRESS: Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex.

  16. Systematic analysis of the contributions of stochastic voltage gated channels to neuronal noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian eO‘Donnell

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical signaling in neurons is mediated by the openingand closing of large numbers of individual ion channels. The ion channel'sstate transitions are stochastic and introduce fluctuations in themacroscopic current through ion channel populations. This createsan unavoidable source of intrinsic electrical noise for the neuron,leading to fluctuations in the membrane potential and spontaneousspikes. While this effect is well known, the impact of channel noiseon single neuron dynamics remains poorly understood. Most resultsare based on numerical simulations. There is no agreement, even intheoretical studies, on which ion channel type is the dominant noisesource, nor how inclusion of additional ion channel types affects voltagenoise. Here we describe a framework to calculate voltage noise directlyfrom an arbitrary set of ion channel models, and discuss how this canbe use to estimate spontaneous spike rates.

  17. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) inhibits voltage-gated T-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, M; Gilbert, G; Lory, P; Marthan, R; Quignard, J F; Savineau, J P

    2012-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form, DHEAS, are the most abundant steroid hormones in the mammalian blood flow. DHEA may have beneficial effects in various pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular diseases or deterioration of the sense of well-being. However to date, the cellular mechanism underlying DHEA action remains elusive and may involve ion channel modulation. In this study, we have characterized the effect of DHEA on T-type voltage-activated calcium channels (T-channels), which are involved in several cardiovascular and neuronal diseases. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that DHEA inhibits the three recombinant T-channels (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2 and Ca(V)3.3) expressed in NG108-15 cell line, as well as native T-channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. This effect of DHEA is both concentration (IC(50) between 2 and 7μM) and voltage-dependent and results in a significant shift of the steady-state inactivation curves toward hyperpolarized potentials. Consequently, DHEA reduces window T-current and inhibits membrane potential oscillations induced by Ca(V)3 channels. DHEA inhibition is not dependent on the activation of nuclear androgen or estrogen receptors and implicates a PTX-sensitive Gi protein pathway. Functionally, DHEA and the T-type inhibitor NNC 55-0396 inhibited KCl-induced contraction of pulmonary artery rings and their effect was not cumulative. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that DHEA inhibits T-channels by a Gi protein dependent pathway. DHEA-induced alteration in T-channel activity could thus account for its therapeutic action and/or physiological effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanism of action of sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs) on insect sodium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, Kristopher S.; Song, Weizhong; NOMURA, Yoshiko; Salgado, Vincent L.; Dong, Ke

    2009-01-01

    Sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs) are a relatively new class of insecticides, with a mechanism of action different from those of other classes of insecticides that target voltage-gated sodium channels. These compounds have no effect at hyperpolarized membrane potentials, but cause a voltage-dependent, nearly irreversible block as the membrane potential is depolarized. The mechanism of action of SCBIs is similar to that of local anesthetics (LAs), class I anticonvulsants and class I ...

  19. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca2+-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it. PMID:27867359

  20. Physiology and evolution of voltage-gated calcium channels in early diverging animal phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Senatore

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium (Cav channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling, gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling, pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling, regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca2+-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when many of these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it.

  1. Ligand- and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels differentially regulate the mode of vesicular neuropeptide release in mammalian sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeshi; Wu, Qihui; Hu, Meiqin; Liu, Bin; Chai, Zuying; Huang, Rong; Wang, Yuan; Xu, Huadong; Zhou, Li; Zheng, Lianghong; Wang, Changhe; Zhou, Zhuan

    2017-06-20

    Neuropeptides released from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons play essential roles in the neurotransmission of sensory inputs, including those underlying nociception and pathological pain. Neuropeptides are released from intracellular vesicles through two modes: a partial release mode called "kiss-and-run" (KAR) and a full release mode called "full fusion-like" (FFL). Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we traced the release of pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein-tagged neuropeptide Y (pHluorin-NPY) from individual dense-core vesicles in the soma and axon of single DRG neurons after Ca2+ influx through either voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) or ligand-gated transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels. We found that Ca2+ influx through VGCCs stimulated FFL and a greater single release of neuropeptides. In contrast, Ca2+ influx through TRPV1 channels stimulated KAR and a pulsed but prolonged release of neuropeptides that was partially mediated by Dynamin 1, which limits fusion pore expansion. Suppressing the Ca2+ gradient to an extent similar to that seen after TRPV1 activation abolished the VGCC preference for FFL. The findings suggest that by generating a steeper Ca2+ gradient, VGCCs promote a more robust fusion pore opening that facilitates FFL. Thus, KAR and FFL release modes are differentially regulated by the two principal types of Ca2+-permeable channels in DRG neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca(2+)-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it.

  3. Niflumic acid alters gating of HCN2 pacemaker channels by interaction with the outer region of S4 voltage sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lan; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2009-05-01

    Niflumic acid, 2-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (NFA), is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modifies the gating of many ion channels. Here, we investigated the effects of NFA on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) pacemaker channels expressed in X. laevis oocytes using site-directed mutagenesis and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Extracellular NFA acted rapidly and caused a slowing of activation and deactivation and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of HCN2 channel activation (-24.5 +/- 1.2 mV at 1 mM). Slowed channel gating and reduction of current magnitude was marked in oocytes treated with NFA, while clamped at 0 mV but minimal in oocytes clamped at -100 mV, indicating the drug preferentially interacts with channels in the closed state. NFA at 0.1 to 3 mM shifted the half-point for channel activation in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC(50) of 0.54 +/- 0.068 mM and a predicted maximum shift of -38 mV. NFA at 1 mM also reduced maximum HCN2 conductance by approximately 20%, presumably by direct block of the pore. The rapid onset and state-dependence of NFA-induced changes in channel gating suggests an interaction with the extracellular region of the S4 transmembrane helix, the primary voltage-sensing domain of HCN2. Neutralization (by mutation to Gln) of any three of the outer four basic charged residues in S4, but not single mutations, abrogated the NFA-induced shift in channel activation. We conclude that NFA alters HCN2 gating by interacting with the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor domains.

  4. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit, E-mail: nilugrandson@gmail.com

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  5. Compound list: 1% cholesterol + 0.25% sodium cholate [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1% cholesterol + 0.25% sodium cholate CH+DS-Na 00161 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arc...hive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/1%25_cholesterol_%2B_0.25%25_sodium_cholate.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  6. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields depolarize transmembrane potential via voltage-gated K+, Ca2+and TRPM8 channels in U87 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ryan C; Bardet, Sylvia M; Carr, Lynn; Romanenko, Sergii; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2017-10-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have a variety of applications in the biomedical and biotechnology industries. Cancer treatment has been at the forefront of investigations thus far as nsPEFs permeabilize cellular and intracellular membranes leading to apoptosis and necrosis. nsPEFs may also influence ion channel gating and have the potential to modulate cell physiology without poration of the membrane. This phenomenon was explored using live cell imaging and a sensitive fluorescent probe of transmembrane voltage in the human glioblastoma cell line, U87 MG, known to express a number of voltage-gated ion channels. The specific ion channels involved in the nsPEF response were screened using a membrane potential imaging approach and a combination of pharmacological antagonists and ion substitutions. It was found that a single 10ns pulsed electric field of 34kV/cm depolarizes the transmembrane potential of cells by acting on specific voltage-sensitive ion channels; namely the voltage and Ca2 + gated BK potassium channel, L- and T-type calcium channels, and the TRPM8 transient receptor potential channel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Blockade of voltage-gated K+ currents in rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells by MK801

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Min Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MK801 (dizocilpine, a phencyclidine (PCP derivative, is a potent noncompetitive antagonist of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr. Another PCP derivative, ketamine, was reported to block voltage-gated K+ (Kv channels, which was independent of NMDAr function. Kv currents are major regulators of the membrane potential (Em and excitability of muscles and neurons. Here, we investigated the effect of MK801 on the Kv channels and Em in rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells (RMASMCs. We used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to analyze the effect of MK801 enantiomers on Kv channels and Em. (+MK801 inhibited Kv channels in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 89.1 ± 13.1 μM, Hill coefficient of 1.05 ± 0.08. The inhibition was voltage- and state- independent. (+MK801 didn't influence steady-state activation and inactivation of Kv channels. (+MK801 treatment depolarized Em in a concentration-dependent manner and concomitantly decreased membrane conductance. (−MK801 also similarly inhibited the Kv channels (IC50 of 134.0 ± 17.5 μM, Hill coefficient of 0.87 ± 0.09. These results indicate that MK801 directly inhibits the Kv channel in a state-independent manner in RMASMCs. This MK801-mediated inhibition of Kv channels should be considered when assessing the various pharmacological effects produced by MK801, such as schizophrenia, neuroprotection, and hypertension.

  8. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hilber, Karlheinz, E-mail: karlheinz.hilber@meduniwien.ac.at [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sandtner, Walter [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on

  9. Sodium channels and nociception: recent concepts and therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafte, Douglas S; Bannon, Anthony W

    2008-02-01

    Recent scientific advances have enhanced our understanding of the role voltage-gated sodium channels play in pain sensation. Human data on Nav1.7 show that gain-of-function mutations lead to enhanced pain while loss-of-function mutations lead to Congenital Indifference to Pain. Pre-clinical data from knockouts, anti-sense oligonucleotides, and siRNA for Nav1.3, 1.7, 1.8, and 1.9 have also demonstrated that specific subtypes of voltage-gated sodium channels play a role in different types of pain signaling. In addition, recent reports show that CNS penetration by voltage-gated sodium channel blockers is not required for efficacy in pre-clinical pain models while others have reported that identification of subtype-selective small molecules is possible. All of these data are converging to suggest next generation sodium channel blockers may offer the potential for novel pain therapies in the future.

  10. S-petasin and butterbur lactones dilate vessels through blockage of voltage gated calcium channels and block DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheykhzade, Majid; Smajilovic, Sanela; Issa, Ali; Haunso, Stig; Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2008-09-28

    Eremophilanlactones isolated from roots of Petasites hybridus (L.) G.M. et Sch. (Asteraceae) and S-petasin have vasodilatory effects with pD(2) -log (EC(50)) values of 6.01+/-0.08, 5.24+/-0.10, 4.74+/-0.13, and 5.43+/-0.06 for S-petasin, the (Z)-3-methylthioacrylic ester of 2beta-hydroxy-8betaH-7(11)-eremophilene-12,8-olide, the angelic ester of 2beta-hydroxy-8alphaH-7(11)-eremophilene-12,8-olide, and the angelic ester of 2beta-hydroxy-8betaH-7(11)-eremophilene-12,8-olide, respectively, in the mesenteric arteries. The pD(2) values were somewhat lower for all compounds in aortic segments. The vasodilation was caused by a blockage of the voltage gated calcium channels. S-petasin, (Z)-3-methylthioacrylic ester of 2beta-hydroxy-8betaH-7(11)-eremophilene-12,8-olide, and the angelic ester of 2beta-hydroxy-8alphaH-7(11)-eremophilene-12,8-olide displayed similar potencies in inhibiting DNA synthesis in cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells.

  11. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels: developments in peptide and small-molecule inhibitors for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, S; Alewood, PF

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain affects approximately 20% of people worldwide and places a large economic and social burden on society. Despite the availability of a range of analgesics, this condition is inadequately treated, with complete alleviation of symptoms rarely occurring. In the past 30 years, the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) have been recognized as potential targets for analgesic development. Although the majority of the research has been focused on Cav2.2 in particular, other VGCC subtypes such as Cav3.2 have recently come to the forefront of analgesic research. Venom peptides from marine cone snails have been proven to be a valuable tool in neuroscience, playing a major role in the identification and characterization of VGCC subtypes and producing the first conotoxin-based drug on the market, the ω-conotoxin, ziconotide. This peptide potently and selectively inhibits Cav2.2, resulting in analgesia in chronic pain states. However, this drug is only available via intrathecal administration, and adverse effects and a narrow therapeutic window have limited its use in the clinic. Other Cav2.2 inhibitors are currently in development and offer the promise of an improved route of administration and safety profile. This review assesses the potential of targeting VGCCs for analgesic development, with a main focus on conotoxins that block Cav2.2 and the developments made to transform them into therapeutics. PMID:22725651

  12. Voltage-gated Na channels in AII amacrine cells accelerate scotopic light responses mediated by the rod bipolar cell pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Miao; Jarsky, Tim; Murphy, Gabe J; Rieke, Fred; Singer, Joshua H

    2010-03-31

    During night (i.e., scotopic) vision in mammals, rod photoreceptor output is conveyed to ganglion cells (GCs), the output cells of the retina, by a specialized neural circuit comprising rod bipolar (RB) and AII amacrine cells. Here, we examined how intrinsic postsynaptic conductances in AIIs contribute to transmission of rod-derived signals. Using paired recordings from synaptically coupled RBs and AIIs, we found that a voltage-gated Na conductance in AII amacrines accelerated EPSPs arising from RB synaptic input. EPSPs also could be amplified by the Na conductance when AIIs were hyperpolarized below resting membrane potential, thereby increasing the availability of Na channels. AII amacrines are coupled electrically, and coupled AII amacrines likely receive common input from individual RBs. Na channel-mediated effects on EPSPs, however, appeared to occur at the single-cell rather than the AII network level. By recording light-evoked synaptic currents from GCs, we determined that the Na channel-dependent acceleration, but not amplification, of RB output by AII amacrines is reflected in the dynamics of AII synaptic output to retinal ganglion cells: synaptic inputs to both ON and OFF GCs are slowed equivalently, although not attenuated in amplitude, when Na channels in AIIs are blocked. Thus, during scotopic vision, Na conductances in AIIs serve to accelerate RB output.

  13. Cloning of a putative human voltage-gated chloride channel (CIC-2) cDNA widely expressed in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, L P; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Smith, D I; Guggino, W B; Cutting, G R

    1995-03-01

    We have cloned a cDNA from the human epithelial cell line T84 whose predicted amino acid sequence shows 93.9% identity with rat CIC-2. Mapping by somatic cell hybrids and polymerase chain reaction localizes the gene corresponding to this cDNA to chromosome 3q26-qter. The major transcription start site assessed by RNA primer extension is 100 nt upstream of the putative translation initiation codon. Analysis of the 5' flanking sequence revealed a high GC content and lack of common transcriptional elements such as TATA and CCAAT boxes. Northern blot analysis indicated wide organ distribution including tissues affected in cystic fibrosis (CF) and expression in an airway epithelial cell line derived from a CF patient. The high degree of sequence similarity and similar tissue distribution to rat CIC-2 suggests that this cDNA encodes the human CIC-2 voltage-gated chloride channel. Since this chloride channel is present in epithelial tissues it may be amenable to manipulation to circumvent the chloride secretion defect observed in CF.

  14. Expression and cellular localization of the voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ3 in the rodent retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Luis Pérez de Sevilla; Sargoy, Allison; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rodriguez, Allen; Liu, Janelle; Cuenca, Nicolás; Brecha, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    High voltage activated calcium channels are hetero-oligomeric protein complexes that mediate multiple cellular processes including the influx of extracellular Ca2+, neurotransmitter release, gene transcription and synaptic plasticity. These channels consist of a primary α1 pore-forming subunit, which is associated with an extracellular α2δ subunit and an intracellular β auxiliary subunit, which alter the gating properties and trafficking of the calcium channel. The cellular localization of the α2δ3 subunit in the mouse and rat retina is unknown. In this study, using RT-PCR a single band at ~305 bp corresponding to the predicted size of the α2δ3 subunit fragment was in mouse and rat retina and brain homogenates. Western blotting of rodent retina and brain homogenates showed a single 123 kDa band. Immunohistochemistry using an affinity purified antibody to the α2δ3 subunit revealed immunoreactive cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL), and immunoreactive processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and the outer plexiform layer (OPL). α2δ3 immunoreactivity was localized to multiple cell types, including ganglion, amacrine and bipolar cells, and photoreceptors, but not by horizontal cells. The expression of the α2δ3 calcium channel subunit to multiple cell types suggests this subunit participates widely in Ca channel-mediated signaling in the retina. PMID:25631988

  15. Human voltage-gated proton channel hv1: a new potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    Full Text Available Solid tumors exist in a hypoxic microenvironment, and possess high-glycolytic metabolites. To avoid the acidosis, tumor cells must exhibit a dynamic cytosolic pH regulation mechanism(s. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 mediates NADPH oxidase function by compensating cellular loss of electrons with protons. Here, we showed for the first time, that Hv1 expression is increased in colorectal tumor tissues and cell lines, associated with poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry showed that Hv1 is strongly expressed in adenocarcinomas but not or lowly expressed in normal colorectal or hyperplastic polyps. Hv1 expression in colorectal cancer is significantly associated with the tumor size, tumor classification, lymph node status, clinical stage and p53 status. High Hv1 expression is associated significantly with shorter overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that Hv1 is highly expressed in colorectal cancer cell lines, SW620, HT29, LS174T and Colo205, but not in SW480. Inhibitions of Hv1 expression and activity in the highly metastatic SW620 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA and Zn(2+ respectively, markedly decrease the cell invasion and migration, restraint proton extrusion and the intracellular pH recovery. Our results suggest that Hv1 may be used as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma, and a potential target for anticancer drugs in colorectal cancer therapy.

  16. A Rare Case of Cerebellar Ataxia Due to Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Giuseppe; Lobo, Pamela; Carbuccia, Cristian

    2017-11-27

    BACKGROUND Autoimmune cerebellar ataxia can be paraneoplastic in nature or can occasionally present without evidence of an ongoing malignancy. The detection of specific autoantibodies has been statistically linked to different etiologies. CASE REPORT A 55-year-old African-American woman with hypertension and a past history of morbid obesity and uncontrolled diabetes status post gastric bypass four years prior to the visit (with significantly improved body mass index and hemoglobin A1c controlled at the time of the clinical encounter) presented to the office complaining of gradual onset of unsteadiness and recurrent falls for the past three years, as well as difficulties coordinating routine daily activities. The neurologic exam showed moderate dysarthria and ataxic gait with bilateral dysmetria and positive Romberg test. Routine laboratory test results were only remarkable for a mild elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and most laboratory and imaging tests for common causes of ataxia failed to demonstrate an etiology. Upon further workup, evidence of anti-voltage-gated calcium channel and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody was demonstrated. She was then treated with intravenous immunoglobulins with remarkable clinical improvement. CONCLUSIONS We present a case of antibody-mediated ataxia not associated with malignancy. While ataxia is rarely related to autoantibodies, in such cases it is critical to understand the etiology of this disabling condition in order to treat it correctly. Clinicians should be aware of the possible association with specific autoantibodies and the necessity to rule out an occult malignancy in such cases.

  17. Mutations in the voltage-gated potassium channel gene KCNH1 cause Temple-Baraitser syndrome and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Cas; Rash, Lachlan D; Crawford, Joanna; Ma, Linlin; Cristofori-Armstrong, Ben; Miller, David; Ru, Kelin; Baillie, Gregory J; Alanay, Yasemin; Jacquinet, Adeline; Debray, François-Guillaume; Verloes, Alain; Shen, Joseph; Yesil, Gözde; Guler, Serhat; Yuksel, Adnan; Cleary, John G; Grimmond, Sean M; McGaughran, Julie; King, Glenn F; Gabbett, Michael T; Taft, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    Temple-Baraitser syndrome (TBS) is a multisystem developmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, epilepsy, and hypoplasia or aplasia of the nails of the thumb and great toe. Here we report damaging de novo mutations in KCNH1 (encoding a protein called ether à go-go, EAG1 or KV10.1), a voltage-gated potassium channel that is predominantly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), in six individuals with TBS. Characterization of the mutant channels in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and human HEK293T cells showed a decreased threshold of activation and delayed deactivation, demonstrating that TBS-associated KCNH1 mutations lead to deleterious gain of function. Consistent with this result, we find that two mothers of children with TBS, who have epilepsy but are otherwise healthy, are low-level (10% and 27%) mosaic carriers of pathogenic KCNH1 mutations. Consistent with recent reports, this finding demonstrates that the etiology of many unresolved CNS disorders, including epilepsies, might be explained by pathogenic mosaic mutations.

  18. Cyclic expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1 promotes disassembly of the primary cilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Araceli; Urrego, Diana; Pardo, Luis A

    2016-05-01

    The primary cilium, critical for morphogenic and growth factor signaling, is assembled upon cell cycle exit, but the links between ciliogenesis and cell cycle progression are unclear. KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel frequently overexpressed in tumors. We have previously reported that expression of KV10.1 is temporally restricted to a time period immediately prior to mitosis in healthy cells. Here, we provide microscopical and biochemical evidence that KV10.1 localizes to the centrosome and the primary cilium and promotes ciliary disassembly. Interference with KV10.1 ciliary localization abolishes not only the effects on ciliary disassembly, but also KV10.1-induced tumor progression in vivo Conversely, upon knockdown of KV10.1, ciliary disassembly is impaired, proliferation is delayed, and proliferating cells show prominent primary cilia. Thus, modulation of ciliogenesis by KV10.1 can explain the influence of KV10.1 expression on the proliferation of normal cells and is likely to be a major mechanism underlying its tumorigenic effects. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  19. An Analytical Threshold Voltage Model of Fully Depleted (FD) Recessed-Source/Drain (Re-S/D) SOI MOSFETs with Back-Gate Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramekala, Gopi Krishna; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an analytical threshold voltage model for back-gated fully depleted (FD), recessed-source drain silicon-on-insulator metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Analytical surface potential models have been developed at front and back surfaces of the channel by solving the two-dimensional (2-D) Poisson's equation in the channel region with appropriate boundary conditions assuming a parabolic potential profile in the transverse direction of the channel. The strong inversion criterion is applied to the front surface potential as well as on the back one in order to find two separate threshold voltages for front and back channels of the device, respectively. The device threshold voltage has been assumed to be associated with the surface that offers a lower threshold voltage. The developed model was analyzed extensively for a variety of device geometry parameters like the oxide and silicon channel thicknesses, the thickness of the source/drain extension in the buried oxide, and the applied bias voltages with back-gate control. The proposed model has been validated by comparing the analytical results with numerical simulation data obtained from ATLAS™, a 2-D device simulator from SILVACO.

  20. SAH-induced suppression of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channel currents in parenchymal arteriolar myocytes involves activation of the HB-EGF/EGFR pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C.

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels play an important role in the regulation of arterial tone and decreased activity of these ion channels has been linked to pial artery vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Our previous work has shown that acute application of a blood component, oxyhemoglobin, caused suppression of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels through heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) mediated activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Using patch clam...

  1. Multiterminal single-molecule-graphene-nanoribbon junctions with the thermoelectric figure of merit optimized via evanescent mode transport and gate voltage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saha, K.K.; Markussen, Troels; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    We propose thermoelectric devices where a single molecule is connected to two metallic zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) via highly transparent contacts that allow the injection of evanescent wave functions from ZGNRs. Their overlap generates a peak in the electronic transmission that is largely.......5 at room temperature and 0.5 Green's function formalism for multiterminal devices, we show how the transmission resonance can be manipulated by the voltage applied to a third ZGNR top-gate electrode...

  2. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na+-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. We describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na+ binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na+ with Li+ or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na+ cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na+ dependence. Thus, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na+ binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na+ binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function. PMID:25869126

  3. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-05-29

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na(+)-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na(+)-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. We describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na(+) binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na(+) with Li(+) or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na(+) cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na(+) dependence. Thus, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na(+) binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na(+) binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Brennan

    Full Text Available Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E11.5-16.5 in mouse in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult. Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels (VGCC, inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, P/Q type (CaV2.1, N-type (CaV2.2, R-type (CaV2.3, and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3, demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to

  5. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kristen Hall

    Full Text Available The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these

  6. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A; Edwards, Michael A J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s) generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these proteins to the cell

  7. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana García-Fernández

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713 is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends.

  8. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org, a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment.

  9. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of voltage-gated calcium channel beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Akito; Miki, Takafumi; Shoji, Hirotaka; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) induces numerous intracellular events such as neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and gene regulation. It has been shown that genes related to Ca2+ signaling, such as the CACNA1C, CACNB2, and CACNA1I genes that encode VGCC subunits, are associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Recently, VGCC beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP) was identified as a novel regulator of VGCC activity via the interaction of VGCC β subunits. To examine the role of the BARP in higher brain functions, we generated BARP knockout (KO) mice and conducted a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. BARP KO mice exhibited greatly reduced locomotor activity, as evidenced by decreased vertical activity, stereotypic counts in the open field test, and activity level in the home cage, and longer latency to complete a session in spontaneous T-maze alteration test, which reached “study-wide significance.” Acoustic startle response was also reduced in the mutants. Interestingly, they showed multiple behavioral phenotypes that are seemingly opposite to those seen in the mouse models of schizophrenia and its related disorders, including increased working memory, flexibility, prepulse inhibition, and social interaction, and decreased locomotor activity, though many of these phenotypes are statistically weak and require further replications. These results demonstrate that BARP is involved in the regulation of locomotor activity and, possibly, emotionality. The possibility was also suggested that BARP KO mice may serve as a unique tool for investigating the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related disorders. Further evaluation of the molecular and physiological phenotypes of the mutant mice would provide new insights into the role of BARP in higher brain functions. PMID:26136667

  10. Distribution of voltage-gated potassium and hyperpolarization-activated channels in sensory afferent fibers in the rat carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniel, Maria; Glazebrook, Patricia A; Ramirez-Navarro, Angelina; Kunze, Diana L

    2008-10-01

    The chemosensory glomus cells of the carotid body (CB) detect changes in O2 tension. Carotid sinus nerve fibers, which originate from peripheral sensory neurons located within the petrosal ganglion, innervate the CB. Release of transmitter from glomus cells activates the sensory afferent fibers to transmit information to the nucleus of the solitary tract in the brainstem. The ion channels expressed within the sensory nerve terminals play an essential role in the ability of the terminal to initiate action potentials in response to transmitter-evoked depolarization. However, with a few exceptions, the identity of ion channels expressed in these peripheral nerve fibers is unknown. This study addresses the expression of voltage-gated channels in the sensory fibers with a focus on channels that set the resting membrane potential and regulate discharge patterns. By using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence confocal microscopy, potassium channel subunits and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated) family members were localized both in petrosal neurons that expressed tyrosine hydroxylase and in the CSN axons within the carotid body. Channels contributing to resting membrane potential, including HCN2 responsible in part for I(h) current and the KCNQ2 and KCNQ5 subunits thought to underlie the neuronal "M current," were identified in the sensory neurons and their axons innervating the carotid body. In addition, the results presented here demonstrate expression of several potassium channels that shape the action potential and the frequency of discharge, including Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv4.3, and K(Ca) (BK). The role of these channels should be considered in interpretation of the fiber discharge in response to perturbation of the carotid body environment.

  11. Functional and pharmacological consequences of the distribution of voltage-gated calcium channels in the renal blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, P B L

    2013-04-01

    Calcium channel blockers are widely used to treat hypertension because they inhibit voltage-gated calcium channels that mediate transmembrane calcium influx in, for example, vascular smooth muscle and cardiomyocytes. The calcium channel family consists of several subfamilies, of which the L-type is usually associated with vascular contractility. However, the L-, T- and P-/Q-types of calcium channels are present in the renal vasculature and are differentially involved in controlling vascular contractility, thereby contributing to regulation of kidney function and blood pressure. In the preglomerular vascular bed, all the three channel families are present. However, the T-type channel is the only channel in cortical efferent arterioles which is in contrast to the juxtamedullary efferent arteriole, and that leads to diverse functional effects of L- and T-type channel inhibition. Furthermore, by different mechanisms, T-type channels may contribute to both constriction and dilation of the arterioles. Finally, P-/Q-type channels are involved in the regulation of human intrarenal arterial contractility. The calcium blockers used in the clinic affect not only L-type but also P-/Q- and T-type channels. Therefore, the distinct effect obtained by inhibiting a given subtype or set of channels under experimental settings should be considered when choosing a calcium blocker for treatment. T-type channels seem to be crucial for regulating the GFR and the filtration fraction. Use of blockers is expected to lead to preferential efferent vasodilation, reduction of glomerular pressure and proteinuria. Therefore, renovascular T-type channels might provide novel therapeutic targets, and may have superior renoprotective effects compared to conventional calcium blockers. Acta Physiologica © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  12. Mono-Heteromeric Configurations of Gap Junction Channels Formed by Connexin43 and Connexin45 Reduce Unitary Conductance and Determine both Voltage Gating and Metabolic Flux Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Zhong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In cardiac tissues, the expression of multiple connexins (Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx30.2 is a requirement for proper development and function. Gap junctions formed by these connexins have distinct permeability and gating mechanisms. Since a single cell can express more than one connexin isoform, the formation of hetero-multimeric gap junction channels provides a tissue with an enormous repertoire of combinations to modulate intercellular communication. To study further the perm-selectivity and gating properties of channels containing Cx43 and Cx45, we studied two monoheteromeric combinations in which a HeLa cell co-transfected with Cx43 and Cx45 was paired with a cell expressing only one of these connexins. Macroscopic measurements of total conductance between cell pairs indicated a drastic reduction in total conductance for mono-heteromeric channels. In terms of Vj dependent gating, Cx43 homomeric connexons facing heteromeric connexons only responded weakly to voltage negativity. Cx45 homomeric connexons exhibited no change in Vj gating when facing heteromeric connexons. The distributions of unitary conductances (γj for both mono-heteromeric channels were smaller than predicted, and both showed low permeability to the fluorescent dyes Lucifer yellow and Rhodamine123. For both mono-heteromeric channels, we observed flux asymmetry regardless of dye charge: flux was higher in the direction of the heteromeric connexon for MhetCx45 and in the direction of the homomeric Cx43 connexon for MhetCx43. Thus, our data suggest that co-expression of Cx45 and Cx43 induces the formation of heteromeric connexons with greatly reduced permeability and unitary conductance. Furthermore, it increases the asymmetry for voltage gating for opposing connexons, and it favors asymmetric flux of molecules across the junction that depends primarily on the size (not the charge of the crossing molecules.

  13. Stable Low-Voltage Operation Top-Gate Organic Field-Effect Transistors on Cellulose Nanocrystal Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Yin Wang; Canek Fuentes-Hernandez; Jen-Chieh Liu; Amir Dindar; Sangmoo Choi; Jeffrey P. Youngblood; Robert J. Moon; Bernard Kippelen

    2015-01-01

    We report on the performance and the characterization of top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), comprising a bilayer gate dielectric of CYTOP/ Al2O3 and a solution-processed semiconductor layer made of a blend of TIPS-pentacene:PTAA, fabricated on recyclable cellulose nanocrystal−glycerol (CNC/glycerol...

  14. An analytical threshold voltage model for a short-channel dual-metal-gate (DMG) recessed-source/drain (Re-S/D) SOI MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramekala, G. K.; Santra, Abirmoya; Dubey, Sarvesh; Jit, Satyabrata; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an analytical short-channel threshold voltage model is presented for a dual-metal-gate (DMG) fully depleted recessed source/drain (Re-S/D) SOI MOSFET. For the first time, the advantages of recessed source/drain (Re-S/D) and of dual-metal-gate structure are incorporated simultaneously in a fully depleted SOI MOSFET. The analytical surface potential model at Si-channel/SiO2 interface and Si-channel/buried-oxide (BOX) interface have been developed by solving the 2-D Poisson’s equation in the channel region with appropriate boundary conditions assuming parabolic potential profile in the transverse direction of the channel. Thereupon, a threshold voltage model is derived from the minimum surface potential in the channel. The developed model is analyzed extensively for a variety of device parameters like the oxide and silicon channel thicknesses, thickness of source/drain extension in the BOX, control and screen gate length ratio. The validity of the present 2D analytical model is verified with ATLAS™, a 2D device simulator from SILVACO Inc.

  15. Low-voltage organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) using crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/neodymium oxide (Nd2O3) bilayer gate dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khound, Sagarika; Sarma, Ranjit

    2018-01-01

    We have reported here on the design, processing and dielectric properties of pentacene-based organic thin film transitors (OTFTs) with a bilayer gate dilectrics of crosslinked PVA/Nd2O3 which enables low-voltage organic thin film operations. The dielectric characteristics of PVA/Nd2O3 bilayer films are studied by capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and current-voltage ( I- V) curves in the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure. We have analysed the output electrical responses and transfer characteristics of the OTFT devices to determine their performance of OTFT parameters. The mobility of 0.94 cm2/Vs, the threshold voltage of - 2.8 V, the current on-off ratio of 6.2 × 105, the subthreshold slope of 0.61 V/decade are evaluated. Low leakage current of the device is observed from current density-electric field ( J- E) curve. The structure and the morphology of the device are studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. The study demonstrates an effective way to realize low-voltage, high-performance OTFTs at low cost.

  16. A low tube voltage technique reduces the radiation dose at retrospective ECG-gated cardiac computed tomography for anatomical and functional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Funama, Yoshinori; Awai, Kazuo; Katahira, Kazuhiro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Yanaga, Yumi; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the effect of low-tube-voltage technique on a cardiac computed tomography (CT) for coronary arterial and cardiac functional analyses and radiation dose in slim patients. We enrolled 80 patients (52women, 28 men; mean age, 68.7 ± 8.9 years) undergoing retrospective electrocardiogram-gated 64-slice cardiac CT. Forty were subjected to the low (80-kV) and 40 to the standard (120-kV) tube-voltage protocol. Quantitative parameters of the coronary arteries (ie, CT attenuation, image noise, and the contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]) were calculated, as were the effective radiation dose and the figure of merit (FOM). Each coronary artery segment was visually evaluated using a 5-point scale. Cardiac function calculated by using low-tube-voltage cardiac CT was compared with that on echocardiographs. CT attenuation and image noise were significantly higher at 80- than 120-kV (P tube-voltage cardiac CT and echocardiography for cardiac functional analyses. Low-tube-voltage cardiac CT significantly reduced the radiation dose by approximately 55% in slim patients while maintaining anatomical image quality and accuracy of cardiac functional analysis. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A new mechanism of voltage-dependent gating exposed by KV10.1 channels interrupted between voltage sensor and pore.(Author abstract)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isacoff, Ehud Y; Tomczak, Adam P; Stuhmer, Walter; Bharill, Shashank; Pardo, Luis A; Panyi, Gyorgy; Fernandez-Trillo, Jorge; Papp, Ferenc

    2017-01-01

    .... Furthermore, a recent single-particle cryo-electron microscopy structure of KV10.1 revealed that the S4uS5 linker is a short loop in this KCNH family member, confirming the need for an alternative gating model...

  18. Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table salt is a combination of two minerals - sodium and chloride Your body needs some sodium to work properly. It helps with the function ... in your body. Your kidneys control how much sodium is in your body. If you have too ...

  19. More gating charges are needed to open a Shaker K+ channel than are needed to open an rBIIA Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal El-Din, Tamer M; Grögler, Dominik; Lehmann, Claudia; Heldstab, Hansjakob; Greeff, Nikolaus G

    2008-08-01

    This study presents what is, to our knowledge, a novel technique by means of which the ratio of the single gating charges of voltage-gated rat brain IIA (rBIIA) sodium and Shaker potassium ion channels was estimated. In the experiment, multiple tandems of enhanced green fluorescent protein were constructed and inserted into the C-terminals of Na(+) and K(+) ion channels. cRNA of Na(+) and K(+) ion channels was injected and expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The two electrode voltage-clamp technique allowed us to determine the total gating charge of sodium and potassium ion channels, while a relative measure of the amount of expressed channels could be established on the basis of the quantification of the fluorescence intensity of membrane-bound channels marked by enhanced green fluorescent proteins. As a result, gating charge and fluorescence intensity were found to be positively correlated. A relative comparison of the single gating charges of voltage-gated sodium and potassium ion channels could thus be established: the ratio of the single gating charges of the Shaker potassium channel and the rBIIA sodium channel was found to be 2.5 +/- 0.4. Assuming the single channel gating charge of the Shaker K(+) channel to be approximately 13 elementary charges (well supported by other studies), this leads to approximately six elementary charges for the rBIIA sodium channel, which includes a fraction of gating charge that is missed during inactivation.

  20. Enigma homolog 1 scaffolds protein kinase D1 to regulate the activity of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Andrés D; Wälchli, Sébastien; Iwata, Miki; Ryser, Stephan; Van Lint, Johannes; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Schlegel, Werner; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2008-06-01

    In cardiomyocytes, protein kinase D1 (PKD1) plays a central role in the response to stress signals. From a yeast two-hybrid assay, we have identified Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) as a new binding partner of PKD1. Since in neurons, ENH1, associated with protein kinase Cepsilon, was shown to modulate the activity of N-type calcium channels, and the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel, alpha1C, possesses a potential phosphorylation site for PKD1, we studied here a possible role of ENH1 and PKD1 in the regulation of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel. PKD1-interacting proteins were searched by yeast two-hybrid screening. In vivo protein interactions in cardiomyocytes isolated from heart ventricles of newborn rats were tested by co-immunoprecipitation. Small interfering RNA and a dominant negative mutant of PKD1 were delivered into cardiomyocytes by use of an adenovirus. Calcium currents were measured by the patch-clamp technique. Both ENH1 and PKD1 interact with alpha1C in cardiomyocytes. This interaction is increased upon stimulation. Silencing of ENH1 prevented the binding of PKD1 to alpha1C. Moreover, a dominant negative mutant of PKD1 or the silencing of ENH1 inhibited the alpha-adrenergic-induced increase of L-type calcium currents. We found a new binding partner, ENH1, and a new target, alpha1C, for PKD1 in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. We propose a model where ENH1 scaffolds PKD1 to alpha1C in order to form a signalling complex that regulates the activity of cardiac L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

  1. Identifying interacting proteins of a Caenorhabditis elegans voltage-gated chloride channel CLH-1 using GFP-Trap and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zi-Liang; Jiang, Jing; Yin, Jiang-An; Cai, Shi-Qing

    2014-06-25

    Chloride channels belong to a superfamily of ion channels that permit passive passage of anions, mainly chloride, across cell membrane. They play a variety of important physiological roles in regulation of cytosolic pH, cell volume homeostasis, organic solute transport, cell migration, cell proliferation, and differentiation. However, little is known about the functional regulation of these channels. In this study, we generated an integrated transgenic worm strain expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) fused CLC-type chloride channel 1 (CLH-1::GFP), a voltage-gated chloride channel in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). CLH-1::GFP was expressed in some unidentified head neurons and posterior intestinal cells of C. elegans. Interacting proteins of CLH-1::GFP were purified by GFP-Trap, a novel system for efficient isolation of GFP fusion proteins and their interacting factors. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that a total of 27 high probability interacting proteins were co-trapped with CLHp-1::GFP. Biochemical evidence showed that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (EEF-1), one of these co-trapped proteins identified by MS, physically interacted with CLH-1, in consistent with GFP-Trap experiments. Further immunostaining data revealed that the protein level of CLH-1 was significantly increased upon co-expression with EEF-1. These results suggest that the combination of GFP-Trap purification with MS is an excellent tool to identify novel interacting proteins of voltage-gated chloride channels in C. elegans. Our data also show that EEF-1 is a regulator of voltage-gated chloride channel CLH-1.

  2. Inhibition of aquaporin-mediated CO2 diffusion and voltage-gated H+ channels by zinc does not alter rabbit lung CO2 and NO excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Erik R; Deem, Steven; Kerr, Mark E; Bidani, Akhil

    2002-12-01

    Aquaporins (AQs) increase cell membrane CO(2) diffusivity, and it has been proposed that they may serve as transmembrane channels for CO(2) and other small gas molecules. In addition, it has been hypothesized that voltage-gated H(+) channels located on the apical membrane of the alveolar epithelium contribute to CO(2) elimination by the lung. To test whether these membrane proteins contribute to CO(2) elimination in vivo, we measured CO(2) exchange in buffer- and blood-perfused rabbit lungs before and after addition of 0.5 mM ZnCl(2), an inhibitor of both AQ-mediated CO(2) diffusion and voltage-gated H(+) channels. For comparison, red cell and lung carbonic anhydrases (CAs) were inhibited by 0.1 mM methazolamide. ZnCl(2) had no effect on CO(2) exchange when inspired CO(2) was altered between 2% and 5% in 5-min intervals. Pulmonary vascular and airway resistances were not altered by ZnCl(2). In contrast, methazolamide inhibited CO(2) exchange by 30% in buffer-perfused lungs and by 65% in blood-perfused lungs. Exhaled NO concentrations were unaffected by ZnCl(2) or by CA inhibition. Lung capillary gas exchange modelling shows that under normal resting conditions it would be necessary to reduce the alveolar-capillary membrane CO(2) diffusion capacity by >90% to lower CO(2) elimination by 10%. Therefore we conclude that red cell and lung AQs and voltage-gated H(+) channels in the alveolar epithelium contribute minimally to normal physiological CO(2) elimination.

  3. Molecular Proximity of Kv1.3 Voltage-gated Potassium Channels and ?1-Integrins on the Plasma Membrane of Melanoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Artym, Vira V.; Petty, Howard R.

    2002-01-01

    Tumor cell membranes have multiple components that participate in the process of metastasis. The present study investigates the physical association of ?1-integrins and Kv1.3 voltage-gated potassium channels in melanoma cell membranes using resonance energy transfer (RET) techniques. RET between donor-labeled anti??1-integrin and acceptor-labeled anti-Kv1.3 channels was detected on LOX cells adherent to glass and fibronectin-coated coverslips. However, RET was not observed on LOX cells in sus...

  4. Voltage-dependent sodium channels and calcium-activated potassium channels in human odontoblasts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hideki; Kim, Hyong-Jung; Shuprisha, Apichai; Shikano, Tetsuo; Tsumura, Maki; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Tazaki, Masakazu

    2012-10-01

    Transmembrane ionic signaling regulates many cellular processes in both physiological and pathologic settings. In this study, the biophysical properties of voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in odontoblasts derived from human dental pulp (HOB cells) were investigated together with the effect of bradykinin on intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and expression of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. Ionic channel activity was characterized by using whole-cell patch-clamp recording and fura-2 fluorescence. Mean resting membrane potential in the HOB cells was -38 mV. Depolarizing steps from a holding potential of -80 mV activated transient voltage-dependent inward currents with rapid activation/inactivation properties. At a holding potential of -50 mV, no inward current was recorded. Fast-activation kinetics exhibited dependence on membrane potential, whereas fast-inactivation kinetics did not. Steady-state inactivation was described by a Boltzmann function with a half-maximal inactivation potential of -70 mV, indicating that whereas the channels were completely inactivated at physiological resting membrane potential, they could be activated when the cells were hyperpolarized. Inward currents disappeared in Na(+)-free extracellular solution. Bradykinin activated intracellular Ca(2+)-releasing and influx pathways. When the HOB cells were clamped at a holding potential of -50 mV, outward currents were recorded at positive potentials, indicating sensitivity to inhibitors of intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. Human odontoblasts expressed voltage-dependent Na(+) channels, bradykinin receptors, and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, which play an important role in driving cellular functions by channel-receptor signal interaction and membrane potential regulation. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Unravelling the origin of irreversible capacity loss in NaNiO 2 for high voltage sodium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liguang; Wang, Jiajun; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Ren, Yang; Zuo, Pengjian; Yin, Geping; Wang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Layered transition metal compounds have attracted much attention due to their high theoretical capacity and energy density for sodium ion batteries. However, this kind of material suffers from serious irreversible capacity decay during the charge and discharge process. Here, using synchrotron-based operando transmission X-ray microscopy and high-energy X-ray diffraction combined with electrochemical measurements, the visualization of the dissymmetric phase transformation and structure evolution mechanism of layered NaNiO2 material during initial charge and discharge cycles are clarified. Phase transformation and deformation of NaNiO2 during the voltage range of below 3.0 V and over 4.0 V are responsible for the irreversible capacity loss during the first cycling, which is also confirmed by the evolution of reaction kinetics behavior obtained by the galvanostatic intermittent titration technique. These findings reveal the origin of the irreversibility of NaNiO2 and offer valuable insight into the phase transformation mechanism, which will provide underlying guidance for further development of high-performance sodium ion batteries.

  6. Substrate-induced unlocking of the inner gate determines the catalytic efficiency of a neurotransmitter:sodium symporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B; Krüger, Mie B; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Li, Zheng; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Kniazeff, Julie; Gotfryd, Kamil; Mortensen, Jonas S; Javitch, Jonathan A; Weinstein, Harel; Loland, Claus J; Gether, Ulrik

    2015-10-30

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) mediate reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft and are targets for several therapeutics and psychostimulants. The prokaryotic NSS homologue, LeuT, represents a principal structural model for Na(+)-coupled transport catalyzed by these proteins. Here, we used site-directed fluorescence quenching spectroscopy to identify in LeuT a substrate-induced conformational rearrangement at the inner gate conceivably leading to formation of a structural intermediate preceding transition to the inward-open conformation. The substrate-induced, Na(+)-dependent change required an intact primary substrate-binding site and involved increased water exposure of the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 5. The findings were supported by simulations predicting disruption of an intracellular interaction network leading to a discrete rotation of transmembrane segment 5 and the adjacent intracellular loop 2. The magnitude of the spectroscopic response correlated inversely with the transport rate for different substrates, suggesting that stability of the intermediate represents an unrecognized rate-limiting barrier in the NSS transport mechanism. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Substrate-induced Unlocking of the Inner Gate Determines the Catalytic Efficiency of a Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B.; Krüger, Mie B.; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Li, Zheng; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Kniazeff, Julie; Gotfryd, Kamil; Mortensen, Jonas S.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Weinstein, Harel; Loland, Claus J.; Gether, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) mediate reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft and are targets for several therapeutics and psychostimulants. The prokaryotic NSS homologue, LeuT, represents a principal structural model for Na+-coupled transport catalyzed by these proteins. Here, we used site-directed fluorescence quenching spectroscopy to identify in LeuT a substrate-induced conformational rearrangement at the inner gate conceivably leading to formation of a structural intermediate preceding transition to the inward-open conformation. The substrate-induced, Na+-dependent change required an intact primary substrate-binding site and involved increased water exposure of the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 5. The findings were supported by simulations predicting disruption of an intracellular interaction network leading to a discrete rotation of transmembrane segment 5 and the adjacent intracellular loop 2. The magnitude of the spectroscopic response correlated inversely with the transport rate for different substrates, suggesting that stability of the intermediate represents an unrecognized rate-limiting barrier in the NSS transport mechanism. PMID:26363074

  8. Alluaudite class of high voltage sodium insertion materials: An interplay of polymorphism and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwibedi, Debasmita; Barpanda, Prabeer

    2017-05-01

    The research and development with sodium ion batteries has geared up manifold in last one decade, owing to their abundance, non-toxicity, uniform geographical distribution and electrochemical performance complimentary to lithium counterpart. This research often leads to various novel material discoveries such as Na2Fe2(SO4)3 sodium insertion material, which has recently registered the highest-ever Fe3+/Fe2+ redox potential (3.8 V vs. Na) having excellent cyclability and rate kinetics. This basically belongs to a family of materials-Alluaudites Na2M2(SO4)3 (M: Fe, Mn, Co, Ni). Such cathode insertion compounds are basically functional materials, involving redox active 3d transition metals that are often magnetic in nature. We have investigated the magnetic structure and properties of - Alluaudites Na2M2(SO4)3. These alluaudite shows wide structural diversity and polymorphism. Employing various experimental methods involving diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, Mössbauer spectroscopy and low temperature neutron powder diffraction data we have explored the magnetic properties exhibited by the Alluaudite class of insertion materials.

  9. Biophysical and Pharmacological Characterization of Nav1.9 Voltage Dependent Sodium Channels Stably Expressed in HEK-293 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhixin; Santos, Sonia; Padilla, Karen; Printzenhoff, David; Castle, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The voltage dependent sodium channel Nav1.9, is expressed preferentially in peripheral sensory neurons and has been linked to human genetic pain disorders, which makes it target of interest for the development of new pain therapeutics. However, characterization of Nav1.9 pharmacology has been limited due in part to the historical difficulty of functionally expressing recombinant channels. Here we report the successful generation and characterization of human, mouse and rat Nav1.9 stably expressed in human HEK-293 cells. These cells exhibit slowly activating and inactivating inward sodium channel currents that have characteristics of native Nav1.9. Optimal functional expression was achieved by coexpression of Nav1.9 with β1/β2 subunits. While recombinantly expressed Nav1.9 was found to be sensitive to sodium channel inhibitors TC-N 1752 and tetracaine, potency was up to 100-fold less than reported for other Nav channel subtypes despite evidence to support an interaction with the canonical local anesthetic (LA) binding region on Domain 4 S6. Nav1.9 Domain 2 S6 pore domain contains a unique lysine residue (K799) which is predicted to be spatially near the local anesthetic interaction site. Mutation of this residue to the consensus asparagine (K799N) resulted in an increase in potency for tetracaine, but a decrease for TC-N 1752, suggesting that this residue can influence interaction of inhibitors with the Nav1.9 pore. In summary, we have shown that stable functional expression of Nav1.9 in the widely used HEK-293 cells is possible, which opens up opportunities to better understand channel properties and may potentially aid identification of novel Nav1.9 based pharmacotherapies.

  10. Biophysical and Pharmacological Characterization of Nav1.9 Voltage Dependent Sodium Channels Stably Expressed in HEK-293 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Lin

    Full Text Available The voltage dependent sodium channel Nav1.9, is expressed preferentially in peripheral sensory neurons and has been linked to human genetic pain disorders, which makes it target of interest for the development of new pain therapeutics. However, characterization of Nav1.9 pharmacology has been limited due in part to the historical difficulty of functionally expressing recombinant channels. Here we report the successful generation and characterization of human, mouse and rat Nav1.9 stably expressed in human HEK-293 cells. These cells exhibit slowly activating and inactivating inward sodium channel currents that have characteristics of native Nav1.9. Optimal functional expression was achieved by coexpression of Nav1.9 with β1/β2 subunits. While recombinantly expressed Nav1.9 was found to be sensitive to sodium channel inhibitors TC-N 1752 and tetracaine, potency was up to 100-fold less than reported for other Nav channel subtypes despite evidence to support an interaction with the canonical local anesthetic (LA binding region on Domain 4 S6. Nav1.9 Domain 2 S6 pore domain contains a unique lysine residue (K799 which is predicted to be spatially near the local anesthetic interaction site. Mutation of this residue to the consensus asparagine (K799N resulted in an increase in potency for tetracaine, but a decrease for TC-N 1752, suggesting that this residue can influence interaction of inhibitors with the Nav1.9 pore. In summary, we have shown that stable functional expression of Nav1.9 in the widely used HEK-293 cells is possible, which opens up opportunities to better understand channel properties and may potentially aid identification of novel Nav1.9 based pharmacotherapies.

  11. Stapled Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel (CaV) α-Interaction Domain (AID) Peptides Act As Selective Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors of CaV Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Campiglio, Marta; Jo, Hyunil; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Rumpf, Christine H; Pope, Lianne; Rossen, Nathan D; Flucher, Bernhard E; DeGrado, William F; Minor, Daniel L

    2017-06-21

    For many voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), creation of a properly functioning ion channel requires the formation of specific protein-protein interactions between the transmembrane pore-forming subunits and cystoplasmic accessory subunits. Despite the importance of such protein-protein interactions in VGIC function and assembly, their potential as sites for VGIC modulator development has been largely overlooked. Here, we develop meta-xylyl (m-xylyl) stapled peptides that target a prototypic VGIC high affinity protein-protein interaction, the interaction between the voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) pore-forming subunit α-interaction domain (AID) and cytoplasmic β-subunit (CaVβ). We show using circular dichroism spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the m-xylyl staples enhance AID helix formation are structurally compatible with native-like AID:CaVβ interactions and reduce the entropic penalty associated with AID binding to CaVβ. Importantly, electrophysiological studies reveal that stapled AID peptides act as effective inhibitors of the CaVα1:CaVβ interaction that modulate CaV function in an CaVβ isoform-selective manner. Together, our studies provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of the use of protein-protein interaction inhibitors to control VGIC function and point to strategies for improved AID-based CaV modulator design.

  12. Boosting of synaptic potentials and spine Ca transients by the peptide toxin SNX-482 requires alpha-1E-encoded voltage-gated Ca channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Giessel

    Full Text Available The majority of glutamatergic synapses formed onto principal neurons of the mammalian central nervous system are associated with dendritic spines. Spines are tiny protuberances that house the proteins that mediate the response of the postsynaptic cell to the presynaptic release of glutamate. Postsynaptic signals are regulated by an ion channel signaling cascade that is active in individual dendritic spines and involves voltage-gated calcium (Ca channels, small conductance (SK-type Ca-activated potassium channels, and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Pharmacological studies using the toxin SNX-482 indicated that the voltage-gated Ca channels that signal within spines to open SK channels belong to the class Ca(V2.3, which is encoded by the Alpha-1E pore-forming subunit. In order to specifically test this conclusion, we examined the effects of SNX-482 on synaptic signals in acute hippocampal slices from knock-out mice lacking the Alpha-1E gene. We find that in these mice, application of SNX-482 has no effect on glutamate-uncaging evoked synaptic potentials and Ca influx, indicating that that SNX-482 indeed acts via the Alpha-1E-encoded Ca(V2.3 channel.

  13. The Effects of Voltage and Concentration of Sodium Bicarbonate on Electrochemical Synthesis of Ethanol from Carbon Dioxide Using Brass as Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Septian; Fariduddin, Sholah; Rizki Aminudin, Afianti; Kurnia Hayatri, Antisa; Riyanto

    2017-11-01

    The effects of voltage and concentration of sodium bicarbonate were investigated to determine the optimum conditions of the electrochemical synthesis process to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol. The conversion process is carried out using a sodium bicarbonate electrolyte solution in an electrochemical synthesis reactor equipped with a cathode and anode. As the cathode was used brass, while as the anode carbon was utilized. Sample of the electrochemical synthesis process was analyzed by gas chromatography to determine the content of the compounds produced. The optimum electrochemical synthesis conditions to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol are voltage and concentration of sodium bicarbonate are 3 volts and 0.4 M with ethanol concentration of 1.33%.

  14. Ta2O5 as gate dielectric material for low-voltage organic thin-film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartic, Carmen; Jansen, Henricus V.; Campitelli, Andrew; Borghs, Staf

    In this paper we report the use of Ta2O5 as gate dielectric material for organic thin-film transistors. Ta2O5 has already attracted a lot of attention as insulating material for VLSI applications. We have deposited Ta2O5 thin-films with different thickness by means of electron-beam evaporation.

  15. Intrinsic oscillatory activity arising within the electrically coupled AII amacrine–ON cone bipolar cell network is driven by voltage-gated Na+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenholm, Stuart; Borowska, Joanna; Zhang, Jiawei; Hoggarth, Alex; Johnson, Kyle; Barnes, Steven; Lewis, Timothy J; Awatramani, Gautam B

    2012-01-01

    In the rd1 mouse model for retinal degeneration, the loss of photoreceptors results in oscillatory activity (∼10–20 Hz) within the remnant electrically coupled network of retinal ON cone bipolar and AII amacrine cells. We tested the role of hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih), voltage-gated Na+ channels and gap junctions in mediating such oscillatory activity. Blocking Ih (1 mm Cs+) hyperpolarized the network and augmented activity, while antagonizing voltage-dependent Na+ channels (1 μm TTX) abolished oscillatory activity in the AII amacrine–ON cone bipolar cell network. Voltage-gated Na+ channels were only observed in AII amacrine cells, implicating these cells as major drivers of activity. Pharmacologically uncoupling the network (200 μm meclofenamic acid (MFA)) blocked oscillations in all cells indicating that Na+ channels exert their influence over multiple cell types within the network. In wt retina, occluding photoreceptor inputs to bipolar cells (10 μm NBQX and 50 μm l-AP4) resulted in a mild (∼10 mV) hyperpolarization and the induction of oscillatory activity within the AII amacrine–ON cone bipolar cell network. These oscillations had similar properties to those observed in rd1 retina, suggesting that no major degeneration-induced network rewiring is required to trigger spontaneous oscillations. Finally, we constructed a simplified computational model that exhibited Na+ channel-dependent network oscillations. In this model, mild heterogeneities in channel densities between individual neurons reproduced our experimental findings. These results indicate that TTX-sensitive Na+ channels in AII amacrine cells trigger degeneration-induced network oscillations, which provide a persistent synaptic drive to downstream remnant neurons, thus appearing to replace photoreceptors as the principal drivers of retinal activity. PMID:22393249

  16. Intrinsic oscillatory activity arising within the electrically coupled AII amacrine-ON cone bipolar cell network is driven by voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenholm, Stuart; Borowska, Joanna; Zhang, Jiawei; Hoggarth, Alex; Johnson, Kyle; Barnes, Steven; Lewis, Timothy J; Awatramani, Gautam B

    2012-05-15

    In the rd1 mouse model for retinal degeneration, the loss of photoreceptors results in oscillatory activity (∼10–20 Hz) within the remnant electrically coupled network of retinal ON cone bipolar and AII amacrine cells. We tested the role of hyperpolarization-activated currents (I(h)), voltage-gated Na(+) channels and gap junctions in mediating such oscillatory activity. Blocking I(h) (1 mm Cs(+)) hyperpolarized the network and augmented activity, while antagonizing voltage-dependent Na(+) channels (1 μm TTX) abolished oscillatory activity in the AII amacrine-ON cone bipolar cell network. Voltage-gated Na(+) channels were only observed in AII amacrine cells, implicating these cells as major drivers of activity. Pharmacologically uncoupling the network (200 μm meclofenamic acid (MFA)) blocked oscillations in all cells indicating that Na(+) channels exert their influence over multiple cell types within the network. In wt retina, occluding photoreceptor inputs to bipolar cells (10 μm NBQX and 50 μm l-AP4) resulted in a mild (∼10 mV) hyperpolarization and the induction of oscillatory activity within the AII amacrine-ON cone bipolar cell network. These oscillations had similar properties to those observed in rd1 retina, suggesting that no major degeneration-induced network rewiring is required to trigger spontaneous oscillations. Finally, we constructed a simplified computational model that exhibited Na(+) channel-dependent network oscillations. In this model, mild heterogeneities in channel densities between individual neurons reproduced our experimental findings. These results indicate that TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels in AII amacrine cells trigger degeneration-induced network oscillations, which provide a persistent synaptic drive to downstream remnant neurons, thus appearing to replace photoreceptors as the principal drivers of retinal activity.

  17. Utilizing the planarian voltage-gated ion channel transcriptome to resolve a role for a Ca(2+) channel in neuromuscular function and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, John D; Zhang, Dan; Liu, Xiaolong; Zarowiecki, Magdalena; Berriman, Matthew; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2017-06-01

    The robust regenerative capacity of planarian flatworms depends on the orchestration of signaling events from early wounding responses through the stem cell enacted differentiative outcomes that restore appropriate tissue types. Acute signaling events in excitable cells play an important role in determining regenerative polarity, rationalized by the discovery that sub-epidermal muscle cells express critical patterning genes known to control regenerative outcomes. These data imply a dual conductive (neuromuscular signaling) and instructive (anterior-posterior patterning) role for Ca(2+) signaling in planarian regeneration. Here, to facilitate study of acute signaling events in the excitable cell niche, we provide a de novo transcriptome assembly from the planarian Dugesia japonica allowing characterization of the diverse ionotropic portfolio of this model organism. We demonstrate the utility of this resource by proceeding to characterize the individual role of each of the planarian voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels during regeneration, and demonstrate that knockdown of a specific voltage operated Ca(2+) channel (Cav1B) that impairs muscle function uniquely creates an environment permissive for anteriorization. Provision of the full transcriptomic dataset should facilitate further investigations of molecules within the planarian voltage-gated channel portfolio to explore the role of excitable cell physiology on regenerative outcomes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Short-Term Facilitation at a Detonator Synapse Requires the Distinct Contribution of Multiple Types of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, Simon; Evstratova, Alesya; Tóth, Katalin

    2017-05-10

    Neuronal calcium elevations are shaped by several key parameters, including the properties, density, and the spatial location of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). These features allow presynaptic terminals to translate complex firing frequencies and tune the amount of neurotransmitter released. Although synchronous neurotransmitter release relies on both P/Q- and N-type VGCCs at hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapses, the specific contribution of VGCCs to calcium dynamics, neurotransmitter release, and short-term facilitation remains unknown. Here, we used random-access two-photon calcium imaging together with electrophysiology in acute mouse hippocampal slices to dissect the roles of P/Q- and N-type VGCCs. Our results show that N-type VGCCs control glutamate release at a limited number of release sites through highly localized Ca 2+ elevations and support short-term facilitation by enhancing multivesicular release. In contrast, Ca 2+ entry via P/Q-type VGCCs promotes the recruitment of additional release sites through spatially homogeneous Ca 2+ elevations. Altogether, our results highlight the specialized contribution of P/Q- and N-types VGCCs to neurotransmitter release. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In presynaptic terminals, neurotransmitter release is dynamically regulated by the transient opening of different types of voltage-gated calcium channels. Hippocampal giant mossy fiber terminals display extensive short-term facilitation during repetitive activity, with a large several fold postsynaptic response increase. Though, how giant mossy fiber terminals leverage distinct types of voltage-gated calcium channels to mediate short-term facilitation remains unexplored. Here, we find that P/Q- and N-type VGCCs generate different spatial patterns of calcium elevations in giant mossy fiber terminals and support short-term facilitation through specific participation in two mechanisms. Whereas N-type VGCCs contribute only to the synchronization of multivesicular release

  19. Inhibition of veratridine-induced delayed inactivation of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel by synthetic analogs of crambescin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tadaaki; Chiba, Yukie; Nakazaki, Atsuo; Ishikawa, Yuki; Nakane, Yoshiki; Cho, Yuko; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Nishikawa, Toshio; Wakamori, Minoru; Konoki, Keiichi

    2017-03-01

    Crambescin B carboxylic acid, a synthetic analog of crambescin B, was recently found to inhibit the voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSC) in a cell-based assay using neuroblastoma Neuro 2A cells. In the present study, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted with three heterologously expressed VSSC subtypes, Na v 1.2, Na v 1.6 and Na v 1.7, in a human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T to further characterize the inhibition of VSSC by crambescin B carboxylic acid. Contrary to the previous observation, crambescin B carboxylic acid did not inhibit peak current evoked by depolarization from the holding potential of -100mV to the test potential of -10mV in the absence or presence of veratridine (VTD). In the presence of VTD, however, crambescin B carboxylic acid diminished VTD-induced sustained and tail currents through the three VSSC subtypes in a dose-dependent manner, whereas TTX inhibited both the peak current and the VTD-induced sustained and tail currents through all subtypes of VSSC tested. We thus concluded that crambescin B carboxylic acid does not block VSSC in a similar manner to TTX but modulate the action of VTD, thereby causing an apparent block of VSSC in the cell-based assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tyrosine phosphatases epsilon and alpha perform specific and overlapping functions in regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels in Schwann cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiran, Zohar; Peretz, Asher; Sines, Tal

    2006-01-01

    + channels and Src were analyzed in vivo in mice lacking either or both PTPs. Lack of either PTP increases Kv channel activity and phosphorylation in Schwann cells, indicating these PTPs inhibit Kv current amplitude in vivo. Open probability and unitary conductance of Kv channels are unchanged, suggesting......Tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) epsilon and alpha are closely related and share several molecular functions, such as regulation of Src family kinases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. Functional interrelationships between PTPepsilon and PTPalpha and the mechanisms by which they regulate K...... an effect on channel number or organization. PTPalpha inhibits Kv channels more strongly than PTPepsilon; this correlates with constitutive association of PTPalpha with Kv2.1, driven by membranal localization of PTPalpha. PTPalpha, but not PTPepsilon, activates Src in sciatic nerve extracts, suggesting Src...

  1. Coassembly of big conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels and L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Kaufmann, Walter A

    2004-01-01

    . The nature of the apparent coupling is not known. In the present study we report a direct coassembly of big conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK) and L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in rat brain. Saturation immunoprecipitation studies were performed on membranes labeled for BK channels...... to separate ion channel complexes. Finally, immunochemical studies showed a distinct but overlapping expression pattern of the two types of ion channels investigated. BK and L-type Ca(2+) channels were colocalized in various compartments throughout the rat brain. Taken together, these results demonstrate...... a direct coassembly of BK channels and L-type Ca(2+) channels in certain areas of the brain....

  2. Physical origin investigation of the flatband voltage roll off for metal-oxide-semiconductor device with high-k/metal gate structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Han; Xiaolei, Wang; Wenwu, Wang

    2015-09-01

    The physical origin of the flatband voltage (VFB) roll off for a metal-oxide-semiconductor device with high-k/metal gate structure is studied from the viewpoint of energy band alignment at the high-k/Si interface because the thickness of SiO2 interlayer is thin enough to be ignored. The VFB roll off phenomenon is assigned to associate with the direct electron transfer between high-k and Si substrate. Quantitatively calculated simulation results based on this model are given considering different conditions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61404093, 50932001) and the Doctoral Scientific Research Foundation of Weifang University (No. 014BS02).

  3. Gate voltage dependent 1/f noise variance model based on physical noise generation mechanisms in n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yukiko; Aoki, Hitoshi; Abe, Fumitaka; Todoroki, Shunichiro; Khatami, Ramin; Kazumi, Masaki; Totsuka, Takuya; Wang, Taifeng; Kobayashi, Haruo

    2015-04-01

    1/f noise is one of the most important characteristics for designing analog/RF circuits including operational amplifiers and oscillators. We have analyzed and developed a novel 1/f noise model in the strong inversion, saturation, and sub-threshold regions based on SPICE2 type model used in any public metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) models developed by the University of California, Berkeley. Our model contains two noise generation mechanisms that are mobility and interface trap number fluctuations. Noise variability dependent on gate voltage is also newly implemented in our model. The proposed model has been implemented in BSIM4 model of a SPICE3 compatible circuit simulator. Parameters of the proposed model are extracted with 1/f noise measurements for simulation verifications. The simulation results show excellent agreements between measurement and simulations.

  4. The feasibility of sub-millisievert coronary CT angiography with low tube voltage, prospective ECG gating, and a knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul Hwan; Lee, Joohee; Oh, Chisuk; Han, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of sub-millisievert (mSv) coronary CT angiography (CCTA) using low tube voltage, prospective ECG gating, and a knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction algorithm. Twenty-four non-obese healthy subjects (M:F 13:11; mean age 50.2 ± 7.8 years) were enrolled. Three sets of CT images were reconstructed using three different reconstruction methods: filtered back projection (FBP), iterative reconstruction (IR), and knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR). The scanning parameters were as follows: step-and-shoot axial scanning, 80 kVp, and 200 mAs. On the three sets of CT images, the attenuation and image noise values were measured at the aortic root. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated at the proximal right coronary artery and the left main coronary artery. The qualitative image quality of the CCTA with IMR was assessed using a 4-point grading scale (grade 1, poor; grade 4, excellent). The mean radiation dose of the CCTA was 0.89 ± 0.09 mSv. The attenuation values with IMR were not different from those of other reconstruction methods. The image noise with IMR was significantly lower than with IR and FBP. Compared to FBP, the noise reduction rate of IMR was 69 %. The SNR and CNR of CCTA with IMR were significantly higher than with FBP or IR. On the qualitative analysis with IMR, all included segments were diagnostic (grades 2, 3, and 4), and the mean image quality score was 3.6 ± 0.6. In conclusion, CCTA with low tube voltage, prospective ECG gating, and an IMR algorithm might be a feasible method that allows for sub-millisievert radiation doses and good image quality when used with non-obese subjects.

  5. Oxidation differentially modulates the recombinant voltage-gated Na(+) channel α-subunits Nav1.7 and Nav1.8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Friederike; Leffler, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels regulate neuronal excitability by generating the upstroke of action potentials. The α-subunits Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 are required for normal function of sensory neurons and thus for peripheral pain processing, but also for an increased excitability leading to an increased pain sensitivity under several conditions associated with oxidative stress. While little is known about the direct effects of oxidants on Nav1.7 and Nav1.8, a recent study on mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons suggested that oxidant-induced alterations of nociceptor excitability are primarily driven by Nav1.8. Here we performed whole-cell patch clamp recordings to explore how oxidation modulates functional properties of recombinant Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 channels. The strong oxidant chloramine-T (ChT) at 100 and 500µM induced a shift of the voltage-dependency of activation towards more hyperpolarized potentials. While fast inactivation was stabilized by 100µM ChT, it was partially removed by 500µM ChT on both α-subunits (Nav1.7gating of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 by reducing the threshold for activation and by abrogating fast inactivation. The resulting persistent currents are regulated by slow inactivation and appear to be more prominent for Nav1.8 as compared to Nav1.7. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sodium channels and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Abdella M; Wood, John N; Cox, James J

    2015-01-01

    Human and mouse genetic studies have led to significant advances in our understanding of the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in pain pathways. In this chapter, we focus on Nav1.7, Nav1.8, Nav1.9 and Nav1.3 and describe the insights gained from the detailed analyses of global and conditional transgenic Nav knockout mice in terms of pain behaviour. The spectrum of human disorders caused by mutations in these channels is also outlined, concluding with a summary of recent progress in the development of selective Nav1.7 inhibitors for the treatment of pain.

  7. Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, tissue distribution, and biophysical characterization of a novel mammalian Shaker-related voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, K; Nguyen, A; Tseng-Crank, J; Dukes, I D; Chandy, G; Hustad, C M; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Mohrenweiser, H; Brandriff, B; Cahalan, M; Gutman, G A; Chandy, K G

    1998-03-06

    We report the isolation of a novel mouse voltage-gated Shaker-related K+ channel gene, Kv1.7 (Kcna7/KCNA7). Unlike other known Kv1 family genes that have intronless coding regions, the protein-coding region of Kv1.7 is interrupted by a 1.9-kilobase pair intron. The Kv1.7 gene and the related Kv3.3 (Kcnc3/KCNC3) gene map to mouse chromosome 7 and human chromosome 19q13.3, a region that has been suggested to contain a diabetic susceptibility locus. The mouse Kv1.7 channel is voltage-dependent and rapidly inactivating, exhibits cumulative inactivation, and has a single channel conductance of 21 pS. It is potently blocked by noxiustoxin and stichodactylatoxin, and is insensitive to tetraethylammonium, kaliotoxin, and charybdotoxin. Northern blot analysis reveals approximately 3-kilobase pair Kv1.7 transcripts in mouse heart and skeletal muscle. In situ hybridization demonstrates the presence of Kv1.7 in mouse pancreatic islet cells. Kv1.7 was also isolated from mouse brain and hamster insulinoma cells by polymerase chain reaction.

  8. Sodium channels and mammalian sensory mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouf, Ramin; Rugiero, Francois; Kiesewetter, Hannes; Hatch, Rachel; Hummler, Edith; Nassar, Mohammed A; Wang, Fan; Wood, John N

    2012-03-26

    Members of the degenerin/epithelial (DEG/ENaC) sodium channel family are mechanosensors in C elegans, and Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 voltage-gated sodium channel knockout mice have major deficits in mechanosensation. β and γENaC sodium channel subunits are present with acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mammalian sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The extent to which epithelial or voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in transduction of mechanical stimuli is unclear. Here we show that deleting β and γENaC sodium channels in sensory neurons does not result in mechanosensory behavioural deficits. We had shown previously that Nav1.7/Nav1.8 double knockout mice have major deficits in behavioural responses to noxious mechanical pressure. However, all classes of mechanically activated currents in DRG neurons are unaffected by deletion of the two sodium channels. In contrast, the ability of Nav1.7/Nav1.8 knockout DRG neurons to generate action potentials is compromised with 50% of the small diameter sensory neurons unable to respond to electrical stimulation in vitro. Behavioural deficits in Nav1.7/Nav1.8 knockout mice reflects a failure of action potential propagation in a mechanosensitive set of sensory neurons rather than a loss of primary transduction currents. DEG/ENaC sodium channels are not mechanosensors in mouse sensory neurons.

  9. Dampening of hyperexcitability in CA1 pyramidal neurons by polyunsaturated fatty acids acting on voltage-gated ion channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Tigerholm

    Full Text Available A ketogenic diet is an alternative treatment of epilepsy in infants. The diet, rich in fat and low in carbohydrates, elevates the level of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs in plasma. These substances have therefore been suggested to contribute to the anticonvulsive effect of the diet. PUFAs modulate the properties of a range of ion channels, including K and Na channels, and it has been hypothesized that these changes may be part of a mechanistic explanation of the ketogenic diet. Using computational modelling, we here study how experimentally observed PUFA-induced changes of ion channel activity affect neuronal excitability in CA1, in particular responses to synaptic input of high synchronicity. The PUFA effects were studied in two pathological models of cellular hyperexcitability associated with epileptogenesis. We found that experimentally derived PUFA modulation of the A-type K (K(A channel, but not the delayed-rectifier K channel, restored healthy excitability by selectively reducing the response to inputs of high synchronicity. We also found that PUFA modulation of the transient Na channel was effective in this respect if the channel's steady-state inactivation was selectively affected. Furthermore, PUFA-induced hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential was an effective approach to prevent hyperexcitability. When the combined effect of PUFA on the K(A channel, the Na channel, and the resting membrane potential, was simulated, a lower concentration of PUFA was needed to restore healthy excitability. We therefore propose that one explanation of the beneficial effect of PUFAs lies in its simultaneous action on a range of ion-channel targets. Furthermore, this work suggests that a pharmacological cocktail acting on the voltage dependence of the Na-channel inactivation, the voltage dependences of K(A channels, and the resting potential can be an effective treatment of epilepsy.

  10. Effect of Tube Voltage (100 vs. 120 kVp) on Radiation Dose and Image Quality using Prospective Gating 320 Row Multi-detector Computed Tomography Angiography.

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    Khan, Atif N; Khosa, Faisal; Shuaib, Waqas; Nasir, Khurram; Blankstein, Ron; Clouse, Melvin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the following study is to evaluate the effect of reducing tube voltage from 120 to 100 kVp using prospective gating 320 row multi-detector computed tomography angiography on image quality and reduction in radiation dose. A total of 78 sequential patients were scanned with prospective electrocardiogram gating. A total of 45 patients (Group 1) with mean body mass index (BMI) 29 ± 2 and heart rate (HR) 57 ± 7 beats per minute (BPM) were scanned at 120 kVp. 33 patients (Group 2) with mean BMI 23 ± 3 and HR 58 ± 6 bpm were scanned at 100 kVp. Effective dose was calculated using dose length product and factor (k = 0.014). Quantitative assessment of image quality was calculated by measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) in the left ventricle and left main coronary artery. Two experienced cardiac radiologists using a three-point ordinal scale assessed subjectively image quality. In Group 1, the median radiation dose was 5.31 mSv (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.86-6.09) and for Group 2 (P = 0.009) the mean radiation dose was 3.71 mSv (95% CI: 2.76-4.87), representing 30% decrease in radiation dose. In multivariate analyses, adjusting for age, gender, HR, BMI, tube current and scan length, an absolute median reduction of 2.21 mSv (1.13-3.29 mSv) was noted in patients scanned with 100 kVp (P image quality (SNR and CNR) was not statistically significant between the groups. Subjective image quality was rated as good or excellent in 99% of coronary segments for both groups (P value was considered as non-significant). Our study suggests that radiation dose may be lowered from 120 to 100 kVp with preservation of image quality in patient's whose BMI is ≤27.

  11. Stimulatory Action of Telmisartan, an Antagonist of Angiotensin II Receptor, on Voltage-Gated Na⁺ Current: Experimental and Theoretical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tzu-Tung; Yang, Chia-Jung; Lee, Yu-Chi; Wu, Sheng-Nan

    2018-02-28

    Telmisartan (Tel) is recognized as a non-peptide blocker of AT1R. Whether this agent has any direct effects on ion currents remains unexplored. In whole-cell current recordings, addition of Tel increased the peak amplitude of voltage-gated Na⁺ (NaV) current (INa) accompanied by the increased time constant of INa inactivation in differentiated NSC-34 motor neuron-like cells. Tel-stimulated INa in these cells is unlinked to either blockade of AT1R or activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). In order to explore how this compound affects the amplitude and kinetics of INa in neurons, a Hodgkin-Huxley-based (HH-based) model designed to mimic effect of Tel on the functional activities of neurons was computationally created in this study. In this framework, the parameter for h inactivation gating variable, which was changed in a stepwise fashion, was implemented to predict changes in membrane potentials (V) as a function of maximal Na⁺ (GNa), K⁺ conductance (GK), or both. As inactivation time course of INa was increased, the bifurcation point of V versus GNa became lower, and the range between subcritical and supercritical values at the bifurcation of V versus GK correspondingly became larger. During a slowing in INa inactivation, the critical boundary between GNa and GK was shifted towards the left. Simulation studies demonstrated that progressive slowing in the inactivation time course of INa resulted in unanticipated increase of neuronal excitability by mimicking the effect of Tel in neuronal cells. Collectively, Tel can directly interact with the NaV channel to increase peak INa as well as to slow INa inactivation. It is thus highly likely that the effects of Tel or its structurally similar drugs could be another intriguing mechanism underlying their pharmacological actions in neurons or neuroendocrine cells occurring in vivo.

  12. Iterative model reconstruction: improved image quality of low-tube-voltage prospective ECG-gated coronary CT angiography images at 256-slice CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Seitaro; Weissman, Gaby; Vembar, Mani; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2014-08-01