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Sample records for voltage gated proton

  1. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  2. Multimeric nature of voltage-gated proton channels

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Hans P.; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Okamura, Yasushi; Larsson, H. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are comprised of four subunits, and each subunit has a pore domain and a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). The four pore domains assemble to form one single central pore, and the four individual VSDs control the gate of the pore. Recently, a family of voltage-gated proton channels, such as HV or voltage sensor only protein (VSOP), was discovered that contain a single VSD but no pore domain. It has been assumed that VSOP channels are monomeric and contain a single ...

  3. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Iwasaki, Hirohide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2009-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  4. Multimeric nature of voltage-gated proton channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Hans P; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Okamura, Yasushi; Larsson, H Peter

    2008-07-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are comprised of four subunits, and each subunit has a pore domain and a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). The four pore domains assemble to form one single central pore, and the four individual VSDs control the gate of the pore. Recently, a family of voltage-gated proton channels, such as H(V) or voltage sensor only protein (VSOP), was discovered that contain a single VSD but no pore domain. It has been assumed that VSOP channels are monomeric and contain a single VSD that functions as both the VSD and the pore domain. It remains unclear, however, how a protein that contains only a VSD and no pore domain can conduct ions. Using fluorescence measurements and immunoprecipitation techniques, we show here that VSOP channels are expressed as multimeric channels. Further, FRET experiments on constructs with covalently linked subunits show that VSOP channels are dimers. Truncation of the cytoplasmic regions of VSOP reduced the dimerization, suggesting that the dimerization is caused mainly by cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions. However, these N terminus- and C terminus-deleted channels displayed large proton currents. Therefore, we conclude that even though VSOP channels are expressed mainly as dimers in the cell membrane, single VSOP subunits could function independently as proton channels.

  5. Voltage-gated proton (H(v)1) channels, a singular voltage sensing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Karen; Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Contreras, Gustavo F; Morera, Francisco J; Neely, Alan; Latorre, Ramon; Gonzalez, Carlos

    2015-11-14

    The main role of voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is to extrude protons from the intracellular milieu when, mediated by different cellular processes, the H(+) concentration increases. Hv1 are exquisitely selective for protons and their structure is homologous to the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of other voltage-gated ion channels like sodium, potassium, and calcium channels. In clear contrast to the classical voltage-dependent channels, Hv1 lacks a pore domain and thus permeation necessarily occurs through the voltage sensing domain. Hv1 channels are activated by depolarizing voltages, and increases in internal proton concentration. It has been proposed that local conformational changes of the transmembrane segment S4, driven by depolarization, trigger the molecular rearrangements that open Hv1. However, it is still unclear how the electromechanical coupling is achieved between the VSD and the potential pore, allowing the proton flux from the intracellular to the extracellular side. Here we provide a revised view of voltage activation in Hv1 channels, offering a comparative scenario with other voltage sensing channels domains.

  6. Hydrophobic plug functions as a gate in voltage-gated proton channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Adam; Qiu, Feng; Rebolledo, Santiago; Wang, Yibo; Noskov, Sergei Y; Larsson, H Peter

    2014-01-14

    Voltage-gated proton (Hv1) channels play important roles in the respiratory burst, in pH regulation, in spermatozoa, in apoptosis, and in cancer metastasis. Unlike other voltage-gated cation channels, the Hv1 channel lacks a centrally located pore formed by the assembly of subunits. Instead, the proton permeation pathway in the Hv1 channel is within the voltage-sensing domain of each subunit. The gating mechanism of this pathway is still unclear. Mutagenic and fluorescence studies suggest that the fourth transmembrane (TM) segment (S4) functions as a voltage sensor and that there is an outward movement of S4 during channel activation. Using thermodynamic mutant cycle analysis, we find that the conserved positively charged residues in S4 are stabilized by countercharges in the other TM segments both in the closed and open states. We constructed models of both the closed and open states of Hv1 channels that are consistent with the mutant cycle analysis. These structural models suggest that electrostatic interactions between TM segments in the closed state pull hydrophobic residues together to form a hydrophobic plug in the center of the voltage-sensing domain. Outward S4 movement during channel activation induces conformational changes that remove this hydrophobic plug and instead insert protonatable residues in the center of the channel that, together with water molecules, can form a hydrogen bond chain across the channel for proton permeation. This suggests that salt bridge networks and the hydrophobic plug function as the gate in Hv1 channels and that outward movement of S4 leads to the opening of this gate.

  7. Molecular mechanism of voltage sensing in voltage-gated proton channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo, Santiago; Perez, Marta E.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton (Hv) channels play an essential role in phagocytic cells by generating a hyperpolarizing proton current that electrically compensates for the depolarizing current generated by the NADPH oxidase during the respiratory burst, thereby ensuring a sustained production of reactive oxygen species by the NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to neutralize engulfed bacteria. Despite the importance of the voltage-dependent Hv current, it is at present unclear which residues in Hv channels are responsible for the voltage activation. Here we show that individual neutralizations of three charged residues in the fourth transmembrane domain, S4, all reduce the voltage dependence of activation. In addition, we show that the middle S4 charged residue moves from a position accessible from the cytosolic solution to a position accessible from the extracellular solution, suggesting that this residue moves across most of the membrane electric field during voltage activation of Hv channels. Our results show for the first time that the charge movement of these three S4 charges accounts for almost all of the measured gating charge in Hv channels. PMID:23401575

  8. Voltage Gated Ion Channel Function: Gating, Conduction, and the Role of Water and Protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariev, Alisher M.; Green, Michael E.

    2012-02-26

    Ion channels, which are found in every biological cell, regulate the concentration of electrolytes, and are responsible for multiple biological functions, including in particular the propagation of nerve impulses. The channels with the latter function are gated (opened) by a voltage signal, which allows Na+ into the cell and K+ out. These channels have several positively charged amino acids on a transmembrane domain of their voltage sensor, and it is generally considered, based primarily on two lines of experimental evidence, that these charges move with respect to the membrane to open the channel. At least three forms of motion, with greatly differing extents and mechanisms of motion, have been proposed. There is a “gating current”, a capacitative current preceding the channel opening, that corresponds to several charges (for one class of channel typically 12–13) crossing the membrane field, which may not require protein physically crossing a large fraction of the membrane. The coupling to the opening of the channel would in these models depend on the motion. The conduction itself is usually assumed to require the “gate” of the channel to be pulled apart to allow ions to enter as a section of the protein partially crosses the membrane, and a selectivity filter at the opposite end of the channel determines the ion which is allowed to pass through. We will here primarily consider K+ channels, although Na+ channels are similar. We propose that the mechanism of gating differs from that which is generally accepted, in that the positively charged residues need not move (there may be some motion, but not as gating current). Instead, protons may constitute the gating current, causing the gate to open; opening consists of only increasing the diameter at the gate from approximately 6 Å to approximately 12 Å. We propose in addition that the gate oscillates rather than simply opens, and the ion experiences a barrier to its motion across the channel that is tuned

  9. Voltage Gated Ion Channel Function: Gating, Conduction, and the Role of Water and Protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisher M. Kariev

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels, which are found in every biological cell, regulate the concentration of electrolytes, and are responsible for multiple biological functions, including in particular the propagation of nerve impulses. The channels with the latter function are gated (opened by a voltage signal, which allows Na+ into the cell and K+ out. These channels have several positively charged amino acids on a transmembrane domain of their voltage sensor, and it is generally considered, based primarily on two lines of experimental evidence, that these charges move with respect to the membrane to open the channel. At least three forms of motion, with greatly differing extents and mechanisms of motion, have been proposed. There is a “gating current”, a capacitative current preceding the channel opening, that corresponds to several charges (for one class of channel typically 12–13 crossing the membrane field, which may not require protein physically crossing a large fraction of the membrane. The coupling to the opening of the channel would in these models depend on the motion. The conduction itself is usually assumed to require the “gate” of the channel to be pulled apart to allow ions to enter as a section of the protein partially crosses the membrane, and a selectivity filter at the opposite end of the channel determines the ion which is allowed to pass through. We will here primarily consider K+ channels, although Na+ channels are similar. We propose that the mechanism of gating differs from that which is generally accepted, in that the positively charged residues need not move (there may be some motion, but not as gating current. Instead, protons may constitute the gating current, causing the gate to open; opening consists of only increasing the diameter at the gate from approximately 6 Å to approximately 12 Å. We propose in addition that the gate oscillates rather than simply opens, and the ion experiences a barrier to its motion across the

  10. X-ray crystal structure of voltage-gated proton channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Kohei; Sakata, Souhei; Yamashita, Eiki; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kawanabe, Akira; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Matsuda, Makoto; Narita, Hirotaka; Okamura, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2014-04-01

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 (or VSOP) has a voltage-sensor domain (VSD) with dual roles of voltage sensing and proton permeation. Its gating is sensitive to pH and Zn(2+). Here we present a crystal structure of mouse Hv1 in the resting state at 3.45-Å resolution. The structure showed a 'closed umbrella' shape with a long helix consisting of the cytoplasmic coiled coil and the voltage-sensing helix, S4, and featured a wide inner-accessible vestibule. Two out of three arginines in S4 were located below the phenylalanine constituting the gating charge-transfer center. The extracellular region of each protomer coordinated a Zn(2+), thus suggesting that Zn(2+) stabilizes the resting state of Hv1 by competing for acidic residues that otherwise form salt bridges with voltage-sensing positive charges on S4. These findings provide a platform for understanding the general principles of voltage sensing and proton permeation.

  11. Functionality of the voltage-gated proton channel truncated in S4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Souhei; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Nørholm, Morten H H; Takagi, Masahiro; Okochi, Yoshifumi; von Heijne, Gunnar; Okamura, Yasushi

    2010-02-02

    The voltage sensor domain (VSD) is the key module for voltage sensing in voltage-gated ion channels and voltage-sensing phosphatases. Structurally, both the VSD and the recently discovered voltage-gated proton channels (Hv channels) voltage sensor only protein (VSOP) and Hv1 contain four transmembrane segments. The fourth transmembrane segment (S4) of Hv channels contains three periodically aligned arginines (R1, R2, R3). It remains unknown where protons permeate or how voltage sensing is coupled to ion permeation in Hv channels. Here we report that Hv channels truncated just downstream of R2 in the S4 segment retain most channel properties. Two assays, site-directed cysteine-scanning using accessibility of maleimide-reagent as detected by Western blotting and insertion into dog pancreas microsomes, both showed that S4 inserts into the membrane, even if it is truncated between the R2 and R3 positions. These findings provide important clues to the molecular mechanism underlying voltage sensing and proton permeation in Hv channels.

  12. Voltage-Gated Proton Channels: Molecular Biology, Physiology, and Pathophysiology of the HV Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels (HV) are unique, in part because the ion they conduct is unique. HV channels are perfectly selective for protons and have a very small unitary conductance, both arguably manifestations of the extremely low H+ concentration in physiological solutions. They open with membrane depolarization, but their voltage dependence is strongly regulated by the pH gradient across the membrane (ΔpH), with the result that in most species they normally conduct only outward current. The HV channel protein is strikingly similar to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD, the first four membrane-spanning segments) of voltage-gated K+ and Na+ channels. In higher species, HV channels exist as dimers in which each protomer has its own conduction pathway, yet gating is cooperative. HV channels are phylogenetically diverse, distributed from humans to unicellular marine life, and perhaps even plants. Correspondingly, HV functions vary widely as well, from promoting calcification in coccolithophores and triggering bioluminescent flashes in dinoflagellates to facilitating killing bacteria, airway pH regulation, basophil histamine release, sperm maturation, and B lymphocyte responses in humans. Recent evidence that hHV1 may exacerbate breast cancer metastasis and cerebral damage from ischemic stroke highlights the rapidly expanding recognition of the clinical importance of hHV1. PMID:23589829

  13. Selectivity Mechanism of the Voltage-gated Proton Channel, HV1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Smith, Susan M. E.; Mazmanian, Karine; Decoursey, Thomas E.; Lim, Carmay

    2015-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, trigger bioluminescence in dinoflagellates, enable calcification in coccolithophores, and play multifarious roles in human health. Because the proton concentration is minuscule, exquisite selectivity for protons over other ions is critical to HV1 function. The selectivity of the open HV1 channel requires an aspartate near an arginine in the selectivity filter (SF), a narrow region that dictates proton selectivity, but the mechanism of proton selectivity is unknown. Here we use a reduced quantum model to elucidate how the Asp-Arg SF selects protons but excludes other ions. Attached to a ring scaffold, the Asp and Arg side chains formed bidentate hydrogen bonds that occlude the pore. Introducing H3O+ protonated the SF, breaking the Asp-Arg linkage and opening the conduction pathway, whereas Na+ or Cl- was trapped by the SF residue of opposite charge, leaving the linkage intact, thus preventing permeation. An Asp-Lys SF behaved like the Asp-Arg one and was experimentally verified to be proton-selective, as predicted. Hence, interacting acidic and basic residues form favorable AspH0-H2O0-Arg+ interactions with hydronium but unfavorable Asp--X-/X+-Arg+ interactions with anions/cations. This proposed mechanism may apply to other proton-selective molecules engaged in bioenergetics, homeostasis, and signaling.

  14. A specialized molecular motion opens the Hv1 voltage-gated proton channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Laetitia; Berger, Thomas K; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2015-04-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is unique among voltage-gated channels for containing the pore and gate within its voltage-sensing domain. Pore opening has been proposed to include assembly of the selectivity filter between an arginine (R3) of segment S4 and an aspartate (D1) of segment S1. We determined whether gating involves motion of S1, using Ciona intestinalis Hv1. We found that channel opening is concomitant with solution access to the pore-lining face of S1, from the cytoplasm to deep inside the pore. Voltage- and patch-clamp fluorometry showed that this involves a motion of S1 relative to its surroundings. S1 motion and the S4 motion that precedes it are each influenced by residues on the other helix, thus suggesting a dynamic interaction between S1 and S4. Our findings suggest that the S1 of Hv1 has specialized to function as part of the channel's gate.

  15. Voltage-gated proton currents in microglia of distinct morphology and functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, R; Heinemann, U; Eder, C

    1999-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements were performed to investigate voltage-gated proton currents (I(PR)) in cultured murine microglia of distinct morphology and functional state. We studied I(PR) in ameboid microglia of untreated cultures, in ameboid microglia which had been activated by lipopolysaccharide, and in ramified microglia which had been exposed to astrocyte-conditioned medium. Proton currents of these three microglia populations did not differ regarding their activation threshold or the voltage dependence of steady-state activation. Moreover, pharmacological properties of I(PR) were similar: proton currents were sensitive to extracellularly applied Zn2+ or La3+, and could be abolished by each of those at a concentration of 100 microM. In the presence of extracellular Na+, I(PR) was decreased to a similar small extent due to activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger in all microglial populations. In contrast, proton currents of microglia differed between the three cell populations with respect to their current density and their time-course of activation: in comparison with untreated microglia, the current density of I(PR) was reduced by about 50% in microglia after their treatment with either lipopolysaccharide or astrocyte-conditioned medium. Moreover, I(PR) activated significantly more slowly in cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide or astrocyte-conditioned medium than in untreated cells. It can be concluded that the distinct H+ current characteristics of the three microglial populations do not correlate with the functional state of the cells.

  16. Molecular and functional characterization of the voltage-gated proton channel in zebrafish neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanayotha, Adisorn; Kawai, Takafumi; Higashijima, Shin-Ichi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2017-08-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1/VSOP) are expressed in various cells types, including phagocytes, and are involved in diverse physiological processes. Although hvcn1, the gene encoding Hv1, has been identified across a wide range of species, most of the knowledge about its physiological function and expression profile is limited to mammals. In this study, we investigated the basic properties of DrHv1, the Hv1 ortholog in zebrafish (Danio rerio) which is an excellent animal model owing to the transparency, as well as its functional expression in native cells. Electrophysiological analysis using a heterologous expression system confirmed the properties of a voltage-gated proton channel are conserved in DrHv1 with differences in threshold and activation kinetics as compared to mouse (Mus musculus) Hv1 (mHv1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that hvcn1 is expressed in zebrafish neutrophils, as is the case in mammals. Subsequent electrophysiological analysis confirmed the functional expression of DrHv1 in zebrafish neutrophils, which suggests Hv1 function in phagocytes is conserved among vertebrates. We also found that DrHv1 is comparatively resistant to extracellular Zn(2+), which is a potent inhibitor of mammalian Hv1, and this phenomenon appears to reflect variation in the Zn(2+)-coordinating residue (histidine) within the extracellular linker region in mammalian Hv1. Notably, the serum Zn(2+) concentration is much higher in zebrafish than in mouse, raising the possibility that Zn(2+) sensitivity was acquired in accordance with a change in the serum Zn(2+) concentration. This study highlights the biological variation and importance of Hv1 in different animal species. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  17. Protonic/electronic hybrid oxide transistor gated by chitosan and its full-swing low voltage inverter applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Jin Yu [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory High Gravity Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhu, Li Qiang, E-mail: lqzhu@nimte.ac.cn; Xiao, Hui [Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Yuan, Zhi Guo, E-mail: ncityzg@163.com [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory High Gravity Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China)

    2015-12-21

    Modulation of charge carrier density in condensed materials based on ionic/electronic interaction has attracted much attention. Here, protonic/electronic hybrid indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) transistors gated by chitosan based electrolyte were obtained. The chitosan-based electrolyte illustrates a high proton conductivity and an extremely strong proton gating behavior. The transistor illustrates good electrical performances at a low operating voltage of ∼1.0 V such as on/off ratio of ∼3 × 10{sup 7}, subthreshold swing of ∼65 mV/dec, threshold voltage of ∼0.3 V, and mobility of ∼7 cm{sup 2}/V s. Good positive gate bias stress stabilities are obtained. Furthermore, a low voltage driven resistor-loaded inverter was built by using an IZO transistor in series with a load resistor, exhibiting a linear relationship between the voltage gain and the supplied voltage. The inverter is also used for decreasing noises of input signals. The protonic/electronic hybrid IZO transistors have potential applications in biochemical sensors and portable electronics.

  18. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 enhances brain damage from ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Long-Jun; Wu, Gongxiong; Akhavan Sharif, M Reza; Baker, Amanda; Jia, Yonghui; Fahey, Frederic H; Luo, Hongbo R; Feener, Edward P; Clapham, David E

    2012-03-04

    Phagocytic cell NADPH oxidase (NOX) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) as part of innate immunity. Unfortunately, ischemia can also induce this pathway and inflict damage on native cells. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 enables NOX function by compensating cellular loss of electrons with protons. Accordingly, we investigated whether NOX-mediated brain damage in stroke can be inhibited by suppression of Hv1. We found that mouse and human brain microglia, but not neurons or astrocytes, expressed large Hv1-mediated currents. Hv1 was required for NOX-dependent ROS generation in brain microglia in situ and in vivo. Mice lacking Hv1 were protected from NOX-mediated neuronal death and brain damage 24 h after stroke. These results indicate that Hv1-dependent ROS production is responsible for a substantial fraction of brain damage at early time points after ischemic stroke and provide a rationale for Hv1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  19. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1/VSOP inhibits neutrophil granule release.

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    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Aratani, Yasuaki; Adissu, Hibret A; Miyawaki, Nana; Sasaki, Mari; Suzuki, Kazuo; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granule exocytosis is crucial for host defense and inflammation. Neutrophils contain 4 types of granules, the exocytotic release of which is differentially regulated. This exocytosis is known to be driven by diverse mediators, including calcium and nucleotides, but the precise molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We show in the present study that voltage-gated proton (Hv) channels are necessary for the proper release of azurophilic granules in neutrophils. On activation of NADPH oxidase by PMA and IgG, neutrophils derived from Hvcn1 gene knockout mouse exhibited greater secretion of MPO and elastase than WT cells. In contrast, release of LTF enriched in specific granules was not enhanced in these cells. The excess release of azurophilic granules in Hv1/VSOP-deficient neutrophils was suppressed by inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity and, in part, by valinomycin, a potassium ionophore. In addition, Hv1/VSOP-deficient mice exhibited more severe lung inflammation after intranasal Candida albicans infection than WT mice. These findings suggest that the Hv channel acts to specifically dampen the release of azurophilic granules through, in part, the suppression of increased positive charges at the plasma membrane accompanied by the activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  20. Mapping of sites facing aqueous environment of voltage-gated proton channel at resting state: a study with PEGylation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Okamura, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Hv1 (also named, voltage-sensor only protein, VSOP) lacks an authentic pore domain, and its voltage sensor domain plays both roles in voltage sensing and proton permeation. The activities of a proton channel are intrinsic to protomers of Hv1, while Hv1 is dimeric in biological membranes; cooperative gating is exerted by interaction between two protomers. As the signature pattern conserved among voltage-gated channels and voltage-sensing phosphatase, Hv1 has multiple arginines intervened by two hydrophobic residues on the fourth transmembrane segment, S4. S4 moves upward relative to other helices upon depolarization, causing conformational change possibly leading to the formation of a proton-selective conduction pathway. However, detailed mechanisms of proton-selectivity and gating of Hv1 are unknown. Here we took an approach of PEGylation protection assay to define residues facing the aqueous environment of mouse Hv1 (mHv1). Accessibilities of two maleimide molecules, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and 4-acetamido-4'-maleimidylstilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (AMS), were examined on cysteine introduced into individual sites. Only the first arginine on S4 (R1: R201) was inaccessible by NEM and AMS in mHv1. This is consistent with previous results of electrophysiology on the resting state channel, suggesting that the accessibility profile represents the resting state of mHv1. D108, critical for proton selectivity, was accessible by AMS and NEM, suggesting that D108 faces the vestibule. F146, a site critical for blocking by a guanidinium-reagent, was accessible by NEM, suggesting that F146 also faces the inner vestibule. These findings suggest an inner vestibule lined by several residues on S2 including F146, D108 on S1, and the C-terminal half of S4. © 2013.

  1. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells and regulates insulin secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qing [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Che, Yongzhe [School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shangrong [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Gao, Ying-Tang [Key Laboratory of Artificial Cell, Third Central Clinical College of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300170 (China); Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xudong; Xi, Wang; Zuo, Weiyan [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Shu Jie, E-mail: shujieli@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics Science, The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a potent acid extruder that participates in the extrusion of the intracellular acid. Here, we showed for the first time, Hv1 is highly expressed in mouse and human pancreatic islet β-cells, as well as β-cell lines. Imaging studies demonstrated that Hv1 resides in insulin-containing granules in β-cells. Knockdown of Hv1 with RNA interference significantly reduces glucose- and K{sup +}-induced insulin secretion in isolated islets and INS-1 (832/13) β-cells and has an impairment on glucose- and K{sup +}-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. Our data demonstrated that the expression of Hv1 in pancreatic islet β-cells regulates insulin secretion through regulating Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis.

  2. Human voltage-gated proton channel hv1: a new potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    Full Text Available Solid tumors exist in a hypoxic microenvironment, and possess high-glycolytic metabolites. To avoid the acidosis, tumor cells must exhibit a dynamic cytosolic pH regulation mechanism(s. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 mediates NADPH oxidase function by compensating cellular loss of electrons with protons. Here, we showed for the first time, that Hv1 expression is increased in colorectal tumor tissues and cell lines, associated with poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry showed that Hv1 is strongly expressed in adenocarcinomas but not or lowly expressed in normal colorectal or hyperplastic polyps. Hv1 expression in colorectal cancer is significantly associated with the tumor size, tumor classification, lymph node status, clinical stage and p53 status. High Hv1 expression is associated significantly with shorter overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that Hv1 is highly expressed in colorectal cancer cell lines, SW620, HT29, LS174T and Colo205, but not in SW480. Inhibitions of Hv1 expression and activity in the highly metastatic SW620 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA and Zn(2+ respectively, markedly decrease the cell invasion and migration, restraint proton extrusion and the intracellular pH recovery. Our results suggest that Hv1 may be used as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma, and a potential target for anticancer drugs in colorectal cancer therapy.

  3. Controlling the threshold voltage of SnO2 nanowire transistors with dual in-plane-gate structures gated by chitosan proton conductors

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    Liu, Huixuan; Tan, Rongri

    2017-05-01

    We fabricated novel dual in-plane-gate electric-double-layer (EDL) SnO2 nanowire transistors gated by chitosan using only one transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nickel grid mask at room temperature, and we successfully controlled its threshold voltage. By changing the second in-plane gate bias from 1.0 to -1.0 V, we tuned the threshold voltage of these transistors from -0.35 to 0.21 V. Their operation voltage was 1.0 V, because the EDL gate dielectric can lead to high gate dielectric capacitance (4.24 µF/cm2). These dual in-plane-gate nanowire transistors could pave the way to useful low-voltage nanoelectronic devices.

  4. Acid extrusion from human spermatozoa is mediated by flagellar voltage-gated proton channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishko, Polina V; Botchkina, Inna L; Fedorenko, Andriy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2010-02-05

    Human spermatozoa are quiescent in the male reproductive system and must undergo activation once introduced into the female reproductive tract. This process is known to require alkalinization of sperm cytoplasm, but the mechanism responsible for transmembrane proton extrusion has remained unknown because of the inability to measure membrane conductance in human sperm. Here, by successfully patch clamping human spermatozoa, we show that proton channel Hv1 is their dominant proton conductance. Hv1 is confined to the principal piece of the sperm flagellum, where it is expressed at unusually high density. Robust flagellar Hv1-dependent proton conductance is activated by membrane depolarization, an alkaline extracellular environment, endocannabinoid anandamide, and removal of extracellular zinc, a potent Hv1 blocker. Hv1 allows only outward transport of protons and is therefore dedicated to inducing intracellular alkalinization and activating spermatozoa. The importance of Hv1 for sperm activation makes it an attractive target for controlling male fertility.

  5. Unconventional role of voltage-gated proton channels (VSOP/Hv1) in regulation of microglial ROS production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takafumi; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Ozaki, Tomohiko; Imura, Yoshio; Koizumi, Schuichi; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Yamashita, Toshihide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2017-09-01

    It has been established that voltage-gated proton channels (VSOP/Hv1), encoded by Hvcn1, support reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in phagocytic activities of neutrophils (El Chemaly et al. ) and antibody production in B lymphocytes (Capasso et al. ). VSOP/Hv1 is a potential therapeutic target for brain ischemia, since Hvcn1 deficiency reduces microglial ROS production and protects brain from neuronal damage (Wu et al. ). In the present study, we report that VSOP/Hv1 has paradoxical suppressive role in ROS production in microglia. Extracellular ROS production was lower in neutrophils of Hvcn1(-/-) mice than WT mice as reported. In contrast, it was drastically enhanced in isolated Hvcn1(-/-) microglia as compared with cells from WT mice. Actin dynamics was altered in Hvcn1(-/-) microglia and intracellular distribution of cytosolic NADPH oxidase subunit, p67, was changed. When expression levels of oxidative stress responsive antioxidant genes were compared between WT and Hvcn1(-/-) in cerebral cortex at different ages of animals, they were slightly decreased in Hvcn1(-/-) mice at younger stage (1 day, 5 days, 3 weeks old), but drastically increased at aged stage (6 months old), suggesting that the regulation of microglial ROS production by VSOP/Hv1 is age-dependent. We also performed brain ischemic stroke experiments and found that the neuroprotective effect of VSOP/Hv1deficiency on infarct volume depended on the age of animals. Taken together, regulation of ROS production by VSOP/Hv1 is more complex than previously thought and significance of VSOP/Hv1 in microglial ROS production depends on age. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Evidence for functional diversity between the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 and its closest related protein HVRP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris H Kim

    Full Text Available The Hv1 channel and voltage-sensitive phosphatases share with voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels the ability to detect changes in membrane potential through voltage-sensing domains (VSDs. However, they lack the pore domain typical of these other channels. NaV, KV, and CaV proteins can be found in neurons and muscles, where they play important roles in electrical excitability. In contrast, VSD-containing proteins lacking a pore domain are found in non-excitable cells and are not involved in neuronal signaling. Here, we report the identification of HVRP1, a protein related to the Hv1 channel (from which the name Hv1 Related Protein 1 is derived, which we find to be expressed primarily in the central nervous system, and particularly in the cerebellum. Within the cerebellar tissue, HVRP1 is specifically expressed in granule neurons, as determined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Analysis of subcellular distribution via electron microscopy and immunogold labeling reveals that the protein localizes on the post-synaptic side of contacts between glutamatergic mossy fibers and the granule cells. We also find that, despite the similarities in amino acid sequence and structural organization between Hv1 and HVRP1, the two proteins have distinct functional properties. The high conservation of HVRP1 in vertebrates and its cellular and subcellular localizations suggest an important function in the nervous system.

  7. Deficiency in the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 increases M2 polarization of microglia and attenuates brain damage from photothrombotic ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dai-Shi; Li, Chun-Yu; Qin, Chuan; Murugan, Madhuvika; Wu, Long-Jun; Liu, Jun-Li

    2016-10-01

    Microglia become activated during cerebral ischemia and exert pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory role dependent of microglial polarization. NADPH oxidase (NOX)-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in microglia plays an important role in neuronal damage after ischemic stroke. Recently, NOX and ROS are consistently reported to participate in the microglial activation and polarization; NOX2 inhibition or suppression of ROS production are shown to shift the microglial polarization from M1 toward M2 state after stroke. The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is selectively expressed in microglia and is required for NOX-dependent ROS generation in the brain. However, the effect of Hv1 proton channel on microglial M1/M2 polarization state after cerebral ischemia remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of microglial Hv1 proton channel in modulating microglial M1/M2 polarization during the pathogenesis of ischemic cerebral injury using a mouse model of photothrombosis. Following photothrombotic ischemic stroke, wild-type mice presented obvious brain infarct, neuronal damage, and impaired motor coordination. However, mice lacking Hv1 (Hv1(-/-)) were partially protected from brain damage and motor deficits compared to wild-type mice. These rescued phenotypes in Hv1(-/-) mice in ischemic stroke is accompanied by reduced ROS production, shifted the microglial polarization from M1 to M2 state. Hv1 deficiency was also found to shift the M1/M2 polarization in primary cultured microglia. Our study suggests that the microglial Hv1 proton channel is a unique target for modulation of microglial M1/M2 polarization in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is selectively expressed in microglia and is required for NOX-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain. ROS participate in microglial activation and polarization. However, the effect of Hv1 on microglial M1/M2 polarization state after

  8. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifan [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Physics Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Shu Jie, E-mail: shujieli@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Physics Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Pan, Juncheng [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Physics Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Che, Yongzhe, E-mail: cheli@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Yin, Jian [Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300060 (China); Zhao, Qing [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Physics Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. {yields} Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. {yields} Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. {yields} Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  9. Low-voltage antimony-doped SnO2 nanowire transparent transistors gated by microporous SiO2-based proton conductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Rui-Jie; Liu Hui-Xuan

    2012-01-01

    A battery drivable low-voltage transparent lightly antimony(Sb)-doped SnO2 nanowire electric-double-layer (EDL)field-effect transistor (FET) is fabricated on an ITO glass substrate at room temperature.An ultralow operation voltage of 1 V is obtained on account of an untralarge specific gate capacitance (~ 2.14 μF/cm2) directly bound up with mobile ions-induced EDL (sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes) effect.The transparent FET shows excellent electric characteristics with a field-effect mobility of 54.43 cm2/V.s,current on/off ration of 2 × 104,and subthreshold gate voltage swing (S =dVgs/d(logIds)) of 140 mV/decade.The threshold voltage Vth (0.1 V) is estimated which indicates that the SnO2 namowire transistor operates in an n-type enhanced mode.Such a low-voltage transparent nanowire transistor gated by a microporous SiO2-based solid electrolyte is very promising for battery-powered portable nanoscale sensors.

  10. Hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba-Galea, Carlos A

    2016-09-30

    Ion channels constitute a superfamily of membrane proteins found in all living creatures. Their activity allows fast translocation of ions across the plasma membrane down the ion's transmembrane electrochemical gradient, resulting in a difference in electrical potential across the plasma membrane, known as the membrane potential. A group within this superfamily, namely voltage-gated channels, displays activity that is sensitive to the membrane potential. The activity of voltage-gated channels is controlled by the membrane potential, while the membrane potential is changed by these channels' activity. This interplay produces variations in the membrane potential that have evolved into electrical signals in many organisms. These signals are essential for numerous biological processes, including neuronal activity, insulin release, muscle contraction, fertilization and many others. In recent years, the activity of the voltage-gated channels has been observed not to follow a simple relationship with the membrane potential. Instead, it has been shown that the activity of voltage-gated channel displays hysteresis. In fact, a growing number of evidence have demonstrated that the voltage dependence of channel activity is dynamically modulated by activity itself. In spite of the great impact that this property can have on electrical signaling, hysteresis in voltage-gated channels is often overlooked. Addressing this issue, this review provides examples of voltage-gated ion channels displaying hysteretic behavior. Further, this review will discuss how Dynamic Voltage Dependence in voltage-gated channels can have a physiological role in electrical signaling. Furthermore, this review will elaborate on the current thoughts on the mechanism underlying hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

  11. VKCDB: Voltage-gated potassium channel database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallin Warren J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of voltage-gated potassium channels comprises a functionally diverse group of membrane proteins. They help maintain and regulate the potassium ion-based component of the membrane potential and are thus central to many critical physiological processes. VKCDB (Voltage-gated potassium [K] Channel DataBase is a database of structural and functional data on these channels. It is designed as a resource for research on the molecular basis of voltage-gated potassium channel function. Description Voltage-gated potassium channel sequences were identified by using BLASTP to search GENBANK and SWISSPROT. Annotations for all voltage-gated potassium channels were selectively parsed and integrated into VKCDB. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data for the channels were collected from published journal articles. Transmembrane domain predictions by TMHMM and PHD are included for each VKCDB entry. Multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains of channels of the four Kv families and the KCNQ family are also included. Currently VKCDB contains 346 channel entries. It can be browsed and searched using a set of functionally relevant categories. Protein sequences can also be searched using a local BLAST engine. Conclusions VKCDB is a resource for comparative studies of voltage-gated potassium channels. The methods used to construct VKCDB are general; they can be used to create specialized databases for other protein families. VKCDB is accessible at http://vkcdb.biology.ualberta.ca.

  12. Voltage-gated lipid ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic lipid membranes can display channel-like ion conduction events even in the absence of proteins. We show here that these events are voltage-gated with a quadratic voltage dependence as expected from electrostatic theory of capacitors. To this end, we recorded channel traces and current...

  13. Voltage-gated lipid ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic lipid membranes can display channel-like ion conduction events even in the absence of proteins. We show here that these events are voltage-gated with a quadratic voltage dependence as expected from electrostatic theory of capacitors. To this end, we recorded channel traces and current...... histograms in patch-experiments on lipid membranes. We derived a theoretical current-voltage relationship for pores in lipid membranes that describes the experimental data very well when assuming an asymmetric membrane. We determined the equilibrium constant between closed and open state and the open...... probability as a function of voltage. The voltage-dependence of the lipid pores is found comparable to that of protein channels. Lifetime distributions of open and closed events indicate that the channel open distribution does not follow exponential statistics but rather power law behavior for long open times...

  14. Voltage-dependent gating of hERG potassium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen May eCheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which voltage-gated channels sense changes in membrane voltage and energetically couple this with opening of the ion conducting pore has been the source of significant interest. In voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels, much of our knowledge in this area comes from Shaker-type channels, for which voltage-dependent gating is quite rapid. In these channels, activation and deactivation are associated with rapid reconfiguration of the voltage-sensing domain unit that is electromechanically coupled, via the S4-S5 linker helix, to the rate-limiting opening of an intracellular pore gate. However, fast voltage-dependent gating kinetics are not typical of all Kv channels, such as Kv11.1 (human ether-a-go-go related gene, hERG, which activates and deactivates very slowly. Compared to Shaker channels, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying slow hERG gating is much poorer. Here, we present a comparative review of the structure-function relationships underlying voltage-dependent gating in Shaker and hERG channels, with a focus on the roles of the voltage sensing domain and the S4-S5 linker that couples voltage sensor movements to the pore. Measurements of gating current kinetics and fluorimetric analysis of voltage sensor movement are consistent with models suggesting that the hERG activation pathway contains a voltage independent step, which limits voltage sensor transitions. Constraints upon hERG voltage sensor movement may result from loose packing of the S4 helices and additional intra-voltage sensor counter charge interactions. More recent data suggest that key amino acid differences in the hERG voltage sensing unit and S4-S5 linker, relative to fast activating Shaker-type Kv channels, may also contribute to the increased stability of the resting state of the voltage sensor.

  15. Deletion of cytosolic gating ring decreases gate and voltage sensor coupling in BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohui; Geng, Yanyan; Jin, Yakang; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Magleby, Karl L; Salkoff, Lawrence; Cui, Jianmin

    2017-03-06

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK channels) gate open in response to both membrane voltage and intracellular Ca(2+) The channel is formed by a central pore-gate domain (PGD), which spans the membrane, plus transmembrane voltage sensors and a cytoplasmic gating ring that acts as a Ca(2+) sensor. How these voltage and Ca(2+) sensors influence the common activation gate, and interact with each other, is unclear. A previous study showed that a BK channel core lacking the entire cytoplasmic gating ring (Core-MT) was devoid of Ca(2+) activation but retained voltage sensitivity (Budelli et al. 2013. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1313433110). In this study, we measure voltage sensor activation and pore opening in this Core-MT channel over a wide range of voltages. We record gating currents and find that voltage sensor activation in this truncated channel is similar to WT but that the coupling between voltage sensor activation and gating of the pore is reduced. These results suggest that the gating ring, in addition to being the Ca(2+) sensor, enhances the effective coupling between voltage sensors and the PGD. We also find that removal of the gating ring alters modulation of the channels by the BK channel's β1 and β2 subunits.

  16. Voltage-Gated Channels as Causative Agents for Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem Abuhamed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that afflicts 1-2% of the general population worldwide. It encompasses a variety of disorders with seizures. Approach: Idiopathic epilepsies were defined as a heterogeneous group of seizure disorders that show no underlying cause .Voltage-gated ion channels defect were recognized etiology of epilepsy in the central nervous system. The aim of this article was to provide an update on voltage-gated channels and their mutation as causative agents for epilepsies. We described the structures of the voltage-gated channels, discuss their current genetic studies, and then review the effects of voltage-gated channels as causative agents for epilepsies. Results: Channels control the flow of ions in and out of the cell causing depolarization and hyper polarization of the cell. Voltage-gated channels were classified into four types: Sodium, potassium calcium ands chloride. Voltage-gated channels were macromolecular protein complexes within the lipid membrane. They were divided into subunits. Each subunit had a specific function and was encoded by more than one gen. Conclusion: Current genetic studies of idiopathic epilepsies show the importance of genetic influence on Voltage-gated channels. Different genes may regulate a function in a channel; the channel defect was directly responsible for neuronal hyper excitability and seizures.

  17. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  18. Voltage-gated Calcium Channels and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenkamp, Alexandra F; Matthes, Jan; Herzig, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a complex-genetic disease and its etiology is unknown for the majority of cases. So far, more than one hundred different susceptibility genes were detected. Voltage-gated calcium channels are among the candidates linked to autism spectrum disorder by results of genetic studies. Mutations of nearly all pore-forming and some auxiliary subunits of voltage gated calcium channels have been revealed from investigations of autism spectrum disorder patients and populations. Though there are only few electrophysiological characterizations of voltage-gated calcium channel mutations found in autistic patients these studies suggest their functional relevance. In summary, both genetic and functional data suggest a potential role of voltage-gated calcium channels in autism spectrum disorder. Future studies require refinement of the clinical and systems biological concepts of autism spectrum disorder and an appropriate holistic approach at the molecular level, e.g. regarding all facets of calcium channel functions.

  19. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27677715

  20. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels.

  1. Voltage-Gated Channels as Causative Agents for Epilepsies

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Problem statement: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that afflicts 1-2% of the general population worldwide. It encompasses a variety of disorders with seizures. Approach: Idiopathic epilepsies were defined as a heterogeneous group of seizure disorders that show no underlying cause .Voltage-gated ion channels defect were recognized etiology of epilepsy in the central nervous system. The aim of this article was to provide an update on voltage-gated ...

  2. Cnidarian Toxins Acting on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Greenberg

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Voltage-gated ion channels generate electrical activity in excitable cells. As such, they are essential components of neuromuscular and neuronal systems, and are targeted by toxins from a wide variety of phyla, including the cnidarians. Here, we review cnidarian toxins known to target voltage-gated ion channels, the specific channel types targeted, and, where known, the sites of action of cnidarian toxins on different channels.

  3. Mechanism of electromechanical coupling in voltage-gated potassium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikard eBlunck

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated ion channels play a central role in the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. They are selective for one type of ion – sodium, calcium or potassium. Voltage-gated ion channels are composed of a central pore that allows ions to pass through the membrane and four peripheral voltage sensing domains that respond to changes in the membrane potential. Upon depolarization, voltage sensors in voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv undergo conformational changes driven by positive charges in the S4 segment and aided by pairwise electrostatic interactions with the surrounding voltage sensor. Structure-function relations of Kv channels have been investigated in detail, and the resulting models on the movement of the voltage sensors now converge to a consensus; the S4 segment undergoes a combined movement of rotation, tilt and vertical displacement in order to bring 3-4 e+ each through the electric field focused in this region. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the voltage sensor movement leads to pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, is still not fully understood. Thus, recently, electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels has been investigated with a multitude of techniques including electrophysiology, 3D crystal structures, fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Evidently, the S4-S5 linker, the covalent link between the voltage sensor and pore, plays a crucial role. The linker transfers the energy from the voltage sensor movement to the pore domain via an interaction with the S6 C-termini, which are pulled open during gating. In addition, other contact regions have been proposed. This review aims to provide (i an in-depth comparison of the molecular mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels; (ii insight as to how the voltage sensor and pore domain influence one another; and (iii theoretical predictions on the movement of the cytosolic face of the KV channels

  4. Actions and Mechanisms of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinder, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) act on most ion channels, thereby having significant physiological and pharmacological effects. In this review we summarize data from numerous PUFAs on voltage-gated ion channels containing one or several voltage-sensor domains, such as voltage-gated sodium (NaV), potassium (KV), calcium (CaV), and proton (HV) channels, as well as calcium-activated potassium (KCa), and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Some effects of fatty acids appear to be channel specific, whereas others seem to be more general. Common features for the fatty acids to act on the ion channels are at least two double bonds in cis geometry and a charged carboxyl group. In total we identify and label five different sites for the PUFAs. PUFA site 1: The intracellular cavity. Binding of PUFA reduces the current, sometimes as a time-dependent block, inducing an apparent inactivation. PUFA site 2: The extracellular entrance to the pore. Binding leads to a block of the channel. PUFA site 3: The intracellular gate. Binding to this site can bend the gate open and increase the current. PUFA site 4: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the voltage-sensor domain. Binding to this site leads to an opening of the channel via an electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged PUFA and the positively charged voltage sensor. PUFA site 5: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the pore domain. Binding to this site affects slow inactivation. This mapping of functional PUFA sites can form the basis for physiological and pharmacological modifications of voltage-gated ion channels.

  5. Actions and Mechanisms of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinder, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) act on most ion channels, thereby having significant physiological and pharmacological effects. In this review we summarize data from numerous PUFAs on voltage-gated ion channels containing one or several voltage-sensor domains, such as voltage-gated sodium (NaV), potassium (KV), calcium (CaV), and proton (HV) channels, as well as calcium-activated potassium (KCa), and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Some effects of fatty acids appear to be channel specific, whereas others seem to be more general. Common features for the fatty acids to act on the ion channels are at least two double bonds in cis geometry and a charged carboxyl group. In total we identify and label five different sites for the PUFAs. PUFA site 1: The intracellular cavity. Binding of PUFA reduces the current, sometimes as a time-dependent block, inducing an apparent inactivation. PUFA site 2: The extracellular entrance to the pore. Binding leads to a block of the channel. PUFA site 3: The intracellular gate. Binding to this site can bend the gate open and increase the current. PUFA site 4: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the voltage-sensor domain. Binding to this site leads to an opening of the channel via an electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged PUFA and the positively charged voltage sensor. PUFA site 5: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the pore domain. Binding to this site affects slow inactivation. This mapping of functional PUFA sites can form the basis for physiological and pharmacological modifications of voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:28220076

  6. Mechanism of voltage-gated channel formation in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelli, Rolando; Becucci, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Although several molecular models for voltage-gated ion channels in lipid membranes have been proposed, a detailed mechanism accounting for the salient features of experimental data is lacking. A general treatment accounting for peptide dipole orientation in the electric field and their nucleation and growth kinetics with ion channel formation is provided. This is the first treatment that explains all the main features of the experimental current-voltage curves of peptides forming voltage-gated channels available in the literature. It predicts a regime of weakly voltage-dependent conductance, followed by one of strong voltage-dependent conductance at higher voltages. It also predicts values of the parameters expressing the exponential dependence of conductance upon voltage and peptide bulk concentration for both regimes, in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Most importantly, the only two adjustable parameters involved in the kinetics of nucleation and growth of ion channels can be varied over broad ranges without affecting the above predictions to a significant extent. Thus, the fitting of experimental current-voltage curves stems naturally from the treatment and depends only slightly upon the choice of the kinetic parameters.

  7. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  8. Voltage controlled resistor using quasi-floating-gate MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susheel Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A voltage controlled resistor (VCR using quasi-floating-gate MOSFETs (QFGMOS suitable for low voltage applications is presented. The performance of the VCR implemented with QFGMOS is compared with its floating-gate MOSFET (FGMOS version. It was found that QFGMOS offers better performance than FGMOS in terms of frequency response, offsets and chip area. The VCR using QFGMOS offers high bandwidth and low power dissipation and yields high value of resistance as compared to its FGMOS counterpart. The workability of the presented circuits was tested by PSpice simulations using level 3 parameters of 0.5μm CMOS technology with supply voltage of ± 0.75V. The simulations results were found to be in accordance with the theoretical predictions.

  9. Ionic selectivity and thermal adaptations within the voltage-gated sodium channel family of alkaliphilic Bacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCaen, Paul G; Takahashi, Yuka; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro; Clapham, David E

    2014-11-11

    Entry and extrusion of cations are essential processes in living cells. In alkaliphilic prokaryotes, high external pH activates voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), which allows Na(+) to enter and be used as substrate for cation/proton antiporters responsible for cytoplasmic pH homeostasis. Here, we describe a new member of the prokaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) channel family (NsvBa; Non-selective voltage-gated, Bacillus alcalophilus) that is nonselective among Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+) ions. Mutations in NsvBa can convert the nonselective filter into one that discriminates for Na(+) or divalent cations. Gain-of-function experiments demonstrate the portability of ion selectivity with filter mutations to other Bacillus Nav channels. Increasing pH and temperature shifts their activation threshold towards their native resting membrane potential. Furthermore, we find drugs that target Bacillus Nav channels also block the growth of the bacteria. This work identifies some of the adaptations to achieve ion discrimination and gating in Bacillus Nav channels.

  10. Flufenamic acid decreases neuronal excitability through modulation of voltage-gated sodium channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Baranauskas, Gytis; Martina, Marco

    2010-10-15

    The electrophysiological phenotype of individual neurons critically depends on the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated channels they express. Differences in sodium channel gating are instrumental in determining the different firing phenotypes of pyramidal cells and interneurons; moreover, sodium channel modulation represents an important mechanism of action for many widely used CNS drugs. Flufenamic acid (FFA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been long used as a blocker of calcium-dependent cationic conductances. Here we show that FFA inhibits voltage-gated sodium currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons; this effect is dose-dependent with IC(50) = 189 μm. We used whole-cell and nucleated patch recordings to investigate the mechanisms of FFA modulation of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium current. Our data show that flufenamic acid slows down the inactivation process of the sodium current, while shifting the inactivation curve ~10 mV toward more hyperpolarized potentials. The recovery from inactivation is also affected in a voltage-dependent way, resulting in slower recovery at hyperpolarized potentials. Recordings from acute slices demonstrate that FFA reduces repetitive- and abolishes burst-firing in CA1 pyramidal neurons. A computational model based on our data was employed to better understand the mechanisms of FFA action. Simulation data support the idea that FFA acts via a novel mechanism by reducing the voltage dependence of the sodium channel fast inactivation rates. These effects of FFA suggest that it may be an effective anti-epileptic drug.

  11. Proton conducting sodium alginate electrolyte laterally coupled low-voltage oxide-based transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang Hui; Qiang Zhu, Li; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-03-01

    Solution-processed sodium alginate electrolyte film shows a high proton conductivity of ˜5.5 × 10-3 S/cm and a high lateral electric-double-layer (EDL) capacitance of ˜2.0 μF/cm2 at room temperature with a relative humidity of 57%. Low-voltage in-plane-gate indium-zinc-oxide-based EDL transistors laterally gated by sodium alginate electrolytes are fabricated on glass substrates. The field-effect mobility, current ON/OFF ratio, and subthreshold swing of such EDL transistors are estimated to be 4.2 cm2 V-1 s-1, 2.8 × 106, and 130 mV/decade, respectively. At last, a low-voltage driven resistor-load inverter is also demonstrated. Such in-plane-gate EDL transistors have potential applications in portable electronics and low-cost biosensors.

  12. VGIchan: Prediction and Classification of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sudipto Saha; Jyoti Zack; Balvinder Singh; G.P.S. Raghava

    2006-01-01

    This study describes methods for predicting and classifying voltage-gated ion channels. Firstly, a standard support vector machine (SVM) method was developed for predicting ion channels by using amino acid composition and dipeptide composition, with an accuracy of 82.89% and 85.56%, respectively. The accuracy of this SVM method was improved from 85.56% to 89.11% when combined with PSIBLAST similarity search. Then we developed an SVM method for classifying ion channels (potassium, sodium, calcium, and chloride) by using dipeptide composition and achieved an overall accuracy of 96.89%. We further achieved a classification accuracy of 97.78% by using a hybrid method that combines dipeptidebased SVM and hidden Markov model methods. A web server VGIchan has been developed for predicting and classifying voltage-gated ion channels using the above approaches. VGIchan is freely available at www.imtech.res.in/raghava/vgichan/.

  13. Neuronal trafficking of voltage-gated potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla S; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Misonou, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    The computational ability of CNS neurons depends critically on the specific localization of ion channels in the somatodendritic and axonal membranes. Neuronal dendrites receive synaptic inputs at numerous spines and integrate them in time and space. The integration of synaptic potentials....... The physiological significance of proper Kv channel localization is emphasized by the fact that defects in the trafficking of Kv channels are observed in several neurological disorders including epilepsy. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms of Kv channel trafficking...... is regulated by voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, such as Kv4.2, which are specifically localized in the dendritic membrane. The synaptic potentials eventually depolarize the membrane of the axon initial segment, thereby activating voltage-gated sodium channels to generate action potentials. Specific Kv...

  14. Caution Is Required in Interpretation of Mutations in the Voltage Sensing Domain of Voltage Gated Channels as Evidence for Gating Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisher M. Kariev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gating mechanism of voltage sensitive ion channels is generally considered to be the motion of the S4 transmembrane segment of the voltage sensing domains (VSD. The primary supporting evidence came from R→C mutations on the S4 transmembrane segment of the VSD, followed by reaction with a methanethiosulfonate (MTS reagent. The cys side chain is –SH (reactive form –S−; the arginine side chain is much larger, leaving space big enough to accommodate the MTS sulfonate head group. The cavity created by the mutation has space for up to seven more water molecules than were present in wild type, which could be displaced irreversibly by the MTS reagent. Our quantum calculations show there is major reorientation of three aromatic residues that face into the cavity in response to proton displacement within the VSD. Two phenylalanines reorient sufficiently to shield/unshield the cysteine from the intracellular and extracellular ends, depending on the proton positions, and a tyrosine forms a hydrogen bond to the cysteine sulfur with its side chain –OH. These could produce the results of the experiments that have been interpreted as evidence for physical motion of the S4 segment, without physical motion of the S4 backbone. The computations strongly suggest that the interpretation of cysteine substitution reaction experiments be re-examined in the light of these considerations.

  15. Voltage-gated sodium channels in taste bud cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Mark E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste bud cells transmit information regarding the contents of food from taste receptors embedded in apical microvilli to gustatory nerve fibers innervating basolateral membranes. In particular, taste cells depolarize, activate voltage-gated sodium channels, and fire action potentials in response to tastants. Initial cell depolarization is attributable to sodium influx through TRPM5 in sweet, bitter, and umami cells and an undetermined cation influx through an ion channel in sour cells expressing PKD2L1, a candidate sour taste receptor. The molecular identity of the voltage-gated sodium channels that sense depolarizing signals and subsequently initiate action potentials coding taste information to gustatory nerve fibers is unknown. Results We describe the molecular and histological expression profiles of cation channels involved in electrical signal transmission from apical to basolateral membrane domains. TRPM5 was positioned immediately beneath tight junctions to receive calcium signals originating from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation, while PKD2L1 was positioned at the taste pore. Using mouse taste bud and lingual epithelial cells collected by laser capture microdissection, SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel transcripts were expressed in taste tissue. SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A were expressed beneath tight junctions in subsets of taste cells. SCN3A and SCN9A were expressed in TRPM5 cells, while SCN2A was expressed in TRPM5 and PKD2L1 cells. HCN4, a gene previously implicated in sour taste, was expressed in PKD2L1 cells and localized to cell processes beneath the taste pore. Conclusion SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channels are positioned to sense initial depolarizing signals stemming from taste receptor activation and initiate taste cell action potentials. SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A gene products likely account for the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents in taste receptor cells.

  16. Biophysical Adaptations of Prokaryotic Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vien, T N; DeCaen, P G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptive features found in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These two families are distinct, having diverged early in evolutionary history but maintain a surprising degree of convergence in function. While prokaryotic NaVs are required for growth and motility, eukaryotic NaVs selectively conduct fast electrical currents for short- and long-range signaling across cell membranes in mammalian organs. Current interest in prokaryotic NaVs is stoked by their resolved high-resolution structures and functional features which are reminiscent of eukaryotic NaVs. In this chapter, comparisons between eukaryotic and prokaryotic NaVs are made to highlight the shared and unique aspects of ion selectivity, voltage sensitivity, and pharmacology. Examples of prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV convergent evolution will be discussed within the context of their structural features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of cough and action potentials by voltage-gated Na channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    The classical role ascribed to voltage-gated Na channels is the conduction of action potentials. Some excitable tissues such as cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle predominantly express a single voltage-gated Na channels isoform. Of the nine voltage-gated Na channels, seven are expressed in neurons, of these Nav 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 are expressed in sensory neurons including vagal sensory neurons that innervate the airways and initiate cough. Nav 1.7 and Nav 1.9 are of particular interest as they represent two extremes in the functional diversity of voltage-gated Na channels. Voltage-gated Na channel isoforms expressed in airway sensory neurons produce multiple distinct Na currents that underlie distinct aspects of sensory neuron function. The interaction between voltage-gated Na currents underlies the characteristic ability of airway sensory nerves to encode encounters with irritant stimuli into action potential discharge and evoke the cough reflex.

  18. Arrangement and mobility of the voltage sensor domain in prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Takushi; Irie, Katsumasa; Nagura, Hitoshi; Imai, Tomoya; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-03-04

    Prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) form homotetramers with each subunit contributing six transmembrane α-helices (S1-S6). Helices S5 and S6 form the ion-conducting pore, and helices S1-S4 function as the voltage sensor with helix S4 thought to be the essential element for voltage-dependent activation. Although the crystal structures have provided insight into voltage-gated K channels (K(V)s), revealing a characteristic domain arrangement in which the voltage sensor domain of one subunit is close to the pore domain of an adjacent subunit in the tetramer, the structural and functional information on Na(V)s remains limited. Here, we show that the domain arrangement in NaChBac, a firstly cloned prokaryotic Na(V), is similar to that in K(V)s. Cysteine substitutions of three residues in helix S4, Q107C, T110C, and R113C, effectively induced intersubunit disulfide bond formation with a cysteine introduced in helix S5, M164C, of the adjacent subunit. In addition, substituting two acidic residues with lysine, E43K and D60K, shifted the activation of the channel to more positive membrane potentials and consistently shifted the preferentially formed disulfide bond from T110C/M164C to Q107C/M164C. Because Gln-107 is located closer to the extracellular side of helix S4 than Thr-110, this finding suggests that the functional shift in the voltage dependence of activation is related to a restriction of the position of helix S4 in the lipid bilayer. The domain arrangement and vertical mobility of helix S4 in NaChBac indicate that the structure and the mechanism of voltage-dependent activation in prokaryotic Na(V)s are similar to those in canonical K(V)s.

  19. Excitability constraints on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Angelino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We study how functional constraints bound and shape evolution through an analysis of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels. The primary function of sodium channels is to allow the propagation of action potentials. Since Hodgkin and Huxley, mathematical models have suggested that sodium channel properties need to be tightly constrained for an action potential to propagate. There are nine mammalian genes encoding voltage-gated sodium channels, many of which are more than approximately 90% identical by sequence. This sequence similarity presumably corresponds to similarity of function, consistent with the idea that these properties must be tightly constrained. However, the multiplicity of genes encoding sodium channels raises the question: why are there so many? We demonstrate that the simplest theoretical constraints bounding sodium channel diversity--the requirements of membrane excitability and the uniqueness of the resting potential--act directly on constraining sodium channel properties. We compare the predicted constraints with functional data on mammalian sodium channel properties collected from the literature, including 172 different sets of measurements from 40 publications, wild-type and mutant, under a variety of conditions. The data from all channel types, including mutants, obeys the excitability constraint; on the other hand, channels expressed in muscle tend to obey the constraint of a unique resting potential, while channels expressed in neuronal tissue do not. The excitability properties alone distinguish the nine sodium channels into four different groups that are consistent with phylogenetic analysis. Our calculations suggest interpretations for the functional differences between these groups.

  20. Voltage-gated sodium channels: mutations, channelopathies and targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andavan, G S B; Lemmens-Gruber, R

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels produce fast depolarization, which is responsible for the rising phase of the action potential in neurons, muscles and heart. These channels are very large membrane proteins and are encoded by ten genes in mammals. Sodium channels are a crucial component of excitable tissues; hence, they are a target for various neurotoxins that are produced by plants and animals for defence and protection, such as tetrodotoxin, scorpion toxins and batrachotoxin. Several mutations in various sodium channel subtypes cause multiple inherited diseases known as channelopathies. When these mutated sodium channel subtypes are expressed in various tissues, channelopathies in brain, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle develop as well as neuropathic pain. In this review, we discuss aspects of voltage-gated sodium channel genes with an emphasis on cardiac muscle sodium channels. In addition, we report novel mutations that underlie a spectrum of diseases, such as Brugada, long QT syndrome and inherited conduction disorders. Furthermore, this review explains commonalities and differences among the channel subtypes, the channelopathies caused by the sodium channel gene mutation and the specificity of toxins and blockers of the channel subtypes.

  1. Three-Function Logic Gate Controlled by Analog Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebulum, Ricardo; Stoica, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    The figure is a schematic diagram of a complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic circuit that performs one of three different logic functions, depending on the level of an externally applied control voltage, V(sub sel). Specifically, the circuit acts as A NAND gate at V(sub sel) = 0.0 V, A wire (the output equals one of the inputs) at V(sub sel) = 1.0 V, or An AND gate at V(sub sel) = -1.8 V. [The nominal power-supply potential (VDD) and logic "1" potential of this circuit is 1.8 V.] Like other multifunctional circuits described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, this circuit was synthesized following an automated evolutionary approach that is so named because it is modeled partly after the repetitive trial-and-error process of biological evolution. An evolved circuit can be tested by computational simulation and/or tested in real hardware, and the results of the test can provide guidance for refining the design through further iteration. The evolutionary synthesis of electronic circuits can now be implemented by means of a software package Genetic Algorithms for Circuit Synthesis (GACS) that was developed specifically for this purpose. GACS was used to synthesize the present trifunctional circuit. As in the cases of other multifunctional circuits described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the multiple functionality of this circuit, the use of a single control voltage to select the function, and the automated evolutionary approach to synthesis all contribute synergistically to a combination of features that are potentially advantageous for the further development of robust, multiple-function logic circuits, including, especially, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). These advantages include the following: This circuit contains only 9 transistors about half the number of transistors that would be needed to obtain equivalent NAND/wire/AND functionality by use of components from a standard digital design library. If

  2. Redox-controlled proton gating in bovine cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain of essentially all organisms that utilize oxygen to generate energy. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the energy to pump protons across the mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes and the plasma membrane in prokaryotes. The mechanism by which proton pumping is coupled to the oxygen reduction reaction remains unresolved, owing to the difficulty of visualizing proton movement within the massive membrane-associated protein matrix. Here, with a novel hydrogen/deuterium exchange resonance Raman spectroscopy method, we have identified two critical elements of the proton pump: a proton loading site near the propionate groups of heme a, which is capable of transiently storing protons uploaded from the negative-side of the membrane prior to their release into the positive-side of the membrane and a conformational gate that controls proton translocation in response to the change in the redox state of heme a. These findings form the basis for a postulated molecular model describing a detailed mechanism by which unidirectional proton translocation is coupled to electron transfer from heme a to heme a3, associated with oxygen chemistry occurring in the heme a3 site, during enzymatic turnover. Each time heme a undergoes an oxidation-reduction transition a proton is translocated across the membrane accounting for the observation that two protons are translocated during the oxidative phase of the enzymatic cycle and two more are translocated during the reductive phase. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Tsuyoshi Egawa and Syun-Ru Yeh. This work was supported the National Institutes of Health Grant GM098799 to D.L.R and National Science Foundation Grant NSF 0956358 to S.-R.Y.

  3. The Voltage–gated Proton Channel, Hv1, Enhances Brain Damage from Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Long–Jun; Wu, Gongxiong; Akhavan Sharif, M. Reza; Baker, Amanda; Jia, Yonghui; H. Fahey, Frederic; Luo, Hongbo; Feener, Edward Paul; Clapham, David Eldon

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Phagocytic cell NADPH oxidase (NOX) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) as part of innate immunity. Unfortunately, ischemia can also induce this pathway and inflict damage on native cells. Here we show that NOX–mediated damage can be inhibited by suppression of the voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1. Hv1 is required for full NOX activity since it compensates for loss of NOX–exported charge. We show that Hv1 is required for NOX–dependent ROS generation in brain microglia in situ and...

  4. TAURINE REGULATION OF VOLTAGE-GATED CHANNELS IN RETINAL NEURONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Matthew JM; Bulley, Simon; Purpura, Lauren; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Taurine activates not only Cl−-permeable ionotropic receptors, but also receptors that mediate metabotropic responses. The metabotropic property of taurine was revealed in electrophysiological recordings obtained after fully blocking Cl−-permeable receptors with an inhibitory “cocktail” consisting of picrotoxin, SR95531, and strychnine. We found that taurine’s metabotropic effects regulate voltage-gated channels in retinal neurons. After applying the inhibitory cocktail, taurine enhanced delayed outward rectifier K+ channels preferentially in Off-bipolar cells, and the effect was completely blocked by the specific PKC inhibitor, GF109203X. Additionally, taurine also acted through a metabotropic pathway to suppress both L- and N-type Ca2+ channels in retinal neurons, which were insensitive to the potent GABAB receptor inhibitor, CGP55845. This study reinforces our previous finding that taurine in physiological concentrations produces a multiplicity of metabotropic effects that precisely govern the integration of signals being transmitted from the retina to the brain. PMID:23392926

  5. Sleep disturbances in voltage-gated potassium channel antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Krieger, Ana C

    2016-05-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) are a family of membrane proteins responsible for controlling cell membrane potential. The presence of antibodies (Ab) against neuronal VGKC complexes aids in the diagnosis of idiopathic and paraneoplastic autoimmune neurologic disorders. The diagnosis of VGKC Ab-associated encephalopathy (VCKC Ab syndrome) should be suspected in patients with subacute onset of disorientation, confusion, and memory loss in the presence of seizures or a movement disorder. VGKC Ab syndrome may present with sleep-related symptoms, and the purpose of this communication is to alert sleep and neurology clinicians of this still-under-recognized condition. In this case, we are presenting the VGKC Ab syndrome which improved after treatment with solumedrol. The prompt recognition and treatment of this condition may prevent the morbidity associated with cerebral atrophy and the mortality associated with intractable seizures and electrolyte disturbances.

  6. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. French

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10-70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  7. The Position of the Fast-Inactivation Gate during Lidocaine Block of Voltage-gated Na+ Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Vedantham, Vasanth; Cannon, Stephen C.

    1999-01-01

    Lidocaine produces voltage- and use-dependent inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ channels through preferential binding to channel conformations that are normally populated at depolarized potentials and by slowing the rate of Na+ channel repriming after depolarizations. It has been proposed that the fast-inactivation mechanism plays a crucial role in these processes. However, the precise role of fast inactivation in lidocaine action has been difficult to probe because gating of drug-bound channel...

  8. Influence of back-gate stress on the back-gate threshold voltage of a LOCOS-isolated SOI MOSFET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅博; 毕津顺; 李多力; 刘思南; 韩郑生

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a LOCOS-isolated SOI MOSFET heavily depends on its back-gate characteristic, which can be affected by back-gate stress,A large voltage stress was applied to the back gate of SOI devices for at least 30 s at room temperature,which could effectively modify the back-gate threshold voltage of these devices.This modification is stable and time invariant.In order to improve the back-gate threshold voltage,positive substrate bias was applied to NMOS devices and negative substrate bias was applied to PMOS devices,These results suggest that there is a leakage path between source and drain along the silicon island edge,and the application of large backgate bias with the source,drain and gate grounded can strongly affect this leakage path.So we draw the conclusion that the back-gate threshold voltage,which is directly related to the leakage current,can be influenced by back-gate stress.

  9. Proton Conducting Graphene Oxide/Chitosan Composite Electrolytes as Gate Dielectrics for New-Concept Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Du, Peifu; Wan, Changjin; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-09-01

    New-concept devices featuring the characteristics of ultralow operation voltages and low fabrication cost have received increasing attention recently because they can supplement traditional Si-based electronics. Also, organic/inorganic composite systems can offer an attractive strategy to combine the merits of organic and inorganic materials into promising electronic devices. In this report, solution-processed graphene oxide/chitosan composite film was found to be an excellent proton conducting electrolyte with a high specific capacitance of ~3.2 μF/cm2 at 1.0 Hz, and it was used to fabricate multi-gate electric double layer transistors. Dual-gate AND logic operation and two-terminal diode operation were realized in a single device. A two-terminal synaptic device was proposed, and some important synaptic behaviors were emulated, which is interesting for neuromorphic systems.

  10. Proton Conducting Graphene Oxide/Chitosan Composite Electrolytes as Gate Dielectrics for New-Concept Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Du, Peifu; Wan, Changjin; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    New-concept devices featuring the characteristics of ultralow operation voltages and low fabrication cost have received increasing attention recently because they can supplement traditional Si-based electronics. Also, organic/inorganic composite systems can offer an attractive strategy to combine the merits of organic and inorganic materials into promising electronic devices. In this report, solution-processed graphene oxide/chitosan composite film was found to be an excellent proton conducting electrolyte with a high specific capacitance of ~3.2 μF/cm2 at 1.0 Hz, and it was used to fabricate multi-gate electric double layer transistors. Dual-gate AND logic operation and two-terminal diode operation were realized in a single device. A two-terminal synaptic device was proposed, and some important synaptic behaviors were emulated, which is interesting for neuromorphic systems. PMID:27688042

  11. Simulating the Activation of Voltage Sensing Domain for a Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Using Polarizable Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui-Ning; Gong, Haipeng

    2017-03-02

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels play vital roles in the signal transduction of excitable cells. Upon activation of a NaV channel, the change of transmembrane voltage triggers conformational change of the voltage sensing domain, which then elicits opening of the pore domain and thus allows an influx of Na(+) ions. Description of this process with atomistic details is in urgent demand. In this work, we simulated the partial activation process of the voltage sensing domain of a prokaryotic NaV channel using a polarizable force field. We not only observed the conformational change of the voltage sensing domain from resting to preactive state, but also rigorously estimated the free energy profile along the identified reaction pathway. Comparison with the control simulation using an additive force field indicates that voltage-gating thermodynamics of NaV channels may be inaccurately described without considering the electrostatic polarization effect.

  12. Voltage-gated K+ channels contain multiple intersubunit association sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, L; Santarelli, V; Sheng, Z; Skach, W; Pain, D; Deutsch, C

    1996-08-02

    A domain in the cytoplasmic NH2 terminus of voltage-gated K+ channels supervises the proper assembly of specific tetrameric channels (Li, M., Jan, J. M., and Jan, L. Y.(1992) Science 257, 1225-1230; Shen, N. V., Chen X., Boyer, M. M., and Pfaffinger, P. (1993) Neuron 11, 67-76). It is referred to as a first tetramerization domain, or T1 (Shen, N. V., Chen X., Boyer, M. M., and Pfaffinger, P.(1993) Neuron 11, 67-76). However, a deletion mutant of Kv1.3 that lacks the first 141 amino acids, Kv1.3 (T1(-)) forms functional channels, suggesting that additional association sites in the central core of Kv1.3 mediate oligomerization. To characterize these sites, we have tested the abilities of cRNA Kv1.3 (T1(-)) fragments co-injected with Kv1.3 (T1(-)) to suppress current in Xenopus oocytes. The fragments include portions of the six putative transmembrane segments, S1 through S6, specifically: S1, S1-S2, S1-S2-S3, S2-S3, S2-S3-S4, S3-S4, S3-S4-S5, S2 through COOH, S3 through COOH, S4 through COOH, and S5-S6-COOH. Electrophysiologic experiments show that the fragments S1-S2-S3, S3-S4-S5, S2 through COOH, and S3 through COOH strongly suppress Kv1.3 (T1(-)) current, while others do not. Suppression of expressed current is due to specific effects of the translated peptide Kv1.3 fragments, as validated by in vivo immunoprecipitation studies of a strong suppressor and a nonsuppressor. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that translation of truncated peptide fragments neither prevents translation of Kv1.3 (T1(-)) nor increases its rate of degradation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that suppression involves direct association of a peptide fragment with Kv1.3 (T1(-)). Fragments that strongly suppress Kv1.3 (T1(-)) also suppress an analogous NH2-terminal deletion mutant of Kv2.1 (Kv2.1 (DeltaN139)), an isoform belonging to a different subfamily. Our results indicate that sites in the central core of Kv1.3 facilitate intersubunit association and that there are suppression

  13. Memory and learning behaviors mimicked in nanogranular SiO2-based proton conductor gated oxide-based synaptic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Zhou, Ju Mei; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2013-10-01

    In neuroscience, signal processing, memory and learning function are established in the brain by modifying ionic fluxes in neurons and synapses. Emulation of memory and learning behaviors of biological systems by nanoscale ionic/electronic devices is highly desirable for building neuromorphic systems or even artificial neural networks. Here, novel artificial synapses based on junctionless oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid transistors gated by nanogranular phosphorus-doped SiO2-based proton-conducting films are fabricated on glass substrates by a room-temperature process. Short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) are mimicked by tuning the pulse gate voltage amplitude. The LTM process in such an artificial synapse is due to the proton-related interfacial electrochemical reaction. Our results are highly desirable for building future neuromorphic systems or even artificial networks via electronic elements.In neuroscience, signal processing, memory and learning function are established in the brain by modifying ionic fluxes in neurons and synapses. Emulation of memory and learning behaviors of biological systems by nanoscale ionic/electronic devices is highly desirable for building neuromorphic systems or even artificial neural networks. Here, novel artificial synapses based on junctionless oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid transistors gated by nanogranular phosphorus-doped SiO2-based proton-conducting films are fabricated on glass substrates by a room-temperature process. Short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) are mimicked by tuning the pulse gate voltage amplitude. The LTM process in such an artificial synapse is due to the proton-related interfacial electrochemical reaction. Our results are highly desirable for building future neuromorphic systems or even artificial networks via electronic elements. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02987e

  14. Proton conducting sodium alginate electrolyte laterally coupled low-voltage oxide-based transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang Hui; Wan, Qing, E-mail: wanqing@nju.edu.cn [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Qiang Zhu, Li, E-mail: lqzhu@nimte.ac.cn [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Shi, Yi [School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-03-31

    Solution-processed sodium alginate electrolyte film shows a high proton conductivity of ∼5.5 × 10{sup −3} S/cm and a high lateral electric-double-layer (EDL) capacitance of ∼2.0 μF/cm{sup 2} at room temperature with a relative humidity of 57%. Low-voltage in-plane-gate indium-zinc-oxide-based EDL transistors laterally gated by sodium alginate electrolytes are fabricated on glass substrates. The field-effect mobility, current ON/OFF ratio, and subthreshold swing of such EDL transistors are estimated to be 4.2 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, 2.8 × 10{sup 6}, and 130 mV/decade, respectively. At last, a low-voltage driven resistor-load inverter is also demonstrated. Such in-plane-gate EDL transistors have potential applications in portable electronics and low-cost biosensors.

  15. SU-E-T-439: Fundamental Verification of Respiratory-Gated Spot Scanning Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamano, H; Yamakawa, T [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Hayashi, N; Kato, H [School of Health Sciences, Fujita Health University, Tayoake (Japan); Yasui, K [Department of Proton Therapy Technology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The spot-scanning proton beam irradiation with respiratory gating technique provides quite well dose distribution and requires both dosimetric and geometric verification prior to clinical implementation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of gating irradiation as a fundamental verification. Methods: We evaluated field width, flatness, symmetry, and penumbra in the gated and non-gated proton beams. The respiration motion was distinguished into 3 patterns: 10, 20, and 30 mm. We compared these contents between the gated and non-gated beams. A 200 MeV proton beam from PROBEAT-III unit (Hitachi Co.Ltd) was used in this study. Respiratory gating irradiation was performed by Quasar phantom (MODUS medical devices) with a combination of dedicated respiratory gating system (ANZAI Medical Corporation). For radiochromic film dosimetry, the calibration curve was created with Gafchromic EBT3 film (Ashland) on FilmQA Pro 2014 (Ashland) as film analysis software. Results: The film was calibrated at the middle of spread out Bragg peak in passive proton beam. The field width, flatness and penumbra in non-gated proton irradiation with respiratory motion were larger than those of reference beam without respiratory motion: the maximum errors of the field width, flatness and penumbra in respiratory motion of 30 mm were 1.75% and 40.3% and 39.7%, respectively. The errors of flatness and penumbra in gating beam (motion: 30 mm, gating rate: 25%) were 0.0% and 2.91%, respectively. The results of symmetry in all proton beams with gating technique were within 0.6%. Conclusion: The field width, flatness, symmetry and penumbra were improved with the gating technique in proton beam. The spot scanning proton beam with gating technique is feasible for the motioned target.

  16. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antagonists and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Lyeth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Despite more than 30 years of research, no pharmacological agents have been identified that improve neurological function following TBI. However, several lines of research described in this review provide support for further development of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. Following TBI, neurons and astrocytes experience a rapid and sometimes enduring increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. These fluxes in [Ca2+]i drive not only apoptotic and necrotic cell death, but also can lead to long-term cell dysfunction in surviving cells. In a limited number of in vitro experiments, both L-type and N-type VGCC antagonists successfully reduced calcium loads as well as neuronal and astrocytic cell death following mechanical injury. In rodent models of TBI, administration of VGCC antagonists reduced cell death and improved cognitive function. It is clear that there is a critical need to find effective therapeutics and rational drug delivery strategies for the management and treatment of TBI, and we believe that further investigation of VGCC antagonists should be pursued before ruling out the possibility of successful translation to the clinic.

  17. Voltage-gated sodium channels: biophysics, pharmacology, and related channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora eSavio Galimberti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa and can also function as cell-adhesion molecules (CAMs. In-vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named channel partners or channel interacting proteins (ChiPs like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin, and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics. Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium channelopathies. This review will outline the structure, function and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field

  18. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Biophysics, Pharmacology, and Related Channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H.; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named “channel partners” or “channel interacting proteins” (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium “channelopathies”.  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field. PMID:22798951

  19. Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Cancer Cell Proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Vidhya R.; Perez-Neut, Mathew [Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Loyola University Chicago 2160 S. 1st Ave, Maywood, IL 60153 (United States); Kaja, Simon [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2411 Holmes St., Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Gentile, Saverio, E-mail: sagentile@luc.edu [Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Loyola University Chicago 2160 S. 1st Ave, Maywood, IL 60153 (United States)

    2015-05-22

    Changes of the electrical charges across the surface cell membrane are absolutely necessary to maintain cellular homeostasis in physiological as well as in pathological conditions. The opening of ion channels alter the charge distribution across the surface membrane as they allow the diffusion of ions such as K{sup +}, Ca{sup ++}, Cl{sup −}, Na{sup +}. Traditionally, voltage-gated ion channels (VGIC) are known to play fundamental roles in controlling rapid bioelectrical signaling including action potential and/or contraction. However, several investigations have revealed that these classes of proteins can also contribute significantly to cell mitotic biochemical signaling, cell cycle progression, as well as cell volume regulation. All these functions are critically important for cancer cell proliferation. Interestingly, a variety of distinct VGICs are expressed in different cancer cell types, including metastasis but not in the tissues from which these tumors were generated. Given the increasing evidence suggesting that VGIC play a major role in cancer cell biology, in this review we discuss the role of distinct VGIC in cancer cell proliferation and possible therapeutic potential of VIGC pharmacological manipulation.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo

    2017-03-31

    The transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV ) channels is an emerging research area that promises to improve our understanding of how many relevant physiological events are shaped in the central nervous system, the skeletal muscle, and other tissues. Interestingly, a picture of how transcription of CaV channel subunit genes is controlled is evolving with the identification of the promoter regions required for tissue-specific expression, and the identification of transcription factors that control their expression. These promoters share several characteristics that include multiple transcriptional start sites, lack of a TATA box, and the presence of elements conferring tissue-selective expression. Likewise, changes in CaV channel expression occur throughout development, following ischemia, seizures, or chronic drug administration. This review focuses on insights achieved regarding the control of CaV channel gene expression. To further understand the complexities of expression and to increase the possibilities of detecting CaV channel alterations causing human disease, a deeper knowledge on the structure of the 5' upstream regions of the genes encoding these remarkable proteins will be necessary. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Ion conduction and conformational flexibility of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; Allen, Toby W

    2014-03-04

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels play an essential role in electrical signaling in the nervous system and are key pharmacological targets for a range of disorders. The recent solution of X-ray structures for the bacterial channel NavAb has provided an opportunity to study functional mechanisms at the atomic level. This channel's selectivity filter exhibits an EEEE ring sequence, characteristic of mammalian Ca(2+), not Na(+), channels. This raises the fundamentally important question: just what makes a Na(+) channel conduct Na(+) ions? Here we explore ion permeation on multimicrosecond timescales using the purpose-built Anton supercomputer. We isolate the likely protonation states of the EEEE ring and observe a striking flexibility of the filter that demonstrates the necessity for extended simulations to study conduction in this channel. We construct free energy maps to reveal complex multi-ion conduction via knock-on and "pass-by" mechanisms, involving concerted ion and glutamate side chain movements. Simulations in mixed ionic solutions reveal relative energetics for Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) within the pore that are consistent with the modest selectivity seen experimentally. We have observed conformational changes in the pore domain leading to asymmetrical collapses of the activation gate, similar to proposed inactivated structures of NavAb, with helix bending involving conserved residues that are critical for slow inactivation. These structural changes are shown to regulate access to fenestrations suggested to be pathways for lipophilic drugs and provide deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms connecting drug activity and slow inactivation.

  2. Effect of Turkish propolis extracts on expression of voltage-gated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Propolis, Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC), PC-3 Human prostate cancer cells. Tropical Journal ... a number of dietary and lifestyle factors have been implicated ... Propolis samples, produced by honey-bee (Apis mellifera L.) ...

  3. Modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels hyperpolarizes the voltage threshold for activation in spinal motoneurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Kevin E; Carlin, Kevin P; Fedirchuk, Brent

    2012-03-01

    Previous work has shown that motoneurone excitability is enhanced by a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential at which an action potential is initiated (V(th)) at the onset, and throughout brainstem-evoked fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate cat and neonatal rat. Modeling work has suggested the modulation of Na(+) conductance as a putative mechanism underlying this state-dependent change in excitability. This study sought to determine whether modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels could induce V(th) hyperpolarization. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from antidromically identified lumbar spinal motoneurones in an isolated neonatal rat spinal cord preparation. Recordings were made with and without the bath application of veratridine, a plant alkaloid neurotoxin that acts as a sodium channel modulator. As seen in HEK 293 cells expressing Nav1.2 channels, veratridine-modified channels demonstrated a hyperpolarizing shift in their voltage-dependence of activation and a slowing of inactivation that resulted in an enhanced inward current in response to voltage ramp stimulations. In the native rat motoneurones, veratridine-modified sodium channels induced a hyperpolarization of V(th) in all 29 neonatal rat motoneurones examined (mean hyperpolarization: -6.6 ± 4.3 mV). V(th) hyperpolarization was not due to the effects on Ca(2+) and/or K(+) channels as blockade of these currents did not alter V(th). Veratridine also significantly increased the amplitude of persistent inward currents (PICs; mean increase: 72.5 ± 98.5 pA) evoked in response to slow depolarizing current ramps. However, the enhancement of the PIC amplitude had a slower time course than the hyperpolarization of V(th), and the PIC onset voltage could be either depolarized or hyperpolarized, suggesting that PIC facilitation did not mediate the V(th) hyperpolarization. We therefore suggest that central neuronal circuitry in mammals could affect V(th) in a mechanism similar to that of

  4. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  5. Low Noise Bias Current/Voltage References Based on Floating-Gate MOS Transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igor, Mucha

    1997-01-01

    The exploitation of floating-gate MOS transistors as reference current and voltage sources is investigated. Test structures of common source and common drain floating-gate devices have been implemented in a commercially available 0.8 micron double-poly CMOS process. The measurements performed...... promise a good maintenance of the operating point of the floating-gate devices. Examples of utilizing of such bias sources in low-noise sensor preamplifiers are discussed....

  6. Low Noise Bias Current/Voltage References Based on Floating-Gate MOS Transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igor, Mucha

    1997-01-01

    The exploitation of floating-gate MOS transistors as reference current and voltage sources is investigated. Test structures of common source and common drain floating-gate devices have been implemented in a commercially available 0.8 micron double-poly CMOS process. The measurements performed...... promise a good maintenance of the operating point of the floating-gate devices. Examples of utilizing of such bias sources in low-noise sensor preamplifiers are discussed....

  7. 人源电压门控质子通道对乳腺癌细胞迁移与侵袭的影响*%Effects of voltage-gated proton channel(Hv1)on the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雅蕾; 张尚荣; 王一凡; 孙保存; 李树杰

    2013-01-01

    目的:明确人源电压门控质子通道蛋白(human voltage-gated proton channel 1,Hv1)对乳腺癌细胞迁移及侵袭能力的影响。方法:检测Hv1在不同转移能力的人乳腺癌细胞系中的表达,利用小RNA干扰(siRNA)技术下调Hv1在乳腺癌MDA-MB-231细胞中的表达,通过细胞划痕和体外侵袭实验方法,观察Hv1对乳腺癌细胞迁移和侵袭的影响并初步探讨相关分子机制。结果:Hv1在高转移的乳腺癌细胞MDA-MB-231中表达较高,Hv1基因的siRNA干扰片段能够抑制Hv1基因及蛋白的表达;细胞划痕和体外侵袭实验表明Hv1降表达的MDA-MB-231细胞迁移和侵袭能力较弱;明胶酶谱和免疫印迹实验证明下调Hv1基因在MDA-MB-231细胞中的表达明显抑制了MMP-2的活性。结论:Hv1能够促进乳腺癌细胞迁移及侵袭。%Objective:To clarify the effect of voltage-gated proton channel 1 (Hv1) on the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Methods:The protein expression of Hv1 was detected in human breast cancer cell lines with different metastatic abilities. SiRNA technique was used to down-regulate the expression of Hvl in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Scratch and matrigel invasion methods were used to observe the effect of Hvl on the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells, and the relevant molecular mechanism was explored. Results:Hv1 was highly expressed in the highly metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Hvl was more highly expressed in MDA-MB-231 cells with higher metastatic ability. The SiRNA sequence target at Hvl inhibited Hvl expression. Scratch and matrigel invasion experiments showed that the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells were significantly attenuated when Hv1 was knocked down by siRNA targeting Hv1. Zymography experiment on matrix metalloproteinase indicated that the enzyme activities of MMP-2 markedly decreased. Conclusion:Hv1 promoted the migration and invasion ability of breast

  8. Proton radiation hardness of single-nanowire transistors using robust organic gate nanodielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sanghyun; Lee, Kangho; Janes, David B.; Dwivedi, Ramesh C.; Baffour-Awuah, Habibah; Wilkins, R.; Yoon, Myung-Han; Facchetti, Antonio; Mark, Tobin J.

    2006-08-01

    In this contribution, the radiation tolerance of single ZnO nanowire field-effect transistors (NW-FETs) fabricated with a self-assembled superlattice (SAS) gate insulator is investigated and compared with that of ZnO NW-FETs fabricated with a 60nm SiO2 gate insulator. A total-radiation dose study was performed using 10MeV protons at doses of 5.71 and 285krad(Si ). The threshold voltage (Vth) of the SAS-based ZnO NW-FETs is not shifted significantly following irradiation at these doses. In contrast, Vth parameters of the SiO2-based ZnO NW-FETs display average shifts of ˜-4.0 and ˜-10.9V for 5.71 and 285krad(Si ) H+ irradiation, respectively. In addition, little change is observed in the subthreshold characteristics (off current, subthreshold slope) of the SAS-based ZnO NW-FETs following H+ irradiation. These results strongly argue that the bulk oxide trap density and interface trap density formed within the SAS and/or at the SAS-ZnO NW interface during H+ irradiation are significantly lower than those for the corresponding SiO2 gate dielectrics. The radiation-robust SAS-based ZnO NW-FETs are thus promising candidates for future space-based applications in electronics and flexible displays.

  9. Effects of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel on Cell Proliferation in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the effects and underlying mechanisms of voltage-gated K+ channels on the proliferation of multiple myeloma cells. Methods. RPMI-8226 MM cell line was used for the experiments. Voltage-gated K+ currents and the resting potential were recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. RT-PCR detected Kv channel mRNA expression. Cell viability was analyzed with MTT assay. Cell counting system was employed to monitor cell proliferation. DNA contents and cell volume were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results. Currents recorded in RPMI-8226 cells were confirmed to be voltage-gated K+ channels. A high level of Kv1.3 mRNA was detected but no Kv3.1 mRNA was detected in RPMI-8226 cells. Voltage-gated K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP (2 mM depolarized the resting potential from −42 ± 1.7 mV to −31.8 ± 2.8 mV (P0.05. Conclusions. In RPMI-8226, voltage-gated K+ channels are involved in proliferation and cell cycle progression its influence on the resting potential and cell volume may be responsible for this process; the inhibitory effect of the voltage-gated K+ channel blocker on RPMI-8226 cell proliferation is a phase-specific event.

  10. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andrew eFrank

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response – homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors.There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies – such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other

  11. Digital-circuit analysis of short-gate tunnel FETs for low-voltage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Jing; Verhulst, Anne S.; Vandenberghe, William G.; Dehaene, Wim; Huang, Ru; Wang, Yangyuan; Groeseneken, Guido

    2011-08-01

    This paper investigates the potential of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), with emphasis on short-gate TFETs, by simulation for low-power digital applications having a supply voltage lower than 0.5 V. A transient study shows that the tunneling current has a negligible contribution in charging and discharging the gate capacitance of TFETs. In spite of a higher resistance region in the short-gate TFET, the gate (dis)charging speed still meets low-voltage application requirements. A circuit analysis is performed on short-gate TFETs with different materials, such as Si, Ge and heterostructures in terms of voltage overshoot, delay, static power, energy consumption and energy delay product (EDP). These results are compared to MOSFET and full-gate TFET performance. It is concluded that short-gate heterostructure TFETs (Ge-source for nTFET, In0.6Ga0.4As-source for pTFET) are promising candidates to extend the supply voltage to lower than 0.5 V because they combine the advantage of a low Miller capacitance, due to the short-gate structures, and strong drive current in TFETs, due to the narrow bandgap material in the source. At a supply voltage of 0.4 V and for an EOT and channel length of 0.6 nm and 40 nm, respectively, a three-stage inverter chain based on short-gate heterostructure TFETs saves 40% energy consumption per cycle at the same delay and shows 60%-75% improvement of EDP at the same static power, compared to its full-gate counterpart. When compared to the MOSFET, better EDP can be achieved in the heterostructure TFET especially at low static power consumption.

  12. Ion permeation and block of the gating pore in the voltage sensor of NaV1.4 channels with hypokalemic periodic paralysis mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Stanislav; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2010-08-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis and normokalemic periodic paralysis are caused by mutations of the gating charge-carrying arginine residues in skeletal muscle Na(V)1.4 channels, which induce gating pore current through the mutant voltage sensor domains. Inward sodium currents through the gating pore of mutant R666G are only approximately 1% of central pore current, but substitution of guanidine for sodium in the extracellular solution increases their size by 13- +/- 2-fold. Ethylguanidine is permeant through the R666G gating pore at physiological membrane potentials but blocks the gating pore at hyperpolarized potentials. Guanidine is also highly permeant through the proton-selective gating pore formed by the mutant R666H. Gating pore current conducted by the R666G mutant is blocked by divalent cations such as Ba(2+) and Zn(2+) in a voltage-dependent manner. The affinity for voltage-dependent block of gating pore current by Ba(2+) and Zn(2+) is increased at more negative holding potentials. The apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) values for Zn(2+) block for test pulses to -160 mV are 650 +/- 150 microM, 360 +/- 70 microM, and 95.6 +/- 11 microM at holding potentials of 0 mV, -80 mV, and -120 mV, respectively. Gating pore current is blocked by trivalent cations, but in a nearly voltage-independent manner, with an apparent K(d) for Gd(3+) of 238 +/- 14 microM at -80 mV. To test whether these periodic paralyses might be treated by blocking gating pore current, we screened several aromatic and aliphatic guanidine derivatives and found that 1-(2,4-xylyl)guanidinium can block gating pore current in the millimolar concentration range without affecting normal Na(V)1.4 channel function. Together, our results demonstrate unique permeability of guanidine through Na(V)1.4 gating pores, define voltage-dependent and voltage-independent block by divalent and trivalent cations, respectively, and provide initial support for the concept that guanidine-based gating pore blockers

  13. Hydrogen bonds as molecular timers for slow inactivation in voltage-gated potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Galpin, Jason D; Niciforovic, Ana P

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels enable potassium efflux and membrane repolarization in excitable tissues. Many Kv channels undergo a progressive loss of ion conductance in the presence of a prolonged voltage stimulus, termed slow inactivation, but the atomic determinants that regulate the k...

  14. Active gate driver for dv/dt control and active voltage clamping in an IGBT stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tonny Wederberg

    2005-01-01

    For high voltages converters stacks of IGBTs can be used if the static and dynamic voltage sharing among the IGBTs can be applied. dVCE/dt should also be controlled in order not to damage insulation material. This paper describes theory and measurements of an active gate driver for stacking IGBTs...

  15. The position of the fast-inactivation gate during lidocaine block of voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, V; Cannon, S C

    1999-01-01

    Lidocaine produces voltage- and use-dependent inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ channels through preferential binding to channel conformations that are normally populated at depolarized potentials and by slowing the rate of Na+ channel repriming after depolarizations. It has been proposed that the fast-inactivation mechanism plays a crucial role in these processes. However, the precise role of fast inactivation in lidocaine action has been difficult to probe because gating of drug-bound channels does not involve changes in ionic current. For that reason, we employed a conformational marker for the fast-inactivation gate, the reactivity of a cysteine substituted at phenylalanine 1304 in the rat adult skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit (rSkM1) with [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTS-ET), to determine the position of the fast-inactivation gate during lidocaine block. We found that lidocaine does not compete with fast-inactivation. Rather, it favors closure of the fast-inactivation gate in a voltage-dependent manner, causing a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of site 1304 accessibility that parallels a shift in the steady state availability curve measured for ionic currents. More significantly, we found that the lidocaine-induced slowing of sodium channel repriming does not result from a slowing of recovery of the fast-inactivation gate, and thus that use-dependent block does not involve an accumulation of fast-inactivated channels. Based on these data, we propose a model in which transitions along the activation pathway, rather than transitions to inactivated states, play a crucial role in the mechanism of lidocaine action.

  16. Manipulating the voltage drop in graphene nanojunctions using a gate potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papior, Nick Rübner; Gunst, Tue; Stradi, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is an attractive electrode material to contact nanostructures down to the molecular scale since it can be gated electrostatically. Gating can be used to control the doping and the energy level alignment in the nanojunction, thereby influencing its conductance. Here we investigate...... the impact of electrostatic gating in nanojunctions between graphene electrodes operating at finite bias. Using first principles quantum transport simulations, we show that the voltage drop across \\emph{symmetric} junctions changes dramatically and controllably in gated systems compared to non...... of graphene in the proximity of the Dirac point. Due to the electrostatic gating, each electrode exposes different density of states in the bias window between the two different electrode Fermi energies, thereby leading to a non-symmetry in the voltage drop across the device. This selective pinning is found...

  17. Energetic role of the paddle motif in voltage gating of Shaker K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanping; Ramu, Yajamana; Shin, Hyeon-Gyu; Yamakaze, Jayden; Lu, Zhe

    2013-05-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels underlie rapid electric signaling in excitable cells. Electrophysiological studies have established that the N-terminal half of the fourth transmembrane segment ((NT)S4) of these channels is the primary voltage sensor, whereas crystallographic studies have shown that (NT)S4 is not located within a proteinaceous pore. Rather, (NT)S4 and the C-terminal half of S3 ((CT)S3 or S3b) form a helix-turn-helix motif, termed the voltage-sensor paddle. This unexpected structural finding raises two fundamental questions: does the paddle motif also exist in voltage-gated channels in a biological membrane, and, if so, what is its function in voltage gating? Here, we provide evidence that the paddle motif exists in the open state of Drosophila Shaker voltage-gated K(+) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes and that (CT)S3 acts as an extracellular hydrophobic 'stabilizer' for (NT)S4, thus biasing the gating chemical equilibrium toward the open state.

  18. Ultra Low Voltage Class AB Switched Current Memory Cells Based on Floating Gate Transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mucha, Igor

    1999-01-01

    A proposal for a class AB switched current memory cell, suitable for ultra-low-voltage applications is presented. The proposal employs transistors with floating gates, allowing to build analog building blocks for ultralow supply voltage operation also in CMOS processes with high threshold voltages....... This paper presents the theoretical basis for the design of "floating-gate'' switched current memory cells by giving a detailed description and analysis of the most important impacts degrading the performance of the cells. To support the theoretical assumptions circuits based on "floating-gate'' switched...... current memory cells were designed using a CMOS process with threshold voltages V-T0n = \\V-T0p\\ = 0.9 V for the n- and p-channel devices. Both hand calculations and PSPICE simulations showed that the designed example switched current memory cell allowed a maximum signal range better than +/-18 mu...

  19. Axonal voltage-gated ion channels as pharmacological targets for pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Romer Rosberg, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    Upon peripheral nerve injury (caused by trauma or disease process) axons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) somatosensory neurons have the ability to sprout and regrow/remyelinate to reinnervate distant target tissue or form a tangled scar mass called a neuroma. This regenerative response can become...... maladaptive leading to a persistent and debilitating pain state referred to as chronic pain corresponding to the clinical description of neuropathic/chronic inflammatory pain. There is little agreement to what causes peripheral chronic pain other than hyperactivity of the nociceptive DRG neurons which...... ultimately depends on the function of voltage-gated ion channels. This review focuses on the pharmacological modulators of voltage-gated ion channels known to be present on axonal membrane which represents by far the largest surface of DRG neurons. Blockers of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, openers of voltage...

  20. The cytoplasmic coiled-coil mediates cooperative gating temperature sensitivity in the voltage-gated H(+) channel Hv1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Takeshita, Kohei; Kobayashi, Megumi; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2012-05-08

    Hv1/VSOP is a dimeric voltage-gated H(+) channel in which the gating of one subunit is reportedly coupled to that of the other subunit within the dimer. The molecular basis for dimer formation and intersubunit coupling, however, remains unknown. Here we show that the carboxy terminus ends downstream of the S4 voltage-sensor helix twist in a dimer coiled-coil architecture, which mediates cooperative gating. We also show that the temperature-dependent activation of H(+) current through Hv1/VSOP is regulated by thermostability of the coiled-coil domain, and that this regulation is altered by mutation of the linker between S4 and the coiled-coil. Cooperative gating within the dimer is also dependent on the linker structure, which circular dichroism spectrum analysis suggests is α-helical. Our results indicate that the cytoplasmic coiled-coil strands form continuous α-helices with S4 and mediate cooperative gating to adjust the range of temperatures over which Hv1/VSOP operates.

  1. Manipulating the voltage drop in graphene nanojunctions using a gate potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papior, Nick; Gunst, Tue; Stradi, Daniele; Brandbyge, Mads

    2016-01-14

    Graphene is an attractive electrode material to contact nanostructures down to the molecular scale since it can be gated electrostatically. Gating can be used to control the doping and the energy level alignment in the nanojunction, thereby influencing its conductance. Here we investigate the impact of electrostatic gating in nanojunctions between graphene electrodes operating at finite bias. Using quantum transport simulations based on density functional theory, we show that the voltage drop across symmetric junctions changes dramatically and controllably in gated systems compared to non-gated junctions. In particular, for p-type(n-type) carriers the voltage drop is located close to the electrode with positive(negative) polarity, the potential of the junction is pinned to the negative(positive) electrode. We trace this behaviour back to the vanishing density of states of graphene in the proximity of the Dirac point. Due to the electrostatic gating, each electrode exposes different density of states in the bias window between the two different electrode Fermi energies, thereby leading to a non-symmetry in the voltage drop across the device. This selective pinning is found to be independent of device length when carriers are induced either by the gate or dopant atoms, indicating a general effect for electronic circuitry based on graphene electrodes. We envision this could be used to control the spatial distribution of Joule heating in graphene nanostructures, and possibly the chemical reaction rate around high potential gradients.

  2. Axonal voltage-gated ion channels as pharmacological targets for pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Romer Rosberg, Mette; Krarup, Christian

    2013-05-15

    Upon peripheral nerve injury (caused by trauma or disease process) axons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) somatosensory neurons have the ability to sprout and regrow/remyelinate to reinnervate distant target tissue or form a tangled scar mass called a neuroma. This regenerative response can become maladaptive leading to a persistent and debilitating pain state referred to as chronic pain corresponding to the clinical description of neuropathic/chronic inflammatory pain. There is little agreement to what causes peripheral chronic pain other than hyperactivity of the nociceptive DRG neurons which ultimately depends on the function of voltage-gated ion channels. This review focuses on the pharmacological modulators of voltage-gated ion channels known to be present on axonal membrane which represents by far the largest surface of DRG neurons. Blockers of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, openers of voltage-gated K(+) channels and blockers of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels that were found to reduce neuronal activity were also found to be effective in neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. The isoforms of these channels present on nociceptive axons have limited specificity. The rationale for considering axonal voltage-gated ion channels as targets for pain treatment comes from the accumulating evidence that chronic pain states are associated with a dysregulation of these channels that could alter their specificity and make them more susceptible to pharmacological modulation. This drives the need for further development of subtype-specific voltage-gated ion channels modulators, as well as clinically available neurophysiological techniques for monitoring axonal ion channel function in peripheral nerves.

  3. Characterization of voltage-gated Ca(2+ conductances in layer 5 neocortical pyramidal neurons from rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Almog

    Full Text Available Neuronal voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels are involved in electrical signalling and in converting these signals into cytoplasmic calcium changes. One important function of voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels is generating regenerative dendritic Ca(2+ spikes. However, the Ca(2+ dependent mechanisms used to create these spikes are only partially understood. To start investigating this mechanism, we set out to kinetically and pharmacologically identify the sub-types of somatic voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels in pyramidal neurons from layer 5 of rat somatosensory cortex, using the nucleated configuration of the patch-clamp technique. The activation kinetics of the total Ba(2+ current revealed conductance activation only at medium and high voltages suggesting that T-type calcium channels were not present in the patches. Steady-state inactivation protocols in combination with pharmacology revealed the expression of R-type channels. Furthermore, pharmacological experiments identified 5 voltage-gated Ca(2+ channel sub-types - L-, N-, R- and P/Q-type. Finally, the activation of the Ca(2+ conductances was examined using physiologically derived voltage-clamp protocols including a calcium spike protocol and a mock back-propagating action potential (mBPAP protocol. These experiments enable us to suggest the possible contribution of the five Ca(2+ channel sub-types to Ca(2+ current flow during activation under physiological conditions.

  4. Highly tunable local gate controlled complementary graphene device performing as inverter and voltage controlled resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonjae; Riikonen, Juha; Li, Changfeng; Chen, Ya; Lipsanen, Harri

    2013-10-04

    Using single-layer CVD graphene, a complementary field effect transistor (FET) device is fabricated on the top of separated back-gates. The local back-gate control of the transistors, which operate with low bias at room temperature, enables highly tunable device characteristics due to separate control over electrostatic doping of the channels. Local back-gating allows control of the doping level independently of the supply voltage, which enables device operation with very low VDD. Controllable characteristics also allow the compensation of variation in the unintentional doping typically observed in CVD graphene. Moreover, both p-n and n-p configurations of FETs can be achieved by electrostatic doping using the local back-gate. Therefore, the device operation can also be switched from inverter to voltage controlled resistor, opening new possibilities in using graphene in logic circuitry.

  5. Ciguatoxins: Cyclic Polyether Modulators of Voltage-gated Iion Channel Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Lewis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatoxins are cyclic polyether toxins, derived from marine dinoflagellates, which are responsible for the symptoms of ciguatera poisoning. Ingestion of tropical and subtropical fin fish contaminated by ciguatoxins results in an illness characterised by neurological, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disorders. The pharmacology of ciguatoxins is characterised by their ability to cause persistent activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, to increase neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release, to impair synaptic vesicle recycling, and to cause cell swelling. It is these effects, in combination with an action to block voltage-gated potassium channels at high doses, which are believed to underlie the complex of symptoms associated with ciguatera. This review examines the sources, structures and pharmacology of ciguatoxins. In particular, attention is placed on their cellular modes of actions to modulate voltage-gated ion channels and other Na+-dependent mechanisms in numerous cell types and to current approaches for detection and treatment of ciguatera.

  6. T-type voltage-gated calcium channels regulate the tone of mouse efferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian B; Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Cribbs, Leanne L;

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the regulation of renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate. Excitation-contraction coupling in afferent arterioles is known to require activation of these channels and we studied their role in the regulation of cortical efferent arteriolar...... tone. We used microdissected perfused mouse efferent arterioles and found a transient vasoconstriction in response to depolarization with potassium; an effect abolished by removal of extracellular calcium. The T-type voltage-gated calcium channel antagonists mibefradil and nickel blocked this potassium....... Low concentrations of nickel, an agent that blocks Ca(v)3.2, had a similar effect. Thus, T-type voltage-gated calcium channels are functionally important for depolarization-induced vasoconstriction and subsequent dilatation in mouse cortical efferent arterioles.Kidney International advance online...

  7. An update on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuli, Donatus O; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential proteins in brain physiology, as they generate the sodium currents that initiate neuronal action potentials. Voltage-gated sodium channels expression, localisation and function are regulated by a range of transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Here, we review our understanding of regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels, in particular SCN1A (NaV1.1), SCN2A (NaV1.2), SCN3A (NaV1.3) and SCN8A (NaV1.6), by transcription factors, by alternative splicing, and by post-translational modifications. Our focus is strongly centred on recent research lines, and newly generated knowledge.

  8. Voltage-gated potassium channelopathy: an expanding spectrum of clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shribman, Sam; Patani, Rickie; Deeb, Jacquie; Chaudhuri, Abhijit

    2013-01-10

    Autoimmune voltage-gated potassium channelopathies represent a wide and expanding spectrum of neurological conditions. We present a case demonstrating the phenotypic heterogeneity of antivoltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC)-associated disorders. Such cases may easily be dismissed as functional disorders at first presentation. We propose that there must remain a high index of suspicion for antiVGKC-associated disorders in cases where there are transient neurological disturbances in atypical spatial and temporal distributions.

  9. Comparative study of the gating motif and C-type inactivation in prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Katsumasa; Kitagawa, Kazuya; Nagura, Hitoshi; Imai, Tomoya; Shimomura, Takushi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2010-02-05

    Prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) are homotetramers and are thought to inactivate through a single mechanism, named C-type inactivation. Here we report the voltage dependence and inactivation rate of the NaChBac channel from Bacillus halodurans, the first identified prokaryotic Na(V), as well as of three new homologues cloned from Bacillus licheniformis (Na(V)BacL), Shewanella putrefaciens (Na(V)SheP), and Roseobacter denitrificans (Na(V)RosD). We found that, although activated by a lower membrane potential, Na(V)BacL inactivates as slowly as NaChBac. Na(V)SheP and Na(V)RosD inactivate faster than NaChBac. Mutational analysis of helix S6 showed that residues corresponding to the "glycine hinge" and "PXP motif" in voltage-gated potassium channels are not obligatory for channel gating in these prokaryotic Na(V)s, but mutations in the regions changed the inactivation rates. Mutation of the region corresponding to the glycine hinge in Na(V)BacL (A214G), Na(V)SheP (A216G), and NaChBac (G219A) accelerated inactivation in these channels, whereas mutation of glycine to alanine in the lower part of helix S6 in NaChBac (G229A), Na(V)BacL (G224A), and Na(V)RosD (G217A) reduced the inactivation rate. These results imply that activation gating in prokaryotic Na(V)s does not require gating motifs and that the residues of helix S6 affect C-type inactivation rates in these channels.

  10. Outward Rectification of Voltage-Gated K+ Channels Evolved at Least Twice in Life History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedelsberger, Janin; Dreyer, Ingo; Gonzalez, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels are present in all living systems. Despite high structural similarities in the transmembrane domains (TMD), this K+ channel type segregates into at least two main functional categories-hyperpolarization-activated, inward-rectifying (Kin) and depolarization-activated, outward-rectifying (Kout) channels. Voltage-gated K+ channels sense the membrane voltage via a voltage-sensing domain that is connected to the conduction pathway of the channel. It has been shown that the voltage-sensing mechanism is the same in Kin and Kout channels, but its performance results in opposite pore conformations. It is not known how the different coupling of voltage-sensor and pore is implemented. Here, we studied sequence and structural data of voltage-gated K+ channels from animals and plants with emphasis on the property of opposite rectification. We identified structural hotspots that alone allow already the distinction between Kin and Kout channels. Among them is a loop between TMD S5 and the pore that is very short in animal Kout, longer in plant and animal Kin and the longest in plant Kout channels. In combination with further structural and phylogenetic analyses this finding suggests that outward-rectification evolved twice and independently in the animal and plant kingdom.

  11. MoS2 oxygen sensor with gate voltage stress induced performance enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yu; Lin, Zhenhua; Thong, John T. L.; Chan, Daniel S. H.; Zhu, Chunxiang

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have recently attracted wide attention and rapidly established themselves in various applications. In particular, 2D materials are regarded as promising building blocks for gas sensors due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, ease in miniaturization, and flexibility in enabling wearable electronics. Compared with other 2D materials, MoS2 is particularly intriguing because it has been widely researched and exhibits semiconducting behavior. Here, we have fabricated MoS2 resistor based O2 sensors with a back gate configuration on a 285 nm SiO2/Si substrate. The effects of applying back gate voltage stress on O2 sensing performance have been systematically investigated. With a positive gate voltage stress, the sensor response improves and the response is improved to 29.2% at O2 partial pressure of 9.9 × 10-5 millibars with a +40 V back-gate bias compared to 21.2% at O2 partial pressure of 1.4 × 10-4 millibars without back-gate bias; while under a negative gate voltage stress of -40 V, a fast and full recovery can be achieved at room temperature. In addition, a method in determining O2 partial pressure with a detectability as low as 6.7 × 10-7 millibars at a constant vacuum pressure is presented and its potential as a vacuum gauge is briefly discussed.

  12. Flat-band voltage shift in metal-gate/high-k/Si stacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang An-Ping; Zheng Xiao-Hu; Xiao Zhi-Song; Yang Zhi-Chao; Wang Mei; Paul K.Chu; Yang Xiao-Dong

    2011-01-01

    In metal-gate/high-k stacks adopted by the 45 nn technology node,the flat-band voltage (Vfb) shift remains one of the most critical challenges,particularly the flat-band voltage roll-off (Vfy roll-off) phenomenon in p-channel metaloxide-semiconductor (pMOS) devices with an ultrathin oxide layer. In this paper,recent progress on the investigation of the Vfb shift and the origin of the Vfb roll-off in the metal-gate/high-k pMOS stacks are reviewed. Methods that can alleviate the Vfb shift phenomenon are summarized and the future research trend is described.

  13. Regulation of voltage gated calcium channels by GPCRs and post-translational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junting; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-10-18

    Calcium entry via voltage gated calcium channels mediates a wide range of physiological functions, whereas calcium channel dysregulation has been associated with numerous pathophysiological conditions. There are myriad cell signaling pathways that act on voltage gated calcium channels to fine tune their activities and to regulate their cell surface expression. These regulatory mechanisms include the activation of G protein-coupled receptors and downstream phosphorylation events, and their control over calcium channel trafficking through direct physical interactions. Calcium channels also undergo post-translational modifications that alter both function and density of the channels in the plasma membrane. Here we focus on select aspects of these regulatory mechanisms and highlight recent developments.

  14. Organic nanodielectrics for low voltage carbon nanotube thin film transistors and complementary logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Seung-Hyun; Yoon, Myung-Han; Gaur, Anshu; Shim, Moonsub; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Rogers, John A

    2005-10-12

    We report the implementation of three dimensionally cross-linked, organic nanodielectric multilayers as ultrathin gate dielectrics for a type of thin film transistor device that uses networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes as effective semiconductor thin films. Unipolar n- and p-channel devices are demonstrated by use of polymer coatings to control the behavior of the networks. Monolithically integrating these devices yields complementary logic gates. The organic multilayers provide exceptionally good gate dielectrics for these systems and allow for low voltage, low hysteresis operation. The excellent performance characteristics suggest that organic dielectrics of this general type could provide a promising path to SWNT-based thin film electronics.

  15. Efficiency of respiratory-gated delivery of synchrotron-based pulsed proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunashima, Yoshikazu; Vedam, Sastry; Dong, Lei; Bues, Martin; Balter, Peter; Smith, Alfred; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Unit 94, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Umezawa, Masumi [Hitachi America Ltd, PTC-H Construction Site, 7707 Fannin Street, Suite 203, Houston, TX 77054 (United States); Sakae, Takeji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)], E-mail: svedam@mdanderson.org

    2008-04-07

    Significant differences exist in respiratory-gated proton beam delivery with a synchrotron-based accelerator system when compared to photon therapy with a conventional linear accelerator. Delivery of protons with a synchrotron accelerator is governed by a magnet excitation cycle pattern. Optimal synchronization of the magnet excitation cycle pattern with the respiratory motion pattern is critical to the efficiency of respiratory-gated proton delivery. There has been little systematic analysis to optimize the accelerator's operational parameters to improve gated treatment efficiency. The goal of this study was to estimate the overall efficiency of respiratory-gated synchrotron-based proton irradiation through realistic simulation. Using 62 respiratory motion traces from 38 patients, we simulated respiratory gating for duty cycles of 30%, 20% and 10% around peak exhalation for various fixed and variable magnet excitation patterns. In each case, the time required to deliver 100 monitor units in both non-gated and gated irradiation scenarios was determined. Based on results from this study, the minimum time required to deliver 100 MU was 1.1 min for non-gated irradiation. For respiratory-gated delivery at a 30% duty cycle around peak exhalation, corresponding average delivery times were typically three times longer with a fixed magnet excitation cycle pattern. However, when a variable excitation cycle was allowed in synchrony with the patient's respiratory cycle, the treatment time only doubled. Thus, respiratory-gated delivery of synchrotron-based pulsed proton irradiation is feasible and more efficient when a variable magnet excitation cycle pattern is used.

  16. The Mechanism of Voltage Dependent Gating of the NaChBac Prokaryotic Sodium Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaen, Paul G.

    Electrical signaling in cells depends on selective conductance of ions through membrane proteins called 'voltage gated ion channels'. These channels are characterized by their ability turn on and off the flow of ionic current by opening and closing their conductive pore in response to changes in membrane potential. The opening and closing of the pore is a mechanically linked to conformational movement of the positively charged fourth transmembrane segment (S4) in 'the voltage sensor' region. How the S4 moves in response to membrane potential is a controversial subject. In this thesis, we used the prokaryotic sodium channel NaChBac as our model sodium channel to study voltage dependent movement of the S4 in the voltage sensor. We use a disulfide-locking method where we introduced pairs of cysteines in the voltage sensor that crosslink and trap the S4 in its path after depolarization. We screened over one hundred mutations of the NaChBac channel in the whole cell patch clamp assay and demonstrated discrete and sequential voltage dependent ion pair interactions that occur in at least three states between the positively charged residues of the S4 segment and the acidic residues in the S1, S2 and S3 segments. In conjunction with structural modeling of the voltage sensor and our disulfide locking data, we propose that the S4 moves in and out of the plane of the membrane 8-13 A, forming distinct gating charge interactions with counter charges of the voltage sensor and adopts a 310 helix over a portion of its structure during activation. These findings are compatible with the sliding helix model and refine our understanding of the structural determinates of voltage sensor function in voltage gated ion channels.

  17. Role of amino terminus in voltage gating and junctional rectification of Shaking B innexins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, William D; Skerrett, I Martha

    2014-03-01

    Rectifying electrical synapses are rare gap junctions that favor transmission of signals in one direction. Such synapses have been identified in neural systems, including those mediating rapid escape responses of arthropods. In the Drosophila giant fiber system, adjacent cells express and contribute different transcript variants of the innexin Shaking B, resulting in heterotypic gap junctions with rectifying properties. When expressed exogenously, variants Shaking B Lethal (ShakBL) and Shaking B neural + 16 (ShakBN16) form heterotypic junctions that gate asymmetrically in response to transjunctional voltage. To determine whether the amino terminus confers properties of gating and rectification, amino-terminal domains were exchanged between ShakBL and ShakBN16, creating chimeric proteins SBL NTN16 and SBN16 NTL. The properties were analyzed in paired Xenopus oocytes. Our results suggest that the amino terminus plays an important role in establishing rectifying properties inherent to heterotypic junctions composed of ShakBL and ShakBN16. ShakBL/SBL NTN16 junctions behaved similarly to ShakBL/ShakBN16 junctions, gating in response to transjunctional voltage of one polarity and inducing a highly asymmetric conductance-voltage relationship. However, the amino terminus did not act independently to confer sensitivity to transjunctional voltage. The complementary pairing ShakBN16/SBN16 NTL displayed little sensitivity to voltage of either polarity, and in homotypic pairings SBL NTN16 was strongly gated by transjunctional voltage. We propose a model in which the amino terminus induces gating only when matched with an accommodating innexin body.

  18. SGK3 Sensitivity of Voltage Gated K+ Channel Kv1.5 (KCNA5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaab Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The serum & glucocorticoid inducible kinase isoform SGK3 is a powerful regulator of several transporters, ion channels and the Na+/K+ ATPase. Targets of SGK3 include the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2, which is in turn a known regulator of the voltage gated K+ channel Kv1.5 (KCNA5. The present study thus explored whether SGK3 modifies the activity of the voltage gated K+ channel KCNA5, which participates in the regulation of diverse functions including atrial cardiac action potential, activity of vascular smooth muscle cells, insulin release and tumour cell proliferation. Methods: cRNA encoding KCNA5 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with and without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type SGK3, constitutively active S419DSGK3, inactive K191NSGK3 and/or wild type Nedd4-2. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was quantified utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp. Results: Voltage gated current in KCNA5 expressing Xenopus oocytes was significantly enhanced by wild-type SGK3 and S419DSGK3, but not by K191NSGK3. SGK3 was effective in the presence of ouabain (1 mM and thus did not require Na+/K+ ATPase activity. Coexpression of Nedd4-2 decreased the voltage gated current in KCNA5 expressing Xenopus oocytes, an effect largely reversed by additional coexpression of SGK3. Conclusion: SGK3 is a positive regulator of KCNA5, which is at least partially effective by abrogating the effect of Nedd4-2.

  19. Being flexible: the voltage-controllable activation gate of Kv channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain J. Labro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kv channels form voltage-dependent potassium selective pores in the outer cell membrane and are composed out of four -subunits, each having six membrane-spanning -helices (S1-S6. The -subunits tetramerize such that the S5-S6 pore domains co-assemble into a centrally located K+ pore which is surrounded by four operational voltage sensing domains (VSD that are each formed by the S1-S4 segments. Consequently, each subunit is capable of responding to changes in membrane potential and dictates whether the pore should be conductive or not. K+ permeation through the pore can be sealed off by two separate gates in series: (a at the inner S6 bundle crossing (BC gate and (b at the level of the selectivity-filter (SF gate located at the extracellular entrance of the pore. Within the last years a general consensus emerged that a direct communication between the S4S5-linker and the bottom part of S6 (S6c constitutes the coupling with the VSD thus making the BC gate the main voltage-controllable activation gate. While the BC gate listens to the VSD, the SF changes its conformation depending on the status of the BC gate. Through the eyes of an entering K+ ion, the operation of the BC gate apparatus can be compared with the iris-like motion of the diaphragm from a camera whereby its diameter widens. Two main gating motions have been proposed to create this BC gate widening: (1 tilting of the helix whereby the S6 converts from a straight -helix to a tilted one or (2 swiveling of the S6c whereby the S6 remains bent. Such motions require a flexible hinge that decouples the pre- and post-hinge segment. Roughly at the middle of the S6 there exists a highly conserved glycine residue and a tandem proline motif that seem to fulfill the role of a gating hinge which allows for tilting/swiveling/rotations of the post-hinge S6 segment. In this review we delineate our current view on the operation of the BC gate for controlling K+ permeation in Kv channels.

  20. The voltage-gated potassium channel subunit, Kv1.3, is expressed in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Hay-Schmidt, Anders;

    2003-01-01

    The Shaker-type voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.3, is believed to be restricted in distribution to lymphocytes and neurons. In lymphocytes, this channel has gained intense attention since it has been proven that inhibition of Kv1.3 channels compromise T lymphocyte activation. To investigate...

  1. Topological phase transition in hexagonal boron-nitride bilayers modulated by gate voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guojun; Zhai, Xuechao

    2013-03-01

    We study the gate-voltage modulated electronic properties of hexagonal boron-nitride bilayers with two different stacking structures in the presence of intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions. Our analytical results show that there are striking cooperation effects arising from the spin-orbit interactions and the interlayer bias voltage. For realizing topological phase transition, in contrast to a gated graphene bilayer for increasing its energy gap, the energy gap of a boron-nitride bilayer is significantly reduced by an applied gate voltage. For the AA stacking-bilayer which has the inversion symmetry, a strong topological phase is found, and there is an interesting reentrant behavior from a normal phase to a topological phase and then to a normal phase again, characterized by the topological index. Therefore, the gate voltage modulated AA-boron nitride bilayer can be taken as a newcomer of the topological insulator family. For the AB stacking-bilayer which is lack of the inversion symmetry, it is always topologically trivial, but exhibits an unusual quantum Hall phase with four degenerate low-energy states localized at a single edge. It is suggested that these theoretical findings could be verified experimentally in the transport properties of boron-nitride bylayers. This research was supported by the NSFC (Nos. 60876065, 11074108), PAPD, and NBRPC (Nos. 2009CB929504, 2011CB922102).

  2. L-type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Conditioned Fear: A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Sze, Wilson; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological approaches, others have suggested that L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) mediate both consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. In the absence of L-VGCC isoform-specific antagonists, we have begun to investigate the subtype-specific role of LVGCCs in consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear…

  3. [Progress in sodium channelopathies and biological functions of voltage-gated sodium channel blockers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Gou, Meng; Xiao, Rong; Li, Qingwei

    2014-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), which are widely distributed in the excitable cells, are the primary mediators of electrical signal amplification and propagation. They play important roles in the excitative conduction of the neurons and cardiac muscle cells. The abnormalities of the structures and functions of VGSCs can change the excitability of the cells, resulting in a variety of diseases such as neuropathic pain, epilepsy and arrhythmia. At present, some voltage-gated sodium channel blockers are used for treating those diseases. In the recent years, several neurotoxins have been purified from the venom of the animals, which could inhibit the current of the voltage-gated sodium channels. Usually, these neurotoxins are compounds or small peptides that have been further designed and modified for targeted drugs of sodium channelopathies in the clinical treatment. In addition, a novel cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRBGP) has been isolated and purified from the buccal gland of the lampreys (Lampetra japonica), and it could inhibit the Na+ current of the hippocampus and dorsal root neurons for the first time. In the present study, the progress of the sodium channelopathies and the biological functions of voltage-gated sodium channel blockers are analyzed and summarized.

  4. Self-assembled nanodielectrics and silicon nanomembranes for low voltage, flexible transistors, and logic gates on plastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoon-Sik; Won, Sang Min; Ha, Young-Geun; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J.; Rogers, John A.

    2009-11-01

    This letter reports the fabrication and electrical characterization of mechanically flexible and low operating voltage transistors and logic gates (NOT, NAND, and NOR gates) using printed silicon nanomembranes and self-assembled nanodielectrics on thin plastic substrates. The transistors exhibit effective linear mobilities of ˜680 cm2/V s, on/off ratios >107, gate leakage current densities <2.8×10-7 A/cm2, and subthreshold slopes ˜120 mV/decade. The inverters show voltage gains as high as 4.8. Simple digital logic gates (NAND and NOR gates) demonstrate the possible application of this materials combination in digital integrated circuits.

  5. Quasi-3D modeling of surface potential and threshold voltage of Triple Metal Quadruple Gate MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Shah, Mihir Kumar P.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present electrostatic model of 3D Triple Metal Quadruple Gate (TMQG) MOSFET of rectangular cross-section based on quasi-3D method. The analytical equations for channel potential and characteristic length have been derived by decomposing TMQG into two 2D perpendicular cross-sections (triple metal double gate, TMDG) and the effective characteristic length of TMQG is found using equivalent number of gates (ENG) method. For each of the TMDG, 2D Poisson's equation is solved by parabolic approximation and proper boundary conditions to calculate channel potential. The threshold voltage expression is developed using inversion carrier charge sheet density method. The developed models for channel potential and threshold voltage are validated using numerical simulations of TMQG. The developed model provides the design guidelines for TMQG with improved HCEs and SCEs.

  6. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lazcano-Pérez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7, voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2, the A-type transient outward (IA and delayed rectifier (IDR currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels.

  7. Characterization of voltage-gated ionic currents in a peripheral sensory neuron in larval Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bate Michael

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development, morphology and genetics of sensory neurons have been extensively studied in Drosophila. Sensory neurons in the body wall of larval Drosophila in particular have been the subject of numerous anatomical studies, however, little is known about the intrinsic electrical properties of larval sensory cells. Findings We performed whole cell patch recordings from an identified peripheral sensory cell, the dorsal bipolar sensory neuron (dbd and measured voltage-gated ionic currents in 1st instar larvae. Voltage clamp analysis revealed that dbds have a TEA sensitive, non-inactivating IK type potassium current as well as a 4-AP sensitive, inactivating IA type potassium current. dbds also show a voltage-gated calcium current (ICa and a voltage-gated sodium current (INa. Conclusions This work provides a first characterization of voltage-activated ionic currents in an identified body-wall sensory neuron in larval Drosophila. Overall, we establish baseline physiology data for future studies aimed at understanding the ionic and genetic basis of sensory neuron function in fruit flies and other model organisms.

  8. New Role of P/Q-type Voltage-gated Calcium Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the depolarization-evoked contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), with L-type channels being the classical channel involved in this mechanism. However, it has been demonstrated that the CaV2.1 subunit, which encodes a neuronal isoform...... of the voltage-gated calcium channels (P/Q-type), is also expressed and contributes functionally to contraction of renal blood vessels in both mice and humans. Furthermore, preglomerular vascular SMCs and aortic SMCs coexpress L-, P-, and Q-type calcium channels within the same cell. Calcium channel blockers...... are widely used as pharmacological treatments. However, calcium channel antagonists vary in their selectivity for the various calcium channel subtypes, and the functional contribution from P/Q-type channels as compared with L-type should be considered. Confirming the presence of P/Q-type voltage...

  9. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Alan Zaydman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD and pore-gate (PGD structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7 channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1 channels. In this review, we put these findings in the context of the current understanding of voltage-dependent gating, lipid modulation of Kv channel activation, and PIP2-regulation of KCNQ channels. We suggest that lipid-mediated coupling of functional domains is a common mechanism among KCNQ channels that may be applicable to other Kv channels and membrane proteins.

  10. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD) and pore-gate (PGD) structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7) channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1 channels. In this review, we put these findings in the context of the current understanding of voltage-dependent gating, lipid modulation of Kv channel activation, and PIP2-regulation of KCNQ channels. We suggest that lipid-mediated coupling of functional domains is a common mechanism among KCNQ channels that may be applicable to other Kv channels and membrane proteins.

  11. Effect of Grain Size on the Threshold Voltage for Double-Gate Polycrystaline Silicon MOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Panwar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of grain size (D on the threshold voltage (Vth for double gate polycrystalline silicon MOSFET is investigated theoretically in terms of grain boundary trap states (NT. It is found that the threshold voltage (Vth increases non-linearly with increasing silicon-oxide thickness (tox for all values of grain size (D. However the threshold voltage is seen to have smaller values for same tox for the larger grains. This may be attributed to the reduction in the number of trap states in the depletion regions on either side of a grain boundary. Finally the dependence of threshold voltage (Vth on various parameters such as the doping concentration, interface trap state density and field penetration from drain to source are explored out. The results of these findings are in good agreement with those available in the literature. For large grain poly silicon MOSFET the threshold voltage is seen to approach the single crystal value.

  12. The precision of respiratory-gated delivery of synchrotron-based pulsed beam proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunashima, Yoshikazu; Vedam, Sastry; Dong Lei; Balter, Peter; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Umezawa, Masumi, E-mail: ytsunash@mdanderson.or [Accelerator System Group Medical System Project, Hitachi, Ltd, Energy and Environmental Systems Laboratory, 2-1, Omika-cho 7-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan)

    2010-12-21

    A synchrotron-based proton therapy system operates in a low repetition rate pulsed beam delivery mode. Unlike cyclotron-based beam delivery, there is no guarantee that a synchrotron beam can be delivered effectively or precisely under the respiratory-gated mode. To evaluate the performance of gated synchrotron treatment, we simulated proton beam delivery in the synchrotron-based respiratory-gated mode using realistic patient breathing signals. Parameters used in the simulation were respiratory motion traces (70 traces from 24 patients), respiratory gate levels (10%, 20% and 30% duty cycles at the exhalation phase) and synchrotron magnet excitation cycles (T{sub cyc}) (fixed T{sub cyc} mode: 2.7, 3.0-6.0 s and each patient breathing cycle, and variable T{sub cyc} mode). The simulations were computed according to the breathing trace in which the proton beams were delivered. In the shorter fixed T{sub cyc} (<4 s), most of the proton beams were delivered uniformly to the target during the entire expiration phase of the respiratory cycle. In the longer fixed T{sub cyc} (>4 s) and the variable T{sub cyc} mode, the proton beams were not consistently delivered during the end-expiration phase of the respiratory cycle. However we found that the longer and variable T{sub cyc} operation modes delivered proton beams more precisely during irregular breathing.

  13. Voltage-gated calcium channels and their auxiliary subunits: physiology and pathophysiology and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-10-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are essential players in many physiological processes in excitable cells. There are three main subdivisions of calcium channel, defined by the pore-forming α1 subunit, the CaV 1, CaV 2 and CaV 3 channels. For all the subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel, their gating properties are key for the precise control of neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction and cell excitability, among many other processes. For the CaV 1 and CaV 2 channels, their ability to reach their required destinations in the cell membrane, their activation and the fine tuning of their biophysical properties are all dramatically influenced by the auxiliary subunits that associate with them. Furthermore, there are many diseases, both genetic and acquired, involving voltage-gated calcium channels. This review will provide a general introduction and then concentrate particularly on the role of auxiliary α2 δ subunits in both physiological and pathological processes involving calcium channels, and as a therapeutic target.

  14. Charged Residues at the First Transmembrane Region Contribute to the Voltage Dependence of the Slow Gate of Connexins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Bernardo I; García, Isaac E; Pupo, Amaury; Retamal, Mauricio A; Martínez, Agustín D; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2016-07-22

    Connexins (Cxs) are a family of membrane-spanning proteins that form gap junction channels and hemichannels. Connexin-based channels exhibit two distinct voltage-dependent gating mechanisms termed slow and fast gating. Residues located at the C terminus of the first transmembrane segment (TM-1) are important structural components of the slow gate. Here, we determined the role of the charged residues at the end of TM-1 in voltage sensing in Cx26, Cx46, and Cx50. Conductance/voltage curves obtained from tail currents together with kinetics analysis reveal that the fast and slow gates of Cx26 involves the movement of two and four charges across the electric field, respectively. Primary sequence alignment of different Cxs shows the presence of well conserved glutamate residues in the C terminus of TM-1; only Cx26 contains a lysine in that position (lysine 41). Neutralization of lysine 41 in Cx26 increases the voltage dependence of the slow gate. Swapping of lysine 41 with glutamate 42 maintains the voltage dependence. In Cx46, neutralization of negative charges or addition of a positive charge in the Cx26 equivalent region reduced the slow gate voltage dependence. In Cx50, the addition of a glutamate in the same region decreased the voltage dependence, and the neutralization of a negative charge increased it. These results indicate that the charges at the end of TM-1 are part of the slow gate voltage sensor in Cxs. The fact that Cx42, which has no charge in this region, still presents voltage-dependent slow gating suggests that charges still unidentified also contribute to the slow gate voltage sensitivity.

  15. Low-Voltage Ultra-Low-Power Current Conveyor Based on Quasi-Floating Gate Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Khateb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The field of low-voltage low-power CMOS technology has grown rapidly in recent years; it is an essential prerequisite particularly for portable electronic equipment and implantable medical devices due to its influence on battery lifetime. Recently, significant improvements in implementing circuits working in the low-voltage low-power area have been achieved, but circuit designers face severe challenges when trying to improve or even maintain the circuit performance with reduced supply voltage. In this paper, a low-voltage ultra-low-power current conveyor second generation CCII based on quasi-floating gate transistors is presented. The proposed circuit operates at a very low supply voltage of only ±0.4 V with rail-to-rail voltage swing capability and a total quiescent power consumption of mere 9.5 µW. Further, the proposed circuit is not only able to process the AC signal as it's usual at quasi-floating gate transistors but also the DC which extends the applicability of the proposed circuit. In conclusion, an application example of the current-mode quadrature oscillator is presented. PSpice simulation results using the 0.18 µm TSMC CMOS technology are included to confirm the attractive properties of the proposed circuit.

  16. MoS{sub 2} oxygen sensor with gate voltage stress induced performance enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yu; Lin, Zhenhua; Thong, John T. L.; Chan, Daniel S. H.; Zhu, Chunxiang, E-mail: elezhucx@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2015-09-21

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have recently attracted wide attention and rapidly established themselves in various applications. In particular, 2D materials are regarded as promising building blocks for gas sensors due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, ease in miniaturization, and flexibility in enabling wearable electronics. Compared with other 2D materials, MoS{sub 2} is particularly intriguing because it has been widely researched and exhibits semiconducting behavior. Here, we have fabricated MoS{sub 2} resistor based O{sub 2} sensors with a back gate configuration on a 285 nm SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The effects of applying back gate voltage stress on O{sub 2} sensing performance have been systematically investigated. With a positive gate voltage stress, the sensor response improves and the response is improved to 29.2% at O{sub 2} partial pressure of 9.9 × 10{sup −5} millibars with a +40 V back-gate bias compared to 21.2% at O{sub 2} partial pressure of 1.4 × 10{sup −4} millibars without back-gate bias; while under a negative gate voltage stress of −40 V, a fast and full recovery can be achieved at room temperature. In addition, a method in determining O{sub 2} partial pressure with a detectability as low as 6.7 × 10{sup −7} millibars at a constant vacuum pressure is presented and its potential as a vacuum gauge is briefly discussed.

  17. Photocontrol of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Azobenzene Trimethylammonium Bromide in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheyda R Frolova

    Full Text Available The ability of azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB to sensitize cardiac tissue excitability to light was recently reported. The dark, thermally relaxed trans- isomer of azoTAB suppressed spontaneous activity and excitation propagation speed, whereas the cis- isomer had no detectable effect on the electrical properties of cardiomyocyte monolayers. As the membrane potential of cardiac cells is mainly controlled by activity of voltage-gated ion channels, this study examined whether the sensitization effect of azoTAB was exerted primarily via the modulation of voltage-gated ion channel activity. The effects of trans- and cis- isomers of azoTAB on voltage-dependent sodium (INav, calcium (ICav, and potassium (IKv currents in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The experiments showed that azoTAB modulated ion currents, causing suppression of sodium (Na+ and calcium (Ca2+ currents and potentiation of net potassium (K+ currents. This finding confirms that azoTAB-effect on cardiac tissue excitability do indeed result from modulation of voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential.

  18. Organic/inorganic hybrid synaptic transistors gated by proton conducting methylcellulose films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Wan, Qing, E-mail: wanqing@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: yshi@nju.edu.cn [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhu, Li Qiang [Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Wan, Xiang; Shi, Yi, E-mail: wanqing@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: yshi@nju.edu.cn [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-01-25

    The idea of building a brain-inspired cognitive system has been around for several decades. Recently, electric-double-layer transistors gated by ion conducting electrolytes were reported as the promising candidates for synaptic electronics and neuromorphic system. In this letter, indium-zinc-oxide transistors gated by proton conducting methylcellulose electrolyte films were experimentally demonstrated with synaptic plasticity including paired-pulse facilitation and spatiotemporal-correlated dynamic logic. More importantly, a model based on proton-related electric-double-layer modulation and stretched-exponential decay function was proposed, and the theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimentally measured synaptic behaviors.

  19. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i...... releases CGRP, and the release is regulated by Ca2+ ions and voltage-gated calcium channels.......Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons...

  20. Membrane voltage modulates the GABA(A) receptor gating in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-02-01

    The kinetics of GABAergic currents in neurons is known to be modulated by the membrane voltage but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully explored. In particular, the impact of membrane potential on the GABA(A) receptor gating has not been elucidated. In the present study, the effect of membrane voltage on current responses elicited by ultrafast GABA applications was studied in cultured hippocampal neurons. The current to voltage relationship (I-V) for responses to saturating [GABA] (10 mM) showed an inward rectification (slope conductance at positive voltages was 0.62 +/- 0.05 of that at negative potentials). On the contrary, I-V for currents evoked by low [GABA] (1 microM) showed an outward rectification. The onset of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] was significantly accelerated at positive potentials. Analysis of currents evoked by prolonged applications of saturating [GABA] revealed that positive voltages significantly increased the rate and extent of desensitization. The onsets of current responses to non-saturating [GABA] were significantly accelerated at positive voltages indicating an enhancement of the binding rate. However, at low [GABA] at which the onset rate is expected to approach an asymptote set by opening/closing and unbinding rates, no significant modification of current onset by voltage was observed. Quantitative analysis based on model simulations indicated that the major effect of membrane depolarization was to increase the rates of binding, desensitization and of opening as well as to slightly reduce the rate of exit from desensitization. In conclusion, we provide evidence that membrane voltage affects the GABA(A) receptor microscopic gating.

  1. Comprehensive behavioral model of dual-gate high voltage JFET and pinch resistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banáš, Stanislav; Paňko, Václav; Dobeš, Josef; Hanyš, Petr; Divín, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Many analog technologies operate in large voltage range and therefore include at least one or more high voltage devices built from low doped layers. Such devices exhibit effects not covered by standard compact models, namely pinching (depletion) effects, in high voltage FETs often called quasisaturation. For example, the conventional compact JFET model is insufficient and oversimplified. Its scalability is controlled by the area factor, which only multiplies currents and capacitances but does not take into account existing 3-D effects. Also the optional second independent gate is missing. Therefore, the customized four terminal (4T) model written in Verilog-A (FitzPatrick and Miller, 2007; Sagdeo, 2007) was developed. It converges very well, its simulation speed is comparable with conventional compact models, and contains all required phenomena, including parasitic effects as, for example, impact ionization. This model has universal usage for many types of devices in various high voltage technologies such as stand-alone voltage dependent resistor, pinch resistor, drift area of power FET, part of special high side or start-up devices, and dual-gate JFET.

  2. Scorpion beta-toxins and voltage-gated sodium channels: interactions and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza Escalona, Martha; Possani, Lourival D

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion beta-toxins (beta-ScTxs) modify the activity of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels, thereby producing neurotoxic effects in diverse organisms. For this reason, beta-ScTxs are essential tools not only for discriminating among different channel sub-types but also for studying the mechanisms of channel gating and the structure-function relationship involved in this process. This review considers both the structural and the functional implications of the beta-ScTxs after they bind to their receptor sites, in accord with their classification into a) anti-mammalian beta-ScTxs, b) anti-insect selective excitatory beta-ScTxs, c) anti-insect selective depressant beta-ScTxs and d) beta-ScTxs active on both insect and mammals Nav channels. Additionally, the molecular mechanism of toxin action by the "voltage sensor trapping" model is discussed, and the systemic effects produced by these toxins are reviewed.

  3. Modeling of a Silicon Nanowire pH Sensor with Nanoscale Side Gate Voltage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alireza Kargar

    2009-01-01

    A silicon nanowire (Si-NW) sensor for pH detection is presented.The conductance of the device is analytically obtained,demonstrating that the conductance increases with decreasing oxide thickness.To calculate the electrical conductance of the sensor,the diffusion-drift model and nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation are applied.To improve the conductance and sensitivity,a Si-NW sensor with nanoscale side gate voltage is offered and its characteristics are theoretically achieved.It is revealed that the conductance and sensor sensitivity can be enhanced by adding appropriate side gate voltages.This effect is compared to a similar fabricated structure in the literature,which has a wire with a rectangular cross section.Finally,the effect of NW length on sensor performance is investigated and an inverse relation between sensor sensitivity and NW length is achieved.

  4. New analytical threshold voltage model for halo-doped cylindrical surrounding-gate MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Cong; Zhuang Yiqi; Han Ru, E-mail: cong.li@mail.xidan.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices of Ministry of Education, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Using an exact solution of two-dimensional Poisson's equation in cylindrical coordinates, a new analytical model comprising electrostatic potential, electric field, threshold voltage and subthreshold current for halo-doped surrounding-gate MOSFETs is developed. It is found that a new analytical model exhibits higher accuracy than that based on parabolic potential approximation when the thickness of the silicon channel is much larger than that of the oxide. It is also revealed that moderate halo doping concentration, thin gate oxide thickness and small silicon channel radius are needed to improve the threshold voltage characteristics. The derived analytical model agrees well with a three-dimensional numerical device simulator ISE. (semiconductor devices)

  5. A Low Phase Noise CMOS Quadrature Voltage Control Oscillator Using Clock Gated Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothi Baskar A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This project presents the low phase noise cmos quadrature voltage control oscillator using clock gating technique. Here the colpitts vco is used to split the capacitance in the Qvco circuit producing quadrature output. The startup condition in the oscillator is improved by using enhancement [12].This QVCO performs the operation anti phase injection locking fordevice reuse [8]. The new clock gating technique is used to reduce the power with thepower supply 1.5v. The QVCO uses a 0.5mwith phase error of 0.4 and exhibits a phase noise of -118dBc/HZ at 1MHZ offset at the centre frequency of 500MHZ. Index terms: current switching, clock gating, phase noise, Qvco

  6. The hitchhiker's guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Christopher A; Payandeh, Jian; Bosmans, Frank; Chanda, Baron

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure-function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na(+) selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts.

  7. Manipulative Properties of Asymmetric Double Quantum Dots via Laser and Gate Voltage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shun-Cai; LIU Zheng-Dong

    2009-01-01

    We present a density matrix approach for the theoretical description of an asymmetric double quantum dot (QD) system. The results show that the properties of gain, absorption and dispersion of the double QD system, the population of the state with one hole in one dot and an electron in another dot transferred by tunneling can be manipulated by a laser pulse or gate voltage. Our scheme may demonstrate the possibility of electro-optical manipulation of quantum systems.

  8. The Structural Basis and Functional Consequences of Interactions Between Tetrodotoxin and Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ruben

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a highly specific blocker of voltage-gated sodium channels. The dissociation constant of block varies with different channel isoforms. Until recently, channel resistance was thought to be primarily imparted by amino acid substitutions at a single position in domain I. Recent work reveals a novel site for tetrodotoxin resistance in the P-region of domain IV.

  9. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC with cerebellar involvement in a teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Langille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  10. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) with cerebellar involvement in a teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Megan M; Desai, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  11. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue.

  12. Non-silent story on synonymous sites in voltage-gated ion channel genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Ko, Eun A; Gu, Wanjun; Lim, Inja; Bang, Hyoweon; Ko, Jae-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Synonymous mutations are usually referred to as "silent", but increasing evidence shows that they are not neutral in a wide range of organisms. We looked into the relationship between synonymous codon usage bias and residue importance of voltage-gated ion channel proteins in mice, rats, and humans. We tested whether translationally optimal codons are associated with transmembrane or channel-forming regions, i.e., the sites that are particularly likely to be involved in the closing and opening of an ion channel. Our hypothesis is that translationally optimal codons are preferred at the sites within transmembrane domains or channel-forming regions in voltage-gated ion channel genes to avoid mistranslation-induced protein misfolding or loss-of-function. Using the Mantel-Haenszel procedure, which applies to categorical data, we found that translationally optimal codons are more likely to be used at transmembrane residues and the residues involved in channel-forming. We also found that the conservation level at synonymous sites in the transmembrane region is significantly higher than that in the non-transmembrane region. This study provides evidence that synonymous sites in voltage-gated ion channel genes are not neutral. Silent mutations at channel-related sites may lead to dysfunction of the ion channel.

  13. Non-silent story on synonymous sites in voltage-gated ion channel genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available Synonymous mutations are usually referred to as "silent", but increasing evidence shows that they are not neutral in a wide range of organisms. We looked into the relationship between synonymous codon usage bias and residue importance of voltage-gated ion channel proteins in mice, rats, and humans. We tested whether translationally optimal codons are associated with transmembrane or channel-forming regions, i.e., the sites that are particularly likely to be involved in the closing and opening of an ion channel. Our hypothesis is that translationally optimal codons are preferred at the sites within transmembrane domains or channel-forming regions in voltage-gated ion channel genes to avoid mistranslation-induced protein misfolding or loss-of-function. Using the Mantel-Haenszel procedure, which applies to categorical data, we found that translationally optimal codons are more likely to be used at transmembrane residues and the residues involved in channel-forming. We also found that the conservation level at synonymous sites in the transmembrane region is significantly higher than that in the non-transmembrane region. This study provides evidence that synonymous sites in voltage-gated ion channel genes are not neutral. Silent mutations at channel-related sites may lead to dysfunction of the ion channel.

  14. Ephaptic coupling rescues conduction failure in weakly coupled cardiac tissue with voltage-gated gap junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    Electrical conduction in cardiac tissue is usually considered to be primarily facilitated by gap junctions, providing a pathway between the intracellular spaces of neighboring cells. However, recent studies have highlighted the role of coupling via extracellular electric fields, also known as ephaptic coupling, particularly in the setting of reduced gap junction expression. Further, in the setting of reduced gap junctional coupling, voltage-dependent gating of gap junctions, an oft-neglected biophysical property in computational studies, produces a positive feedback that promotes conduction failure. We hypothesized that ephaptic coupling can break the positive feedback loop and rescue conduction failure in weakly coupled cardiac tissue. In a computational tissue model incorporating voltage-gated gap junctions and ephaptic coupling, we demonstrate that ephaptic coupling can rescue conduction failure in weakly coupled tissue. Further, ephaptic coupling increased conduction velocity in weakly coupled tissue, and importantly, reduced the minimum gap junctional coupling necessary for conduction, most prominently at fast pacing rates. Finally, we find that, although neglecting gap junction voltage-gating results in negligible differences in well coupled tissue, more significant differences occur in weakly coupled tissue, greatly underestimating the minimal gap junctional coupling that can maintain conduction. Our study suggests that ephaptic coupling plays a conduction-preserving role, particularly at rapid heart rates.

  15. Eye tracking and gating system for proton therapy of orbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dongho; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Gyeonggi 463-712 (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiological Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: A new motion-based gated proton therapy for the treatment of orbital tumors using real-time eye-tracking system was designed and evaluated. Methods: We developed our system by image-pattern matching, using a normalized cross-correlation technique with LabVIEW 8.6 and Vision Assistant 8.6 (National Instruments, Austin, TX). To measure the pixel spacing of an image consistently, four different calibration modes such as the point-detection, the edge-detection, the line-measurement, and the manual measurement mode were suggested and used. After these methods were applied to proton therapy, gating was performed, and radiation dose distributions were evaluated. Results: Moving phantom verification measurements resulted in errors of less than 0.1 mm for given ranges of translation. Dosimetric evaluation of the beam-gating system versus nongated treatment delivery with a moving phantom shows that while there was only 0.83 mm growth in lateral penumbra for gated radiotherapy, there was 4.95 mm growth in lateral penumbra in case of nongated exposure. The analysis from clinical results suggests that the average of eye movements depends distinctively on each patient by showing 0.44 mm, 0.45 mm, and 0.86 mm for three patients, respectively. Conclusions: The developed automatic eye-tracking based beam-gating system enabled us to perform high-precision proton radiotherapy of orbital tumors.

  16. Whole-cell recordings of voltage-gated Calcium, Potassium and Sodium currents in acutely isolated hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuyun Huang; Qing Cai; Weitian Liu; Xiaoling Wang; Tao Wang

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To record Calcium, Potassium and Sodium currents in acutely isolated hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Methods:Hip-pocampal CA3 neurons were freshly isolated by 1 mg protease/3 ml SES and mechanical trituration with polished pipettes of progressively smaller tip diameters. Patch clamp technique in whole-cell mode was employed to record voltage-gated channel currents. Results:The procedure dissociated hippocampal neurons, preserving apical dendrites and several basal dendrites, without impairing the electrical characteristics of the neurons. Whole-cell patch clamp configuration was successfully used to record voltage-gated Ca2+ currents, delayed rectifier K+ current and voltage-gated Na+ currents. Conclusion:Protease combined with mechanical trituration may be used for the dissociation of neurons from rat hippocampus. Voltage-gated channels currents could be recorded using a patch clamp technique.

  17. A molecular mechanism for proton-dependent gating in KcsA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, Luis G; Cortes, D Marien; Jogini, Vishwanath; Sompornpisut, Amornrat; Perozo, Eduardo

    2010-03-19

    Activation gating in KcsA is elicited by changes in intracellular proton concentration. Thompson et al. identified a charge cluster around the inner gate that plays a key role in defining proton activation in KcsA. Here, through functional and spectroscopic approaches, we confirmed the role of this charge cluster and now provide a mechanism of pH-dependent gating. Channel opening is driven by a set of electrostatic interactions that include R117, E120 and E118 at the bottom of TM2 and H25 at the end of TM1. We propose that electrostatic compensation in this charge cluster stabilizes the closed conformation at neutral pH and that its disruption at low pH facilitates the transition to the open conformation by means of helix-helix repulsion. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonequilibrium response of a voltage gated sodium ion channel and biophysical characterization of dynamic hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Krishnendu; Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2017-02-21

    Here we have studied the dynamic as well as the non-equilibrium thermodynamic response properties of voltage-gated Na-ion channel. Using sinusoidally oscillating external voltage protocol we have both kinetically and energetically studied the non-equilibrium steady state properties of dynamic hysteresis in details. We have introduced a method of estimating the work done associated with the dynamic memory due to a cycle of oscillating voltage. We have quantitatively characterised the loop area of ionic current which gives information about the work done to sustain the dynamic memory only for ion conduction, while the loop area of total entropy production rate gives the estimate of work done for overall gating dynamics. The maximum dynamic memory of Na-channel not only depends on the frequency and amplitude but it also depends sensitively on the mean of the oscillating voltage and here we have shown how the system optimize the dynamic memory itself in the biophysical range of field parameters. The relation between the average ionic current with increasing frequency corresponds to the nature of the average dissipative work done at steady state. It is also important to understand that the utilization of the energy from the external field can not be directly obtained only from the measurement of ionic current but also requires nonequilibrium thermodynamic study.

  19. PROPERTIES OF VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNELS IN DEVELOPING AUDITORY NEURONS OF THE MOUSE IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na+) channels in developing auditoryneurons during early postnatal stages in the mammalian central nervous system.Methods. Using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique, we have studied changes in the electrophysi-ological properties of Na+ channels in the principal neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB).Results. We found that MNTB neurons already express functional Na+ channels at postnatal day 1 (P1),and that channel density begins to increase at P5 when the neurons receive synaptic innervation andreach its maximum (~3 fold) at P11 when functional hearing onsets. These changes were paralleled byan age-dependent acceleration in both inactivation and recovery from inactivation. In contrast, there wasvery little alteration in the voltage-dependence of inactivation.Conclusion. These profound changes in the properties of voltage-gated Na+ channels may increase theexcitability of MNTB neurons and enhance their phase-locking fidelity and capacity during high-frequencysynaptic transmission.

  20. State-dependent FRET reports calcium- and voltage-dependent gating-ring motions in BK channels

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Pablo; Contreras, Jorge E.; Plested, Andrew J. R.; Sigworth, Fred J.; Holmgren, Miguel; Giraldez, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium channels (BK, “Big K+”) are important controllers of cell excitability. In the BK channel, a large C-terminal intracellular region containing a “gating-ring” structure has been proposed to transduce Ca2+ binding into channel opening. Using patch-clamp fluorometry, we have investigated the calcium and voltage dependence of conformational changes of the gating-ring region of BK channels, while simultaneously monitoring channel conductan...

  1. Analytical modeling of threshold voltage for Cylindrical Gate All Around (CGAA MOSFET using center potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P. Pradhan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analytical threshold voltage model is proposed for a cylindrical gate-all-around (CGAA MOSFET by solving the 2-D Poisson’s equation in the cylindrical coordinate system. A comparison is made for both the center and the surface potential model of CGAA MOSFET. This paper claims that the calculation of threshold voltage using center potential is more accurate rather than the calculation from surface potential. The effects of the device parameters like the drain bias (VDS, oxide thickness (tox, channel thickness (r, etc., on the threshold voltage are also studied in this paper. The model is verified with 3D numerical device simulator Sentaurus from Synopsys Inc.

  2. The voltage dependence of GABAA receptor gating depends on extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2005-11-28

    Recent studies have indicated that changes in extracellular pH and in membrane voltage affect the gamma-amino-n-butyric acid type A receptor gating mainly by altering desensitization and binding. To test whether the effects of membrane potential and pH are additive, their combined actions were investigated. By analyzing the current responses to rapid gamma-amino-n-butyric acid applications, we found that the current to voltage relationship was close to linear at acid pH but the increasing pH induced an inward rectification. Desensitization was enhanced at depolarizing potentials, but this strongly depended on pH, being weak at acidic and strong at basic pH values. A similar trend was observed for the onset rate of responses to saturating gamma-amino-n-butyric acid concentration. These data provide evidence that the voltage sensitivity of GABAA receptors depends on extracellular pH.

  3. The voltage dependence of GABAA receptor gating depends on extracellular pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that changes in extracellular pH and in membrane voltage affect the γ-amino-n-butyric acid type A receptor gating mainly by altering desensitization and binding. To test whether the effects of membrane potential and pH are additive, their combined actions were investigated. By analyzing the current responses to rapid γ-amino-n-butyric acid applications, we found that the current to voltage relationship was close to linear at acid pH but the increasing pH induced an inward rectification. Desensitization was enhanced at depolarizing potentials, but this strongly depended on pH, being weak at acidic and strong at basic pH values. A similar trend was observed for the onset rate of responses to saturating γ-amino-n-butyric acid concentration. These data provide evidence that the voltage sensitivity of GABAA receptors depends on extracellular pH. PMID:16272885

  4. A dual VCDL DLL based gate driver for zero-voltage-switching DC-DC converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tian; Xiangxin, Liu; Wenhong, Li

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a dual voltage-controlled-delay-line (VCDL) delay-lock-loop (DLL) based gate driver for a zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) DC-DC converter. Using the delay difference of two VCDLs for the dead time control, the dual VCDL DLL is able to implement ZVS control with high accuracy while keeping good linearity performance of the DLL and low power consumption. The design is implemented in the CSM 2P4M 0.35 μm CMOS process. The measurement results indicate that an efficiency improvement of 2%-4% is achieved over the load current range from 100 to 600 mA at 4 MHz switching frequency with 3.3 V input and 1.3 V output voltage.

  5. A dual VCDL DLL based gate driver for zero-voltage-switching DC-DC converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Xin; Liu Xiangxin; Li Wenhong, E-mail: wenhongli@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents a dual voltage-controlled-delay-line (VCDL) delay-lock-loop (DLL) based gate driver for a zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) DC-DC converter. Using the delay difference of two VCDLs for the dead time control, the dual VCDL DLL is able to implement ZVS control with high accuracy while keeping good linearity performance of the DLL and low power consumption. The design is implemented in the CSM 2P4M 0.35 {mu}m CMOS process. The measurement results indicate that an efficiency improvement of 2%-4% is achieved over the load current range from 100 to 600 mA at 4 MHz switching frequency with 3.3 V input and 1.3 V output voltage.

  6. Uncoupling charge movement from channel opening in voltage-gated potassium channels by ruthenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Ishida, Itzel G; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E; Espinosa-Jalapa, Noel; Pérez-Guzmán, José A; Elías-Viñas, David; Le Lagadec, Ronan; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D

    2011-05-06

    The Kv2.1 channel generates a delayed-rectifier current in neurons and is responsible for modulation of neuronal spike frequency and membrane repolarization in pancreatic β-cells and cardiomyocytes. As with other tetrameric voltage-activated K(+)-channels, it has been proposed that each of the four Kv2.1 voltage-sensing domains activates independently upon depolarization, leading to a final concerted transition that causes channel opening. The mechanism by which voltage-sensor activation is coupled to the gating of the pore is still not understood. Here we show that the carbon-monoxide releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) is an allosteric inhibitor of the Kv2.1 channel and that its inhibitory properties derive from the CORM-2 ability to largely reduce the voltage dependence of the opening transition, uncoupling voltage-sensor activation from the concerted opening transition. We additionally demonstrate that CORM-2 modulates Shaker K(+)-channels in a similar manner. Our data suggest that the mechanism of inhibition by CORM-2 may be common to voltage-activated channels and that this compound should be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of electromechanical coupling.

  7. Bottom-series coupled quadrature VCO using the inductive gate voltage boosting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sheng-Lyang; Chou, Li-Te

    2013-09-01

    This article presents a new low-voltage bottom-series coupled quadrature voltage-controlled oscillator (QVCO), which consists of two n-core cross-coupled VCOs with the bottom-series coupling transistors. The low-voltage operation is obtained via an inductive gate voltage boosting technique. The proposed CMOS QVCO has been implemented with the TSMC 0.18 µm CMOS technology and the die area is 0.897 × 0.767 mm2. At the supply voltage of 0.7 V, the total power consumption is 1.5 mW. The free-running frequency of the QVCO is tuneable from 3.77 to 4.12 GHz as the tuning voltage is varied from 0.0 to 0.7 V. The measured phase noise at 1 MHz frequency offset is -123.35 dBc/Hz at the oscillation frequency of 4.12 GHz and the figure of merit of the proposed QVCO is -193.5 dBc/Hz.

  8. Gate-voltage control of spin interactions between electrons and nuclei in a semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, J. H.; Deutschmann, R. A.; Ertl, F.; Wegscheider, W.; Abstreiter, G.; von Klitzing, K.

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductors are ubiquitous in device electronics, because their charge distributions can be conveniently manipulated with applied voltages to perform logic operations. Achieving a similar level of control over the spin degrees of freedom, either from electrons or nuclei, could provide intriguing prospects for information processing and fundamental solid-state physics issues. Here, we report procedures that carry out the controlled transfer of spin angular momentum between electrons-confined to two dimensions and subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field-and the nuclei of the host semiconductor, using gate voltages only. We show that the spin transfer rate can be enhanced near a ferromagnetic ground state of the electron system, and that the induced nuclear spin polarization can be subsequently stored and ‘read-out’. These techniques can also be combined into a spectroscopic tool to detect the low-energy collective excitations in the electron system that promote the spin transfer. The existence of such excitations is contingent on appropriate electron-electron correlations, and these can be tuned by changing, for example, the electron density via a gate voltage.

  9. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (KV channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD, the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins.

  10. Emerging roles of L-type voltage gated and other calcium channels in T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah eBadou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In T lymphocytes, calcium ion controls a variety of biological processes including development, survival, proliferation, and effector functions. These distinct and specific roles are regulated by different calcium signals, which are generated by various plasma membrane calcium channels. The repertoire of calcium-conducting proteins in T lymphocytes includes store-operated CRAC channels, transient receptor potential (TRP channels, P2X channels, and L-type voltage-gated calcium (Cav1 channels. In this paper, we will focus mainly on the role of the Cav1 channels found expressed by T lymphocytes, where these channels appear to operate in a TCR stimulation-dependent and voltage-sensor independent manner. We will review their expression profile at various differentiation stages of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. Then, we will present crucial genetic evidence in favor of a role of these Cav1 channels and related regulatory proteins in both CD4 and CD8 T cell functions such as proliferation, survival, cytokine production and cytolysis. Finally, we will provide evidence and speculate on how these voltage-gated channels might function in the T lymphocyte, a non-excitable cell.

  11. Voltage-dependent gating of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated pacemaker channels: molecular coupling between the S4-S5 and C-linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decher, Niels; Chen, Jun; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2004-04-02

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels have a transmembrane topology that is highly similar to voltage-gated K(+) channels, yet HCN channels open in response to membrane hyperpolarization instead of depolarization. The structural basis for the "inverted" voltage dependence of HCN gating and how voltage sensing by the S1-S4 domains is coupled to the opening of the intracellular gate formed by the S6 domain are unknown. Coupling could arise from interaction between specific residues or entire transmembrane domains. We previously reported that the mutation of specific residues in the S4-S5 linker of HCN2 (i.e. Tyr-331 and Arg-339) prevented normal channel closure presumably by disruption of a crucial interaction with the activation gate. Here we hypothesized that the C-linker, a carboxyl terminus segment that connects S6 to the cyclic nucleotide binding domain, interacts with specific residues of the S4-S5 linker to mediate coupling. The recently solved structure of the C-linker of HCN2 indicates that an alpha-helix (the A'-helix) is located near the end of each S6 domain, the presumed location of the activation gate. Ala-scanning mutagenesis of the end of S6 and the A'-helix identified five residues that were important for normal gating as mutations disrupted channel closure. However, partial deletion of the C-linker indicated that the presence of only two of these residues was required for normal coupling. Further mutation analyses suggested that a specific electrostatic interaction between Arg-339 of the S4-S5 linker and Asp-443 of the C-linker stabilizes the closed state and thus participates in the coupling of voltage sensing and activation gating in HCN channels.

  12. Solution processed self-assembled monolayer gate dielectrics for low-voltage organic transistors. : Section Title: Electric Phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ball, James; Wobkenberg, Paul H.; Colleaux, Florian; Kooistra, Floris B.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Low-voltage org. transistors are sought for implementation in high vol. low-power portable electronics of the future. Here we assess the suitability of three phosphonic acid based self-assembling mols. for use as ultra-thin gate dielecs. in low-voltage soln. processable org. field-effect

  13. Dynamic memory of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel: A stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Kinshuk, E-mail: kbpchem@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India)

    2015-05-14

    In this work, we have studied the stochastic response of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel to a periodic external voltage that keeps the system out-of-equilibrium. The system exhibits memory, resulting from time-dependent driving, that is reflected in terms of dynamic hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. The hysteresis loop area has a maximum at some intermediate voltage frequency and disappears in the limits of low and high frequencies. However, the (average) dissipation at long-time limit increases and finally goes to saturation with rising frequency. This raises the question: how diminishing hysteresis can be associated with growing dissipation? To answer this, we have studied the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system and analyzed different thermodynamic functions which also exhibit hysteresis. Interestingly, by applying a temporal symmetry analysis in the high-frequency limit, we have analytically shown that hysteresis in some of the periodic responses of the system does not vanish. On the contrary, the rates of free energy and internal energy change of the system as well as the rate of dissipative work done on the system show growing hysteresis with frequency. Hence, although the current-voltage hysteresis disappears in the high-frequency limit, the memory of the ion channel is manifested through its specific nonequilibrium thermodynamic responses.

  14. Tunable Radiation Response in Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Gate Dielectrics for Low-Voltage Graphene Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Heather N; Cress, Cory D; McMorrow, Julian J; Schmucker, Scott W; Sangwan, Vinod K; Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Kumar, Rajan; Puntambekar, Kanan P; Luck, Kyle A; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-03-01

    Solution-processed semiconductor and dielectric materials are attractive for future lightweight, low-voltage, flexible electronics, but their response to ionizing radiation environments is not well understood. Here, we investigate the radiation response of graphene field-effect transistors employing multilayer, solution-processed zirconia self-assembled nanodielectrics (Zr-SANDs) with ZrOx as a control. Total ionizing dose (TID) testing is carried out in situ using a vacuum ultraviolet source to a total radiant exposure (RE) of 23.1 μJ/cm(2). The data reveal competing charge density accumulation within and between the individual dielectric layers. Additional measurements of a modified Zr-SAND show that varying individual layer thicknesses within the gate dielectric tuned the TID response. This study thus establishes that the radiation response of graphene electronics can be tailored to achieve a desired radiation sensitivity by incorporating hybrid organic-inorganic gate dielectrics.

  15. Anomalous positive flatband voltage shifts in metal gate stacks containing rare-earth oxide capping layers

    KAUST Repository

    Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.

    2012-03-09

    It is shown that the well-known negative flatband voltage (VFB) shift, induced by rare-earth oxide capping in metal gate stacks, can be completely reversed in the absence of the silicon overlayer. Using TaN metal gates and Gd2O3-doped dielectric, we measure a ∼350 mV negative shift with the Si overlayer present and a ∼110 mV positive shift with the Si overlayer removed. This effect is correlated to a positive change in the average electrostatic potential at the TaN/dielectric interface which originates from an interfacial dipole. The dipole is created by the replacement of interfacial oxygen atoms in the HfO2 lattice with nitrogen atoms from TaN.

  16. Double-metal-gate nanocrystalline Si thin film transistors with flexible threshold voltage controllability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiou, Uio-Pu; Pan, Fu-Ming, E-mail: fmpan@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China); Shieh, Jia-Min, E-mail: jmshieh@narlabs.org.tw, E-mail: jmshieh@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [National Nano Device Laboratories, No. 26, Prosperity Road 1, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China); Departments of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chih-Chao [National Nano Device Laboratories, No. 26, Prosperity Road 1, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China); Huang, Wen-Hsien [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China); National Nano Device Laboratories, No. 26, Prosperity Road 1, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China); Kao, Yo-Tsung [Departments of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-11

    We fabricated nano-crystalline Si (nc-Si:H) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with a double-metal-gate structure, which showed a high electron-mobility (μ{sub FE}) and adjustable threshold voltages (V{sub th}). The nc-Si:H channel and source/drain (S/D) of the multilayered TFT were deposited at 375 °C by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition. The low grain-boundary defect density of the channel layer is responsible for the high μ{sub FE} of 370 cm{sup 2}/V-s, a steep subthreshold slope of 90 mV/decade, and a low V{sub th} of −0.64 V. When biased with the double-gate driving mode, the device shows a tunable V{sub th} value extending from −1 V up to 2.7 V.

  17. Modulation of voltage-gated potassium Kv2.1 via the cytoplasmic C terminal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man Jin; Peiyuan Lu

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels comprise 12 subtypes (Kv1-Kv12). Kv2.1, which is expressed in most mammalian central neurons, provides the majority of delayed-rectifier K current in cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and plays an especially prominent role in repolarizing membrane potential, as well as in facilitation of exocytosis. Kv2.1-encoded K efflux is essential for neuronal apoptosis programming. The human form of the Kv2.1 potassium channel contains large intracellular regions. The cytoplasmic C-terminal plays a key role in modulating Kv2.1 gating. The present manuscript summarized Kv2.1 structure and modulation in neurons and analyzed the roles of the cytoplasmic C-terminal.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Voltage Gated Cation Channels: Insights on Voltage-Sensor Domain Function and Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie eDelemotte

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery in the 1950s, the structure and function of voltage gated cation channels (VGCC has been largely understood thanks to results stemming from electrophysiology, pharmacology, spectroscopy and structural biology. Over the past decade, computational methods such as molecular dynamics (MD simulations have also contributed, providing molecular level information that can be tested against experimental results, thereby allowing the validation of the models and protocols. Importantly, MD can shed light on elements of VGCC function that cannot be easily accessed through classical experiments. Here, we review the results of recent MD simulations addressing key questions that pertain to the function and modulation of the VGCC’s voltage sensor domain (VSD highlighting: 1 the movement of the S4-helix basic residues during channel activation, articulating how the electrical driving force acts upon them; 2 the nature of the VSD intermediate states on transitioning between open and closed states of the VGCC; and 3 the molecular level effects on the VSD arising from mutations of specific S4 positively charged residues involved in certain genetic diseases.

  19. Crystal structure of a voltage-gated sodium channel in two potentially inactivated states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh, Jian; Gamal El-Din, Tamer M; Scheuer, Todd; Zheng, Ning; Catterall, William A

    2012-05-20

    In excitable cells, voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels activate to initiate action potentials and then undergo fast and slow inactivation processes that terminate their ionic conductance. Inactivation is a hallmark of Na(V) channel function and is critical for control of membrane excitability, but the structural basis for this process has remained elusive. Here we report crystallographic snapshots of the wild-type Na(V)Ab channel from Arcobacter butzleri captured in two potentially inactivated states at 3.2 Å resolution. Compared to previous structures of Na(V)Ab channels with cysteine mutations in the pore-lining S6 helices (ref. 4), the S6 helices and the intracellular activation gate have undergone significant rearrangements: one pair of S6 helices has collapsed towards the central pore axis and the other S6 pair has moved outward to produce a striking dimer-of-dimers configuration. An increase in global structural asymmetry is observed throughout our wild-type Na(V)Ab models, reshaping the ion selectivity filter at the extracellular end of the pore, the central cavity and its residues that are analogous to the mammalian drug receptor site, and the lateral pore fenestrations. The voltage-sensing domains have also shifted around the perimeter of the pore module in wild-type Na(V)Ab, compared to the mutant channel, and local structural changes identify a conserved interaction network that connects distant molecular determinants involved in Na(V) channel gating and inactivation. These potential inactivated-state structures provide new insights into Na(V) channel gating and novel avenues to drug development and therapy for a range of debilitating Na(V) channelopathies.

  20. The modulatory effect of zinc ions on voltage-gated potassium currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons is not related to Kv1.3 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teisseyre, A; Mercik, K; Mozrzymas, J W

    2007-12-01

    We applied the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study the influence of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) and extracellular protons at acidic pH (pH(o)) on voltage-gated potassium currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The first goal of the study was to estimate whether Kv1.3 currents significantly contributed to voltage-gated potassium currents in examined cells. Then, the influence of both ions on the activity of other voltage-gated potassium currents in the neurons was examined. We examined both the total current and the delayed - rectifier component. Results obtained in both cases were not significantly different from each other. Available data argued against any significant contribution of Kv1.3 currents to the recorded currents. Nevertheless, application of Zn(2+) in the concentration range from 100 microM to 5 mM reversibly modulated the recorded currents. The activation midpoint was shifted by about 40 mV (total current) and 30 mV (delayed-rectifier current) towards positive membrane potentials and the activation kinetics were slowed significantly (2 - 3 fold) upon application of Zn(2+). The inactivation midpoint was also shifted towards positive membrane potentials, but less significantly (about 14 mV). The current amplitudes were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner to about 0.5 of the control value. The effects of Zn(2+) were saturated at the concentration of 1 mM. Raising extracellular proton concentration by lowering the pH(o) from 7.35 to 6.4 did not affect significantly the currents. Possible mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena and their possible physiological significance are discussed.

  1. Realization of an 850V High Voltage Half Bridge Gate Drive IC with a New NFFP HVI Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Qiao; Hong-Jie Wang; Ming-Wei Duan; Jian Fang; Bo Zhang; Zhao-Ji Li

    2007-01-01

    A NFFP HVI structure which implements high breakdown voltage without using additional FFP and process steps is proposed in this paper. An 850 V high voltage half bridge gate drive IC with the NFFP HVI structure is experimentally realized using a thin epitaxial BCD process. Compared with the MFFP HVI structure,the proposed NFFP HVI structure shows simpler process and lower cost. The high side offset voltage in the half bridge gate drive IC with the NFFP HVI structure is almost as same as that with the selfshielding structure.

  2. A voltage-gated H+ channel underlying pH homeostasis in calcifying coccolithophores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison R Taylor

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine coccolithophorid phytoplankton are major producers of biogenic calcite, playing a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Predicting the impacts of ocean acidification on coccolithophore calcification has received much recent attention and requires improved knowledge of cellular calcification mechanisms. Uniquely amongst calcifying organisms, coccolithophores produce calcified scales (coccoliths in an intracellular compartment and secrete them to the cell surface, requiring large transcellular ionic fluxes to support calcification. In particular, intracellular calcite precipitation using HCO₃⁻ as the substrate generates equimolar quantities of H+ that must be rapidly removed to prevent cytoplasmic acidification. We have used electrophysiological approaches to identify a plasma membrane voltage-gated H+ conductance in Coccolithus pelagicus ssp braarudii with remarkably similar biophysical and functional properties to those found in metazoans. We show that both C. pelagicus and Emiliania huxleyi possess homologues of metazoan H(v1 H+ channels, which function as voltage-gated H+ channels when expressed in heterologous systems. Homologues of the coccolithophore H+ channels were also identified in a diversity of eukaryotes, suggesting a wide range of cellular roles for the H(v1 class of proteins. Using single cell imaging, we demonstrate that the coccolithophore H+ conductance mediates rapid H+ efflux and plays an important role in pH homeostasis in calcifying cells. The results demonstrate a novel cellular role for voltage gated H+ channels and provide mechanistic insight into biomineralisation by establishing a direct link between pH homeostasis and calcification. As the coccolithophore H+ conductance is dependent on the trans-membrane H+ electrochemical gradient, this mechanism will be directly impacted by, and may underlie adaptation to, ocean acidification. The presence of this H+ efflux pathway suggests that there is no obligate

  3. The voltage-gated sodium channel nav1.8 is expressed in human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cejudo-Roman

    Full Text Available The role of Na(+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na(+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM, the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca(2+-containing or Ca(2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na(+, [Na(+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na(+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function.

  4. PIP2 in pancreatic β-cells regulates voltage-gated calcium channels by a voltage-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Lizbeth; Puente, Erika I; Reyes-Vaca, Arturo; Arenas, Isabel; Garduño, Julieta; Bravo-Martínez, Jorge; Garcia, David E

    2016-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phosphoinositide that regulates the activity of many ion channels. Influx of calcium primarily through voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels promotes insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. However, whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2, as is the case for some non-insulin-secreting cells, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2 depletion in pancreatic β-cells through activation of a muscarinic pathway induced by oxotremorine methiodide (Oxo-M). CaV channel currents were recorded by the patch-clamp technique. The CaV current amplitude was reduced by activation of the muscarinic receptor 1 (M1R) in the absence of kinetic changes. The Oxo-M-induced inhibition exhibited the hallmarks of voltage-independent regulation and did not involve PKC activation. A small fraction of the Oxo-M-induced CaV inhibition was diminished by a high concentration of Ca(2+) chelator, whereas ≥50% of this inhibition was prevented by diC8-PIP2 dialysis. Localization of PIP2 in the plasma membrane was examined by transfecting INS-1 cells with PH-PLCδ1, which revealed a close temporal association between PIP2 hydrolysis and CaV channel inhibition. Furthermore, the depletion of PIP2 by a voltage-sensitive phosphatase reduced CaV currents in a way similar to that observed following M1R activation. These results indicate that activation of the M1R pathway inhibits the CaV channel via PIP2 depletion by a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism in pancreatic β- and INS-1 cells and thereby support the hypothesis that membrane phospholipids regulate ion channel activity by interacting with ion channels.

  5. On the multiple roles of the voltage gated sodium channel β1 subunit in genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora eBaroni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels are intrinsic plasma membrane proteins that initiate the action potential in electrically excitable cells. They are composed of a pore-forming α-subunit and associated β-subunits. The β1-subunit was the first accessory subunit to be cloned. It can be important for controlling cell excitability and modulating multiple aspects of sodium channel physiology. Mutations of β1 are implicated in a wide variety of inherited pathologies, including epilepsy and cardiac conduction diseases. This review summarizes β1-subunit related channelopathies pointing out the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and their underlying molecular mechanisms.

  6. A novel mechanism for fine-tuning open-state stability in a voltage-gated potassium channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Niciforovic, Ana P; Galpin, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels elicit membrane hyperpolarization through voltage-sensor domains that regulate the conductive status of the pore domain. To better understand the inherent basis for the open-closed equilibrium in these channels, we undertook an atomistic scan using synthetic fluor...... that the intrinsic open-state destabilization via aromatic repulsion represents a new mechanism by which ion channels, and likely other proteins, fine-tune conformational equilibria.......Voltage-gated potassium channels elicit membrane hyperpolarization through voltage-sensor domains that regulate the conductive status of the pore domain. To better understand the inherent basis for the open-closed equilibrium in these channels, we undertook an atomistic scan using synthetic...... fluorinated derivatives of aromatic residues previously implicated in the gating of Shaker potassium channels. Here we show that stepwise dispersion of the negative electrostatic surface potential of only one site, Phe481, stabilizes the channel open state. Furthermore, these data suggest that this apparent...

  7. Low Voltage Floating Gate MOS Transistor Based Four-Quadrant Multiplier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Srivastava

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a four-quadrant multiplier based on square-law characteristic of floating gate MOSFET (FGMOS in saturation region. The proposed circuit uses square-difference identity and the differential voltage squarer proposed by Gupta et al. to implement the multiplication function. The proposed multiplier employs eight FGMOS transistors and two resistors only. The FGMOS implementation of the multiplier allows low voltage operation, reduced power consumption and minimum transistor count. The second order effects caused due to mobility degradation, component mismatch and temperature variations are discussed. Performance of the proposed circuit is verified at ±0.75 V in TSMC 0.18 µm CMOS, BSIM3 and Level 49 technology by using Cadence Spectre simulator.

  8. Deciphering voltage-gated Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels by studying prokaryotic ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catterall, William A; Zheng, Ning

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) and calcium channels (CaVs) are involved in electrical signaling, contraction, secretion, synaptic transmission, and other physiological processes activated in response to depolarization. Despite their physiological importance, the structures of these closely related proteins have remained elusive because of their size and complexity. Bacterial NaVs have structures analogous to a single domain of eukaryotic NaVs and CaVs and are their likely evolutionary ancestor. Here we review recent work that has led to new understanding of NaVs and CaVs through high-resolution structural studies of their prokaryotic ancestors. New insights into their voltage-dependent activation and inactivation, ion conductance, and ion selectivity provide realistic structural models for the function of these complex membrane proteins at the atomic level. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A semi-floating gate transistor for low-voltage ultrafast memory and sensing operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Fei; Lin, Xi; Liu, Lei; Sun, Qing-Qing; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Liu, Wei; Gong, Yi; Zhang, David Wei

    2013-08-09

    As the semiconductor devices of integrated circuits approach the physical limitations of scaling, alternative transistor and memory designs are needed to achieve improvements in speed, density, and power consumption. We report on a transistor that uses an embedded tunneling field-effect transistor for charging and discharging the semi-floating gate. This transistor operates at low voltages (≤2.0 volts), with a large threshold voltage window of 3.1 volts, and can achieve ultra-high-speed writing operations (on time scales of ~1 nanosecond). A linear dependence of drain current on light intensity was observed when the transistor was exposed to light, so possible applications include image sensing with high density and performance.

  10. Characterization and Modeling of a Floating Gate Dosimeter with Gamma and Protons at Various Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Danzeca, S; Brugger, M; Dusseau, L; Masi, A; Pineda, A; Spiezia, G

    2014-01-01

    In this work a prototype of a floating gate sensor FGDOS has been characterized with a Co-60 source and with protons. The dependency of the sensor sensitivity on the dose rate and accumulated Total Ionizing Dose (TID) are investigated. The proton test permits to measure the sensitivity of the sensor at different incoming particles energies. An analytical model of the sensor is presented in the paper and the theoretical sensitivity for the prototype of FGDOS is evaluated. Finally, the model allows to accurately measuring the charge yield for different particle types and different energies.

  11. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4-Induced Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhiwen; Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to control the resting membrane potential and increase excitability in many types of cells. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play an important role in initiating action potentials in neurons. However, whether VGSCs can be modulated by the activation of TRPV4 in hippocampal pyramidal neurons remains unknown. In this study, we tested the effect of TRPV4 agonists (GSK1016790A and 4α-PDD) on voltage-gated sodium current (I Na) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and the protein levels of α/β-subunit of VGSCs in the hippocampus of mice subjected to intracerebroventricular (icv.) injection of GSK1016790A (GSK-injected mice). Herein, we report that I Na was inhibited by acute application of GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD. In the presence of TRPV4 agonists, the voltage-dependent inactivation curve shifted to the hyperpolarization, whereas the voltage-dependent activation curve remained unchanged. The TRPV4 agonist-induced inhibition of I Na was blocked by the TRPV4 antagonist or tetrodotoxin. Moreover, blocking protein kinase A (PKA) markedly attenuated the GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I Na, whereas antagonism of protein kinase C or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not change GSK1016790A action. Finally, the protein levels of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, and Nav1.6 in the hippocampus increased in GSK-injected mice, whereas those of Nav1.3 and Navβ1 remained nearly unchanged. We conclude that I Na is inhibited by the acute activation of TRPV4 through PKA signaling pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, but protein expression of α-subunit of VGSCs is increased by sustained TRPV4 activation, which may compensate for the acute inhibition of I Na and provide a possibility for hyper-excitability upon sustained TRPV4 activation.

  12. Regulation of Voltage-Activated K(+) Channel Gating by Transmembrane β Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-activated K(+) (K(V)) channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. K(V) channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD) surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many K(V) channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the K(V) β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM) segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of K(V) α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening, and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into K(V) channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  13. Analysis of the selectivity filter of the voltage-gated sodium channel NavRh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zhang; Mengdie Xia; Yang Li; Huihui Liu; Xin Jiang; Wenlin Ren; Jianping Wu

    2013-01-01

    NaChBac is a bacterial voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel that shows sequence similarity to voltage-gated calcium channels.To understand the ion-permeation mechanism of Nav channels,we combined molecular dynamics simulation,structural biology and electrophysiological approaches to investigate the recently determined structure of NavRh,a marine bacterial NaChBac ortholog.Two Na+ binding sites are identified in the selectivity filter (SF) in our simulations:The extracellular Na+ ion first approaches site 1 constituted by the side groups of Ser181 and Glu183,and then spontaneously arrives at the energetically more favorable site 2 formed by the carbonyi oxygens of Leu179 and Thr178.In contrast,Ca2+ ions are prone to being trapped by Glu183 at site 1,which then blocks the entrance of both Na+ and Ca2+ to the vestibule of the SF.In addition,Na+ permeates through the selective filter in an asymmetrical manner,a feature that resembles that of the mammalian Nav orthologs.The study reported here provides insights into the mechanism of ion selectivity on Na+ over Ca2+ in mammalian Nav channels.

  14. Regulatory role of voltage-gated sodium channel β subunits in sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed eChahine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Na+ channels are transmembrane-bound proteins incorporating aqueous conduction pores that are highly selective for Na+. The opening of these channels results in the rapid influx of Na+ ions that depolarize the cell and drive the rapid upstroke of nerve and muscle action potentials. While the concept of a Na+-selective ion channel had been formulated in the 1940s, it was not until the 1980s that the biochemical properties of the 260-kDa and 36-kDa auxiliary β subunits (β1, β2 were first described. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression studies revealed that the  subunit forms the core of the channel and is responsible for both voltage-dependent gating and ionic selectivity. To date, ten isoforms of the Na+ channel α subunit have been identified that vary in their primary structures, tissue distribution, biophysical properties, and sensitivity to neurotoxins. Four β subunits (β1-β4 and two splice variants (β1A, β1B have been identified that modulate the subcellular distribution, cell surface expression, and functional properties of the α subunits. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad overview of β subunit expression and function in peripheral sensory neurons and examine their contributions to neuropathic pain.

  15. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na(+) channel function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Martini, Rudolf; Krarup, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na(+) channels on motor axons aggravating the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice. With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform expression was found by immunohistochemistry. The depolarizing excitability features were absent in Nav1.8 null mice, and they were counteracted in WT mice by a Nav1.8 blocker. Our data suggest that alteration in voltage-gated Na(+) channel isoform expression contributes to changes in motor axon function during aging.

  16. Developmental expression of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels in the avian hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doczi, Megan A; Vitzthum, Carl M; Forehand, Cynthia J

    2016-03-11

    Specialized hypothalamic neurons integrate the homeostatic balance between food intake and energy expenditure, processes that may become dysregulated during the development of diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders. Shaker family voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1) contribute to the maintenance of resting membrane potential, action potential characteristics, and neurotransmitter release in many populations of neurons, although hypothalamic Kv1 channel expression has been largely unexplored. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from avian hypothalamic brain slices demonstrate a developmental shift in the electrophysiological properties of avian arcuate nucleus neurons, identifying an increase in outward ionic current that corresponds with action potential maturation. Additionally, RT-PCR experiments identified the early expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.3, and Kv1.5 mRNA in the embryonic avian hypothalamus, suggesting that these channels may underlie the electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis on intact microdissections of embryonic hypothalamic tissue revealed a concomitant increase in Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 gene expression at key electrophysiological time points during development. This study is the first to demonstrate hypothalamic mRNA expression of Kv1 channels in developing avian embryos and may suggest a role for voltage-gated ion channel regulation in the physiological patterning of embryonic hypothalamic circuits governing energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Brivaracetam Differentially Affects Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents Without Impairing Sustained Repetitive Firing in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; André, Véronique Marie; Leclère, Nathalie; Hanon, Etienne; Ghisdal, Philippe; Wolff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Brivaracetam (BRV) is an antiepileptic drug in Phase III clinical development. BRV binds to synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) protein and is also suggested to inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). To evaluate whether the effect of BRV on VGSCs represents a relevant mechanism participating in its antiepileptic properties, we explored the pharmacology of BRV on VGSCs in different cell systems and tested its efficacy at reducing the sustained repetitive firing (SRF). Methods Brivaracetam investigations on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) were performed in N1E-155 neuroblastoma cells, cultured rat cortical neurons, and adult mouse CA1 neurons. SRF was measured in cultured cortical neurons and in CA1 neurons. All BRV (100–300 μM) experiments were performed in comparison with 100 μM carbamazepine (CBZ). Results Brivaracetam and CBZ reduced INa in N1E-115 cells (30% and 40%, respectively) and primary cortical neurons (21% and 47%, respectively) by modulating the fast-inactivated state of VGSCs. BRV, in contrast to CBZ, did not affect INa in CA1 neurons and SRF in cortical and CA1 neurons. CBZ consistently inhibited neuronal SRF by 75–93%. Conclusions The lack of effect of BRV on SRF in neurons suggests that the reported inhibition of BRV on VGSC currents does not contribute to its antiepileptic properties. PMID:25444522

  18. Down-regulation of endogenous KLHL1 decreases voltage-gated calcium current density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotti, Paula P; Ethington, Elizabeth G; Cribbs, Leanne; Koob, Michael D; Martin, Jody; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S

    2014-05-01

    The actin-binding protein Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1) can modulate voltage-gated calcium channels in vitro. KLHL1 interacts with actin and with the pore-forming subunits of Cav2.1 and CaV3.2 calcium channels, resulting in up-regulation of P/Q and T-type current density. Here we tested whether endogenous KLHL1 modulates voltage gated calcium currents in cultured hippocampal neurons by down-regulating the expression of KLHL1 via adenoviral delivery of shRNA targeted against KLHL1 (shKLHL1). Control adenoviruses did not affect any of the neuronal properties measured, yet down-regulation of KLHL1 resulted in HVA current densities ~68% smaller and LVA current densities 44% smaller than uninfected controls, with a concomitant reduction in α(1A) and α(1H) protein levels. Biophysical analysis and western blot experiments suggest Ca(V)3.1 and 3.3 currents are also present in shKLHL1-infected neurons. Synapsin I levels, miniature postsynaptic current frequency, and excitatory and inhibitory synapse number were reduced in KLHL1 knockdown. This study corroborates the physiological role of KLHL1 as a calcium channel modulator and demonstrates a novel, presynaptic role.

  19. Bidirectional regulation of dendritic voltage-gated potassium channels by the fragile X mental retardation protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Young; Ge, Woo-Ping; Huang, Wendy; He, Ye; Wang, Gordon X; Rowson-Baldwin, Ashley; Smith, Stephen J; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2011-11-17

    How transmitter receptors modulate neuronal signaling by regulating voltage-gated ion channel expression remains an open question. Here we report dendritic localization of mRNA of Kv4.2 voltage-gated potassium channel, which regulates synaptic plasticity, and its local translational regulation by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) linked to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common heritable mental retardation. FMRP suppression of Kv4.2 is revealed by elevation of Kv4.2 in neurons from fmr1 knockout (KO) mice and in neurons expressing Kv4.2-3'UTR that binds FMRP. Moreover, treating hippocampal slices from fmr1 KO mice with Kv4 channel blocker restores long-term potentiation induced by moderate stimuli. Surprisingly, recovery of Kv4.2 after N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced degradation also requires FMRP, likely due to NMDAR-induced FMRP dephosphorylation, which turns off FMRP suppression of Kv4.2. Our study of FMRP regulation of Kv4.2 deepens our knowledge of NMDAR signaling and reveals a FMRP target of potential relevance to FXS.

  20. A Microscopic Capacitor Model of Voltage Coupling in Membrane Proteins: Gating Charge Fluctuations in Ci-VSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-01-28

    The voltage sensitivity of membrane proteins is reflected in the response of the voltage sensing domains (VSDs) to the changes in membrane potential. This response is implicated in the displacement of positively charged residues, associated with the conformational changes of VSDs. The displaced charges generate nonlinear (i.e., voltage-dependent) capacitance current called the gating current (and its corresponding gating charge), which is a key experimental quantity that characterizes voltage activation in VSMP. However, the relevant theoretical/computational approaches, aimed to correlate the structural information on VSMP to electrophysiological measurements, have been rather limited, posing a broad challenge in computer simulations of VSMP. Concomitant with the development of our coarse-graining (CG) model of voltage coupling, we apply our theoretical framework for the treatments of voltage effects in membrane proteins to modeling the VSMP activation, taking the VSDs (Ci-VSD) derived from the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) as a model system. Our CG model reproduces the observed gating charge of Ci-VSD activation in several different perspectives. In particular, a new closed-form expression of the gating charge is evaluated in both nonequilibrium and equilibrium ways, while considering the fluctuation-dissipation relation that connects a nonequilibrium measurement of the gating charge to an equilibrium measurement of charge fluctuations (i.e., the voltage-independent linear component of membrane capacitance). In turn, the expression uncovers a novel link that connects an equilibrium measurement of the voltage-independent linear capacitance to a nonequilibrium measurement of the voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (whose integral over voltage is equal to the gating charge). In addition, our CG model yields capacitor-like voltage dependent free energy parabolas, resulting in the free energy difference and the free energy barrier for

  1. An non-uniformity voltage model for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kelei; Li, Yankun; Liu, Jiawei; Guo, Ai

    2017-01-01

    The fuel cell used in transportation has environmental protection, high efficiency and no line traction power system which can greatly reduce line construction investment. That makes it a huge potential. The voltage uniformity is one of the most important factors affecting the operation life of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). On the basis of principle and classical model of the PEMFC, single cell voltage is calculated and the location coefficients are introduced so as to establish a non-uniformity voltage model. These coefficients are estimated with the experimental datum at stack current 50 A. The model is validated respectively with datum at 60 A and 100 A. The results show that the model reflects the basic characteristics of voltage non-uniformity and provides the beneficial reference for fuel cell control and single cell voltage detection.

  2. Voltage-gated potassium currents within the dorsal vagal nucleus: inhibition by BDS toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Mark L; Morris, Neil P; Lewis, David I; Deuchars, Susan A; Deuchars, Jim

    2008-01-16

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential components of neuronal excitability. The Kv3.4 channel protein is widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS), where it can form heteromeric or homomeric Kv3 channels. Electrophysiological studies reported here highlight a functional role for this channel protein within neurons of the dorsal vagal nucleus (DVN). Current clamp experiments revealed that blood depressing substance (BDS) and intracellular dialysis of an anti-Kv3.4 antibody prolonged the action potential duration. In addition, a BDS sensitive, voltage-dependent, slowly inactivating outward current was observed in voltage clamp recordings from DVN neurons. Electrical stimulation of the solitary tract evoked EPSPs and IPSPs in DVN neurons and BDS increased the average amplitude and decreased the paired pulse ratio, consistent with a presynaptic site of action. This presynaptic modulation was action potential dependent as revealed by ongoing synaptic activity. Given the role of the Kv3 proteins in shaping neuronal excitability, these data highlight a role for homomeric Kv3.4 channels in spike timing and neurotransmitter release in low frequency firing neurons of the DVN.

  3. Input Stage for Low-Voltage, Low-Noise Preamplifiers Based on a Floating-Gate MOS Transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igor, Mucha

    1997-01-01

    A novel input stage for low-voltage, low-noise preamplifiers for integrated capacitive sensors is presented. The input stage of the preamplifier employs floating-gate MOS transistors which are capable of storing the operation point of the input stage over several years without any severe degradat......A novel input stage for low-voltage, low-noise preamplifiers for integrated capacitive sensors is presented. The input stage of the preamplifier employs floating-gate MOS transistors which are capable of storing the operation point of the input stage over several years without any severe...

  4. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  5. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Low voltage copper phthalocyanine organic thin film transistors with a polymer layer as the gate insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xueqiang, Liu; Weihong, Bi; Tong, Zhang

    2010-12-01

    Low voltage organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) were created using polymethyl-methacrylate-co g-lyciclyl-methacrylate (PMMA-GMA) as the gate dielectric. The OTFTs performed acceptably at supply voltages of about 10 V. From a densely packed copolymer brush, a leakage current as low as 2 × 10-8 A/cm2 was obtained. From the measured capacitance—insulator frequency characteristics, a dielectric constant in the range 3.9-5.0 was obtained. By controlling the thickness of the gate dielectric, the threshold voltage was reduced from -3.5 to -2.0 V. The copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) based organic thin film transistor could be operated at low voltage and 1.2 × 10-3 cm2/(V·s) mobility.

  6. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlmeister, Jürgen F

    2015-06-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m(3) → m(4)). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. A 2-D Analytical Threshold Voltage Model for Symmetric Double Gate MOSFET's Using Green’s Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Garg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new two dimensional (2D analytical solution of Threshold Voltage for undoped (or lightly doped Double Gate MOSFETs. We have used Green’s function technique to solve the 2D Poisson equation, and derived the threshold voltage model using minimum surface potential concept. This model is assumed uniform doping profile in Si region. The proposed model compared with existing literature and experimental data and we obtain excellent agreements with previous techniques.

  8. Modeling of the Binding of Peptide Blockers to Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: Approaches and Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoseletsky, V N; Volyntseva, A D; Shaitan, K V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Feofanov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of the structure of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels bound to peptide blockers aims to identify the key amino acid residues dictating affinity and provide insights into the toxin-channel interface. Computational approaches open up possibilities for in silico rational design of selective blockers, new molecular tools to study the cellular distribution and functional roles of potassium channels. It is anticipated that optimized blockers will advance the development of drugs that reduce over activation of potassium channels and attenuate the associated malfunction. Starting with an overview of the recent advances in computational simulation strategies to predict the bound state orientations of peptide pore blockers relative to KV-channels, we go on to review algorithms for the analysis of intermolecular interactions, and then take a look at the results of their application.

  9. Wafer-scale solution-derived molecular gate dielectrics for low-voltage graphene electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; McMorrow, Julian J.; He, Jianting; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Everaerts, Ken [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Grayson, Matthew [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Marks, Tobin J., E-mail: t-marks@northwestern.edu, E-mail: m-hersam@northwestern.edu; Hersam, Mark C., E-mail: t-marks@northwestern.edu, E-mail: m-hersam@northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    Graphene field-effect transistors are integrated with solution-processed multilayer hybrid organic-inorganic self-assembled nanodielectrics (SANDs). The resulting devices exhibit low-operating voltage (2 V), negligible hysteresis, current saturation with intrinsic gain >1.0 in vacuum (pressure < 2 × 10{sup −5} Torr), and overall improved performance compared to control devices on conventional SiO{sub 2} gate dielectrics. Statistical analysis of the field-effect mobility and residual carrier concentration demonstrate high spatial uniformity of the dielectric interfacial properties and graphene transistor characteristics over full 3 in. wafers. This work thus establishes SANDs as an effective platform for large-area, high-performance graphene electronics.

  10. Wafer-scale solution-derived molecular gate dielectrics for low-voltage graphene electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Everaerts, Ken; McMorrow, Julian J.; He, Jianting; Grayson, Matthew; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2014-02-01

    Graphene field-effect transistors are integrated with solution-processed multilayer hybrid organic-inorganic self-assembled nanodielectrics (SANDs). The resulting devices exhibit low-operating voltage (2 V), negligible hysteresis, current saturation with intrinsic gain >1.0 in vacuum (pressure < 2 × 10-5 Torr), and overall improved performance compared to control devices on conventional SiO2 gate dielectrics. Statistical analysis of the field-effect mobility and residual carrier concentration demonstrate high spatial uniformity of the dielectric interfacial properties and graphene transistor characteristics over full 3 in. wafers. This work thus establishes SANDs as an effective platform for large-area, high-performance graphene electronics.

  11. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na(+) channel function in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na(+) channels on motor axons aggravating...... the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice....... With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform...

  12. Two-pore channels (TPCs): Novel voltage-gated ion channels with pleiotropic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijóo-Bandín, Sandra; García-Vence, María; García-Rúa, Vanessa; Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Lago, Francisca

    2017-01-02

    Two-pore channels (TPC1-3) comprise a subfamily of the eukaryotic voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) superfamily that are mainly expressed in acidic stores in plants and animals. TPCS are widespread across the animal kingdom, with primates, mice and rats lacking TPC3, and mainly act as Ca(+) and Na(+) channels, although it was also suggested that they could be permeable to other ions. Nowadays, TPCs have been related to the development of different diseases, including Parkinson´s disease, obesity or myocardial ischemia. Due to this, their study has raised the interest of the scientific community to try to understand their mechanism of action in order to be able to develop an efficient drug that could regulate TPCs activity. In this review, we will provide an updated view regarding TPCs structure, function and activation, as well as their role in different pathophysiological processes.

  13. Voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmaceutical targets via anticonvulsants to treat epileptic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsayed, Mena; Sokolov, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels, Nav1.1 and Nav1.2. The effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as effective therapies for epilepsy have been characterized by extensive research. Most of the classic AEDs targeting Nav share a common mechanism of action by stabilizing the channel's fast-inactivated state. In contrast, novel AEDs, such as lacosamide, stabilize the slow-inactivated state in neuronal Nav1.1 and Nav1.7 isoforms. This paper reviews the different mechanisms by which this stabilization occurs to determine new methods for treatment.

  14. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-06-05

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation.

  15. High Grade Glioma Mimicking Voltage Gated Potassium Channel Complex Associated Antibody Limbic Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilan Athauda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though raised titres of voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC complex antibodies have been occasionally associated with extracranial tumours, mainly presenting as Morvan's Syndrome or neuromyotonia, they have not yet been reported to be associated with an intracranial malignancy. This is especially important as misdiagnosis of these conditions and delay of the appropriate treatment can have important prognostic implications. We describe a patient with a high grade glioma presenting with clinical, radiological, and serological features consistent with the diagnosis of VGKC antibody associated limbic encephalitis (LE. This is the first association between a primary brain tumour and high titre of VGKC complex antibodies. Clinicoradiological progression despite effective immunosuppressive treatment should prompt clinicians to look for alternative diagnoses. Further studies to elucidate a possible association between VGKC complex and other surface antigen antibodies with primary brain tumours should be carried out.

  16. High grade glioma mimicking voltage gated potassium channel complex associated antibody limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athauda, Dilan; Delamont, R S; Pablo-Fernandez, E De

    2014-01-01

    Though raised titres of voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies have been occasionally associated with extracranial tumours, mainly presenting as Morvan's Syndrome or neuromyotonia, they have not yet been reported to be associated with an intracranial malignancy. This is especially important as misdiagnosis of these conditions and delay of the appropriate treatment can have important prognostic implications. We describe a patient with a high grade glioma presenting with clinical, radiological, and serological features consistent with the diagnosis of VGKC antibody associated limbic encephalitis (LE). This is the first association between a primary brain tumour and high titre of VGKC complex antibodies. Clinicoradiological progression despite effective immunosuppressive treatment should prompt clinicians to look for alternative diagnoses. Further studies to elucidate a possible association between VGKC complex and other surface antigen antibodies with primary brain tumours should be carried out.

  17. Voltage-gated calcium channel subunits from platyhelminths: Potential role in praziquantel action✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeziorski, Michael C.; Greenberg, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Ca2+) channels provide the pathway for Ca2+ influxes that underlie Ca2+-dependent responses in muscles, nerves and other excitable cells. They are also targets of a wide variety of drugs and toxins. Ca2+ channels are multisubunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming α1 subunit and other modulatory subunits, including the β subunit. Here, we review the structure and function of schistosome Ca2+ channel subunits, with particular emphasis on variant Ca2+ channel β subunits (Cavβvar) found in these parasites. In particular, we examine the role these β subunits may play in the action of praziquantel, the current drug of choice against schistosomiasis. We also present evidence that Cavβvar homologs are found in other praziquantel-sensitive platyhelminths such as the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, and that these variant β subunits may thus represent a platyhelminth-specific gene family. PMID:16545816

  18. SCN9A mutations define primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder of voltage gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenth, Joost P H; te Morsche, Rene H M; Guillet, Gerard; Taieb, Alain; Kirby, R Lee; Jansen, Jan B M J

    2005-06-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of red, warm and painful hands, and/or feet. We previously localized the gene for primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM region on chromosome 2q. Recently, Yang et al identified two missense mutations of the sodium channel alpha subunit SCN9A in patients with erythermalgia. The presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurons is thought to play a crucial role in several chronic painful neuropathies. We examined four different families and two sporadic cases and detected missense sequence variants in SCN9A to be present in primary erythermalgia patients. A total of five of six mutations were located in highly conserved regions. One family with autosomal dominantly inherited erythermalgia was double heterozygous for two separate SCN9A mutations. These data establish primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder and offers hope for treatment of this incapacitating painful disorder.

  19. Regulation of KCNQ/Kv7 family voltage-gated K(+) channels by lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Keenan C; Sanders, Charles R

    2017-04-01

    Many years of studies have established that lipids can impact membrane protein structure and function through bulk membrane effects, by direct but transient annular interactions with the bilayer-exposed surface of protein transmembrane domains, and by specific binding to protein sites. Here, we focus on how phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) impact ion channel function and how the structural details of the interactions of these lipids with ion channels are beginning to emerge. We focus on the Kv7 (KCNQ) subfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels, which are regulated by both PIP2 and PUFAs and play a variety of important roles in human health and disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  20. Towards a Unified Theory of Calmodulin Regulation (Calmodulation) of Voltage-Gated Calcium and Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E; Sang, Lingjie; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Kang, Po Wei; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer S; Issa, John B; Lee, Shin Rong; Namkung, Ho; Li, Jiangyu; Zhang, Manning; Yang, Philemon S; Bazzazi, Hojjat; Adams, Paul J; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, Daniel N; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca(2+) channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca(2+) and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms.

  1. Thalamic microinfusion of antibody to a voltage-gated potassium channel restores consciousness during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkire, Michael T; Asher, Christopher D; Franciscus, Amanda M; Hahn, Emily L

    2009-04-01

    The Drosophila Shaker mutant fruit-fly, with its malfunctioning voltage-gated potassium channel, exhibits anesthetic requirements that are more than twice normal. Shaker mutants with an abnormal Kv1.2 channel also demonstrate significantly reduced sleep. Given the important role the thalamus plays in both sleep and arousal, the authors investigated whether localized central medial thalamic (CMT) microinfusion of an antibody designed to block the pore of the Kv1.2 channel might awaken anesthetized rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with a cannula aimed at the CMT or lateral thalamus. One week later, unconsciousness was induced with either desflurane (3.6 +/- 0.2%; n = 55) or sevoflurane (1.2 +/- 0.1%; n = 51). Arousal effects of a single 0.5-microl infusion of Kv1.2 potassium channel blocking antibody (0.1- 0.2 mg/ml) or a control infusion of Arc-protein antibody (0.2 mg/ml) were then determined. The Kv1.2 antibody, but not the control antibody, temporarily restored consciousness in 17% of all animals and in 75% of those animals where infusions occurred within the CMT (P Consciousness returned on average (+/- SD) 170 +/- 99 s after infusion and lasted a median time of 398 s (interquartile range: 279-510 s). Temporary seizures, without apparent consciousness, predominated in 33% of all animals. These findings support the idea that the CMT plays a role in modulating levels of arousal during anesthesia and further suggest that voltage-gated potassium channels in the CMT may contribute to regulating arousal or may even be relevant targets of anesthetic action.

  2. Designing a C84 fullerene as a specific voltage-gated sodium channel blocker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2013-07-01

    Fullerene derivatives demonstrate considerable potential for numerous biological applications, such as the effective inhibition of HIV protease. Recently, they were identified for their ability to indiscriminately block biological ion channels. A fullerene derivative which specifically blocks a particular ion channel could lead to a new set of drug leads for the treatment of various ion channel-related diseases. Here, we demonstrate their extraordinary potential by designing a fullerene which mimics some of the functions of μ-conotoxin, a peptide derived from cone snail venom which potently binds to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (NavAb). We show, using molecular dynamics simulations, that the C84 fullerene with six lysine derivatives uniformly attached to its surface is selective to NavAb over a voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3). The side chain of one of the lysine residues protrudes into the selectivity filter of the channel, while the methionine residues located just outside of the channel form hydrophobic contacts with the carbon atoms of the fullerene. The modified C84 fullerene strongly binds to the NavAb channel with an affinity of 46 nM but binds weakly to Kv1.3 with an affinity of 3 mM. This potent blocker of NavAb may serve as a structural template from which potent compounds can be designed for the targeting of mammalian Nav channels. There is a genuine need to target mammalian Nav channels as a form of treatment of various diseases which have been linked to their malfunction, such as epilepsy and chronic pain.

  3. Neurotoxins and their binding areas on voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke eStevens

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Sodium Channels (VGSCs are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Genetic defects in sodium channel genes therefore can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called ‘channelopathies’.The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. Until now, these concepts still form the basis for understanding the functioning of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and will generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start inactivating and currents decrease. In the inactivated state channels stay refractory for any new stimulus and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to any new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX and saxitoxin (STX also contributed largely to our today’s understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and specifically of VGSCs. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable tools in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt®, Elan. The original peptide, -MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMEA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in neurons.This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the

  4. Regulation of persistent Na current by interactions between beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Teresa K; Grieco-Calub, Tina M; Chen, Chunling; Rusconi, Raffaella; Slat, Emily A; Isom, Lori L; Raman, Indira M

    2009-02-18

    The beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels (Scnxb) regulate the gating of pore-forming alpha subunits, as well as their trafficking and localization. In heterologous expression systems, beta1, beta2, and beta3 subunits influence inactivation and persistent current in different ways. To test how the beta4 protein regulates Na channel gating, we transfected beta4 into HEK (human embryonic kidney) cells stably expressing Na(V)1.1. Unlike a free peptide with a sequence from the beta4 cytoplasmic domain, the full-length beta4 protein did not block open channels. Instead, beta4 expression favored open states by shifting activation curves negative, decreasing the slope of the inactivation curve, and increasing the percentage of noninactivating current. Consequently, persistent current tripled in amplitude. Expression of beta1 or chimeric subunits including the beta1 extracellular domain, however, favored inactivation. Coexpressing Na(V)1.1 and beta4 with beta1 produced tiny persistent currents, indicating that beta1 overcomes the effects of beta4 in heterotrimeric channels. In contrast, beta1(C121W), which contains an extracellular epilepsy-associated mutation, did not counteract the destabilization of inactivation by beta4 and also required unusually large depolarizations for channel opening. In cultured hippocampal neurons transfected with beta4, persistent current was slightly but significantly increased. Moreover, in beta4-expressing neurons from Scn1b and Scn1b/Scn2b null mice, entry into inactivated states was slowed. These data suggest that beta1 and beta4 have antagonistic roles, the former favoring inactivation, and the latter favoring activation. Because increased Na channel availability may facilitate action potential firing, these results suggest a mechanism for seizure susceptibility of both mice and humans with disrupted beta1 subunits.

  5. Voltage-gated ion channel dysfunction precedes cardiomyopathy development in the dystrophic heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xaver Koenig

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, is associated with severe cardiac complications including cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmias. Recent research suggests that impaired voltage-gated ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes accompany cardiac pathology. It is, however, unknown if the ion channel defects are primary effects of dystrophic gene mutations, or secondary effects of the developing cardiac pathology.To address this question, we first investigated sodium channel impairments in cardiomyocytes derived from dystrophic neonatal mice prior to cardiomyopahty development, by using the whole cell patch clamp technique. Besides the most common model for DMD, the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, we also used mice additionally carrying an utrophin mutation. In neonatal cardiomyocytes, dystrophin-deficiency generated a 25% reduction in sodium current density. In addition, extra utrophin-deficiency significantly altered sodium channel gating parameters. Moreover, also calcium channel inactivation was considerably reduced in dystrophic neonatal cardiomyocytes, suggesting that ion channel abnormalities are universal primary effects of dystrophic gene mutations. To assess developmental changes, we also studied sodium channel impairments in cardiomyocytes derived from dystrophic adult mice, and compared them with the respective abnormalities in dystrophic neonatal cells. Here, we found a much stronger sodium current reduction in adult cardiomyocytes. The described sodium channel impairments slowed the upstroke of the action potential in adult cardiomyocytes, and only in dystrophic adult mice, the QRS interval of the electrocardiogram was prolonged.Ion channel impairments precede pathology development in the dystrophic heart, and may thus be considered potential cardiomyopathy triggers.

  6. Fatty Acid Regulation of Voltage- and Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antollini, Silvia S.; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are essential components of the cell, where they play a key role in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and most particularly in cell membranes, where they are central actors in shaping the physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the cellular adaptation to the environment. FFA are continuously being produced and degraded, and a feedback regulatory function has been attributed to their turnover. The massive increase observed under some pathological conditions, especially in brain, has been interpreted as a protective mechanism possibly operative on ion channels, which in some cases is of stimulatory nature and in other cases inhibitory. Here we discuss the correlation between the structure of FFA and their ability to modulate protein function, evaluating the influence of saturation/unsaturation, number of double bonds, and cis vs. trans isomerism. We further focus on the mechanisms of FFA modulation operating on voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channel function, contrasting the still conflicting evidence on direct vs. indirect mechanisms of action. PMID:27965583

  7. Fatty Acid Regulation of Voltage- and Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antollini, Silvia S; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are essential components of the cell, where they play a key role in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and most particularly in cell membranes, where they are central actors in shaping the physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the cellular adaptation to the environment. FFA are continuously being produced and degraded, and a feedback regulatory function has been attributed to their turnover. The massive increase observed under some pathological conditions, especially in brain, has been interpreted as a protective mechanism possibly operative on ion channels, which in some cases is of stimulatory nature and in other cases inhibitory. Here we discuss the correlation between the structure of FFA and their ability to modulate protein function, evaluating the influence of saturation/unsaturation, number of double bonds, and cis vs. trans isomerism. We further focus on the mechanisms of FFA modulation operating on voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channel function, contrasting the still conflicting evidence on direct vs. indirect mechanisms of action.

  8. KCNE1 and KCNE3: The yin and yang of voltage-gated K(+) channel regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2016-01-15

    The human KCNE gene family comprises five genes encoding single transmembrane-spanning ion channel regulatory subunits. The primary function of KCNE subunits appears to be regulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, and the best-understood KCNE complexes are with the KCNQ1 Kv α subunit. Here, we review the often opposite effects of KCNE1 and KCNE3 on Kv channel biology, with an emphasis on regulation of KCNQ1. Slow-activating IKs channel complexes formed by KCNQ1 and KCNE1 are essential for human ventricular myocyte repolarization, while constitutively active KCNQ1-KCNE3 channels are important in the intestine. Inherited sequence variants in human KCNE1 and KCNE3 cause cardiac arrhythmias but by different mechanisms, and each is important for hearing in unique ways. Because of their contrasting effects on KCNQ1 function, KCNE1 and KCNE3 have proved invaluable tools in the mechanistic understanding of how channel gating can be manipulated, and each may also provide a window into novel insights and new therapeutic opportunities in K(+) channel pharmacology. Finally, findings from studies of Kcne1(-/-) and Kcne3(-/-) mouse lines serve to illustrate the complexity of KCNE biology and KCNE-linked disease states.

  9. Mapping of scorpion toxin receptor sites at voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevitz, Michael

    2012-09-15

    Scorpion alpha and beta toxins interact with voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) at two pharmacologically distinct sites. Alpha toxins bind at receptor site-3 and inhibit channel inactivation, whereas beta toxins bind at receptor site-4 and shift the voltage-dependent activation toward more hyperpolarizing potentials. The two toxin classes are subdivided to distinct pharmacological groups according to their binding preferences and ability to compete for the receptor sites at Na(v) subtypes. To elucidate the toxin-channel surface of interaction at both receptor sites and clarify the molecular basis of varying toxin preferences, an efficient bacterial system for their expression in recombinant form was established. Mutagenesis accompanied by toxicity, binding and electrophysiological assays, in parallel to determination of the three-dimensional structure using NMR and X-ray crystallography uncovered a bipartite bioactive surface in toxin representatives of all pharmacological groups. Exchange of external loops between the mammalian brain channel rNa(v)1.2a and the insect channel DmNa(v)1 highlighted channel regions involved in the varying sensitivity to assorted toxins. In parallel, thorough mutagenesis of channel external loops illuminated points of putative interaction with the toxins. Amino acid substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain II of rNa(v)1.2a had prominent impact on the activity of the beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus), and substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain IV affected the activity of the alpha-toxin Lqh2 (from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus). Rosetta modeling of toxin-Na(v) interaction using the voltage sensor module of the potassium channel as template raises commonalities in the way alpha and beta toxins interact with the channel. Css4 interacts with rNa(v)1.2a at a crevice between S1-S2 and S3-S4 transmembrane segments in domain

  10. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J;

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i...

  11. Solution structure and alanine scan of a spider toxin that affects the activation of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo, Gerardo; Sabo, Jennifer K; Bosmans, Frank; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Tytgat, Jan; Norton, Raymond S

    2007-02-16

    Magi 5, from the hexathelid spider Macrothele gigas, is a 29-residue polypeptide containing three disulfide bridges. It binds specifically to receptor site 4 on mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels and competes with scorpion beta-toxins, such as Css IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus. As a consequence, Magi 5 shifts the activation voltage of the mammalian rNav1.2a channel to more hyperpolarized voltages, whereas the insect channel, DmNav1, is not affected. To gain insight into toxin-channel interactions, Magi 5 and 23 analogues were synthesized. The three-dimensional structure of Magi 5 in aqueous solution was determined, and its voltage-gated sodium channel-binding surfaces were mapped onto this structure using data from electrophysiological measurements on a series of Ala-substituted analogues. The structure clearly resembles the inhibitor cystine knot structural motif, although the triple-stranded beta-sheet typically found in that motif is partially distorted in Magi 5. The interactive surface of Magi 5 toward voltage-gated sodium channels resembles in some respects the Janus-faced atracotoxins, with functionally important charged residues on one face of the toxin and hydrophobic residues on the other. Magi 5 also resembles the scorpion beta-toxin Css IV, which has distinct nonpolar and charged surfaces that are critical for channel binding and has a key Glu involved in voltage sensor trapping. These two distinct classes of toxin, with different amino acid sequences and different structures, may utilize similar groups of residues on their surface to achieve the common end of modifying voltage-gated sodium channel function.

  12. Regulation of voltage-gated sodium current by endogenous Src family kinases in cochlear spiral ganglion neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuang; Pflueger, Melissa; Lin, Shuang-Xiu; Groveman, Bradley R; Su, Jiping; Yu, Xian-Min

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+)channels have been found to be regulated by Src family kinases(SFKs).However, how these channels are regulated by SFKs in cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) remains unknown.Here, we report that altering the activity of endogenous SFKs modulated voltage-gated Na+, but not K+, currents recorded in embryonic SGNs in culture. Voltage-gated Na+ current was suppressed by inhibition of endogenous SFKs or just Src and potentiated by the activation of these enzymes. Detailed investigations showed that under basal conditions, SFK inhibitor application did not significantly affect the voltage-dependent activation, but shifted the steady-state inactivation curves of Na+ currents and delayed the recovery of Na+ currents from inactivation. Application of Src specific inhibitor, Src40–58,not only shifted the inactivation curve but also delayed the recovery of Na+ currents and moved the voltage-dependent activation curve towards the left. The pre-inhibition of SFKs occluded all the effects induced by Src40–58 application, except the left shift of the activation curve. The activation of SFKs did not change either steady-state inactivation or recovery of Na+ currents, but caused the left shift of the activation curve.SFK inhibitor application effectively prevented all the effects induced by SFK activation, suggesting that both the voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation of Na+ current are subjects of SFK regulation. The different effects induced by activation versus inhibition of SFKs implied that under basal conditions, endogenously active and inactive SFKs might be differentially involved in the regulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels in SGNs.

  13. Low Voltage Low Power Quadrature LC Oscillator Based on Back-gate Superharmonic Capacitive Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Minglin; Li, Zhijun

    2013-09-01

    This work introduces a new low voltage low power superharmonic capacitive coupling quadrature LC oscillator (QLCO) made by coupling two identical cross-connected LC oscillators without tail transistor. In each of the core oscillators, the back-gate nodes of the cross-coupled NMOS pair and PMOS pair, acting as common mode nodes, have been connected directly. Then the core oscillators are coupled together via capacitive coupling of the PMOS common mode node in one of the core oscillators to the NMOS common mode node in the other core oscillator, and vice versa. Only capacitors are used for coupling of the two core oscillators and therefore no extra noise sources are imposed on the circuit. Operation of the proposed QLCO was investigated with simulation using a commercial 0.18 µm RF CMOS technology: it shows a power dissipation of 5.2 mW from a 0.6 V supply voltage. Since the proposed core oscillator has Complementary NMOS and PMOS cross coupled pairs, and capacitive coupling method will not introduce extra phase noise, so this circuit can operate with a low phase noise as low as -126.8 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from center oscillation frequency of 2.4 GHz, as confirmed with simulation.

  14. Functional expression of voltage-gated calcium channels in human melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A; Pushparaj, C; Bahí, N; Sorolla, A; Herreros, J; Pamplona, R; Vilella, R; Matias-Guiu, X; Martí, R M; Cantí, C

    2012-03-01

    The expression of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) has not been reported previously in melanoma cells in spite of increasing evidence of a role of VGCCs in tumorigenesis and tumour progression. To address this issue we have performed an extensive RT-PCR analysis of VGCC expression in human melanocytes and a range of melanoma cell lines and biopsies. In addition, we have tested the functional expression of these channels using Ca(2+) imaging techniques and examined their relevance for the viability and proliferation of the melanoma cells. Our results show that control melanocytes and melanoma cells express channel isoforms belonging to the Ca(v) 1 and Ca(v) 2 gene families. Importantly, the expression of low voltage-activated Ca(v) 3 (T-type) channels is restricted to melanoma. We have confirmed the function of T-type channels as mediators of constitutive Ca(2+) influx in melanoma cells. Finally, pharmacological and gene silencing approaches demonstrate a role for T-type channels in melanoma viability and proliferation. These results encourage the analysis of T-type VGCCs as targets for therapeutic intervention in melanoma tumorigenesis and/or tumour progression. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. A two-dimensional threshold voltage analytical model for metal-gate/high-k/SiO2/Si stacked MOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Fei; Liu Hong-Xia; Fan Ji-Bin; Wang Shu-Long

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the influences of the metal-gate and high-k/SiO2/Si stacked structure on the metal-oxidesemiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) axe investigated.The flat-band voltage is revised by considering the influences of stacked structure and metal-semiconductor work function fluctuation. The two-dimensional Poisson's equation of potential distribution is presented.A threshold voltage analytical model for metal-gate/high-k/SiO2/Si stacked MOSFETs is developed by solving these Poisson's equations using the boundary conditions.The model is verified by a two-dimensional device simulator,which provides the basic design guidance for metal-gate/high-k/SiO2/Si stacked MOSFETs.

  16. Low-voltage large-current ion gel gated polymer transistors fabricated by a "cut and bond" process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xianyi; Bao, Bei; Zhao, Jiaqing; Tang, Wei; Wang, Shun; Guo, Xiaojun

    2015-03-04

    A "cut and bond" process using a commercial die bonder was developed for fabricating ion gel gated organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs). It addresses the issues of damaging or contaminating the channel layer when depositing the ion gel layer on top in conventional fabrication processes. The formed isolated dielectric regions can help to eliminate possible lateral electric field coupling through the dielectric layer when several devices are integrated to construct functional circuits. The fabricated OTFTs provide mA-level ON current, and an ON/OFF current ratio higher than 10(5) with the gate swing voltage of less than 3 V. With the developed process, the ion gel OTFTs are integrated with inorganic light emitting diodes (LEDs) of different colors on plastic substrate using the same die bonder, and the light emission of the LEDs can be modulated in a wide range from dark to high brightness with change of the gate voltage less than 3 V.

  17. A fully on-chip fast-transient NMOS low dropout voltage regulator with quasi floating gate pass element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Gou, Chao; Luo, Kai

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a fully on-chip NMOS low-dropout regulator (LDO) for portable applications with quasi floating gate pass element and fast transient response. The quasi floating gate structure makes the gate of the NMOS transistor only periodically charged or refreshed by the charge pump, which allows the charge pump to be a small economical circuit with small silicon area. In addition, a variable reference circuit is introduced enlarging the dynamic range of error amplifier during load transient. The proposed LDO has been implemented in a 0.35 μm BCD process. From experimental results, the regulator can operate with a minimum dropout voltage of 250 mV at a maximum 1 A load and {I}{{Q}} of 395 μA. Under full-range load current step, the voltage undershoot and overshoot of the proposed LDO are reduced to 50 and 26 mV, respectively.

  18. Comparison of Voltage Gated K(+) Currents in Arterial Myocytes with Heterologously Expressed K v Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robert H; Fromme, Samantha

    2016-12-01

    We have shown that three components contribute to functional voltage gated K(+) (K v) currents in rat small mesenteric artery myocytes: (1) Kv1.2 plus Kv1.5 with Kvβ1.2 subunits, (2) Kv2.1 probably associated with Kv9.3 subunits, and (3) Kv7.4 subunits. To confirm and address subunit stoichiometry of the first two, we have compared the biophysical properties of K v currents in small mesenteric artery myocytes with those of Kv subunits heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells using whole cell voltage clamp methods. Selective inhibitors of Kv1 (correolide, COR) and Kv2 (stromatoxin, ScTx) channels were used to separate these K v current components. Conductance-voltage and steady state inactivation data along with time constants of activation, inactivation, and deactivation of native K v components were generally well represented by those of Kv1.2-1.5-β1.2 and Kv2.1-9.3 channels. The slope of the steady state inactivation-voltage curve (availability slope) proved to be the most sensitive measure of accessory subunit presence. The availability slope curves exhibited a single peak for both native K v components. Availability slope curves for Kv1.2-1.5-β1.2 and Kv2.1-9.3 channels expressed in human embryonic kidney cells also exhibited a single peak that shifted to more depolarized voltages with increasing accessory to α subunit transfection ratio. Availability slope curves for SxTc-insensitive currents were similar to those of Kv1.2-1.5 expressed with Kvβ1.2 at a 1:5 molar ratio while curves for COR-insensitive currents closely resembled those of Kv2.1 expressed with Kv9.3 at a 1:1 molar ratio. These results support the suggested Kv subunit combinations in small mesenteric artery, and further suggest that Kv1 α and Kvβ1.2 but not Kv2.1 and Kv9.3 subunits are present in a saturated (4:4) stoichiometry.

  19. Molecular Model of Anticonvulsant Drug Binding to the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Inner Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkind, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    The tricyclic anticonvulsant drugs phenytoin, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine block neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels, and their binding sites to domain IV-S6 in the channel's inner pore overlap with those of local anesthetic drugs. These anticonvulsants are neutral, in contrast to the mostly positively charged local anesthetics, but their open/inactivated-state blocking affinities are similar. Using a model of the open pore of the Na+ channel that we developed by homology with the crystal structures of potassium channels, we have docked these three anticonvulsants with residues identified by mutagenesis as important for their binding energy. The three drugs show a common pharmacophore, including an aromatic ring that has an aromatic-aromatic interaction with Tyr-1771 of NaV1.2 and a polar amide or imide that interacts with the aromatic ring of Phe-1764 by a low-energy amino-aromatic hydrogen bond. The second aromatic ring is nearly at a right angle to the pharmacophore and fills the pore lumen, probably interacting with the other S6 segments and physically occluding the inner pore to block Na+ permeation. Hydrophobic interactions with this second aromatic ring may contribute an important component to binding for anticonvulsants, which compensates energetically for the absence of positive charge in their structures. Voltage dependence of block, their important therapeutic property, results from their interaction with Phe-1764, which connects them to the voltage sensors. Their use dependence is modest and this results from being neutral, with a fast drug off-rate after repolarization, allowing a normal action potential rate in the presence of the drugs. PMID:20643904

  20. Effect of gate length on breakdown voltage in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Luo; Sheng-Lei, Zhao; Min-Han, Mi; Wei-Wei, Chen; Bin, Hou; Jin-Cheng, Zhang; Xiao-Hua, Ma; Yue, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The effects of gate length LG on breakdown voltage VBR are investigated in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) with LG = 1 μm˜ 20 μm. With the increase of LG, VBR is first increased, and then saturated at LG = 3 μm. For the HEMT with LG = 1 μm, breakdown voltage VBR is 117 V, and it can be enhanced to 148 V for the HEMT with LG = 3 μm. The gate length of 3 μm can alleviate the buffer-leakage-induced impact ionization compared with the gate length of 1 μm, and the suppression of the impact ionization is the reason for improving the breakdown voltage. A similar suppression of the impact ionization exists in the HEMTs with LG > 3 μm. As a result, there is no obvious difference in breakdown voltage among the HEMTs with LG = 3 μm˜20 μm, and their breakdown voltages are in a range of 140 V-156 V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002, 61106106, and 61204085).

  1. The insecticidal neurotoxin Aps III is an atypical knottin peptide that potently blocks insect voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bende, Niraj S; Kang, Eunji; Herzig, Volker; Bosmans, Frank; Nicholson, Graham M; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F

    2013-05-15

    One of the most potent insecticidal venom peptides described to date is Aps III from the venom of the trapdoor spider Apomastus schlingeri. Aps III is highly neurotoxic to lepidopteran crop pests, making it a promising candidate for bioinsecticide development. However, its disulfide-connectivity, three-dimensional structure, and mode of action have not been determined. Here we show that recombinant Aps III (rAps III) is an atypical knottin peptide; three of the disulfide bridges form a classical inhibitor cystine knot motif while the fourth disulfide acts as a molecular staple that restricts the flexibility of an unusually large β hairpin loop that often houses the pharmacophore in this class of toxins. We demonstrate that the irreversible paralysis induced in insects by rAps III results from a potent block of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. Channel block by rAps III is voltage-independent insofar as it occurs without significant alteration in the voltage-dependence of channel activation or steady-state inactivation. Thus, rAps III appears to be a pore blocker that plugs the outer vestibule of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. This mechanism of action contrasts strikingly with virtually all other sodium channel modulators isolated from spider venoms that act as gating modifiers by interacting with one or more of the four voltage-sensing domains of the channel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The conduction mechanism of stress induced leakage current through ultra-thin gate oxide under constant voltage stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan-Gang; Xu Ming-Zhen; Tan Chang-Hua; Zhang Zhang J.F; Duan Xiao-Rong

    2005-01-01

    The conduction mechanism of stress induced leakage current (SILC) through 2nm gate oxide is studied over a gate voltage range between 1.7V and stress voltage under constant voltage stress (CVS). The simulation results show that the SILC is formed by trap-assisted tunnelling (TAT) process which is dominated by oxide traps induced by high field stresses. Their energy levels obtained by this work are approximately 1.9eV from the oxide conduction band, and the traps are believed to be the oxygen-related donor-like defects induced by high field stresses. The dependence of the trap density on stress time and oxide electric field is also investigated.

  3. Regulation of membrane excitability: a convergence on voltage-gated sodium conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Baines, Richard A

    2015-02-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) plays a key role in regulation of neuronal excitability. Aberrant regulation of Nav expression and/or function can result in an imbalance in neuronal activity which can progress to epilepsy. Regulation of Nav activity is achieved by coordination of a multitude of mechanisms including RNA alternative splicing and translational repression. Understanding of these regulatory mechanisms is complicated by extensive genetic redundancy: the mammalian genome encodes ten Navs. By contrast, the genome of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, contains just one Nav homologue, encoded by paralytic (DmNa v ). Analysis of splicing in DmNa v shows variants exhibit distinct gating properties including varying magnitudes of persistent sodium current (INaP). Splicing by Pasilla, an identified RNA splicing factor, alters INaP magnitude as part of an activity-dependent mechanism. Enhanced INaP promotes membrane hyperexcitability that is associated with seizure-like behaviour in Drosophila. Nova-2, a mammalian Pasilla homologue, has also been linked to splicing of Navs and, moreover, mouse gene knockouts display seizure-like behaviour.Expression level of Navs is also regulated through a mechanism of translational repression in both flies and mammals. The translational repressor Pumilio (Pum) can bind to Na v transcripts and repress the normal process of translation, thus regulating sodium current (INa) density in neurons. Pum2-deficient mice exhibit spontaneous EEG abnormalities. Taken together, aberrant regulation of Nav function and/or expression is often epileptogenic. As such, a better understanding of regulation of membrane excitability through RNA alternative splicing and translational repression of Navs should provide new leads to treat epilepsy.

  4. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit, E-mail: nilugrandson@gmail.com

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  5. Analytical model of threshold voltage degradation due to localized charges in gate material engineered Schottky barrier cylindrical GAA MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Haldar, Subhasis; Gupta, Mridula; Gupta, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    The threshold voltage degradation due to the hot carrier induced localized charges (LC) is a major reliability concern for nanoscale Schottky barrier (SB) cylindrical gate all around (GAA) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The degradation physics of gate material engineered (GME)-SB-GAA MOSFETs due to LC is still unexplored. An explicit threshold voltage degradation model for GME-SB-GAA-MOSFETs with the incorporation of localized charges (N it) is developed. To accurately model the threshold voltage the minimum channel carrier density has been taken into account. The model renders how +/- LC affects the device subthreshold performance. One-dimensional (1D) Poisson’s and 2D Laplace equations have been solved for two different regions (fresh and damaged) with two different gate metal work-functions. LCs are considered at the drain side with low gate metal work-function as N it is more vulnerable towards the drain. For the reduction of carrier mobility degradation, a lightly doped channel has been considered. The proposed model also includes the effect of barrier height lowering at the metal-semiconductor interface. The developed model results have been verified using numerical simulation data obtained by the ATLAS-3D device simulator and excellent agreement is observed between analytical and simulation results.

  6. Effects of acidic pH on voltage-gated ion channels in rat trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Eon; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Choi, In-Sun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Jang, Il-Sung

    2017-03-01

    The effects of acidic pH on several voltage-dependent ion channels, such as voltage-dependent K(+) and Ca(2+) channels, and hyperpolarization-gated and cyclic nucleotide-activated cation (HCN) channels, were examined using a whole-cell patch clamp technique on mechanically isolated rat mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons. The application of a pH 6.5 solution had no effect on the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K(+) currents. A pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K(+) currents. The pH 6.0 also shifted both the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The application of a pH 6.5 solution scarcely affected the peak amplitude of membrane currents mediated by HCN channels, which were profoundly inhibited by the general HCN channel blocker Cs(+) (1 mM). However, the pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of HCN-mediated currents. Although the pH 6.0 solution showed complex modulation of the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships, the midpoint voltages for the activation of HCN channels were not changed by acidic pH. On the other hand, voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels were significantly inhibited by an acidic pH. The application of an acidic pH solution significantly shifted the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The modulation of several voltage-dependent ion channels by an acidic pH might affect the excitability of mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons, and thus physiological functions mediated by the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus could be affected in acidic pH conditions.

  7. Voltage-gated K+ currents in mouse articular chondrocytes regulate membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert B; Hatano, Noriyuki; Kondo, Colleen; Belke, Darrell D; Brown, Barry S; Kumar, Sanjay; Votta, Bartholomew J; Giles, Wayne R

    2010-01-01

    Membrane currents and resting potential of isolated primary mouse articular chondrocytes maintained in monolayer cell culture for 1-9 days were recorded using patch clamp methods. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the most abundantly expressed transcript of voltage-gated K(+) channels was for K(V)1.6, and immunological methods confirmed the expression of K(V)1.6 α-subunit proteins. These chondrocytes expressed a large time- and potential-dependent, Ca(2+)-independent 'delayed rectifier' K(+) current. Steady-state activation was well-fit by a Boltzmann function with a threshold near -50 mV, and a half-activation potential of -34.5 mV. The current was 50% blocked by 1.48 mM tetraethylammonium, 0.66 mM 4-aminopyridine and 20.6 nM α-dendrotoxin. The current inactivated very slowly at membrane potentials in the range of the resting potential of the chondrocytes. Resting membrane potential of the chondrocytes at room temperature (19-21°C) and in 5 mM external K(+) was -46.4 ± 1.3 mV (mean ± s.e.m; n = 23), near the 'foot' of the activation curve of this K(+) current. Resting potential was depolarized by an average of 4.2 ± 0.8 mV by 25 mM TEA, which blocked about 95% of the K(+) current. At a membrane potential of -50 mV, the apparent time constant of inactivation (tau(in)) was 37.9 s, and the 'steady-state' current level was 19% of that at a holding potential of -90 mV; at -40 mV, tau(in) was 20.3 s, and 'steady-state' current was 5% of that at -90 mV. These results demonstrate that in these primary cultured, mouse articular chondrocytes steady-state activation of a voltage-gated K(+) current contributes to resting membrane potential. However, this current is also likely to have a significant physiological role in repolarizing the chondrocyte following depolarizing stimuli that might occur in conditions of membrane stretch. For example, activation of TRP('transient receptor potential') non-specific cation channels in these cells during cyclic loading and unloading

  8. Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy associated with a high voltage gated calcium channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardson, Simon; Oz, Shimrit; Abulhijaa, Fida Aziz; Taher, Flora Barghouthi; Shaag, Avraham; Zenvirt, Shamir; Dascal, Nathan; Elpeleg, Orly

    2013-02-01

    Early infantile epileptic encephalopathies usually manifest as severely impaired cognitive and motor development and often result in a devastating permanent global developmental delay and intellectual disability. A large set of genes has been implicated in the aetiology of this heterogeneous group of disorders. Among these, the ion channelopathies play a prominent role. In this study, we investigated the genetic cause of infantile epilepsy in three affected siblings. Homozygosity mapping in DNA samples followed by exome analysis in one of the patients resulted in the identification of a homozygous mutation, p.L1040P, in the CACNA2D2 gene. This gene encodes the auxiliary α(2)δ2 subunit of high voltage gated calcium channels. The expression of the α(2)δ2-L1040P mutant instead of α(2)δ2 wild-type (WT) in Xenopus laevis oocytes was associated with a notable reduction of current density of both N (Ca(V)2.2) and L (Ca(V)1.2) type calcium channels. Western blot and confocal imaging analyses showed that the α(2)δ2-L1040P mutant was synthesised normally in oocyte but only the α(2)δ2-WT, and not the α(2)δ2-L1040P mutant, increased the expression of α(1B), the pore forming subunit of Ca(V)2.2, at the plasma membrane. The expression of α(2)δ2-WT with Ca(V)2.2 increased the surface expression of α(1B) 2.5-3 fold and accelerated current inactivation, whereas α(2)δ2-L1040P did not produce any of these effects. L1040P mutation in the CACNA2D2 gene is associated with dysfunction of α(2)δ2, resulting in reduced current density and slow inactivation in neuronal calcium channels. The prolonged calcium entry during depolarisation and changes in surface density of calcium channels caused by deficient α(2)δ2 could underlie the epileptic phenotype. This is the first report of an encephalopathy caused by mutation in the auxiliary α(2)δ subunit of high voltage gated calcium channels in humans, illustrating the importance of this subunit in normal physiology of the

  9. Identification of BACE1 cleavage sites in human voltage-gated sodium channel beta 2 subunit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs Dora M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The voltage-gated sodium channel β2 subunit (Navβ2 is a physiological substrate of BACE1 (β-site APP cleaving enzyme and γ-secretase, two proteolytic enzymes central to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Previously, we have found that the processing of Navβ2 by BACE1 and γ-secretase regulates sodium channel metabolism in neuronal cells. In the current study we identified the BACE1 cleavage sites in human Navβ2. Results We found a major (147-148 L↓M, where ↓ indicates the cleavage site and a minor (144145 L↓Q BACE1 cleavage site in the extracellular domain of human Navβ2 using a cell-free BACE1 cleavage assay followed by mass spectrometry. Next, we introduced two different double mutations into the identified major BACE1 cleavage site in human Navβ2: 147LM/VI and 147LM/AA. Both mutations dramatically decreased the cleavage of human Navβ2 by endogenous BACE1 in cell-free BACE1 cleavage assays. Neither of the two mutations affected subcellular localization of Navβ2 as confirmed by confocal fluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation of cholesterol-rich domains. Finally, wildtype and mutated Navβ2 were expressed along BACE1 in B104 rat neuroblastoma cells. In spite of α-secretase still actively cleaving the mutant proteins, Navβ2 cleavage products decreased by ~50% in cells expressing Navβ2 (147LM/VI and ~75% in cells expressing Navβ2 (147LM/AA as compared to cells expressing wildtype Navβ2. Conclusion We identified a major (147-148 L↓M and a minor (144-145 L↓Q BACE1 cleavage site in human Navβ2. Our in vitro and cell-based results clearly show that the 147-148 L↓M is the major BACE1 cleavage site in human Navβ2. These findings expand our understanding of the role of BACE1 in voltage-gated sodium channel metabolism.

  10. Controllable Hysteresis and Threshold Voltage of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-tube Transistors with Ferroelectric Polymer Top-Gate Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Lin; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhang, Cheng; Dai, Rui-Xuan; Li, Xian; Meng, Xiang-Jian; Zhu, Hong-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Double-gated field effect transistors have been fabricated using the SWCNT networks as channel layer and the organic ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) film spin-coated as top gate insulators. Standard photolithography process has been adopted to achieve the patterning of organic P(VDF-TrFE) films and top-gate electrodes, which is compatible with conventional CMOS process technology. An effective way for modulating the threshold voltage in the channel of P(VDF-TrFE) top-gate transistors under polarization has been reported. The introduction of functional P(VDF-TrFE) gate dielectric also provides us an alternative method to suppress the initial hysteresis of SWCNT networks and obtain a controllable ferroelectric hysteresis behavior. Applied bottom gate voltage has been found to be another effective way to highly control the threshold voltage of the networked SWCNTs based FETs by electrostatic doping effect.

  11. SKF-96365 strongly inhibits voltage-gated sodium current in rat ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kui-Hao; Liu, Hui; Yang, Lei; Jin, Man-Wen; Li, Gui-Rong

    2015-06-01

    SKF-96365 (1-(beta-[3-(4-methoxy-phenyl) propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl)-1H-imidazole hydrochloride) is a general TRPC channel antagonist commonly used to characterize the potential functions of TRPC channels in cardiovascular system. Recent reports showed that SKF-96365 induced a reduction in cardiac conduction. The present study investigates whether the reduced cardiac conduction caused by SKF-96365 is related to the blockade of voltage-gated sodium current (I Na) in rat ventricular myocytes using the whole-cell patch voltage-clamp technique. It was found that SKF-96365 inhibited I Na in rat ventricular myocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound (1 μM) negatively shifted the potential of I Na availability by 9.5 mV, increased the closed-state inactivation of I Na, and slowed the recovery of I Na from inactivation. The inhibition of cardiac I Na by SKF-96365 was use-dependent and frequency-dependent, and the IC₅₀ was decreased from 1.36 μM at 0.5 Hz to 1.03, 0.81, 0.61, 0.56 μM at 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz, respectively. However, the selective TRPC3 antagonist Pyr3 decreased cardiac I Na by 8.5% at 10 μM with a weak use and frequency dependence. These results demonstrate that the TRPC channel antagonist SKF-96365 strongly blocks cardiac I Na in use-dependent and frequency-dependent manners. Caution should be taken for interpreting the alteration of cardiac electrical activity when SKF-96365 is used in native cells as a TRPC antagonist.

  12. Effect of dexamethasone on voltage-gated Na+ channel in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Toshiaki; Jo, Taisuke; Meguro, Kentaro; Oonuma, Hitoshi; Ma, Ji; Kubota, Nami; Imuta, Hiroyuki; Takano, Haruhito; Iida, Haruko; Nagase, Takahide; Nagata, Taiji

    2008-06-06

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel (I(Na)) encoded by SCN9A mRNA is expressed in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells. We investigated the effects of dexamethasone on I(Na), by using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques, reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Acute application of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) did not affect I(Na). However, the percentage of the cells with I(Na) was significantly less in cells pretreated with dexamethasone for 48 h, and the current-density of I(Na) adjusted by cell capacitance in cells with I(Na) was also decreased in cells treated with dexamethasone. RT-PCR analysis showed that alpha and beta subunits mRNA of I(Na) mainly consisted of SCN9A and SCN1beta, respectively. Treatment with dexamethasone for 24-48 h inhibited the expression of SCN9A mRNA. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone was concentration-dependent, and was observed at a concentration higher than 0.1 nM. The effect of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA was not blocked by spironolactone, but inhibited by mifepristone. The inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA could not be explained by the changes of the stabilization of mRNA measured by using actinomycin D. These results suggest that dexamethasone inhibited I(Na) encoded by SCN9A mRNA in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells by inhibiting the transcription via the glucocorticoid receptor.

  13. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

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    Pietro eMesirca

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3-/- or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1-/- channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias.

  14. Voltage-clamp predictions by gompertz kinetics model relating squid-axon Na+-gating and ionic currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Dexter M

    2005-10-01

    Gompertz kinetics is a simple, realistic, accurate, and computationally parsimonious alternative for prediction of macroscopic changes in Na+ conductance during voltage clamp. Conductance delay and time course depend on initial amplitudes and decay rates of surrogates for the macroscopic gating currents. The model is tested by the fit to published data of other authors. The proposed physical basis for the model is that membrane potential perturbation triggers motion of charged "gating" components of the axon membrane at rapid (activating) and at slow (inactivating) rates. The resulting distortion increases and more slowly diminishes the probability that conduction channels will be open.

  15. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  16. Ether-à-go-go family voltage-gated K+ channels evolved in an ancestral metazoan and functionally diversified in a cnidarian–bilaterian ancestor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Martinson, Alexandra S.; Layden, Michael J.; Diatta, Fortunay H.; Sberna, Anna P.; Simmons, David K.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Jegla, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the evolutionary origins of the ether-à-go-go (EAG) family of voltage-gated K+ channels, which have a strong influence on the excitability of neurons. The bilaterian EAG family comprises three gene subfamilies (Eag, Erg and Elk) distinguished by sequence conservation and functional properties. Searches of genome sequence indicate that EAG channels are metazoan specific, appearing first in ctenophores. However, phylogenetic analysis including two EAG family channels from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi indicates that the diversification of the Eag, Erg and Elk gene subfamilies occurred in a cnidarian/bilaterian ancestor after divergence from ctenophores. Erg channel function is highly conserved between cnidarians and mammals. Here we show that Eag and Elk channels from the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (NvEag and NvElk) also share high functional conservation with mammalian channels. NvEag, like bilaterian Eag channels, has rapid kinetics, whereas NvElk activates at extremely hyperpolarized voltages, which is characteristic of Elk channels. Potent inhibition of voltage activation by extracellular protons is conserved between mammalian and Nematostella EAG channels. However, characteristic inhibition of voltage activation by Mg2+ in Eag channels and Ca2+ in Erg channels is reduced in Nematostella because of mutation of a highly conserved aspartate residue in the voltage sensor. This mutation may preserve sub-threshold activation of Nematostella Eag and Erg channels in a high divalent cation environment. mRNA in situ hybridization of EAG channels in Nematostella suggests that they are differentially expressed in distinct cell types. Most notable is the expression of NvEag in cnidocytes, a cnidarian-specific stinging cell thought to be a neuronal subtype. PMID:25696816

  17. Ether-à-go-go family voltage-gated K+ channels evolved in an ancestral metazoan and functionally diversified in a cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Martinson, Alexandra S; Layden, Michael J; Diatta, Fortunay H; Sberna, Anna P; Simmons, David K; Martindale, Mark Q; Jegla, Timothy J

    2015-02-15

    We examined the evolutionary origins of the ether-à-go-go (EAG) family of voltage-gated K(+) channels, which have a strong influence on the excitability of neurons. The bilaterian EAG family comprises three gene subfamilies (Eag, Erg and Elk) distinguished by sequence conservation and functional properties. Searches of genome sequence indicate that EAG channels are metazoan specific, appearing first in ctenophores. However, phylogenetic analysis including two EAG family channels from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi indicates that the diversification of the Eag, Erg and Elk gene subfamilies occurred in a cnidarian/bilaterian ancestor after divergence from ctenophores. Erg channel function is highly conserved between cnidarians and mammals. Here we show that Eag and Elk channels from the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (NvEag and NvElk) also share high functional conservation with mammalian channels. NvEag, like bilaterian Eag channels, has rapid kinetics, whereas NvElk activates at extremely hyperpolarized voltages, which is characteristic of Elk channels. Potent inhibition of voltage activation by extracellular protons is conserved between mammalian and Nematostella EAG channels. However, characteristic inhibition of voltage activation by Mg(2+) in Eag channels and Ca(2+) in Erg channels is reduced in Nematostella because of mutation of a highly conserved aspartate residue in the voltage sensor. This mutation may preserve sub-threshold activation of Nematostella Eag and Erg channels in a high divalent cation environment. mRNA in situ hybridization of EAG channels in Nematostella suggests that they are differentially expressed in distinct cell types. Most notable is the expression of NvEag in cnidocytes, a cnidarian-specific stinging cell thought to be a neuronal subtype. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. The sorting receptor Rer1 controls Purkinje cell function via voltage gated sodium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkova, Christina; Liebmann, Lutz; Krämer, Andreas; Hübner, Christian A.; Kaether, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Rer1 is a sorting receptor in the early secretory pathway that controls the assembly and the cell surface transport of selected multimeric membrane protein complexes. Mice with a Purkinje cell (PC) specific deletion of Rer1 showed normal polarization and differentiation of PCs and normal development of the cerebellum. However, PC-specific loss of Rer1 led to age-dependent motor deficits in beam walk, ladder climbing and gait. Analysis of brain sections revealed a specific degeneration of PCs in the anterior cerebellar lobe in old animals. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated severe deficits in spontaneous action potential generation. Measurements of resurgent currents indicated decreased surface densities of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), but not changes in individual channels. Analysis of mice with a whole brain Rer1-deletion demonstrated a strong down-regulation of Nav1.6 and 1.1 in the absence of Rer1, whereas protein levels of the related Cav2.1 and of Kv3.3 and 7.2 channels were not affected. The data suggest that Rer1 controls the assembly and transport of Nav1.1 and 1.6, the principal sodium channels responsible for recurrent firing, in PCs. PMID:28117367

  19. Persistent photocurrent (PPC) in solution-processed organic thin film transistors: Mechanisms of gate voltage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Subhash; Mohapatra, Y. N.

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing need to understand mechanisms of photoresponse in devices based on organic semiconductor thin films and interfaces. The phenomenon of persistent photocurrent (PPC) has been systematically investigated in solution processed TIPS-Pentacene based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) as an important example of an organic semiconductor material system. With increasing light intensity from dark to 385 mW/cm2, there is a significant shift in threshold voltage (VTh) while the filed-effect mobility remains unchanged. The OTFT shows large photoresponse under white light illumination due to exponential tail states with characteristic energy parameter of 86 meV. The photo-induced current is observed to persist even for several hours after turning the light off. To investigate the origin of PPC, its quenching mechanism is investigated by a variety of methods involving a combination of gate bias, illumination and temperature. We show that a coherent model of trap-charge induced carrier concentration is able to account for the quenching behavior. Analysis of isothermal transients using time-analyzed transient spectroscopy shows that the emission rates are activated and are also field enhanced due to Poole-Frankel effect. The results shed light on the nature, origin, and energetic distribution of the traps controlling PPC in solution processed organic semiconductors and their interfaces.

  20. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI-DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI-DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII-DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  1. Endogenous polyamines regulate cortical neuronal excitability by blocking voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleidervish, Ilya A; Libman, Lior; Katz, Efrat; Gutnick, Michael J

    2008-12-02

    Because the excitable properties of neurons in the neocortex depend on the characteristics of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, factors which regulate those characteristics can fundamentally modify the dynamics of cortical circuits. Here, we report on a novel neuromodulatory mechanism that links the availability of Na(+) channels to metabolism of polyamines (PAs) in the cerebral cortex. Using single channel and whole-cell recordings, we found that products of PA metabolism, the ubiquitous aliphatic polycations spermine and spermidine, are endogenous blockers of Na(+) channels in layer 5 pyramidal cells. Because the blockade is activity-dependent, it is particularly effective against Na(+) channels which fail to inactivate rapidly and thus underlie the persistent Na(+) current. At the level of the local cortical circuit, pharmacological depletion of PAs led to increased spontaneous spiking and periods of hypersynchronous discharge. Our data suggest that changes in PA levels, whether associated with normal brain states or pathological conditions, profoundly modify Na(+) channel availability and thereby shape the integrative behavior of single neurons and neocortical circuits.

  2. Targeting voltage-gated sodium channels for treatment for chronic visceral pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-Hu Qi; You-Lang Zhou; Guang-Yin Xu

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a fundamental role in controlling cellular excitability, and their abnormal activity is related to several pathological processes, including cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, spasticity and chronic pain. In particular, chronic visceral pain, the central symptom of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, is a serious clinical problem that affects a high percentage of the world population. In spite of intense research efforts and after the dedicated decade of pain control and research, there are not many options to treat chronic pain conditions. However, there is a wealth of evidence emerging to give hope that a more refined approach may be achievable. By using electronic databases, available data on structural and functional properties of VGSCs in chronic pain, particularly functional gastrointestinal hypersensitivity, were reviewed. We summarize the involvement and molecular bases of action of VGSCs in the pathophysiology of several organic and functional gastrointestinal disorders. We also describe the efficacy of VGSC blockers in the treatment of these neurological diseases, and outline future developments that may extend the therapeutic use of compounds that target VGSCs. Overall, clinical and experimental data indicate that isoform-specific blockers of these channels or targeting of their modulators may provide effective and novel approaches for visceral pain therapy.

  3. Molecular determinants of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels for recognition of local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Takushi; Irie, Katsumasa; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-08-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) inhibit mammalian voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Navs) and are thus clinically important. LAs also inhibit prokaryotic Navs (BacNavs), which have a simpler structure than mammalian Navs. To elucidate the detailed mechanisms of LA inhibition to BacNavs, we used NavBh, a BacNav from Bacillus halodurans, to analyze the interactions of several LAs and quaternary ammoniums (QAs). Based on the chemical similarity of QA with the tertiary-alkylamine (TAA) group of LAs, QAs were used to determine the residues required for the recognition of TAA by NavBh. We confirmed that two residues, Thr220 and Phe227, are important for LA binding; a methyl group of Thr220 is important for recognizing both QAs and LAs, whereas Phe227 is involved in holding blockers at the binding site. In addition, we found that NavBh holds blockers in a closed state, consistent with the large inner cavity observed in the crystal structures of BacNavs. These findings reveal the inhibition mechanism of LAs in NavBh, where the methyl group of Thr220 provides the main receptor site for the TAA group and the bulky phenyl group of Phe227 holds the blockers inside the large inner cavity. These two residues correspond to the two LA recognition residues in mammalian Navs, which suggests the relevance of the LA recognition between BacNavs and mammalian Navs. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. A novel anticonvulsant modulates voltage-gated sodium channel inactivation and prevents kindling-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Muhammad N; Gavrilovici, Cezar; Shah, Syed U Ali; Shaheen, Farzana; Choudhary, Muhammad I; Rahman, Atta-ur; Fahnestock, Margaret; Simjee, Shabana U; Poulter, Michael O

    2013-09-01

    Here, we explore the mechanism of action of isoxylitone (ISOX), a molecule discovered in the plant Delphinium denudatum, which has been shown to have anticonvulsant properties. Patch-clamp electrophysiology assayed the activity of ISOX on voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in both cultured neurons and brain slices isolated from controls and rats with experimental epilepsy(kindling model). Quantitative transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (QPCR) assessed brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in kindled rats, and kindled rats treated with ISOX. ISOX suppressed sodium current (I(Na)) showing an IC50 value of 185 nM in cultured neurons. ISOX significantly slowed the recovery from inactivation (ISOX τ = 18.7 ms; Control τ = 9.4 ms; p kindled cortical neurons, the IC50 for sodium current block was identical to that found in cultured neurons. ISOX prevented kindled stage 5 seizures and decreased the enhanced BDNF mRNA expression that is normally associated with kindling (p kindling is likely a secondary outcome that nevertheless would suppress epileptogenesis. These data show a new class of anti-seizure compound that inhibits sodium channel function and prevents the development of epileptic seizures.

  5. Supratentorial white matter blurring associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex limbic encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H.; Mader, I. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rauer, S.; Baumgartner, A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neurology, Freiburg (Germany); Paus, S. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Wagner, J. [University Medical Center, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany); Malter, M.P. [University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Pruess, H. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Lewerenz, J.; Kassubek, J. [Ulm University, Department of Neurology, Ulm (Germany); Hegen, H.; Auer, M.; Deisenhammer, F. [University Innsbruck, Department of Neurology, Innsbruck (Austria); Ufer, F. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Bien, C.G. [Epilepsy Centre Bethel, Bielefeld-Bethel (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies (VGKC-LE) is frequently non-paraneoplastic and associated with marked improvement following corticosteroid therapy. Mesial temporal lobe abnormalities are present in around 80 % of patients. If associated or preceded by faciobrachial dystonic seizures, basal ganglia signal changes may occur. In some patients, blurring of the supratentorial white matter on T2-weighted images (SWMB) may be seen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of SWMB and whether it is specific for VGKC-LE. Two experienced neuroradiologists independently evaluated signal abnormalities on FLAIR MRI in 79 patients with LE while unaware on the antibody type. SWMB was independently assessed as present in 10 of 36 (28 %) compared to 2 (5 %) of 43 non-VGKC patients (p = 0.009). It was not related to the presence of LGI1 or CASPR2 proteins of VGKC antibodies. MRI showed increased temporomesial FLAIR signal in 22 (61 %) VGKC compared to 14 (33 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.013), and extratemporomesial structures were affected in one VGKC (3 %) compared to 11 (26 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.005). SWMB is a newly described MRI sign rather specific for VGKC-LE. (orig.)

  6. Neuregulin directly decreases voltage-gated sodium current in hippocampal ErbB4-expressing interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Megan J; Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Buonanno, Andres

    2012-10-03

    The Neuregulin 1 (NRG1)/ErbB4 signaling pathway has been genetically and functionally implicated in the etiology underlying schizophrenia, and in the regulation of glutamatergic pyramidal neuron function and plasticity. However, ErbB4 receptors are expressed in subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons, but not in hippocampal or cortical pyramidal neurons, indicating that NRG1 effects on principal neurons are indirect. Consistent with these findings, NRG1 effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation at CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses in slices are mediated indirectly by dopamine. Here we studied whether NRG/ErbB signaling directly regulates interneuron intrinsic excitability by pharmacologically isolating ErbB4-expressing neurons in rat dissociated hippocampal cultures, which lack dopaminergic innervation. We found that NRG1 acutely attenuates ErbB4-expressing interneuron excitability by depolarizing the firing threshold; neurons treated with the pan-ErbB inhibitor PD158780 or negative for ErbB4 were unaffected. These effects of NRG1 are primarily attributable to decreased voltage-gated sodium channel activity, as current density was attenuated by ∼60%. In stark contrast, NRG1 had minor effects on whole-cell potassium currents. Our data reveal the direct actions of NRG1 signaling in ErbB4-expressing interneurons, and offer novel insight into how NRG1/ErbB4 signaling can impact hippocampal activity.

  7. Conotoxins Targeting Neuronal Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes: Potential Analgesics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. McArthur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC are the primary mediators of electrical signal amplification and propagation in excitable cells. VGSC subtypes are diverse, with different biophysical and pharmacological properties, and varied tissue distribution. Altered VGSC expression and/or increased VGSC activity in sensory neurons is characteristic of inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. Therefore, VGSC modulators could be used in prospective analgesic compounds. VGSCs have specific binding sites for four conotoxin families: μ-, μO-, δ- and ί-conotoxins. Various studies have identified that the binding site of these peptide toxins is restricted to well-defined areas or domains. To date, only the μ- and μO-family exhibit analgesic properties in animal pain models. This review will focus on conotoxins from the μ- and μO-families that act on neuronal VGSCs. Examples of how these conotoxins target various pharmacologically important neuronal ion channels, as well as potential problems with the development of drugs from conotoxins, will be discussed.

  8. Voltage-gated potassium channels autoantibodies in a child with rasmussen encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Marie-Aude; Dubois-Teklali, Fanny; Vercueil, Laurent; Sabourdy, Cécile; Nugues, Frédérique; Vincent, Angela; Oliver, Viviana; Bulteau, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a severe epileptic and inflammatory encephalopathy of unknown etiology, responsible for focal neurological signs and cognitive decline. The current leading hypothesis suggests a sequence of immune reactions induced by an indeterminate factor. This sequence is thought to be responsible for the production of autoantibody-mediated central nervous system degeneration. However, these autoantibodies are not specific to the disease and not all patients present with them. We report the case of a 4-year-old girl suffering from RE displaying some atypical features such as fast evolution and seizures of left parietal onset refractory to several antiepileptics, intravenous immunoglobulins, and corticosteroids. Serum autoantibodies directed against voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) were evidenced at 739 pM, a finding never previously reported in children. This screening was performed because of an increased signal in the temporolimbic areas on brain magnetic resonance imaging, which was similar to what is observed during limbic encephalitis. The patient experienced epilepsia partialis continua with progressive right hemiplegia and aphasia. She underwent left hemispherotomy at the age of 5.5 years after which she became seizure free with great cognitive improvement. First described in adults, VGKC autoantibodies have been recently described in children with various neurological manifestations. The implication of VGKC autoantibodies in RE is a new observation and opens up new physiopathological and therapeutic avenues of investigation.

  9. Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Antibody Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis Associated with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Alcantara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS associated with malignant hemopathies, there are few reports of PNS of the central nervous system and most of them are associated with lymphomas. Limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome classically diagnosed in the context of PNS. We report the case of a 81-year-old man who presented with a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML with minimal maturation. He was admitted for confusion with unfavorable evolution as he presented a rapidly progressive dementia resulting in death. A brain magnetic resonance imaging, performed 2 months after the onset, was considered normal. An electroencephalogram showed non-specific bilateral slow waves. We received the results of the blood screening of neuronal autoantibodies after the patient's death and detected the presence of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC antibodies at 102 pmol/l (normal at <30 pmol/l. Other etiologic studies, including the screening for another cause of rapidly progressive dementia, were negative. To our knowledge, this is the first case of anti-VGKC paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to AML.

  10. BARP suppresses voltage-gated calcium channel activity and Ca2+-evoked exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguin, Pascal; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Mahalakshmi, Ramasubbu N; Vigot, Réjan; Matsunaga, Atsuko; Miki, Takafumi; Ng, Mei Yong; Ng, Yu Jin Alvin; Lim, Chiaw Hwee; Tay, Hock Soon; Hwang, Le-Ann; Firsov, Dmitri; Tang, Bor Luen; Inagaki, Nobuya; Mori, Yasuo; Seino, Susumu; Launey, Thomas; Hunziker, Walter

    2014-04-28

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are key regulators of cell signaling and Ca(2+)-dependent release of neurotransmitters and hormones. Understanding the mechanisms that inactivate VGCCs to prevent intracellular Ca(2+) overload and govern their specific subcellular localization is of critical importance. We report the identification and functional characterization of VGCC β-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP), a previously uncharacterized integral membrane glycoprotein expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neurons. BARP interacts via two cytosolic domains (I and II) with all Cavβ subunit isoforms, affecting their subcellular localization and suppressing VGCC activity. Domain I interacts at the α1 interaction domain-binding pocket in Cavβ and interferes with the association between Cavβ and Cavα1. In the absence of domain I binding, BARP can form a ternary complex with Cavα1 and Cavβ via domain II. BARP does not affect cell surface expression of Cavα1 but inhibits Ca(2+) channel activity at the plasma membrane, resulting in the inhibition of Ca(2+)-evoked exocytosis. Thus, BARP can modulate the localization of Cavβ and its association with the Cavα1 subunit to negatively regulate VGCC activity.

  11. Voltage gated calcium channels negatively regulate protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers to evade protective immune responses. Calcium release from voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC regulates immune responses to pathogens. In this study, we investigated the roles of VGCC in regulating protective immunity to mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting L-type or R-type VGCC in dendritic cells (DCs either using antibodies or by siRNA increased calcium influx in an inositol 1,4,5-phosphate and calcium release calcium activated channel dependent mechanism that resulted in increased expression of genes favoring pro-inflammatory responses. Further, VGCC-blocked DCs activated T cells that in turn mediated killing of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages. Likewise, inhibiting VGCC in infected macrophages and PBMCs induced calcium influx, upregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and resulted in enhanced killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Importantly, compared to healthy controls, PBMCs of tuberculosis patients expressed higher levels of both VGCC, which were significantly reduced following chemotherapy. Finally, blocking VGCC in vivo in M. tuberculosis infected mice using specific antibodies increased intracellular calcium and significantly reduced bacterial loads. These results indicate that L-type and R-type VGCC play a negative role in M. tuberculosis infection by regulating calcium mobilization in cells that determine protective immunity.

  12. Mechanism underlying blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels by agmatine in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-quan ZHENG; Xie-chuan WENG; Xiao-dan GAI; Jin LI; Wen-bin XIAO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether agmatine could selectively block a given type of the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) and whether related receptors are involved in the blocking effect of agmatine on VGCC. METHODS: The whole-cell patch recording technique was performed to record VGCC currents in the cultured neonatal rat hippocampal neurons. RESULTS: Verapamil (100 μmol/L), a selective blocker of L-type calcium channel, significantly inhibited VGCC current by 80 %± 7 %. Agmatine (100 μmol/L) could further depress the remained currents by 25 %±6 %. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (10 μmol/L) and the I2 imidazoline receptor antagonist idazoxon (10 and 40 μmol/L) had no significant effect on VGCC currents when used respectively. When the mixture of yohimbine and agmatine was applied, VGCC currents were still depressed remarkably. However, the blocking effect of agmatine was decreased by 29 %± 8 % in the presence of idazoxon (10 μmol/L). The effect of idazoxon did not increase at a higher concentration (40 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Agmatine could block the L- and other types of VGCC currents in the cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Blocking effect of agmatine on VGCC was partially related to I2 imidazoline receptor and had no relationship with α2-adrenoceptors.

  13. Mechanism of Ion Permeation in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Mahdavi

    Full Text Available Recent determination of the crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated sodium (NaV channels have raised hopes that modeling of the mammalian counterparts could soon be achieved. However, there are substantial differences between the pore domains of the bacterial and mammalian NaV channels, which necessitates careful validation of mammalian homology models constructed from the bacterial NaV structures. Such a validated homology model for the NaV1.4 channel was constructed recently using the extensive mutagenesis data available for binding of μ-conotoxins. Here we use this NaV1.4 model to study the ion permeation mechanism in mammalian NaV channels. Linking of the DEKA residues in the selectivity filter with residues in the neighboring domains is found to be important for keeping the permeation pathway open. Molecular dynamics simulations and potential of mean force calculations reveal that there is a binding site for a Na+ ion just inside the DEKA locus, and 1-2 Na+ ions can occupy the vestibule near the EEDD ring. These sites are separated by a low free energy barrier, suggesting that inward conduction occurs when a Na+ ion in the vestibule goes over the free energy barrier and pushes the Na+ ion in the filter to the intracellular cavity, consistent with the classical knock-on mechanism. The NaV1.4 model also provides a good description of the observed Na+/K+ selectivity.

  14. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Marion; Bennani, Omar; Verdure, Pierre; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2013-05-01

    Among paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) associated with malignant hemopathies, there are few reports of PNS of the central nervous system and most of them are associated with lymphomas. Limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome classically diagnosed in the context of PNS. We report the case of a 81-year-old man who presented with a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with minimal maturation. He was admitted for confusion with unfavorable evolution as he presented a rapidly progressive dementia resulting in death. A brain magnetic resonance imaging, performed 2 months after the onset, was considered normal. An electroencephalogram showed non-specific bilateral slow waves. We received the results of the blood screening of neuronal autoanti-bodies after the patient's death and detected the presence of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies at 102 pmol/l (normal at <30 pmol/l). Other etiologic studies, including the screening for another cause of rapidly progressive dementia, were negative. To our knowledge, this is the first case of anti-VGKC paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to AML.

  15. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV 1.9 in visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, J R F; Winchester, W J; Bulmer, D C

    2016-03-01

    Visceral pain is a common symptom for patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disease. It is unpleasant, debilitating, and represents a large unmet medical need for effective clinical treatments. Recent studies have identified NaV 1.9 as an important regulator of afferent sensitivity in visceral pain pathways to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that NaV 1.9 could represent an important therapeutic target for the treatment of visceral pain. This potential has been highlighted by the identification of patients who have an insensitivity to pain or painful neuropathies associated with mutations in SCN11A, the gene encoding voltage-gated sodium channel subtype 1.9 (NaV 1.9). Here, we address the role of NaV 1.9 in visceral pain and what known human NaV 1.9 mutants can tell us about NaV 1.9 function in gut physiology and pathophysiology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction.

  17. Voltage dependence of proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin mutants with altered lifetime of the M intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Geibel

    Full Text Available The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR from Halobacterium salinarum is tightly regulated by the [H(+] gradient and transmembrane potential. BR exhibits optoelectric properties, since spectral changes during the photocycle are kinetically controlled by voltage, which predestines BR for optical storage or processing devices. BR mutants with prolonged lifetime of the blue-shifted M intermediate would be advantageous, but the optoelectric properties of such mutants are still elusive. Using expression in Xenopus oocytes and two-electrode voltage-clamping, we analyzed photocurrents of BR mutants with kinetically destabilized (F171C, F219L or stabilized (D96N, D96G M intermediate in response to green light (to probe H(+ pumping and blue laser flashes (to probe accumulation/decay of M. These mutants have divergent M lifetimes. As for BR-WT, this strictly correlates with the voltage dependence of H(+ pumping. BR-F171C and BR-F219L showed photocurrents similar to BR-WT. Yet, BR-F171C showed a weaker voltage dependence of proton pumping. For both mutants, blue laser flashes applied during and after green-light illumination showed reduced M accumulation and shorter M lifetime. In contrast, BR-D96G and BR-D96N exhibited small photocurrents, with nonlinear current-voltage curves, which increased strongly in the presence of azide. Blue laser flashes showed heavy M accumulation and prolonged M lifetime, which accounts for the strongly reduced H(+ pumping rate. Hyperpolarizing potentials augmented these effects. The combination of M-stabilizing and -destabilizing mutations in BR-D96G/F171C/F219L (BR-tri shows that disruption of the primary proton donor Asp-96 is fatal for BR as a proton pump. Mechanistically, M destabilizing mutations cannot compensate for the disruption of Asp-96. Accordingly, BR-tri and BR-D96G photocurrents were similar. However, BR-tri showed negative blue laser flash-induced currents even without actinic green light, indicating

  18. A Doping Dependent Threshold Voltage Model of Uniformly Doped Short-Channel Symmetric Double-Gate (DG MOSFET’s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Tiwari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a doping dependent threshold voltage model for the short-channel double-gate (DG MOSFETs. The channel potential has been determined by solving the two-dimensional (2D Poisson’s equation using the parabolic potential approximation in the vertical direction of channel. Threshold voltage sensitivity on acceptor doping and device parameters is discussed in detail. The threshold voltage expression has been modified by incorporating the effects of band gap narrowing for highly doped DG MOSFETs. Quantum mechanical corrections have also been employed in the threshold voltage model. The theoretical results have been compared with the ATLASTM simulation results. The present model is found to be valid for acceptor doping variation from 1014 cm–3 to 5 × 1018cm–3.

  19. Characterization of voltage-gated K+ currents contributing to subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in hippocampal CA1 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, France; Haufler, Darrell; Skinner, Frances K; Lacaille, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-01

    CA1 inhibitory interneurons at the stratum lacunosum-moleculare and radiatum junction (LM/RAD-INs) display subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) involving voltage-dependent Na(+) and A-type K(+) currents. LM/RAD-INs also express other voltage-gated K(+) currents, although their properties and role in MPOs remain unclear. Here, we characterized these voltage-gated K(+) currents and investigated their role in MPOs. Using outside-out patch recordings from LM/RAD-IN somata, we distinguished four voltage-gated K(+) currents based on their pharmacology and activation/inactivation properties: a fast delayed rectifier current (I(Kfast)), a slow delayed rectifier current (I(Kslow)), a rapidly inactivating A-type current (I(A)), and a slowly inactivating current (I(D)). Their relative contribution to the total K(+) current was I(A) > I(Kfast) > I(Kslow) = I(D). The presence of I(D) and the relative contributions of K(+) currents in LM/RAD-INs are different from those of other CA1 interneurons, suggesting the presence of differential complement of K(+) currents in subgroups of interneurons. We next determined whether these K(+) currents were sufficient for MPO generation using a single-compartment model of LM/RAD-INs. The model captured the subthreshold voltage dependence of MPOs. Moreover, all K(+) currents were active at subthreshold potentials but I(D), I(A), and the persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) were most active near threshold. Using impedance analysis, we found that I(A) and I(NaP) contribute to MPO generation by modulating peak spectral frequency during MPOs and governing the voltage range over which MPOs occur. Our findings uncover a differential expression of a complement of K(+) channels that underlies intrinsic rhythmic activity in inhibitory interneurons.

  20. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels by PI(4,5)P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Martin; Hammond, Gerald R V; Hille, Bertil

    2012-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) regulates activities of numerous ion channels including inwardly rectifying potassium (K(ir)) channels, KCNQ, TRP, and voltage-gated calcium channels. Several studies suggest that voltage-gated potassium (K(V)) channels might be regulated by PI(4,5)P(2). Wide expression of K(V) channels in different cells suggests that such regulation could have broad physiological consequences. To study regulation of K(V) channels by PI(4,5)P(2), we have coexpressed several of them in tsA-201 cells with a G protein-coupled receptor (M(1)R), a voltage-sensitive lipid 5-phosphatase (Dr-VSP), or an engineered fusion protein carrying both lipid 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activity (pseudojanin). These tools deplete PI(4,5)P(2) with application of muscarinic agonists, depolarization, or rapamycin, respectively. PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PH probes of PLCδ1 simultaneously with whole-cell recordings. Activation of Dr-VSP or recruitment of pseudojanin inhibited K(V)7.1, K(V)7.2/7.3, and K(ir)2.1 channel current by 90-95%. Activation of M(1)R inhibited K(V)7.2/7.3 current similarly. With these tools, we tested for potential PI(4,5)P(2) regulation of activity of K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1, K(V)1.3, K(V)1.4, and K(V)1.5/K(V)β1.3, K(V)2.1, K(V)3.4, K(V)4.2, K(V)4.3 (with different KChIPs and DPP6-s), and hERG/KCNE2. Interestingly, we found a substantial removal of inactivation for K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1 and K(V)3.4, resulting in up-regulation of current density upon activation of M(1)R but no changes in activity upon activating only VSP or pseudojanin. The other channels tested except possibly hERG showed no alteration in activity in any of the assays we used. In conclusion, a depletion of PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane by enzymes does not seem to influence activity of most tested K(V) channels, whereas it does strongly inhibit members of the K(V)7 and K(ir) families.

  1. Actions of Tefluthrin on Rat Nav1.7 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jianguo; Soderlund, David M.

    2011-01-01

    In rats expression of the Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel isoform is restricted to the peripheral nervous system and is abundant in the sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion. We expressed the rat Nav1.7 sodium channel α subunit together with the rat auxiliary β1 and β2 subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes and assessed the effects of the pyrethroid insecticide tefluthrin on the expressed currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp method. Tefluthrin at 100 µM modified of Nav1.7 chan...

  2. VSOP/Hv1 proton channels sustain calcium entry, neutrophil migration, and superoxide production by limiting cell depolarization and acidification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El Chemaly, Antoun; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Arnaudeau, Serge; Okamura, Yasushi; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    .... Voltage-gated proton channels (voltage-sensing domain only protein [VSOP]/Hv1) are required for high-level superoxide production by phagocytes, but the mechanism of this effect is not established...

  3. Atom-by-atom engineering of voltage-gated ion channels: Magnified insights into function and pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Kim, Robin Y; Ahern, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Unnatural amino acid incorporation into ion channels has proven to be a valuable approach to interrogate detailed hypotheses arising from atomic resolution structures. In this short review, we provide a brief overview of some of the basic principles and methods for incorporation of unnatural amin...... acids into proteins. We also review insights into the function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels that have emerged from unnatural amino acid mutagenesis approaches....

  4. Leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 and voltage gated potassium channel autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Patryce McGinley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypothesizes linking these two disease processes are proposed.

  5. Locating the route of entry and binding sites of benzocaine and phenytoin in a bacterial voltage gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lewis J; Corry, Ben

    2014-07-01

    Sodium channel blockers are used to control electrical excitability in cells as a treatment for epileptic seizures and cardiac arrhythmia, and to provide short term control of pain. Development of the next generation of drugs that can selectively target one of the nine types of voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in the body requires a much better understanding of how current channel blockers work. Here we make use of the recently determined crystal structure of the bacterial voltage gated sodium channel NavAb in molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the position at which the sodium channel blocking drugs benzocaine and phenytoin bind to the protein as well as to understand how these drugs find their way into resting channels. We show that both drugs have two likely binding sites in the pore characterised by nonspecific, hydrophobic interactions: one just above the activation gate, and one at the entrance to the the lateral lipid filled fenestrations. Three independent methods find the same sites and all suggest that binding to the activation gate is slightly more favourable than at the fenestration. Both drugs are found to be able to pass through the fenestrations into the lipid with only small energy barriers, suggesting that this can represent the long posited hydrophobic entrance route for neutral drugs. Our simulations highlight the importance of a number of residues in directing drugs into and through the fenestration, and in forming the drug binding sites.

  6. Locating the route of entry and binding sites of benzocaine and phenytoin in a bacterial voltage gated sodium channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis J Martin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sodium channel blockers are used to control electrical excitability in cells as a treatment for epileptic seizures and cardiac arrhythmia, and to provide short term control of pain. Development of the next generation of drugs that can selectively target one of the nine types of voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in the body requires a much better understanding of how current channel blockers work. Here we make use of the recently determined crystal structure of the bacterial voltage gated sodium channel NavAb in molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the position at which the sodium channel blocking drugs benzocaine and phenytoin bind to the protein as well as to understand how these drugs find their way into resting channels. We show that both drugs have two likely binding sites in the pore characterised by nonspecific, hydrophobic interactions: one just above the activation gate, and one at the entrance to the the lateral lipid filled fenestrations. Three independent methods find the same sites and all suggest that binding to the activation gate is slightly more favourable than at the fenestration. Both drugs are found to be able to pass through the fenestrations into the lipid with only small energy barriers, suggesting that this can represent the long posited hydrophobic entrance route for neutral drugs. Our simulations highlight the importance of a number of residues in directing drugs into and through the fenestration, and in forming the drug binding sites.

  7. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric James Laedermann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs is a very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential. Navs are composed of 9 different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the action potential and consequently modify pain transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions.Post-translational modification (PTM of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e. peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with the subunit of Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological

  8. Clinical features of neuromuscular disorders in patients with N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Totzeck

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular junction disorders affect the pre- or postsynaptic nerve to muscle transmission due to autoimmune antibodies. Members of the group like myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton syndrome have pathophysiologically distinct characteristics. However, in practice, distinction may be difficult. We present a series of three patients with a myasthenic syndrome, dropped-head syndrome, bulbar and respiratory muscle weakness and positive testing for anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. In two cases anti-acetylcholin receptor antibodies were elevated, anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. All patients initially responded to pyridostigmine with a non-response in the course of the disease. While one patient recovered well after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, 3,4-diaminopyridine, steroids and later on immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil, a second died after restriction of treatment due to unfavorable cancer diagnosis, the third patient declined treatment. Although new antibodies causing neuromuscular disorders were discovered, clinical distinction has not yet been made. Our patients showed features of pre- and postsynaptic myasthenic syndrome as well as severe dropped-head syndrome and bulbar and axial muscle weakness, but only anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were positive. When administered, one patient benefited from 3,4-diaminopyridine. We suggest that this overlap-syndrome should be considered especially in patients with assumed seronegative myasthenia gravis and lack of improvement under standard therapy.

  9. Gate voltage control of the AlO x /SrTiO3 interface electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaye, J.; Grenet, T.

    2016-10-01

    Electron-beam deposition of an insulating granular aluminium or off-stoichiometric amorphous alumina layer on a SrTiO3 surface is a simple way to get a metallic interface from insulating materials. No heating nor specific preparation of the SrTiO3 surface is needed. In this paper, we investigate how the electrical properties of this interface can be tuned by the use of a back gate voltage (electrical field through the SrTiO3 substrate). We demonstrate that the slow field-effect observed at room temperature can be used to tune in a controlled, reversible way the low temperature electrical properties of the interface. In particular, important parameters of a transistor such as the amplitude of the resistance response to gate voltage changes or the existence of an ‘on’ or an ‘off’ state at zero gate voltage and at low temperature can be adjusted in a single sample. This method should be applicable to any SrTiO3-based interface in which oxygen vacancies are involved and might provide a powerful way to study the metal or superconductor insulator transition observed in such systems.

  10. Modeling and discussion of threshold voltage for a multi-floating gate FET pH sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Zhaoxia; Zhu Dazhong

    2009-01-01

    Research into new pH sensors fabricated by the standard CMOS process is currently a hot topic. The new pH sensing multi-floating gate field effect transistor is found to have a very large threshold voltage, which is different from the normal ion-sensitive field effect transistor. After analyzing all the interface layers of the structure, a new sensitive model based on the Gauss theorem and the charge neutrality principle is created in this paper. According to the model, the charge trapped on the multi-floating gate during the process and the thickness of the sensitive layer are the main causes of the large threshold voltage. From this model, it is also found that removing the charge on the multi-floating gate is an effective way to decrease the threshold voltage. The test results for three different standard pH buffer solutions show the correctness of the model and point the way to solve the large threshold problem.

  11. Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels regulate neurotransmitter release from mouse motor nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Ruth E; Moores, Thomas S; Morris, Neil P; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2004-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are critical to regulation of neurotransmitter release throughout the nervous system but the roles and identity of the subtypes involved remain unclear. Here we show that Kv3 channels regulate transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 subunits within all motor nerve terminals of muscles examined [transversus abdominus, lumbrical and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB)]. To determine the roles of these Kv3 subunits, intracellular recordings were made of end-plate potentials (EPPs) in FDB muscle fibres evoked by electrical stimulation of tibial nerve. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) applied at low concentrations (0.05-0.5 mM), which blocks only a few known potassium channels including Kv3 channels, did not affect muscle fibre resting potential but significantly increased the amplitude of all EPPs tested. Significantly, this effect of TEA was still observed in the presence of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers iberiotoxin (25-150 nM) and Penitrem A (100 nM), suggesting a selective action on Kv3 subunits. Consistent with this, 15-microM 4-aminopyridine, which blocks Kv3 but not large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, enhanced evoked EPP amplitude. Unexpectedly, blood-depressing substance-I, a toxin selective for Kv3.4 subunits, had no effect at 0.05-1 microM. The combined presynaptic localization of Kv3 subunits and pharmacological enhancement of EPP amplitude indicate that Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals at the NMJ.

  12. Adaptive evolution of voltage-gated sodium channels: the first 800 million years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakon, Harold H

    2012-06-26

    Voltage-gated Na(+)-permeable (Nav) channels form the basis for electrical excitability in animals. Nav channels evolved from Ca(2+) channels and were present in the common ancestor of choanoflagellates and animals, although this channel was likely permeable to both Na(+) and Ca(2+). Thus, like many other neuronal channels and receptors, Nav channels predated neurons. Invertebrates possess two Nav channels (Nav1 and Nav2), whereas vertebrate Nav channels are of the Nav1 family. Approximately 500 Mya in early chordates Nav channels evolved a motif that allowed them to cluster at axon initial segments, 50 million years later with the evolution of myelin, Nav channels "capitalized" on this property and clustered at nodes of Ranvier. The enhancement of conduction velocity along with the evolution of jaws likely made early gnathostomes fierce predators and the dominant vertebrates in the ocean. Later in vertebrate evolution, the Nav channel gene family expanded in parallel in tetrapods and teleosts (∼9 to 10 genes in amniotes, 8 in teleosts). This expansion occurred during or after the late Devonian extinction, when teleosts and tetrapods each diversified in their respective habitats, and coincided with an increase in the number of telencephalic nuclei in both groups. The expansion of Nav channels may have allowed for more sophisticated neural computation and tailoring of Nav channel kinetics with potassium channel kinetics to enhance energy savings. Nav channels show adaptive sequence evolution for increasing diversity in communication signals (electric fish), in protection against lethal Nav channel toxins (snakes, newts, pufferfish, insects), and in specialized habitats (naked mole rats).

  13. Functional and molecular characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in uteri from nonpregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Marian; Pinto, Francisco M; Wray, Susan; Cintado, Cristina G; Noheda, Pedro; Buschmann, Helmut; Candenas, Luz

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the function and expression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) in the uteri of nonpregnant rats using organ bath techniques, intracellular [Ca(2+)] fluorescence measurements, and RT-PCR. In longitudinally arranged whole-tissue uterine strips, veratridine, a VGSC activator, caused the rapid appearance of phasic contractions of irregular frequency and amplitude. After 50-60 min in the continuous presence of veratridine, rhythmic contractions of very regular frequency and slightly increasing amplitude occurred and were sustained for up to 12 h. Both the early and late components of the contractile response to veratridine were inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by tetrodotoxin (TTX). In small strips dissected from the uterine longitudinal smooth muscle layer and loaded with Fura-2, veratridine also caused rhythmic contractions, accompanied by transient increases in [Ca(2+)](i), which were abolished by treatment with 0.1 microM TTX. Using end-point and real-time quantitative RT-PCR, we detected the presence of the VGSC alpha subunits Scn2a1, Scn3a, Scn5a, and Scn8a in the cDNA from longitudinal muscle. The mRNAs of the auxiliary beta subunits Scbn1b, Scbn2b, Scbn4b, and traces of Scn3b were also present. These data show for the first time that Scn2a1, Scn3a, Scn5a, and Scn8a, as well as all VGSC beta subunits are expressed in the longitudinal smooth muscle layer of the rat myometrium. In addition, our data show that TTX-sensitive VGSC are able to mediate phasic contractions maintained over long periods of time in the uteri of nonpregnant rats.

  14. Voltage-gated potassium channel-complex autoimmunity and associated clinical syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Sarosh R; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antibodies are defined by the radioimmunoprecipitation of Kv1 potassium channel subunits from brain tissue extracts and were initially discovered in patients with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH). Subsequently, they were found in patients with PNH plus psychosis, insomnia, and dysautonomia, collectively termed Morvan's syndrome (MoS), and in a limbic encephalopathy (LE) with prominent amnesia and frequent seizures. Most recently, they have been described in patients with pure epilepsies, especially in patients with the novel and distinctive semiology termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). In each of these conditions, there is a close correlation between clinical measures and antibody levels. The VGKC-complex is a group of proteins that are strongly associated in situ and after extraction in mild detergent. Two major targets of the autoantibodies are leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2). The patients with PNH or MoS are most likely to have CASPR2 antibodies, whereas LGI1 antibodies are found characteristically in patients with FBDS and LE. Crucially, each of these conditions has a good response to immunotherapies, often corticosteroids and plasma exchange, although optimal regimes require further study. VGKC-complex antibodies have also been described in neuropathic pain syndromes, chronic epilepsies, a polyradiculopathy in porcine abattoir workers, and some children with status epilepticus. Increasingly, however, the antigenic targets in these patients are not defined and in some cases the antibodies may be secondary rather than the primary cause. Future serologic studies should define all the antigenic components of the VGKC-complex, and further inform mechanisms of antibody pathogenicity and related inflammation.

  15. Electrical coupling between the human serotonin transporter and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchala, Iwona; Cabra, Vanessa; Solis, Ernesto; Glennon, Richard A; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2014-07-01

    Monoamine transporters have been implicated in dopamine or serotonin release in response to abused drugs such as methamphetamine or ecstasy (MDMA). In addition, monoamine transporters show substrate-induced inward currents that may modulate excitability and Ca(2+) mobilization, which could also contribute to neurotransmitter release. How monoamine transporters modulate Ca(2+) permeability is currently unknown. We investigate the functional interaction between the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV). We introduce an excitable expression system consisting of cultured muscle cells genetically engineered to express hSERT. Both 5HT and S(+)MDMA depolarize these cells and activate the excitation-contraction (EC)-coupling mechanism. However, hSERT substrates fail to activate EC-coupling in CaV1.1-null muscle cells, thus implicating Ca(2+) channels. CaV1.3 and CaV2.2 channels are natively expressed in neurons. When these channels are co-expressed with hSERT in HEK293T cells, only cells expressing the lower-threshold L-type CaV1.3 channel show Ca(2+) transients evoked by 5HT or S(+)MDMA. In addition, the electrical coupling between hSERT and CaV1.3 takes place at physiological 5HT concentrations. The electrical coupling between monoamine neurotransmitter transporters and Ca(2+) channels such as CaV1.3 is a novel mechanism by which endogenous substrates (neurotransmitters) or exogenous substrates (like ecstasy) could modulate Ca(2+)-driven signals in excitable cells.

  16. Sinomenine produces peripheral analgesic effects via inhibition of voltage-gated sodium currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Yun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Won, Jonghwa; Kim, Han-Byul; Kang, Youngnam; Oh, Seog Bae

    2017-09-01

    Sinomenium acutum has been used in traditional medicine to treat a painful disease such as rheumatic arthritis and neuralgia. Sinomenine, which is a main bioactive ingredient in Sinomenium acutum, has been reported to have an analgesic effect in diverse pain animal models. However little is known about the detailed mechanisms underlying peripheral analgesic effect of sinomenine. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate its cellular mechanism by using formalin-induced acute inflammatory pain model in mice. We found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of sinomenine (50mg/kg) suppressed formalin-induced paw licking behavior in both the first and the second phase. Formalin-induced c-Fos protein expression was also suppressed by sinomenine (50mg/kg i.p.) in the superficial dorsal horn of spinal cord. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from small-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons revealed that sinomenine reversibly increased the spike threshold and the threshold current intensity for evoking a single spike and decreased firing frequency of action potentials evoked in response to a long current pulse. Voltage-gated sodium currents (INa) were also significantly reduced by sinomenine in a dose-dependent manner (IC50=2.3±0.2mM). Finally, we confirmed that intraplantar application of sinomenine suppressed formalin-induced pain behavior only in the first phase, but not the second phase. Taken together, our results suggest that sinomenine has a peripheral analgesic effect by inhibiting INa. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutation in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel SCN1A in familial hemiplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichgans, Martin; Freilinger, Tobias; Eckstein, Gertrud; Babini, Elena; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Biskup, Saskia; Ferrari, Michel D; Herzog, Jürgen; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Pusch, Michael; Strom, Tim M

    Familial hemiplegic migraine is an autosomal dominant severe subtype of migraine with aura characterised by some degree of hemiparesis during the attacks. So far, mutations in two genes regulating ion translocation-CACNA1A and ATP1A2-have been identified in pedigrees with this disease. To identify additional genes for familial hemiplegic migraine, we did a genome-wide linkage analysis of two disease pedigrees without mutations in CACNA1A and ATP1A2. Ion channel genes in the candidate interval were analysed for mutations, and the functional consequences of the recorded sequence alteration were determined. We identified a novel locus for familial hemiplegic migraine on chromosome 2q24. Sequencing of candidate genes in this region revealed a heterozygous missense mutation (Gln1489Lys) in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN1A, mutations of which have been associated with epilepsy. This same mutation was present in three families with familial hemiplegic migraine. It results in a charge-altering aminoacid exchange in the so-called hinged-lid domain of the protein, which is critical for fast inactivation of the channel. Whole-cell recordings in transiently transfected tsA201 cells expressing the highly homologous SCN5A sodium channel showed that the mutation induces a two-fold to four-fold accelerated recovery from fast inactivation without altering any of the other channel parameters investigated. Dysfunction of the neuronal sodium channel SCN1A can cause familial hemiplegic migraine. Our findings have implications for the understanding of migraine aura. Moreover, our study reinforces the molecular links between migraine and epilepsy, two common paroxysmal disorders.

  18. Differential CaMKII regulation by voltage-gated calcium channels in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Johanna G; Wang, Xiaohan; Colbran, Roger J

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and many other functions in striatal medium spiny neurons to modulate basal ganglia function. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a major calcium-dependent signaling protein that couples calcium entry to diverse cellular changes. CaMKII activation results in autophosphorylation at Thr286 and sustained calcium-independent CaMKII activity after calcium signals dissipate. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating striatal CaMKII. To address this, mouse brain slices were treated with pharmacological modulators of calcium channels and punches of dorsal striatum were immunoblotted for CaMKII Thr286 autophosphorylation as an index of CaMKII activation. KCl depolarization increased levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation ~2-fold; this increase was blocked by an LTCC antagonist and was mimicked by treatment with pharmacological LTCC activators. The chelation of extracellular calcium robustly decreased basal CaMKII autophosphorylation within 5min and increased levels of total CaMKII in cytosolic fractions, in addition to decreasing the phosphorylation of CaMKII sites in the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors and the GluA1 subunit of AMPA receptors. We also found that the maintenance of basal levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation requires low-voltage gated T-type calcium channels, but not LTCCs or R-type calcium channels. Our findings indicate that CaMKII activity is dynamically regulated by multiple calcium channels in the striatum thus coupling calcium entry to key downstream substrates.

  19. Differential expression of voltage-gated K+ and Ca2+ currents in bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V P; Maguire, G

    1998-04-01

    Whole-cell voltage-gated currents were recorded from bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice. Two physiological populations of bipolar cells were identified. In the first, depolarizing voltage steps elicited a rapidly activating A-current that reached peak amplitude or = 10 ms after step onset and did not inactivate. IK was antagonized by internal caesium and external tetraethylammonium. Bipolar cells expressing IK also expressed a time-dependent h-current at membrane potentials calcium-dependent potassium current (IK(Ca)) were identified. Depolarizing voltage steps > -50 mV activated ICa, which reached peak amplitude between -20 and -10 mV. ICa was eliminated in Ca+2-free Ringer and blocked by cadmium and cobalt, but not tetrodotoxin. In most cells, Ica was transient, activating rapidly at -50 mV. This current was antagonized by nickel. The remaining bipolar cells expressed a nifedipine-sensitive sustained current that activated between -40 and -30 mV, with both slower kinetics and smaller amplitude than transient ICa. IK(Ca) was elicited by membrane depolarizations > -20 mV. Bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice preparation express an array of voltage-gated currents which contribute to non-linear I-V characteristics. The zebrafish retinal slice preparation is well-suited to patch clamp analyses of membrane mechanisms and provides a suitable model for studying genetic defects in visual system development.

  20. Modulation of voltage-gated conductances of retinal horizontal cells by UV-excited TiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshik, Xenia; Choi, Min; Baker, Adam; Malchow, R Paul; Covnot, Leigha; Doan, Samuel; Mukherjee, Souvik; Farid, Sidra; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-11-22

    This study examines the ability of optically-excited titanium dioxide nanoparticles to influence voltage-gated ion channels in retinal horizontal cells. Voltage clamp recordings were obtained in the presence and absence of TiO2 and ultraviolet laser excitation. Significant current changes were observed in response to UV light, particularly in the -40 mV to +40 mV region where voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels have the highest conductance. Cells in proximity to UV-excited TiO2 exhibited a left-shift in the current-voltage relation of around 10 mV in the activation of Na(+) currents. These trends were not observed in control experiments where cells were excited with UV light without being exposed to TiO2. Electrostatic force microscopy confirmed that electric fields can be induced in TiO2 with UV light. Simulations using the Hodgkin-Huxley model yielded results which agreed with the experimental data and showed the I-V characteristics of individual ion channels in the presence of UV-excited TiO2.

  1. IDENTIFIKASI MUTASI NOKTAH PADA” GEN VOLTAGE GATED SODIUM CHANNEL” Aedes aegypti RESISTEN TERHADAP INSEKTISIDA PYRETHROID DI SEMARANG JAWA TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiarti Widiarti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of a point mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene was conducted on the major of dengue vector Aedes aegypti from Simongan Village, Semarang Municypality Central Java, which occurred to be resistant toward malathion and cypermethrin base on WHO methodology standard (impregnated paper.  The objectives of this studi was to identify the point mutation on the codon 1014  of voltage gated sodium channel gene of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes which was associated  with the vector resistance of pyrethroid group. The detection of a point mutation of  voltage-gated sodium channel was conducted using DNA extraction and semi nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of the mosquitoes resistant strain. The susceptibility test (as a screening resistant phenotype showed that few samples of Ae. aegypti from Simongan Village, Semarang Municypality Central Java resistant to malathion 0,8 % ( organophosphate group and cypermethrin 0,25 % (pyrethroid group. The sequencing result showed that there has been a mutation from the leucine (TTA which turned to be phenylalanin (TTT (kdr-w type on the codon 1014 at the voltage gated sodium channel gene of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes from  Simongan Village, Semarang Municypality Central Java, which was associated with the pyrethroid insecticide resistance. There were 78 % mosquitoes which brought  mutation alel kdr-w type on the codon 1014 F. Therefore dengue vector control activities should not use any pyrethroid insecticide group. Key  Words :  Resistance,  Aedes   aegypti,  Voltage   Gated   Sodium  Channel    (VGSC,  Point  Mutation. Abstrak Identifikasi mutasi noktah pada  gen Voltage Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC telah dilakukan pada nyamuk Aedes aegypti dari Kelurahan Simongan Kota Semarang, yang telah resisten terhadap insektisida Malathion dan Cypermethrin pada screening susceptibility test (Standar WHO Impregnated paper. Tujuan penelitian adalah untuk mendeteksi

  2. Aspartic Acid Residue D3 Critically Determines Cx50 Gap Junction Channel Transjunctional Voltage-Dependent Gating and Unitary Conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Li; Nakagawa, So; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Bai, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the aspartic acid residue (D) at the third position is critical in determining the voltage polarity of fast Vj-gating of Cx50 channels. To test whether another negatively charged residue (a glutamic acid residue, E) could fulfill the role of the D3 residue, we generated the mutant Cx50D3E. Vj-dependent gating properties of this mutant channel were characterized by double-patch-clamp recordings in N2A cells. Macroscopically, the D3E substitution reduced the residual conductance (Gmin) to near zero and outwardly shifted the half-inactivation voltage (V0), which is a result of both a reduced aggregate gating charge (z) and a reduced free-energy difference between the open and closed states. Single Cx50D3E gap junction channels showed reduced unitary conductance (γj) of the main open state, reduced open dwell time at ±40 mV, and absence of a long-lived substate. In contrast, a G8E substitution tested to compare the effects of the E residue at the third and eighth positions did not modify the Vj-dependent gating profile or γj. In summary, this study is the first that we know of to suggest that the D3 residue plays an essential role, in addition to serving as a negative-charge provider, as a critical determinant of the Vj-dependent gating sensitivity, open-closed stability, and unitary conductance of Cx50 gap junction channels. PMID:22404924

  3. hERG S4-S5 linker acts as a voltage-dependent ligand that binds to the activation gate and locks it in a closed state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Olfat A; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Loussouarn, Gildas

    2017-12-01

    Delayed-rectifier potassium channels (hERG and KCNQ1) play a major role in cardiac repolarization. These channels are formed by a tetrameric pore (S5-S6) surrounded by four voltage sensor domains (S1-S4). Coupling between voltage sensor domains and the pore activation gate is critical for channel voltage-dependence. However, molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that covalently binding, through a disulfide bridge, a peptide mimicking the S4-S5 linker (S4-S5L) to the channel S6 C-terminus (S6T) completely inhibits hERG. This shows that channel S4-S5L is sufficient to stabilize the pore activation gate in its closed state. Conversely, covalently binding a peptide mimicking S6T to the channel S4-S5L prevents its inhibiting effect and renders the channel almost completely voltage-independent. This shows that the channel S4-S5L is necessary to stabilize the activation gate in its closed state. Altogether, our results provide chemical evidence that S4-S5L acts as a voltage-controlled ligand that binds S6T to lock the channel in a closed state, elucidating the coupling between voltage sensors and the gate in delayed rectifier potassium channels and potentially other voltage-gated channels.

  4. Extended-gate-type IGZO electric-double-layer TFT immunosensor with high sensitivity and low operation voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lingyan; Zhang, Shengnan; Wu, Weihua; Zhu, Liqiang; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Yanghui; Zhang, Hongliang; Javaid, Kashif; Cao, Hongtao

    2016-10-01

    An immunosensor is proposed based on the indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) electric-double-layer thin-film transistor (EDL TFT) with a separating extended gate. The IGZO EDL TFT has a field-effect mobility of 24.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 and an operation voltage less than 1.5 V. The sensors exhibit the linear current response to label-free target immune molecule in the concentrations ranging from 1.6 to 368 × 10-15 g/ml with a detection limit of 1.6 × 10-15 g/ml (0.01 fM) under an ultralow operation voltage of 0.5 V. The IGZO TFT component demonstrates a consecutive assay stability and recyclability due to the unique structure with the separating extended gate. With the excellent electrical properties and the potential for plug-in-card-type multifunctional sensing, extended-gate-type IGZO EDL TFTs can be promising candidates for the development of a label-free biosensor for public health applications.

  5. Voltage-gated ion transport through semiconducting conical nanopores formed by metal nanoparticle-assisted plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Teena; Kalinin, Yevgeniy V; Chan, Chih-Chieh; Randhawa, Jatinder S; Gaevski, Mikhail; Gracias, David H

    2012-07-11

    Nanopores with conical geometries have been found to rectify ionic current in electrolytes. While nanopores in semiconducting membranes are known to modulate ionic transport through gated modification of pore surface charge, the fabrication of conical nanopores in silicon (Si) has proven challenging. Here, we report the discovery that gold (Au) nanoparticle (NP)-assisted plasma etching results in the formation of conical etch profiles in Si. These conical profiles result due to enhanced Si etch rates in the vicinity of the Au NPs. We show that this process provides a convenient and versatile means to fabricate conical nanopores in Si membranes and crystals with variable pore-diameters and cone-angles. We investigated ionic transport through these pores and observed that rectification ratios could be enhanced by a factor of over 100 by voltage gating alone, and that these pores could function as ionic switches with high on-off ratios of approximately 260. Further, we demonstrate voltage gated control over protein transport, which is of importance in lab-on-a-chip devices and biomolecular separations.

  6. SOI-Based High-Voltage, High-Temperature Integrated Circuit Gate Driver for SiC-Based Power FETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Mohammad A [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Blalock, Benjamin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Islam, Syed K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC)-based field effect transistors (FETs) are gaining popularity as switching elements in power electronic circuits designed for high-temperature environments like hybrid electric vehicle, aircraft, well logging, geothermal power generation etc. Like any other power switches, SiC-based power devices also need gate driver circuits to interface them with the logic units. The placement of the gate driver circuit next to the power switch is optimal for minimizing system complexity. Successful operation of the gate driver circuit in a harsh environment, especially with minimal or no heat sink and without liquid cooling, can increase the power-to-volume ratio as well as the power-to-weight ratio for power conversion modules such as a DC-DC converter, inverter etc. A silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based high-voltage, high-temperature integrated circuit (IC) gate driver for SiC power FETs has been designed and fabricated using a commercially available 0.8-m, 2-poly and 3-metal bipolar-complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-double diffused metal oxide semiconductor (DMOS) process. The prototype circuit-s maximum gate drive supply can be 40-V with peak 2.3-A sourcing/sinking current driving capability. Owing to the wide driving range, this gate driver IC can be used to drive a wide variety of SiC FET switches (both normally OFF metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and normally ON junction field effect transistor (JFET)). The switching frequency is 20-kHz and the duty cycle can be varied from 0 to 100-. The circuit has been successfully tested with SiC power MOSFETs and JFETs without any heat sink and cooling mechanism. During these tests, SiC switches were kept at room temperature and ambient temperature of the driver circuit was increased to 200-C. The circuit underwent numerous temperature cycles with negligible performance degradation.

  7. Regulation of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel Kv1.5 by the Janus Kinase JAK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsi, Jamshed; Elvira, Bernat; Bissinger, Rosi; Hosseinzadeh, Zohreh; Lang, Florian

    2015-12-01

    The tyrosine kinase Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) participates in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. The kinase further influences ion channels and transport proteins. The present study explored whether JAK3 contributes to the regulation of the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv1.5, which participates in the regulation of diverse functions including atrial cardiac action potential and tumor cell proliferation. To this end, cRNA encoding Kv1.5 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type JAK3, constitutively active (A568V)JAK3, or inactive (K851A)JAK3. Voltage-gated K(+) channel activity was measured utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp, and Kv1.5 channel protein abundance in the cell membrane was quantified utilizing chemiluminescence of Kv1.5 containing an extracellular hemagglutinin epitope (Kv1.5-HA). As a result, Kv1.5 activity and Kv1.5-HA protein abundance were significantly decreased by wild-type JAK3 and (A568V)JAK3, but not by (K851A)JAK3. Inhibition of Kv1.5 protein insertion into the cell membrane by brefeldin A (5 μM) resulted in a decline of the voltage-gated current, which was similar in the absence and presence of (A568V)JAK3, suggesting that (A568V)JAK3 did not accelerate Kv1.5 protein retrieval from the cell membrane. A 24 h treatment with ouabain (100 µM) significantly decreased the voltage-gated current in oocytes expressing Kv1.5 without or with (A568V)JAK3 and dissipated the difference between oocytes expressing Kv1.5 alone and oocytes expressing Kv1.5 with (A568V)JAK3. In conclusion, JAK3 contributes to the regulation of membrane Kv1.5 protein abundance and activity, an effect sensitive to ouabain and thus possibly involving Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity.

  8. Osteoblasts detect pericellular calcium concentration increase via neomycin-sensitive voltage gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuanhao; Kishore, Vipuil; Fites, Kateri; Akkus, Ozan

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the detection of critically loaded or micro-damaged regions of bone by bone cells are still a matter of debate. Our previous studies showed that calcium efflux originates from pre-failure regions of bone matrix and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts respond to such efflux by an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration. The mechanisms by which the intracellular calcium concentration increases in response to an increase in the pericellular calcium concentration are unknown. Elevation of the intracellular calcium may occur via release from the internal calcium stores of the cell and/or via the membrane bound channels. The current study applied a wide range of pharmaceutical inhibitors to identify the calcium entry pathways involved in the process: internal calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER, inhibited by thapsigargin and TMB-8), calcium receptor (CaSR, inhibited by calhex), stretch-activated calcium channel (SACC, inhibited by gadolinium), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC, inhibited by nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, and ω-conotoxin), and calcium-induced-calcium-release channel (CICRC, inhibited by ryanodine and dantrolene). These inhibitors were screened for their effectiveness to block intracellular calcium increase by using a concentration gradient induced calcium efflux model which mimics calcium diffusion from the basal aspect of cells. The inhibitor(s) which reduced the intracellular calcium response was further tested on osteoblasts seeded on mechanically loaded notched cortical bone wafers undergoing damage. The results showed that only neomycin reduced the intracellular calcium response in osteoblasts, by 27%, upon extracellular calcium stimulus induced by concentration gradient. The inhibitory effect of neomycin was more pronounced (75% reduction in maximum fluorescence) for osteoblasts seeded on notched cortical bone wafers loaded mechanically to damaging load levels. These results imply that the increase in

  9. The role of voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of mouse uterine contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan C; McClure, Marisa C; Smith, Margaret A; Abel, Peter W; Bradley, Michael E

    2007-11-02

    Uterine smooth muscle cells exhibit ionic currents that appear to be important in the control of uterine contractility, but how these currents might produce the changes in contractile activity seen in pregnant myometrium has not been established. There are conflicting reports concerning the role of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels and large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels in the regulation of uterine contractility. In this study we provide molecular and functional evidence for a role for Kv channels in the regulation of spontaneous contractile activity in mouse myometrium, and also demonstrate a change in Kv channel regulation of contractility in pregnant mouse myometrium. Functional assays which evaluated the effects of channel blockers and various contractile agonists were accomplished by quantifying contractility of isolated uterine smooth muscle obtained from nonpregnant mice as well as mice at various stages of pregnancy. Expression of Kv channel proteins in isolated uterine smooth muscle was evaluated by Western blots. The Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) caused contractions in nonpregnant mouse myometrium (EC50 = 54 micromolar, maximal effect at 300 micromolar) but this effect disappeared in pregnant mice; similarly, the Kv4.2/Kv4.3 blocker phrixotoxin-2 caused contractions in nonpregnant, but not pregnant, myometrium. Contractile responses to 4-AP were not dependent upon nerves, as neither tetrodotoxin nor storage of tissues at room temperature significantly altered these responses, nor were responses dependent upon the presence of the endometrium. Spontaneous contractions and contractions in response to 4-AP did not appear to be mediated by BK, as the BK channel-selective blockers iberiotoxin, verruculogen, or tetraethylammonium failed to affect either spontaneous contractions or 4-AP-elicited responses. A number of different Kv channel alpha subunit proteins were found in isolated myometrium from both nonpregnant and

  10. The role of voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of mouse uterine contractility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Peter W

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine smooth muscle cells exhibit ionic currents that appear to be important in the control of uterine contractility, but how these currents might produce the changes in contractile activity seen in pregnant myometrium has not been established. There are conflicting reports concerning the role of voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels and large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK channels in the regulation of uterine contractility. In this study we provide molecular and functional evidence for a role for Kv channels in the regulation of spontaneous contractile activity in mouse myometrium, and also demonstrate a change in Kv channel regulation of contractility in pregnant mouse myometrium. Methods Functional assays which evaluated the effects of channel blockers and various contractile agonists were accomplished by quantifying contractility of isolated uterine smooth muscle obtained from nonpregnant mice as well as mice at various stages of pregnancy. Expression of Kv channel proteins in isolated uterine smooth muscle was evaluated by Western blots. Results The Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP caused contractions in nonpregnant mouse myometrium (EC50 = 54 micromolar, maximal effect at 300 micromolar but this effect disappeared in pregnant mice; similarly, the Kv4.2/Kv4.3 blocker phrixotoxin-2 caused contractions in nonpregnant, but not pregnant, myometrium. Contractile responses to 4-AP were not dependent upon nerves, as neither tetrodotoxin nor storage of tissues at room temperature significantly altered these responses, nor were responses dependent upon the presence of the endometrium. Spontaneous contractions and contractions in response to 4-AP did not appear to be mediated by BK, as the BK channel-selective blockers iberiotoxin, verruculogen, or tetraethylammonium failed to affect either spontaneous contractions or 4-AP-elicited responses. A number of different Kv channel alpha subunit proteins were

  11. Mutations in voltage-gated potassium channel KCNC3 cause degenerative and developmental central nervous system phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Michael F; Minassian, Natali A; Stevanin, Giovanni; Figueroa, Karla P; Bannister, John P A; Nolte, Dagmar; Mock, Allan F; Evidente, Virgilio Gerald H; Fee, Dominic B; Müller, Ulrich; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Papazian, Diane M; Pulst, Stefan M

    2006-04-01

    Potassium channel mutations have been described in episodic neurological diseases. We report that K+ channel mutations cause disease phenotypes with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative features. In a Filipino adult-onset ataxia pedigree, the causative gene maps to 19q13, overlapping the SCA13 disease locus described in a French pedigree with childhood-onset ataxia and cognitive delay. This region contains KCNC3 (also known as Kv3.3), encoding a voltage-gated Shaw channel with enriched cerebellar expression. Sequencing revealed two missense mutations, both of which alter KCNC3 function in Xenopus laevis expression systems. KCNC3(R420H), located in the voltage-sensing domain, had no channel activity when expressed alone and had a dominant-negative effect when co-expressed with the wild-type channel. KCNC3(F448L) shifted the activation curve in the negative direction and slowed channel closing. Thus, KCNC3(R420H) and KCNC3(F448L) are expected to change the output characteristics of fast-spiking cerebellar neurons, in which KCNC channels confer capacity for high-frequency firing. Our results establish a role for KCNC3 in phenotypes ranging from developmental disorders to adult-onset neurodegeneration and suggest voltage-gated K+ channels as candidates for additional neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. A thermalization energy analysis of the threshold voltage shift in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors under positive gate bias stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niang, K.M.; Barquinha, P.M.C.; Martins, R.F.P.; Cobb, B.; Powell, M.J.; Flewitt, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) employing an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) channel layer exhibit a positive shift in the threshold voltage under the application of positive gate bias stress (PBS). The time and temperature dependence of the threshold voltage shift was measured and analyse

  13. An LMS Programming Scheme and Floating-Gate Technology Enabled Trimmer-Less and Low Voltage Flame Detection Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Gomez-Castañeda, Felipe; Moreno-Cadenas, Jose Antonio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a Least Mean Square (LMS) programming scheme is used to set the offset voltage of two operational amplifiers that were built using floating-gate transistors, enabling a 0.95 VRMS trimmer-less flame detection sensor. The programming scheme is capable of setting the offset voltage over a wide range of values by means of electron injection. The flame detection sensor consists of two programmable offset operational amplifiers; the first amplifier serves as a 26 μV offset voltage follower, whereas the second amplifier acts as a programmable trimmer-less voltage comparator. Both amplifiers form the proposed sensor, whose principle of functionality is based on the detection of the electrical changes produced by the flame ionization. The experimental results show that it is possible to measure the presence of a flame accurately after programming the amplifiers with a maximum of 35 LMS-algorithm iterations. Current commercial flame detectors are mainly used in absorption refrigerators and large industrial gas heaters, where a high voltage AC source and several mechanical trimmings are used in order to accurately measure the presence of the flame. PMID:28613250

  14. An LMS Programming Scheme and Floating-Gate Technology Enabled Trimmer-Less and Low Voltage Flame Detection Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Rojas, Juan Carlos; Gomez-Castañeda, Felipe; Moreno-Cadenas, Jose Antonio

    2017-06-14

    In this paper, a Least Mean Square (LMS) programming scheme is used to set the offset voltage of two operational amplifiers that were built using floating-gate transistors, enabling a 0.95 VRMS trimmer-less flame detection sensor. The programming scheme is capable of setting the offset voltage over a wide range of values by means of electron injection. The flame detection sensor consists of two programmable offset operational amplifiers; the first amplifier serves as a 26 μV offset voltage follower, whereas the second amplifier acts as a programmable trimmer-less voltage comparator. Both amplifiers form the proposed sensor, whose principle of functionality is based on the detection of the electrical changes produced by the flame ionization. The experimental results show that it is possible to measure the presence of a flame accurately after programming the amplifiers with a maximum of 35 LMS-algorithm iterations. Current commercial flame detectors are mainly used in absorption refrigerators and large industrial gas heaters, where a high voltage AC source and several mechanical trimmings are used in order to accurately measure the presence of the flame.

  15. Application of Stochastic Automata Networks for Creation of Continuous Time Markov Chain Models of Voltage Gating of Gap Junction Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Snipas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs, which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ∼20 times.

  16. Interface Defect Hydrogen Depassivation and Capacitance-Voltage Hysteresis of Al2O3/InGaAs Gate Stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kechao; Palumbo, Felix Roberto; Zhang, Liangliang; Droopad, Ravi; McIntyre, Paul C

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effects of pre- and postatomic layer deposition (ALD) defect passivation with hydrogen on the trap density and reliability of Al2O3/InGaAs gate stacks. Reliability is characterized by capacitance-voltage hysteresis measurements on samples prepared using different fabrication procedures and having different initial trap densities. Despite its beneficial capability to passivate both interface and border traps, a final forming gas (H2/N2) anneal (FGA) step is correlated with a significant hysteresis. This appears to be caused by hydrogen depassivation of defects in the gate stack under bias stress, supported by the observed bias stress-induced increase of interface trap density, and strong hydrogen isotope effects on the measured hysteresis. On the other hand, intentional air exposure of the InGaAs surface prior to Al2O3 ALD increases the initial interface trap density (Dit) but considerably lowers the hysteresis.

  17. Application of stochastic automata networks for creation of continuous time Markov chain models of voltage gating of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipas, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Paulauskas, Nerijus; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC) of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ) channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs), which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ~20 times.

  18. Optimization of GEANT4 settings for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning simulations using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevillot, Loic, E-mail: loic.grevillot@gmail.co [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); IBA, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Frisson, Thibault [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); Zahra, Nabil [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); IPNL, CNRS UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); Bertrand, Damien; Stichelbaut, Frederic [IBA, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Freud, Nicolas [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); CNDRI, INSA-Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Sarrut, David [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France)

    2010-10-15

    This study reports the investigation of different GEANT4 settings for proton therapy applications in the context of Treatment Planning System comparisons. The GEANT4.9.2 release was used through the GATE platform. We focused on the Pencil Beam Scanning delivery technique, which allows for intensity modulated proton therapy applications. The most relevant options and parameters (range cut, step size, database binning) for the simulation that influence the dose deposition were investigated, in order to determine a robust, accurate and efficient simulation environment. In this perspective, simulations of depth-dose profiles and transverse profiles at different depths and energies between 100 and 230 MeV have been assessed against reference measurements in water and PMMA. These measurements were performed in Essen, Germany, with the IBA dedicated Pencil Beam Scanning system, using Bragg-peak chambers and radiochromic films. GEANT4 simulations were also compared to the PHITS.2.14 and MCNPX.2.5.0 Monte Carlo codes. Depth-dose simulations reached 0.3 mm range accuracy compared to NIST CSDA ranges, with a dose agreement of about 1% over a set of five different energies. The transverse profiles simulated using the different Monte Carlo codes showed discrepancies, with up to 15% difference in beam widening between GEANT4 and MCNPX in water. A 8% difference between the GEANT4 multiple scattering and single scattering algorithms was observed. The simulations showed the inability of reproducing the measured transverse dose spreading with depth in PMMA, corroborating the fact that GEANT4 underestimates the lateral dose spreading. GATE was found to be a very convenient simulation environment to perform this study. A reference physics-list and an optimized parameters-list have been proposed. Satisfactory agreement against depth-dose profiles measurements was obtained. The simulation of transverse profiles using different Monte Carlo codes showed significant deviations. This point

  19. Structure of the proton-gated urea channel from the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugatsky, David; McNulty, Reginald; Munson, Keith; Chen, Chiung-Kuang; Soltis, S Michael; Sachs, George; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-01-10

    Half the world's population is chronically infected with Helicobacter pylori, causing gastritis, gastric ulcers and an increased incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its proton-gated inner-membrane urea channel, HpUreI, is essential for survival in the acidic environment of the stomach. The channel is closed at neutral pH and opens at acidic pH to allow the rapid access of urea to cytoplasmic urease. Urease produces NH(3) and CO(2), neutralizing entering protons and thus buffering the periplasm to a pH of roughly 6.1 even in gastric juice at a pH below 2.0. Here we report the structure of HpUreI, revealing six protomers assembled in a hexameric ring surrounding a central bilayer plug of ordered lipids. Each protomer encloses a channel formed by a twisted bundle of six transmembrane helices. The bundle defines a previously unobserved fold comprising a two-helix hairpin motif repeated three times around the central axis of the channel, without the inverted repeat of mammalian-type urea transporters. Both the channel and the protomer interface contain residues conserved in the AmiS/UreI superfamily, suggesting the preservation of channel architecture and oligomeric state in this superfamily. Predominantly aromatic or aliphatic side chains line the entire channel and define two consecutive constriction sites in the middle of the channel. Mutation of Trp 153 in the cytoplasmic constriction site to Ala or Phe decreases the selectivity for urea in comparison with thiourea, suggesting that solute interaction with Trp 153 contributes specificity. The previously unobserved hexameric channel structure described here provides a new model for the permeation of urea and other small amide solutes in prokaryotes and archaea.

  20. Lung adenocarcinoma with Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome indicated by voltage-gated calcium channel: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai Hiromasa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome is a rare disorder and it is known as a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Small cell lung cancer often accompanies this syndrome. Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome associated with lung adenocarcinoma is extremely rare; there are only a few reported cases worldwide. Case presentation A 75-year-old Japanese man with a past history of chronic rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed with Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome by electromyography and serum anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibody level preceding the diagnosis of lung cancer. A chest computed tomography to screen for malignant lesions revealed an abnormal shadow in the lung. Although a histopathological examination by bronchoscopic study could not reveal the malignancy, lung cancer was mostly suspected after the results of a chest computed tomography and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. An intraoperative diagnosis based on the frozen section obtained by tumor biopsy was adenocarcinoma so the patient underwent a lobectomy of the right lower lobe and lymph node dissection with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The permanent pathological examination was the same as the frozen diagnosis (pT2aN1M0: Stage IIa: TNM staging 7th edition. Immunohistochemistry revealed that most of the cancer cells were positive for P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel. Conclusions Our case is a rare combination of Lambert–Eaton myasthenic syndrome associated with lung adenocarcinoma, rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren syndrome, and to the best of our knowledge it is the first report that indicates the presence of voltage-gated calcium channel in lung adenocarcinoma by immunostaining.

  1. The free energy barrier for arginine gating charge translation is altered by mutations in the voltage sensor domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine S Schwaiger

    Full Text Available The gating of voltage-gated ion channels is controlled by the arginine-rich S4 helix of the voltage-sensor domain moving in response to an external potential. Recent studies have suggested that S4 moves in three to four steps to open the conducting pore, thus visiting several intermediate conformations during gating. However, the exact conformational changes are not known in detail. For instance, it has been suggested that there is a local rotation in the helix corresponding to short segments of a 3(10-helix moving along S4 during opening and closing. Here, we have explored the energetics of the transition between the fully open state (based on the X-ray structure and the first intermediate state towards channel closing (C1, modeled from experimental constraints. We show that conformations within 3 Å of the X-ray structure are obtained in simulations starting from the C1 model, and directly observe the previously suggested sliding 3(10-helix region in S4. Through systematic free energy calculations, we show that the C1 state is a stable intermediate conformation and determine free energy profiles for moving between the states without constraints. Mutations indicate several residues in a narrow hydrophobic band in the voltage sensor contribute to the barrier between the open and C1 states, with F233 in the S2 helix having the largest influence. Substitution for smaller amino acids reduces the transition cost, while introduction of a larger ring increases it, largely confirming experimental activation shift results. There is a systematic correlation between the local aromatic ring rotation, the arginine barrier crossing, and the corresponding relative free energy. In particular, it appears to be more advantageous for the F233 side chain to rotate towards the extracellular side when arginines cross the hydrophobic region.

  2. Modulation of major voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels in cultured neurons of the rat inferior colliculus by lidocaine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu YU; Lin CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the present study was to explore how lidocaine as a thera-peutic drug for tinnitus targets voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels and changes the excitability of central auditory neurons. Methods: Membrane cur-rents mediated by major voltage- and ligand-gated channels were recorded from primary cultured neurons of the inferior colliculus (IC) in rats with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in the presence and absence of lidocaine. The effects of lidocaine on the current-evoked firing of action potentials were also exam-ined. Results: Lidocaine at 100 μmol/L significantly suppressed voltage-gated sodium currents, transient outward potassium currents, and the glycine-induced chloride currents to 87.66%±2.12%, 96.33%±0.35%, and 91.46%±2.69% of that of the control level, respectively. At 1 mmol/L, lidocaine further suppressed the 3 currents to 70.26%±4.69%, 62.80% ±2.61%, and 89.11%±3.17% of that of the control level, respectively, However, lidocaine at concentrations lower than 1 mmol/L did not significantly affect GABA- or aspartate-induced currents. At a higher concentration (3 retool/L), lidocaine slightly depressed the GABA-in-duced current to 87.70%±1.87% of that of the control level. Finally, lidocaine at 100 μmol/L was shown to significantly suppress the current-evoked firing of IC neurons to 58.62%±11.22% of that of the control level, indicating that lidocaine decreases neuronal excitability. Conclusion: Although the action of lidocaine on the ion channels and receptors is complex and non-specific, it has an overall inhibitory effect on IC neurons at a clinically-relevant concentration, suggesting a central mechanism for lidocaine to suppress tinnitus.

  3. Tolperisone-type drugs inhibit spinal reflexes via blockade of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Pál; Farkas, Sándor; Fodor, László; Bielik, Norbert; Thán, Márta; Kolok, Sándor; Gere, Anikó; Csejtei, Mónika; Tarnawa, István

    2005-12-01

    The spinal reflex depressant mechanism of tolperisone and some of its structural analogs with central muscle relaxant action was investigated. Tolperisone (50-400 microM), eperisone, lanperisone, inaperisone, and silperisone (25-200 microM) dose dependently depressed the ventral root potential of isolated hemisected spinal cord of 6-day-old rats. The local anesthetic lidocaine (100-800 microM) produced qualitatively similar depression of spinal functions in the hemicord preparation, whereas its blocking effect on afferent nerve conduction was clearly stronger. In vivo, tolperisone and silperisone as well as lidocaine (10 mg/kg intravenously) depressed ventral root reflexes and excitability of motoneurons. However, in contrast with lidocaine, the muscle relaxant drugs seemed to have a more pronounced action on the synaptic responses than on the excitability of motoneurons. Whole-cell measurements in dorsal root ganglion cells revealed that tolperisone and silperisone depressed voltage-gated sodium channel conductance at concentrations that inhibited spinal reflexes. Results obtained with tolperisone and its analogs in the [3H]batrachotoxinin A 20-alpha-benzoate binding in cortical neurons and in a fluorimetric membrane potential assay in cerebellar neurons further supported the view that blockade of sodium channels may be a major component of the action of tolperisone-type centrally acting muscle relaxant drugs. Furthermore, tolperisone, eperisone, and especially silperisone had a marked effect on voltage-gated calcium channels, whereas calcium currents were hardly influenced by lidocaine. These data suggest that tolperisone-type muscle relaxants exert their spinal reflex inhibitory action predominantly via a presynaptic inhibition of the transmitter release from the primary afferent endings via a combined action on voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

  4. Opposite Effects of the S4-S5 Linker and PIP(2) on Voltage-Gated Channel Function: KCNQ1/KCNE1 and Other Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choveau, Frank S; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Coyan, Fabien C; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Baró, Isabelle; Loussouarn, Gildas

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are tetramers, each subunit presenting six transmembrane segments (S1-S6), with each S1-S4 segments forming a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) and the four S5-S6 forming both the conduction pathway and its gate. S4 segments control the opening of the intracellular activation gate in response to changes in membrane potential. Crystal structures of several voltage-gated ion channels in combination with biophysical and mutagenesis studies highlighted the critical role of the S4-S5 linker (S4S5(L)) and of the S6 C-terminal part (S6(T)) in the coupling between the VSD and the activation gate. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe the coupling at a molecular scale. This review summarizes the mechanisms suggested for various voltage-gated ion channels, including a mechanism that we described for KCNQ1, in which S4S5(L) is acting like a ligand binding to S6(T) to stabilize the channel in a closed state. As discussed in this review, this mechanism may explain the reverse response to depolarization in HCN-like channels. As opposed to S4S5(L), the phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), stabilizes KCNQ1 channel in an open state. Many other ion channels (not only voltage-gated) require PIP(2) to function properly, confirming its crucial importance as an ion channel cofactor. This is highlighted in cases in which an altered regulation of ion channels by PIP(2) leads to channelopathies, as observed for KCNQ1. This review summarizes the state of the art on the two regulatory mechanisms that are critical for KCNQ1 and other voltage-gated channels function (PIP(2) and S4S5(L)), and assesses their potential physiological and pathophysiological roles.

  5. Opposite effects of the S4-S5 linker and PIP2 on voltage-gated channel function: KCNQ1/KCNE1 and other channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S Choveau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels are tetramers, each subunit presenting six transmembrane segments (S1-S6, with each S1-S4 segments forming a voltage-sensing domain (VSD and the four S5-S6 forming both the conduction pathway and its gate. S4 segments control the opening of the intracellular activation gate in response to changes in membrane potential. Crystal structures of several voltage-gated ion channels in combination with biophysical and mutagenesis studies highlighted the critical role of the S4-S5 linker (S4S5L and of the S6 C-terminal part (S6T in the coupling between the VSD and the activation gate. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe the coupling at a molecular scale. This review summarizes the mechanisms suggested for various voltage-gated ion channels, including a mechanism that we described for KCNQ1, in which S4S5L is acting like a ligand binding to S6T to stabilize the channel in a closed state. As discussed in this review, this mechanism may explain the reverse response to depolarization in HCN-like channels. As opposed to S4S5L, the phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2, stabilizes KCNQ1 channel in an open state. Many other ion channels (not only voltage-gated require PIP2 to function properly, confirming its crucial importance as an ion channel co-factor. This is highlighted in cases in which an altered regulation of ion channels by PIP2 leads to channelopathies, as observed for KCNQ1. This review summarizes the state of the art on the two regulatory mechanisms that are critical for KCNQ1 and other voltage-gated channels function (PIP2 and S4-S5L, and assesses their potential physiological and pathophysiological roles.

  6. Dynamical characterization of inactivation path in voltage-gated Na(+) ion channel by non-equilibrium response spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Krishnendu; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2016-11-01

    Inactivation path of voltage gated sodium channel has been studied here under various voltage protocols as it is the main governing factor for the periodic occurrence and shape of the action potential. These voltage protocols actually serve as non-equilibrium response spectroscopic tools to study the ion channel in non-equilibrium environment. In contrast to a lot of effort in finding the crystal structure based molecular mechanism of closed-state(CSI) and open-state inactivation(OSI); here our approach is to understand the dynamical characterization of inactivation. The kinetic flux as well as energetic contribution of the closed and open- state inactivation path is compared here for voltage protocols, namely constant, pulsed and oscillating. The non-equilibrium thermodynamic quantities used in response to these voltage protocols serve as improved characterization tools for theoretical understanding which not only agrees with the previously known kinetic measurements but also predict the energetically optimum processes to sustain the auto-regulatory mechanism of action potential and the consequent inactivation steps needed. The time dependent voltage pattern governs the population of the conformational states which when couple with characteristic rate parameters, the CSI and OSI selectivity arise dynamically to control the inactivation path. Using constant, pulsed and continuous oscillating voltage protocols we have shown that during depolarization the OSI path is more favored path of inactivation however, in the hyper-polarized situation the CSI is favored. It is also shown that the re-factorisation of inactivated sodium channel to resting state occurs via CSI path. Here we have shown how the subtle energetic and entropic cost due to the change in the depolarization magnitude determines the optimum path of inactivation. It is shown that an efficient CSI and OSI dynamical profile in principle can characterize the open-state drug blocking phenomena.

  7. Intron retention in mRNA encoding ancillary subunit of insect voltage-gated sodium channel modulates channel expression, gating regulation and drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, Céline M; Moignot, Bénédicte; Wang, Lingxin; Murillo, Laurence; Juchaux, Marjorie; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Dong, Ke; Legros, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Insect voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are formed by a well-known pore-forming α-subunit encoded by para-like gene and ancillary subunits related to TipE from the mutation "temperature-induced-paralysis locus E." The role of these ancillary subunits in the modulation of biophysical and pharmacological properties of Na(+) currents are not enough documented. The unique neuronal ancillary subunit TipE-homologous protein 1 of Drosophila melanogaster (DmTEH1) strongly enhances the expression of insect Nav channels when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Here we report the cloning and functional expression of two neuronal DmTEH1-homologs of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana, PaTEH1A and PaTEH1B, encoded by a single bicistronic gene. In PaTEH1B, the second exon encoding the last 11-amino-acid residues of PaTEH1A is shifted to 3'UTR by the retention of a 96-bp intron-containing coding-message, thus generating a new C-terminal end. We investigated the gating and pharmacological properties of the Drosophila Nav channel variant (DmNav1-1) co-expressed with DmTEH1, PaTEH1A, PaTEH1B or a truncated mutant PaTEH1Δ(270-280) in Xenopus oocytes. PaTEH1B caused a 2.2-fold current density decrease, concomitant with an equivalent α-subunit incorporation decrease in the plasma membrane, compared to PaTEH1A and PaTEH1Δ(270-280). PaTEH1B positively shifted the voltage-dependences of activation and slow inactivation of DmNav1-1 channels to more positive potentials compared to PaTEH1A, suggesting that the C-terminal end of both proteins may influence the function of the voltage-sensor and the pore of Nav channel. Interestingly, our findings showed that the sensitivity of DmNav1-1 channels to lidocaine and to the pyrazoline-type insecticide metabolite DCJW depends on associated TEH1-like subunits. In conclusion, our work demonstrates for the first time that density, gating and pharmacological properties of Nav channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes can be modulated by an

  8. The effect of protein kinase C on voltage-gated potassium channel in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from rats exposed to chronic hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永昶; 倪望; 张珍祥; 徐永健

    2004-01-01

    Background Chronic hypoxia can cause pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary heart disease with high mortality.The signal transduction pathway of protein kinase C (PKC) plays an important role in chronic pulmonary hypertension. So it is necessary to investigate the effect of PKC on voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of rats exposed to chronic hypoxia.Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a control group (group A) and a chronic hypoxia group (group B). Group B received hypoxia [oxygen concentration (10±1)%] eight hours per day for four consecutive weeks. Single pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were obtained using an acute enzyme separation method. Conventional whole cell patch clamp technique was used to record resting membrane potential, membrane capacitance and voltage-gated K+ currents. The changes in voltage-gated K+ currents before and after applying paramethoxyamphetamine (PMA) (500 nmol/L), an agonist of PKC, and PMA plus carbohydrate mixture of glucose, fructose and xylitol (GFX) (30 nmol/L), an inhibitor of PKC, were compared between the two groups. Results The resting membrane potential in group B was significantly lower than that of group A: -(29.0±4.8) mV (n=18) vs -(42.5±4.6) mV (n=35) (P0.05). The voltage-gated K+ currents were significantly inhibited by PMA in group A, and this effect was reversed by GFX. However, the voltage-gated K+ currents in group B were not affected by PMA.Conclusions The resting membrane potential and voltage-gated K+ currents in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from rats exposed to chronic hypoxia decreased significantly. It seems that PKC has different effects on the voltage-gated K+ currents of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells under different conditions.

  9. Reversible dementia: two nursing home patients with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reintjes, Wesley; Romijn, Marloes D M; Hollander, Daan; Ter Bruggen, Jan P; van Marum, Rob J

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (VGKC-LE) is a rare disease that is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for medical practitioners. Two patients with VGKC-LE, both developing dementia are presented. Following treatment, both patients showed remarkable cognitive and functional improvement enabling them to leave the psychogeriatric nursing homes they both were admitted to. Patients with VGKC-LE can have a major cognitive and functional improvement even after a diagnostic delay of more than 1 year. Medical practitioners who treat patients with unexplained cognitive decline, epileptic seizures, or psychiatric symptoms should be aware of LE as an underlying rare cause.

  10. The mechanism of KV4.3 voltage-gated potassium channel in arrhythmia induced by sleep deprivation in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-jing ZHANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of sleep deprivation(SD on the changes in electrocardiogram and mRNA and protein expression of KV4.3 voltage-gated potassium channel in rats,and explore the related mechanisms of arrhythmia induced by SD.Methods A total of 48 adult male SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups(8 each: normal control(CC group,tank control(TC group,1-,3-,5-and 7-day SD group.Animal model of SD was established by modified multiple platform method,and electrocardiogram was recorded on 1st,3rd,5th,and 7th of experiment.Protein and mRNA expressions of KV4.3 voltage-gated potassium channel were measured by real-time PCR and Western blotting analysis.Results The main changes on electrocardiogram following SD were arrhythmia.Compared with the CC group,rats in TC group showed sinus tachycardia in electrocardiogram: frequent atrial premature beats were observed one day after SD;ventricular arrhythmias,such as frequent polymorphic ventricular premature beats and paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia were observed three days after SD;incomplete right bundle branch block wave occurred five days after SD;the electrocardiogram showed third-degree atrioventricular(AV block wave seven days after SD,which indicated atrial arrhythmia and ventricular arrhythmia respectively.Ventricular escape beat,sinus arrest as well as the fusion of obviously elevated ST segment and T-wave were also observed.The expression levels of KV4.3 voltage-gated potassium channel decreased with prolongation of SD time.The expression of mRNA and protein of KV4.3 potassium channel in 7-day SD rats were only the one ninth and one fourth of levels in CC group.Conclusion Sleep deprivation can cause arrhythmia,and decreased expression of KV4.3 voltage-gated potassium channel may possibly be one of the reasons of arrhythmia induced by SD.

  11. Ultra-Low-Voltage Low-Power Bulk-Driven Quasi-Floating-Gate Operational Transconductance Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Alsibai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new ultra-low-voltage (LV low-power (LP bulk-driven quasi-floating-gate (BD-QFG operational transconductance amplifier (OTA is presented in this paper. The proposed circuit is designed using 0.18 μm CMOS technology. A supply voltage of ±0.3 V and a quiescent bias current of 5 μA are used. The PSpice simulation result shows that the power consumption of the proposed BD-QFG OTA is 13.4 μW. Thus, the circuit is suitable for low-power applications. In order to confirm that the proposed BD-QFG OTA can be used in analog signal processing, a BD-QFG OTA-based diodeless precision rectifier is designed as an example application. This rectifier employs only two BD-QFG OTAs and consumes only 26.8 μW.

  12. The effect of gate voltage on the electrical transport properties in the contacts of C60 to carbon nanotube leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Shokri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, we examined the effect of gate voltage, bias voltage, contact geometries and the different bond lengths on the electrical transport properties in a nanostructure consisting of C60 molecule attached to two semi-infinite leads made of single wall carbon nanotubes in the coherent regime. Our calculation was based on the Green’s function method within nearest-neighbour tight-binding approximation. After the calculation was of transmission, the electrical current was obtained by the Landauer-Buttiker formula. Next, the effect of the mentioned factors was investigated in the nanostructure. The application of the present results may be useful in designing devices based on molecular electronics in nanoscale.

  13. Molecular determinants of voltage-gated sodium channel regulation by the Nedd4/Nedd4-like proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Bruce, M Christine

    2004-01-01

    -ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family. We recently reported that cardiac Na(v)1.5 is regulated by Nedd4-2. In this study, we further investigated the molecular determinants of regulation of Na(v) proteins. When expressed in HEK-293 cells and studied using whole cell voltage clamping, the neuronal Na(v)1.2 and Na......The voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Na(v)) form a family composed of 10 genes. The COOH termini of Na(v) contain a cluster of amino acids that are nearly identical among 7 of the 10 members. This COOH-terminal sequence, PPSYDSV, is a PY motif known to bind to WW domains of E3 protein...... that Nedd4-dependent ubiquitination of Na(v) channels may represent a general mechanism regulating the excitability of neurons and myocytes via modulation of channel density at the plasma membrane....

  14. Large protonation-gated photochromism of an OPE-embedded difurylperfluorocyclopentene

    KAUST Repository

    Wolf, Jannic Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    A recently reported protolytic gating effect on the ring closing reaction of an oligo(phenylene ethynylene) (OPE) embedded difurylperfluorocyclopentene (S) with a dimethylaminophenyl chain link in each of the side arms, was quantitatively analyzed in detail. The reaction system (So, SoH+, SoH2 2+, Sc, ScH+, ScH2 2+) comprising three protolytic forms in both open and closed configuration, is characterized by four protolytic equilibrium constants and six photochemical quantum yields of ring closing and ring opening. The absorption spectra, conductivity, and effective photochemical quantum yields were measured in acetonitrile as functions of solvent acidity varied by addition of trifluoroacetic acid and triethylamine and characterized by an effective pHnon-aq. Based on the derivation of a rigorous method for assessing the individual quantum yields of ring closure and ring opening of the six species, it was shown that it is specifically the second protonation step that is responsible for a more than 10-fold increase in the quantum yield of ring closure.

  15. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  16. Analytical model for an asymmetric double-gate MOSFET with gate-oxide thickness and flat-band voltage variations in the subthreshold region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Hyeon; Yun, Ilgu

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes an analytical model for an asymmetric double-gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (DG MOSFET) with varying gate-oxide thickness (tox) and flat-band voltage (Vfb) in the subthreshold region. Since such variations cannot be completely avoided, the modeling of their behaviors is essential. The analytical model is developed by solving a 2D Poisson equation with a varying channel doping concentration (NA). To solve the 2D Poisson equation of the asymmetric DG MOSFET, a perturbation method is used to separate the solution of the channel potential into basic and perturbed terms. Since the basic terms can be regarded as the equations derived from a general symmetric doped DG MOSFET, the conventional analytical model is adopted. In addition, a solution related to the perturbed terms for the asymmetric structures is obtained using Fourier series. Based on the obtained channel potential, the electrical characteristics of the drive current (IDS) are expressed in the analytical model. The prediction of the electrical characteristics by the analytical model shows excellent agreement when compared with commercially available 2D numerical device simulation results with respect to not only tox and Vfb variations but also channel length and NA variations.

  17. Low voltage logic circuits exploiting gate level dynamic body biasing in 28 nm UTBB FD-SOI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taco, Ramiro; Levi, Itamar; Lanuzza, Marco; Fish, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the recently proposed gate level body bias (GLBB) technique is evaluated for low voltage logic design in state-of-the-art 28 nm ultra-thin body and box (UTBB) fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) technology. The inherent benefits of the low-granularity body-bias control, provided by the GLBB approach, are emphasized by the efficiency of forward body bias (FBB) in the FD-SOI technology. In addition, the possibility to integrate PMOS and NMOS devices into a single common well configuration allows significant area reduction, as compared to an equivalent triple well implementation. Some arithmetic circuits were designed using GLBB approach and compared to their conventional CMOS and DTMOS counterparts under different running conditions at low voltage regime. Simulation results shows that, for 300 mV of supply voltage, a 4 × 4-bit GLBB Baugh Wooley multiplier allows performance improvement of about 30% and area reduction of about 35%, while maintaining low energy consumption as compared to the conventional CMOS ⧹ DTMOS solutions. Performance and energy benefits are maintained over a wide range of process-voltage-temperature (PVT) variations.

  18. Omega currents in voltage-gated ion channels: what can we learn from uncovering the voltage-sensing mechanism using MD simulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarek, Mounir; Delemotte, Lucie

    2013-12-17

    Ion channels conduct charged species through otherwise impermeable biological membranes. Their activity supports a number of physiological processes, and genetic mutations can disrupt their function dramatically. Among these channels, voltage gated cation channels (VGCCs) are ubiquitous transmembrane proteins involved in electrical signaling. In addition to their selectivity for ions, their function requires membrane-polarization-dependent gating. Triggered by changes in the transmembrane voltage, the activation and deactivation of VGCCs proceed through a sensing mechanism that prompts motion of conserved positively charged (basic) residues within the S4 helix of a four-helix bundle, the voltage sensor domain (VSD). Decades of experimental investigations, using electrophysiology, molecular biology, pharmacology, and spectroscopy, have revealed details about the function of VGCCs. However, in 2005, the resolution of the crystal structure of the activated state of one member of the mammalian voltage gated potassium (Kv) channels family (the Kv1.2) enabled researchers to make significant progress in understanding the structure-function relationship in these proteins on a molecular level. In this Account, we review the use of a complementary technique, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, that has offered new insights on this timely issue. Starting from the "open-activated state" crystal structure, we have carried out large-scale all atom MD simulations of the Kv1.2 channel embedded in its lipidic environment and submitted to a hyperpolarizing (negative) transmembrane potential. We then used steered MD simulations to complete the full transition to the resting-closed state. Using these procedures, we have followed the operation of the VSDs and uncovered three intermediate states between their activated and deactivated conformations. Each conformational state is characterized by its network of salt bridges and by the occupation of the gating charge transfer center by a

  19. Distance measurements reveal a common topology of prokaryotic voltage-gated ion channels in the lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jessica; Blunck, Rikard; Ge, Pinghua; Selvin, Paul R; Bezanilla, Francisco; Papazian, Diane M; Correa, Ana M

    2006-10-24

    Voltage-dependent ion channels are fundamental to the physiology of excitable cells because they underlie the generation and propagation of the action potential and excitation-contraction coupling. To understand how ion channels work, it is important to determine their structures in different conformations in a membrane environment. The validity of the crystal structure for the prokaryotic K(+) channel, K(V)AP, has been questioned based on discrepancies with biophysical data from functional eukaryotic channels, underlining the need for independent structural data under native conditions. We investigated the structural organization of two prokaryotic voltage-gated channels, NaChBac and K(V)AP, in liposomes by using luminescence resonance energy transfer. We describe here a transmembrane packing representation of the voltage sensor and pore domains of the prokaryotic Na channel, NaChBac. We find that NaChBac and K(V)AP share a common arrangement in which the structures of the Na and K selective pores and voltage-sensor domains are conserved. The packing arrangement of the voltage-sensing region as determined by luminescence resonance energy transfer differs significantly from that of the K(V)AP crystal structure, but resembles that of the eukaryotic K(V)1.2 crystal structure. However, the voltage-sensor domain in prokaryotic channels is closer to the pore domain than in the K(V)1.2 structure. Our results indicate that prokaryotic and eukaryotic channels that share similar functional properties have similar helix arrangements, with differences arising likely from the later introduction of additional structural elements.

  20. Amitriptyline and carbamazepine utilize voltage-gated ion channel suppression to impair excitability of sensory dorsal horn neurons in thin tissue slice: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Matthias; Czorlich, Patrick; Nagaraj, Chandran; Schnöbel-Ehehalt, Rose; Li, Yingji; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Olschewski, Horst; Heschl, Stefan; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Amitriptyline, carbamazepine and gabapentin are often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, their analgesic action on central sensory neurons is still not fully understood. Moreover, the expression pattern of their target ion channels is poorly elucidated in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Thus, we performed patch-clamp investigations in visualized neurons of lamina I-III of the spinal cord. The expression of the different voltage-gated ion channels, as the targets of these drugs, was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Neurons of the lamina I-III express the TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na(+) as well as voltage-gated K(+) subunits assembling the fast inactivating (A-type) currents and the delayed rectifier K(+) currents. Our pharmacological studies show that tonically-firing, adapting-firing and single spike neurons responded dose-dependently to amitriptyline and carbamazepine. The ion channel inhibition consecutively reduced the firing rate of tonically-firing and adapting-firing neurons. This study provides evidence for the distribution of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) subunits in lamina I-III of the spinal cord and for the action of drugs used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our work confirms that modulation of voltage-gated ion channels in the central nervous system contributes to the antinociceptive effects of these drugs.

  1. Regulation of voltage-gated ion channels in excitable cells by the ubiquitin ligases Nedd4 and Nedd4-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno, Daria; Schuetz, Friderike; Poronnik, Philip; Adams, David J

    2011-01-01

    The electrical excitability of neurons is mediated primarily by voltage-gated ion channels, particularly voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(v)), K(+) (K(v)) and Cl(-) (ClC) channels. Cells regulate their electrical excitability by controlling not only the activity, but also the number of individual ion channels in the plasma membrane. There exist several mechanisms for regulating levels of voltage-gated ion channels: transcription and translation, retention and export from the endoplasmic reticulum as well as insertion and retrieval from the plasma membrane. Alterations in voltage-gated ion channel activity, composition and distribution can contribute to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, hypertension, neuropathic and inflammatory pain. One mechanism for retrieval is ubiquitination. Here specific ubiquitin ligases bind to membrane proteins to modulate and regulate their cellular fate. In this review, we focus on Nedd4 and Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligases and the mechanisms by which they regulate voltage-gated ion channels and describe a novel paradigm on the mechanisms that underpin aberrant ion channel function in neurological disorders.

  2. Non-depletion floating layer in SOI LDMOS for enhancing breakdown voltage and eliminating back-gate bias effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhi; Li Wei; Li Ping

    2013-01-01

    A non-depletion floating layer silicon-on-insulator (NFL SOI) lateral double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor (LDMOS) is proposed and the NFL-assisted modulated field (NFLAMF) principle is investigated in this paper.Based on this principle,the floating layer can pin the potential for modulating bulk field.In particular,the accumulated high concentration of holes at the bottom of the NFL can efficiently shield the electric field of the SOI layer and enhance the dielectric field in the buried oxide layer (BOX).At variation of back-gate bias,the shielding charges of NFL can alsoeliminate back-gate effects.The simulated results indicate that the breakdown voltage (BV) is increased from 315 V to 558 V compared to the conventional reduced surface field (RESURF) SOI (CSOI) LDMOS,yielding a 77% improvement.Furthermore,due to the field shielding effect of the NFL,the device can maintain the same breakdown voltage of 558 V with a thinner BOX to resolve the thermal problem in an SOI device.

  3. Excessive blinking and ataxia in a child with occult neuroblastoma and voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Nicholas M

    2012-05-01

    A previously healthy 9-year-old girl presented with a 10-day history of slowly progressive unsteadiness, slurred speech, and behavior change. On examination there was cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria, excessive blinking, subtle perioral myoclonus, and labile mood. The finding of oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid prompted paraneoplastic serological evaluation and search for an occult neural crest tumor. Antineuronal nuclear autoantibody type 1 (anti-Hu) and voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies were detected in serum. Metaiodobenzylguanidine scan and computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed a localized abdominal mass in the region of the porta hepatis. A diagnosis of occult neuroblastoma was made. Resection of the stage 1 neuroblastoma and treatment with pulsed corticosteroids resulted in resolution of all symptoms and signs. Excessive blinking has rarely been described with neuroblastoma, and, when it is not an isolated finding, it may be a useful clue to this paraneoplastic syndrome. Although voltage-gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity has not been described previously in the setting of neuroblastoma, it is associated with a spectrum of paraneoplastic neurologic manifestations in adults, including peripheral nerve hyperexcitability disorders.

  4. Diverse roles for auxiliary subunits in phosphorylation-dependent regulation of mammalian brain voltage-gated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, Helene; Trimmer, James S

    2011-11-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are a diverse family of signaling proteins that mediate rapid electrical signaling events. Among these, voltage-gated potassium or Kv channels are the most diverse partly due to the large number of principal (or α) subunits and auxiliary subunits that can assemble in different combinations to generate Kv channel complexes with distinct structures and functions. The diversity of Kv channels underlies much of the variability in the active properties between different mammalian central neurons and the dynamic changes that lead to experience-dependent plasticity in intrinsic excitability. Recent studies have revealed that Kv channel α subunits and auxiliary subunits are extensively phosphorylated, contributing to additional structural and functional diversity. Here, we highlight recent studies that show that auxiliary subunits exert some of their profound effects on dendritic Kv4 and axonal Kv1 channels through phosphorylation-dependent mechanisms, either due to phosphorylation on the auxiliary subunit itself or by influencing the extent and/or impact of α subunit phosphorylation. The complex effects of auxiliary subunits and phosphorylation provide a potent mechanism to generate additional diversity in the structure and function of Kv4 and Kv1 channels, as well as allowing for dynamic reversible regulation of these important ion channels.

  5. Two methods of tuning threshold voltage of bulk FinFETs with replacement high-k metal-gate stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Miao; Zhu, Huilong; Zhang, Yanbo; Xu, Qiuxia; Zhang, Yongkui; Qin, Changliang; Zhang, Qingzhu; Yin, Huaxiang; Xu, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Luo, Jun; Li, Chunlong; Zhao, Chao; Ye, Tianchun

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we propose two threshold voltage (VTH) tuning methods for bulk FinFETs with replacement high-k metal gate. The first method is to perform a vertical implantation into fin structure after dummy gate removal, self-aligned forming halo & punch through stop pocket (halo & PTSP) doping profile. The second method is to execute P+/BF2+ ion implantations into the single common work function (WF) layer in N-/P-FinFETs, respectively. These two methods have been investigated by TCAD simulations and MOS-capacitor experiments respectively, and then integrated into FinFET fabrication successfully. Experimental results show that the halo & PTSP doping profile can reduce VTH roll off and total variation. With P+/BF2+ doped WF layer, the VTH-sat shift -0.43 V/+1.26 V for N-FinFETs and -0.75 V/+0.11 V for P-FinFETs, respectively, with gate length of 500 nm. The proposed two methods are simple and effective for FinFET VTH tuning, and have potential for future application of massive production.

  6. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°.

  7. Dual-harmonic auto voltage control for the rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko Tamura

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The dual-harmonic operation, in which the accelerating cavities are driven by the superposition of the fundamental and the second harmonic rf voltage, is useful for acceleration of the ultrahigh intensity proton beam in the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC. However, the precise and fast voltage control of the harmonics is necessary to realize the dual-harmonic acceleration. We developed the dual-harmonic auto voltage control system for the J-PARC RCS. We describe details of the design and the implementation. Various tests of the system are performed with the RCS rf system. Also, a preliminary beam test has been done. We report the test results.

  8. Characterization of high-dose and high-energy implanted gate and source diode and analysis of lateral spreading of p gate profile in high voltage SiC static induction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onose, Hidekatsu; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Onuki, Jin

    2017-03-01

    The effect of the p gate dose on the characteristics of the gate-source diode in SiC static induction transistors (SIT) was investigated. It was found that a dose of 1.5 × 1014 cm-2 yields a pn junction breakdown voltage higher than 60 V and good forward characteristics. A normally on SiC SIT was fabricated and demonstrated. A blocking voltage higher than 2.0 kV at a gate-source voltage of -50 V and on-resistance of 70 mΩ cm2 were obtained. Device simulations were performed to investigate the effect of the lateral spreading. By comparing the measured I-V curves with simulation results, the lateral spreading factor was estimated to be about 0.5. The lateral spreading detrimentally affected the electrical properties of the SIT made using implantations at energies higher than 1 MeV.

  9. Highly stable carbon nanotube top-gate transistors with tunable threshold voltage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Cobb, B.; Breemen, A. van; Gelinck, G.H.; Bao, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-nanotube top-gate transistors with fluorinated dielectrics are presented. With PTrFE as the dielectric, the devices have absent or small hysteresis at different sweep rates and excellent bias-stress stability under ambient conditions. Ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistors

  10. High Radiation Tolerant Ceramic Voltage Isolator (Non-optical Gate Driver) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the Phase I effort is to design, develop and demonstrate a novel solid-state ceramic-based voltage isolator and demonstrate its potential to provide a...

  11. Gate-voltage control of equal-spin Andreev reflection in half-metal/semiconductor/superconductor junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiuqiang, E-mail: xianqiangzhe@126.com [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Meng, Hao, E-mail: menghao1982@shu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, Shanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong 723001 (China)

    2016-04-22

    With the Blonder–Tinkham–Klapwijk (BTK) approach, we investigate conductance spectrum in Ferromagnet/Semiconductor/Superconductor (FM/Sm/SC) double tunnel junctions where strong Rashba spin–orbit interaction (RSOI) is taken into account in semiconductors. For the half-metal limit, we find that the in-gap conductance becomes finite except at zero voltage when inserting a ferromagnetic insulator (FI) at the Sm/SC interface, which means that the appearance of a long-range triplet states in the half-metal. This is because of the emergence of the unconventional equal-spin Andreev reflection (ESAR). When the FI locates at the FM/Sm interface, however, we find the vanishing in-gap conductance due to the absence of the ESAR. Moreover, the non-zero in-gap conductance shows a nonmonotonic dependence on RSOI which can be controlled by applying an external gate voltage. Our results can be used to generate and manipulate the long-range spin triplet correlation in the nascent field of superconducting spintronics. - Highlights: • We study the equal-spin Andreev reflection in half-metal/semiconductor/superconductor (HM/Sm/SC) junctions. • The equal-spin Andreev reflection appearance when inserting a ferromagnetic insulator at the Sm/SC interface. • The finite in-gap conductance is attributed to the emergence of the equal-spin Andreev reflection. • The finite in-gap conductance shows a nonmonotonic dependence on Rashba spin–orbit interaction. • The finite in-gap conductance can be controlled by applying an external gate voltage.

  12. Voltage-sensor movements describe slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels II: a periodic paralysis mutation in Na(V)1.4 (L689I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jonathan R; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2013-03-01

    In skeletal muscle, slow inactivation (SI) of Na(V)1.4 voltage-gated sodium channels prevents spontaneous depolarization and fatigue. Inherited mutations in Na(V)1.4 that impair SI disrupt activity-induced regulation of channel availability and predispose patients to hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. In our companion paper in this issue (Silva and Goldstein. 2013. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201210909), the four voltage sensors in Na(V)1.4 responsible for activation of channels over microseconds are shown to slowly immobilize over 1-160 s as SI develops and to regain mobility on recovery from SI. Individual sensor movements assessed via attached fluorescent probes are nonidentical in their voltage dependence, time course, and magnitude: DI and DII track SI onset, and DIII appears to reflect SI recovery. A causal link was inferred by tetrodotoxin (TTX) suppression of both SI onset and immobilization of DI and DII sensors. Here, the association of slow sensor immobilization and SI is verified by study of Na(V)1.4 channels with a hyperkalemic periodic paralysis mutation; L689I produces complex changes in SI, and these are found to manifest directly in altered sensor movements. L689I removes a component of SI with an intermediate time constant (~10 s); the mutation also impedes immobilization of the DI and DII sensors over the same time domain in support of direct mechanistic linkage. A model that recapitulates SI attributes responsibility for intermediate SI to DI and DII (10 s) and a slow component to DIII (100 s), which accounts for residual SI, not impeded by L689I or TTX.

  13. Voltage-sensor movements describe slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels II: A periodic paralysis mutation in NaV1.4 (L689I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, slow inactivation (SI) of NaV1.4 voltage-gated sodium channels prevents spontaneous depolarization and fatigue. Inherited mutations in NaV1.4 that impair SI disrupt activity-induced regulation of channel availability and predispose patients to hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. In our companion paper in this issue (Silva and Goldstein. 2013. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201210909), the four voltage sensors in NaV1.4 responsible for activation of channels over microseconds are shown to slowly immobilize over 1–160 s as SI develops and to regain mobility on recovery from SI. Individual sensor movements assessed via attached fluorescent probes are nonidentical in their voltage dependence, time course, and magnitude: DI and DII track SI onset, and DIII appears to reflect SI recovery. A causal link was inferred by tetrodotoxin (TTX) suppression of both SI onset and immobilization of DI and DII sensors. Here, the association of slow sensor immobilization and SI is verified by study of NaV1.4 channels with a hyperkalemic periodic paralysis mutation; L689I produces complex changes in SI, and these are found to manifest directly in altered sensor movements. L689I removes a component of SI with an intermediate time constant (∼10 s); the mutation also impedes immobilization of the DI and DII sensors over the same time domain in support of direct mechanistic linkage. A model that recapitulates SI attributes responsibility for intermediate SI to DI and DII (10 s) and a slow component to DIII (100 s), which accounts for residual SI, not impeded by L689I or TTX. PMID:23401572

  14. Evidence of Gate Voltage Oscillations during Short Circuit of Commercial 1.7 kV/ 1 kA IGBT Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigosa, Paula Diaz; Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco;

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evidence of critical gate voltage oscillations in 1.7 kV/1 kA Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) power modules under short circuit conditions. A 6 kA/1.1 kV Non-Destructive Test (NDT) set up for repeatable short circuit tests has been built with a 40 nH stray inducta...

  15. Evidence of Gate Voltage Oscillations during Short Circuit of Commercial 1.7 kV/ 1 kA IGBT Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigosa, Paula Diaz; Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evidence of critical gate voltage oscillations in 1.7 kV/1 kA Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) power modules under short circuit conditions. A 6 kA/1.1 kV Non-Destructive Test (NDT) set up for repeatable short circuit tests has been built with a 40 nH stray inducta...

  16. A surface plasmon resonance approach to monitor toxin interactions with an isolated voltage-gated sodium channel paddle motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Ferracci, Géraldine; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2015-02-01

    Animal toxins that inhibit voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channel fast inactivation can do so through an interaction with the S3b-S4 helix-turn-helix region, or paddle motif, located in the domain IV voltage sensor. Here, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR), an optical approach that uses polarized light to measure the refractive index near a sensor surface to which a molecule of interest is attached, to analyze interactions between the isolated domain IV paddle and Na(v) channel-selective α-scorpion toxins. Our SPR analyses showed that the domain IV paddle can be removed from the Na(v) channel and immobilized on sensor chips, and suggest that the isolated motif remains susceptible to animal toxins that target the domain IV voltage sensor. As such, our results uncover the inherent pharmacological sensitivities of the isolated domain IV paddle motif, which may be exploited to develop a label-free SPR approach for discovering ligands that target this region.

  17. Amorphous Strontium Titanate Film as Gate Dielectric for Higher Performance and Low Voltage Operation of Transparent and Flexible Organic Field Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sarita; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-04-27

    We report that the pervoskite material, strontium titanate (STO) can be used as a gate dielectric layer of flexible and low voltage organic field effect transistor (OFET). The crystallinity, dielectric constant, and surface morphology of STO films can be controlled by the engineering of the growth condition. Under optimized growth condition, amorphous films of STO show a much better gate dielectric compared to other gate dielectrics used to date, with very small leakage current density for flexible and low voltage (transistors with amorphous STO gate dielectric show high mobility of 2 cm(2)/(V s), on/off ratio of 10(6), subthreshold swing of 0.3 V/dec and low interface trap density. Similarly excellent performance has been obtained in copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) based OFETs with on/off ratio ∼10(5) and carrier mobility ∼5.9 × 10(-2) cm(2)/(V s). Moreover, the operating voltage (∼5 V) has been reduced by more than one order of magnitude. It has been demonstrated that the low processing temperature of amorphous STO makes it the most suitable gate dielectric for flexible and transparent organic devices to operate under low voltage.

  18. Formation of combined partially recessed and multiple fluorinated-dielectric layers gate structures for high threshold voltage GaN-based HEMT power devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huolin; Liang, Yung Chii

    2015-12-01

    The formation of partial AlGaN trench recess filled with multiple fluorinated gate dielectric layers as metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) gate structure for GaN-based HEMT power devices is designed, fabricated and experimentally verified. The approach realizes the device normally-off operational mode and at the same time is able to preserve the good mobility in the 2DEG channel for a maximum on-state current. Experimental measurements on the fabricated MIS-HEMT devices indicate a high gate threshold voltage (Vth) at around 5 V and a very low gate leakage current at pA/mm level. This proposed gate structure provides very promising properties for GaN-based power semiconductor devices in future power electronics switching applications.

  19. Functional Importance of L- and P/Q-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Human Renal Vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B; Poulsen, Christian B; Walter, Steen

    2011-01-01

    in kidney function. It was hypothesized that human renal vascular excitation-contraction coupling involves different subtypes of channels. In human renal artery and dissected intrarenal blood vessels from nephrectomies, PCR analysis showed expression of L-type (Ca(v) 1.2), P/Q-type (Ca(v) 2.1), and T-type......, and L- and P/Q-type channels are of functional importance for the depolarization-induced vasoconstriction. The contribution of P/Q-type channels to contraction in the human vasculature is a novel mechanism for the regulation of renal blood flow and suggests that clinical treatment with calcium blockers......Calcium channel blockers are widely used for treatment of hypertension, because they decrease peripheral vascular resistance through inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Animal studies of renal vasculature have shown expression of several types of calcium channels that are involved...

  20. Update on the frequency of Ile1016 mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Quetzaly; Ponce, Gustavo; Lozano, Saul; Flores, Adriana E

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed 790 Aedes aegypti from 14 localities of Mexico in 2009 to update information on the frequency of the Ile1016 allele in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene that confers resistance to pyrethroids and DDT. The Ile1016 mutation was present in all 17 collections, and was close to fixation in Acapulco (frequency = 0.97), Iguala (0.93), and San Nicolas (0.90). Genotypes at the 1016 locus were not in Hardy-Weinberg proportions in collections from Panuco, Veracruz, Cosoleacaque, Coatzacoalcos, Tantoyuca, and Monterrey due in every case to an excess of homozygotes. The high frequencies of this mutation in Ae. aegypti are probably due to selection pressure from pyrethroid insecticides, particularly permethrin, which has been used in mosquito control programs for >10 years in Mexico.

  1. A case study of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis with PET/MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Day

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the significance of inflammation and autoantibodies in epilepsy, and the use of immunotherapies in certain situations has become an established practice. Temporal lobe epilepsy can follow paraneoplastic or nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with antibodies directed against brain antigens. Here, we focus on a patient with worsening confusion and temporal lobe seizures despite treatment with antiepileptic medications. Serial brain MRIs did not conclusively reveal structural abnormalities, so the patient underwent brain PET/MRI to simultaneously evaluate brain structure and function, revealing bitemporal abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis based on clinical presentation, imaging findings, and antibody testing. Treatment included the addition of a second antiepileptic agent and oral steroids. His seizures and cognitive deficits improved and stabilized.

  2. Diverse and Dynamic Expression Patterns of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Genes in Rat Cochlear Hair Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisel, K. W.; Fritzsch, B.

    2003-02-01

    Both qualitative and quantitative differences in ion-channel conductances are observed along the tonotopic axis of the mammalian cochlea. We have used a molecular approach to characterize these longitudinal expression patterns of voltage-gated ion-channel (VgCN) superfamily members in the peripheral auditory system. Initially RT-PCR and sequence analyses identified the VgCN α and accessory subunits of the cochlear hair cell (HC). Next, whole mount in situ hybridizations demonstrated at least seven common longitudinal expression patterns with the apex tip and basal hook region having the greatest in disparity. These data suggest potential topological variations in hair-cell electrophysiological signatures and these gradients may contribute to cochlear HC's ability to function as efficient frequency analyzers.

  3. Voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in cultured human smooth muscle cells: involvement of SCN9A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Taisuke; Nagata, Taiji; Iida, Haruko; Imuta, Hiroyuki; Iwasawa, Kuniaki; Ma, Ji; Hara, Kei; Omata, Masao; Nagai, Ryozo; Takizawa, Hajime; Nagase, Takahide; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2004-06-04

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel (I(Na)) is expressed under culture conditions in human smooth muscle cells (hSMCs) such as coronary myocytes. The aim of this study is to clarify the physiological, pharmacological and molecular characteristics of I(Na) expressed in cultured hSMCs obtained from bronchus, main pulmonary and coronary artery. I(Na), was recorded in these hSMCs and inhibited by tetrodotoxin (TTX) with an IC(50) value of approximately 10 nM. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of mRNA showed the prominent expression of transcripts for SCN9A, which was consistent with the results of real-time quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide novel evidence that TTX-sensitive Na(+) channel expressed in cultured hSMCs is mainly composed of Na(v)1.7.

  4. Antagonist action of progesterone at σ-receptors in the modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Molly; Fontanilla, Dominique; Mavlyutov, Timur; Ruoho, Arnold E; Jackson, Meyer B

    2011-02-01

    σ-Receptors are integral membrane proteins that have been implicated in a number of biological functions, many of which involve the modulation of ion channels. A wide range of synthetic ligands activate σ-receptors, but endogenous σ-receptor ligands have proven elusive. One endogenous ligand, dimethyltryptamine (DMT), has been shown to act as a σ-receptor agonist. Progesterone and other steroids bind σ-receptors, but the functional consequences of these interactions are unclear. Here we investigated progesterone binding to σ(1)- and σ(2)-receptors and evaluated its effect on σ-receptor-mediated modulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Progesterone binds both σ-receptor subtypes in liver membranes with comparable affinities and blocks photolabeling of both subtypes in human embryonic kidney 293 cells that stably express the human cardiac Na(+) channel Na(v)1.5. Patch-clamp recording in this cell line tested Na(+) current modulation by the σ-receptor ligands ditolylguanidine, PB28, (+)SKF10047, and DMT. Progesterone inhibited the action of these ligands to varying degrees, and some of these actions were reduced by σ(1)-receptor knockdown with small interfering RNA. Progesterone inhibition of channel modulation by drugs was consistent with stronger antagonism of σ(2)-receptors. By contrast, progesterone inhibition of channel modulation by DMT was consistent with stronger antagonism of σ(1)-receptors. Progesterone binding to σ-receptors blocks σ-receptor-mediated modulation of a voltage-gated ion channel, and this novel membrane action of progesterone may be relevant to changes in brain and cardiovascular function during endocrine transitions.

  5. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-08-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca(2+) /calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca(2+) -mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects.

  6. Butanol isomers exert distinct effects on voltage-gated calcium channel currents and thus catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McDavid

    Full Text Available Butanol (C4H10OH has been used both to dissect the molecular targets of alcohols/general anesthetics and to implicate phospholipase D (PLD signaling in a variety of cellular functions including neurotransmitter and hormone exocytosis. Like other primary alcohols, 1-butanol is a substrate for PLD and thereby disrupts formation of the intracellular signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Because secondary and tertiary butanols do not undergo this transphosphatidylation, they have been used as controls for 1-butanol to implicate PLD signaling. Recently, selective pharmacological inhibitors of PLD have been developed and, in some cases, fail to block cellular functions previously ascribed to PLD using primary alcohols. For example, exocytosis of insulin and degranulation of mast cells are blocked by primary alcohols, but not by the PLD inhibitor FIPI. In this study we show that 1-butanol reduces catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells to a much greater extent than tert-butanol, and that the PLD inhibitor VU0155056 has no effect. Using fluorescent imaging we show the effect of these drugs on depolarization-evoked calcium entry parallel those on secretion. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed the peak amplitude of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (I(Ca is inhibited by 1-butanol, with little or no block by secondary or tert-butanol. Detailed comparison shows for the first time that the different butanol isomers exert distinct, and sometimes opposing, effects on the voltage-dependence and gating kinetics of I(Ca. We discuss these data with regard to PLD signaling in cellular physiology and the molecular targets of general anesthetics.

  7. Butanol isomers exert distinct effects on voltage-gated calcium channel currents and thus catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavid, Sarah; Bauer, Mary Beth; Brindley, Rebecca L; Jewell, Mark L; Currie, Kevin P M

    2014-01-01

    Butanol (C4H10OH) has been used both to dissect the molecular targets of alcohols/general anesthetics and to implicate phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in a variety of cellular functions including neurotransmitter and hormone exocytosis. Like other primary alcohols, 1-butanol is a substrate for PLD and thereby disrupts formation of the intracellular signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Because secondary and tertiary butanols do not undergo this transphosphatidylation, they have been used as controls for 1-butanol to implicate PLD signaling. Recently, selective pharmacological inhibitors of PLD have been developed and, in some cases, fail to block cellular functions previously ascribed to PLD using primary alcohols. For example, exocytosis of insulin and degranulation of mast cells are blocked by primary alcohols, but not by the PLD inhibitor FIPI. In this study we show that 1-butanol reduces catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells to a much greater extent than tert-butanol, and that the PLD inhibitor VU0155056 has no effect. Using fluorescent imaging we show the effect of these drugs on depolarization-evoked calcium entry parallel those on secretion. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed the peak amplitude of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (I(Ca)) is inhibited by 1-butanol, with little or no block by secondary or tert-butanol. Detailed comparison shows for the first time that the different butanol isomers exert distinct, and sometimes opposing, effects on the voltage-dependence and gating kinetics of I(Ca). We discuss these data with regard to PLD signaling in cellular physiology and the molecular targets of general anesthetics.

  8. Purification of binding protein for Tityus gamma toxin identified with the gating component of the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, R I; Schmid, A; Lombet, A; Barhanin, J; Lazdunski, M

    1983-01-01

    The gating component associated with the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel from electroplax membranes of Electrophorus electricus has been purified by using toxin gamma from the venom of the scorpion Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. The toxin-binding site was efficiently solubilized with Lubrol PX, resulting in an extract of high initial specific activity. Purification was achieved by adsorption of the toxin-binding component to DEAE-Sephadex A-25 followed by desorption at high ionic strength and chromatography on either wheat germ agglutinin-Ultrogel or Sepharose 6B. Maximal final specific activities were at least 42% of the specific activity expected for a pure toxin-binding component. The purified material exhibited a Stokes radius of 85 A, and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated a single polypeptide component of Mr 270,000. Furthermore, tetrodotoxin binding activity and Tityus gamma toxin binding activity copurified, suggesting that the selectivity filter and the gating component of the Na+ channel are carried by the same polypeptide chain. Images PMID:6306665

  9. Solution-deposited sodium beta-alumina gate dielectrics for low-voltage and transparent field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Bhola N; Dhar, Bal Mukund; See, Kevin C; Katz, Howard E

    2009-11-01

    Sodium beta-alumina (SBA) has high two-dimensional conductivity, owing to mobile sodium ions in lattice planes, between which are insulating AlO(x) layers. SBA can provide high capacitance perpendicular to the planes, while causing negligible leakage current owing to the lack of electron carriers and limited mobility of sodium ions through the aluminium oxide layers. Here, we describe sol-gel-beta-alumina films as transistor gate dielectrics with solution-deposited zinc-oxide-based semiconductors and indium tin oxide (ITO) gate electrodes. The transistors operate in air with a few volts input. The highest electron mobility, 28.0 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), was from zinc tin oxide (ZTO), with an on/off ratio of 2 x 10(4). ZTO over a lower-temperature, amorphous dielectric, had a mobility of 10 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). We also used silicon wafer and flexible polyimide-aluminium foil substrates for solution-processed n-type oxide and organic transistors. Using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulphonate) conducting polymer electrodes, we prepared an all-solution-processed, low-voltage transparent oxide transistor on an ITO glass substrate.

  10. Thermal characteristics investigation of high voltage grounded gate-LDMOS under ESD stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Weifeng; Qian Qinsong; Wang Wen; Yi Yangbo, E-mail: swffrog@seu.edu.c [National ASIC System Engineering Research Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The thermal characteristics of high voltage gg-LDMOS under ESD stress conditions are investigated in detail based on the Sentaurus process and device simulators. The total heat and lattice temperature distributions along the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface under different stress conditions are presented and the physical mechanisms are discussed in detail. The influence of structure parameters on peak lattice temperature is also discussed, which is useful for designers to optimize the parameters of LDMSO for better ESD performance.

  11. Thermal characteristics investigation of high voltage grounded gate-LDMOS under ESD stress conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Weifeng; Qian Qinsong; Wang Wen; Yi Yangbo

    2009-01-01

    The thermal characteristics of high voltage gg-LDMOS under ESD stress conditions are investigated in detail based on the Sentaurus process and device simulators. The total heat and lattice temperature distributions along the Si-SiO_2 interface under different stress conditions are presented and the physical mechanisms are discussed in detail. The influence of structure parameters on peak lattice temperature is also discussed, which is useful for designers to optimize the parameters of LDMSO for better ESD performance.

  12. Zn2+ regulates Kv2.1 voltage-dependent gating and localization following ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Aras, Mandar A.; Saadi, Robert A.; Aizenman, Elias

    2009-01-01

    The delayed-rectifier K+ channel Kv2.1 exists in highly phosphorylated somatodendritic clusters. Ischemia induces rapid Kv2.1 dephosphorylation and a dispersal of these clusters, accompanied by a hyperpolarizing shift in their voltage-dependent activation kinetics. Transient modulation of Kv2.1 activity and localization following ischemia is dependent on a rise in intracellular Ca2+and the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Here, we show that neuronal free Zn2+also plays a critical role in the ...

  13. A Monte Carlo pencil beam scanning model for proton treatment plan simulation using GATE/GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevillot, L; Freud, N; Sarrut, D [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Bertrand, D; Dessy, F, E-mail: loic.grevillot@creatis.insa-lyon.fr [IBA, B-1348, Louvain-la Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-08-21

    This work proposes a generic method for modeling scanned ion beam delivery systems, without simulation of the treatment nozzle and based exclusively on beam data library (BDL) measurements required for treatment planning systems (TPS). To this aim, new tools dedicated to treatment plan simulation were implemented in the Gate Monte Carlo platform. The method was applied to a dedicated nozzle from IBA for proton pencil beam scanning delivery. Optical and energy parameters of the system were modeled using a set of proton depth-dose profiles and spot sizes measured at 27 therapeutic energies. For further validation of the beam model, specific 2D and 3D plans were produced and then measured with appropriate dosimetric tools. Dose contributions from secondary particles produced by nuclear interactions were also investigated using field size factor experiments. Pristine Bragg peaks were reproduced with 0.7 mm range and 0.2 mm spot size accuracy. A 32 cm range spread-out Bragg peak with 10 cm modulation was reproduced with 0.8 mm range accuracy and a maximum point-to-point dose difference of less than 2%. A 2D test pattern consisting of a combination of homogeneous and high-gradient dose regions passed a 2%/2 mm gamma index comparison for 97% of the points. In conclusion, the generic modeling method proposed for scanned ion beam delivery systems was applicable to an IBA proton therapy system. The key advantage of the method is that it only requires BDL measurements of the system. The validation tests performed so far demonstrated that the beam model achieves clinical performance, paving the way for further studies toward TPS benchmarking. The method involves new sources that are available in the new Gate release V6.1 and could be further applied to other particle therapy systems delivering protons or other types of ions like carbon.

  14. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels after subchronic and repeated exposure of PC12 cells to different classes of insecticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, since human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insec

  15. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels after subchronic and repeated exposure of PC12 cells to different classes of insecticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834564; Westerink, Remco H S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239425952

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, since human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insec

  16. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca[subscript v]1.3 Mediates Consolidation, but Not Extinction, of Contextually Conditioned Fear in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Using pharmacological techniques, it has been demonstrated that both consolidation and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning are dependent to some extent upon L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs). Although these studies have successfully implicated LVGCCs in Pavlovian fear conditioning, they do not provide information about the…

  17. Modulatory effect of auxiliary β1 subunit on Nav1.3 voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in Xenopus oocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying-wei; CHENG Zhi-jun; TAN Hong; XIA Yi-meng; REN Rong-rong; DING Yu-qiang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Voltage-gated sodium channels play an important role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. They are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and auxiliary β subunits. To date,nine subtypes of the α subunit, designated Nav 1.1 to Nav1.9, have been shown to form functional sodium channels.

  18. Like Extinction, Latent Inhibition of Conditioned Fear in Mice Is Blocked by Systemic Inhibition of L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Ashley M.; Cain, Chris K.; Barad, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Having recently shown that extinction of conditioned fear depends on L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs), we have been seeking other protocols that require this unusual induction mechanism. We tested latent inhibition (LI) of fear, because LI resembles extinction except that cue exposures precede, rather than follow, cue-shock pairing.…

  19. Differential regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents and metabotropic glutamate receptor activity by measles virus infection in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Christine; Laube, Mandy; Liebert, Uwe-Gerd; Kraft, Robert

    2012-01-06

    Measles virus (MV) infection may lead to severe chronic CNS disease processes, including MV-induced encephalitis. Because the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is a major determinant of the (patho-)physiological state in all cells we asked whether important Ca(2+) conducting pathways are affected by MV infection in cultured cortical rat neurons. Patch-clamp measurements revealed a decrease in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents during MV-infection, while voltage-gated K(+) currents and NMDA-evoked currents were unaffected. Calcium-imaging experiments using 50mM extracellular KCl showed reduced [Ca(2+)](i) increases in MV-infected neurons, confirming a decreased activity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In contrast, the group-I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist DHPG evoked changes in [Ca(2+)](i) that were increased in MV-infected cells. Our results show that MV infection conversely regulates Ca(2+) signals induced by group-I mGluRs and by voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, suggesting that these physiological impairments may contribute to an altered function of cortical neurons during MV-induced encephalitis.

  20. Structure of a potentially open state of a proton-activated pentameric ligand-gated ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilf, Ricarda J C; Dutzler, Raimund

    2009-01-01

    The X-ray structure of a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel from Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC) has recently provided structural insight into this family of ion channels at high resolution. The structure shows a homo-pentameric protein with a barrel-stave architecture that defines an ion-conduction pore located on the fivefold axis of symmetry. In this structure, the wide aqueous vestibule that is encircled by the extracellular ligand-binding domains of the five subunits narrows to a discontinuous pore that spans the lipid bilayer. The pore is constricted by bulky hydrophobic residues towards the extracellular side, which probably serve as barriers that prevent the diffusion of ions. This interrupted pore architecture in ELIC thus depicts a non-conducting conformation of a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel, the thermodynamically stable state in the absence of bound ligand. As ligand binding promotes pore opening in these ion channels and the specific ligand for ELIC has not yet been identified, we have turned our attention towards a homologous protein from the cyanobacterium Gloebacter violaceus (GLIC). GLIC was shown to form proton-gated channels that are activated by a pH decrease on the extracellular side and that do not desensitize after activation. Both prokaryotic proteins, ELIC and GLIC form ion channels that are selective for cations over anions with poor discrimination among monovalent cations, characteristics that resemble the conduction properties of the cation-selective branch of the family that includes acetylcholine and serotonin receptors. Here we present the X-ray structure of GLIC at 3.1 A resolution. The structure reveals a conformation of the channel that is distinct from ELIC and that probably resembles the open state. In combination, both structures suggest a novel gating mechanism for pentameric ligand-gated ion channels where channel opening proceeds by a change in the tilt of the pore-forming helices.

  1. Low-voltage organic electronics based on a gate-tunable injection barrier in vertical graphene-organic semiconductor heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Htay; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Carta, Fabio; Nam, Chang-Yong; Barton, Rob A; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2015-01-14

    The vertical integration of graphene with inorganic semiconductors, oxide semiconductors, and newly emerging layered materials has recently been demonstrated as a promising route toward novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we report organic thin film transistors based on vertical heterojunctions of graphene and organic semiconductors. In these thin heterostructure devices, current modulation is accomplished by tuning of the injection barriers at the semiconductor/graphene interface with the application of a gate voltage. N-channel devices fabricated with a thin layer of C60 show a room temperature on/off ratio >10(4) and current density of up to 44 mAcm(-2). Because of the ultrashort channel intrinsic to the vertical structure, the device is fully operational at a driving voltage of 200 mV. A complementary p-channel device is also investigated, and a logic inverter based on two complementary transistors is demonstrated. The vertical integration of graphene with organic semiconductors via simple, scalable, and low-temperature fabrication processes opens up new opportunities to realize flexible, transparent organic electronic, and optoelectronic devices.

  2. S3-S4 linker length modulates the relaxed state of a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Michael F; Lacroix, Jérôme J; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2013-11-19

    Voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are membrane protein modules found in ion channels and enzymes that are responsible for a large number of fundamental biological tasks, such as neuronal electrical activity. The VSDs switch from a resting to an active conformation upon membrane depolarization, altering the activity of the protein in response to voltage changes. Interestingly, numerous studies describe the existence of a third distinct state, called the relaxed state, also populated at positive potentials. Although some physiological roles for the relaxed state have been suggested, little is known about the molecular determinants responsible for the development and modulation of VSD relaxation. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the linker (S3-S4 linker) between the third (S3) and fourth (S4) transmembrane segments of the VSD alters the equilibrium between resting and active conformations. By measuring gating currents from the Shaker potassium channel, we demonstrate here that shortening the S3-S4 linker stabilizes the relaxed state, whereas lengthening the linker or splitting it and coinjecting two fragments of the channel have little effect. We propose that natural variations of the length of the S3-S4 linker in various VSD-containing proteins may produce differential VSD relaxation in vivo.

  3. β-Adrenergic receptor agonist increases voltage-gated Na(+) currents in medial prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczyk, Bartlomiej

    2015-05-19

    The prefrontal cortex does not function properly in neuropsychiatric diseases and during chronic stress. The aim of this study was to test the effects of isoproterenol, a β-adrenergic receptor agonist, on the voltage-dependent fast-inactivating Na(+) currents in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) pyramidal neurons obtained from young rats. The recordings were performed in the cell-attached configuration. Isoproterenol (2μM) did not change the peak Na(+) current amplitude but shifted the IV curve of the Na(+) currents toward hyperpolarization. Pretreatment of the cells with the β-adrenergic antagonists propranolol and metoprolol abolished the effect of isoproterenol on the Na(+) currents, suggesting the involvement of β1-adrenergic receptors. The effect of β-adrenergic receptor stimulation on the sodium currents was dependent on kinase A and kinase C; the effect was diminished in the presence of the kinase A antagonist H-89 and the kinase C antagonist chelerythrine and abolished when the antagonists were coapplied. Moreover, isoproterenol depolarized the membrane potential recorded using the perforated-patch method, and this depolarization was abolished by cesium ions. Thus, in mPFC pyramidal neurons, stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors up-regulates the fast-inactivating voltage-gated Na(+) currents evoked by suprathreshold depolarizations.

  4. Functional interaction between S1 and S4 segments in voltage-gated sodium channels revealed by human channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarouch, Mohamed-Yassine; Kasimova, Marina A; Tarek, Mounir; Abriel, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    The p.I141V mutation of the voltage-gated sodium channel is associated with several clinical hyper-excitability phenotypes. To understand the structural bases of the p.I141V biophysical alterations, molecular dynamics simulations were performed. These simulations predicted that the p.I141V substitution induces the formation of a hydrogen bond between the Y168 residue of the S2 segment and the R225 residue of the S4 segment. We generated a p.I141V-Y168F double mutant for both the Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 channels. The double mutants demonstrated the abolition of the functional effects of the p.I141V mutation, consistent with the formation of a specific interaction between Y168-S2 and R225-S4. The single p.Y168F mutation, however, positively shifted the activation curve, suggesting a compensatory role of these residues on the stability of the voltage-sensing domain.

  5. Upregulation of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Cav1.3 in Bovine Somatotropes Treated with Ghrelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Salinas Zarate

    2013-01-01

    the Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 pore-forming subunits of L-type channels. The treatment with Ghrelin significantly increased the Cav1.3 subunit expression, suggeting that the chronic stimulation of the GHS receptor with Ghrelin or GHRP-6 increases the number of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at the cell surface of BS.

  6. ¬cAMP promotes the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in vitro via modulation of voltage-gated calcium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme eLepski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs remain poorly understood. In this study we investigated the role of Ca2+ and cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the differentiation of NPCs extracted from the subventricular zone of E14.5 rat embryos. Patch clamp recordings revealed that increasing cAMP-signaling with Forskolin or IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine significantly facilitated neuronal functional maturation. A continuous application of IBMX to the differentiation medium substantially increased the functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels, as well as neuronal firing frequency. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents and in the amplitude of evoked glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic currents. The most prominent acute effect of applying IBMX was an increase in L-type Ca2+currents. Conversely, blocking L-type channels strongly inhibited dendritic outgrowth and synapse formation even in the presence of IBMX, indicating that voltage-gated Ca2+ influx plays a major role in neuronal differentiation. Finally, we found that nifedipine completely blocks IBMX-induced CREB phosphorylation (cAMP-response-element-binding protein, indicating that the activity of this important transcription factor equally depends on both enhanced cAMP and voltage-gated Ca2+-signaling. Taken together, these data indicate that the up-regulation of voltage-gated L-type Ca2+-channels and early electrical excitability are critical steps in the cAMP-dependent differentiation of SVZ-derived NPCs into functional neurons. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the acute effects of cAMP on voltage-gated Ca+2channels in NPC-derived developing neurons.

  7. CaV1.1: The atypical prototypical voltage-gated Ca2+ channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Roger A.; Beam, Kurt G.

    2012-01-01

    CaV1.1 is the prototype for the other nine known CaV channel isoforms, yet it has functional properties that make it truly atypical of this group. Specifically, CaV1.1 is expressed solely in skeletal muscle where it serves multiple purposes; it is the voltage sensor for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and it is an L-type Ca2+ channel which contributes to a form of activity-dependent Ca2+ entry that has been termed Excitation-Coupled Ca2+ Entry (ECCE). The ability of CaV1.1 to serve as voltage-sensor for EC coupling appears to be unique amongst CaV channels, whereas the physiological role of its more conventional function as a Ca2+ channel has been a matter of uncertainty for nearly 50 years. In this chapter, we discuss how CaV1.1 supports EC coupling, the possible relevance of Ca2+ entry through CaV1.1 and how alterations of CaV1.1 function can have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:22982493

  8. Mapping the Interaction Site for a β-Scorpion Toxin in the Pore Module of Domain III of Voltage-gated Na+ Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Joel Z.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels initiates and propagates action potentials in electrically excitable cells. β-Scorpion toxins, including toxin IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssIV), enhance activation of NaV channels. CssIV stabilizes the voltage sensor in domain II in its activated state via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. Amino acid residues required for the action of CssIV have been identified in the S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of domain II. The extracellular loops of domain III are also involved in toxin action, but individual amino acid residues have not been identified. We used site-directed mutagenesis and voltage clamp recording to investigate amino acid residues of domain III that are involved in CssIV action. In the IIISS2-S6 loop, five substitutions at four positions altered voltage-sensor trapping by CssIVE15A. Three substitutions (E1438A, D1445A, and D1445Y) markedly decreased voltage-sensor trapping, whereas the other two substitutions (N1436G and L1439A) increased voltage-sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that residues in IIISS2-S6 make both positive and negative interactions with CssIV. N1436G enhanced voltage-sensor trapping via increased binding affinity to the resting state, whereas L1439A increased voltage-sensor trapping efficacy. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the toxin-channel interaction was developed using the Rosetta modeling method. These data provide additional molecular insight into the voltage-sensor trapping mechanism of toxin action and define a three-point interaction site for β-scorpion toxins on NaV channels. Binding of α- and β-scorpion toxins to two distinct, pseudo-symmetrically organized receptor sites on NaV channels acts synergistically to modify channel gating and paralyze prey. PMID:22761417

  9. Mapping the interaction site for a β-scorpion toxin in the pore module of domain III of voltage-gated Na(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Joel Z; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Scheuer, Todd; Karbat, Izhar; Cohen, Lior; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Catterall, William A

    2012-08-31

    Activation of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channels initiates and propagates action potentials in electrically excitable cells. β-Scorpion toxins, including toxin IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssIV), enhance activation of Na(V) channels. CssIV stabilizes the voltage sensor in domain II in its activated state via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism. Amino acid residues required for the action of CssIV have been identified in the S1-S2 and S3-S4 extracellular loops of domain II. The extracellular loops of domain III are also involved in toxin action, but individual amino acid residues have not been identified. We used site-directed mutagenesis and voltage clamp recording to investigate amino acid residues of domain III that are involved in CssIV action. In the IIISS2-S6 loop, five substitutions at four positions altered voltage-sensor trapping by CssIV(E15A). Three substitutions (E1438A, D1445A, and D1445Y) markedly decreased voltage-sensor trapping, whereas the other two substitutions (N1436G and L1439A) increased voltage-sensor trapping. These bidirectional effects suggest that residues in IIISS2-S6 make both positive and negative interactions with CssIV. N1436G enhanced voltage-sensor trapping via increased binding affinity to the resting state, whereas L1439A increased voltage-sensor trapping efficacy. Based on these results, a three-dimensional model of the toxin-channel interaction was developed using the Rosetta modeling method. These data provide additional molecular insight into the voltage-sensor trapping mechanism of toxin action and define a three-point interaction site for β-scorpion toxins on Na(V) channels. Binding of α- and β-scorpion toxins to two distinct, pseudo-symmetrically organized receptor sites on Na(V) channels acts synergistically to modify channel gating and paralyze prey.

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) inhibits voltage-gated T-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, M; Gilbert, G; Lory, P; Marthan, R; Quignard, J F; Savineau, J P

    2012-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form, DHEAS, are the most abundant steroid hormones in the mammalian blood flow. DHEA may have beneficial effects in various pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular diseases or deterioration of the sense of well-being. However to date, the cellular mechanism underlying DHEA action remains elusive and may involve ion channel modulation. In this study, we have characterized the effect of DHEA on T-type voltage-activated calcium channels (T-channels), which are involved in several cardiovascular and neuronal diseases. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that DHEA inhibits the three recombinant T-channels (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2 and Ca(V)3.3) expressed in NG108-15 cell line, as well as native T-channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. This effect of DHEA is both concentration (IC(50) between 2 and 7μM) and voltage-dependent and results in a significant shift of the steady-state inactivation curves toward hyperpolarized potentials. Consequently, DHEA reduces window T-current and inhibits membrane potential oscillations induced by Ca(V)3 channels. DHEA inhibition is not dependent on the activation of nuclear androgen or estrogen receptors and implicates a PTX-sensitive Gi protein pathway. Functionally, DHEA and the T-type inhibitor NNC 55-0396 inhibited KCl-induced contraction of pulmonary artery rings and their effect was not cumulative. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that DHEA inhibits T-channels by a Gi protein dependent pathway. DHEA-induced alteration in T-channel activity could thus account for its therapeutic action and/or physiological effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca(2+)-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it.

  12. Physiology and evolution of voltage-gated calcium channels in early diverging animal phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Senatore

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium (Cav channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling, gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling, pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling, regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca2+-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when many of these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it.

  13. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca2+-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it. PMID:27867359

  14. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes.

  15. Effect of the gate width to the IGBT on state voltage drop%栅极宽度对IGBT通态压降的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关艳霞; 姜秀丽

    2011-01-01

    The I-V characteristics of PT-IGBT was simulated Using'silvaco'.Comparing the I-V characteristic curves of the different widths of the gate electrode,the different values of on-state voltage drop of the different widths of the gate electrode were extracted at the same current density,so then the curves of on-state voltage drop to the gate electrode was gained.The simulation consequence is consistent with theory.For the same cell size there is an optimal value of the width of the gate electrode.The on-state voltage drop is reduced throgh reasonable designing.%利用silvaco软件对PT-IGBT的I-V特性进行了仿真,在同一电流密度下提取了不同栅极宽度IGBT的通态压降,得到了通态压降随栅极宽度变化的曲线,该仿真结果与理论分析一致。对于相同的元胞尺寸,栅极宽度存在最优值,只要合理地选取,可以有效地降低通态压降。

  16. Studies of alpha-helicity and intersegmental interactions in voltage-gated Na+ channels: S2D4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Ma

    Full Text Available Much data, including crystallographic, support structural models of sodium and potassium channels consisting of S1-S4 transmembrane segments (the "voltage-sensing domain" clustered around a central pore-forming region (S5-S6 segments and the intervening loop. Voltage gated sodium channels have four non-identical domains which differentiates them from the homotetrameric potassium channels that form the basis for current structural models. Since potassium and sodium channels also exhibit many different functional characteristics and the fourth domain (D4 of sodium channels differs in function from other domains (D1-D3, we have explored its structure in order to determine whether segments in D4 of sodium channels differ significantly from that determined for potassium channels. We have probed the secondary and tertiary structure and the role of the individual amino acid residues of the S2D4 of Na(v1.4 by employing cysteine-scanning mutagenesis (with tryptophan and glutamine substituted for native cysteine. A Fourier transform power spectrum of perturbations in free energy of steady-state inactivation gating (using midpoint potentials and slopes of Boltzmann equation fits of channel availability, h(infinity-V plots indicates a substantial amount of alpha-helical structure in S2D4 (peak at 106 degrees, alpha-Periodicity Index (alpha-PI of 3.10, This conclusion is supported by alpha-PI values of 3.28 and 2.84 for the perturbations in rate constants of entry into (beta and exit from (alpha fast inactivation at 0 mV for mutant channels relative to WT channels assuming a simple two-state model for transition from the open to inactivated state. The results of cysteine substitution at the two most sensitive sites of the S2D4 alpha-helix (N1382 and E1392C support the existence of electrostatic network interactions between S2 and other transmembrane segments within Na(v1.4D4 similar to but not identical to those proposed for K+ channels.

  17. Niflumic acid alters gating of HCN2 pacemaker channels by interaction with the outer region of S4 voltage sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lan; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2009-05-01

    Niflumic acid, 2-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (NFA), is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modifies the gating of many ion channels. Here, we investigated the effects of NFA on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) pacemaker channels expressed in X. laevis oocytes using site-directed mutagenesis and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Extracellular NFA acted rapidly and caused a slowing of activation and deactivation and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of HCN2 channel activation (-24.5 +/- 1.2 mV at 1 mM). Slowed channel gating and reduction of current magnitude was marked in oocytes treated with NFA, while clamped at 0 mV but minimal in oocytes clamped at -100 mV, indicating the drug preferentially interacts with channels in the closed state. NFA at 0.1 to 3 mM shifted the half-point for channel activation in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC(50) of 0.54 +/- 0.068 mM and a predicted maximum shift of -38 mV. NFA at 1 mM also reduced maximum HCN2 conductance by approximately 20%, presumably by direct block of the pore. The rapid onset and state-dependence of NFA-induced changes in channel gating suggests an interaction with the extracellular region of the S4 transmembrane helix, the primary voltage-sensing domain of HCN2. Neutralization (by mutation to Gln) of any three of the outer four basic charged residues in S4, but not single mutations, abrogated the NFA-induced shift in channel activation. We conclude that NFA alters HCN2 gating by interacting with the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor domains.

  18. Current-voltage characteristics and charge DLTS spectra of proton-bombarded Schottky diodes on semi-insulating GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurzo, I. (Inst. of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia)); Hrubcin, L. (Inst. of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia)); Bartos, J. (Inst. of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia)); Pincik, E. (Inst. of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia))

    1993-10-01

    Changes in the current-voltage characteristics and charge DLTS spectra of Schottky diodes on semi-insulating GaAs after irradiation by protons at different energies and doses are presented and discussed. Apart from a progressive degradation of the Schottky barriers with enhanced proton energy and dose, there is a threshold, positioned between 10[sup 14] and 10[sup 15] protons/cm[sup 2], for observing trap-limited transients. (orig.)

  19. Functional Expression Profile of Voltage-Gated K(+) Channel Subunits in Rat Small Mesenteric Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robert H; Fromme, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    Multiple K v channel complexes contribute to total K v current in numerous cell types and usually subserve different physiological functions. Identifying the complete compliment of functional K v channel subunits in cells is a prerequisite to understanding regulatory function. It was the goal of this work to determine the complete K v subunit compliment that contribute to functional K v currents in rat small mesenteric artery (SMA) myocytes as a prelude to studying channel regulation. Using RNA prepared from freshly dispersed myocytes, high levels of K v 1.2, 1.5, and 2.1 and lower levels of K v 7.4 α-subunit expressions were demonstrated by quantitative PCR and confirmed by Western blotting. Selective inhibitors correolide (K v 1; COR), stromatoxin (K v 2.1; ScTx), and linopirdine (K v 7.4; LINO) decreased K v current at +40 mV in SMA by 46 ± 4, 48 ± 4, and 6.5 ± 2 %, respectively, and K v current in SMA was insensitive to α-dendrotoxin. Contractions of SMA segments pretreated with 100 nmol/L phenylephrine were enhanced by 27 ± 3, 30 ± 8, and 7 ± 3 % of the response to 120 mmol/L KCl by COR, ScTX, and LINO, respectively. The presence of K v 6.1, 9.3, β1.1, and β1.2 was demonstrated by RT-PCR using myocyte RNA with expressions of K vβ1.2 and K v 9.3 about tenfold higher than K vβ1.1 and K v 6.1, respectively. Selective inhibitors of K v 1.3, 3.4, 4.1, and 4.3 channels also found at the RNA and/or protein level had no significant effect on K v current or contraction. These results suggest that K v current in rat SMA myocytes are dominated equally by two major components consisting of K v 1.2-1.5-β1.2 and K v 2.1-9.3 channels along with a smaller contribution from K v 7.4 channels but differences in voltage dependence of activation allows all three to provide significant contributions to SMA function at physiological voltages.

  20. A rugged 650 V SOI-based high-voltage half-bridge IGBT gate driver IC for motor drive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Qing; Li, Zehong; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Weizhong; Huang, Xiangjun; Feng, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a rugged high-voltage N-channel insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) gate driver integrated circuit. The device integrates a high-side and a low-side output stages on a single chip, which is designed specifically for motor drive applications. High-voltage level shift technology enables the high-side stage of this device to operate up to 650 V. The logic inputs are complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)/transistor transistor logic compatible down to 3.3 V. Undervoltage protection functionality with hysteresis characteristic has also been integrated to enhance the device reliability. The device is fabricated in a 1.0 μm, 650 V high-voltage bipolar CMOS double-diffused metal oxide semiconductor (BCD) on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process. Deep trench dielectric isolation technology is employed to provide complete electrical isolation with advantages such as reduced parasitic effects, excellent noise immunity and low leakage current. Experimental results show that the isolation voltage of this device can be up to approximately 779 V at 25°C, and the leakage current is only 5 nA at 650 V, which is 15% higher and 67% lower than the conventional ones. In addition, it delivers an excellent thermal stability and needs very low quiescent current and offers a high gate driver capability which is needed to adequately drive IGBTs that have large input capacitances.

  1. Dopaminergic modulation of the voltage-gated sodium current in the cochlear afferent neurons of the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Valdés-Baizabal

    Full Text Available The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs. Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway.

  2. Dopaminergic modulation of the voltage-gated sodium current in the cochlear afferent neurons of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Baizabal, Catalina; Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA) plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway.

  3. PKC enhances the capacity for secretion by rapidly recruiting covert voltage-gated Ca2+ channels to the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Christopher J; Magoski, Neil S

    2015-02-11

    It is unknown whether neurons can dynamically control the capacity for secretion by promptly changing the number of plasma membrane voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. To address this, we studied peptide release from the bag cell neurons of Aplysia californica, which initiate reproduction by secreting hormone during an afterdischarge. This burst engages protein kinase C (PKC) to trigger the insertion of a covert Ca(2+) channel, Apl Cav2, alongside a basal channel, Apl Cav1. The significance of Apl Cav2 recruitment to secretion remains undetermined; therefore, we used capacitance tracking to assay secretion, along with Ca(2+) imaging and Ca(2+) current measurements, from cultured bag cell neurons under whole-cell voltage-clamp. Activating PKC with the phorbol ester, PMA, enhanced Ca(2+) entry, and potentiated stimulus-evoked secretion. This relied on channel insertion, as it was occluded by preventing Apl Cav2 engagement with prior whole-cell dialysis or the cytoskeletal toxin, latrunculin B. Channel insertion reduced the stimulus duration and/or frequency required to initiate secretion and strengthened excitation-secretion coupling, indicating that Apl Cav2 accesses peptide release more readily than Apl Cav1. The coupling of Apl Cav2 to secretion also changed with behavioral state, as Apl Cav2 failed to evoke secretion in silent neurons from reproductively inactive animals. Finally, PKC also acted secondarily to enhance prolonged exocytosis triggered by mitochondrial Ca(2+) release. Collectively, our results suggest that bag cell neurons dynamically elevate Ca(2+) channel abundance in the membrane to ensure adequate secretion during the afterdischarge.

  4. Low-operating-voltage polymer thin-film transistors based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) with hafnium oxide as the gate dielectric

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, YR; Deng, LF; Yao, RH; Lai, PT

    2010-01-01

    The effects of hafnium oxide $(hbox{HfO}-{2})$ gate dielectric annealing treatment in oxygen $(hbox{O}-{2})$ and ammonia $(hbox{NH}-{3})$ ambient on the electrical performance of polymer thin-film transistors (PTFTs) based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) are investigated. The PTFTs with $hbox{HfO}-{2}$ gate dielectric and also octadecyltrichlorosilane surface modification, prepared by spin-coating process, exhibit good performance, such as a small threshold voltage of $-$0.5 V and an operating volt...

  5. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels by sequestration of beta subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchillo-Ibañez, Inmaculada; Aldea, Marcos; Brocard, Jacques; Albillos, Almudena; Weiss, Norbert; Garcia, Antonio G; De Waard, Michel

    2003-11-28

    The auxiliary Ca(v)beta subunit is essential for functional expression of high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels. Here, we describe a lure sequence designed to sequester the Ca(v)beta subunits in transfected bovine chromaffin cells. This sequence is composed of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the alpha chain of the human CD8, the I-II loop of Ca(v)2.1 subunit, and EGFP. We showed that expressing the CD8-I-II-EGFP sequence in chromaffin cells led to a >50% decrease in overall Ca(2+) current density. Although this decrease involved all the Ca(2+) channel types (L, N, P/Q, R), the proportion of each type supporting the remaining current was altered. A similar effect was observed after transfection when measuring the functional role of Ca(2+) channels in catecholamine release by chromaffin cells: global decrease of release and change of balance between the different channel types supporting it. Possible explanations for this apparent discrepancy are further discussed.

  6. Neutralization of Gating Charges in Domain II of the Sodium Channel α Subunit Enhances Voltage-Sensor Trapping by a β-Scorpion Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestèle, Sandrine; Scheuer, Todd; Mantegazza, Massimo; Rochat, Hervé; Catterall, William A.

    2001-01-01

    β-Scorpion toxins shift the voltage dependence of activation of sodium channels to more negative membrane potentials, but only after a strong depolarizing prepulse to fully activate the channels. Their receptor site includes the S3–S4 loop at the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor in domain II of the α subunit. Here, we probe the role of gating charges in the IIS4 segment in β-scorpion toxin action by mutagenesis and functional analysis of the resulting mutant sodium channels. Neutralization of the positively charged amino acid residues in the IIS4 segment by mutation to glutamine shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive membrane potentials and reduces the steepness of voltage-dependent gating, which is consistent with the presumed role of these residues as gating charges. Surprisingly, neutralization of the gating charges at the outer end of the IIS4 segment by the mutations R850Q, R850C, R853Q, and R853C markedly enhances β-scorpion toxin action, whereas mutations R856Q, K859Q, and K862Q have no effect. In contrast to wild-type, the β-scorpion toxin Css IV causes a negative shift of the voltage dependence of activation of mutants R853Q and R853C without a depolarizing prepulse at holding potentials from −80 to −140 mV. Reaction of mutant R853C with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate causes a positive shift of the voltage dependence of activation and restores the requirement for a depolarizing prepulse for Css IV action. Enhancement of sodium channel activation by Css IV causes large tail currents upon repolarization, indicating slowed deactivation of the IIS4 voltage sensor by the bound toxin. Our results are consistent with a voltage-sensor–trapping model in which the β-scorpion toxin traps the IIS4 voltage sensor in its activated position as it moves outward in response to depolarization and holds it there, slowing its inward movement on deactivation and enhancing subsequent channel activation. Evidently

  7. Pyrethroids differentially alter voltage-gated sodium channels from the honeybee central olfactory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklesso Kadala

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of neurons from the honey bee olfactory system to pyrethroid insecticides was studied using the patch-clamp technique on central 'antennal lobe neurons' (ALNs in cell culture. In these neurons, the voltage-dependent sodium currents are characterized by negative potential for activation, fast kinetics of activation and inactivation, and the presence of cumulative inactivation during train of depolarizations. Perfusion of pyrethroids on these ALN neurons submitted to repetitive stimulations induced (1 an acceleration of cumulative inactivation, and (2 a marked slowing of the tail current recorded upon repolarization. Cypermethrin and permethrin accelerated cumulative inactivation of the sodium current peak in a similar manner and tetramethrin was even more effective. The slow-down of channel deactivation was markedly dependent on the type of pyrethroid. With cypermethrin, a progressive increase of the tail current amplitude along with successive stimulations reveals a traditionally described use-dependent recruitment of modified sodium channels. However, an unexpected decrease in this tail current was revealed with tetramethrin. If one considers the calculated percentage of modified channels as an index of pyrethroids effects, ALNs are significantly more susceptible to tetramethrin than to permethrin or cypermethrin for a single depolarization, but this difference attenuates with repetitive activity. Further comparison with peripheral neurons from antennae suggest that these modifications are neuron type specific. Modeling the sodium channel as a multi-state channel with fast and slow inactivation allows to underline the effects of pyrethroids on a set of rate constants connecting open and inactivated conformations, and give some insights to their specificity. Altogether, our results revealed a differential sensitivity of central olfactory neurons to pyrethroids that emphasize the ability for these compounds to impair detection and

  8. CHARACTERIZING CALCIUM INFLUX VIA VOLTAGE- AND LIGAND-GATED CALCIUM CHANNELS IN EMBRYONIC ALLIGATOR NEURONS IN CULTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Weina; Wu, Jiang; Pritz, Michael B.; Khanna, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate brains share many features in common. Early in development, both the hindbrain and diencephalon are built similarly. Only later in time do differences in morphology occur. Factors that could potentially influence such changes include certain physiological properties of neurons. As an initial step to investigate this problem, embryonic Alligator brain neurons were cultured and calcium responses were characterized. The present report is the first to document culture of Alligator brain neurons in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) as well as in standard mammalian tissue culture medium supplemented with growth factors. Alligator brain neuron cultures were viable for at least 1 week with unipolar neurites emerging by 24 hours. Employing Fura-2 AM, robust depolarization-induced calcium influx, was observed in these neurons. Using selective blockers of the voltage-gated calcium channels, the contributions of N-, P/Q-, R-, T-, and L-type channels in these neurons were assessed and their presence documented. Lastly, Alligator brain neurons were challenged with an excitotoxic stimulus (glutamate + glycine) where delayed calcium deregulation could be prevented by a classical NMDA receptor antagonist. PMID:24260711

  9. Complex oligosaccharides are N-linked to Kv3 voltage-gated K+ channels in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Tara A; Corey, Melissa J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2007-04-01

    Neuronal Kv3 voltage-gated K(+) channels have two absolutely conserved N-glycosylation sites. Here, it is shown that Kv3.1, 3.3, and 3.4 channels are N-glycosylated in rat brain. Digestion of total brain membranes with peptide N glycosidase F (PNGase F) produced faster migrating immunobands than those of undigested membranes. Additionally, partial PNGase F digests showed that both sites are occupied by oligosaccharides. Neuraminidase treatment produced a smaller immunoband shift relative to PNGase F treatment. These results indicate that both sites are highly available and occupied by N-linked oligosaccharides for Kv3.1, 3.3, and 3.4 in rat brain, and furthermore that at least one oligosaccharide is of complex type. Additionally, these results point to an extracytoplasmic S1-S2 linker in Kv3 proteins expressed in native membranes. We suggest that N-glycosylation processing of Kv3 channels is critical for the expression of K(+) currents at the surface of neurons, and perhaps contributes to the pathophysiology of congenital disorders of glycosylation.

  10. Voltage-Gated K+ Channel, Kv3.3 Is Involved in Hemin-Induced K562 Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min Seok; Choi, Seon Young; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels are well known to be involved in cell proliferation. However, even though cell proliferation is closely related to cell differentiation, the relationship between Kv channels and cell differentiation remains poorly investigated. This study demonstrates that Kv3.3 is involved in K562 cell erythroid differentiation. Down-regulation of Kv3.3 using siRNA-Kv3.3 increased hemin-induced K562 erythroid differentiation through decreased activation of signal molecules such as p38, cAMP response element-binding protein, and c-fos. Down-regulation of Kv3.3 also enhanced cell adhesion by increasing integrin β3 and this effect was amplified when the cells were cultured with fibronectin. The Kv channels, or at least Kv3.3, appear to be associated with cell differentiation; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of Kv channel regulation of cell differentiation would provide important information regarding vital cellular processes.

  11. Three dimensional neuronal cell cultures more accurately model voltage gated calcium channel functionality in freshly dissected nerve tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinzhi Lai

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that neuronal cells cultured on traditional flat surfaces may exhibit exaggerated voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC functionality. To gain a better understanding of this phenomenon, primary neuronal cells harvested from mice superior cervical ganglion (SCG were cultured on two dimensional (2D flat surfaces and in three dimensional (3D synthetic poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA and polystyrene (PS polymer scaffolds. These 2D- and 3D-cultured cells were compared to cells in freshly dissected SCG tissues, with respect to intracellular calcium increase in response to high K(+ depolarization. The calcium increases were identical for 3D-cultured and freshly dissected, but significantly higher for 2D-cultured cells. This finding established the physiological relevance of 3D-cultured cells. To shed light on the mechanism behind the exaggerated 2D-cultured cells' functionality, transcriptase expression and related membrane protein distributions (caveolin-1 were obtained. Our results support the view that exaggerated VGCC functionality from 2D cultured SCG cells is possibly due to differences in membrane architecture, characterized by uniquely organized caveolar lipid rafts. The practical implication of use of 3D-cultured cells in preclinical drug discovery studies is that such platforms would be more effective in eliminating false positive hits and as such improve the overall yield from screening campaigns.

  12. Synergistic Inhibition of Delayed Rectifier K+ and Voltage-Gated Na+ Currents by Artemisinin in Pituitary Tumor (GH3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund Cheung So

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Artemisinin (ART is an anti-malarial agent reported to influence endocrine function. Methods: Effects of ART on ionic currents and action potentials (APs in pituitary tumor (GH3 cells were evaluated by patch clamp techniques. Results: ART inhibited the amplitude of delayed-rectifier K+ current (IK(DR in response to membrane depolarization and accelerated the process of current inactivation. It exerted an inhibitory effect on IK(DR with an IC50 value of 11.2 µM and enhanced IK(DR inactivation with a KD value of 14.7 µM. The steady-state inactivation curve of IK(DR was shifted to hyperpolarization by 10 mV. Pretreatment of chlorotoxin (1 µM or iloprost (100 nM did not alter the magnitude of ART-induced inhibition of IK(DR in GH3 cells. ART also decreased the peak amplitude of voltage-gated Na+ current (INa with a concentration-dependent slowing in inactivation rate. Application of KMUP-1, an inhibitor of late INa, was effective at reversing ART-induced prolongation in inactivation time constant of INa. Under current-clamp recordings, ART alone reduced the amplitude of APs and prolonged the duration of APs. Conclusion: Under ART exposure, the inhibitory actions on both IK(DR and INa could be a potential mechanisms through which this drug influences membrane excitability of endocrine or neuroendocrine cells appearing in vivo.

  13. Functional Expression of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels Navl.5 in Human Breast Caner Cell Line MDA-MB-231

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui GAO; Jing WANG; Yi SHEN; Ming LEI; Zehua WANG

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are known to be involved in the initiation and progression of many malignancies,and the different subtypes of VGSCs play important roles in the metastasis cascade of many tumors.This study investigated the functional expression of Nav 1.5 and its effect on invasion behavior of human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231.The mRNA and pro-tein expression of Navl.5 was detected by real time PCR,Western Blot and immunofluorescence.The effects of Navl.5 on cell proliferation,migration and invasion were respectively assessed by MTT and Transwell.The effects of Nav1.5 on the secretion of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) by MDA-MB-231 were analyzed by RT-PCR.The over-expressed Navl.5 was present on the membrane of MDA-MB-231 cells.The invasion ability in vitro and the MMP-9 mRNA expression were respec-tively decreased to (47.82±0.53)% and (43.97±0.64)% (P<0.05) respectively in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VGSCs specific inhibitor tetrodotoxin (TTX) by blocking Navl.5 activity.It was con-eluded that Nav1.5 functional expression potentiated the invasive behavior of human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 by increasing the secretion of MMP-9.

  14. Comparative impact of voltage-gated calcium channels and NMDA receptors on mitochondria-mediated neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanika, Ruslan I; Villanueva, Idalis; Kazanina, Galina; Andrews, S Brian; Pivovarova, Natalia B

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate excitotoxicity, a major component of many neurodegenerative disorders, is characterized by excessive calcium influx selectively through NMDARs. However, there is a substantial uncertainty concerning why other known routes of significant calcium entry, in particular, VGCCs, are not similarly toxic. Here, we report that in the majority of neurons in rat hippocampal and cortical cultures, maximal L-type VGCC activation induces much lower calcium loading than toxic NMDAR activation. Consequently, few depolarization-activated neurons exhibit calcium deregulation and cell death. Activation of alternative routes of calcium entry induced neuronal death in proportion to the degree of calcium loading. In a small subset of neurons, depolarization evoked stronger calcium elevations, approaching those induced by toxic NMDA. These neurons were characterized by elevated expression of VGCCs and enhanced voltage-gated calcium currents, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Preventing VGCC-dependent mitochondrial calcium loading resulted in stronger cytoplasmic calcium elevations, whereas inhibiting mitochondrial calcium clearance accelerated mitochondrial depolarization. Both observations further implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in VGCC-mediated cell death. Results indicate that neuronal vulnerability tracks the extent of calcium loading but does not appear to depend explicitly on the route of calcium entry.

  15. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the voltage gated sodium ion channel TcNav causes mortality in Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Halim, Hesham M.; Alshukri, Baida M. H.; Ahmad, Munawar S.; Nakasu, Erich Y. T.; Awwad, Mohammed H.; Salama, Elham M.; Gatehouse, Angharad M. R.; Edwards, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium ion channel (VGSC) belongs to the largest superfamily of ion channels. Since VGSCs play key roles in physiological processes they are major targets for effective insecticides. RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used to analyse gene function, but recently, it has shown potential to contribute to novel strategies for selectively controlling agricultural insect pests. The current study evaluates the delivery of dsRNA targeted to the sodium ion channel paralytic A (TcNav) gene in Tribolium castaneum as a viable means of controlling this insect pest. Delivery of TcNav dsRNA caused severe developmental arrest with larval mortalities up to 73% post injection of dsRNA. Injected larvae showed significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression between 30–60%. Expression was also significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in pupae following injection causing 30% and 42% knockdown for early and late pupal stages, respectively. Oral delivery of dsRNA caused dose-dependant mortalities of between 19 and 51.34%; this was accompanied by significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression following 3 days of continuous feeding. The majority of larvae injected with, or fed, dsRNA died during the final larval stage prior to pupation. This work provides evidence of a viable RNAi-based strategy for insect control. PMID:27411529

  16. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  17. Spider-venom peptides that target voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmacological tools and potential therapeutic leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klint, Julie K; Senff, Sebastian; Rupasinghe, Darshani B; Er, Sing Yan; Herzig, Volker; Nicholson, Graham M; King, Glenn F

    2012-09-15

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels play a central role in the propagation of action potentials in excitable cells in both humans and insects. Many venomous animals have therefore evolved toxins that modulate the activity of Na(V) channels in order to subdue their prey and deter predators. Spider venoms in particular are rich in Na(V) channel modulators, with one-third of all known ion channel toxins from spider venoms acting on Na(V) channels. Here we review the landscape of spider-venom peptides that have so far been described to target vertebrate or invertebrate Na(V) channels. These peptides fall into 12 distinct families based on their primary structure and cysteine scaffold. Some of these peptides have become useful pharmacological tools, while others have potential as therapeutic leads because they target specific Na(V) channel subtypes that are considered to be important analgesic targets. Spider venoms are conservatively predicted to contain more than 10 million bioactive peptides and so far only 0.01% of this diversity been characterised. Thus, it is likely that future research will reveal additional structural classes of spider-venom peptides that target Na(V) channels.

  18. Membrane potential bistability in nonexcitable cells as described by inward and outward voltage-gated ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Alcaraz, Antonio; Mafe, Salvador

    2014-10-30

    The membrane potential of nonexcitable cells, defined as the electrical potential difference between the cell cytoplasm and the extracellular environment when the current is zero, is controlled by the individual electrical conductance of different ion channels. In particular, inward- and outward-rectifying voltage-gated channels are crucial for cell hyperpolarization/depolarization processes, being amenable to direct physical study. High (in absolute value) negative membrane potentials are characteristic of terminally differentiated cells, while low membrane potentials are found in relatively depolarized, more plastic cells (e.g., stem, embryonic, and cancer cells). We study theoretically the hyperpolarized and depolarized values of the membrane potential, as well as the possibility to obtain a bistability behavior, using simplified models for the ion channels that regulate this potential. The bistability regions, which are defined in the multidimensional state space determining the cell state, can be relevant for the understanding of the different model cell states and the transitions between them, which are triggered by changes in the external environment.

  19. Phenolic acids isolated from the fungus Schizophyllum commune exert analgesic activity by inhibiting voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hui-Min; Wang, Gan; Liu, Ya-Ping; Rong, Ming-Qiang; Shen, Chuan-Bin; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Luo, Xiao-Dong; Lai, Ren

    2016-09-01

    The present study was designed to search for compounds with analgesic activity from the Schizophyllum commune (SC), which is widely consumed as edible and medicinal mushroom world. Thin layer chromatography (TLC), tosilica gel column chromatography, sephadex LH 20, and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) were used to isolate and purify compounds from SC. Structural analysis of the isolated compounds was based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The effects of these compounds on voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels were evaluated using patch clamp. The analgesic activity of these compounds was tested in two types of mouse pain models induced by noxious chemicals. Five phenolic acids identified from SC extracts in the present study included vanillic acid, m-hydroxybenzoic acid, o-hydroxybenzeneacetic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-methybenzoic acid, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid. They inhibited the activity of both tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r) and tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-s) NaV channels. All the compounds showed low selectivity on NaV channel subtypes. After intraperitoneal injection, three compounds of these compounds exerted analgesic activity in mice. In conclusion, phenolic acids identified in SC demonstrated analgesic activity, facilitating the mechanistic studies of SC in the treatment of neurasthenia.

  20. Expression and cellular localization of the voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ3 in the rodent retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Sargoy, Allison; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rodriguez, Allen; Liu, Janelle; Cuenca, Nicolás; Brecha, Nicholas

    2015-07-01

    High-voltage-activated calcium channels are hetero-oligomeric protein complexes that mediate multiple cellular processes, including the influx of extracellular Ca(2+), neurotransmitter release, gene transcription, and synaptic plasticity. These channels consist of a primary α(1) pore-forming subunit, which is associated with an extracellular α(2)δ subunit and an intracellular β auxiliary subunit, which alter the gating properties and trafficking of the calcium channel. The cellular localization of the α(2)δ(3) subunit in the mouse and rat retina is unknown. In this study using RT-PCR, a single band at ∼ 305 bp corresponding to the predicted size of the α(2)δ(3) subunit fragment was found in mouse and rat retina and brain homogenates. Western blotting of rodent retina and brain homogenates showed a single 123-kDa band. Immunohistochemistry with an affinity-purified antibody to the α(2)δ(3) subunit revealed immunoreactive cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer and inner nuclear layer and immunoreactive processes in the inner plexiform layer and the outer plexiform layer. α(2)δ(3) immunoreactivity was localized to multiple cell types, including ganglion, amacrine, and bipolar cells and photoreceptors, but not horizontal cells. The expression of the α(2)δ(3) calcium channel subunit to multiple cell types suggests that this subunit participates widely in Ca-channel-mediated signaling in the retina.

  1. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  2. Peptide-rich venom from the spider Heteropoda venatoria potently inhibits insect voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yazhou; Wu, Xinzhou; Zhang, Peng; Duan, Zhigui; Zhou, Xi; Chen, Minzhi; Farooq, Athar; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    Heteropoda venatoria is a venomous spider species distributed worldwide and has a characteristic habit of feeding on insects. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses revealed that H. venatoria venom contains hundreds of peptides with a predominant molecular weights of 3000-5000 Da. Intra-abdominal injection of the venom had severe toxic effects on cockroaches and caused death at higher concentrations. The LD50 was 28.18 μg/g of body weight in the cockroach. It was found that the venom had potent inhibitory effect on voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in Periplaneta americana cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons with an IC50 values of 6.25 ± 0.02 μg/mL. However, 100 μg/mL venom only partially blocked VGSC currents in rat dorsal root ganglion cells, a much lower inhibitory effect than that on DUM VGSCs. Our results indicate that the venom of H. venatoria contains diverse neurotoxins that might become new leads for bioinsecticides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preferential targeting of Nav1.6 voltage-gated Na+ Channels to the axon initial segment during development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J Akin

    Full Text Available During axonal maturation, voltage-gated sodium (Nav channels accumulate at the axon initial segment (AIS at high concentrations. This localization is necessary for the efficient initiation of action potentials. The mechanisms underlying channel trafficking to the AIS during axonal development have remained elusive due to a lack of Nav reagents suitable for high resolution imaging of channels located specifically on the cell surface. Using an optical pulse-chase approach in combination with a novel Nav1.6 construct containing an extracellular biotinylation domain we demonstrate that Nav1.6 channels are preferentially inserted into the AIS membrane during neuronal development via direct vesicular trafficking. Single-molecule tracking illustrates that axonal channels are immediately immobilized following delivery, while channels delivered to the soma are often mobile. Neither a Nav1.6 channel lacking the ankyrin-binding motif nor a chimeric Kv2.1 channel containing the Nav ankyrinG-binding domain show preferential AIS insertion. Together these data support a model where ankyrinG-binding is required for preferential Nav1.6 insertion into the AIS plasma membrane. In contrast, ankyrinG-binding alone does not confer the preferential delivery of proteins to the AIS.

  4. Probing the gate--voltage-dependent surface potential of individual InAs nanowires using random telegraph signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfi, Joe; Paradiso, Nicola; Roddaro, Stefano; Heun, Stefan; Nair, Selvakumar V; Savelyev, Igor G; Blumin, Marina; Beltram, Fabio; Ruda, Harry E

    2011-03-22

    We report a novel method for probing the gate-voltage dependence of the surface potential of individual semiconductor nanowires. The statistics of electronic occupation of a single defect on the surface of the nanowire, determined from a random telegraph signal, is used as a measure for the local potential. The method is demonstrated for the case of one or two switching defects in indium arsenide (InAs) nanowire field effect transistors at temperatures T=25-77 K. Comparison with a self-consistent model shows that surface potential variation is retarded in the conducting regime due to screening by surface states with density Dss≈10(12) cm(-2) eV(-1). Temperature-dependent dynamics of electron capture and emission producing the random telegraph signals are also analyzed, and multiphonon emission is identified as the process responsible for capture and emission of electrons from the surface traps. Two defects studied in detail had capture activation energies of EB≈50 meV and EB≈110 meV and cross sections of σ∞≈3×10(-19) cm2 and σ∞≈2×10(-17) cm2, respectively. A lattice relaxation energy of Sℏω=187±15 meV was found for the first defect.

  5. Structure and function of splice variants of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Annett; Walzik, Stefan; Blechschmidt, Steve; Haufe, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the rapid upstroke of the action potential in excitable tissues. The tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant isoform Na(v)1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is the predominant isoform in the heart. This channel plays a key role for excitability of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and for rapid impulse propagation through the specific conduction system. During recent years, strong evidence has been accumulated in support of the expression of several Na(v)1.5 splice variants in the heart, and in various other tissues and cell lines including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells and neuronal stem cell lines. This review summarizes our knowledge on the structure and putative function of nine Na(v)1.5 splice variants detected so far. Attention will be paid to the distinct biophysical properties of the four functional splice variants, to the pronounced tissue- and species-specific expression, and to the developmental regulation of Na(v)1.5 splicing. The implications of alternative splicing for SCN5A channelopathies, and for a better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, are discussed.

  6. Frequency-dependent reliability of spike propagation is function of axonal voltage-gated sodium channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhilai; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2013-12-01

    The spike propagation on nerve axons, like synaptic transmission, is essential to ensure neuronal communication. The secure propagation of sequential spikes toward axonal terminals has been challenged in the neurons with a high firing rate, such as cerebellar Purkinje cells. The shortfall of spike propagation makes some digital spikes disappearing at axonal terminals, such that the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying spike propagation reliability is crucial to find the strategy of preventing loss of neuronal codes. As the spike propagation failure is influenced by the membrane potentials, this process is likely caused by altering the functional status of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). We examined this hypothesis in Purkinje cells by using pair-recordings at their somata and axonal blebs in cerebellar slices. The reliability of spike propagation was deteriorated by elevating spike frequency. The frequency-dependent reliability of spike propagation was attenuated by inactivating VGSCs and improved by removing their inactivation. Thus, the functional status of axonal VGSCs influences the reliability of spike propagation.

  7. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Davies, T. G. Emyr; Field, Linda M.; Schmehl, Daniel; Ellis, James D.; Krieger, Klemens; Williamson, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V) of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes. PMID:27191597

  8. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes.

  9. Effect of genistein on voltage-gated potassium channels in guinea pig proximal colon smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Ying Li; Bin-Bin Huang; Shou Ouyang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the action of genistein (GST), a broad spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on voltagegated potassium channels in guinea pig proximal colon smooth muscle cells.METHODS: Smooth muscle cells in guinea pig proximal colon were enzymatically isolated. Nystatin-perforated whole cell patch clamp technique was used to record potassium currents including fast transient outward current (IKto) and delayed rectifier current (IKdr), two of which were isolated pharmacologically with 10 mmol/L tetraethylammonium or 5 mmol/L 4-aminopyridine.Contamination of calcium-dependent potassium currents was minimized with no calcium and 0.2 mmol/L CdCl2 in an external solution.RESULTS: GST (10-100 μmol/L) reversibly and dosedependently reduced the peak amplitude of IKto with an IC50value of 22.0±6.9 μmol/L. To a lesser extent, IKdr was also inhibited in both peak current and sustained current.GST could not totally block the outward potassium current as a fraction of the outWard potassium current,which was insensitive to GST. GST had no effect on the steady-state activation (n = 6) and inactivation kinetics(n =6) of IKto. Sodium orthovanadate (1 mmol/L), a potent inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatase, significantly inhibited GST-induced inhibition (P< 0.05).CONCLUSION: GST can dose-dependently and reversibly block voltage-gated potassium channels in guinea pig proximal colon smooth muscle cells.

  10. Therapeutic value of voltage-gated sodium channel inhibitors in breast, colorectal and prostate cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola eMartin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although survival rates of breast, colon and prostate cancers are improving, deaths from these tumors frequently occur due to metastasis. Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs are membrane proteins, which regulate membrane current and cellular migration during nervous system organogenesis. VGSCs are also expressed in fibroblasts, immune cells, glia and metastatic cancer cells. VGSCs regulate migration and invasion of breast, bowel and prostate cancer cells, suggesting that they may be novel anti-metastatic targets. We conducted a systematic review of clinical and preclinical studies testing the effects of VGSC-inhibiting drugs in cancer. 204 publications were identified, of which two human, two mouse and 20 in vitro publications were included. In the clinical studies, the effect of these drugs on survival and metastatic relapse is not clear. The 22 preclinical studies collectively suggest that several VGSC-inhibiting drugs inhibit cancer proliferation, migration and invasion. None of the human and only six of the preclinical studies directly investigated the effect of the drugs on VGSC activity. Studies were difficult to compare due to lack of standardized methodology and outcome measures. We conclude that the benefits of VGSC inhibitors require further investigation. Standardization of future studies and outcome measures should enable meaningful study comparisons.

  11. Steroid hormone regulation of the voltage-gated, calcium-activated potassium channel expression in developing muscular and neural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Sheldon L; Witten, Jane L

    2010-11-01

    A precise organization of gene expression is required for developing neural and muscular systems. Steroid hormones can control the expression of genes that are critical for development. In this study we test the hypothesis that the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates gene expression of the voltage-gated calcium-activated potassium ion channel, Slowpoke or KCNMA1. Late in adult development of the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, slowpoke (msslo) levels increased contributing to the maturation of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs) and CNS. We show that critical components of ecdysteroid gene regulation were present during upreglation of msslo in late adult DLM and CNS development. Ecdysteroid receptor complex heterodimeric partner proteins, the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), and the ecdysone-induced early gene, msE75B, were expressed at key developmental time points, suggesting that ecdysteroids direct aspects of gene expression in the DLMs during these late developmental stages. We provide evidence that ecdysteroids suppress msslo transcription in the DLMs; when titers decline msslo transcript levels increase. These results are consistent with msslo being a downstream gene in an ecdysteroid-mediated gene cascade during DLM development. We also show that the ecdysteroids regulate msslo transcript levels in the developing CNS. These results will contribute to our understanding of how the spatiotemporal regulation of slowpoke transcription contributes to tailoring cell excitability to the differing physiological and behavioral demands during development.

  12. Voltage-gated potassium channels involved in regulation of physiological function in MrgprA3-specific itch neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Wu, Guanyi; Wang, Zhongli; Yang, Niuniu; Shi, Hao; He, Qian; Zhu, Chan; Yang, Yan; Yu, Guang; Wang, Changming; Yuan, Xiaolin; Liu, Qin; Guan, Yun; Dong, Xinzhong; Tang, Zongxiang

    2016-04-01

    Itch is described as an unpleasant or irritating skin sensation that elicits the desire or reflex to scratch. MrgprA3, one of members of the Mrgprs family, is specifically expressed in a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). These MrgprA3-expressing DRG neurons have been identified as itch-specific neurons. They can be activated by the compound, chloroquine, which is used as a drug to treat malaria. In the present study, we labeled these itch-specific neurons using the method of molecular genetic markers, and then studied their electrophysiological properties. We also recorded the cutaneous MrgprA3(-) neurons retrogradely labeled by Dil dye (MrgprA3(-)-Dil). We first found that MrgprA3(+) neurons have a lower excitability than MrgprA3(-) neurons (MrgprA3(-)-non-Dil and MrgprA3(-)-Dil). The number of action potential (AP) was reduced more obviously in MrgprA3(+) neurons than that of in MrgprA3(-) neurons. In most cases, MrgprA3(+) neurons only generated single AP; however, in MrgprA3(-) neurons, the same stimulation could induce multiple AP firing due to the greater voltage-gated potassium (Kv) current existence in MrgprA3(+) than in MrgprA3(-) neurons. Thus, Kv current plays an important role in the regulation of excitability in itch-specific neurons.

  13. Regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel expression in cancer: hormones, growth factors and auto-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Scott P; Ozerlat-Gunduz, Iley; Brackenbury, William J; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M; Campbell, Thomas M; Coombes, R Charles; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2014-03-19

    Although ion channels are increasingly being discovered in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and shown to contribute to different aspects and stages of the cancer process, much less is known about the mechanisms controlling their expression. Here, we focus on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) which are upregulated in many types of carcinomas where their activity potentiates cell behaviours integral to the metastatic cascade. Regulation of VGSCs occurs at a hierarchy of levels from transcription to post-translation. Importantly, mainstream cancer mechanisms, especially hormones and growth factors, play a significant role in the regulation. On the whole, in major hormone-sensitive cancers, such as breast and prostate cancer, there is a negative association between genomic steroid hormone sensitivity and functional VGSC expression. Activity-dependent regulation by positive feedback has been demonstrated in strongly metastatic cells whereby the VGSC is self-sustaining, with its activity promoting further functional channel expression. Such auto-regulation is unlike normal cells in which activity-dependent regulation occurs mostly via negative feedback. Throughout, we highlight the possible clinical implications of functional VGSC expression and regulation in cancer.

  14. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  15. Reciprocal regulation of reactive oxygen species and phospho-CREB regulates voltage gated calcium channel expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Selvakumar

    Full Text Available Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS, Protein Kinase C (PKC and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection.

  16. Chronic ciguatoxin treatment induces synaptic scaling through voltage gated sodium channels in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Rubiolo, Juan A; Roel, Maria; Hirama, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuji; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2015-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channels activators that cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents with long-term neurological alterations. In central neurons, chronic perturbations in activity induce homeostatic synaptic mechanisms that adjust the strength of excitatory synapses and modulate glutamate receptor expression in order to stabilize the overall activity. Immediate early genes, such as Arc and Egr1, are induced in response to activity changes and underlie the trafficking of glutamate receptors during neuronal homeostasis. To better understand the long lasting neurological consequences of ciguatera, it is important to establish the role that chronic changes in activity produced by ciguatoxins represent to central neurons. Here, the effect of a 30 min exposure of 10-13 days in vitro (DIV) cortical neurons to the synthetic ciguatoxin CTX 3C on Arc and Egr1 expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Since the toxin increased the mRNA levels of both Arc and Egr1, the effect of CTX 3C in NaV channels, membrane potential, firing activity, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and glutamate receptors expression in cortical neurons after a 24 h exposure was evaluated using electrophysiological and western blot approaches. The data presented here show that CTX 3C induced an upregulation of Arc and Egr1 that was prevented by previous coincubation of the neurons with the NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin. In addition, chronic CTX 3C caused a concentration-dependent shift in the activation voltage of NaV channels to more negative potentials and produced membrane potential depolarization. Moreover, 24 h treatment of cortical neurons with 5 nM CTX 3C decreased neuronal firing and induced synaptic scaling mechanisms, as evidenced by a decrease in the amplitude of mEPSCs and downregulation in the protein level of glutamate receptors that was also prevented by tetrodotoxin

  17. Neuroprotective effect of interleukin-6 regulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels of cortical neurons is time- and dose-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 has been shown to be involved in nerve injury and nerve regeneration, but the effects of long-term administration of high concentrations of interleukin-6 on neurons in the central nervous system is poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of 24 hour exposure of interleukin-6 on cortical neurons at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 ng/mL and the effects of 10 ng/mL interleukin-6 exposure to cortical neurons for various durations (2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours by studying voltage-gated Na + channels using a patch-clamp technique. Voltage-clamp recording results demonstrated that interleukin-6 suppressed Na + currents through its receptor in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but did not alter voltage-dependent activation and inactivation. Current-clamp recording results were consistent with voltage-clamp recording results. Interleukin-6 reduced the action potential amplitude of cortical neurons, but did not change the action potential threshold. The regulation of voltage-gated Na + channels in rat cortical neurons by interleukin-6 is time- and dose-dependent.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of interleukin-6 regulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels of cortical neurons is time- and dose-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Peng, Guo-Yi; Sheng, Jiang-Tao; Zhu, Fang-Fang; Guo, Jing-Fang; Chen, Wei-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Interleukin-6 has been shown to be involved in nerve injury and nerve regeneration, but the effects of long-term administration of high concentrations of interleukin-6 on neurons in the central nervous system is poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of 24 hour exposure of interleukin-6 on cortical neurons at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 ng/mL) and the effects of 10 ng/mL interleukin-6 exposure to cortical neurons for various durations (2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours) by studying voltage-gated Na(+) channels using a patch-clamp technique. Voltage-clamp recording results demonstrated that interleukin-6 suppressed Na(+) currents through its receptor in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but did not alter voltage-dependent activation and inactivation. Current-clamp recording results were consistent with voltage-clamp recording results. Interleukin-6 reduced the action potential amplitude of cortical neurons, but did not change the action potential threshold. The regulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels in rat cortical neurons by interleukin-6 is time- and dose-dependent.

  19. Two-Dimensional Analytical Modeling Of Threshold Voltage Of Doped Short-Channel Triple-Material Double-Gate (TM-DG MOSFET’S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvesh Dubey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a short-channel threshold voltage model is presented for triple-material double-gate(TM-DG MOSFET with uniform doping profile in the channel region. To obtain the channel potential expression, the two-dimensional (2D Poisson’s equation has been solved using the parabolic potential approximation with suitable boundary conditions. Subsequently, the surface potential expression has been employed to derive an analytical expression of thresholod. The threshold voltage variation with various device parameters has been shown. To validate the model, ATLASTM based numerical simulation results have been used.

  20. Optimizing Design of Breakdown Voltage to Eliminate Back Gate Bias Effect in Silicon-on-Insulator Diode Using Low Doping Buried Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H0 Chi-Hon; LIAO Chen-Nan; CHIEN Feng-Tso; TSAI Yao-Tsung

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the optimal design of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) diode structure to eliminate the back gate bias effect and to improve breakdown voltage. The SOI structure is characterized by inserting a silicon low doping buried layer (LDBL) between the silicon layer and the buried oxide layer. The LDBL thickness is a key parameter that affects the strong inversion condition of the back MOS capacitor of the new SOI diode. The optimal LDBL thickness in the SOI diode is 2.65μm. The LDBL shielding layer improved the breakdown voltage.

  1. Gate voltage and drain current stress instabilities in amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistors with an asymmetric graphene electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonwoo Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The gate voltage and drain current stress instabilities in amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs having an asymmetric graphene electrode structure are studied. A large positive shift in the threshold voltage, which is well fitted to a stretched-exponential equation, and an increase in the subthreshold slope are observed when drain current stress is applied. This is due to an increase in temperature caused by power dissipation in the graphene/a-IGZO contact region, in addition to the channel region, which is different from the behavior in a-IGZO TFTs with a conventional transparent electrode.

  2. Effects of dragon's blood resin and its component loureirin B on tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiangming; CHEN Su; YIN Shijin; MEI Zhinan

    2004-01-01

    Using whole-cell patch clamp technique on the membrane of freshly isolated dorsal root ganglion(DRG)neurons,the effects of dragon's blood resin and its important component Ioureirin B on tetrodotoxin-sensitive(TTX-S)voltage-gated sodium currents were observed.The results show that both blood resin and loureirin B could suppress TTX-S voltage-gated sodium currents in a dose-dependent way.The peak current amplitudes and the steady-state activation and inactivation curves are also made to shift by 0.05% blood resin and 0.2 mmol/L loureirin B.These results demonstrate that the effects of blood resin on TTX-S sodium current may contribute to loureirin B in blood resin.Perhaps the analgesic effect of blood resin is caused partly by loureirin B directly interfering with the nociceptive transmission of primary sensory neurons.

  3. Effects of dragon's blood resin and its component loureirin B on tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangming, Liu; Su, Chen; Shijin, Yin; Zhinan, Mei

    2004-08-01

    Using whole-cell patch clamp technique on the membrane of freshly isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, the effects of dragon's blood resin and its important component loureirin B on tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) voltage-gated sodium currents were observed. The results show that both blood resin and loureirin B could suppress TTX-S voltage-gated sodium currents in a dose-dependent way. The peak current amplitudes and the steady-state activation and inactivation curves are also made to shift by 0.05% blood resin and 0.2 mmol/L loureirin B. These results demonstrate that the effects of blood resin on TTX-S sodium current may contribute to loureirin B in blood resin. Perhaps the analgesic effect of blood resin is caused partly by loureirin B directly interfering with the nociceptive transmission of primary sensory neurons.

  4. Interplay between low threshold voltage-gated K+ channels and synaptic inhibition in neurons of the chicken nucleus laminaris along its frequency axis

    OpenAIRE

    William eHamlet; Yu-Wei eLiu; Zhengquang eTang; Yong eLu

    2014-01-01

    Central auditory neurons that localize sound in horizontal space have specialized intrinsic and synaptic cellular mechanisms to tightly control the threshold and timing for action potential generation. However, the critical interplay between intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and extrinsic synaptic conductances in determining neuronal output are not well understood. In chicken, neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) encode sound location using interaural time difference (ITD) as a cue. Along...

  5. Therapeutic plasma exchange as a steroid-sparing therapy in a patient with limbic encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Isabella W; Martin, Christi-Lynn B; Dunbar, Nancy M; Lee, Stephen L; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M

    2016-02-01

    Autoantibodies to the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex cause a spectrum of non-paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes including limbic encephalitis (LE). We report a case of a man with LE who underwent a course of therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) in addition to other immunomodulatory therapies and experienced sustained clinical resolution of his symptoms. This report adds to the existing literature supporting TPE in cases of LE due to VGKC complex autoantibodies.

  6. Leucine-Rich Glioma Inactivated-1 and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Autoimmune Encephalitis Associated with Ischemic Stroke: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Marisa; Morales-Vidal, Sarkis; Ruland, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypotheses linking these two disease processes are proposed.

  7. Tyrosine phosphatases epsilon and alpha perform specific and overlapping functions in regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels in Schwann cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiran, Zohar; Peretz, Asher; Sines, Tal

    2006-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) epsilon and alpha are closely related and share several molecular functions, such as regulation of Src family kinases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. Functional interrelationships between PTPepsilon and PTPalpha and the mechanisms by which they regulate K...... but are not fully redundant. We conclude that PTPepsilon and PTPalpha differ significantly in their regulation of Kv channels and Src in the system examined and that similarity between PTPs does not necessarily result in full functional redundancy in vivo....

  8. Proton migration mechanism for operational instabilities in organic field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Mathijssen, S. G. J.; Smits, E. C. P.; Kemerink, M.; de Leeuw, D. M.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2010-08-01

    Organic field-effect transistors exhibit operational instabilities involving a shift of the threshold gate voltage when a gate bias is applied. For a constant gate bias the threshold voltage shifts toward the applied gate bias voltage, an effect known as the bias-stress effect. Here, we report on a detailed experimental and theoretical study of operational instabilities in p -type transistors with silicon-dioxide gate dielectric both for a constant as well as for a dynamic gate bias. We associate the instabilities with a reversible reaction in the organic semiconductor in which holes are converted into protons in the presence of water and a reversible migration of these protons into the gate dielectric. We show how redistribution of charge between holes in the semiconductor and protons in the gate dielectric can consistently explain the experimental observations. Furthermore, we show how a shorter period of application of a gate bias leads to a faster backward shift of the threshold voltage when the gate bias is removed. The proposed mechanism is consistent with the observed acceleration of the bias-stress effect with increasing humidity, increasing temperature, and increasing energy of the highest molecular orbital of the organic semiconductor.

  9. Redox-Dependent Conformational Changes in Cytochrome c Oxidase Suggest a Gating Mechanism for Proton Uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Ling; Liu, Jian; Mills, Denise A.; Proshlyakov, Denis A.; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh; (MSU)

    2009-08-05

    A role for conformational change in the coupling mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase is the subject of controversy. Relatively small conformational changes have been reported in comparisons of reduced and oxidized crystal structures of bovine oxidase but none in bacterial oxidases. Comparing the X-ray crystal structures of the reduced (at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution) and oxidized forms of cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we observe a displacement of heme a3 involving both the porphyrin ring and the hydroxyl farnesyl tail, accompanied by protein movements in nearby regions, including the mid part of helix VIII of subunit I which harbors key residues of the K proton uptake path, K362 and T359. The conformational changes in the reduced form are reversible upon reoxidation. They result in an opening of the top of the K pathway and more ordered waters being resolved in that region, suggesting an access path for protons into the active site. In all high-resolution structures of oxidized R. sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase, a water molecule is observed in the hydrophobic region above the top of the D path, strategically positioned to facilitate the connection of residue E286 of subunit I to the active site or to the proton pumping exit path. In the reduced and reduced plus cyanide structures, this water molecule disappears, implying disruption of proton conduction from the D path under conditions when the K path is open, thus providing a mechanism for alternating access to the active site.

  10. A High Breakdown Voltage A1GaN/GaN MOSHEMT Using Thermal Oxidized Al-Ti as the Gate Insulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bin; WANG Jin-Yan; MENG Di; LIN Shu-Xun; FANG Min; DONG Zhi-Hua; YU Min; HAOYi-Long; Cheng P. WEN

    2011-01-01

    Direct oxidation of composite Al/Ti metal films as gate insulators for AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron mobility transistors (MOSHEMTs/HEMTs) is successfully realized.The devices fabricated with this novel process exhibit four orders of magnitude reduction in gate leakage current and remarkable breakdown voltage (Vbr =490 V vs 88 V for normal HEMT) improvement,compared with conventional Schottky-gate HEMTs.Furthermore,the transconductance of the MOSHEMT is only slightly lower (2.6%) than that of Schottky-gate HEMTs and have a wider full width of half maximum.The notable enhancement in device performance renders this new process highly promising for GaN-based microwave power amplifier applications in communication and radar systems.AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are expected to be applied in the highfrequency and high-power area because of their excellent properties.AlGaN/GaN has,for example,a wide energy band gap (3.39eV),high density (up to 1013 cm-2) two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG)and a high saturation electron velocity.Due to the unavailability of native oxide,Schottky-contact gates are commonly adopted in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs.%Direct oxidation of composite Al/Ti metal films as gate insulators for AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron mobility transistors (MOSHEMTs/HEMTs) is successfully realized. The devices fabricated with this novel process exhibit four orders of magnitude reduction in gate leakage current and remarkable breakdown voltage (Vbr = 490 V vs 88 V for normal HEMT) improvement, compared with conventional Schottky-gate HEMTs. Furthermore, the transconductance of the MOSHEMT is only slightly lower (2.6%) than that of Schottky-gate HEMTs and have a wider full width of half maximum. The notable enhancement in device performance renders this new process highly promising for GaN-based microwave power amplifier applications in communication and radar systems.

  11. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels.

  12. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sarah C; Finney, Brenda A; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5-16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to match

  13. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Brennan

    Full Text Available Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E11.5-16.5 in mouse in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult. Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels (VGCC, inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, P/Q type (CaV2.1, N-type (CaV2.2, R-type (CaV2.3, and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3, demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to

  14. Mechanism of Modification, by Lidocaine, of Fast and Slow Recovery from Inactivation of Voltage-Gated Na⁺ Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Lukacs, Peter; Cervenka, Rene; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter; Todt, Hannes

    2015-11-01

    The clinically important suppression of high-frequency discharges of excitable cells by local anesthetics (LA) is largely determined by drug-induced prolongation of the time course of repriming (recovery from inactivation) of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. This prolongation may result from periodic drug-binding to a high-affinity binding site during the action potentials and subsequent slow dissociation from the site between action potentials ("dissociation hypothesis"). For many drugs it has been suggested that the fast inactivated state represents the high-affinity binding state. Alternatively, LAs may bind with high affinity to a native slow-inactivated state, thereby accelerating the development of this state during action potentials ("stabilization hypothesis"). In this case, slow recovery between action potentials occurs from enhanced native slow inactivation. To test these two hypotheses we produced serial cysteine mutations of domain IV segment 6 in rNav1.4 that resulted in constructs with varying propensities to enter fast- and slow-inactivated states. We tested the effect of the LA lidocaine on the time course of recovery from short and long depolarizing prepulses, which, under drug-free conditions, recruited mainly fast- and slow-inactivated states, respectively. Among the tested constructs the mutation-induced changes in native slow recovery induced by long depolarizations were not correlated with the respective lidocaine-induced slow recovery after short depolarizations. On the other hand, for long depolarizations the mutation-induced alterations in native slow recovery were significantly correlated with the kinetics of lidocaine-induced slow recovery. These results favor the "dissociation hypothesis" for short depolarizations but the "stabilization hypothesis" for long depolarizations. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. Voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in rabbit ciliary epithelium regulates the membrane potential via coupling intracellular calcium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-feng; ZHUO Ye-hong; BI Wei-na; BAI Yu-jing; LI Yan-na; WANG Zhi-jian

    2008-01-01

    Background The cell layer of the ciliary epithelium is responsible for aqueous humor secretion and maintenance.Ion channels play an important role in these processes.The main aim of this study was to determine whether the well-characterized members of the Kvl family (Kv1.3) contribute to the Kv currents in ciliary epithelium.Methods New Zealand White rabbits were maintained in a 12 hours light/dark cycle.Ciliary epithelium samples were isolated from the rabbits.We used Western blotting and immunocytochemistry to identify the expression and location of a voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in ciliary body epithelium.Membrane potential change after adding of Kv1.3 inhibitor margatoxin (MgTX) was observed with a fluorescence method.Results Western blotting and immunocytochemical studies showed that the Kv1.3 protein expressed in pigment ciliary epithelium and nonpigment ciliary epithelium,however it seemed to express more in the apical membrane of the nonpigmented epithelial cells.One nmol/L margatoxin,a specific inhibitor of Kv1.3 channels caused depolarization of the cultured nonpigmented epithelium (NPE) membrane potential.The cytosotic calcium increased after NPE cell depolarization,this increase of cytosolic calcium was partially blocked by 12.5 μmol/L dantrolene and 10 μmol/L nifedipine.These observations suggest that Kv1.3 channels modulate ciliary epithelium potential and effect calcium dependent mechanisms.Conclusion Kv1.3 channels contribute to K+ efflux at the membrane of rabbit ciliary epithelium.

  16. The voltage-gated potassium channel subfamily KQT member 4 (KCNQ4) displays parallel evolution in echolocating bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Han, Naijian; Franchini, Lucía F; Xu, Huihui; Pisciottano, Francisco; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel; Zhang, Shuyi

    2012-05-01

    Bats are the only mammals that use highly developed laryngeal echolocation, a sensory mechanism based on the ability to emit laryngeal sounds and interpret the returning echoes to identify objects. Although this capability allows bats to orientate and hunt in complete darkness, endowing them with great survival advantages, the genetic bases underlying the evolution of bat echolocation are still largely unknown. Echolocation requires high-frequency hearing that in mammals is largely dependent on somatic electromotility of outer hair cells. Then, understanding the molecular evolution of outer hair cell genes might help to unravel the evolutionary history of echolocation. In this work, we analyzed the molecular evolution of two key outer hair cell genes: the voltage-gated potassium channel gene KCNQ4 and CHRNA10, the gene encoding the α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. We reconstructed the phylogeny of bats based on KCNQ4 and CHRNA10 protein and nucleotide sequences. A phylogenetic tree built using KCNQ4 amino acid sequences showed that two paraphyletic clades of laryngeal echolocating bats grouped together, with eight shared substitutions among particular lineages. In addition, our analyses indicated that two of these parallel substitutions, M388I and P406S, were probably fixed under positive selection and could have had a strong functional impact on KCNQ4. Moreover, our results indicated that KCNQ4 evolved under positive selection in the ancestral lineage leading to mammals, suggesting that this gene might have been important for the evolution of mammalian hearing. On the other hand, we found that CHRNA10, a gene that evolved adaptively in the mammalian lineage, was under strong purifying selection in bats. Thus, the CHRNA10 amino acid tree did not show echolocating bat monophyly and reproduced the bat species tree. These results suggest that only a subset of hearing genes could underlie the evolution of echolocation. The present work continues to

  17. Molecular insights into the local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels using hydroxylated analogues of mexiletine

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    Jean-François eDesaphy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that the β-adrenoceptor modulators, clenbuterol and propranolol, directly blocked voltage-gated sodium channels, whereas salbutamol and nadolol did not (Desaphy et al., 2003, suggesting the presence of two hydroxyl groups on the aromatic moiety of the drugs as a molecular requisite for impeding sodium channel block. To verify such an hypothesis, we synthesized five new mexiletine analogues by adding one or two hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of the sodium channel blocker and tested these compounds on hNav1.4 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Concentration-response relationships were constructed using an holding potential of -120 mV at 0.1 Hz (tonic block and 10 Hz (use-dependent block stimulation frequencies. The half-maximum inhibitory concentrations (IC50 were linearly correlated to drug lipophilicity: the less lipophilic the drug, minor was the block. The same compounds were also tested on F1586C and Y1593C hNav1.4 channel mutants, to gain further information on the molecular interactions of mexiletine with its receptor within the sodium channel pore. Alteration of tonic block suggests that the aryl moiety of mexiletine may interact either directly or indirectly with Phe1586 in the closed sodium channel to produce low-affinity binding block, and that this interaction depends on the electrostatic potential of the drug aromatic tail. Alteration of use-dependent block suggests that addition of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety may modify high-affinity binding of the drug ammine terminal to Phe1586 through cooperativity between the two pharmacophores, this effect being mainly related to drug lipophilicity. Mutation of Tyr1593 further impaired such cooperativity. In conclusion, these results confirm our former hypothesis showing that the presence of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of mexiletine greatly reduced sodium channel block, and provide molecular insights into the intimate interaction of local anesthetics with

  18. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of voltage-gated calcium channel beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Akito; Miki, Takafumi; Shoji, Hirotaka; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) induces numerous intracellular events such as neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and gene regulation. It has been shown that genes related to Ca(2+) signaling, such as the CACNA1C, CACNB2, and CACNA1I genes that encode VGCC subunits, are associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Recently, VGCC beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP) was identified as a novel regulator of VGCC activity via the interaction of VGCC β subunits. To examine the role of the BARP in higher brain functions, we generated BARP knockout (KO) mice and conducted a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. BARP KO mice exhibited greatly reduced locomotor activity, as evidenced by decreased vertical activity, stereotypic counts in the open field test, and activity level in the home cage, and longer latency to complete a session in spontaneous T-maze alteration test, which reached "study-wide significance." Acoustic startle response was also reduced in the mutants. Interestingly, they showed multiple behavioral phenotypes that are seemingly opposite to those seen in the mouse models of schizophrenia and its related disorders, including increased working memory, flexibility, prepulse inhibition, and social interaction, and decreased locomotor activity, though many of these phenotypes are statistically weak and require further replications. These results demonstrate that BARP is involved in the regulation of locomotor activity and, possibly, emotionality. The possibility was also suggested that BARP KO mice may serve as a unique tool for investigating the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related disorders. Further evaluation of the molecular and physiological phenotypes of the mutant mice would provide new insights into the role of BARP in higher brain functions.

  19. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of voltage-gated calcium channel beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito eNakao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs induces numerous intracellular events such as neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and gene regulation. It has been shown that genes related to Ca2+ signaling, such as the CACNA1C, CACNB2, and CACNA1I genes that encode VGCC subunits, are associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Recently, VGCC beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP was identified as a novel regulator of VGCC activity via the interaction of VGCC β subunits. To examine the role of the BARP in higher brain functions, we generated BARP knockout (KO mice and conducted a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. BARP KO mice exhibited greatly reduced locomotor activity, as evidenced by decreased vertical activity, stereotypic counts in the open field test, and activity level in the home cage, and longer latency to complete a session in spontaneous T-maze alteration test, which reached study-wide significance. Acoustic startle response was also reduced in the mutants. Interestingly, they showed multiple behavioral phenotypes that are seemingly opposite to those seen in the mouse models of schizophrenia and its related disorders, including increased working memory, flexibility, prepulse inhibition, and social interaction, and decreased locomotor activity, though many of these phenotypes are statistically weak and require further replications. These results demonstrate that BARP is involved in the regulation of locomotor activity and, possibly, emotionality. The possibility was also suggested that BARP KO mice may serve as a unique tool for investigating the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related disorders. Further evaluation of the molecular and physiological phenotypes of the mutant mice would provide new insights into the role of BARP in higher brain functions.

  20. Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channel blockade by plant cannabinoids does not confer anticonvulsant effects per se.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew J; Jones, Nicholas A; Smith, Imogen; Hill, Charlotte L; Williams, Claire M; Stephens, Gary J; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2014-04-30

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive, well-tolerated, anticonvulsant plant cannabinoid, although its mechanism(s) of seizure suppression remains unknown. Here, we investigate the effect of CBD and the structurally similar cannabinoid, cannabigerol (CBG), on voltage-gated Na(+) (NaV) channels, a common anti-epileptic drug target. CBG's anticonvulsant potential was also assessed in vivo. CBD effects on NaV channels were investigated using patch-clamp recordings from rat CA1 hippocampal neurons in brain slices, human SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma) cells and mouse cortical neurons in culture. CBG effects were also assessed in SH-SY5Y cells and mouse cortical neurons. CBD and CBG effects on veratridine-stimulated human recombinant NaV1.1, 1.2 or 1.5 channels were assessed using a membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent dye high-throughput assay. The effect of CBG on pentyleneterazole-induced (PTZ) seizures was assessed in rat. CBD (10μM) blocked NaV currents in SH-SY5Y cells, mouse cortical neurons and recombinant cell lines, and affected spike parameters in rat CA1 neurons; CBD also significantly decreased membrane resistance. CBG blocked NaV to a similar degree to CBD in both SH-SY5Y and mouse recordings, but had no effect (50-200mg/kg) on PTZ-induced seizures in rat. CBD and CBG are NaV channel blockers at micromolar concentrations in human and murine neurons and recombinant cells. In contrast to previous reports investigating CBD, CBG had no effect upon PTZ-induced seizures in rat, indicating that NaV blockade per se does not correlate with anticonvulsant effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Circadian profiles in the embryonic chick heart: L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Michael L; Shi, Liheng; Grushin, Kirill; Nigussie, Fikru; Ko, Gladys Y-P

    2010-10-01

    Circadian clocks exist in the heart tissue and modulate multiple physiological events, from cardiac metabolism to contractile function and expression of circadian oscillator and metabolic-related genes. Ample evidence has demonstrated that there are endogenous circadian oscillators in adult mammalian cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian embryos cannot be entrained independently to light-dark (LD) cycles in vivo without any maternal influence, but circadian genes are well expressed and able to oscillate in embryonic stages. The authors took advantage of using chick embryos that are independent of maternal influences to investigate whether embryonic hearts could be entrained under LD cycles in ovo. The authors found circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), the ion channels responsible for the production of cardiac muscle contraction in embryonic chick hearts. The mRNA levels and protein expression of VGCCα1C and VGCCα1D are under circadian control, and the average L-VGCC current density is significantly larger when cardiomyocytes are recorded during the night than day. The phosphorylation states of several kinases involved in insulin signaling and cardiac metabolism, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), stress-activated protein kinase (p38), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), are also under circadian control. Both Erk and p38 have been implicated in regulating cardiac contractility and in the development of various pathological states, such as cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Even though both Erk and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathways participate in complex cellular processes regarding physiological or pathological states of cardiomyocytes, the circadian oscillators in the heart regulate these pathways independently, and both pathways contribute to the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs.

  2. Differential calcium signaling mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels in rat retinal ganglion cells and their unmyelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Sargoy

    Full Text Available Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury.

  3. Computational modeling of voltage-gated Ca channels inhibition: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

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    Wing Chiu eTong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs. Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models – of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC, cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN and ventricular cells – to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents – the L-type (ICaL and T-type (ICaT Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10% alone, or ICaT (40% alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine

  4. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  5. Nuclear life of the voltage-gated Cacnb4 subunit and its role in gene transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronjat, Michel; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Barbado, Maud; De Waard, Michel; Mori, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    The pore-forming subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels is associated to auxiliary subunits among which the cytoplasmic β subunit. The different isoforms of this subunit control both the plasma membrane targeting and the biophysical properties of the channel moiety. In a recent study, we demonstrated that the Cacnb4 (β 4) isoform is at the center of a new signaling pathway that connects neuronal excitability and gene transcription. This mechanism relies on nuclear targeting of β 4 triggered by neuronal electrical stimulation. This re-localization of β 4 is promoted by its interaction with Ppp2r5d a regulatory subunit of PP2A in complex with PP2A itself. The formation, as well as the nuclear translocation, of the β 4/ Ppp2r5d/ PP2A complex is totally impaired by the premature R482X stops mutation of β 4 that has been previously associated with juvenile epilepsy. Taking as a case study the tyrosine hydroxylase gene that is strongly upregulated in brain of lethargic mice, deficient for β 4 expression, we deciphered the molecular steps presiding to this signaling pathway. Here we show that expression of wild-type β 4 in HEK293 cells results in the regulation of several genes, while expression of the mutated β 4 (β 1-481) produces a different set of gene regulation. Several genes regulated by β 4 in HEK293 cells were also regulated upon neuronal differentiation of NG108-15 cells that induces nuclear translocation of β 4 suggesting a link between β 4 nuclear targeting and gene regulation.

  6. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients.

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    Chih-Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org, a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment.

  7. High-performance low-leakage regions of nano-scaled CMOS digital gates under variations of threshold voltage and mobility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein AGHABABA; Behjat FOROUZANDEH; Ali AFZALI-KUSHA

    2012-01-01

    We propose a modeling methodology for both leakage power consumption and delay of basic CMOS digital gates in the presence of threshold voltage and mobility variations.The key parameters in determining the leakage and delay are OFF and ON currents,respectively,which are both affected by the variation of the threshold voltage.Additionally,the current is a strong function of mobility.The proposed methodology relies on a proper modeling of the threshold voltage and mobility variations,which may be induced by any source.Using this model,in the plane of threshold voltage and mobility,we determine regions for different combinations of performance (speed) and leakage.Based on these regions,we discuss the trade-offbetween leakage and delay where the leakage-delay-product is the optimization objective.To assess the accuracy of the proposed model,we compare its predictions with those of HSPICE simulations for both basic digital gates and ISCAS85 benchmark circuits in 45-,65-,and 90-nm technologies.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of interleukin-6 regulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels of cortical neurons is time- and dose-dependent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xia; Guo-yi Peng; Jiang-tao Sheng; Fang-fang Zhu; Jing-fang Guo; Wei-qiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-6 has been shown to be involved in nerve injury and nerve regeneration, but the effects of long-term administration of high concentrations of interleukin-6 on neurons in the central nervous system is poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of 24 hour expo-sure of interleukin-6 on cortical neurons at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 ng/mL) and the effects of 10 ng/mL interleukin-6 exposure to cortical neurons for various durations (2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours) by studying voltage-gated Na+ channels using a patch-clamp technique. Volt-age-clamp recording results demonstrated that interleukin-6 suppressed Na+ currents through its receptor in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but did not alter voltage-dependent activation and inactivation. Current-clamp recording results were consistent with voltage-clamp recording results. Interleukin-6 reduced the action potential amplitude of cortical neurons, but did not change the action potential threshold. The regulation of voltage-gated Na+channels in rat corti-cal neurons by interleukin-6 is time- and dose-dependent.

  9. Exploring the structure of the voltage-gated Na+ channel by an engineered drug access pathway to the receptor site for local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Cervenka, Rene; Ke, Song; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Zarrabi, Touran; Hilber, Karlheinz; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Todt, Hannes

    2014-08-01

    Despite the availability of several crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na(+) channels, the structure of eukaryotic Na(+) channels is still undefined. We used predictions from available homology models and crystal structures to modulate an external access pathway for the membrane-impermeant local anesthetic derivative QX-222 into the internal vestibule of the mammalian rNaV1.4 channel. Potassium channel-based homology models predict amino acid Ile-1575 in domain IV segment 6 to be in close proximity to Lys-1237 of the domain III pore-loop selectivity filter. The mutation K1237E has been shown previously to increase the diameter of the selectivity filter. We found that an access pathway for external QX-222 created by mutations of Ile-1575 was abolished by the additional mutation K1237E, supporting the notion of a close spatial relationship between sites 1237 and 1575. Crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na(+) channels predict that the side chain of rNaV1.4 Trp-1531 of the domain IV pore-loop projects into the space between domain IV segment 6 and domain III pore-loop and, therefore, should obstruct the putative external access pathway. Indeed, mutations W1531A and W1531G allowed for exceptionally rapid access of QX-222. In addition, W1531G created a second non-selective ion-conducting pore, bypassing the outer vestibule but probably merging into the internal vestibule, allowing for control by the activation gate. These data suggest a strong structural similarity between bacterial and eukaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) channels. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Exploring the Structure of the Voltage-gated Na+ Channel by an Engineered Drug Access Pathway to the Receptor Site for Local Anesthetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Cervenka, Rene; Ke, Song; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Zarrabi, Touran; Hilber, Karlheinz; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Todt, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of several crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na+ channels, the structure of eukaryotic Na+ channels is still undefined. We used predictions from available homology models and crystal structures to modulate an external access pathway for the membrane-impermeant local anesthetic derivative QX-222 into the internal vestibule of the mammalian rNaV1.4 channel. Potassium channel-based homology models predict amino acid Ile-1575 in domain IV segment 6 to be in close proximity to Lys-1237 of the domain III pore-loop selectivity filter. The mutation K1237E has been shown previously to increase the diameter of the selectivity filter. We found that an access pathway for external QX-222 created by mutations of Ile-1575 was abolished by the additional mutation K1237E, supporting the notion of a close spatial relationship between sites 1237 and 1575. Crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na+ channels predict that the side chain of rNaV1.4 Trp-1531 of the domain IV pore-loop projects into the space between domain IV segment 6 and domain III pore-loop and, therefore, should obstruct the putative external access pathway. Indeed, mutations W1531A and W1531G allowed for exceptionally rapid access of QX-222. In addition, W1531G created a second non-selective ion-conducting pore, bypassing the outer vestibule but probably merging into the internal vestibule, allowing for control by the activation gate. These data suggest a strong structural similarity between bacterial and eukaryotic voltage-gated Na+ channels. PMID:24947510

  11. Mono-Heteromeric Configurations of Gap Junction Channels Formed by Connexin43 and Connexin45 Reduce Unitary Conductance and Determine both Voltage Gating and Metabolic Flux Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Zhong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In cardiac tissues, the expression of multiple connexins (Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx30.2 is a requirement for proper development and function. Gap junctions formed by these connexins have distinct permeability and gating mechanisms. Since a single cell can express more than one connexin isoform, the formation of hetero-multimeric gap junction channels provides a tissue with an enormous repertoire of combinations to modulate intercellular communication. To study further the perm-selectivity and gating properties of channels containing Cx43 and Cx45, we studied two monoheteromeric combinations in which a HeLa cell co-transfected with Cx43 and Cx45 was paired with a cell expressing only one of these connexins. Macroscopic measurements of total conductance between cell pairs indicated a drastic reduction in total conductance for mono-heteromeric channels. In terms of Vj dependent gating, Cx43 homomeric connexons facing heteromeric connexons only responded weakly to voltage negativity. Cx45 homomeric connexons exhibited no change in Vj gating when facing heteromeric connexons. The distributions of unitary conductances (γj for both mono-heteromeric channels were smaller than predicted, and both showed low permeability to the fluorescent dyes Lucifer yellow and Rhodamine123. For both mono-heteromeric channels, we observed flux asymmetry regardless of dye charge: flux was higher in the direction of the heteromeric connexon for MhetCx45 and in the direction of the homomeric Cx43 connexon for MhetCx43. Thus, our data suggest that co-expression of Cx45 and Cx43 induces the formation of heteromeric connexons with greatly reduced permeability and unitary conductance. Furthermore, it increases the asymmetry for voltage gating for opposing connexons, and it favors asymmetric flux of molecules across the junction that depends primarily on the size (not the charge of the crossing molecules.

  12. Gating of the two-pore cation channel AtTPC1 in the plant vacuole is based on a single voltage-sensing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaślan, D; Mueller, T D; Becker, D; Schultz, J; Cuin, T A; Marten, I; Dreyer, I; Schönknecht, G; Hedrich, R

    2016-09-01

    The two-pore cation channel TPC1 operates as a dimeric channel in animal and plant endomembranes. Each subunit consists of two homologous Shaker-like halves, with 12 transmembrane domains in total (S1-S6, S7-S12). In plants, TPC1 channels reside in the vacuolar membrane, and upon voltage stimulation, give rise to the well-known slow-activating SV currents. Here, we combined bioinformatics, structure modelling, site-directed mutagenesis, and in planta patch clamp studies to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of voltage-dependent channel gating in TPC1 in its native plant background. Structure-function analysis of the Arabidopsis TPC1 channel in planta confirmed that helix S10 operates as the major voltage-sensing site, with Glu450 and Glu478 identified as possible ion-pair partners for voltage-sensing Arg537. The contribution of helix S4 to voltage sensing was found to be negligible. Several conserved negative residues on the luminal site contribute to calcium binding, stabilizing the closed channel. During evolution of plant TPC1s from two separate Shaker-like domains, the voltage-sensing function in the N-terminal Shaker-unit (S1-S4) vanished.

  13. SU-E-T-266: Development of Evaluation System of Optimal Synchrotron Controlling Parameter for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Multiple Gate Irradiations in One Operation Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, T; Fujii, Y [Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki (Japan); Miyamoto, N; Matsuura, T; Takao, S; Matsuzaki, Y [Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Koyano, H; Shirato, H [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Nihongi, H; Umezawa, M; Matsuda, K [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki (Japan); Umegaki, K [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We have developed a gated spot scanning proton beam therapy system with real-time tumor-tracking. This system has the ability of multiple-gated irradiation in a single synchrotron operation cycle controlling the wait-time for consecutive gate signals during a flat-top phase so that the decrease in irradiation efficiency induced by irregular variation of gate signal is reduced. Our previous studies have shown that a 200 ms wait-time is appropriate to increase the average irradiation efficiency, but the optimal wait-time can vary patient by patient and day by day. In this research, we have developed an evaluation system of the optimal wait-time in each irradiation based on the log data of the real-time-image gated proton beam therapy (RGPT) system. Methods: The developed system consists of logger for operation of RGPT system and software for evaluation of optimal wait-time. The logger records timing of gate on/off, timing and the dose of delivered beam spots, beam energy and timing of X-ray irradiation. The evaluation software calculates irradiation time in the case of different wait-time by simulating the multiple-gated irradiation operation using several timing information. Actual data preserved in the log data are used for gate on and off time, spot irradiation time, and time moving to the next spot. Design values are used for the acceleration and deceleration times. We applied this system to a patient treated with the RGPT system. Results: The evaluation system found the optimal wait-time of 390 ms that reduced the irradiation time by about 10 %. The irradiation time with actual wait-time used in treatment was reproduced with accuracy of 0.2 ms. Conclusion: For spot scanning proton therapy system with multiple-gated irradiation in one synchrotron operation cycle, an evaluation system of the optimal wait-time in each irradiation based on log data has been developed. Funding Support: Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through the FIRST

  14. Silicon-on-insulator-based high-voltage, high-temperature integrated circuit gate driver for silicon carbide-based power field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Huque, Mohammad A [ORNL; Blalock, Benjamin J [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC)-based field effect transistors (FETs) are gaining popularity as switching elements in power electronic circuits designed for high-temperature environments like hybrid electric vehicle, aircraft, well logging, geothermal power generation etc. Like any other power switches, SiC-based power devices also need gate driver circuits to interface them with the logic units. The placement of the gate driver circuit next to the power switch is optimal for minimising system complexity. Successful operation of the gate driver circuit in a harsh environment, especially with minimal or no heat sink and without liquid cooling, can increase the power-to-volume ratio as well as the power-to-weight ratio for power conversion modules such as a DC-DC converter, inverter etc. A silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based high-voltage, high-temperature integrated circuit (IC) gate driver for SiC power FETs has been designed and fabricated using a commercially available 0.8--m, 2-poly and 3-metal bipolar-complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-double diffused metal oxide semiconductor (DMOS) process. The prototype circuit-s maximum gate drive supply can be 40-V with peak 2.3-A sourcing/sinking current driving capability. Owing to the wide driving range, this gate driver IC can be used to drive a wide variety of SiC FET switches (both normally OFF metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and normally ON junction field effect transistor (JFET)). The switching frequency is 20-kHz and the duty cycle can be varied from 0 to 100-. The circuit has been successfully tested with SiC power MOSFETs and JFETs without any heat sink and cooling mechanism. During these tests, SiC switches were kept at room temperature and ambient temperature of the driver circuit was increased to 200-C. The circuit underwent numerous temperature cycles with negligible performance degradation.

  15. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels as common mode of action for (mixtures of) distinct classes of insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M L; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin; organophosphate: chlorpyrifos; organochlorine: endosulfan; neonicotinoid: imidacloprid) and mixtures thereof on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Effects of acute (20 min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were studied in vitro with Fura-2-loaded PC12 cells and high resolution single-cell fluorescence microscopy. The data demonstrate that cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos concentration-dependently decreased depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i, with 50% (IC50) at 78nM, 239nM, 250nM, and 899nM, respectively. Additionally, acute exposure to chlorpyrifos or endosulfan (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i, amounting to 68 ± 8nM and 53 ± 8nM, respectively. Imidacloprid did not disturb basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i at 10μM. Following exposure to binary mixtures, effects on depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were within the expected effect additivity range, whereas the effect of the tertiary mixture was less than this expected additivity effect range. These results demonstrate that different types of insecticides inhibit depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i in PC12 cells by inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in vitro at concentrations comparable with human occupational exposure levels. Moreover, the effective concentrations in this study are below those for earlier described modes of action. Because inhibition of VGCCs appears to be a common and potentially additive mode of action of several classes of insecticides, this target should be considered in neurotoxicity risk assessment studies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  16. Characterization of a novel radiolabeled peptide selective for a subpopulation of voltage-gated potassium channels in mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racapé, Judith; Lecoq, Alain; Romi-Lebrun, Régine; Liu, Jessica; Kohler, Martin; Garcia, Maria L; Ménez, André; Gasparini, Sylvaine

    2002-02-08

    BgK, a 37-amino acid voltage-gated potassium (Kv) 1 channel blocker isolated from the sea anemone Bunodosoma granulifera, can be modified at certain positions to alter its pharmacological profile (Alessandri-Haber, N., Lecoq, A., Gasparini, S., Grangier-Macmath, G., Jacquet, G., Harvey, A. L., de Medeiros, C., Rowan, E. G., Gola, M., Ménez, A., and Crest, M. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 35653-35661). In the present study, we report the design of two BgK analogs that have been radiolabeled with (125)INa. Whereas BgK(W5Y/Y26F) and its radiolabeled derivative, (125)I-BgK(W5Y/Y26F), bind to Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with potencies similar to those for the parent peptide, BgK, BgK(W5Y/F6A/Y26F) and its monoiodo-tyrosine derivative, (125)I-BgK(W5Y/F6A/Y26F), display a distinctive and unique pharmacological profile; they bind with high affinity to homomultimeric Kv1.1 and Kv1.6 channels, but not to Kv1.2 channels. Interaction of BgK(W5Y/F6A/Y26F) with potassium channels depends on the nature of a residue in the mouth of the channel, at a position that determines channel sensitivity to external tetraethylammonium. In native brain tissue, (125)I-BgK(W5Y/F6A/Y26F) binds to a population of Kv1 channels that appear to consist of at least two sensitive (Kv1.1 and/or Kv1.6) subunits, in adjacent position. Given its unique pharmacological properties, (125)I-BgK(W5Y/F6A/Y26F) represents a new tool for studying subpopulations of Kv1 channels in native tissues.

  17. Voltage-gated K(+) channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 regulate myogenic and neurogenic contractions of rat urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Muyan; Kellett, Whitney F; Petkov, Georgi V

    2010-07-01

    Members of the voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channel family are suggested to control the resting membrane potential and the repolarization phase of the action potential in urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). Recent studies report that stromatoxin-1, a peptide isolated from tarantulas, selectively inhibits K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, K(V)4.2, and K(V)2.1/9.3 channels. The objective of this study was to investigate whether K(V) channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 participate in the regulation of rat UBSM contractility and to identify their molecular fingerprints. Stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude, muscle force, and tone in isolated UBSM strips. However, stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) had no effect on the UBSM contractions induced by depolarizing agents such as KCl (20 mM) or carbachol (1 microM). This indicates that, under conditions of sustained membrane depolarization, the K(V) channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 have no further contribution to the membrane excitability and contractility. Stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) increased the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions, suggesting also a role for these channels in neurogenic contractions. RT-PCR experiments on freshly isolated UBSM cells showed mRNA expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)9.3, but not K(V)4.2 channel subunits. Protein expression of K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2 channels was detected using Western blot and was further confirmed by immunocytochemical detection in freshly isolated UBSM cells. These novel findings indicate that K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2, but not K(V)4.2, channel subunits are expressed in rat UBSM and play a key role in opposing both myogenic and neurogenic UBSM contractions.

  18. Elastic and Muscular Arteries Differ in Structure, Basal NO Production and Voltage-Gated Ca(2+)-Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloup, Arthur J A; Van Hove, Cor E; Heykers, Annick; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Fransen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the search for mechanisms underlying progressive arterial stiffening and for interventions to avoid or reverse this process has gained much attention. In general, arterial stiffening displays regional variation and is, for example, during aging more prominent in elastic than in muscular arteries. We hypothesize that besides passive also active regulators of arterial compliance [i.e., endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function] differ between these arteries. Hence, it is conceivable that these vessel types will display different time frames of stiffening. To investigate this hypothesis segments of muscular arteries such as femoral and mesenteric arteries and elastic arteries such as the aorta and carotid artery were isolated from female C57Bl6 mice (5-6 months of age, n = 8). Both microscopy and passive stretching of the segments in a myograph confirmed that passive mechanical properties (elastin, collagen) of elastic and muscular arteries were significantly different. Endothelial function, more specifically basal nitric oxide (NO) efficacy, and VSMC function, more specifically L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC)-mediated contractions, were determined by α1-adrenoceptor stimulation with phenylephrine (PE) and by gradual depolarization with elevated extracellular K(+) in the absence and presence of eNOS inhibition with L-NAME. PE-mediated isometric contractions significantly increased after inhibition of NO release with L-NAME in elastic, but not in muscular vessel segments. This high basal eNOS activity in elastic vessels was also responsible for shifts of K(+) concentration-contraction curves to higher external K(+). VGCC-mediated con