WorldWideScience

Sample records for volcanologist highlights included

  1. HIGHLIGHTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEGYI

    2002-01-01

    King Gesar is a focus of study in and outside China. Accomplished scholars include:——Alexandra David-Neel (1868-1969): A noted French expert in Oriental studies, Chinese and Tibetan studies in the 20th century, she visited Tibet and surrounding areas five times for survey. Her treatises and diaries related to the Orient, especially to Tibet and related areas, were translated into many languages and published repeatedly.——Ren Neiqiang (1894-1989): A noted geologist, an expert in ethnic groups and a pioneer in Tibetan studies. From 1939 to 1944, he published his Initial Introduction to "Tibetan Three Kingdoms" and "On the Three Kingdoms" in Border Government Affairs Forum and Kangdao Month.——R.A. Stein (1911-1999): He is held as the most successful Tibetan study worker in France in the 20th century. And he was one of the few who could do research in both Tibetan and Chinese. His contribution to the study of King Gesarfinds expression in his effort to translate the epic.——Wang Yinuan (1907-1998): A

  2. BBG Highlights

    Data.gov (United States)

    Broadcasting Board of Governors — BBG Highlights is a monthly summary of the BBG's accomplishments and news and developments affecting the Agency's work. Now, for the first time, this monthly update...

  3. EUROPEAN VOLCANOES' NIGHT: building a link between general public and volcanologists in a relaxed and welcoming setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, David; González-Cárdenas, María E.; Baldrich, Laura; Solana, Carmen; Nave, Rosella; Calvari, Sonia; Harangi, Szabolcs; Chouraqui, Floriane; Dionis, Samara; Silva, Sonia V.; Forjaz, Victor H.; D'Auria, Luca; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2017-04-01

    European Volcanoes' Night (www.volcanoesnight.com) is a "volcanic eruption" of art, culture, music, gastronomy, school activities, geotourism, exhibitions and scientific debates. The event aims to bring together members of the general public with scientists who work on the study of volcanoes, in order to meet and ask questions in a relaxed and welcoming setting. It is open to both locals and tourists who appreciate the beauty and power of this natural phenomena. This celebration gives attendees, and in particular young people, the opportunity to meet researchers in a relaxed and festive setting, which will feature many activities and which will be used to highlight the attractiveness of a career research on one of the most attractive natural phenomena; volcanoes. The 2016 European Volcanoes' Night was held at 16 different municipalities of Spain, France, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, United Kingdom and Cape Verde on September 30, 2016, coinciding with the celebration of "European Researchers' Night" held annually throughout Europe and neighbouring countries the last Friday of September. The spirit of the European VolcanoeśNight fits perfectly in the aim of the ERN, trying to close the gap between the scientific community and the rest of the society. In this case, volcanoes are the driving force of this event, celebrating the singularity of living on volcanoes, and how these affect our daily lives, our culture and our heritage. European VolcanoeśNight also celebrates volcano science, with avantgarde talks and presentations on different volcanic topics and becomes a meeting point for children discovering volcanoes as a pastime or a leisure topic, making this event a must for tourists and locals wherever has been held. At the end of 2016 European VolcanoeśNight, almost 150 activities were performed for thousands of spectators, a big success that confirms something as crucial as science as a communication issue, and as a tool to strengthen the ties between researchers

  4. Expo Highlights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZHIPING; SHAO DA

    2010-01-01

    @@ The 2010 World Expo opened in Shanghai on May 1.While serving as a platform to display the latest global scientific achievements and economic growth,it otters a wonderful opportunity for Chinese culture to be shared with the rest of the world as well.On this occasion,participants from 246 nations and international organizations gathered in Shanghai to create an Expo stage that goes beyond national,ethnic and religious boundaries,and to convey the Expo ideas of "understanding,communication,togetherness and cooperation" to the world.Currently,four highlights of the Expo are available to visitors.

  5. A genome wide association study for backfat thickness in Italian Large White pigs highlights new regions affecting fat deposition including neuronal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanesi Luca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcass fatness is an important trait in most pig breeding programs. Following market requests, breeding plans for fresh pork consumption are usually designed to reduce carcass fat content and increase lean meat deposition. However, the Italian pig industry is mainly devoted to the production of Protected Designation of Origin dry cured hams: pigs are slaughtered at around 160 kg of live weight and the breeding goal aims at maintaining fat coverage, measured as backfat thickness to avoid excessive desiccation of the hams. This objective has shaped the genetic pool of Italian heavy pig breeds for a few decades. In this study we applied a selective genotyping approach within a population of ~ 12,000 performance tested Italian Large White pigs. Within this population, we selectively genotyped 304 pigs with extreme and divergent backfat thickness estimated breeding value by the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip and performed a genome wide association study to identify loci associated to this trait. Results We identified 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms with P≤5.0E-07 and additional 119 ones with 5.0E-07 Conclusions Further investigations are needed to evaluate the effects of the identified single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with backfat thickness on other traits as a pre-requisite for practical applications in breeding programs. Reported results could improve our understanding of the biology of fat metabolism and deposition that could also be relevant for other mammalian species including humans, confirming the role of neuronal genes on obesity.

  6. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  7. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  8. FY 2016 Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-23

    This fact sheet summarizes the research highlights for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) for Fiscal Year 2106. Topics covered include additive manufacturing for the wind industry, biomass-based chemicals substitutions, carbon fiber manufacturing facility siting, geothermal power plant turbines, hydrogen refueling stations, hydropower turbines, LEDs and lighting, light-duty automotive lithium-ion cells, magnetocaloric refrigeration, silicon carbide power electronics for variable frequency motor drives, solar photovoltaics, and wide bandgap semiconductor opportunities in power electronics.

  9. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouke T. Annema

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  10. Highlights of the optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G H

    2011-07-01

    The development of super-resolution microscopy techniques using molecular localization, such as photoactivated localization microscopy, fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy with independent running acquisition and many others, has heightened interest in molecules that will be grouped here into a category referred to as 'optical highlighter' fluorescent proteins. This review will survey many of the advances in development of fluorescent proteins for optically highlighting sub-populations of fluorescently labelled molecules.

  11. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Highlights of recent results from ATLAS were presented. The data collected to date, the detector and physics performance, and measurements of previously established Standard Model processes were reviewed briefly before summarising the latest ATLAS results in the Brout-Englert-Higgs sector, where big progress has been made in the year since the discovery. Finally, selected prospects for measurements including the data from the HL-LHC luminosity upgrade were presented, for both ATLAS and CMS. Many of the results mentioned are preliminary. These proceedings reflect only a brief summary of the material presented, and the status at the time of the conference is reported.

  12. Science Highlights from VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Staszak, D; Archambault, S; Archer, A; Barnacka, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Coppi, P; Cui, W; Dwarkadas, V V; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Alonso, M Fernandez; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Flinders, A; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Gyuk, G; Hütten, M; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nguyen, T; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Pelassa, V; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rovero, A C; Santander, M; Schlenstedt, S; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2015-01-01

    The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is a ground-based array located at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona and is one of the world's most sensitive gamma-ray instruments at energies of 85 GeV to $>$30 TeV. VERITAS has a wide scientific reach that includes the study of extragalactic and Galactic objects as well as the search for astrophysical signatures of dark matter and the measurement of cosmic rays. In this paper, we will summarize the current status of the VERITAS observatory and present some of the scientific highlights from the last two years, focusing in particular on those results shown at the 2015 ICRC in The Hague, Netherlands.

  13. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care

  14. Highlights from Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    In these two lectures I will chose some highlights from the Tevatron experiments (CDF/D0) and the Neutrino experiments and then discuss the future direction of physics at Fermilab after the Tevatron collider era.

  15. Highlights, predictions, and changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2012-11-15

    Recent literature highlights at Retrovirology are described. Predictions are made regarding "hot" retrovirology research trends for the coming year based on recent journal access statistics. Changes in Retrovirology editor and the frequency of the Retrovirology Prize are announced.

  16. NSI organization and highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Fred

    1991-01-01

    The agenda of the NASA Science Internet (NSI) Users Working Group is given. The NSI project organization is laid out in view graph format. Also given are NSI highlights which are divided into three areas: administration, engineering, and operations.

  17. Evaluation and Comparison of High-Resolution (HR) and High-Light (HL) Phosphors in the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) using Generalized Linear Systems Analyses (GMTF, GDQE) that include the Effect of Scatter, Magnification and Detector Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandesh K; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the imaging characteristics of the high-resolution, high-sensitivity micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) with 35-micron pixel-pitch when used with different commercially-available 300 micron thick phosphors: the high resolution (HR) and high light (HL) from Hamamatsu. The purpose of this evaluation was to see if the HL phosphor with its higher screen efficiency could be replaced with the HR phosphor to achieve improved resolution without an increase in noise resulting from the HR's decreased light-photon yield. We designated the detectors MAF-HR and MAF-HL and compared them with a standard flat panel detector (FPD) (194 micron pixel pitch and 600 micron thick CsI(Tl)). For this comparison, we used the generalized linear-system metrics of GMTF, GNNPS and GDQE which are more realistic measures of total system performance since they include the effect of scattered radiation, focal spot distribution, and geometric un-sharpness. Magnifications (1.05-1.15) and scatter fractions (0.28 and 0.33) characteristic of a standard head phantom were used. The MAF-HR performed significantly better than the MAF-HL at high spatial frequencies. The ratio of GMTF and GDQE of the MAF-HR compared to the MAF-HL at 3(6) cycles/mm was 1.45(2.42) and 1.23(2.89), respectively. Despite significant degradation by inclusion of scatter and object magnification, both MAF-HR and MAF-HL provide superior performance over the FPD at higher spatial frequencies with similar performance up to the FPD's Nyquist frequency of 2.5 cycles/mm. Both substantially higher resolution and improved GDQE can be achieved with the MAF using the HR phosphor instead of the HL phosphor.

  18. Neutrino Experiments Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T

    2001-01-01

    This article consists of two parts. The first section presents the highlights on the goals of neutrino physics, status of the current neutrino experiments and future directions and program. The second section describes the theme, program and research efforts for the TEXONO Collaboration among scientists from Taiwan and China.

  19. Highlights, predictions, and changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent literature highlights at Retrovirology are described. Predictions are made regarding “hot” retrovirology research trends for the coming year based on recent journal access statistics. Changes in Retrovirology editor and the frequency of the Retrovirology Prize are announced.

  20. Highlights, predictions, and changes

    OpenAIRE

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recent literature highlights at Retrovirology are described. Predictions are made regarding “hot” retrovirology research trends for the coming year based on recent journal access statistics. Changes in Retrovirology editor and the frequency of the Retrovirology Prize are announced.

  1. ESO Highlights in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    As is now the tradition, the European Southern Observatory looks back at the exciting moments of last year. 2008 was in several aspects an exceptionally good year. Over the year, ESO's telescopes provided data for more than 700 scientific publications in refereed journals, making ESO the most productive ground-based observatory in the world. ESO PR Highlights 2008 ESO PR Photo 01a/09 The image above is a clickable map. These are only some of the press releases issued by ESO in 2008. For a full listing, please go to ESO 2008 page. Austria signed the agreement to join the other 13 ESO member states (ESO 11/08 and 20/08), while the year marked the 10th anniversary of first light for ESO's "perfect science machine", the Very Large Telescope (ESO 16/08 and 17/08). The ALMA project, for which ESO is the European partner, had a major milestone in December, as the observatory was equipped with its first antenna (ESO 49/08). Also the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope impressed this year with some very impressive and publicly visible results. Highlights came in many fields: Astronomers for instance used the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to discover and image a probable giant planet long sought around the star Beta Pictoris (ESO 42/08). This is now the eighth extrasolar planet to have been imaged since the VLT imaged the first extrasolar planet in 2004 (three of eight were imaged with VLT). The VLT also enabled three students to confirm the nature of a unique planet (ESO 45/08). This extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is a planet about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. The world's foremost planet-hunting instrument, HARPS, located at ESO's La Silla observatory, scored a new first, finding a system of three super-Earths around a star (ESO 19/08). Based on the complete HARPS sample, astronomers now think that one Sun-like star out of three harbours short orbit, low

  2. Science Highlights from SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erick T.

    2017-06-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center DLR to provide infrared and sub-millimeter observing capabilities to the worldwide astronomical community. With a wide range of instruments that cover both imaging and spectroscopy, SOFIA has produced unique scientific results that could not be obtained with a ground-based facility. In this talk, I will describe highlights from a range of areas in astronomy. A particular strength of SOFIA is high resolution spectroscopy. In the mid-infrared, the instrument EXES has enabled velocity-resolved observations of solar system, interstellar, and star forming regions. The heterodyne spectrometer GREAT has been a particularly productive instrument on SOFIA, with high resolution studies of the gas in the interstellar medium. With its extremely high spectral resolution, GREAT has allowed dynamical studies of clouds and their interactions. I will highlight observations that demonstrate the infall of material in star-forming regions. SOFIA can go to where the science is. This mobility is important for localized events such as occultations. Results from the recent Pluto occultation campaign will be discussed.

  3. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits.

  4. 1999 NCCS Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jerome (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS) is a high-performance scientific computing facility operated, maintained and managed by the Earth and Space Data Computing Division (ESDCD) of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Earth Sciences Directorate. The mission of the NCCS is to advance leading-edge science by providing the best people, computers, and data storage systems to NASA's Earth and space sciences programs and those of other U.S. Government agencies, universities, and private institutions. Among the many computationally demanding Earth science research efforts supported by the NCCS in Fiscal Year 1999 (FY99) are the NASA Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission, Earth gravitational model development efforts, the National Weather Service's North American Observing System program, Data Assimilation Office studies, a NASA-sponsored project at the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, a NASA-sponsored microgravity project conducted by researchers at the City University of New York and the University of Pennsylvania, the completion of a satellite-derived global climate data set, simulations of a new geodynamo model, and studies of Earth's torque. This document presents highlights of these research efforts and an overview of the NCCS, its facilities, and its people.

  5. Research Highlights of CAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1. Basic Research Basic research has always been one of the major tasks of CAS. Over the more than 50 years since its founding, CAS has gradually branched out to cover many fundamental fields of the natural sciences, such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, mechanics,astronomy, space science, life science, geoscience and environmental science - with nearly 10,000 research professionals and 117 open laboratories (including 50 key State laboratories). At present, there are 29 research institutes (including observatories) covering such fields as physical science, mathematics, mechanics and astronomy; with 31 open laboratories (nine key State laboratories, four State laboratories and 18 CAS open laboratories).

  6. Highlights of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next

  7. Highlights from BNL-RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2012-01-01

    Recent highlights from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reviewed and discussed. Topics include: Discovery of the strongly interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (sQGP) in 2005; RHIC machine operation in 2011 as well as latest achievements from the superconducting Magnet Division and the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. Highlights from QGP physics at RHIC include: comparison of new measurements of charged multiplicity in A+A collisions by ALICE at the LHC to previous RHIC measurements; Observation of the anti-alpha particle by the STAR experiment; Collective Flow, including the Triangular Flow discovery and the latest results on v3; the RHIC beam energy scan in search of the QCD critical point. The pioneering use at RHIC of hard-scattering as a probe of the sQGP will also be reviewed and the latest results presented including: jet-quenching via suppression of high pT particles and two particle correlations; new results on fragmentation functions using gamma...

  8. Highlights: Spring Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council members present at the May 24, 1981, meeting were Keiiti Aki, Steven Burges (for Jim Wallis), Peter S. Eagleson, E. R. Engdahl, Charles E. Helsley, James R. Heirtzler, Carl Kisslinger, Leslie H. Meredith, Chris N. K. Mooers, Norman F. Ness, Marcia M. Neugebauer, James J. O'Brien, Richard Rapp, Carl Sagan, James C. Savage, Joseph V. Smith, Fred Spilhaus, Donald L. Turcotte, James A. Van Allen, J. Tuzo Wilson, and Jay Winston (for Elmar R. Reiter until his arrival at 6:50 P.M.). David Strangway, representing the Canadian Geophysical Union, and Peter Steinhauser, representing the European Geophysical Society, were special observers at the meeting. Council meetings are open, and a number of section secretaries, committee chairmen, journal editors, and other members attended. The following major actions were adopted by the Council:The experiment of publishing oceanography and lower-atmosphere papers in JGR Green issues alternate to those containing upper-atmosphere papers will be continued through 1982. From preliminary indications the experiment seems to be working, but a full year of data, including a renewal cycle, is needed to assess the success of the experiment. Final decision will be made prior to the 1983 dues notices.

  9. HIGHLIGHTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS¥//ZhaxiPuncogprayedwhilehisassistantsplacedneedlesintotheflamingstove.Hethenappliedneedlesto30-oddacupointsonthepa...

  10. Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    BELGIUM ITALY Coordonnateur AGARD VSL • Aeronautica Militare Etat-Major de la Force Airienne Ufficio del Delegato Nazionale all’AGARD Quartier Reine...past ten years. Medico /clinical aspects. - Physiology/psychophysiology aspects. * 33 *- Engineering/crash worthiness aspects. - Life support/escape...aspects. - Medico -legal/pathology aspects. It is anticipated that the audience will be operational staff, both general officers and field grade officers

  11. Highlighting Impact and the Impact of Highlighting: PRB Editors' Suggestions

    CERN Document Server

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    Associate Editor Manolis Antonoyiannakis discusses the highlighting, as Editors' Suggestions, of a small percentage of the papers published each week. We highlight papers primarily for their importance and impact in their respective fields, or because we find them particularly interesting or elegant. It turns out that the additional layer of scrutiny involved in the selection of papers as Editors' Suggestions is associated with a significantly elevated and sustained citation impact.

  12. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  13. False "highlighting" with Wood's lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Wood's lamp evaluation is used to diagnose pigmentary disorders. For example, vitiligo typically demonstrates lesional enhancement under Wood's lamp evaluation. Numerous false positive enhancing lesions can be noted in the skin. We describe a 5-year-old Hispanic boy who had painted his face with highlighter, producing enhancing lesions under Wood's lamp. Physicians who use Wood's lamp should be aware that the appearance of markers and highlighter can mimic that of true clinical illnesses.

  14. Southeast Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2004-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent southeast Alaska inventory and analysis conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). Southeast Alaska has about 22.9 million acres, of which two-thirds are vegetated. Almost 11 million acres are forest land and about 4 million acres have nonforest...

  15. Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T K

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an overview of neutrino physics research, with highlights on the physics goals, results and interpretations of the current neutrino experiments and future directions and program. It is not meant to be a comprehensive account or detailed review article. Interested readers can pursue the details via the listed references.

  16. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric research in the Earth Sciences Division (610) consists of research and technology development programs dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the atmosphere and its interaction with the climate of Earth. The Division's goals are to improve understanding of the dynamics and physical properties of precipitation, clouds, and aerosols; atmospheric chemistry, including the role of natural and anthropogenic trace species on the ozone balance in the stratosphere and the troposphere; and radiative properties of Earth's atmosphere and the influence of solar variability on the Earth's climate. Major research activities are carried out in the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office. The overall scope of the research covers an end-to-end process, starting with the identification of scientific problems, leading to observation requirements for remote-sensing platforms, technology and retrieval algorithm development; followed by flight projects and satellite missions; and eventually, resulting in data processing, analyses of measurements, and dissemination from flight projects and missions. Instrument scientists conceive, design, develop, and implement ultraviolet, infrared, optical, radar, laser, and lidar technology to remotely sense the atmosphere. Members of the various Laboratories conduct field measurements for satellite sensor calibration and data validation, and carry out numerous modeling activities. These modeling activities include climate model simulations, modeling the chemistry and transport of trace species on regional-to-global scales, cloud resolving models, and developing the next-generation Earth system models. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential at every stage of the research process to meeting our goals and maintaining leadership of the

  17. Energy Policy. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    Energy Policy Highlights showcases recent developments in energy policies among all 28 IEA member countries. Each contribution underscores the changing nature of both global and domestic energy challenges, as well as the commonality of energy concerns among member countries. The policies highlighted in this publication identify an urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as a clear policy objective. Electricity, enhancing energy efficiency and increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix in a cost effective manner are likewise areas of common focus. On the end-user side, increasing public awareness of domestic energy policies through improved transparency and engagement is an important facet of policy support among IEA member countries. The successful implementation of policies and other initiatives benefitted from efforts to inform the public.

  18. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    Ghada F. Mohammed; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune ...

  19. LHC Results Highlights (CLASHEP 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O

    2015-01-01

    The good performance of the LHC provided enough data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV to allow the experiments to perform very competitive measurements and to expand the knowledge about the fundamental interaction far beyond that from previous colliders. This report summarizes the highlights of the results obtained with these data samples by the four large experiments, covering all the topics of the physics program and focusing on those exploiting the possibilities of the LHC.

  20. ESO PR Highlights in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Last year proved to be another exceptional year for the European organisation for ground-based astronomy. ESO should begin the New Year with two new member states: Spain (PR 05/06) and the Czech Republic (PR 52/06). ESO PR Highlights 2006 2006 was a year of renovation and revolution in the world of planets. A new Earth-like exoplanet has been discovered (PR 03/06) using a network of telescopes from all over the world (including the Danish 1.54-m one at ESO La Silla). It is not the only child of this fruitful year: thanks to the combined use of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and La Silla instruments, a surprising system of twin giant exoplanets was found (PR 29/06), and a trio of Neptune-like planets hosted by a nearby star were identified (PR 18/06). These results open new perspectives on the search for habitable zones and on the understanding of the mechanism of planet formation. The VISIR instrument on the VLT has been providing unique information to answer this last question, by supplying a high resolution view of a planet-forming disc (PR 36/06). There are not only new members in the planets' register: during the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union held in Prague (Czech Republic), it was decided that Pluto is not a planet anymore but a 'dwarf planet'. Whatever its status, Pluto still has a satellite, Charon, whose radius and density have been measured more accurately by observing a rare occultation from different sites, including Cerro Paranal (PR 02/06). The scientific community dedicated 2006 to the great physicist James Clerk Maxwell (it was the 175th anniversary of the birth): without his electromagnetic theory of light, none of the astonishing discoveries of modern physics could have been achieved. Nowadays we can look at distant galaxies in great detail: the GIRAFFE spectrograph on the VLT revealed that galaxies 6 billion years ago had the same amount of dark matter relative to stars than nowadays (PR 10/06), while SINFONI gave an

  1. PHYSICS FOR HEALTH: CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of ICTR-PHE 2016 - International Conference on Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and Physics for Health -, co organized by CERN, aims at developing new strategies to better diagnose and treat cancer, by uniting biology and physics with clinics. Through the various sessions and symposia, the scientific programme offers the delegates the opportunity to discuss, in a friendly atmosphere, the latest progress in physics breakthroughs for health applications. The third edition of this conference took place at CICG (Centre International de Conférence Genève) from 15 to 19 Feb 2016.

  2. Data-intensive science gateway for rock physicists and volcanologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcom; Bell, Andrew; Main, Ian; Boon, Steve; Meredith, Philp; Kilburn, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Scientists have always shared data and mathematical models of the phenomena they study. Rock physics and Volcanology, as well as other solid-Earth sciences, have increasingly used Internet communications and computational renditions of their models for this purpose over the last two decades. Here we consider how to organise rock physics and volcanology data to open up opportunities for sharing and comparing both experiment data from experiments, observations and model runs and analytic interpretations of these data. Our hypothesis is that if we facilitate productive information sharing across those communities by using a new science gateway, it will benefit the science. The proposed science gateway should make the first steps for making existing research practices easier and facilitate new research. It will achieve this by supporting three major functions: 1) sharing data from laboratories and observatories, experimental facilities and models; 2) sharing models of rock fracture and methods for analysing experimental data; and 3) supporting recurrent operational tasks, such as data collection and model application in real time. We report initial work in two projects (NERC EFFORT and NERC CREEP-2) and experience with an early web-accessible protytpe called EFFORT gateway, where we are implementing such information sharing services for those projects. 1. Sharing data: In EFFORT gateway, we are working on several facilities for sharing data: *Upload data: We have designed and developed a new adaptive data transfer java tool called FAST (Flexible Automated Streaming Transfer) to upload experimental data and metadata periodically from laboratories to our repository. *Visualisation: As data are deposited in the repository, a visualisation of the accumulated data is made available for display in the Web portal. *Metadata and catalogues: The gateway uses a repository to hold all the data and a catalogue to hold all the corresponding metadata. 2. Sharing models and methods: The EFFORT gateway uses a repository to hold all of the models and a catalogue to hold the corresponding metadata. It provides several Web facilities for uploading, accessing and testing models. *Upload and store models: Through the gateway, researchers can upload as many models to the repository as they want. *Description of models: The gateway solicits and creates metadata for every model uploaded to store in the catalogue. *Search for models: Researchers can search the catalogue for models by using prepackaged sql-queries. *Access to models: Once a researcher has selected the model(s) that is going to be used for analysing an experiment, it will be obtained from the gateway. *Services to test and run models: Once a researcher selects a model and the experimental data to which it should be applied, the gateway submits the corresponding computational job to a high-performance computational (HPC) resource hiding technical details. Once a job is submitted to the HPC cluster, the results are displayed in the gateway in real time, catalogued and stored in the data repository, allowing further researcher-instigated operations to retrieve, inspect and aggregate results. *Services to write models: We have desgined VarPy library, which is an open-source toolbox which provides a Python framework for analysing volcanology and rock physics data. It provides several functions, which allow users to define their own workflows to develop models, analyses and visualizations. 3. Recurrent Operations: We have started to introduce some recurrent operations: *Automated data upload: FAST provides a mechanism to automate the data upload. *Periodic activation of models: The EFFORT gateway allows researchers to run different models periodically against the experimental data that are being or have been uploaded

  3. ESO PR Highlights in 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Another great year went by for ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere. From 1 January 2007, with the official joining of the Czech Republic, ESO has 13 member states, and since September, ESO has a new Director General, Tim de Zeeuw (ESO 03/07 and 38/07). Many scientific discoveries were made possible with ESO's telescopes. Arguably, the most important is the discovery of the first Earth-like planet in the habitable zone of a low-mass red dwarf (ESO 22/07). If there is water on this planet, then it should be liquid! ESO PR Highlights 2007 This is a clickable map. These are only some of the press releases issued by ESO in 2007. For a full listing, please go to ESO 2007 page. In our own Solar System also, astronomers made stunning breakthroughs with ESO's telescopes, observing the effect of the light from the Sun on an asteroid's rotation (ESO 11/07), describing in unprecedented detail the double asteroid Antiope (ESO 18/07), peering at the rings of Uranus (ESO 37/07), discovering a warm south pole on Neptune (ESO 41/07), showing a widespread and persistent morning drizzle of methane over the western foothills of Titan's major continent (ESO 47/07), and studying in the greatest details the wonderful Comet McNaught (ESO 05/07 and 07/07). In the study of objects slightly more massive than planets, the VLT found that brown dwarfs form in a similar manner to normal stars (ESO 24/07). The VLT made it also possible to measure the age of a fossil star that was clearly born at the dawn of time (ESO 23/07). Other discoveries included reconstructing the site of a flare on a solar-like star (ESO 53/07), catching a star smoking (ESO 34/07), revealing a reservoir of dust around an elderly star (ESO 43/07), uncovering a flat, nearly edge-on disc of silicates in the heart of the magnificent Ant Nebula (ESO 42/07), finding material around a star before it exploded (ESO 31/07), fingerprinting the Milky Way (ESO 15/07), revealing a rich

  4. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment.

  5. Highlighting inconsistencies regarding metal biosorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robalds, Artis; Naja, Ghinwa Melodie; Klavins, Maris

    2016-03-01

    Thousands of articles have been devoted to examine different types of biosorbents and their use in cleaning polluted waters. An important objective of some studies has been the identification of the biosorption mechanisms. This type of investigation is not always performed, as it can only be done if scientists are aware of all mechanisms that, at least theoretically, control the removal of the target substances. Mistakes are often made, even in highly cited review articles, where biosorption mechanisms are named and/or grouped. The aim of this article is to highlight errors and inaccuracies as well as to discuss different classification systems of the biosorption mechanisms. This article serves as a guide, as well as a platform for discussion among researchers involved in the investigation of biosorbents, in an effort to avoid reproducing errors in subsequent articles.

  6. Highlights from the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz Maestre, Juan

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the status and some recent results of the CMS experiment at the LHC. The performance of the detector is assessed using a luminosity of $\\approx 5~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ recorded in the first part of the 2017 data-taking period. Run~2 physics studies use data collected at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $36~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. Highlights from studies in the Higgs sector are the first observation of its decay into tau leptons by a single experiment, the most precise measurement of its mass, $\\mathrm{m_H} = 125.26 \\pm 0.21~\\mathrm{GeV}$ and a first search for the $\\mathrm{H}\\to\\mathrm{b\\overline{b}}$ decay in a phase space region that is sensitive to the gluon-fusion production mechanism. In the electroweak sector, CMS provides the currently most precise measurement of the effective weak mixing angle at the LHC: $\\sin\\theta^{\\rm lept}_{\\rm eff} = 0.23101\\pm 0.00052$, using an integrated luminosity of $\\approx 20~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqr...

  7. Highlights of DAMA/LIBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabei R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The DAMA project develops and uses new/improved low background scintillation detectors to investigate the Dark Matter (DM particle component(s in the galactic halo and rare processes deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS of the I.N.F.N.. Here some highlights of DAMA/LIBRA (Large sodium Iodide Bulk for Rare processes as a unique apparatus in direct DM investigation for its full sensitive mass, target material, intrinsic radio-purity, methodological approach and all the controls performed on the experimental parameters are outlined. The DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles have reached a model-independent evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo exploiting the DM annual modulation signature with highly radio-pure NaI(Tl target. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA–phase2 are summarised and the powerful tools offered by a model independent strategy of DM investigation are pointed out.

  8. ESO PR Highlights in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    2005 was the year of Physics. It was thus also in part the year of astronomy and this is clearly illustrated by the numerous breakthroughs that were achieved, in particular using ESO's telescopes. One of the highlights was without any doubt the confirmation of the first image of an exoplanet , around the star 2M1207 (see ESO PR 12/05). ESO's telescopes also found a Neptune-mass exoplanet around a small star ( PR 30/05) - a discovery that proves crucial in the census of other planetary systems, and imaged a tiny companion in the close vicinity of the star GQ Lupi, a very young object still surrounded by a disc, with an age between 100,000 and 2 million years ( PR 09/05). Moreover, using a new high-contrast adaptive optics camera on the VLT, the NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager, or NACO SDI, astronomers were able for the first time to image a companion 120 times fainter than its star , very near the star AB Doradus A. This companion appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be ( PR 02/05). ESO's telescopes proved very useful in helping to solve a 30-year old puzzle . Astronomers have for the first time observed the visible light from a short gamma-ray burst (GRB). Using the 1.5m Danish telescope at La Silla (Chile), they showed that these short, intense bursts of gamma-ray emission most likely originate from the violent collision of two merging neutron stars ( PR 26/05). Additional evidence came from witnessing another event with the VLT ( PR 32/05). Also in this field, astronomers found the farthest known gamma-ray burst with ESO's VLT, observing an object with a redshift 6.3, i.e. that is seen when the Universe was less than 900 million years old ( PR 22/05). On July 4, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft plunged onto Comet 9P/Tempel 1 with the aim to create a crater and expose pristine material from beneath the surface. For two days before and six days after, all major ESO telescopes have been observing the comet, in a coordinated fashion and in

  9. Highlights of Astronomy, Volume 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2007-08-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next

  10. Research highlights: digital assays on chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyuk; Wei, Qingshan; Kong, Janay Elise; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-01-07

    The ability to break up a volume of fluid into smaller pieces that are confined or separated to prevent molecular communication/transport is a key capability intrinsic to microfluidic systems. This capability has been used to develop or implement digital versions of traditional molecular analysis assays, including digital PCR and digital immunoassays/ELISA. In these digital versions, the concentration of the target analyte is in a range such that, when sampled into smaller fluid volumes, either a single molecule or no molecule may be present. Subsequent amplification is sensitive enough to obtain a digital readout of the presence of these target molecules. Advantages of such approaches that are claimed include quantification without calibration and robustness to variations in reaction conditions or times because the digital readout is less sensitive to absolute signal intensity levels. Weaknesses of digital approaches include a lower dynamic range of concentrations over which the assay is sensitive, which depends on the total volume that can be analyzed. We highlight recent efforts to expand the dynamic range of digital assays based on exploiting reaction/diffusion phenomena. A side-by-side study that evaluates the strengths of digital assays reveals that the majority of these claims are supported, with specific caveats. Finally, we highlight approaches to apply digital assays to analyze new types of reactions, including the active transport of protons across membranes by ATPases at the single protein level - perhaps opening up new biophysical understanding and screening opportunities, similar to widely deployed single-molecule ion channel analysis.

  11. Highlights and perspectives from the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, Joel Nathan

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the Large Hadron Collider provided proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy and achieved very high luminosity and reliablity. The performance of the CMS Experiment in this running period and a selection of recent physics results are presented. These include precision measurements and searches for new particles. The status and prospects for data-taking in 2017 and a brief summary of the highlights of the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrade of the CMS detector are also presented.

  12. Highlights and Perspectives from the CMS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Joel Nathan [Fermilab

    2017-09-09

    In 2016, the Large Hadron Collider provided proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy and achieved very high luminosity and reliability. The performance of the CMS Experiment in this running period and a selection of recent physics results are presented. These include precision measurements and searches for new particles. The status and prospects for data-taking in 2017 and a brief summary of the highlights of the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrade of the CMS detector are also presented.

  13. Highlights from the Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J. N.

    2016-11-01

    The Telescope Array measures the properties of ultra high energy cosmic ray induced extensive air showers. We do this using a variety of techniques including an array of scintillator detectors to sample the footprint of the air shower when it reaches the Earth's surface and telescopes to measure the fluorescence and Cerenkov light of the air shower. From this we determine the energy spectrum and chemical composition of the primary particles. We also search for sources of cosmic rays and anisotropy. We have found evidence of a possible source of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the northern sky. The experiment and its most recent measurements will be discussed.

  14. Highlights from the Telescope Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Telescope Array measures the properties of ultra high energy cosmic ray induced extensive air showers. We do this using a variety of techniques including an array of scintillator detectors to sample the footprint of the air shower when it reaches the Earth’s surface and telescopes to measure the fluorescence and Cerenkov light of the air shower. From this we determine the energy spectrum and chemical composition of the primary particles. We also search for sources of cosmic rays and anisotropy. We have found evidence of a possible source of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the northern sky. The experiment and its most recent measurements will be discussed.

  15. Atmospheric Research 2016 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric research in the Earth Sciences Division (610) consists of research and technology development programs dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the atmosphere and its interaction with the climate of Earth. The Divisions goals are to improve understanding of the dynamics and physical properties of precipitation, clouds, and aerosols; atmospheric chemistry, including the role of natural and anthropogenic trace species on the ozone balance in the stratosphere and the troposphere; and radiative properties of Earth's atmosphere and the influence of solar variability on the Earth's climate. Major research activities are carried out in the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office. The overall scope of the research covers an end-to-end process, starting with the identification of scientific problems, leading to observation requirements for remote-sensing platforms, technology and retrieval algorithm development; followed by flight projects and satellite missions; and eventually, resulting in data processing, analyses of measurements, and dissemination from flight projects and missions. Instrument scientists conceive, design, develop, and implement ultraviolet, infrared, optical, radar, laser, and lidar technology to remotely sense the atmosphere. Members of the various laboratories conduct field measurements for satellite sensor calibration and data validation, and carry out numerous modeling activities. These modeling activities include climate model simulations, modeling the chemistry and transport of trace species on regional-to-global scales, cloud resolving models, and developing the next-generation Earth system models. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential at every stage of the research process to meeting our goals and maintaining leadership of the

  16. Highlights on experimental neutrino physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Ernesto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: In the last years a remarkable progress was achieved in a deeper understanding of neutrino sector. Nowadays we know all mixing angles and mass splits which govern the neutrino oscillation phenomena. The parameters of neutrino mixing were measured by combining results of different experimental approaches including accelerator beams, nuclear reactors, radiative decays and astrophysical neutrinos. Nevertheless, there are open questions which can be viewed as key points to consolidate our knowledge on the intrinsic properties of neutrinos such as mass hierarchy and the existence of a CP violation in leptonic sector. To answer these questions and also to improve the precision of the already known mixing parameters, a series of huge experimental efforts are being set up, even in a world-wide scale in some cases. In this presentation I will review the current knowledge of the fundamental properties of neutrinos and the experimental scenario in which we expect, in a time frame of a decade, to find missing pieces in the leptonic sector. The findings can strengthen the foundations of the Standard Model as well as open very interesting paths for new physics. (author)

  17. Highlights from NuFact05

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Landua, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    The 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Superbeams was held in Frascati in June 2005 with nearly 200 participants. The most recent progress in the design of future neutrino facilities was described, including novel ideas in detectors, and many issues were raised. The International Scoping Study (ISS) for a future Neutrino Facility which would incorporate a Neutrino Factory and/or a high intensity Neutrino Superbeam was launched at that occasion. Built upon previous studies in the USA, Europe and Japan, it will aim to i) define the physics case and a baseline design for such a facility including the related neutrino detection systems, ii) identify the required research and development programme and iii) perform comparisons with other options such as beta beams. The highlights of the meeting and the upcoming studies will be presented.

  18. Facilitating pictorial comprehension with color highlighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougald, Brannan R; Wogalter, Michael S

    2014-09-01

    Pictorials can aid in communicating warning information, but viewers may not always correctly comprehend them. Two experiments focused on whether the use of relevant highlighting could benefit pictorial comprehension. A set of warning-related pictorials were manipulated according to three-color highlighting conditions: highlighting areas more relevant to correct comprehension, highlighting areas less relevant to comprehension, and no highlighting. Participants were asked to describe the purpose and meaning of each pictorial presented to them. The findings from both experiments indicate that comprehension of warning pictorials is higher for the relevant highlighting condition than the other two conditions. The highlighting of less relevant areas reduced comprehension compared to no highlighting. Use of appropriately placed highlighting could benefit the design of a complex symbol by pointing out pertinent areas to aid in determining its intended conceptual meaning.

  19. Astonishing the wild pigs highlights of technology

    CERN Document Server

    Trueb, Lucien F; Stuber, Fred A

    2015-01-01

    A hydraulic machine for astonishing wild pigs was one of the many technological highlights the author encountered in the course of his career as a research scientist and science writer. Writing a book about them, never taking more (or less) than two printed pages for each of 146 subjects was a very special challenge. The book covers fundamentally important achievements of technology that directly impacted mankind or even profoundly changed it. Many of those highlights are quite new, at least one of them (power generation by nuclear fusion) is not available yet. But particularly ingenious things dating way back were also included, as they are the base of our technical civilization Good examples are ceramics as well as copper, bronze and iron; whole periods of history have been named for the latter three. The analog computer of Antikythera used for stellar navigation was made some 2100 years ago, gunpowder was used in China as early as 1044 A.D., the astronomical clock in the Strasburg cathedral was built in th...

  20. Highlight detection for video content analysis through double filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chen, Hexin; Chen, Mianshu

    2005-07-01

    Highlight detection is a form of video summarization techniques aiming at including the most expressive or attracting parts in the video. Most video highlights selection research work has been performed on sports video, detecting certain objects or events such as goals in soccer video, touch down in football and others. In this paper, we present a highlight detection method for film video. Highlight section in a film video is not like that in sports video that usually has certain objects or events. The methods to determine a highlight part in a film video can exhibit as three aspects: (a) locating obvious audio event, (b) detecting expressive visual content around the obvious audio location, (c) selecting the preferred portion of the extracted audio-visual highlight segments. We define a double filters model to detect the potential highlights in video. First obvious audio location is determined through filtering the obvious audio features, and then we perform the potential visual salience detection around the potential audio highlight location. Finally the production from the audio-visual double filters is compared with a preference threshold to determine the final highlights. The user study results indicate that the double filters detection approach is an effective method for highlight detection for video content analysis.

  1. FY 1996 Congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The FY 1996 budget presentation is organized by the Department`s major business lines. An accompanying chart displays the request for new budget authority. The report compares the budget request for FY 1996 with the appropriated FY 1995 funding levels displayed on a comparable basis. The FY 1996 budget represents the first year of a five year plan in which the Department will reduce its spending by $15.8 billion in budget authority and by $14.1 billion in outlays. FY 1996 is a transition year as the Department embarks on its multiyear effort to do more with less. The Budget Highlights are presented by business line; however, the fifth business line, Economic Productivity, which is described in the Policy Overview section, cuts across multiple organizational missions, funding levels and activities and is therefore included in the discussion of the other four business lines.

  2. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  3. Highlights from past and future physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    2009-01-01

    A two-day symposium was held at CERN on 3 and 4 December in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Proton Synchrotron and the twentieth anniversary of LEP. The symposium, entitled “From the Proton Synchrotron to the Large Hadron Collider- 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics”, included a series of seminars reflecting on the past fifty years in particle physics and an exhibition highlighting CERN’s research over this period.   Lyn Evans, LHC project leader, addressing the audience gathered in the Main Auditorium during the symposium that celebrated the 50 years of the PS and the 20 years of LEP.  The events were well attended on both days. Thursday’s reception, to which the Director-General invited everyone working at CERN, attracted over 1200 people. The seminars drew about 500 people to the Main Auditorium and the Council Chamber each day, with at least as many on-line attendees. The symposium speakers, including thirteen No...

  4. Photon science 2012. Highlights and annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Karen; Gehrke, Rainer; Gutt, Christian; Incoccia-Hermes, Lucia; Laarmann, Tim; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Roehlsberger, Ralf; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst; Vainio, Ulla; Zimmermann, Martin von (eds.)

    2012-12-15

    The synchrotron-radiation research at DESY is reviewed. The following topics are dealt with: Research highlights, research platforms and outstations, light sources, new technologies and developments. (HSI)

  5. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2007 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  6. Highlights from BNL-RHIC-2012

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2013-01-01

    Recent highlights from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reviewed and discussed in the context of the discovery of the strongly interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (sQGP) at RHIC in 2005 as confirmed by results from the CERN-LHC Pb+Pb program. Outstanding RHIC machine operation in 2012 with 3-dimensional stochastic cooling and a new EBIS ion source enabled measurements with Cu+Au, U+U, for which multiplicity distributions are shown, as well as with polarized p-p collisions. Differences of the physics and goals of p-p versus A+A are discussed leading to a review of RHIC results on pi0 suppression in Au+Au collisions and comparison to LHC Pb+Pb results in the same range 5 30 GeV. Improved measurements of direct photon production and correlation with charged particles at RHIC are shown, including the absence of a low pT (thermal) photon enhancement in d+Au collisions. Attempts to understand the apparent equality of the energy loss of light and heavy quarks in the QGP by...

  7. Using Highlighting to Train Attentional Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roads, Brett; Mozer, Michael C; Busey, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring expertise in complex visual tasks is time consuming. To facilitate the efficient training of novices on where to look in these tasks, we propose an attentional highlighting paradigm. Highlighting involves dynamically modulating the saliency of a visual image to guide attention along the fixation path of a domain expert who had previously viewed the same image. In Experiment 1, we trained naive subjects via attentional highlighting on a fingerprint-matching task. Before and after training, we asked subjects to freely inspect images containing pairs of prints and determine whether the prints matched. Fixation sequences were automatically scored for the degree of expertise exhibited using a Bayesian discriminative model of novice and expert gaze behavior. Highlighted training causes gaze behavior to become more expert-like not only on the trained images but also on transfer images, indicating generalization of learning. In Experiment 2, to control for the possibility that the increase in expertise is due to mere exposure, we trained subjects via highlighting of fixation sequences from novices, not experts, and observed no transition toward expertise. In Experiment 3, to determine the specificity of the training effect, we trained subjects with expert fixation sequences from images other than the one being viewed, which preserves coarse-scale statistics of expert gaze but provides no information about fine-grain features. Observing at least a partial transition toward expertise, we obtain only weak evidence that the highlighting procedure facilitates the learning of critical local features. We discuss possible improvements to the highlighting procedure.

  8. Status and recent highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Wengler, Thorsten; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After a brief introduction the start-up of the ATLAS detector for 2016 data taking will be described, as well as its current status and performance, before discussing a selection of recent physics highlights.

  9. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2008 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report. The Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 613) is part of the Earth Sciences Division (Code 610), formerly the Earth Sun Exploration Division, under the Sciences and Exploration Directorate (Code 600) based at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. In line with NASA s Exploration Initiative, the Laboratory executes a comprehensive research and technology development program dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the atmospheres of Earth and other planets. The research program is aimed at understanding the influence of solar variability on the Earth s climate; predicting the weather and climate of Earth; understanding the structure, dynamics, and radiative properties of precipitation, clouds, and aerosols; understanding atmospheric chemistry, especially the role of natural and anthropogenic trace species on the ozone balance in the stratosphere and the troposphere; and advancing our understanding of physical properties of Earth s atmosphere. The research program identifies problems and requirements for atmospheric observations via satellite missions. Laboratory scientists conceive, design, develop, and implement ultraviolet, infrared, optical, radar, laser, and lidar technology for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Laboratory members conduct field measurements for satellite data calibration and validation, and carry out numerous modeling activities. These modeling activities include climate model simulations, modeling the chemistry and transport of trace species on regional-to-global scales, cloud-resolving models, and development of next-generation Earth system models. Interdisciplinary research is carried

  10. Cassini's Grand Finale and Recent Science Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda J.

    2017-06-01

    After almost 13 years in Saturn orbit, the Cassini-Huygens mission has entered its final year of data collection. Cassini will return its final bits of unique data on 15 September 2017 as it plunges into Saturn’s atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements.Since early 2016 Cassini’s orbital inclination was slowly increased towards its final inclination. In November Cassini transitioned to a series of 20 orbits with periapses just outside Saturn's F ring that included some of the closest flybys of the tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring.Cassini's final close flyby of Titan in April 2017 propelled it across Saturn’s main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale began in April 2017 and is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini is repeatedly diving between the innermost ring and Saturn's upper atmosphere providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. It is the first spacecraft to explore this region.These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles' composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on Saturn's interior structure and mass distribution in the rings. Probing the magnetic field will give insight into the nature of the magnetic dynamo and the true rotation rate of Saturn's interior. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer will sniff the exosphere and upper atmosphere and examine water-based molecules originating from the rings. The cosmic dust analyzer will sample particle composition from different parts of the main rings.Recent science highlights and science objectives from Cassini’s final orbits will be discussed.This work was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California

  11. South-central Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2005-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent south-central Alaska inventory conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). South-central Alaska has about 18.5 million acres, of which one-fifth (4 million acres) is forested. Species diversity is greatest in closed and open Sitka spruce forests, spruce...

  12. Palliativedrugs.com therapeutic highlights: gabapentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twycross Robert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the second in a series of highlights drawn from the www.palliativedrugs.com website. The website provides free access to the Palliative Care Formulary, a monthly newsletter and a bulletin board for advice to be given and received. With almost 10,000 professional members it is the largest palliative care resource of its kind.

  13. Research highlights: printing the future of microfabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Murray, Coleman; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-05-07

    In this issue we highlight emerging microfabrication approaches suitable for microfluidic systems with a focus on "additive manufacturing" processes (i.e. printing). In parallel with the now-wider availability of low cost consumer-grade 3D printers (as evidenced by at least three brands of 3D printers for sale in a recent visit to an electronics store in Akihabara, Tokyo), commercial-grade 3D printers are ramping to higher and higher resolution with new capabilities, such as printing of multiple materials of different transparency, and with different mechanical and electrical properties. We highlight new work showing that 3D printing (stereolithography approaches in particular) has now risen as a viable technology to print whole microfluidic devices. Printing on 2D surfaces such as paper is an everyday experience, and has been used widely in analytical chemistry for printing conductive materials on paper strips for glucose and other electrochemical sensors. We highlight recent work using electrodes printed on paper for digital microfluidic droplet actuation. Finally, we highlight recent work in which printing of membrane-bound droplets that interconnect through bilayer membranes may open up an entirely new approach to microfluidic manufacturing of soft devices that mimic physiological systems.

  14. Status and recent highlights from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Van Mulders, Petra Karel Ann

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Run-2 at a center of mass energy of 13 TeV started in 2015. This proceeding highlights some of the physics results based on the collision data collected by the CMS experiment in 2015. In addition, the status and readiness of the experiment for the collisions in 2016 are discussed with concrete examples on the object reconstruction performance.

  15. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  16. Teaching Literature to Highlight Social Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaan, Ram A.

    1989-01-01

    A second-year elective course for graduate social work students in which twentieth-century novels are used to highlight social issues is described. The relationships between art and social realities and literature's usefulness for social policy analysis are discussed. (Author/MSE)

  17. LibTech Highlights from ALA Midwinter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hane, Paula J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite lower attendance than in the past and blustery, cold weather, the American Library Association's Midwinter Meeting in Denver in January offered lots of news from industry vendors and lots of opportunities to discuss important issues and trends. In this report, the author highlights some of the most important product announcements with a…

  18. Students' reflections in a portfolio pilot: Highlighting professional issues.

    OpenAIRE

    Haffling, Ann-Christin; Beckman, Anders; Pahlmblad, Annika; Edgren, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Background: Portfolios are highlighted as potential assessment tools for professional competence. Although students' self-reflections are considered to be central in the portfolio, the content of reflections in practice-based portfolios is seldom analysed. Aim: To investigate whether students' reflections include sufficient dimensions of professional competence, notwithstanding a standardized portfolio format, and to evaluate students' satisfaction with the portfolio. Methods: Thi...

  19. Highlights from the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, A.J.M.; Schuurman, R.; Brule, A.J.C. van den

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the highlights of the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics held in Scheveningen, The Hague, The Netherlands, 12-14 October 2011. The areas covered included molecular diagnostics applications in medical microbiology, virology, pathology, hemato-oncology,clinical genetics

  20. Highlights from Johannesburg, Gauteng Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Although the extraction of mineral wealth has been the major influence in the history of Johannesburg and the surrounding Witwatersrand regions (with about 45% of all gold ever mined coming from there), the discovery of now-famous hominid fossils at the Sterkfontein Caves, and the convening of the world's largest-ever conference on environment and development, are setting a new stage for the future. The United Nations began the second Development and Environment Conference in Johannesburg on August 26, 2002. This meeting addresses the implementation of international goals to fight poverty and protect the global environment that were established at the first such conference held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. The Johannesburg summit involves about forty thousand participants, and perhaps 100 world leaders. One of several official opening ceremonies for the conference was held at the Sterkfontein Caves to recognize the outstanding universal value of the paleo-anthropological fossils found there.These views from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) highlight a number of the land use, vegetation, and geological features found within Gauteng Province (including the urban center of Johannesburg and the capital city Pretoria) and parts of the North West and Free State Provinces. The image on the right displays vegetation in red hues and is a false-color view utilizing data from MISR's near-infrared, red and blue bands. Both the natural-color view (left) and the false-color version were acquired by MISR's nadir camera on June 16, 2002. The urban areas appear as gray-colored pixels in the natural-color view, and exhibit colors corresponding with the relative abundance of vegetation found in the urban parts of this arid region.The mountains trending east-west near the center of the images extend from Pretoria in the east to Rustenberg in the west. These ranges, the Magaliesberg and Witwatersberg, separate the low-lying, hotter bushveld to the north from the cooler

  1. Highlights from H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Ryan C. G.

    2017-01-01

    In this proceeding, we briefly highlight the contributions to the 6th International Symposium on High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy that were on behalf of the H.E.S.S. Collaboration, with particular focus given to those results shown publicly for the first time at this symposium. Many of these new results were made possible by the improved capabilities of the H.E.S.S. II telescope array, namely its increased sensitivity to γ-rays and lower energy threshold. Other important results capitalized on the very large datasets accumulated by H.E.S.S. I observations over the last 12 years. Prominent highlights cover a diverse range of topics and astronomical objects: the Galactic center, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, shell-type supernova remnants, γ-ray binaries, unidentified sources, flat-spectrum radio quasars, blazars, gamma-ray bursts, fast radio bursts, neutrino event follow-up, and Lorentz invariance violation.

  2. Trends and highlights of VCI 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    This report attempts to summarize the presentations given at this conference. Topics related to R&D of gaseous and solid state detectors clearly point to several trends in particle physics instrumentation. More established techniques are represented by reports on recent experiments and facilities which can be considered the highlights in this research field. The extension of these techniques to space, arctic ice and deep sea are opening new frontiers of particle physics.

  3. Highlights of LHC experiments – Part I

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, Dave; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The superb performance of the LHC accelerator in 2016, in both live time and peak luminosity, has provided a large data sample of collisions at 13 TeV. Excellent performances of the ATLAS and LHCb detectors, together with highly performant offline and analysis systems, mean that a wealth of results are already available from 13 TeV data. Selected highlights are reported here.

  4. Physics highlights at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, the physics potential for the e+e- linear collider experiments ILC and CLIC is reviewed. The experimental conditions are compared to those at hadron colliders and their intrinsic value for precision experiments, complementary to the hadron colliders, is discussed. The detector concepts for ILC and CLIC are outlined in their most important aspects related to the precision physics. Highlights from the physics program and from the benchmark studies are given. It is shown that linear colliders are a promising tool, complementing the LHC in essential ways to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics.

  5. Highlights in the study of exoplanet atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Adam S

    2014-09-18

    Exoplanets are now being discovered in profusion. To understand their character, however, we require spectral models and data. These elements of remote sensing can yield temperatures, compositions and even weather patterns, but only if significant improvements in both the parameter retrieval process and measurements are made. Despite heroic efforts to garner constraining data on exoplanet atmospheres and dynamics, reliable interpretation has frequently lagged behind ambition. I summarize the most productive, and at times novel, methods used to probe exoplanet atmospheres; highlight some of the most interesting results obtained; and suggest various broad theoretical topics in which further work could pay significant dividends.

  6. Highlights in the Study of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Exoplanets are now being discovered in profusion. However, to understand their character requires spectral models and data. These elements of remote sensing can yield temperatures, compositions, and even weather patterns, but only if significant improvements in both the parameter retrieval process and measurements are achieved. Despite heroic efforts to garner constraining data on exoplanet atmospheres and dynamics, reliable interpretation has oftimes lagged ambition. I summarize the most productive, and at times novel, methods employed to probe exoplanet atmospheres, highlight some of the most interesting results obtained, and suggest various broad theoretical topics in which further work could pay significant dividends.

  7. Selected Highlights from Precision Studies in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Hans Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Recent highlights on precision measurements in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector are presented: the production cross section of jets, W and Z bosons, multi-bosons and top quark pairs, as well as single top production. Furthermore, the production of W and Z bosons and top quarks in association with jets is discussed and compared to state-of-art theory calculations. The latest measurements of the top quark mass and other properties, together with Standard Model parameters, will be reviewed.

  8. Highlights fra Tour de ledelse 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt Larsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Co-creation, ledelse af generation Y, HRM-begrebets udvikling og mellemlederen som organisationens nye helt. Det skortede ikke på spændende aktuelle temaer og indspark, da verdens største ledelseskonference – Academy of Management – løb af stablen tidligere på måneden i Florida, USA. CBS-professo......-professor Henrik Holt Larsen var med på første række for at opsnappe nye trends og landvindinger inden for HRM og god ledelse af virksomhedens menneskelige ressourcer. Her er hans highlights fra den storstilede konference....

  9. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation.

  10. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2015-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2013-June 2014 are presented. It was a busy year for news, most notably a U. S. Government shutdown for 16 days beginning October 1, 2013 due to the lack of an approved budget for FY2014. Even with this unusual government activity, the $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV Au+Au Run14 at RHIC was the best ever with integrated luminosity exceeding the sum of all previous runs. Additionally there was a brief He$^3$+Au run to continue the study of collective flow in small systems which was reinforced by new results presented on identified particle flow in d+Au. The other scientific highlights are also mostly concerned with ``soft (low $p_T$)'' physics complemented by the first preliminary results of reconstructed jets from hard-scattered partons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC . The measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions, which demonstrated last ye...

  11. Introducing Open Highlights: Highlighting Open Access Research from PLOS and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    PLOS Biology announces a new article type, Open Highlights, which uses a recent research article to nucleate a short synthesis of up to ten related research articles from other PLOS journals and from the wider Open Access corpus.

  12. Physical Sciences 2007 Science & Technology Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A U

    2008-04-07

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007.

  13. ARGO-YBJ: Status and Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, G

    2012-01-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment is in stable data taking since November 2007 at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm$^2$). ARGO-YBJ is facing open problems in Cosmic Ray (CR) physics in different ways. The search for CR sources is carried out by the observation of TeV gamma-ray sources both galactic and extra-galactic. The CR spectrum, composition and anisotropy are measured in a wide energy range (TeV - PeV) thus overlapping for the first time direct measurements. In this paper we summarize the current status of the experiment and describe some of the scientific highlights since 2007.

  14. Research highlights: microfluidics meets big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Weaver, Westbrook M; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Owsley, Keegan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-03-07

    In this issue we highlight a collection of recent work in which microfluidic parallelization and automation have been employed to address the increasing need for large amounts of quantitative data concerning cellular function--from correlating microRNA levels to protein expression, increasing the throughput and reducing the noise when studying protein dynamics in single-cells, and understanding how signal dynamics encodes information. The painstaking dissection of cellular pathways one protein at a time appears to be coming to an end, leading to more rapid discoveries which will inevitably translate to better cellular control--in producing useful gene products and treating disease at the individual cell level. From these studies it is also clear that development of large scale mutant or fusion libraries, automation of microscopy, image analysis, and data extraction will be key components as microfluidics contributes its strengths to aid systems biology moving forward.

  15. AGILE Data Center and AGILE science highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittori, C. [ASI Science Data Center, ESRIN, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); INAF-OAR, Via Frascati 33, I00040 Monte Porzio Catone (RM) (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    AGILE is a scientific mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) with INFN, INAF e CIFS participation, devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics. The satellite is in orbit since April 23rd, 2007. Gamma-ray astrophysics above 100 MeV is an exciting field of astronomical sciences that has received a strong impulse in recent years. Despite the small size and budget, AGILE produced several important scientific results, among which the unexpected discovery of strong and rapid gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula. This discovery won to the AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the prestigious Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012, an international recognition in the field of high energy astrophysics. We present here the AGILE data center main activities, and we give an overview of the AGILE scientific highlights after 5 years of operations.

  16. Research highlights: impacts of microplastics on plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Vivian S

    2016-02-01

    Each year, millions of metric tons of the plastic produced for food packaging, personal care products, fishing gear, and other human activities end up in lakes, rivers, and the ocean. The breakdown of these primary plastics in the environment results in microplastics, small fragments of plastic typically less than 1-5 mm in size. These synthetic particles have been detected in all of the world's oceans and also in many freshwater systems, accumulating in sediment, on shorelines, suspended in surface waters, and being ingested by plankton, fish, birds, and marine mammals. While the occurrence of plastics in surface waters has been surveyed in a number of studies, the impacts of microplastics on marine organisms are still being elucidated. This highlight features three recent publications that explore the interactions of microplastics with planktonic organisms to clarify the effects of these pollutants on some of the ocean's smallest and most important inhabitants.

  17. Highlights from the VERITAS AGN Observation Program

    CERN Document Server

    Benbow, Wystan

    2016-01-01

    The VERITAS array of four 12-m imaging atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes began full-scale operations in 2007, and is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of astrophysical very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma rays. Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are a major focus of the VERITAS Collaboration, and more than 60 AGN, primarily blazars, are known to emit VHE photons. Approximately 4000 hours have been devoted to the VERITAS AGN observation program, resulting in 34 detections. Most of these detections are accompanied by contemporaneous, broadband observations, enabling a more detailed study of the underlying jet-powered processes. Recent highlights of the VERITAS AGN observation program are presented.

  18. Highlights from the VERITAS AGN Observation Program

    CERN Document Server

    Benbow, Wystan

    2015-01-01

    The VERITAS array of four 12-m imaging atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes began full-scale operations in 2007, and is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of astrophysical VHE (E>100 GeV) $\\gamma$-rays. Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are a major focus of the VERITAS Collaboration, and more than 60 AGN, primarily blazars, are known to emit VHE photons. Approximately 3400 hours have been devoted to the VERITAS AGN observation program and roughly 160 AGN are already observed with the array, in most cases with the deepest VHE exposure to date. These observations have resulted in 34 detections, most of which are accompanied by contemporaneous, multi-wavelength observations, enabling a more detailed study of the underlying jet-powered processes. Recent highlights of the VERITAS AGN observation program, and the collaboration's long-term AGN observation strategy, are presented.

  19. Highlights from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes some highlights from the Pierre Auger Observatory that were presented at the ICRC 2011 in Beijing. The cumulative exposure has grown by more than 60% since the previous ICRC to above 21000 km^2 sr yr. Besides giving important updates on the energy spectrum, mass composition, arrival directions, and photon- and neutrino upper limits, we present first measurements of the energy spectrum down to 3 x 10^{17} eV, first distributions of the shower maximum, X_max, together with new surface detector related observables sensitive to X_max, and we present first measurements of the p-air cross section at ~ 10^{18} eV. Serendipity observations such as of atmospheric phenomena showing time evolutions of elves extend the breadth of the astrophysics research program.

  20. Comparison of solid highlighter materials for thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genest, M.; Forsyth, D.S. [National Research Council of Canada, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: marc.genest@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca; Maldague, X. [Univ. Laval, Electrical and Computing Engienering Dept., Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    Bare metal surfaces are difficult to inspect with flash thermography due to the high reflectivity and low emissivity of metal surfaces. Often black paint is used to prepare these surfaces for inspection. The additional time required to apply, dry, and then remove paint after inspection can be a significant barrier to using thermographic inspection techniques in these applications. This paper examines the use of solid 'highlighter' materials instead of paint to provide desirable surface characteristics and ease of use. Both positive pressure and vacuum methods were used to apply a variety of materials to metal test specimens, which were then inspected with a commercial pulsed flash thermography system. A vacuum-applied black latex material provided surface performance close to that of black paint without the extra burden of paint application and removal. (author)

  1. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  2. Highlights of Commission 37 Science Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Giovanni; de Grijs, Richard; Elmegreen, Bruce; Stetson, Peter; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Goodwin, Simon; Geisler, Douglas; Minniti, Dante

    2016-04-01

    It is widely accepted that stars do not form in isolation but result from the fragmentation of molecular clouds, which in turn leads to star cluster formation. Over time, clusters dissolve or are destroyed by interactions with molecular clouds or tidal stripping, and their members become part of the general field population. Star clusters are thus among the basic building blocks of galaxies. In turn, star cluster populations, from young associations and open clusters to old globulars, are powerful tracers of the formation, assembly, and evolutionary history of their parent galaxies. Although their importance (e.g., in mapping out the Milky Way) had been recognised for decades, major progress in this area has only become possible in recent years, both for Galactic and extragalactic cluster populations. Star clusters are the observational foundation for stellar astrophysics and evolution, provide essential tracers of galactic structure, and are unique stellar dynamical environments. Star formation, stellar structure, stellar evolution, and stellar nucleosynthesis continue to benefit and improve tremendously from the study of these systems. Additionally, fundamental quantities such as the initial mass function can be successfully derived from modelling either the Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams or the integrated velocity structures of, respectively, resolved and unresolved clusters and cluster populations. Star cluster studies thus span the fields of Galactic and extragalactic astrophysics, while heavily affecting our detailed understanding of the process of star formation in dense environments. This report highlights science results of the last decade in the major fields covered by IAU Commission 37: Star clusters and associations. Instead of focusing on the business meeting - the out-going president presentation can be found here: http://www.sc.eso.org/gcarraro/splinter2015.pdf - this legacy report contains highlights of the most important scientific achievements in

  3. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015 [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A. Richards

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS.

  4. An annual topic highlight: Alcohol and liver, 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalia A Osna

    2011-01-01

    An annual topic highlight: Alcohol and Liver, 2011, covers the important and new aspects of pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). It includes broad topics ranging from the exacerbation of ALD by infectious (viral) agents (hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus) to the influence of alcohol on liver fibrogenesis, lipid rafts, autophagy and other aspects. This issue is recommended for both basic scientists and clinicians who are involved in alcoholic liver research.

  5. Towards a Moon Village : Community Workshops Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    A series of Moon Village Workshops were organised at ESTEC and at ILEWG community events in 2015 and 2016. They gathered a multi-disciplinary group of professionals from all around the world to discuss their ideas about the concept of a Moon Village, the vision of ESA's Director General (DG) Jan Woerner of a permanent lunar base within the next decades [1]. Three working groups focused on 1) Moon Habitat Design; 2) science and technology potentials of the Moon Village, and 3) engaging stake-holders [2-3]. Their results and recommendations are presented in this abstract. The Moon Habitat Design group identified that the lunar base design is strongly driven by the lunar environment, which is characterized by high radiation, meteoroids, abrasive dust particles, low gravity and vacuum. The base location is recommended to be near the poles to provide optimized illumination conditions for power generation, permanent communication to Earth, moderate temperature gradients at the surface and interesting subjects to scientific investigations. The abundance of nearby available resources, especially ice at the dark bottoms of craters, can be exploited in terms of In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU). The identified infrastructural requirements include a navigation, data- & commlink network, storage facilities and sustainable use of resources. This involves a high degree of recycling, closed-loop life support and use of 3D-printing technology, which are all technologies with great potential for terrestrial spin-off applications. For the site planning of the Moon Village, proven ideas from urban planning on Earth should be taken into account. A couple of principles, which could improve the quality of a long-term living milieu on the Moon, are creating spacious environments, visibility between interior and exterior spaces, areas with flora, such as gardens and greenhouses, establishing a sustainable community and creating social places for astronauts to interact and relax. The

  6. STS-107 Flight Day 5 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The fifth day of the STS-107 space mission begins with a presentation of The Six Space Technology and Research Students (STARS) program experiments aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Students from Australia, China, Israel, Japan, Lichtenstein and The United States send scientific experiments into space. The video includes the progress of experiments with various insects including silkworms, carpenter bees, ants, fish, and spiders.

  7. LHC Highlights, from dream to reality

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The idea of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was born in the early 1980s. Although LEP (CERN’s previous large accelerator) was still under construction at that time, scientists were already starting to think about re-using the 27-kilometre ring for an even more powerful machine. Turning this ambitious scientific plan into reality proved to be an immensely complex task. Civil engineering work, state-of-the-art technologies, a new approach to data storage and analysis: many people worked hard for many years to accomplish all this.   Here are some of the highlights: 1984. A symposium organized in Lausanne, Switzerland, is the official starting point for the LHC. LHC prototype of the two beam pipes (1992). 1989. The first embryonic collaborations begin. 1992. A meeting in Evian, France, marks the beginning of the LHC experiments. 1994. The CERN Council approves the construction of the LHC accelerator. 1995. Japan becomes an Observer of CERN and announces a financial contribution to ...

  8. AGILE Highlights after Six Years in Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Pittori

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AGILE is an ASI space mission in collaboration with INAF, INFN and CIFS, dedicated to the observation of the gamma-ray Universe in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV energy range, with simultaneous X-ray imaging capability in the 18-60 keV band. The AGILE satellite was launched on April 23rd, 2007, and produced several important scientic results, among which the unexpected discovery of strong ares from the Crab Nebula. This discovery won to the AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012 by the High Energy Astrophysics division of the American Astronomical Society. Thanks to its sky monitoring capability and fast ground segment alert system, AGILE detected many Galactic and extragalactic sources: among other results AGILE discovered gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-3, detected many bright blazars, discovered several new gamma-ray pulsars, and discovered emission up to 100 MeV from Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes. We present an overview of the main AGILE Data Center activities and the AGILE scientic highlights after 6 years of operations.

  9. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2014-June 2015 are presented. The news this year was mostly very positive. The major event at BNL was the startup and dedication of the new NSLS II, "the World's brightest Synchrotron Light Source". The operation of RHIC was outstanding with a polarized p+p run at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV with integrated luminosity that exceeded the sum of all previous p+p integrated luminosity at this $\\sqrt{s}$. For the first time at RHIC asymmetric p+Au and p+Al runs were made but the p+Al run caused damage in the PHENIX forward detectors from quenches that were inadequately shielded for this first p+A run. This was also the 10th anniversary of the 2005 announcement of the Perfect Liquid Quark Gluon Plasma at RHIC and a review is presented of the discoveries leading to this claim. A new result on net-charge fluctuations (with no particle identification) from PHENIX based on previous scans ov...

  10. Active Reading Procedures for Moderating the Effects of Poor Highlighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, Vicki S.; Herring, Daniel; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Kreiner, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated two active reading techniques intended to eliminate the negative effect on reading comprehension of preexisting, inappropriate highlighting. College students read passages in three highlighting conditions: no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, and inappropriate highlighting. In Experiment 1, 30 students read the passages while…

  11. Mars geologic mapping program: Review and highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David H.

    1991-06-01

    The Mars Geologic Mapping (MGM) Program was introduced by NASA in 1987 as a new initiative in the Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) Program. The overall purpose of the program is to support research on topical science problems that address specific questions. Among the objectives of the project are: (1) to produce highly detailed geologic maps that will greatly increase the knowledge of the materials and processes that have contributed to the evolutionary history of Mars; (2) to define areas of special interest for possible future investigation by planned missions (Mars Observer, Mars Sample Return); and (3) to maintain the interest of the planetary community in the development of new concepts and the re-evaluation of Martian geology as new data in usable form become available. Some interesting highlights of the geologic mapping indicate that multiple flood episodes occurred at different times during the Hesperian Period in both Kasei and Maja Valles. Studies of small channels in the Memnonia, Mangala, and Tharsis regions show that fluvial events appear to have occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters from Mangala Valles may have seeped into surficial materials with the subsequent development of numerous sapping channels and debris flows; this suggests that the ancient highland terrain consists of relatively unconsolidated materials. Multiple layers were observed for the first time in the ridged plains lava flows covering large areas of Lunae Planum; some wrinkle ridges in this area are associated with grabens and collapse volcanic units at Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae indicates that the units may have been emplaced by gravity-driven pyroclastic flows. Unlike the north polar layered deposits, those in the south polar region show no angular unconformities or evidence of faulting and folding. Water ice in the south polar layered deposits may be protected

  12. Mars geologic mapping program: Review and highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David H.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Geologic Mapping (MGM) Program was introduced by NASA in 1987 as a new initiative in the Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) Program. The overall purpose of the program is to support research on topical science problems that address specific questions. Among the objectives of the project are: (1) to produce highly detailed geologic maps that will greatly increase the knowledge of the materials and processes that have contributed to the evolutionary history of Mars; (2) to define areas of special interest for possible future investigation by planned missions (Mars Observer, Mars Sample Return); and (3) to maintain the interest of the planetary community in the development of new concepts and the re-evaluation of Martian geology as new data in usable form become available. Some interesting highlights of the geologic mapping indicate that multiple flood episodes occurred at different times during the Hesperian Period in both Kasei and Maja Valles. Studies of small channels in the Memnonia, Mangala, and Tharsis regions show that fluvial events appear to have occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters from Mangala Valles may have seeped into surficial materials with the subsequent development of numerous sapping channels and debris flows; this suggests that the ancient highland terrain consists of relatively unconsolidated materials. Multiple layers were observed for the first time in the ridged plains lava flows covering large areas of Lunae Planum; some wrinkle ridges in this area are associated with grabens and collapse volcanic units at Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae indicates that the units may have been emplaced by gravity-driven pyroclastic flows. Unlike the north polar layered deposits, those in the south polar region show no angular unconformities or evidence of faulting and folding. Water ice in the south polar layered deposits may be protected

  13. A highlight of recent advances in immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG DeXian

    2011-01-01

    To celebrate the 60th anniversary of SCIENCE CHINA,six research groups of overseas and domestic Chinese immunologists published a series of review articles (SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences,2010,53(2):157-158),which highlighted recent advances and their contributions to immunology.Wang YaYa in Prof.Cheng GenHong's group,who discovered the function of TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) and other signal molecules in Toll-like receptor (TLR) mediated signaling pathway and innate immunity [1],reviewed TRAF-mediated regulation of immune and inflammatory responses [2].TRAF family consists of six mammalian members (TRAF1,TRAF2,TRAF3,TRAF4,TRAF5,and TRAF6) and participates in signal transduction of a large number of receptor families such as TNF receptor family (TNFR) and TLR-interleukin-1 receptor (TLR-IL-1R)family.Upon receptor-mediated activation,TRAFs are directly or indirectly recruited to the intracellular domains of these receptors and subsequently combine with other signaling molecules to activate the inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK) complex,TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and the inducible Iκ B kinase (IKK-i),ultimately leading to activation of transcription factors,such as NF-κB,interferon-regulatory factor (IRF),to induce immune or inflammatory responses.In the past few years,immunologists have demonstrated the central role of TRAFs in inflammation,innate immunity.

  14. Cluster recent highlights in magnetospheric physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C. Philippe; Laakso, Harri; Goldstein, Mevlyn; Masson, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    After more than 15 years in space, the Cluster mission is continuing to deliver groundbreaking results, thanks to its ability to move the four spacecraft with respect to each other, according to the science topic to be studied. The main goal of the Cluster mission, made of four identical spacecraft carrying each 11 complementary instruments, is to study in three dimensions the key plasma processes at work in the main regions of the Earth's environment: solar wind and bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail, and auroral zone. During the course of the mission, the relative distance between the four spacecraft has been varied more than 55 times from a few km up to 36000 km to address the various scientific objectives. The smallest distance achieved between two Cluster spacecraft was 3.1 km in December 2015, about 50 times smaller than planned at the beginning of the mission. The rate of change of separation distances has accelerated in the last few years with the Guest Investigator programme that allowed scientists in the community to propose special science programmes requiring a new spacecraft constellation. We will present recent science highlights obtained such as solar wind reconnection and bifurcated current sheet development, multi-altitude measurements of field aligned currents, reconnection efficiency in accelerating particles and effect of cold ions, motion of X-lines, speed and direction of tail reconnection events, flux transfer events evolution, new method to find magnetic nulls outside the Cluster tetrahedron, interplanetary shock waves very quick damping and origin of theta auroras. We will also present the distribution of data through the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS), and the Cluster Science Archive (CSA). CSA was implemented to provide, for the first time for a plasma physics mission, a permanent and public archive of all the high-resolution data from all instruments.

  15. Chemical Engineering Division research highlights, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-08-01

    Separate abstracts are included for sections with information on lithium/metal sulfide batteries; electrochemical energy development; advanced fuel cell development; utilization of coal; magnetohydrodynamics technology; LMFBR and GCFR support work; fuel cycle studies; fusion reactor research; solar energy development; and basic energy science.

  16. STS-69 flight day 6 highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    After being awakened by the Beatles song, 'A Hard Days Night', the flightcrew of the STS-69 mission, Cmdr. Dave Walker, Pilot Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Jim Voss, Jim Newman, and Mike Gernhardt, began their sixth day in orbit by monitoring the free orbiting Wake Shield Facility (WSF). Later Cmdr. Walker conducted an interview with television reporters from Atlanta and Boston, answering questions about the mission and general questions about NASA's space program. The crew filmed a video fo themselves performing daily routines (eating, shaving, exercising), as well as some of the physiological experiments, and shuttle equipment maintenance and checkout. One of the secondary experiments included the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus-7 (CGBA-7), which served as an incubator and experiment station for a variety of tests (agricultural, pharmaceutical, biomedical, and environmental). Earth views included some cloud cover, the Gulf of Mexico, Texas, and the Atlantic Ocean.

  17. STS-107 Flight Day 13 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This video shows the activities of the STS-107 crew on flight day 13 of the Columbia orbiter's final mission. The crew members include: Rick Husband, Commander; William McCool, Pilot; Kalpana Chawla, David Brown, Michael Anderson, Laurel Clark, Mission Specialists; Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist. The primary activities of flight day 13 are spaceborne experiments, including troubleshooting undertaken by Mission Specialist Chawla on the Water Mist Fire Suppression (MIST) experiment. Chawla performs troubleshooting tasks relayed to her by Mission Control. She shows Mission Control the location of air and water in a transparent hose that is part of the atomizer on the exterior of the combustion module. She also changes the atomizer head. All six Space Technology and Research Students (STARS) experiments are profiled in the video. These experiments are on ants, crystal growth in a chemical garden, fish embryos, carpenter bees, spiders, and silkworms. The video also includes a view of the southeast Texas coast near Houston, and a view of Portugal, Spain, Gibraltar, Morocco, and the Sahara Desert. The video ends with an explanation of roses at Mission Control which commemorate astronauts who have died on missions.

  18. Electric transport in the Netherlands. Highlights 2012; Elektrisch vervoer in Nederland. Highlights 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    Businesses, social and educational institutions and governmental institutes work together to accelerate electric transport and to discover and exploit economic opportunities. In 2012, many activities were carried out and results achieved, of which the highlights are presented in this brochure [Dutch] Bedrijfsleven, maatschappelijke- en kennisinstellingen en overheden werken samen aan versnelling van elektrisch vervoer en het ontdekken en benutten van economische kansen. In 2012 werden veel activiteiten uitgevoerd en resultaten geboekt, waarvan in deze brochure verslag wordt gedaan.

  19. Highlights of the SM Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Haijun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This talk shows the recent highlights of the SM physics from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. It includes the precision measurements of diboson, triboson, vector boson scattering, and indirect search for new physics via anomalous triple/quartic gauge boson couplings etc. Some latest results from LHC Run2 @ 13 TeV will also be presented. The talk was invited to present at the 5th KIAS Workshop on Particle Physics and Cosmology in Seoul on November 9-13, 2015.

  20. Highlights of the GURI hydroelectric plant computer control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Monte, R.; Banakar, H.; Hoffman, R.; Lebeau, M.; Schroeder, R.

    1988-07-01

    The GURI power plant on the Caroni river in Venezuela has 20 generating units with a total capacity of 10,000 MW, the largest currently operating in the world. The GURI Computer Control System (GCS) provides for comprehensive operation management of the entire power plant and the adjacent switchyards. This article describes some highlights of the functions of the state-of-the-art system. The topics considered include the operating modes of the remote terminal units (RTUs), automatic start/stop of generating units, RTU closed-loop control, automatic generation and voltage control, unit commitment, operator training stimulator, and maintenance management.

  1. Secretary's annual report to Congress. Volume II. Budget highlights, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    DOE budget requests for FY 1982 is summarized and then detailed. Budget highlights of the energy programs include: conservation; research, development, and applications (fossil energy, solar, electric energy and energy storage systems, magnetic fusion, nuclear fission, environment); regulation and energy information; direct energy production, and strategic petroleum reserves. Additional programs and their budget requests are given for: general science, defense activities, and departmental administration. The FY 1981 supplemental and recission request is indicated. Special budget analyses are given for Federal fossil, Federal solar, nuclear waste, conservation, and alternative fuels activities programs. The organizational table is presented. Extensive statistics are presented in the appendix. (MCW)

  2. Realizing a Clean Energy Future: Highlights of NREL Analysis (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-12-01

    Profound energy system transformation is underway. In Hawaiian mythology, Maui set out to lasso the sun in order to capture its energy. He succeeded. That may have been the most dramatic leap forward in clean energy systems that the world has known. Until now. Today, another profound transformation is underway. A combination of forces is taking us from a carbon-centric, inefficient energy system to one that draws from diverse energy sources - including the sun. NREL analysis is helping guide energy systems policy and investment decisions through this transformation. This brochure highlights NREL analysis accomplishments in the context of four thematic storylines.

  3. Highlight Talk: Recent Results from VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Ong, R A; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Boltuch, D; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Chow, Y C; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Duke, C; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Toner, J A; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2009-01-01

    VERITAS is a state-of-the-art ground-based gamma-ray observatory that operates in the very high-energy (VHE) region of 100 GeV to 50 TeV. The observatory consists of an array of four 12m-diameter imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located in southern Arizona, USA. The four-telescope array has been fully operational since September 2007, and over the last two years, VERITAS has been operating with high efficiency and with excellent performance. This talk summarizes the recent results from VERITAS, including the discovery of eight new VHE gamma-ray sources.

  4. Trade Performance: Highlights in the Crisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Figure On January 13, China Customs issued the annual profile of China's foreign trade,including import and export, in 2008. According to the Customs statistics, trade volume last year amounted to US$2.562trillion, a year-on-year growth of 17.8%.In the total amount, value of US$1.42 trillion goes for China's export growth, 17.2% up, while the import takes up US$1.13trillion, 18.5% up. The trade surplus stood at US$295.47 billion in 2008, increased by 12.5% year-on-year, with the net increase value of US$32.83 billion.

  5. 2016 Science Mission Directorate Technology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The role of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is to enable NASA to achieve its science goals in the context of the nation's science agenda. SMD's strategic decisions regarding future missions and scientific pursuits are guided by agency goals, input from the science community including the recommendations set forth in the National Research Council (NRC) decadal surveys and a commitment to preserve a balanced program across the major science disciplines. Toward this end, each of the four SMD science divisions -- Heliophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics -- develops fundamental science questions upon which to base future research and mission programs.

  6. People and computers--some recent highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackel, B

    2000-12-01

    This paper aims to review selectively a fair proportion of the literature on human-computer interaction (HCI) over the three years since Shackel (J. Am. Soc. Inform. Sci. 48 (11) (1997) 970-986). After a brief note of history I discuss traditional input, output and workplace aspects, the web and 'E-topics', web-related aspects, virtual reality, safety-critical systems, and the need to move from HCI to human-system integration (HSI). Finally I suggest, and consider briefly, some future possibilities and issues including web consequences, embedded ubiquitous computing, and 'back to systems ergonomics?'.

  7. STS-107 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This video shows the activities of the STS-107 crew (Rick Husband, Commander; William McCool, Pilot; Kalpana Chawla, David Brown, Michael Anderson, Laurel Clark, Mission Specialists, Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist) during flight day 8 of the Columbia orbiter's final flight. The primary activities of flight day 8 are spaceborne experiments. Some background information is given on the SOFBALL (Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number) microgravity experiment as footage of the flame balls is shown. The video also shows the MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) calibrating on the Moon. The six STARS (Space Technology and Research Students) international student experiments are profiled, including experiments on carpenter bees (Liechtenstein), spiders (Australia), silkworms (China), ants (United States), crystal growth (Israel), and fish embryos (Japan). A commercial experiment on roses is also profiled. Astronaut Clark gives a tour of the SpaceHab RDM (Research Double Module), in the space shuttle's payload bay. Astronauts McCool and Ramon take turns on an exercise machine. The video includes a partly cloudy view of the Pacific Ocean.

  8. Tevatron accelerator physics and operation highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Valishev, A

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the Tevatron collider demonstrated continuous growth over the course of Run II, with the peak luminosity reaching 4\\times1032 cm-2 s-1, and the weekly integration rate exceeding 70 pb-1. This report presents a review of the most important advances that contributed to this performance improvement, including beam dynamics modeling, precision optics measurements and stability control, implementation of collimation during low-beta squeeze. Algorithms employed for optimization of the luminosity integration are presented and the lessons learned from high-luminosity operation are discussed. Studies of novel accelerator physics concepts at the Tevatron are described, such as the collimation techniques using crystal collimator and hollow electron beam, and compensation of beam-beam effects.

  9. FY 1997 congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This is an overview of the 1997 budget request for the US DOE. The topics of the overview include a policy overview, the budget by business line, business lines by organization, crosswalk from business line to appropriation, summary by appropriation, energy supply research and development, uranium supply and enrichment activities, uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund, general science and research, weapons activities, defense environmental restoration and waste management, defense nuclear waste disposal, departmental administration, Office of the Inspector General, power marketing administrations, Federal Energy Regulatory commission, nuclear waste disposal fund, fossil energy research and development, naval petroleum and oil shale reserves, energy conservation, economic regulation, strategic petroleum reserve, energy information administration, clean coal technology and a Department of Energy Field Facilities map.

  10. STS-110 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    On Flight Day 8 of the STS-110 mission, the combined members of the Atlantis STS-110 crew and the International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 4 crew, Commanders Michael J. Bloomfield and Yury I. Onufrienko, respectively, answer questions posed to them by press members on the ground. Topics covered include: challenges of long term space habitation, adequacy of training for the on-orbit construction of the space station, details on the Mobile Transporter (MT) railcar system. Footage of the MT directly precedes and follows the extended question and answer portion of the video. The MT is seen from a variety of angles, as it slowly moves from Workstation 4 to Workstation 5 in order to test its ability to grapple to a fixed point along the track. The MT will eventually be used as a base for the robot arm in order to perform maintenance and assembly tasks on the ISS.

  11. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch 2005 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based); spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning; attitude analysis; attitude determination and sensor calibration; and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  12. STS-107 Flight Day 9 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This video shows the activities of the STS-107 crew (Rick Husband, Commander; William McCool, Pilot; Kalpana Chawla, David Brown, Michael Anderson, Laurel Clark, Mission Specialists; Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist) during flight day 9 of the Columbia orbiter's final flight. The primary activities of flight day 9 are spaceborne experiments. The video shows a commercial experiment on roses, a partial view of Africa from Libya to the Horn of Africa through the MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment), and the FAST (Facility for Absorption and Surface Tension) experiment. The STARS (Space Technology and Research Students) international student experiments are shown. The preliminary results of these experiments on the effects of microgravity on silkworms, spiders, crystal growth, fish embryos, carpenter bees, and ants are discussed. The video includes a view of southern Spain and the Mediterranean Sea.

  13. STS-69 flight day 9 highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The song, 'He's A Tramp', from the Walt Disney cartoon movie, 'Lady and the Tramp', awakened the astronauts, Cmdr. Dave Walker, Pilot Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Jim Voss, Jim Newman, and Mike Gernhardt, on the ninth day of the STS-69 mission. The Wake Shield Facility (WSF) was again unberthed from the shuttle cargo bay and , using the shuttle's robot arm, held over the side of the shuttle for five hours where it collected data on the electrical field build-up around the spacecraft as part of the Charging Hazards and Wake Studies Experiment (CHAWS). Voss and Gernhardt rehearsed their Extravehicular Activity (EVA) spacewalk, which was planned for the next day. Earth views included cloud cover, a hurricane, and its eye.

  14. Highlights from the prostate cancer genome report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shyh-Han Tan; Gyorgy Petrovics; Shiv Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    @@ Prostate cancer (Cap) is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer of men worldwide (899 000 new cases,13.6% of the total),with nearly 75% of the registered cases occurring in developed countries (644000 cases).1 Blood prostate-specific antigen test has revolutionized the early detection of Cap and organ-confined Cap is effectively managed by state-of-the-art treatments including radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy.2 In the past decade,tremendous progress has also been made in our understanding of the biology and common genomicalterations in Cap 3.4 New molecular marker assays have promise in improving CaP diagnosis.Despite these advances,major challenges remain with our ability to distinguish indolent cancers from the more aggressive cancers detected early due to widely used prostate-specific antigen test.Furthermore,development of molecular stratification of CaP for targeted and more effective therapies is critically needed.

  15. Highlights of the NASA particle astrophysics program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, William Vernon, E-mail: w.vernon.jones@nasa.gov [Astrophysics Division DH000, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington DC (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The NASA Particle Astrophysics Program covers Origin of the Elements, Nearest Sources of Cosmic Rays, How Cosmic Particle Accelerators Work, The Nature of Dark Matter, and Neutrino Astrophysics. Progress in each of these topics has come from sophisticated instrumentation flown on long duration balloon (LDB) flights around Antarctica over the past two decades. New opportunities including Super Pressure Balloons (SPB) and International Space Station (ISS) platforms are emerging for the next major step. Stable altitudes and long durations enabled by SPB flights ensure ultra-long duration balloon (ULDB) missions that can open doors to new science opportunities. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) has been operating on the ISS since May 2011. The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) and Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiments are being developed for launch to the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) in 2015. And, the Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) is planned for launch to the ISS JEM-EF after 2017. Collectively, these four complementary ISS missions covering a large portion of the cosmic ray energy spectrum serve as a cosmic ray observatory. (author)

  16. STS-114 Flight Day 6 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Day 6 is a relatively quiet day for the STS-114 crew. The main responsibility for crew members of Space Shuttle Discovery (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) and the Expedition 11 crew of the International Space Station (ISS) (Commander Sergei Krikalev and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer John Phillips) is to unload supplies from the shuttle payload bay and from the Raffaello Multipurpose Logistics Module onto the ISS. Several of the astronauts answer interview questions from the news media, with an emphasis on the significance of their mission for the Return to Flight, shuttle damage and repair, and the future of the shuttle program. Thomas announces the winners of an essay contest for Australian students about the importance of science and mathematics education. The video includes the installation of a stowage rack for the Human Research Facility onboard the ISS, a brief description of the ISS modules, and an inverted view of the Nile Delta.

  17. Roaming earthquakes in China highlight midcontinental hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mian; Wang, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Before dawn on 28 July 1976, a magnitude (M) 7.8 earthquake struck Tangshan, a Chinese industrial city only 150 kilometers from Beijing (Figure 1a). In a brief moment, the earthquake destroyed the entire city and killed more than 242,000 people [Chen et al., 1988]. More than 30 years have passed, and upon the ruins a new Tangshan city has been built. However, the memory of devastation remains fresh. For this reason, a sequence of recent small earthquakes in the Tangshan region, including an M 4.8 event on 28 May and an M 4.0 event on 18 June 2012, has caused widespread concerns and heated debate in China. In the science community, the debate is whether the recent Tangshan earthquakes are the aftershocks of the 1976 earthquake despite the long gap in time since the main shock or harbingers of a new period of active seismicity in Tangshan and the rest of North China, where seismic activity seems to fluctuate between highs and lows over periods of a few decades [Ma, 1989].

  18. Briefing highlights space weather risks to GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-07-01

    Solar storms, which are expected to increase as the Sun nears the most active phase of the solar cycle, can disrupt a variety of technologies on which society relies. Speakers at a 22 June briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D. C., focused on how space weather can affect the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is used in a wide range of industries, including commercial air travel, agriculture, national security, and emergency response. Rocky Stone, chief technical pilot for United Airlines, noted that GPS allows more aircraft to be in airspace, saves fuel, and helps aircraft move safely on runways. “Improvements in space weather forecasting need to be pursued,” he said. Precision GPS has also “changed the whole nature of farming,” said Ron Hatch, Director of Navigation Systems, NavCom Technology/John Deere. GPS makes it possible for tractors to be driven in the most efficient paths and for fertilizer and water to be applied precisely to the areas that most need them. Space weather-induced degradation of GPS signals can cause significant loss to farms that rely on GPS. Elizabeth Zimmerman, Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Response and Recovery at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), described how FEMA relies on GPS for disaster recovery. The agency is developing an operations plan for dealing with space weather, she said.

  19. Highlighting Astyanax Species Diversity through DNA Barcoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carlos Alexandre Miranda; de Melo, Filipe Augusto Gonçalves; Bertaco, Vinicius de Araújo; de Astarloa, Juan M. Díaz; Rosso, Juan J.; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been used extensively to solve taxonomic questions and identify new species. Neotropical fishes are found in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, with a large number of species yet to be described, many of which are very difficult to identify. Characidae is the most species-rich family of the Characiformes, and many of its genera are affected by taxonomic uncertainties, including the widely-distributed, species-rich genus Astyanax. In this study, we present an extensive analysis of Astyanax covering almost its entire area of occurrence, based on DNA barcoding. The use of different approaches (ABGD, GMYC and BIN) to the clustering of the sequences revealed ample consistency in the results obtained by the initial cutoff value of 2% divergence for putative species in the Neighbor-Joining analysis using the Kimura-2-parameter model. The results indicate the existence of five Astyanax lineages. Some groups, such as that composed by the trans-Andean forms, are mostly composed of well-defined species, and in others a number of nominal species are clustered together, hampering the delimitation of species, which in many cases proved impossible. The results confirm the extreme complexity of the systematics of the genus Astyanax and show that DNA barcoding can be an useful tool to address these complexes questions. PMID:27992537

  20. STS-112 Flight Day 4 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    On the fourth day of STS-112, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) onboard Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) are seen preparing for the installation of the S1 truss structure. Inside the Destiny Laboratory Module, Korzun and other crewmembers are seen as they busily prepare for the work of the day. Sellers dons an oxygen mask and uses an exercise machine in order to purge the nitrogen from his bloodstream, in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Whitson uses the ISS's Canadarm 2 robotic arm to grapple the S1 truss and remove it from Atlantis' payload bay, with the assistance of Magnus. Using the robotic arm, Whitson slowly maneuvers the 15 ton truss structure into alignment with its attachment point on the starboard side of the S0 truss structure, where the carefully orchestrated mating procedures take place. There is video footage of the entire truss being rotated and positioned by the arm, and ammonia tank assembly on the structure is visible, with Earth in the background. Following the completion of the second stage capture, the robotic arm is ungrappled from truss. Sellers and Wolf are shown exiting the the Quest airlock hatch to begin their EVA. They are shown performing a variety of tasks on the now attached S1 truss structure, including work on the Crew Equipment Translation Cart (CETA), the S-band Antenna Assembly, and umbilical cables that provide power and remote operation capability to cameras. During their EVA, they are shown using a foot platform on the robotic arm. Significant portions of their activities are shown from the vantage of helmet mounted video cameras. The video closes with a final shot of the ISS and its new S1 truss.

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  2. Coated Particle and Deep Burn Fuels Monthly Highlights December 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for November 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/323, was distributed to program participants on December 9, 2010. The final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU (transuranic elements) Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing (ORNL); (4) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling (ORNL).

  3. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  4. Highlights of top quark cross-section measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Berta, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The highlights of the measurements of top quark production in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The inclusive measurements of the top-pair production cross section have reached high precision and are compared to the best available theoretical calculations. The differential cross section measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top-pair production in the TeV regime. The results are compared to Monte Carlo generators implementing LO and NLO matrix elements matched with parton showers. Measurements of the single top quark production cross section are presented in the t-channel and s-channel, and with associated production with a W boson. For the t-channel production, results on the ratio between top quark and antitop quark production cross sections and differential measurements are also included.

  5. Optical modulator including grapene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  6. Antibacterial agents: patent highlights January to June 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Oludotun A

    2004-08-01

    This review presents highlights of 32 patents, published between January and June 2004, detailing different classes of antibacterial agents. Disclosures on novel oxazolidinone derivatives with antibacterial activity continue to dominate patent publications in recent years. Novel oxazolidinone derivatives active against linezolid-resistant cocci are reviewed. Patents on beta-lactam antibiotics focused mainly on developing new processes and formulations to improve cost, purity and pharmacokinetic parameters of existing clinical agents. Disclosures on novel potential dual-acting macrolide-quinolone hybrids designed to overcome erythromycin resistance, and new macrolide derivatives with antimycobacterial activity are described. Also presented are novel antibacterial agents, including peptide deformylase and cell-wall inhibitors, and those with undefined mechanisms of action as potential lead compounds, as well as quinolone and quinoline derivatives.

  7. FY 1995 research highlights: PNL accomplishments in OER programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducts fundamental and applied research in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) core missions in science and technology, environmental quality, energy resources, and national security. Much of this research is funded by the program offices of DOE`s Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER), primarily the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), and by PNL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This document is a collection of research highlights that describe PNL`s accomplishments in DOE-ER funded programs during Fiscal Year 1995. Included are accomplishments in research funded by OHER`s Analytical Technologies, Environmental Research, Health Effects, General Life Sciences, and Carbon Dioxide Research programs; BES`s Materials Science, Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geoscience, and Applied Mathematical Sciences programs; and PNL`s LDRD Program. Summaries are given for 70 projects.

  8. Highlights from the 2013 national cancer research institute conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Cancer research is a multifaceted endeavour that incorporates not only a myriad of techniques and specialties but also encompasses a huge range of disease types. The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK partnership comprising 21 charity and government funders of cancer research along with the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry. Each year, the NCRI hosts the largest cancer meeting in the UK; bringing together members of the UK cancer research community, research leaders from around the world, health professionals, service users, research funders, and industry to discuss the latest findings in cancer research from a wide range of disciplines. The 2013 NCRI Conference attracted over 1700 delegates and 150 speakers from 15 different countries. The conference programme covered a large range of topic areas including prevention, screening, model systems, the provision of information, survivorship, and end-of-life care. This conference report gives an overview of the plenary sessions at the conference as well as highlights from the parallel sessions.

  9. Visual Impairment, Including Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Knows What? Survey Item Bank Search for: Visual Impairment, Including Blindness Links updated, April 2017 En ... doesn’t wear his glasses. Back to top Visual Impairments in Children Vision is one of our ...

  10. PNNL Highlights for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (July 2013-July 2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Warren, Pamela M.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2014-08-13

    This report includes research highlights of work funded in part or whole by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as well as selected leadership accomplishments.

  11. Stereoscopic highlighting: 2D graph visualization on stereo displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Basak; Höllerer, Tobias; Kuchera-Morin, JoAnn; Forbes, Angus

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present a new technique and prototype graph visualization system, stereoscopic highlighting, to help answer accessibility and adjacency queries when interacting with a node-link diagram. Our technique utilizes stereoscopic depth to highlight regions of interest in a 2D graph by projecting these parts onto a plane closer to the viewpoint of the user. This technique aims to isolate and magnify specific portions of the graph that need to be explored in detail without resorting to other highlighting techniques like color or motion, which can then be reserved to encode other data attributes. This mechanism of stereoscopic highlighting also enables focus+context views by juxtaposing a detailed image of a region of interest with the overall graph, which is visualized at a further depth with correspondingly less detail. In order to validate our technique, we ran a controlled experiment with 16 subjects comparing static visual highlighting to stereoscopic highlighting on 2D and 3D graph layouts for a range of tasks. Our results show that while for most tasks the difference in performance between stereoscopic highlighting alone and static visual highlighting is not statistically significant, users performed better when both highlighting methods were used concurrently. In more complicated tasks, 3D layout with static visual highlighting outperformed 2D layouts with a single highlighting method. However, it did not outperform the 2D layout utilizing both highlighting techniques simultaneously. Based on these results, we conclude that stereoscopic highlighting is a promising technique that can significantly enhance graph visualizations for certain use cases.

  12. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  13. Integrative Data Mining Highlights Candidate Genes for Monogenic Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Osorio Abath; Tassy, Olivier; Biancalana, Valérie; Zanoteli, Edmar; Pourquié, Olivier; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Inherited myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disabling disorders with still barely understood pathological mechanisms. Around 40% of afflicted patients remain without a molecular diagnosis after exclusion of known genes. The advent of high-throughput sequencing has opened avenues to the discovery of new implicated genes, but a working list of prioritized candidate genes is necessary to deal with the complexity of analyzing large-scale sequencing data. Here we used an integrative data mining strategy to analyze the genetic network linked to myopathies, derive specific signatures for inherited myopathy and related disorders, and identify and rank candidate genes for these groups. Training sets of genes were selected after literature review and used in Manteia, a public web-based data mining system, to extract disease group signatures in the form of enriched descriptor terms, which include functional annotation, human and mouse phenotypes, as well as biological pathways and protein interactions. These specific signatures were then used as an input to mine and rank candidate genes, followed by filtration against skeletal muscle expression and association with known diseases. Signatures and identified candidate genes highlight both potential common pathological mechanisms and allelic disease groups. Recent discoveries of gene associations to diseases, like B3GALNT2, GMPPB and B3GNT1 to congenital muscular dystrophies, were prioritized in the ranked lists, suggesting a posteriori validation of our approach and predictions. We show an example of how the ranked lists can be used to help analyze high-throughput sequencing data to identify candidate genes, and highlight the best candidate genes matching genomic regions linked to myopathies without known causative genes. This strategy can be automatized to generate fresh candidate gene lists, which help cope with database annotation updates as new knowledge is incorporated. PMID:25353622

  14. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  15. Guidelines for Effective Usage of Text Highlighting Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobelt, Hendrik; Oelke, Daniela; Kwon, Bum Chul; Schreck, Tobias; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    Semi-automatic text analysis involves manual inspection of text. Often, different text annotations (like part-of-speech or named entities) are indicated by using distinctive text highlighting techniques. In typesetting there exist well-known formatting conventions, such as bold typeface, italics, or background coloring, that are useful for highlighting certain parts of a given text. Also, many advanced techniques for visualization and highlighting of text exist; yet, standard typesetting is common, and the effects of standard typesetting on the perception of text are not fully understood. As such, we surveyed and tested the effectiveness of common text highlighting techniques, both individually and in combination, to discover how to maximize pop-out effects while minimizing visual interference between techniques. To validate our findings, we conducted a series of crowdsourced experiments to determine: i) a ranking of nine commonly-used text highlighting techniques; ii) the degree of visual interference between pairs of text highlighting techniques; iii) the effectiveness of techniques for visual conjunctive search. Our results show that increasing font size works best as a single highlighting technique, and that there are significant visual interferences between some pairs of highlighting techniques. We discuss the pros and cons of different combinations as a design guideline to choose text highlighting techniques for text viewers.

  16. Cassini Science Highlights: Surprises in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda J.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini’s exploration of the Saturn system has generated a treasure trove of scientific data on Saturn, Titan, Enceladus, and other diverse icy satellites, the rings, and magnetosphere. After eight years of close study of this exceptionally complex and dynamic environment, Cassini is still unveiling new scientific discoveries that continue to amaze us. Standout recent highlights include aftereffects from Saturn’s huge storm, a possible subsurface ocean on Titan, close flybys of icy satellites, migrating ring “propellers”, and unexpected variations in Saturn kilometric radiation periodicities. Current observations show seasonal changes including the formation of a polar vortex at Titan’s south pole. To date, Cassini has observed Saturn from just after northern winter solstice through northern spring equinox and now is observing the Saturn system in the previously unobserved period leading up to northern summer solstice. In the remaining five years of the on-going Solstice Mission, Cassini will continue to study seasonally and temporally dependent processes. Given the long Saturnian year ( 30 years) the longevity of Cassini is essential for elucidating seasonal change in the Saturn system. The grand finale of the mission occurs in 2017, when a series of inclined orbits brings Cassini between the innermost D ring and the upper regions of Saturn’s atmosphere. This geometry will offer unique opportunities for new discoveries and ground-breaking science, including Saturn interior structure science from otherwise unobtainable gravity and magnetic field measurements and unprecedented determination of the ring mass, currently uncertain by an order of magnitude. This Proximal orbit phase is similar to Juno’s mission at Jupiter. Comparing Jupiter and Saturn is the first step toward the next great leap in solar system origins research. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA

  17. Technical highlights of the C-Class Sports Coupe; Technische Highlights des C-Klasse Sportcoupes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claar, K.P.; Colmsee, H.; Dannenberg, M.; Grevener, C. [DaimlerChrysler AG, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2001-05-01

    In mid-March 2001, a newcomer joined the 203-series model family: the new C-Class Sports Coupe. This new model is sportier and more compact in design than the 203 series Saloon. The new exterior styling required a full-scale redesign of all visible body parts including the doors, bonnet, bumper trim, headlamps, rear lights and windows. The substructure of the passenger cell and front end on the other hand was adopted unchanged from the Saloon. (orig.) [German] Mitte Maerz 2001 fuehrte Daimler-Chrysler das neue Sportcoupe der C-Klasse ein, das die Modellfamilie der Baureihe 203 erweitert. Im Vergleich zur Limousine der Baureihe 203 ist es sportlicher und kompakter konzipiert. Die neue aeussere Form erforderte eine vollstaendige Neukonstruktion aller Beplankungsteile einschliesslich der Tueren, Motorhaube, Stossfaengerverkleidungen, Scheinwerfer, Rueckleuchten und Scheiben. Die Bodenanlage der Limousine blieb jedoch im Bereich der Fahrgastzelle und des Vorbaus unveraendert. (orig.)

  18. AGILE DATA CENTER AT ASDC AND AGILE HIGHLIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Pittori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the main AGILE Data Center activities and the AGILE scientific highlights during the first 5 years of operations. AGILE is an ASI space mission in joint collaboration with INAF, INFN and CIFS, dedicated to the observation of the gamma-ray Universe. The AGILE satellite was launched on April 23rd, 2007, and is devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics in the 30MeV ÷ 50 GeV energy range, with simultaneous X-ray imaging capability in the 18 ÷ 60 keV band. Despite the small size and budget, AGILE has produced several important scientific results, including the unexpected discovery of strong and rapid gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula over daily timescales. This discovery won AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the prestigious Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012, an international award in the field of high energy astrophysics. Thanks to its sky monitoring capability and fast ground segment alert system, AGILE is substantially improving our knowledge of the gamma-ray sky, also making a crucial contribution to the study of the terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs detected in the Earth atmosphere. The AGILE Data Center, part of the ASI Science Data Center (ASDC located in Frascati, Italy, is in charge of all the science oriented activities related to the analysis, archiving and distribution of AGILE data.

  19. Can Chimpanzee Biology Highlight Human Origin and Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Roffman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan sister species, members of the same subfamily “Homininae”. This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human–chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine’s subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins.

  20. Highlights lecture EANM 2015: the search for nuclear medicine's superheroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    contributions focused on cardiac inflammation, cardiac sarcoidosis, and specific imaging of large vessel vasculitis. The physics and instrumentation track included many highlights such as novel, high resolution scanners. The most noteworthy news and developments of this meeting were summarized in the highlights lecture. Only 55 scientific contributions were mentioned, and hence they represent only a brief summary, which is outlined in this article. For a more detailed view, all presentations can be accessed by the online version of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (Volume 42, Supplement 1).

  1. Students' reflections in a portfolio pilot: highlighting professional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffling, Ann-Christin; Beckman, Anders; Pahlmblad, Annika; Edgren, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Portfolios are highlighted as potential assessment tools for professional competence. Although students' self-reflections are considered to be central in the portfolio, the content of reflections in practice-based portfolios is seldom analysed. To investigate whether students' reflections include sufficient dimensions of professional competence, notwithstanding a standardized portfolio format, and to evaluate students' satisfaction with the portfolio. Thirty-five voluntary final-year medical students piloted a standardized portfolio in a general practice (GP) attachment at Lund University, Sweden. Students' portfolio reflections were based upon documentary evidence from practice, and aimed to demonstrate students' learning. The reflections were qualitatively analysed, using a framework approach. Students' evaluations of the portfolio were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. Among professional issues, an integration of cognitive, affective and practical dimensions in clinical practice was provided by students' reflections. The findings suggested an emphasis on affective issues, particularly on self-awareness of feelings, attitudes and concerns. In addition, ethical problems, clinical reasoning strategies and future communication skills training were subjects of several reflective commentaries. Students' reflections on their consultation skills demonstrated their endeavour to achieve structure in the medical interview by negotiation of an agenda for the consultation, keeping the interview on track, and using internal summarizing. The importance of active listening and exploration of patient's perspective was also emphasized. In students' case summaries, illustrating characteristic attributes of GP, the dominating theme was 'patient-centred care', including the patient-doctor relationship, holistic modelling and longitudinal continuity. Students were satisfied with the portfolio, but improved instructions were needed. A standardized portfolio in a

  2. Highlights and Conclusions of the Unidata OGC Interoperability Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenico, B.; Davis, E.; Rew, R.; Caron, J.; Nativi, S.; Yang, W.; Falke, S.; Woolf, A.; Tandy, J.

    2007-12-01

    At the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) Technical Committee meetings, Unidata hosted a special Interoperability Day workshop to address the use of web services via standard interfaces for accessing a broad range of environmental data. These interfaces include: WCS (Web Coverage Service), WFS (Web Feature Service, SOS (Sensor Observation Service, CS-W/ebRIM (Catalog Service for the Web / electronic business Registry Information Model) for providing access to data currently served via THREDDS (THematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services), OPeNDAP (Open source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol), netCDF-CF (network Common Data Form - Climate and Forecast conventions) and IDD/LDM (Internet Data Distribution / Local Data Manager) technologies. The primary data served includes weather, climate and ocean data from the community sometimes referred to as Fluid Earth Sciences (FES). An international set of representatives from industry, government, and academia, spanning many geosciences disciplines participated actively in the workshop and are committed to continued collaboration. The overall objective for the day was to come up with practical and concrete ideas for how to deliver various classes of FES data via web services through the standard interfaces. The primary focus was on gridded datasets (e.g., forecast model output) and station/observation/point datasets (e.g. the observational data collected at weather stations, ocean buoys, river gaging stations. As time allowed, other categories (profile/trajectory, swath, radial, unstructured grids) were addressed. The main objective was to come up with a realistic plan for dealing with gridded and station/observation/point datasets. Then the remaining categories can be addressed incrementally. This presentation summarizes the highlights of the Interoperability Day and the resulting plans for future implementation and testing.

  3. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  4. Physical and Life Sciences 2008 Science & Technology Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correll, D L; Hazi, A U

    2009-05-06

    This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate that made news in 2008. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2008.

  5. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, FY08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-28

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  6. Refuge Accomplishment Report Highlights: Canaan National Wildlife Refuge FY2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge highlights Refuge accomplishments during the 2012 fiscal year. The report begins with a...

  7. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: FY 2008, 3rd Quarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-09-16

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  8. [A target-highlighting method in multispectral remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin-jun; Lin, Qi-zhong; Li, Ming-xiao; Wang, Li-ming; Tian, Qing-jiu

    2009-04-01

    In order to highlight target in multispectral remote sensing and overcome the human error caused by threshold, a new method is proposed here. Image of target similarity is firstly calculated by spectral energy level matching (SEM) algorithm and as a band added to original image; Then, band normalization is performed on the new image to reduce the effects caused by the order of magnitude in different bands; Finally, a false color image that highlights the target is made by RGB composed of the first three bands (3, 2, 1) in MNF transformation. Results from the experiment of highlighting the main rock-type tuffaceous siltstone in Hatu area, Xinjiang province, China show that (1) the new method can highlight target for the increment of target's information and weights during the process of transformation by adding a band representing target's similarity to the original image. Therefore, it overcomes the shortcomings existing in the common transformations on space information-although different objects corresponding to special information space are distinguished, targets the authors wanted can not be highlighted yet; (2) The new method can distinguish more objects than original maximum noise fraction (MNF) transformation because it unifies the tone for the same object's type by suppressing none target information using SEM method; (3) In addition to highlighting tuffaceous siltstone in the study area, the new method can be used widely in other fields such as soil, concrete, altered mineral etc.

  9. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission Status and Science Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Entin, Jared

    2017-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory was launched January 31, 2015, and its L-band radiometer and radar instruments became operational during April 2015. This paper provides a summary of the quality assessment of its baseline soil moisture and freeze/thaw products as well as an overview of new products. The first new product explores the Backus Gilbert optimum interpolation based on the oversampling characteristics of the SMAP radiometer. The second one investigates the disaggregation of the SMAP radiometer data using the European Space Agency's Sentinel-1 C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to obtain soil moisture products at about 1 to 3 km resolution. In addition, SMAPs L-band data have been found useful for many scientific applications, including depictions of water cycles, vegetation opacity, ocean surface salinity and hurricane ocean surface wind mapping. Highlights of these new applications will be provided.The SMAP soil moisture, freeze/taw state and SSSprovide a synergistic view of water cycle. For example, Fig.7 illustrates the transition of freeze/thaw state, change of soilmoisture near the pole and SSS in the Arctic Ocean fromApril to October in 2015 and 2016. In April, most parts ofAlaska, Canada, and Siberia remained frozen. Melt onsetstarted in May. Alaska, Canada, and a big part of Siberia havebecome thawed at the end of May; some freshwater dischargecould be found near the mouth of Mackenzie in 2016, but notin 2015. The soil moisture appeared to be higher in the Oband Yenisei river basins in Siberia in 2015. As a result,freshwater discharge was more widespread in the Kara Seanear the mouths of both rivers in June 2015 than in 2016. TheNorth America and Siberia have become completely thawedin July. After June, the freshwater discharge from other riversinto the Arctic, indicated by blue, also became visible. Thefreeze-up started in September and the high latitude regionsin North America and Eurasia became frozen. Comparing

  10. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  11. Center Overview and UAV Highlights at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Deborah; Yan, Jerry Chi Yiu

    2017-01-01

    The PowerPoint presentation gives an overview of NASA Ames Research Center and its core competencies, as well as some of the highlights of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) accomplishments and innovations by researchers at Ames.

  12. Tobacco Use. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2012-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte; Terzian, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has steadily declined among adolescents during the last fifteen years, although use of some tobacco products, like cigars, has seen recent increases. However, large numbers of teens continue to use tobacco products. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents key research findings; describes prevalence and trends; illustrates…

  13. The Morehouse College Glee Club: History and Recent Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, David

    1987-01-01

    The history of the Morehouse College Glee Club, founded around 1911 at the Black college, is highlighted by appearances before such notables as Franklin D. Roosevelt, Martin Luther King, Jr., Haile Selassie, Jimmy Carter, and Benjamin E. Mays and performances with people such as Robert Shaw, Leontyne Price, Diahann Carroll, Maynard Jackson, Billy…

  14. Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

  15. The Shortcomings of Medical Education Highlighted through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Pranav

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this report are to highlight the shortcomings in medical education. To use a student made short film as an example of how issues that cause medical student distress can be displayed. To show that the process of film-making is a useful tool in reflection. To display that film is an effective device in raising awareness. (Contains 3…

  16. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  17. Highlighting Text as a Study Strategy: Beyond Attentional Focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Reinhard W.; And Others

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether the strategy of differentiating main and supporting ideas with different colored highlighter pens resulted in greater use of schema building and increased recall of information by students and whether the benefits of text marking come at the time of encoding or at the time of review. Sixty-six…

  18. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2010-13. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Ministry of Advanced Education and Technology envisions Alberta's prosperity through innovation and lifelong learning. Advanced Education and Technology's mission is to lead the development of a knowledge-driven future through a dynamic and integrated advanced learning and innovation system. This paper presents the highlights of the business…

  19. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2009-12. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Advanced Education and Technology provides strategic leadership for the development of the next generation economy in Alberta through the provision of accessible, affordable and quality learning opportunities for all Albertans and support for a dynamic and integrated innovation system. This paper provides the highlights of the business plan of the…

  20. Highlights of the Conference "Celebrity Tycoon and Brand"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang Lin'aiyi

    2007-01-01

    @@ A summit's conference with the theme "Celebrity,Tycoon and Brand" highlighted this event and impressedall the present.Figring out the way to establish,protect and develop brand was the core of this summit,which triggered hot discussions and blazed ardent communications.

  1. Water Reuse Highlights: A Summary Volume of Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Water Works Association, Denver, CO. Research Foundation.

    This document reports the efforts of the AWWA Research Foundation to gather, prepare, and distribute current technical information in the wastewater reclamation and reuse field. The information reported has been abstracted from other Foundation publications and only attempts here to highlight the field. Categories discussed include research,…

  2. The Goal Trumps the Means: Highlighting Goals is More Beneficial than Highlighting Means in Means-End Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Sarah A.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Means-end actions are an early-emerging form of problem solving. These actions require initiating initial behaviors with a goal in mind. In this study, we explored the origins of 8-month-old infants' means-end action production using a cloth-pulling training paradigm. We examined whether highlighting the goal (toy) or the means (cloth) was more…

  3. Size from Specular Highlights for Analyzing Droplet Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, Andrei C.; Westenberg, Michel A.; Grooten, Mart H. M.

    In mechanical engineering, heat-transfer models by dropwise condensation are under development. The condensation process is captured by taking many pictures, which show the formation of droplets, of which the size distribution and area coverage are of interest for model improvement. The current analysis method relies on manual measurements, which is time consuming. In this paper, we propose an approach to automatically extract the positions and radii of the droplets from an image. Our method relies on specular highlights that are visible on the surfaces of the droplets. We show that these highlights can be reliably extracted, and that they provide sufficient information to infer the droplet size. The results obtained by our method compare favorably with those obtained by laborious and careful manual measurements. The processing time per image is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  4. Automatic Segmentation and Inpainting of Specular Highlights for Endoscopic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Mirko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive medical procedures have become increasingly common in today's healthcare practice. Images taken during such procedures largely show tissues of human organs, such as the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. These surfaces usually have a glossy appearance showing specular highlights. For many visual analysis algorithms, these distinct and bright visual features can become a significant source of error. In this article, we propose two methods to address this problem: (a a segmentation method based on nonlinear filtering and colour image thresholding and (b an efficient inpainting method. The inpainting algorithm eliminates the negative effect of specular highlights on other image analysis algorithms and also gives a visually pleasing result. The methods compare favourably to the existing approaches reported for endoscopic imaging. Furthermore, in contrast to the existing approaches, the proposed segmentation method is applicable to the widely used sequential RGB image acquisition systems.

  5. Highlights on eclipsing binary variables from Araucaria Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karczmarek Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Araucaria Project, which main goal is to provide precise determination of the cosmic distance scale, has recently made a set of discoveries involving variable stars in binary systems. Among these discoveries we highlight three: 1% precise measurement of a Cepheid's dynamical mass and its projection factor, accurate determination of both stellar and orbital parameters of eclipsing binary consisting of two Cepheid variables, and discovery of new class of variable stars, mimicking RR Lyrae pulsators.

  6. The hair color-highlighting burn: a unique burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, W

    2000-01-01

    A unique, preventable, 2.8 x 3.7-cm, full-thickness scalp burn resulted after a woman underwent a professional color-highlighting procedure at a hair salon. The burn appeared to result from scalp contact with aluminum foil that had been overheated by a hair dryer during the procedure. The wound required debridement and skin grafting and 3 subsequent serial excisions to eliminate the resulting area of burn scar alopecia. The preventive aspects of this injury are discussed.

  7. Highlights of SPring-8 BL23SU in 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agui, Akane; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Nakatani, Takeshi; Saitoh, Yuji; Teraoka, Yuden; Yokoya, Akinari [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Mikazuki, Hyogo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Commissioning of SPring-8 BL23SU started in 1996 and the beamline has been constructed. The insertion device, monochromator and other beamline equipments have been installed and tuned. The beamline setting and tuning have been continued. Experiments using synchrotron radiation tried in this year. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurement has been tried and achieved by driving periodic phase shift of ID23. In this document, we report highlights of BL23SU in 2000. (author)

  8. Ten Highlights of the Fifth Beijing International Music Festival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Beijing International Music Festival has been successfully held for four times and gained considerable reputation at home and abroad. On October 11, this annual art event was launched again in Beijing, but with notable changes. It is no longer a gathering of master artists playing classic works. Instead, in light of international practice, the festival begins to highlight new productions and trends and put more emphasis on diversification and localization

  9. Recent results and highlights from the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00211911; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After a 2-year stop for the upgrade of the detector, since 2015 the ATLAS collaboration has collected data for over 20 fb$^{-1}$ at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy of pp collisions at the LHC. In this talk a summary of recent measurements of Higgs boson properties, BSM Higgs searches and the status with the resonance at 750 GeV will be presented. Also some of most recent SM and electroweak results will be highlighted.

  10. Recent results and highlights from the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Caforio, Davide; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After a 2-year stop for the upgrade of the detector, since 2015 the ATLAS collaboration has collected data for over 20 fb-1 at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy of pp collisions at the LHC. In this talk a summary of recent measurements of Higgs boson properties, BSM Higgs searches and the situation with the resonance at 750 GeV will be presented. Also some of most recent SM and Electroweak results will be highlighted.

  11. Spring Research Festival Highlighted on WHAG-TV | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    WHAG-TV (Hagerstown, Md.) visited Fort Detrick to highlight the 2015 Spring Research Festival (SRF), sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR). Visit the WHAG-TV website to see the video broadcast, which aired May 6. The video was produced by WHAG Reporter Mallory Sofastaii. The video featured Linganore High School senior Rebecca Matthews, a Werner H. Kirsten student intern in the Human Retrovirus Pathogenesis Section, Vaccine Branch, NCI Center for Cancer Research; Lanessa Hill, public affairs specialist,

  12. Annual scientific meeting--American Headache Society Washington 2011--highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, R Allan

    2012-05-01

    The 53rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society was held in Washington from June 2 to 5, 2011. Important clinical and basic science information was presented at this meeting. This is a review of the highlights of that meeting dealing in many areas of headache medicine. Once again, this meeting, which is the premier scientific meeting of the American Headache Society, provided lots of new and exciting information about multiple facets of migraine headache and other disorders.

  13. Pediatric deformity treatment update, including 3D correction concepts%Pediatric deformity treatment update,including 3D correction concepts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Randal R. Betz; Patrick J. Cahill; Joshua M. Pahys; Amer F. Samdani

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the new developments in the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis,including 3D correction of deformity,posterior and minimally invasive surgery,and fusionless strategies.

  14. Ranking Highlights in Personal Videos by Analyzing Edited Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Farhadi, Ali; Chen, Tseng-Hung; Seitz, Steve

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully automatic system for ranking domain-specific highlights in unconstrained personal videos by analyzing online edited videos. A novel latent linear ranking model is proposed to handle noisy training data harvested online. Specifically, given a targeted domain such as "surfing," our system mines the YouTube database to find pairs of raw and their corresponding edited videos. Leveraging the assumption that an edited video is more likely to contain highlights than the trimmed parts of the raw video, we obtain pair-wise ranking constraints to train our model. The learning task is challenging due to the amount of noise and variation in the mined data. Hence, a latent loss function is incorporated to mitigate the issues caused by the noise. We efficiently learn the latent model on a large number of videos (about 870 min in total) using a novel EM-like procedure. Our latent ranking model outperforms its classification counterpart and is fairly competitive compared with a fully supervised ranking system that requires labels from Amazon Mechanical Turk. We further show that a state-of-the-art audio feature mel-frequency cepstral coefficients is inferior to a state-of-the-art visual feature. By combining both audio-visual features, we obtain the best performance in dog activity, surfing, skating, and viral video domains. Finally, we show that impressive highlights can be detected without additional human supervision for seven domains (i.e., skating, surfing, skiing, gymnastics, parkour, dog activity, and viral video) in unconstrained personal videos.

  15. Two interesting cases highlighting an oblivious specialty of psychoneuroendocrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. S. Hari kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroendocrinology deals with the overlap disorders pertaining to three different specialties. Awareness about the somatic manifestations of psychiatric diseases and vice versa is a must for all the clinicians. The knowledge of this interlinked specialty is essential because of the obscure presentation of certain disorders. Our first case was treated as depressive disorder, whereas the diagnosis was hypogonadism with empty sella. Our second patient was managed as schizophrenia and the evaluation revealed bilateral basal ganglia calcification and a diagnosis of Fahr′s disease. We report these cases for their unusual presentation and to highlight the importance of this emerging specialty.

  16. Hot subluminous stars: Highlights from the MUCHFUSS and Kepler missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geier S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Research into hot subdwarf stars is progressing rapidly. We present recent important discoveries. First we review the knowledge about magnetic fields in hot subdwarfs and highlight the first detection of a highly-magnetic, helium-rich sdO star. We briefly summarize recent discoveries based on Kepler light curves and finally introduce the closest known sdB+WD binary discovered by the MUCHFUSS project and discuss its relevance as a progenitor of a double-detonation type Ia supernova.

  17. GREAT Highlights from the SOFIA Early Science Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnecker, Hans; Gusten, R.; GREAT Team

    2012-01-01

    Since its first light on April 01, the German REceiver for Astronomy at TeraHertz Frequencies (GREAT) has flown more than a dozen SOFIA science flights both for US and German proposals. The spectrometer was operated routinely in its low frequency configurations, for sky frequencies between 1.25 and 1.5 THz (L1 channel) and 1.81-1.91 THz (L2 channel). During a GREAT engineering flight, the 2.5 THz OH ground-state transition was successfully observed. We will summarize the science opportunities with GREAT and present highlights from these Early Science flights.

  18. Highlights from PHENIX-I: initial state and early times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitch, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We will review the latest physics developments from PHENIX concentrating on cold nuclear matter effects, the initial state for heavy-ion collisions, and probes of the earliest stages of the hot-dense medium created in those collisions. Recent physics results from p + p and d + Au collisions; and from direct photons, quarkonia and low-mass vector mesons in A+A collisions will be highlighted. Insights from these measurements into the characteristics of the initial state and about the earliest times in heavy-ion collisions will be discussed.

  19. Touchstone Stars: Highlights from the Cool Stars 18 Splinter Session

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Andrew W; Boyajian, Tabetha; Gaidos, Eric; von Braun, Kaspar; Feiden, Gregory A; Metcalfe, Travis; Swift, Jonathan J; Curtis, Jason L; Deacon, Niall R; Filippazzo, Joseph C; Gillen, Ed; Hejazi, Neda; Newton, Elisabeth R

    2014-01-01

    We present a summary of the splinter session on "touchstone stars" -- stars with directly measured parameters -- that was organized as part of the Cool Stars 18 conference. We discuss several methods to precisely determine cool star properties such as masses and radii from eclipsing binaries, and radii and effective temperatures from interferometry. We highlight recent results in identifying and measuring parameters for touchstone stars, and ongoing efforts to use touchstone stars to determine parameters for other stars. We conclude by comparing the results of touchstone stars with cool star models, noting some unusual patterns in the differences.

  20. Highlights of SPring-8 BL23SU in 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Agui, A; Nakatani, T; Yokoya, A; Yoshigoe, A

    2002-01-01

    BL23SU in SPring-8 is a soft x-ray beamline for the material science project in JAERI. The insertion device, monochromator and other beamline equipments have been installed or developed. The beamline maintenance has also been continued. We report highlights of these activities for the BL23SU in 2001. Specially, it has proceeded with the countermeasure against the rise in the maximum radiant power, toward the low-energy operation realization. And, improvement in that precision proceeds through the COD correlation to the ID drive as well.

  1. CO2 Emissions From Fuel Combustion. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Warsaw, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process, the IEA is making available for free download the ''Highlights'' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion now for sale on IEA Bookshop. This annual publication contains, for more than 140 countries and regions: estimates of CO2 emissions from 1971 to 2011; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; a decomposition of CO2 emissions into driving factors; and CO2emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, key sources, and other relevant information. The nineteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention (COP-19), in conjunction with the ninth meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 9), met in Warsaw, Poland from 11 to 22 November 2013. This volume of ''Highlights'', drawn from the full-scale study, was specially designed for delegations and observers of the meeting in Warsaw.

  2. Low cost labeling with highlighter ink efficiently visualizes developing blood vessels in avian and mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Yuta; Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2013-12-01

    To understand how blood vessels form to establish the intricate network during vertebrate development, it is helpful if one can visualize the vasculature in embryos. We here describe a novel labeling method using highlighter ink, easily obtained in stationery stores with a low cost, to visualize embryo-wide vasculatures in avian and mice. We tested 50 different highlighters for fluorescent microscopy with filter sets equipped in a standard fluorescent microscope. The yellow and violet inks yielded fluorescent signals specifically detected by the filters used for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) detections, respectively. When the ink solution was infused into chicken/quail and mouse embryos, vasculatures including large vessels and capillaries were labeled both in living and fixed embryos. Ink-infused embryos were further subjected to histological sections, and double stained with antibodies including QH-1 (quail), α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and PECAM-1 (mouse), revealing that the endothelial cells were specifically labeled by the infused highlighter ink. Highlighter-labeled signals were detected with a resolution comparable to or higher than signals of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-lectin and Rhodamine-dextran, conventionally used for angiography. Furthermore, macroconfocal microscopic analyses with ink-infused embryos visualized fine vascular structures of both embryo proper and extra-embryonic plexus in a Z-stack image of 2400 μm thick with a markedly high resolution. Together, the low cost highlighter ink serves as an alternative reagent useful for visualization of blood vessels in developing avian and mouse embryos and possibly in other animals.

  3. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  4. ISOLDE highlights and the HIE-ISOLDE project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borge María José G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ISOLDE facility has as objective the production, study and research of nuclei far from stability. Exotic nuclei of most chemical elements are available for the study of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries and atomic physics, and for applications in condensed-matter and life sciences. The most recent highlights are presented. The on-going upgrade, the HIE-ISOLDE project, is discussed. HIE-ISOLDE aims to improve the ISOLDE capabilities in a wide front, from an energy increase of the post-accelerated beam to improvements in beam quality and beam purity. The first phase of HIE-ISOLDE will start for physics in the autumn of 2015 with an upgrade of energy for all post-accelerated ISOLDE beams up to 5.5 MeV/u. The proposed day-one experiments are summarized.

  5. Mobile learning and high-lighting language education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Jane

    advantage of the social side in their application. The aim has been to make language classes attractive and relevant and to highlight the attractiveness and fun in learning through web 2.0 and mobile units. The overall project was supported by the Danish ministry of education as well as the individual...... time and any firm conclusions cannot be reached until further analyses have been carried out, but will be ready by the time of the conference. It is clear at this point that, the potential imbued in mobile learning and social media have given rise to a strengthening of student participation......Mobile learning and high-profiling language education. The number of students learning a second or foreign language and participating in instruction in languages other than English has been in decline for some time. There seems to be such a general tendency across nations albeit for a variety...

  6. Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoto, K. Andrew; Schweinsberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data Descriptors published in Scientific Data presents data obtained in the process of attempting to replicate previously published research. These new replication data describe published and unpublished projects. The different papers in this collection highlight the many ways that scientific replications can be conducted, and they reveal the benefits and challenges of crucial replication research. The organizers of this collection encourage scientists to reuse the data contained in the collection for their own work, and also believe that these replication examples can serve as educational resources for students, early-career researchers, and experienced scientists alike who are interested in learning more about the process of replication. PMID:28291224

  7. Technology meets research 60 years of CERN technology : selected highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Thomas; Treille, Daniel; Wenninger, Horst

    2017-01-01

    "Big" science and advanced technology are known to cross-fertilize. This book emphasizes the interplay between particle physics and technology at CERN that has led to breakthroughs in both research and technology over the laboratory's first 60 years. The innovations, often the work of individuals or by small teams, are illustrated with highlights describing selected technologies from the domains of accelerators and detectors. The book also presents the framework and conditions prevailing at CERN that enabled spectacular advances in technology and contributed to propel the European organization into the league of leading research laboratories in the world. While the book is specifically aimed at providing information for the technically interested general public, more expert readers may also appreciate the broad variety of subjects presented. Ample references are given for those who wish to further explore a given topic.

  8. Mobile learning and high-lighting language education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Jane

    advantage of the social side in their application. The aim has been to make language classes attractive and relevant and to highlight the attractiveness and fun in learning through web 2.0 and mobile units. The overall project was supported by the Danish ministry of education as well as the individual...... time and any firm conclusions cannot be reached until further analyses have been carried out, but will be ready by the time of the conference. It is clear at this point that, the potential imbued in mobile learning and social media have given rise to a strengthening of student participation...... of reasons idiosyncratic to the particular national conditions. This paper gives an account of a diversified national project designed to infuse foreign language learning classes in upper secondary schools in Denmark with renewed enthusiasm through systematically experimenting with the new media by taking...

  9. Women in evolution - highlighting the changing face of evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellenreuther, Maren; Otto, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The face of science has changed. Women now feature alongside men at the forefront of many fields, and this is particularly true in evolutionary biology. This special issue celebrates the outstanding achievements and contributions of women in evolutionary biology, by highlighting a sample of their research and accomplishments. In addition to original research contributions, this collection of articles contains personal reflections to provide perspective and advice on succeeding as a woman in science. By showcasing the diversity and research excellence of women and drawing on their experiences, we wish to enhance the visibility of female scientists and provide inspiration as well as role models. These are exciting times for evolutionary biology, and the field is richer and stronger for the diversity of voices contributing to the field.

  10. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  11. LHC highlights from ATLAS - FRAPWS2016 conference - Claudio Luci

    CERN Document Server

    Luci, Claudio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    I am going to give a talk about highlight from ATLAS. The conference is FRAP2016, it is a conference of astrophysics. My talk is the third one oon the first day, after a general talk and one about dark matter search at colliders (given by someone does not working in atlas or cms). There is not a talk given by a colleague from cms, so mine is the only one about lhc. I have prepared my slides thinking about a "general" public and not for a specialized audience like the one we use to give talks. I have 30 minutes, maybe I have too many slides but I can easily keep the ones about dark matter if I am going to run late.

  12. Big data for ecologists: Highlighting the ORNL DAAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Alison G [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL; Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Eby, Pete I [ORNL; Thornton, Michele M [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K [ORNL; Virdi, Makhan L [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Ecologists are increasingly confronted by questions that can be addressed only by integrating data from numerous sources, often across large geographic areas and broad time periods. The supply of ecological big data is increasing at a rapid pace as researchers are publishing their data sets and large, public science and data infrastructures (such as NEON, DataONE, LTER, & NCEAS) are producing and curating extensive volumes of complex data and metadata. While supply of, and demand for, ecological data is on the rise, many ecologists now face a new challenge in locating and synthesizing the data relevant for their particular question. Here we highlight selected popular big data products applicable to ecological research available from the NASA Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  13. Highlights of a recycling behaviour study in South Africa’s large urban areas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strydom, WF

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available behaviour study in South Africa?s large urban areas WF STRYDOM CSIR Natural Resources and the Environment, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001 Email: wstrydom@csir.co.za ? www.csir.co.za INTRODUCTION The recently promulgated National Environmental Management...: Waste Act (RSA, 2008) requires the delivery of an efficient collection service combined with cooperation from all stakeholders to recycle, including households. This poster presents the highlights from a recycling behaviour survey conducted among a...

  14. Brookhaven highlights. Report on research, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications.

  15. Photoconversion of purified fluorescent proteins and dual-probe optical highlighting in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Piston, David

    2010-06-26

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (pc-FPs) are a class of fluorescent proteins with "optical highlighter" capability, meaning that the color of fluorescence can be changed by exposure to light of a specific wavelength. Optical highlighting allows noninvasive marking of a subpopulation of fluorescent molecules, and is therefore ideal for tracking single cells or organelles. Critical parameters for efficient photoconversion are the intensity and the exposure time of the photoconversion light. If the intensity is too low, photoconversion will be slow or not occur at all. On the other hand, too much intensity or too long exposure can photobleach the protein and thereby reduce the efficiency of photoconversion. This protocol describes a general approach how to set up a confocal laser scanning microscope for pc-FP photoconversion applications. First, we describe a procedure for preparing purified protein droplet samples. This sample format is very convenient for studying the photophysical behavior of fluorescent proteins under the microscope. Second, we will use the protein droplet sample to show how to configure the microscope for photoconversion. And finally, we will show how to perform optical highlighting in live cells, including dual-probe optical highlighting with mOrange2 and Dronpa.

  16. History highlights and future trends of infrared sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    Infrared (IR) technologies (materials, devices and systems) represent an area of excellence in science and technology and, even if they have been generally confined to a selected scientific community, they have achieved technological and scientific highlights constituting 'innovation drivers' for neighbouring disciplines, especially in the sensors field. The development of IR sensors, initially linked to astronomical observations, since World War II and for many years has been fostered essentially by defence applications, particularly thermo-vision and, later on, smart vision and detection, for surveillance and warning. Only in the last few decades, the impact of silicon technology has changed the development of IR detectors dramatically, with the advent of integrated signal read-outs and the opening of civilian markets (EO communications, biomedical, environmental, transport and energy applications). The history of infrared sensors contains examples of real breakthroughs, particularly true in the case of focal plane arrays that first appeared in the late 1970s, when the superiority of bi-dimensional arrays for most applications pushed the development of technologies providing the highest number of pixels. An impressive impulse was given to the development of FPA arrays by integration with charge coupled devices (CCD), with strong competition from different technologies (high-efficiency photon sensors, Schottky diodes, multi-quantum wells and, later on, room temperature microbolometers/cantilevers). This breakthrough allowed the development of high performance IR systems of small size, light weight and low cost - and therefore suitable for civil applications - thanks to the elimination of the mechanical scanning system and the progressive reduction of cooling requirements (up to the advent of microbolometers, capable of working at room temperature). In particular, the elimination of cryogenic cooling allowed the development and commercialisation of IR Smart Sensors

  17. Highlighting landslides and other geomorphological features using sediment connectivity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Giulia; Crema, Stefano; Cavalli, Marco; Marcato, Gianluca; Pasuto, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Landslide identification is usually made through interpreting geomorphological features in the field or with remote sensing imagery. In recent years, airborne laser scanning (LiDAR) has enhanced the potentiality of geomorphological investigations by providing a detailed and diffuse representation of the land surface. The development of algorithms for geomorphological analysis based on LiDAR derived high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) is increasing. Among them, the sediment connectivity index (IC) has been used to quantify sediment dynamics in alpine catchments. In this work, maps of the sediment connectivity index are used for detecting geomorphological features and processes not exclusively related to water-laden processes or debris flows. The test area is located in the upper Passer Valley in South Tyrol (Italy). Here a 4 km2 Deep-seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (DGSD) with several secondary phenomena has been studied for years. The connectivity index was applied to a well-known study area in order to evaluate its effectiveness as an interpretative layer to assist geomorphological analysis. Results were cross checked with evidence previously identified by means of in situ investigations, photointerpretation and monitoring data. IC was applied to a 2.5 m LiDAR derived DTM using two different scenarios in order to test their effectiveness: i) IC derived on the hydrologically correct DTM; ii) IC derived on the original DTM. In the resulting maps a cluster of low-connectivity areas appears as the deformation of the DGSD induce a convexity in the central part of the phenomenon. The double crests, product of the sagging of the landslide, are extremely evident since in those areas the flow directions diverge from the general drainage pattern, which is directed towards the valley river. In the crown area a rock-slab that shows clear evidence of incumbent detachment is clearly highlighted since the maps emphasize the presence of traction trenches and

  18. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Eom

    Full Text Available How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013.

  19. Highlights on Hevea brasiliensis (pro)hevein proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Karine; Peruch, Frédéric; Lecomte, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    Hevein, from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree), was identified in 1960. It is the most abundant soluble protein (22%) found in latex. Hevein is formed from a larger protein called prohevein. The 187 amino-acid prohevein is cleaved into two fragments: the N-terminal 43 amino-acid hevein, a lectin bearing a chitin-binding motif with antifungal properties, and a C-terminal domain (C-ter), which possesses amyloid properties. Hevein-like proteins are also widely represented in the plant kingdom and belong to a larger family related to stress and pathogenic responses. During the last 55 years, these proteins have attracted the interest of numerous specialists from the fields of plant physiology, genetics, molecular and structural biology, and physico-chemistry to allergology. This review highlights various aspects of hevein, prohevein, and C-ter from the point of view of these various fields, and examines their potential roles in latex as well as their beneficial and negative biological effects (e.g. wound sealing and resistance to pathogens which is mediated by agglutination, antimicrobial activity, and/or allergenicity). It covers results and observations from 1960 up to the most recent research.

  20. Highlights from the La Silla QUEST Variability Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, Paolo S.; La Silla QUEST Survey Team

    2017-01-01

    The recently completely QUEST supernova survey ran for 6 years on the ESO 1m Schmidt telescope in La Silla Chile using a large CCD array to replace the photographic plate of the Schmidt. The survey covered ~1000 degres twice per night, for a total survey coverage area of ~20,000 square degrees from declination ~ -40 to +20. The survey magnitude limit is V~21. The average number of visits on a given patch of sky was ~150, although over a thousand squares more than 1000 visits. Although the survey cadence was driven by supernova science, it turns out to be provide good logarithmic coverage on a broad range of timescales, from ~hours to ~year, Much more time domain science can thus be done than a simple supernova search. Here we present highlights from La Silla QUEST non-supernova science, especially for AGN and RR Lyrae stars. Lessons learned from the La Silla QUEST survey should prove useful in preparing for LSST.

  1. Highlights of Selected Consultative Studies of CASAD in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on issues critical to national economy, people's livelihood and sustainable development, such as energy, resources and the environment, in 2010, the Academic Divisions of CAS (CASAD) completed a number of consultative studies on a variety of topics, ranging from land reclamation, exploiting the Heishanxia Reach of the Yellow River, developing a national energy base for large-scale hybrid PV-hydro power generation in Qinghai, to the development of a largescale integrated energy base in Xinjiang, and industrial energy saving in China.In line with China's pressing needs for developing strategically-important emerging industries, and at the request of the General Office of the State Council, CASAD carried out a questionnaire survey and convened many seminars of CAS Members to work out an Investigation Report on Developing Strategic Emerging Industries in China, providing important scientific evidence to the State Council and related government departments.In all, ten consultative reports were presented to the State Council and 12 CAS Member Suggestions were submitted to the State Council and related government departments, which attracted close attention from policymakers.The followings are highlights of some of the consultation reports.

  2. Latest Highlights from our Direct Measurement Video Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, M.; Bohacek, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in technology have made videos much easier to produce, edit, store, transfer, and view. This has spawned an explosion in a production of a wide variety of different types of pedagogical videos. But with the exception of student-made videos (which are often of poor quality) almost all of the educational videos being produced are passive. No matter how compelling the content, students are expected to simply sit and watch them. Because we feel that being engaged and active are necessary components of student learning, we have been working to create a free online library of Direct Measurement Videos (DMV's). These videos are short high-quality videos of real events, shot in a way that allows students to make measurements directly from the video. Instead of handing students a word problem about a car skidding on ice, we actually show them the car skidding on ice. We then ask them to measure the important quantities, make calculations based on those measurements and solve for unknowns. DMV's are more interesting than their word problem equivalents and frequently inspire further questions about the physics of the situation or about the uncertainty of the measurement in ways that word problems almost never do. We feel that it is simply impossible to a video of a roller coaster or a rocket and then argue that word problems are better. In this talk I will highlight some new additions to our DMV collection. This work is supported by NSF TUES award #1245268

  3. Highlights and Discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Tananbaum, H; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-01-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extrasolar X-ray source in 1962,NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond X-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding ...

  4. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Tucker, W.; Wilkes, B.; Edmonds, P.

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over timescales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding of topics as diverse as protoplanetary nebulae; massive stars; supernova explosions; pulsar wind nebulae; the superfluid interior of neutron stars; accretion flows around black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy.

  5. National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center project accomplishments: highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) has invested more than $20M since 2008 to put cutting-edge climate science research in the hands of resource managers across the Nation. With NCCWSC support, more than 25 cooperative research initiatives led by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers and technical staff are advancing our understanding of habitats and species to provide guidance to managers in the face of a changing climate. Projects focus on quantifying and predicting interactions between climate, habitats, species, and other natural resources such as water. Spatial scales of the projects range from the continent of North America, to a regional scale such as the Pacific Northwest United States, to a landscape scale such as the Florida Everglades. Time scales range from the outset of the 20th century to the end of the 21st century. Projects often lead to workshops, presentations, publications and the creation of new websites, computer models, and data visualization tools. Partnership-building is also a key focus of the NCCWSC-supported projects. New and on-going cooperative partnerships have been forged and strengthened with resource managers and scientists at Federal, tribal, state, local, academic, and non-governmental organizations. USGS scientists work closely with resource managers to produce timely and relevant results that can assist managers and policy makers in current resource management decisions. This fact sheet highlights accomplishments of five NCCWSC projects.

  6. Engineering and science highlights of the KAT-7 radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    The construction of the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scientific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular, we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stirling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Streaming Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended H I haloes and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations.

  7. Pre-accidental situations highlighted by RECUPERARE method and data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matahri, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    RECUPERARE method has been developed for operating feedback analysis and built on the French Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) principles. It is used to study the causes of human errors or technical failures occurred in French PWRs and the recovery process of events. Based on an event classification (6 categories) model according to the nature of the link between failure and recovery, the identified and recorded data are: the causes of the defects (technical, human, organizational) and the context in which they appear; the factors of the recovery performance (depending on technical and organizational aspects); a chronological analysis, designed to collect delays between failures and their detection/recovery for each event. About 3600 events reported in French PWRs (1997-2003) had been reviewed through this model. Initially, the weight of factors and the most important factors, which influenced the detection and recovery delay, are defined. For this purpose, the regression Partial Least Square (PLS) is used. Then, to link RECUPERARE results with pre-accidental data, conditional probabilities of events linked between them by a cause and effect relationship are calculated. For this, the Bayesian method with the Bayesian network is built with the PLS obtained results and applied. This constitutes a first approach to take into account in HRA the human and organizational factors highlighted by operating feedback. (author)

  8. The infrared astronomical satellite AKARI: overview, highlights of the mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2008-07-01

    The AKARI, Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, is a 68.5 cm cooled telescope with two focal-plane instruments providing continuous sky scan at six wavelength bands in mid- and far-infrared. The instruments also have capabilities of imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2-180 μm in the pointing observations occasionally inserted into the continuous survey. AKARI was launched on 21st Feb. 2006, and has performed the all-sky survey as well as 5380 pointing observations until the liquid helium exhaustion on 26th Aug. 2007. The all sky survey covers more than 90 percent of the entire sky with higher spatial resolutions and sensitivities than the IRAS. First version of the infrared source catalogue will be released in 2009. Here we report the overview of the mission, highlights on the scientific results as well as the performance of the focal-plane instruments. We also present the observation plan with the near infrared camera during the post-helium mission phase started in June 2008.

  9. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  10. Recent highlights from the PHENIX heavy ion program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    It is accepted that a QGP can be formed in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei (A+A). Recently long-range correlations have been observed in p+A collisions at the LHC in high multiplicity events. PHENIX has carried out a series of studies of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV to see if such correlations persist at lower energies compared to those at the LHC. Results of a study of long-range correlations and flow are presented for d+Au collisions. Data from Au+Au collisions collected during the beam energy scan (BES) was used to determine both quark and nucleon number scaling. The HBT method was used to determine radii of the fireball at kinetic freezeout. Implications for the nuclear EOS are discussed. Also results of a search for "dark photons" are presented. Recent PHENIX highlights on heavy flavor, electromagnetic probes, spin and plans for PHENIX upgrades were presented in other talks at this conference.

  11. Engineering and Science Highlights of the KAT-7 Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, A R; Armstrong, R P; Barta, A; Bauermeister, E F; Bester, H; Blose, S; Booth, R S; Botha, D H; Buchner, S J; Carignan, C; Cheetham, T; Cloete, K; Coreejes, G; Crida, R C; Cross, S D; Curtolo, F; Dikgale, A; de Villiers, M S; Toit, L J du; Esterhuyse, S W P; Fanaroff, B; Fender, R P; Fijalkowski, M; Fourie, D; Frank, B; George, D; Gibbs, P; Goedhart, S; Grobbelaar, J; Gumede, S C; Herselman, P; Hess, K M; Hoek, N; Horrell, J; Jonas, J L; Jordaan, J D B; Julie, R; Kapp, F; Kotzé, P; Kusel, T; Langman, A; Lehmensiek, R; Liebenberg, D; Liebenberg, I J V; Loots, A; Lord, R T; Lucero, D M; Ludick, J; Macfarlane, P; Madlavana, M; Magnus, L; Magozore, C; Malan, J A; Manley, J R; Marais, L; Marais, N; Marais, S J; Maree, M; Martens, A; Mokone, O; Moss, V; Mthembu, S; New, W; Nicholson, G D; van Niekerk, P C; Oozeer, N; Passmoor, S S; Peens-Hough, A; Pińska, A B; Prozesky, P; Rajan, S; Ratcliffe, S; Renil, R; Richter, L L; Rosekrans, D; Rust, A; Schröder, A C; Schwardt, L C; Seranyane, S; Serylak, M; Shepherd, D S; Siebrits, R; Sofeya, L; Spann, R; Springbok, R; Swart, P S; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L; Theron, I P; Tiplady, A; Toruvanda, O; Tshongweni, S; Heever, L van den; van der Merwe, C; van Rooyen, R; Wakhaba, S; Walker, A L; Welz, M; Williams, L; Wolleben, M; Woudt, P A; Young, N J; Zwart, J T L

    2016-01-01

    The construction of the KAT-7 array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scien- tific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stir- ling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Recon- figurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Stream- ing Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used f...

  12. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013.

  13. Research highlights: microfluidic-enabled single-cell epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Manjima; Khojah, Reem; Tay, Andy; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-07

    Individual cells are the fundamental unit of life with diverse functions from metabolism to motility. In multicellular organisms, a single genome can give rise to tremendous variability across tissues at the single-cell level due to epigenetic differences in the genes that are expressed. Signals from the local environment or a history of signals can drive these variations, and tissues have many cell types that play separate roles. This epigenetic heterogeneity is of biological importance in normal functions such as tissue morphogenesis and can contribute to development or resistance of cancer, or other disease states. Therefore, an improved understanding of variations at the single cell level are fundamental to understanding biology and developing new approaches to combating disease. Traditional approaches to characterize epigenetic modifications of chromatin or the transcriptome of cells have often focused on blended responses of many cells in a tissue; however, such bulk measures lose spatial and temporal differences that occur from cell to cell, and cannot uncover novel or rare populations of cells. Here we highlight a flurry of recent activity to identify the mRNA profiles from thousands of single-cells as well as chromatin accessibility and histone marks on single to few hundreds of cells. Microfluidics and microfabrication have played a central role in the range of new techniques, and will likely continue to impact their further development towards routine single-cell epigenetic analysis.

  14. Recent highlights from the PHENIX heavy ion program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is accepted that a QGP can be formed in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei (A+A. Recently long-range correlations have been observed in p+A collisions at the LHC in high multiplicity events. PHENIX has carried out a series of studies of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV to see if such correlations persist at lower energies compared to those at the LHC. Results of a study of long-range correlations and flow are presented for d+Au collisions. Data from Au+Au collisions collected during the beam energy scan (BES was used to determine both quark and nucleon number scaling. The HBT method was used to determine radii of the fireball at kinetic freezeout. Implications for the nuclear EOS are discussed. Also results of a search for “dark photons” are presented. Recent PHENIX highlights on heavy flavor, electromagnetic probes, spin and plans for PHENIX upgrades were presented in other talks at this conference.

  15. Improved "optical highlighter" probes derived from discosoma red fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lisbeth C; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2005-02-01

    The tetrameric red fluorescent protein, DsRed, undergoes a rapid red to green color change evoked by short wavelength (lambda highlighter" probe for tracking live cells, organelles, and fusion proteins. This color change results from selective bleaching of the "mature" red-emitting species of DsRed and an enhancement of emission from the "immature" green species, likely caused by dequenching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring within the protein tetramer. Here, we have examined the role of residues known to influence the rate and completeness of chromophore maturation on the cellular and biophysical properties of DsRed mutants. Surprisingly, a single amino acid mutation (N42Q) with increased basal green emission yet rapid chromophore maturation displayed a multiphoton-evoked color change that was brighter, more consistent, more vivid, and easier to evoke than DsRed, despite the larger proportion of green chromophores. Rapidly maturing mutants with more complete chromophore maturation, exhibited little color change and increased resistance to multiphoton bleaching. We describe improved optical and cell biological properties for two DsRed-derived variants which we showcase in photolabeling studies, and discuss these data in terms of implications for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based probes.

  16. New bunya-like viruses: Highlighting their relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterres, Alexandro; de Oliveira, Renata Carvalho; Fernandes, Jorlan; de Lemos, Elba Regina Sampaio; Schrago, Carlos Guerra

    2017-04-01

    The standard virus classification scheme for arenaviruses and bunyaviruses shifted dramatically when several groups reported the detection and isolation of divergent groups of viruses in a variety of insect collections. Although these viral families can differ in terms of morphology, structure and genetics, recent findings indicate these viruses may have a shared evolutionary origin. To determine the phylogenetic relations among these families, we inferred phylogenetic trees using three methods. The Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian trees were rooted as suggested by the (molecular clock-rooted) BEAST tree. Our results highlight a noteworthy relation among these viral supergroups of different genome organizations. Our study suggests that the best scenario is the existence of at least three monophyletic supergroups, all of them well supported. The recent data indicate that these viruses are evolutionarily and genetically interconnected. While these supergroups appear to be closely related in our phylogenetic analysis, other viruses should be investigated in future research. In sum, our results also provide insights into the classification scheme, thereby providing a new perspective about the fundamental questions of family origins, diversity and genome evolution.

  17. Risoe DTU annual report 2009. Highlights from Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Birgit; Bindslev, H. (eds.)

    2010-06-15

    Risoe DTU is the National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy at the Technical University of Denmark. The research focuses on development of energy technologies and systems with minimal effect on climate, and contributes to innovation, education and policy. Risoe has large experimental facilities and interdisciplinary research environments, and includes the national centre for nuclear technologies. The 2009 annual report gives highlights on Risoe's research in the following areas: wind energy, bioenergy, solar energy, fusion energy, fuel cells and hydrogen, energy systems and climate change, and nuclear technologies. It also includes information on Education and training, Innovation and business, Research facilities, and Management, Personnel and Operating statements. (LN)

  18. Risoe DTU annual report 2008. Highlights from Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Birgit; Bindslev, H. (eds.)

    2009-08-15

    Risoe DTU is the National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy at the Technical University of Denmark. The research focuses on development of energy technologies and systems with minimal effect on climate, and contributes to innovation, education and policy. Risoe has large experimental facilities and interdisciplinary research environments, and includes the national centre for nuclear technologies. The 2008 annual report gives highlights on Risoe's research in the following areas: wind energy, bioenergy, solar energy, fusion energy, fuel cells and hydrogen, energy systems and climate change, and nuclear technologies. It also includes information on Education and training, Innovation and business, Research facilities, and Management, Personnel and Operating statements. (LN)

  19. Macro Photography for Reflectance Transformation Imaging: A Practical Guide to the Highlights Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Cosentino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI is increasingly being used for art documentation and analysis and it can be successful also for the examination of features on the order of hundreds of microns. This paper evaluates some macro scale photography methods specifically for RTI employing the Highlights method for documenting sub-millimeter details. This RTI technique consists in including one reflective sphere in the scene photographed so that the processing software can calculate for each photo the direction of the light source from its reflection on the sphere. RTI documentation can be performed also with an RTI dome, but the Highlights method is preferred because is more mobile and more affordable. This technique is demonstrated in the documentation of some prints ranging from the XV to the XX century from to the Ingels collection in Sweden. The images are here examined and discussed, showing the application of macro RTI for identifying features of prints.

  20. Structure-activity relationship of nerve-highlighting fluorophores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer L Gibbs

    Full Text Available Nerve damage is a major morbidity associated with numerous surgical interventions. Yet, nerve visualization continues to challenge even the most experienced surgeons. A nerve-specific fluorescent contrast agent, especially one with near-infrared (NIR absorption and emission, would be of immediate benefit to patients and surgeons. Currently, there are only three classes of small molecule organic fluorophores that penetrate the blood nerve barrier and bind to nerve tissue when administered systemically. Of these three classes, the distyrylbenzenes (DSBs are particularly attractive for further study. Although not presently in the NIR range, DSB fluorophores highlight all nerve tissue in mice, rats, and pigs after intravenous administration. The purpose of the current study was to define the pharmacophore responsible for nerve-specific uptake and retention, which would enable future molecules to be optimized for NIR optical properties. Structural analogs of the DSB class of small molecules were synthesized using combinatorial solid phase synthesis and commercially available building blocks, which yielded more than 200 unique DSB fluorophores. The nerve-specific properties of all DSB analogs were quantified using an ex vivo nerve-specific fluorescence assay on pig and human sciatic nerve. Results were used to perform quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR modeling and to define the nerve-specific pharmacophore. All DSB analogs with positive ex vivo fluorescence were tested for in vivo nerve specificity in mice to assess the effect of biodistribution and clearance on nerve fluorescence signal. Two new DSB fluorophores with the highest nerve to muscle ratio were tested in pigs to confirm scalability.

  1. Highlights from Hitomi observations of non-Perseus targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Bamba, Aya; Ishida, Manabu; Katsuda, Satoru; Hughes, John Patrick; Madejski, Greg; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hitomi Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Before the tragic loss of the spacecraft due to attitude control problems, Hitomi observed three supernova remnants (SNR), N132D, G21.5-0.9, and the Crab Nebula, with the main purpose of initial in-orbit calibration. Here we present some scientific highlights of these observations.N132D is a middle-aged, core-collapse SNR in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). It was observed after the Perseus cluster. Even though the exposure was very short, the SXS clearly resolves the fine structure of He-like S K-shell emission. We detect a significant redshift that is consistent with the line-of-sight velocity of the LMC. Fe K emission is redshifted even more significantly, with a corresponding velocity of ~2000 km/s. This suggests a non-uniform velocity distribution of the Fe ejecta, probably due to an asymmetric supernova explosion.G21.5-0.9 is a young plerionic composite-type SNR. Powered by the 62 ms rotation-powered pulsar J1833-1034, the SNR is dominated by non-thermal emission from the pulsar wind nebula, with extended limb-brightening and knots of X-ray emission. The Hitomi SXS, SXI, and HXI observations provide a high-statistics wide-band spectrum from a single satellite. We are currently searching for 1) emission or absorption line features, 2) a spectral break in the continuum, and 3) the pulse period. The status of the analysis and results will be presented.The Crab was observed after all the instruments aboard Hitomi were turned on. We successfully obtain the pulse profile with all of the instruments. The X-ray polarization is being studied with the HXI and SGD. We also search for emission/absorption lines with the SXS, but no features have so far been significantly detected. We discuss the results in light of constraining the nature of the Crab's progenitor explosion.

  2. Algerian abortion controversy highlights rape of war victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelala, C

    1998-05-09

    This brief article highlights the change in Islamic practices to allow abortion for women raped during war situations in Algeria. The Islamic Supreme Council on April 12, 1998, issued an edict (fatwa) that allowed abortions for women attacked by Islamic extremists. This changes the prior prohibition of abortion, except in cases where the mother's life is in danger. The day after the edict, the newspapers Le Matin and La Tribune denied the existence of the edict, because the President's council did not request the change in Islamic law. The newspaper Al Khabar published the April 12, 1998, news of the edict and drew attention to the fate of over 1000 women and young girls raped during attacks. An estimated 70,000 people have been reported killed since 1992. The war was precipitated when the army nullified national elections that would have given the Islamic party political power. The Algerian Family Solidarity Ministry reports that as many as 1600 women, mostly aged 13-20 years, have been abducted and raped since 1994, by bands from the Armed Islamic Group. Figures are considered underestimates. Many women were able to escape from captors, but many of these women were pregnant. The stigma is so strong that many of these women will not be accepted home by their own families. In addition to those women who survived being raped, an estimated 2000 raped women were killed by their captors. The abductions have declined, but are still ongoing, especially around Algiers and near the Moroccan and Tunisian borders. The terrorists consider the act a "temporary marriage." Amnesty International and others have criticized the recent UN Human Rights Commission for not taking action in Algeria.

  3. Dissection of protein interactomics highlights microRNA synergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenliang Zhu

    Full Text Available Despite a large amount of microRNAs (miRNAs have been validated to play crucial roles in human biology and disease, there is little systematic insight into the nature and scale of the potential synergistic interactions executed by miRNAs themselves. Here we established an integrated parameter synergy score to determine miRNA synergy, by combining the two mechanisms for miRNA-miRNA interactions, miRNA-mediated gene co-regulation and functional association between target gene products, into one single parameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis indicated that synergy score accurately identified the gene ontology-defined miRNA synergy (AUC = 0.9415, p<0.001. Only a very small portion of the random miRNA-miRNA combinations generated potent synergy, implying poor expectancy of widespread synergy. However, targeting more key genes made two miRNAs more likely to act synergistically. Compared to other miRNAs, miR-21 was a highly exceptional case due to frequent appearance in the top synergistic miRNA pairs. This result highlighted its essential role in coordinating or strengthening physiological and pathological functions of other miRNAs. The synergistic effect of miR-21 and miR-1 were functionally validated for their significant influences on myocardial apoptosis, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The novel approach established in this study enables easy and effective identification of condition-restricted potent miRNA synergy simply by concentrating the available protein interactomics and miRNA-target interaction data into a single parameter synergy score. Our results may be important for understanding synergistic gene regulation by miRNAs and may have significant implications for miRNA combination therapy of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Overview of NSTX Upgrade initial results and modelling highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, J. E.; Allain, J. P.; Battaglia, D. J.; Bedoya, F.; Bell, R. E.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J. W.; Boyer, M. D.; Crocker, N.; Diallo, A.; Ebrahimi, F.; Ferraro, N.; Fredrickson, E.; Frerichs, H.; Gerhardt, S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Guttenfelder, W.; Heidbrink, W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kriete, D. M.; Kubota, S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Liu, D.; Lunsford, R.; Mueller, D.; Myers, C. E.; Ono, M.; Park, J.-K.; Podesta, M.; Raman, R.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schmitz, O.; Scotti, F.; Sechrest, Y.; Skinner, C. H.; Smith, D. R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Yuh, H.; Wang, Z.; Waters, I.; Ahn, J.-W.; Andre, R.; Barchfeld, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bertelli, N.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Brennan, D.; Buttery, R.; Capece, A.; Canal, G.; Canik, J.; Chang, C. S.; Darrow, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Domier, C.; Ethier, S.; Evans, T.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Fonck, R.; Gan, K.; Gates, D.; Goumiri, I.; Gray, T.; Hosea, J.; Humphreys, D.; Jarboe, T.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M. A.; Koel, B.; Kolemen, E.; Ku, S.; La Haye, R. J.; Levinton, F.; Luhmann, N.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R.; McKee, G.; Meier, E.; Myra, J.; Perkins, R.; Poli, F.; Rhodes, T.; Riquezes, J.; Rowley, C.; Russell, D.; Schuster, E.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K.; Wang, W.; Wirth, B.; Zweben, S. J.

    2017-10-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has undergone a major upgrade, and the NSTX Upgrade (NSTX-U) Project was completed in the summer of 2015. NSTX-U first plasma was subsequently achieved, diagnostic and control systems have been commissioned, the H-mode accessed, magnetic error fields identified and mitigated, and the first physics research campaign carried out. During ten run weeks of operation, NSTX-U surpassed NSTX record pulse-durations and toroidal fields (TF), and high-performance ~1 MA H-mode plasmas comparable to the best of NSTX have been sustained near and slightly above the n  =  1 no-wall stability limit and with H-mode confinement multiplier H98y,2 above 1. Transport and turbulence studies in L-mode plasmas have identified the coexistence of at least two ion-gyro-scale turbulent micro-instabilities near the same radial location but propagating in opposite (i.e. ion and electron diamagnetic) directions. These modes have the characteristics of ion-temperature gradient and micro-tearing modes, respectively, and the role of these modes in contributing to thermal transport is under active investigation. The new second more tangential neutral beam injection was observed to significantly modify the stability of two types of Alfven eigenmodes. Improvements in offline disruption forecasting were made in the areas of identification of rotating MHD modes and other macroscopic instabilities using the disruption event characterization and forecasting code. Lastly, the materials analysis and particle probe was utilized on NSTX-U for the first time and enabled assessments of the correlation between boronized wall conditions and plasma performance. These and other highlights from the first run campaign of NSTX-U are described.

  5. Recent highlights from the ATLAS heavy-ion program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angerami, Aaron

    2016-12-01

    These proceedings report on recent measurements performed with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC presented at the Quark Matter 2015 Conference. These include measurements of two-particle correlations in pp collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 and 13 TeV. These results are the first to show a second harmonic modulation in the azimuthal dependence of the particle yields in pp collisions, a signature closely associated with collective flow in ion-ion collisions. Measurements of p+Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV are presented including charged particle multiplicities, Bose-Einstein correlations and yields of jets and electroweak bosons that provide insight into the initial stages of these collisions including the nuclear geometry. Finally, measurements of dijet asymmetry and jet structure in Pb+Pb and pp collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV are presented that further illuminate the phenomenon of partonic energy loss.

  6. Teenage Pregnancy. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Fact Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Laurie L.

    This fact sheet addresses the issue of teenage pregnancy. Six factors contributing to the current attention focused on teenage pregnancy and parenthood are listed and teenage pregnancy and birth rates are discussed. Other areas covered include teenage nonuse of contraception, sex education by schools and parents, family planning services, and the…

  7. Research Program of the TEXONO Collaboration Status and Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T K; Wong, Henry Tsz-King; Li, Jin

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the research program and efforts for the TEXONO Collaboration among scientists from Taiwan and China. These include reactor-based neutrino physics at the Kuo-Sheng Power Plant in Taiwan as well as various R&D efforts related to the various experimental techniques in neutrino and astro-particle physics.

  8. Highlights in Pioneering the Understanding of Language Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Lauretta

    1987-01-01

    Described are the history of the study of language disabilities, briefly outlining the work of Samuel Orton, Judson Herrick, Adolph Meyer, and Paul Schilder; Lauretta Bender's development of the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test; and the basic principles of language disorders, including familial patterns, maturation lag, plasticity, and nonfixated…

  9. Missouri Program Highlights How Standards Make a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Joellen

    2017-01-01

    Professional development designed to integrate key features of research-based professional learning has positive and significant effects on teacher practice and student achievement in mathematics when implemented in schools that meet specified technology-readiness criteria. Key features of research-based professional learning include intensive…

  10. Highlight on the dynamic organization of the nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The last decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of the proteins of the nuclear envelope, which have multiple roles including positioning the nucleus, maintaining its structural organization, and in events ranging from mitosis and meiosis to chromatin positioning and gene expression. Diverse new and stimulating results relating to nuclear organization and genome function from across kingdoms were presented in a session stream entitled “Dynamic Organization of the Nucleus” at this year's Society of Experimental Biology (SEB) meeting in Brighton, UK (July 2016). This was the first session stream run by the Nuclear Dynamics Special Interest Group, which was organized by David Evans, Katja Graumann (both Oxford Brookes University, UK) and Iris Meier (Ohio State University, USA). The session featured presentations on areas relating to nuclear organization across kingdoms including the nuclear envelope, chromatin organization, and genome function. PMID:27715428

  11. Recent highlights from the ATLAS heavy-ion program

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00210782; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings report on recent measurements performed by with ATLAS Detector at the LHC presented at the Quark Matter 2015 Conference. These include measurements of two-particle correlations in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ and 13 TeV. These results are the first to show a second harmonic modulation in the azimuthal dependence of the particle yields in $pp$ collisions, a signature closely associated with collective flow in ion-ion collisions. Measurements of $p$+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV are presented including charged particle multiplicities, Bose-Einstein correlations and yields of jets and electroweak bosons that provide insight into the initial stages of these collisions including the nuclear geometry. Finally, measurements of dijet asymmetry and jet structure in Pb+Pb and $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$ TeV are presented that further illuminate the phenomenon of partonic energy loss.

  12. Theory including future not excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    We study a complex action theory (CAT) whose path runs over not only past but also future. We show that, if we regard a matrix element defined in terms of the future state at time T and the past state at time TA as an expectation value in the CAT, then we are allowed to have the Heisenberg equation......, Ehrenfest's theorem, and the conserved probability current density. In addition,we showthat the expectation value at the present time t of a future-included theory for large T - t and large t - T corresponds to that of a future-not-included theory with a proper inner product for large t - T. Hence, the CAT...

  13. Identifying, highlighting and reducing polypharmacy in a UK hospice inpatient unit using improvement Science methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phippen, Alison; Pickard, Jennie; Steinke, Douglas; Cope, Matt; Roberts, Dai

    2017-01-01

    Polypharmacy, the concurrent use of multiple medications by one individual is a growing global issue driven by an ageing population and increasing prevalence of multi-morbidity[1]. Polypharmacy can be problematic: interactions between medications, reduced adherence to medication, burden of medication to patients, administration time, increased risk of errors and increased cost. Quality improvement methods were applied to identify and highlight polypharmacy patients with the aim of reducing their average number of regular tablets/capsules per day by 25%. The project was delivered within a UK based 27 bedded hospice inpatient unit. A series of PDSA cycles studied interventions focusing on the identification of patients with polypharmacy, the highlighting of these patients to prescribers for review and the views of patients about their medication. For the purposes of the study, polypharmacy was defined as greater than ten regular medicines and/or greater than twenty regular tablets/capsules each day. The interventions tested included patients on regular paracetamol and strong opioids being offered a trial without regular paracetamol, a constipation guide promoting the use of combination laxatives, education of prescribers around dose strengths, checklist of recommendations was placed in case notes and a sticker was used on the medicine chart to highlight patients in need of polypharmacy review. The introduction of a trial without paracetamol and a laxative guide led to reductions in polypharmacy. The sticker and checklist were successful interventions for highlighting patients with polypharmacy. Quality improvement methods were used to plan, try, test and implement simple interventions for patients on the hospice inpatient unit. This has led to a 25% reduction in the average regular tablet/capsules burden , a 16% reduction in the average number of regular medications and a 30% reduction in the average volume of liquid medication per patient without an increase in the

  14. Angelman syndrome: A review highlighting musculoskeletal and anatomical aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Rohit; Donkers, Sarah J; Kim, Soo Y

    2016-07-01

    Angelman's syndrome (AS) is a genetic neurodevelopment disorder. The cause is a known abnormality involving the maternal inherited ubiquitin-protein ligase (UBE3A) gene. Clinical characteristics universal to the disorder are well documented in the literature and include developmental delay, seizures, ataxia, altered tone, severely impaired speech and intellect, as well as an overall happy demeanor, frequent bouts of laughter, and hypermotoric behavior. Associated with this disorder are several musculoskeletal aberrations. To date, a review of case studies reporting on these musculoskeletal changes has not been carried out. Thus, the purpose of this paper was to provide an overview of the musculoskeletal changes present in individuals with AS. In our review of 21 case reports from 1965-2013, the most consistently reported anatomical changes were of the craniofacial region. These include microcephaly, brachycephaly, a palpable occipital groove, prognathism, and wide spaced teeth. Other musculoskeletal abnormalities less frequently reported in the literature include scoliosis, excessive lumbar lordosis, and pes planus. Given that the majority of the case reports reviewed was of young children, the possibility of underreporting musculoskeletal changes which may manifest in the later years of life may be present. Early diagnosis and interventions to minimize secondary complications are crucial to maintain quality of life. An overall multidisciplinary approach is emphasized to maximize developmental potential for these individuals. Future prospective studies that follow patients into adulthood are needed to better understand the prevalence and development of secondary musculoskeletal changes, which in turn can inform intervention techniques and preventative measures. Clin. Anat. 29:561-567, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Event displays highlighting the main properties of heavy flavour jets in the CMS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Skovpen, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    A broad range of physics analyses at CMS rely on the efficient identification of heavy flavour jets. Identification of these objects is a challenging task, especially in the presence of a large number of multiple interactions per bunch crossing. The presented summary contains a set of graphical displays of reconstructed events in data collected by CMS in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV in 2016. The displays highlight the main properties of heavy flavour jets in several event topologies, including QCD multijet, top quark pair, W+c and boosted H→bb.

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory - 1995 Highlights. Fiscal Year 1995, 1 October 1994--30 September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this Highlights Report is to present a brief overview of the Laboratory`s significant research accomplishments during the fiscal year 1995. The activities covered in this report include advances on the large projects, such as the discovery of the Enhanced Reversed Shear mode on the TFTR and the engineering design developments in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, as well as the significant progress made in plasma theory, small-scale experiments, technology transfer, graduate education, and the Laboratory`s outreach program in science education.

  17. The benchmark aeroelastic models program: Description and highlights of initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Farmer, Moses G.; Durham, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental effort was implemented in aeroelasticity called the Benchmark Models Program. The primary purpose of this program is to provide the necessary data to evaluate computational fluid dynamic codes for aeroelastic analysis. It also focuses on increasing the understanding of the physics of unsteady flows and providing data for empirical design. An overview is given of this program and some results obtained in the initial tests are highlighted. The tests that were completed include measurement of unsteady pressures during flutter of a rigid wing with an NACA 0012 airfoil section and dynamic response measurements of a flexible rectangular wing with a thick circular arc airfoil undergoing shock boundary layer oscillations.

  18. Earth Science Week 2009, "Understanding Climate", Highlights and News Clippings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robeck, Edward C. [American Geological Inst., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    2010-01-05

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) proposes to expand its influential Earth Science Week Program in 2009, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, to disseminate DOE's key messages, information, and resources on climate education and to include new program components. These components, ranging from online resources to live events and professional networks, would significantly increase the reach and impact of AGI's already successful geoscience education and public awareness effort in the United States and abroad in 2009, when the campaign's theme will be "Understanding Climate."

  19. Webcast for students to highlight science and technology

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne research meteorologist Doug Sisterson and other scientists from across the United States will interact with a worldwide audience of students via a special World Wide Web broadcast Monday, April 29. The two-hour Webcast will begin at 1 p.m. with introductions by host David Heil, science communicator and former host of the US TV show "Newton's Apple." A series of short (five- to 15-minute) presentations by scientists will follow. Each presentation will include time for questions by the online audience (1 PC screen).

  20. Biodiversity conservation including uncharismatic species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Joaquin

    2007-01-01

    Recent papers mention ideas on the topics of biodiversity conservation strategies and priorities (Redford et al. 2003; Lamoreux et al. 2006; Rodrı´guez et al. 2006), the current status of biodiversity (Loreau et al. 2006), the obligations of conservation biologists regarding management policies...... (Chapron 2006; Schwartz 2006), and the main threats to biodiversity (including invasive species) (Bawa 2006). I suggest, however, that these articles do not really deal with biodiversity. Rather, they all focus on a few obviously charismatic groups (mammals, birds, some plants, fishes, human culture...

  1. Raphael: materials and components highlights from the HTR FP5 and FP6 programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckthorpe, D. [AMEC NNC Limited, Knutsford (United Kingdom); Breuil, E.; Besson, D.; Gelineau, O.; Falcand, C. [AREVA-NP SAS, 69 - Lyon (France); Davies, M. [AMECNNC Ltd., Knutsford (United Kingdom); Lejeail, Y. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Hugon, I. [CEA Valrho, 30 - Marcoule (France); Briottet, L.; Tochon, P. [CEA Grenoble, 38 (France); Hegeman, J.; Vreeling, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Hurst, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Advanced Materials, Petten, (Netherlands); Von Lensa, W.; Schogl, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (FZJ..ISR) (Germany); Der Lorenzo, D. [Empresarios Agrupados Internacional S A (EASA.MD) (Spain); Friedrich, B.C. [AREVA-NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Blatt, M. [Electricitie de France (EdF) (France); Marek, M. [NRI Rez (Czech Republic); Chen, J. [Paul Sherer Institute (PSI) (Switzerland); Hingst, K.; Tahon, B. [SGL Carbon (France); Homerin, P. [Graphtech Intern Ltd (France); Hall, G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Cucini, D. [Jeumont (France); Gronek, M. [Zittau Univ. (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Good progress has been made on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) material and components investigations performed within the European Commission fifth and sixth Framework programmes. These programmes focus on the identification and investigation of key technological issues for this modular type of reactor, which offers significant advantages for the long-term development of sustainable energy and heat applications including hydrogen generation. For the fifth Framework programme two materials projects HTR-M and M1 and a component project (HTR-E) were undertaken to address requirements for the reactor pressure boundary, high temperature components (including turbine and recuperator), tribology issues and operational issues and the graphite core. For the sixth Framework programme the RAPHAEL-IP is underway addressing the remaining key issues plus extending the development and qualification to include heat exchangers, the gas circulator and design codes. The main highlights of the results from the key investigations and tests performed within these programmes are summarized. (authors)

  2. Satellite Monitoring Over the Canadian Oil Sands: Highlights from Aura OMI and TES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Mark W.; McLinden, Chris; Fioletov, Vitali; Cady-Pereira, Karen E.; Krotkov, Nick A.; Boersma, Folkert; Li, Can; Luo, Ming; Bhartia, P. K.; Joiner, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides a unique perspective for air quality monitoring in and around the Canadian Oil Sands as a result of its spatial and temporal coverage. Presented are Aura satellite observations of key pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ammonia (NH3), methanol (CH3OH), and formic acid (HCOOH) over the Canadian Oil Sands. Some of the highlights include: (i) the evolution of NO2 and SO2 from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), including comparisons with other nearby sources, (ii) two years of ammonia, carbon monoxide, methanol, and formic acid observations from 240 km North-South Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) transects through the oils sands, and (iii) preliminary insights into emissions derived from these observations.

  3. A correlative study of the allantois in pig and rabbit highlighting the diversity of extraembryonic tissues in four mammalian species, including mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waad; Viebahn, Christoph

    2017-02-06

    Despite its conserved role in placenta and umbilical cord formation, the mammalian allantois shows remarkable diversity in size and form as well as in the timing of its appearance and attachment to the chorion. In the mouse, the common allantoic diverticulum is lacking; instead, the allantoic core domain is defined as a progenitor center for allantoic development. In this study, the allantoises of the pig and the rabbit as two nonrodent mammals of increasing significance in biomedical research are compared (1) morphologically using high resolution light and electron microscopy and (2) molecularly using brachyury mRNA expression as a mesodermal marker. Multiple small allantoic diverticula in the rabbit contrast with a single large cavity filling the entire allantois of the pig, but neither pig nor rabbit allantois expresses brachyury. The mesothelium on the allantois surface shows regional variability of cell contacts and microvilli, while blood vessels appear randomly around the allantoic diverticula in a mesodermal layer of variable thickness. Primordial germ cell-like cells are found in the allantois of the pig but not of the rabbit. To understand further the relevance of this developmental and morphological diversity, we compare the allantois development of pig and rabbit with early developmental landmarks of mouse and man. Our findings suggest that (1) tissue interaction between endoderm and mesoderm is important for allantoic development and vascular differentiation in species with a rudimentary allantoic diverticulum, (2) allantoic mesothelium plays a specific role in chorioallantoic attachment, allantoic differentiation and vascularization, and (3) there is a pronounced diversity in the extraembryonic migratory pathways of primordial germ cells among mammals. Finally, the phylogenetically basal characteristics of the pig allantois are suggestive of a functional similarity in mammals with a large allantois before placentation and in (aplacental) sauropsids with a chorioallantoic membrane well-adjusted to material exchange function.

  4. FLUXNET2015 Dataset: Batteries included

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorello, G.; Papale, D.; Agarwal, D.; Trotta, C.; Chu, H.; Canfora, E.; Torn, M. S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis datasets have become one of the signature products of the FLUXNET global network. They are composed from contributions of individual site teams to regional networks, being then compiled into uniform data products - now used in a wide variety of research efforts: from plant-scale microbiology to global-scale climate change. The FLUXNET Marconi Dataset in 2000 was the first in the series, followed by the FLUXNET LaThuile Dataset in 2007, with significant additions of data products and coverage, solidifying the adoption of the datasets as a research tool. The FLUXNET2015 Dataset counts with another round of substantial improvements, including extended quality control processes and checks, use of downscaled reanalysis data for filling long gaps in micrometeorological variables, multiple methods for USTAR threshold estimation and flux partitioning, and uncertainty estimates - all of which accompanied by auxiliary flags. This "batteries included" approach provides a lot of information for someone who wants to explore the data (and the processing methods) in detail. This inevitably leads to a large number of data variables. Although dealing with all these variables might seem overwhelming at first, especially to someone looking at eddy covariance data for the first time, there is method to our madness. In this work we describe the data products and variables that are part of the FLUXNET2015 Dataset, and the rationale behind the organization of the dataset, covering the simplified version (labeled SUBSET), the complete version (labeled FULLSET), and the auxiliary products in the dataset.

  5. Highlighting and Its Relation to Distributed Study and Students' Metacognitive Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Carole L.; Storm, Benjamin C.; Kornell, Nate; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2015-01-01

    Use of highlighting is a prevalent study strategy among students, but evidence regarding its benefit for learning is mixed. We examined highlighting in relation to distributed study and students' attitudes about highlighting as a study strategy. Participants read a text passage twice while highlighting or not, with their readings either…

  6. NASA's Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach: Selected Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H.; Smith, D.; Sharma, M.

    2013-04-01

    NASA's rich portfolio of Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach (EPO) programs spans formal and informal education from K-12, addresses diverse audiences, and takes the latest NASA scientific discoveries to the public through science museums, planetaria, exhibitions, and other outlets. Public outreach activities use NASA Astrophysics scientific discoveries and technology to inspire students to undertake scientific careers and enhance public understanding of science and technology. Examples of noteworthy activities in the past year include Hubble, Chandra, JWST exhibits at the Intrepid Museum, New York, community collaborations such as the Multiwavelength Universe online course, and a variety of Citizen Science projects associated with robotic telescopes and with flight missions such as HST and Kepler. Special EPO programs have been developed to reach out to girls and underrepresented minorities. NASA's Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) has developed resources to assist the scientific community in participating in education and public outreach.

  7. Highlights From the Second Conference on Graduate Education in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Renee

    2014-03-01

    The Second Conference on Graduate Education in Physics was held in January 2013 with more than 100 participants from 74 different institutions. The participants comprised a diverse group faculty from large and small departments, staff from industry and national labs, and graduate students and postdocs. The conference was aimed at fostering innovation and creativity in our approach to graduate education in physics. Because the majority of physics PhDs ultimately find permanent employment outside academia, and because of the many competing demands on new faculty, many departments are reviewing their graduate programs. The presentations and discussions at the conference included the increasing attention being paid to broader and more flexible graduate curricula, forming industrial partnerships, strategies to increase diversity, professional skills training for graduate students and postdocs, and improving mentoring practices and instituting family-friendly policies for graduate students.

  8. Highlights from e-EPS: Coordinated Access to Light sources

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    The CALIPSO project, which runs until May 2015, will contribute to the effective exploitation of European synchrotrons and free electron lasers. CALIPSO (Coordinated Access to Light sources to Promote Standards and Optimisation) includes 20 partners forming one of the largest Research Networks in the world.   e-EPS interviewed M. Bertolo, CALIPSO project manager and his assistant C. Blasetti. Which challenges are addressed by CALIPSO? CALIPSO’s goal is to optimize the exploitation of the European synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers. With respect to previous projects funded by the European Commission, it foresees significant improvements in integration, innovation and user-friendliness in all three areas of networking, transnational access and instrumentation. The Transnational Access program potentially benefits a community of 25,000 estimated users offering free open access to 12 synchrotrons and 5 free electron lasers solely based on scientific merit. In ad...

  9. Highlights of the First 15 Months of Aquarius Salinity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Kao, Hsun-Ying; Wentz, Frank; LeVine, David M.; Yueh, Simon H.; Feldman, Gene C.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius satellite salinity measurements are resolving the major global and regional spatial patterns, and temporal variations, since the start of routine data collection on 25 August 2011. This description includes the principal seasonal variations over the first annual cycle as observed by the mission. In particular, we identify the evolution of low salinity anomalies associated with the Atlantic and Pacific intertropical convergence zones (ITCZ), major river outflows such as the Amazon, a seasonal low salinity anomaly in the Panama bight, and other features. We also explore the links that the salinity variations have with precipitation and surface currents. We then will describe the variations related to the presently evolving 2012 El Nino, now evident, as it progresses through the summer and fall 2012. We conclude with a brief summary of the Aquarius data products and validation

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease: Highlights for the General Pediatrician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Quigley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease in the pediatric population has been increasing. Early detection and treatment can slow down the progression of kidney disease and help prevent the development of end stage renal disease. In addition, as the kidney function declines, there are many pathophysiologic interactions with other organ systems that need to be monitored and treated. In particular, because of impaired vitamin D metabolism, calcium and phosphorus homeostasis is dysregulated and results in secondary bone disease. Anemia is common due to a number of factors including impaired erythropoietin production. Growth is often impacted by chronic kidney disease but can be improved by proper treatment. Complications of chronic kidney disease can be minimized by proper monitoring and treatment of these parameters. The general pediatrician plays a critical role in this process.

  11. Anatomical terminology and nomenclature: past, present and highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachlik, David; Baca, Vaclav; Bozdechova, Ivana; Cech, Pavel; Musil, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    The anatomical terminology is a base for medical communication. It is elaborated into a nomenclature in Latin. Its history goes back to 1895, when the first Latin anatomical nomenclature was published as Basiliensia Nomina Anatomica. It was followed by seven revisions (Jenaiensia Nomina Anatomica 1935, Parisiensia Nomina Anatomica 1955, Nomina Anatomica 2nd to 6th edition 1960-1989). The last revision, Terminologia Anatomica, (TA) created by the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology and approved by the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists, was published in 1998. Apart from the official Latin anatomical terminology, it includes a list of recommended English equivalents. In this article, major changes and pitfalls of the nomenclature are discussed, as well as the clinical anatomy terms. The last revision (TA) is highly recommended to the attention of not only teachers, students and researchers, but also to clinicians, doctors, translators, editors and publishers to be followed in their activities.

  12. CERTS: Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions - Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph

    2003-07-30

    Historically, the U.S. electric power industry was vertically integrated, and utilities were responsible for system planning, operations, and reliability management. As the nation moves to a competitive market structure, these functions have been disaggregated, and no single entity is responsible for reliability management. As a result, new tools, technologies, systems, and management processes are needed to manage the reliability of the electricity grid. However, a number of simultaneous trends prevent electricity market participants from pursuing development of these reliability tools: utilities are preoccupied with restructuring their businesses, research funding has declined, and the formation of Independent System Operators (ISOs) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) to operate the grid means that control of transmission assets is separate from ownership of these assets; at the same time, business uncertainty, and changing regulatory policies have created a climate in which needed investment for transmission infrastructure and tools for reliability management has dried up. To address the resulting emerging gaps in reliability R&D, CERTS has undertaken much-needed public interest research on reliability technologies for the electricity grid. CERTS' vision is to: (1) Transform the electricity grid into an intelligent network that can sense and respond automatically to changing flows of power and emerging problems; (2) Enhance reliability management through market mechanisms, including transparency of real-time information on the status of the grid; (3) Empower customers to manage their energy use and reliability needs in response to real-time market price signals; and (4) Seamlessly integrate distributed technologies--including those for generation, storage, controls, and communications--to support the reliability needs of both the grid and individual customers.

  13. Families classification including multiopposition asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Andrea; Spoto, Federica; Knežević, Zoran; Novaković, Bojan; Tsirvoulis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of our new classification of asteroid families, upgraded by using catalog with > 500,000 asteroids. We discuss the outcome of the most recent update of the family list and of their membership. We found enough evidence to perform 9 mergers of the previously independent families. By introducing an improved method of estimation of the expected family growth in the less populous regions (e.g. at high inclination) we were able to reliably decide on rejection of one tiny group as a probable statistical fluke. Thus we reduced our current list to 115 families. We also present newly determined ages for 6 families, including complex 135 and 221, improving also our understanding of the dynamical vs. collisional families relationship. We conclude with some recommendations for the future work and for the family name problem.

  14. Highlights lecture EANM 2014: "Gimme gimme gimme those nuclear Super Troupers".

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Marion; Van Laere, Koen

    2015-04-01

    The EANM Congress 2014 took place in Gothenburg, Sweden, from 18 to 22 October under the presidency of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. Prof. Peter Gjertsson chaired the Local Organizing Committee, according to the standardized EANM congress structure. The meeting was a highlight for the multidisciplinary community that forms the heart and soul of nuclear medicine; attendance was exceptionally high. In total almost 5,300 participants came to Gothenburg, and 1,397 colleagues participated via the EANM LIVE sessions ( http://eanmlive.eanm.org/index.php ). Participants from all continents were presented with an excellent programme consisting of symposia, scientific and featured sessions, CME sessions, and plenary lectures. These lectures were devoted to nuclear medicine therapy, hybrid imaging and molecular life sciences. Two tracks were included in the main programme, clustering multi-committee involvement: the 5th International Symposium on Targeted Radionuclide-therapy and Dosimetry (ISTARD) and the first Molecules to Man (M2M) track, an initiative of the EANM Committees for Translational Molecular Imaging, Radiopharmacy and Drug Development. The industry made a substantial contribution to the success of the congress demonstrating the latest technology and innovations in the field. During the closing Highlights Lecture, a selection of the best-rated abstracts was presented including diverse areas of nuclear medicine: physics and instrumentation, radiopharmacy, preclinical imaging, oncology (with a focus on the clinical application of newly developed tracers) and radionuclide therapy, cardiology and neurosciences. This Highlights Lecture could only be a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed during the meeting, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress proceedings book, published as Volume 41, Supplement 2 of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging in October 2014.

  15. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Catalysis Highlights for FY2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Bruce C.

    2007-11-15

    To reduce the nation’s dependence on imported oil, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other federal and private agencies are investing in understanding catalysis. This report focuses on catalysis research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its collaborators. Using sophisticated instruments in DOE’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility, research was conducted to answer key questions related to the nation’s use of automotive fuels. Research teams investigated how hydrogen can be safely stored and efficiently released, critical questions to use this alternative fuel. Further, they are answering key questions to design molecular catalysts to control the transfer of hydrogen atoms, hydrides, and protons important to hydrogen production. In dealing with today’s fuels, researchers examined adsorption of noxious nitrous oxides in automotive exhaust. Beyond automotive fuel, researchers worked on catalysts to harness solar power. These catalysts include the rutile and anatase forms of titanium dioxide. Basic research was conducted on designing catalysts for these and other applications. Our scientists examined how to build catalysts with the desired properties atom by atom and molecule by molecule. In addition, this report contains brief descriptions of the outstanding accomplishments of catalysis experts at PNNL.

  16. Emotion theory and research: highlights, unanswered questions, and emerging issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Carroll E

    2009-01-01

    Emotion feeling is a phase of neurobiological activity, the key component of emotions and emotion-cognition interactions. Emotion schemas, the most frequently occurring emotion experiences, are dynamic emotion-cognition interactions that may consist of momentary/situational responding or enduring traits of personality that emerge over developmental time. Emotions play a critical role in the evolution of consciousness and the operations of all mental processes. Types of emotion relate differentially to types or levels of consciousness. Unbridled imagination and the ability for sympathetic regulation of empathy may represent both potential gains and losses from the evolution and ontogeny of emotion processes and consciousness. Unresolved issues include psychology's neglect of levels of consciousness that are distinct from access or reflective consciousness and use of the term "unconscious mind" as a dumpster for all mental processes that are considered unreportable. The relation of memes and the mirror neuron system to empathy, sympathy, and cultural influences on the development of socioemotional skills are unresolved issues destined to attract future research.

  17. History of Belle and some of its lesser known highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Stephen Lars

    2016-01-01

    I report on the early history of Belle, which was almost entirely focused on testing the Kobayashi Maskawa mechanism for $CP$ violation that predicted large matter-antimatter asymmetries in certain $B$ meson decay modes. Results reported by both BaBar and Belle in the summer of 2001 verified the Kobayashi Maskawa idea and led to their Nobel prizes in 2008. In addition to studies of CP violation, Belle (and BaBar) reported a large number of important results on a wide variety of other subjects, many of which that had nothing to do with B mesons. In this talk I cover three (of many) subjects where Belle measurements have had a significant impact on specific sub-fields of hadron physics but are not generally well know. These include: the discovery of an anomalously large cross sections for double charmonium production in continuum e+e- annihilation; sensitive probes of the structure of the low-mass scalar mesons; and first measurements of the Collins spin fragmentation function.

  18. Criminal justice processing of sexual assault cases. Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J V

    1994-03-01

    This article discusses the processing of criminal justice on sexual assault cases in Canada. To begin with, in 1983, Bill C-127 abolished the offense of rape and indecent assault and created three new crimes of sexual assault and three parallel offenses of assault. This legislation also introduced a number of important changes to the way crimes of sexual aggression are processed by the criminal justice system. In 1991, the Supreme Court struck down provisions of the sexual assault legislation preventing a defendant from introducing evidence regarding complainant's previous sexual conduct. As a result, Bill C-49 was introduced to provide a test to determine whether a complainant's sexual history could be admitted at trial. This bill also addresses the issue of consent and the defense of mistaken beliefs in consent. The focus of the Juristat is the criminal justice processing of the three levels of sexual assault, which are elaborated in this article. In order to distinguish between the different levels, body harm relates only to physical injury and does not include psychological harm. Drawing on the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Sentence Study, the Adult Criminal Court Survey and the Youth Court Survey, the Juristat summarizes recent trends relating to the processing of sexual assault and assault by the police and the courts. Canada's Violence Against Women Survey provides a profile of sexual assault incidents among adult women in Canada.

  19. Highlights on artificial insemination (AI technology in the pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Khalifa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, there has been a tremendous increase in the development of field AI services in the majority of countries concerned with pig production. The objective of this paper is to review: (a the current status of swine AI in the world, (b significance and limitation of AI with liquid and frozen semen, (c the biological traits of porcine semen in relation to in-vitro sperm storage, (d the criteria used for selection of a boar stud as a semen supplier, (e how to process boar semen for liquid and frozen storage in the commercial settings and (f how to improve fertility and prolificacy of boar semen. More than 99% of the inseminations conducted worldwide are made with liquid-stored semen. AI with frozen semen is used only for upgrading the genetic base in a particular country or herd. Determining the initial quality of semen ejaculates along with the selection of the optimum storage extender has a profound effect on the quality and fertility of AI doses. Different procedures have been used for improving the fertility of preserved spermatozoa including colloidal centrifugation of the semen, intrauterine insemination and modulation of the uterine defense mechanism after AI. Development of an efficient protocol for synchronizing the time of ovulation in sows and gilts coupled with improving uterine horn insemination technique will make a breakthrough in the commercial use of frozen boar semen.

  20. Honeybee Colony Vibrational Measurements to Highlight the Brood Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bencsik

    Full Text Available Insect pollination is of great importance to crop production worldwide and honey bees are amongst its chief facilitators. Because of the decline of managed colonies, the use of sensor technology is growing in popularity and it is of interest to develop new methods which can more accurately and less invasively assess honey bee colony status. Our approach is to use accelerometers to measure vibrations in order to provide information on colony activity and development. The accelerometers provide amplitude and frequency information which is recorded every three minutes and analysed for night time only. Vibrational data were validated by comparison to visual inspection data, particularly the brood development. We show a strong correlation between vibrational amplitude data and the brood cycle in the vicinity of the sensor. We have further explored the minimum data that is required, when frequency information is also included, to accurately predict the current point in the brood cycle. Such a technique should enable beekeepers to reduce the frequency with which visual inspections are required, reducing the stress this places on the colony and saving the beekeeper time.

  1. 2003 Biology and Biotechnology Research Program Overview and Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prange, C

    2003-03-01

    LLNL conducts multidisciplinary bioscience to fill national needs. Our primary roles are to: develop knowledge and tools which enhance national security, including biological, chemical and nuclear capabilities, and energy and environmental security; develop understanding of genetic and biochemical processes to enhance disease prevention, detection and treatment; develop unique biochemical measurement and computational modeling capabilities which enable understanding of biological processes; and develop technology and tools which enhance healthcare. We execute our roles through integrated multidisciplinary programs that apply our competencies in: microbial and mammalian genomics--the characterization of DNA, the genes it encodes, their regulation and function and their role in living systems; protein function and biochemistry - the structure, function, and interaction of proteins and other molecules involved in the integrated biochemical function of the processes of life; computational modeling and understanding of biochemical systems--the application of high-speed computing technology to simulate and visualize complex, integrated biological processes; bioinformatics--databasing, networking, and analysis of biological data; and bioinstrumentation--the application of physical and engineering technologies to novel biological and biochemical measurements, laboratory automation, medical device development, and healthcare technologies. We leverage the Laboratory's exceptional capabilities in the physical, computational, chemical, environmental and engineering sciences. We partner with industry and universities to utilize their state-of-the art technology and science and to make our capabilities and discoveries available to the broader research community.

  2. Review of accessory tragus with highlights of its associated syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Bahar; Khachemoune, Amor

    2014-12-01

    Accessory tragus is a developmental defect involving malformation of part of the external ear. It is a moderately rare congenital condition reported in 1858 by Birkett for the first time. Histological features of accessory tragus include a thin layer of stratum corneum with a rugated epidermis, presence of eccrine glands, and irregular spatial positioning of vellus hair follicles accompanied by sebaceous glands. Accessory tragus is commonly a limited deformity; however, it can be a sign of associated congenital syndromes. It has been shown to be associated with Goldenhar syndrome, Townes-Brocks syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, VACTERL syndrome, and Wolf-Hirschhron syndrome. Surgical excision, the most common form of management of accessory tragus lesions, typically leads to a positive outcome. An extensive search was performed using pubmed.gov, Embase, MedLine, and Googlescholar.com using key words: accessory tragus, congenital malformations of ear, first branchial arch, and embryology. In this paper, we review the clinical and histological presentation, associated syndromes, management, and outcome of accessory tragus.

  3. NREL Highlight: Truck Platooning Testing; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-21

    NREL's fleet test and evaluation team assesses the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning of line-haul sleeper cabs with modern aerodynamics. Platooning reduces aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and safely decreasing the distance between them via electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. In 2014, the team conducted track testing of three SmartWay tractor - two platooned tractors and one control tractor—at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights. While platooning improved fuel economy at all speeds, travel at 55 mph resulted in the best overall miles per gallon. The lead truck demonstrated fuel savings up to 5.3% while the trailing truck saved up to 9.7%. A number of conditions impact the savings attainable, including ambient temperature, distance between lead and trailing truck, and payload weight. Future studies may look at ways to optimize system fuel efficiency and emissions reductions.

  4. Evolution of the the ART approach: highlights and achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo E. Frencken

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART was initiated in the mid-eighties in Tanzania in response to an inappropriately functioning community oral health programme that was based on western health care models and western technology. The approach has evolved to its present standing as an effective minimal intervention approach mainly because the originators anticipated the great potential of ART to alleviate inequality in oral health care, and because they recognised the need to carry out research to investigate its effectiveness and applicability. Twenty-five years later, ART was accepted by the World Health Organisation (1994 and the FDI World Dental Federation (2002. It is included in textbooks on cariology, restorative dentistry and minimal intervention dentistry. It is being systematically introduced into public oral health service systems in a number of low- and middle income countries. Private practitioners use it. Many publications related to aspects of ART have been published and many more will follow. To achieve quality results with ART one has to attend well-conducted and sufficiently long training courses, preferably in combination with other caries preventive strategies. ART should, therefore, not be considered in isolation and must be part of an evidence-based approach to oral health with a strong foundation based on prevention.

  5. HIGHLIGHTS OF THE REPRESENTATION COSTUME IN PICTORIAL ART- BAROQUE STYLE -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    URDEA Olimpia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the social history of human civilization and art history, the human body was and still is a challenging field to explore in various representations, a material for various manners of cultural interventions. The way of artistically representing the body, the clothed body, has followed the path of various artistic movements that marked art history. In the act of interpersonal perception, the costume establishes itself as a particular field of non-verbal communication, one based on image. The present paper refers to the costume, as a particular vector of non-verbal communication in social space, as it was depicted and perceived in the painting of the 17th century and early 18th century, a time marked by the Baroque style. From this point of view, garment received the value of an intermediary in the communication between bodily space and the social one. In Baroque formal portrait, the garment completes by scale and the rendering technique of the texture and chromatic emphasizes the position of the pictorially represented person. Thus, the garment interferes with the gesture and mimics as forms of interpersonal knowledge. The transmitter – the clothed character represented through the eyes of the painter – is exposed to the perceptions of the others, providing a comprehensive matrix of information integrated in the social context. Pictorial representations are included in the matrix of the means by which the body is exposed by the costume in order to communicate with the social environment

  6. Highlights from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Pretz, John

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory was completed this year at a 4100-meter site on the flank of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico. HAWC is a water Cherenkov ground array with the capability to distinguish 100 GeV - 100 TeV gamma rays from the hadronic cosmic-ray background. HAWC is uniquely suited to study extremely high energy cosmic-ray sources, search for regions of extended gamma-ray emission, and to identify transient gamma-ray phenomena. HAWC will play a key role in triggering multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies of active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Observation of TeV photons also provide unique tests for a number of fundamental physics phenomena including dark matter annihilation and primordial black hole evaporation. Operation began mid-2013 with the partially-completed detector. Multi-TeV emission from the Galactic Plane is clearly seen in the first year of operation, confirming a number of known TeV sources, and a numb...

  7. Including Magnetostriction in Micromagnetic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Fabian, Karl; Nagy, Lesleis

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic anomalies that identify crustal spreading are predominantly recorded by basalts formed at the mid-ocean ridges, whose magnetic signals are dominated by iron-titanium-oxides (Fe3-xTixO4), so called "titanomagnetites", of which the Fe2.4Ti0.6O4 (TM60) phase is the most common. With sufficient quantities of titanium present, these minerals exhibit strong magnetostriction. To date, models of these grains in the pseudo-single domain (PSD) range have failed to accurately account for this effect. In particular, a popular analytic treatment provided by Kittel (1949) for describing the magnetostrictive energy as an effective increase of the anisotropy constant can produce unphysical strains for non-uniform magnetizations. I will present a rigorous approach based on work by Brown (1966) and by Kroner (1958) for including magnetostriction in micromagnetic codes which is suitable for modelling hysteresis loops and finding remanent states in the PSD regime. Preliminary results suggest the more rigorously defined micromagnetic models exhibit higher coercivities and extended single domain ranges when compared to more simplistic approaches.

  8. NSTX: Facility/Research Highlights and Near Term Facility Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ono

    2008-11-19

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a collaborative mega-ampere-class spherical torus research facility with high power heating and current drive systems and the state-of-the-art comprehensive diagnostics. For the 2008 experimental campaign, the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating efficiency in deuterium improved significantly with lithium evaporation and produced a record central Te of 5 keV. The HHFW heating of NBI-heated discharges was also demonstrated for the first time with lithium application. The EBW emission in H-mode was also improved dramatically with lithium which was shown to be attributable to reduced edge collisional absorption. Newly installed FIDA energetic particle diagnostic measured significant transport of energetic ions associated with TAE avalanche as well as n=1 kink activities. A full 75 channel poloidal CHERS system is now operational yielding tantalizing initial results. In the near term, major upgrade activities include a liquid-lithium divertor target to achieve lower collisionality regime, the HHFW antenna upgrades to double its power handling capability in H-mode, and a beam-emission spectroscopy diagnostic to extend the localized turbulence measurements toward the ion gyro-radius scale from the present concentration on the electron gyro-radius scale. For the longer term, a new center stack to significantly expand the plasma operating parameters is planned along with a second NBI system to double the NBI heating and CD power and provide current profile control. These upgrades will enable NSTX to explore fully non-inductive operations over a much expanded plasma parameter space in terms of higher plasma temperature and lower collisionality, thereby significantly reducing the physics parameter gap between the present NSTX and the projected next-step ST experiments.

  9. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights June 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2011-07-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for May 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/126, was distributed to program participants on June 9, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Behavior, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

  10. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights March 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2011-04-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for February 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/71, was distributed to program participants on March 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Behavior, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (d) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; and (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

  11. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights February 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for January 2010, ORNL/TM-2011/30, was distributed to program participants on February 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; and (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

  12. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights January 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for December 2010, ORNL/TM-2011/10, was distributed to program participants on January 12, 2011. As reported last month, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

  13. Pathway thermodynamics highlights kinetic obstacles in central metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Flamholz, Avi; Reznik, Ed; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Milo, Ron

    2014-02-01

    In metabolism research, thermodynamics is usually used to determine the directionality of a reaction or the feasibility of a pathway. However, the relationship between thermodynamic potentials and fluxes is not limited to questions of directionality: thermodynamics also affects the kinetics of reactions through the flux-force relationship, which states that the logarithm of the ratio between the forward and reverse fluxes is directly proportional to the change in Gibbs energy due to a reaction (ΔrG'). Accordingly, if an enzyme catalyzes a reaction with a ΔrG' of -5.7 kJ/mol then the forward flux will be roughly ten times the reverse flux. As ΔrG' approaches equilibrium (ΔrG' = 0 kJ/mol), exponentially more enzyme counterproductively catalyzes the reverse reaction, reducing the net rate at which the reaction proceeds. Thus, the enzyme level required to achieve a given flux increases dramatically near equilibrium. Here, we develop a framework for quantifying the degree to which pathways suffer these thermodynamic limitations on flux. For each pathway, we calculate a single thermodynamically-derived metric (the Max-min Driving Force, MDF), which enables objective ranking of pathways by the degree to which their flux is constrained by low thermodynamic driving force. Our framework accounts for the effect of pH, ionic strength and metabolite concentration ranges and allows us to quantify how alterations to the pathway structure affect the pathway's thermodynamics. Applying this methodology to pathways of central metabolism sheds light on some of their features, including metabolic bypasses (e.g., fermentation pathways bypassing substrate-level phosphorylation), substrate channeling (e.g., of oxaloacetate from malate dehydrogenase to citrate synthase), and use of alternative cofactors (e.g., quinone as an electron acceptor instead of NAD). The methods presented here place another arrow in metabolic engineers' quiver, providing a simple means of evaluating the

  14. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Data Management Progress and Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G.; Blackman, B.; Eakins, J.; Hodgkinson, K.; Matykiewicz, J.; Boler, F.; Beldyk, M.; Henderson, B.; Hoyt, B.; Lee, E.; Persson, E.; Smith, J.; Torrez, D.; Wright, J.; Jackson, M.; Meertens, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three- dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters by October 2008, as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations and one laser strainmeter through the PBO Nucleus project and 11 GPS stations installed by the USArray segment of EarthScope. As of 1 September 2007, UNAVCO had completed 680 PBO GPS stations and had upgraded 89% of the planned PBO Nucleus stations. Most of these stations return data to the UNAVCO Boulder Network Operations Center (NOC) on a daily basis, with about 40 stations returning data on an hourly basis. Overall, the combined PBO and Nucleus network has now provided almost 350 GB of raw standard rate data, which are routinely processed by the PBO GPS Analysis Centers, at Central Washington University and the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the PBO GPS Analysis Center Coordinator at MIT. These groups create a range of GPS products, including station position time series, GPS velocity vectors, and related information. As of September 2007, these centers processed data on a daily basis from about 920 stations; typical position uncertainties are under 1.5 mm horizontally and 4 mm vertically. All PBO GPS data products are archived at and available from the UNAVCO Facility, with a second archive at the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). All these products may be accessed via the PBO web page at http://pboweb.unavco.org/gps_data. As part of PBO, UNAVCO will also install and operate the largest borehole seismic and strainmeter networks in North America, as well as tiltmeters and laser strainmeters. As of September 2007, 41 PBO borehole stations

  15. Highlights of TOMS Version 9 Total Ozone Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, Pawan; Haffner, David

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental basis of TOMS total ozone algorithm was developed some 45 years ago by Dave and Mateer. It was designed to estimate total ozone from satellite measurements of the backscattered UV radiances at few discrete wavelengths in the Huggins ozone absorption band (310-340 nm). Over the years, as the need for higher accuracy in measuring total ozone from space has increased, several improvements to the basic algorithms have been made. They include: better correction for the effects of aerosols and clouds, an improved method to account for the variation in shape of ozone profiles with season, latitude, and total ozone, and a multi-wavelength correction for remaining profile shape errors. These improvements have made it possible to retrieve total ozone with just 3 spectral channels of moderate spectral resolution (approx. 1 nm) with accuracy comparable to state-of-the-art spectral fitting algorithms like DOAS that require high spectral resolution measurements at large number of wavelengths. One of the deficiencies of the TOMS algorithm has been that it doesn't provide an error estimate. This is a particular problem in high latitudes when the profile shape errors become significant and vary with latitude, season, total ozone, and instrument viewing geometry. The primary objective of the TOMS V9 algorithm is to account for these effects in estimating the error bars. This is done by a straightforward implementation of the Rodgers optimum estimation method using a priori ozone profiles and their error covariances matrices constructed using Aura MLS and ozonesonde data. The algorithm produces a vertical ozone profile that contains 1-2.5 pieces of information (degrees of freedom of signal) depending upon solar zenith angle (SZA). The profile is integrated to obtain the total column. We provide information that shows the altitude range in which the profile is best determined by the measurements. One can use this information in data assimilation and analysis. A side

  16. NOD-like receptor signaling and inflammasome-related pathways are highlighted in psoriatic epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, Mari H; Katayama, Shintaro; Skoog, Tiina; Siitonen, H Annika; Vuola, Jyrki; Nuutila, Kristo; Sormunen, Raija; Johnsson, Anna; Linnarsson, Sten; Suomela, Sari; Kankuri, Esko; Kere, Juha; Elomaa, Outi

    2016-03-15

    Psoriatic skin differs distinctly from normal skin by its thickened epidermis. Most gene expression comparisons utilize full-thickness biopsies, with substantial amount of dermis. We assayed the transcriptomes of normal, lesional, and non-lesional psoriatic epidermis, sampled as split-thickness skin grafts, with 5'-end RNA sequencing. We found that psoriatic epidermis contains more mRNA per total RNA than controls, and took this into account in the bioinformatic analysis. The approach highlighted innate immunity-related pathways in psoriasis, including NOD-like receptor (NLR) signaling and inflammasome activation. We demonstrated that the NLR signaling genes NOD2, PYCARD, CARD6, and IFI16 are upregulated in psoriatic epidermis, and strengthened these findings by protein expression. Interestingly, PYCARD, the key component of the inflammasome, showed an altered expression pattern in the lesional epidermis. The profiling of non-lesional skin highlighted PSORS4 and mitochondrially encoded transcripts, suggesting that their gene expression is altered already before the development of lesions. Our data suggest that all components needed for the active inflammasome are present in the keratinocytes of psoriatic skin. The characterization of inflammasome pathways provides further opportunities for therapy. Complementing previous transcriptome studies, our approach gives deeper insight into the gene regulation in psoriatic epidermis.

  17. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

    2010-01-15

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  18. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lumley, David [U. W. AUSTRALIA; Sherlock, Don [CHEVRON; Daley, Tom [LBNL; Lawton, Don [U CALGARY; Masters, Ron [SHELL; Verliac, Michel [SCHLUMBERGER; White, Don [GEOL. SURVEY CANADA

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  19. A case of chemical scalp burns after hair highlights: experimental evidence of oxidative injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, Roberta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Pendolino, Flavio; Facchin, Giangiacomo; Snenghi, Rossella

    2016-12-01

    Hair highlights are quite common procedures carried out in hair salons by using a mixture of a lightening powder containing persulfates with a suspension containing hydrogen peroxide: a representative case of chemical scalp burns is described as a consequence of this treatment. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the strict relationship between the scalp damage and the commercial products used in a case of hair highlighting. The results of some chemical analyses have been reported, showing, in particular, that the chemical reactivity of the mixture changes in the time, thus strongly suggesting that the procedure for the application of the mixture is critical for the occurrence of possible accidents. The presence in the powder of chemical compounds bearing aliphatic chains as surfactants explains the appearance of dramatic symptoms after days due to a slow dissolution of the oxidant compounds in the stratum corneum of skin with no effect in reducing injury of palliative treatments. Safety suggestions and recommendations for producers and workers are also included.

  20. Highlights of recent studies and future plans for the French human biomonitoring (HBM) programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréry, Nadine; Vandentorren, Stéphanie; Etchevers, Anne; Fillol, Clémence

    2012-02-01

    This manuscript presents highlights of recent studies and perspectives from the French human biomonitoring (HBM) programme. Until recently, HBM studies focused on specific populations or pollutants to gain a better understanding of exposure to environmental chemicals, to help regulators reduce environmental exposure and to monitor existing policies on specific concerns. Highlights of recent multicentre biomonitoring studies with specific population or pollutant focus are given. These French HBM studies have been implemented to know: (1) the influence of living near an incinerator on serum dioxin and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels, (2) the influence of consuming river fish contaminated by PCBs on serum PCBs of fishermen, and (3) the evolution of blood lead levels in children from 1 to 6 years old since 1995. Special emphasis is placed on the use of an integrated (HBM coupled with nutrition and health studies), multipollutant approach. This approach has been initiated in France with a recent national population-based biomonitoring survey, the Etude Nationale Nutrition Santé (ENNS; French Nutrition and Health Survey). This survey will provide the first reference distribution for 42 biomarkers in the French population. The current national HBM strategy will build upon the ENNS and include a national survey of people aged between 6 and 74 years complemented for the neonatal period and childhood by the Etude Longitudinale Française depuis l'Enfance (ELFE; French longitudinal study of children). France also contributes to the harmonization of HBM activities in Europe through participation in European HBM projects.

  1. Evaluating Membrane Processes for Air Conditioning; Highlights in Research and Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This NREL Highlight discusses a recent state-of-the-art review of membrane processes for air conditioning that identifies future research opportunities. This highlight is being developed for the June 2015 S&T Alliance Board meeting.

  2. Product highlights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    This machine is used to weave high-quality/ace, jacquard apparel fabric, and jacquard ornamental fabric, etc. The features of this machine are presented in the following aspects: the combination of multi bar and jacquard technology form textured base fabric; the fall plate and selvage bar forms embossed pattern; laying-in selvage bar forms the pattern of plain fabric, all those strengthening the effect of the lace pattern.

  3. MAGIC highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Coto, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    The present generation of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) has greatly improved our knowledge on the Very High Energy (VHE) side of our Universe. The MAGIC IACTs operate since 2004 with one telescope and since 2009 as a two telescope stereoscopic system. I will outline a few of our latest and most relevant results: the discovery of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at VHE, recently found to extend up to 400 GeV and along the "bridge" of the light curve, the measurement of the Crab nebula spectrum over three decades of energy, the discovery of VHE γ-ray emission from the PWN 3C 58, the very rapid emission of IC 310, in addition to dark matter studies. The results that will be described here and the planned deep observations in the next years will pave the path for the future generation of IACTs.

  4. Highlights 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    This document summarizes a year of activities for the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facilities), this facility serves 31 beamlines that represent 34 end stations that can be run independently. This document is organized into 9 parts. Part 1: 'high resolution and resonance scattering' deals with surface science and magnetism at high pressure, in particular results are presented for samarium and europium chalcogenides. A cross-section of a variety of applications are presented, they range from glass physics to the understanding of thermoelectric materials. Part 2: 'materials sciences' deals with material behaviour under extreme conditions (metallic sulfur above 100 GPa,...) general applications of X-ray diffraction : stress and strain studies, assessment of excess free volume in metallic glasses, or grain nucleation and growth kinetics during solidification. Part 3: 'soft condensed matter'. Part 4: 'structural biology'. Part 5: 'surface and interface science' (at ESRF surfaces and interfaces are studied at about 50% of all beamlines). A study shows the existence of ordered SiGe domains in the interior of the small Ge islands in Si, whereas bulk SiGe alloy is disordered. Other studies shed light on the surprisingly different magnetic behaviour of ultra-thin cobalt and nickel films on a platinum surface. Part 6 : 'X-ray absorption and magnetic scattering'. Many of the studies push the limits of methods using high pressure, high magnetic fields, high and low temperature with absorption and scattering techniques. There are also examples of measurements on the femtosecond time scale using the core-hole clock method and on femto-meter length scale in magnetostriction measurements. Part 7: 'X-ray imaging and optics'. Part 8: 'the X-ray source'. Part 9: 'facts and figures'. (A.C.)

  5. MAGIC highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Coto Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present generation of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs has greatly improved our knowledge on the Very High Energy (VHE side of our Universe. The MAGIC IACTs operate since 2004 with one telescope and since 2009 as a two telescope stereoscopic system. I will outline a few of our latest and most relevant results: the discovery of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at VHE, recently found to extend up to 400 GeV and along the “bridge” of the light curve, the measurement of the Crab nebula spectrum over three decades of energy, the discovery of VHE γ-ray emission from the PWN 3C 58, the very rapid emission of IC 310, in addition to dark matter studies. The results that will be described here and the planned deep observations in the next years will pave the path for the future generation of IACTs.

  6. HAWC highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin-Blicq, Armelle [Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: HAWC-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory was completed and began full operation on March 20, 2015. The detector consists of an array of 300 water tanks, each containing 200 tons of purified water and instrumented with 4 PMTs. Located at an elevation of 4100m a.s.l. near the Sierra Negra volcano in central Mexico, HAWC observes gamma rays in the 0.1-100 TeV range and has a sensitivity to TeV-scale gamma-ray sources an order of magnitude better than previous air-shower arrays. It has 2 sr field-of-view and >90% duty cycle make HAWC an ideal instrument for surveying the high-energy sky. We describe the HAWC detector and its performance characteristics and report initial results from the first months of operation.

  7. STAR Highlights

    OpenAIRE

    Masui, Hiroshi; collaboration, for the STAR

    2011-01-01

    We report selected results from STAR collaboration at RHIC, focusing on jet-hadron and jet-like correlations, quarkonium suppression and collectivity, di-electron spectrum in both p+p and Au+Au, and higher moments of net-protons as well as azimuthal anisotropy from RHIC Beam Energy Scan program.

  8. OPERA HIGHLIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Strauss

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The OPERA experiment is a long baseline neutrino oscillation  experiment aimed at observing the νμ → ντ neutrino oscillation in the CERN neutrino to Gran Sasso beamline in the appearance mode by detecting the τ-decay. Here I will summarize the results from the run years 2008–10 with an update on observed rare decay topologies and the results of the neutrino velocity measurements.

  9. AGARD Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    m) IT ala (1) a freccia ES sensacion (r) artificial ES indicador (m) tipo A NE pillvleugel FR I sensation MI artificielle FR indicateur (m) type A...visualizzatore (m) tipo A TU W tipi kanat fT sensirie Nf errificiale NE A-scharmt iro) NE kunstmastig I stuurkracht) gevroel In) PO dcran Wm tipo A 10596

  10. Diagnosis and Management of Rhinosinusitis: Highlights from the 2015 Practice Parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Kathleen; Peters, Anju Tripathi

    2016-04-01

    Rhinosinusitis is a commonly diagnosed disease in the USA. Rhinosinusitis is classified as acute, recurrent, or chronic (with or without nasal polyps). While acute rhinosinusitis is diagnosed by history and physical examination, chronic rhinosinusitis and recurrent acute rhinosinusitis are diagnosed based on symptoms and the presence of disease on either a sinus CT scan and/or endoscopy. Management of uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis includes analgesics, saline irrigation, and/or intranasal steroids. Antibiotics and intranasal steroids are recommended for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Intranasal and oral steroids with antibiotics are recommended to treat chronic rhinosinusitis although the evidence for antibiotics is weak. Biologics such as omalizumab and mepolizumab are being investigated for the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps. Surgery may be indicated in management of refractory chronic rhinosinusitis and rarely for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. This review discusses highlights of the updated 2014 practice parameter and up-to-date evidence from other literature sources.

  11. Differential proteomic analysis highlights metabolic strategies associated with balhimycin production in Amycolatopsis balhimycina chemostat cultivations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, Giuseppe; Alduina, Rosa; Renzone, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    , used to generate biomass for proteomic analysis, mycelia grew with the same rate and with similar glucose-biomass conversion efficiencies. Global gene expression analysis revealed a differential metabolic adaptation, highlighting strategies for energetic supply and biosynthesis of metabolic...... to balhimycin biosynthesis, and of phoP, phoR, pstS and phoD, known to be associated to Pi limitation stress response. 2D-Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) and protein identification, performed by mass spectrometry and computer-assisted 2 D reference-map http......://www.unipa.it/ampuglia/Abal-proteome-maps webcite matching, demonstrated a differential expression for proteins involved in many metabolic pathways or cellular processes, including central carbon and phosphate metabolism. Interestingly, proteins playing a key role in generation of primary metabolism intermediates and cofactors required...

  12. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979. [October 1978 to September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities. (GHT)

  13. Neurological Diseases, Disorders and Injuries in Canada: Highlights of a National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Garth M; Huggett, Deanna L

    2016-01-01

    The National Population Health Study of Neurological Conditions, a partnership between Neurological Health Charities Canada and the Government of Canada, was the largest study of neurological diseases, disorders, and injuries ever conducted in Canada. Undertaken between 2009 and 2013, the expansive program of research addressed the epidemiology, impacts, health services, and risk factors of 18 neurological conditions and estimated the health outcomes and costs of these conditions in Canada through 2031. This review summarizes highlights from the component projects of the study as presented in the synthesis report, Mapping Connections: An Understanding of Neurological Conditions in Canada. The key findings included new prevalence and incidence estimates, documentation of the diverse and often debilitating effects of neurological conditions, and identification of the utilization, economic costs, and current limitations of related health services. The study findings will support health charities, governments, and other stakeholders to reduce the impact of neurological conditions in Canada.

  14. Highlights of Recent Research Activities at the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J - C.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) was established at the NASA Johnson Space Center in 1979. The ODPO has initiated and led major orbital debris research activities over the past 38 years, including developing the first set of the NASA orbital debris mitigation requirements in 1995 and supporting the establishment of the U.S. Government Orbital Debris Mitigation Standard Practices in 2001. This paper is an overview of the recent ODPO research activities, ranging from ground-based and in-situ measurements, to laboratory tests, and to engineering and long-term orbital debris environment modeling. These activities highlight the ODPO's commitment to continuously improve the orbital debris environment definition to better protect current and future space missions from the low Earth orbit to the geosynchronous Earth orbit regions.

  15. Expression Analysis Highlights AXL as a Candidate Zika Virus Entry Receptor in Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Pollen, Alex A; Di Lullo, Elizabeth; Sandoval-Espinosa, Carmen; Bershteyn, Marina; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2016-05-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) in Brazil has been linked to substantial increases in fetal abnormalities and microcephaly. However, information about the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms connecting viral infection to these defects remains limited. In this study we have examined the expression of receptors implicated in cell entry of several enveloped viruses including ZIKV across diverse cell types in the developing brain. Using single-cell RNA-seq and immunohistochemistry, we found that the candidate viral entry receptor AXL is highly expressed by human radial glial cells, astrocytes, endothelial cells, and microglia in developing human cortex and by progenitor cells in developing retina. We also show that AXL expression in radial glia is conserved in developing mouse and ferret cortex and in human stem cell-derived cerebral organoids, highlighting multiple experimental systems that could be applied to study mechanisms of ZIKV infectivity and effects on brain development.

  16. Highlighting hybridity: A critical discourse analysis of teacher talk in science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Mary U.

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence that alienation from science is linked to the dominant discourse practices of science classrooms (cf. Lemke, J. L. (1990). Talking Science: Language, Learning, and Values. Norwood, NJ: Ablex). Yet, in secondary science education it is particularly hard to find evidence of curriculum reform that includes explicit changes in pedagogic discourses to accommodate the needs of students from a wide range of backgrounds. However, such evidence does exist and needs to be highlighted wherever it is found to help address social justice concerns in science education. In this article, I show how critical discourse analysis can be used to explore a way of challenging the dominant discourse in teacher - student interactions in science classrooms. My findings suggest a new way of moving toward more socially just science curricula in middle years and secondary classrooms by using hybrid discourses that can serve emancipatory purposes.

  17. Highlights of the SLD Physics Program at the SLAC Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willocq, Stephane

    2001-09-07

    Starting in 1989, and continuing through the 1990s, high-energy physics witnessed a flowering of precision measurements in general and tests of the standard model in particular, led by e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments operating at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Key contributions to this work came from the SLD collaboration at the SLAC Linear Collider. By exploiting the unique capabilities of this pioneering accelerator and the SLD detector, including a polarized electron beam, exceptionally small beam dimensions, and a CCD pixel vertex detector, SLD produced a broad array of electroweak, heavy-flavor, and QCD measurements. Many of these results are one of a kind or represent the world's standard in precision. This article reviews the highlights of the SLD physics program, with an eye toward associated advances in experimental technique, and the contribution of these measurements to our dramatically improved present understanding of the standard model and its possible extensions.

  18. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights April 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    The baseline change proposal BCP-FCRD-11026 submitted to change the due date for M21AF080202 'Demonstrate fabrication of Transuranic kernels of Plutonium-239/3.5at%Neptunium-237 using newly installed glove box facilities in ORNL 7930 hot cell complex' from 4/25/11 to 3/30/12 was approved this month. During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for March 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/96, was distributed to program participants on April 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Behavior, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (d) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling; and (6) ZrC Properties and Handbook - Properties of ZrC.

  19. Highlights and Challenges in Education, Outreach, and Undergraduate Mentoring from an NSF Hydrologic Sciences CAREER Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    A recent CAREER award (2009) has been used to facilitate environmentally-based outreach and education in local urban Los Angeles schools, primarily through an established NSF GK-12 program. Mini-weather stations, purchased through this CAREER award, were installed at two partner GK-12 schools, University High School (LAUSD) and Culver City Middle School (CCUSD). Each system contains an automated data logging system that record continuous observations of a range of variables (including precipitation, UV, temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, dewpoint temperature and pressure). Observations are being downloaded and used by GK-12 Fellows and Teachers in curriculum development. In addition, the PI has worked with the GK-12 fellows in developing water-related inquiry lessons for both middle and high school science curriculum. Specific lessons facilitated during the initial stages of this CAREER award include urban ecosystems and satellite imagery, water quality, stream biota and ecosystem health, water treatment, urban climate and heat index, and soil chemistry testing. All lessons that have been implemented in the middle or high school classrooms are uploaded to the SEE-LA GK-12 website (http://measure.igpp.ucla.edu/GK12-SEE-LA/lessons.html). Examples of lesson development and integration in the classroom setting will be highlighted as well as tools required for sustainability of the projects. In addition to the K-12 outreach activities, the PI has engaged several undergraduates in independent research projects, working on various aspects of the primary research project. Highlights and lessons learned from outreach and mentoring activities will be presented.

  20. Does mode mixing matter in EMD-based highlight volume methods for hydrocarbon detection? Experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ya-juan; Cao, Jun-xing; Du, Hao-kun; Zhang, Gu-lan; Yao, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD)-based spectral decomposition methods have been successfully used for hydrocarbon detection. However, mode mixing that occurs during the sifting process of EMD causes the 'true' intrinsic mode function (IMF) to be extracted incorrectly and blurs the physical meaning of the IMF. We address the issue of how the mode mixing influences the EMD-based methods for hydrocarbon detection by introducing mode-mixing elimination methods, specifically ensemble EMD (EEMD) and complete ensemble EMD (CEEMD)-based highlight volumes, as feasible tools that can identify the peak amplitude above average volume and the peak frequency volume. Three schemes, that is, using all IMFs, selected IMFs or weighted IMFs, are employed in the EMD-, EEMD- and CEEMD-based highlight volume methods. When these methods were applied to seismic data from a tight sandstone gas field in Central Sichuan, China, the results demonstrated that the amplitude anomaly in the peak amplitude above average volume captured by EMD, EEMD and CEEMD combined with Hilbert transforms, whether using all IMFs, selected IMFs or weighted IMFs, are almost identical to each other. However, clear distinctions can be found in the peak frequency volume when comparing results generated using all IMFs, selected IMFs, or weighted IMFs. If all IMFs are used, the influence of mode mixing on the peak frequency volume is not readily discernable. However, using selected IMFs or a weighted IMFs' scheme affects the peak frequency in relation to the reservoir thickness in the EMD-based method. Significant improvement in the peak frequency volume can be achieved in EEMD-based highlight volumes using selected IMFs. However, if the weighted IMFs' scheme is adopted (i.e., if the undesired IMFs are included with reduced weights rather than excluded from the analysis entirely), the CEEMD-based peak frequency volume provides a more accurate reservoir thickness estimate compared with the other two methods. This

  1. Highlights of GAO’s Corporate Governance, Transparency and Accountability Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    United States General Accounting Office GAO By the Comptroller General of the United States March 2002 HIGHLIGHTS OF GAO’S CORPORATE GOVERNANCE , TRANSPARENCY...to) - Title and Subtitle HIGHLIGHTS OF GAO S CORPORATE GOVERNANCE , TRANSPARENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY FORUMs Contract Number Grant Number Program...Subject: Highlights of GAO’s Corporate Governance , Transparency, and Accountability Forum The recent sudden and largely unexpected bankruptcy of one

  2. TRMM Science Highlights and Status of Precipitation Estimates on Monthly and Finder Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has completed three years in orbit. A summary of research highlights will be presented focusing on application of TRMM data to topics ranging from climate analysis, through improving forecasts, to microphysical research. Monthly surface rainfall estimates over the ocean based on different instruments on TRMM currently differ by 20%. The difference is not surprising considering the different type of observations available for the first time from TRMM with both the passive and active microwave sensors. Resolving this difference will strengthen the validity and utility of ocean rainfall estimates and is the topic of ongoing research utilizing various facets of the TRMM validation and field experiment programs. The TRMM rainfall estimates are intercompared among themselves and with other estimates, including those of the standard, monthly Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) analysis. The GPCP analysis agrees roughly in magnitude with the passive microwave-based TRMM estimates which is not surprising considering GPCP over-ocean estimates are based on passive microwave observations. A three year TRMM rainfall climatology is presented based on the TRMM merged product, including anomaly fields related to the changing ENSO situation during the mission. Results of merging TRMM, other passive microwave observations, and geosynchronous infrared rainfall estimates into a global, tropical 3-hour time resolution analysis will also be described.

  3. Liposome Delivery Systems for Inhalation: A Critical Review Highlighting Formulation Issues and Anticancer Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudokas, Mindaugas; Najlah, Mohammad; Alhnan, Mohamed Albed; Elhissi, Abdelbary

    2016-01-01

    This is a critical review on research conducted in the field of pulmonary delivery of liposomes. Issues relating to the mechanism of nebulisation and liposome composition were appraised and correlated with literature reports of liposome formulations used in clinical trials to understand the role of liposome size and composition on therapeutic outcome. A major highlight was liposome inhalation for the treatment of lung cancers. Many in vivo studies that explored the potential of liposomes as anticancer carrier systems were evaluated, including animal studies and clinical trials. Liposomes can entrap anticancer drugs and localise their action in the lung following pulmonary delivery. The safety of inhaled liposomes incorporating anticancer drugs depends on the anticancer agent used and the amount of drug delivered to the target cancer in the lung. The difficulty of efficient targeting of liposomal anticancer aerosols to the cancerous tissues within the lung may result in low doses reaching the target site. Overall, following the success of liposomes as inhalable carriers in the treatment of lung infections, it is expected that more focus from research and development will be given to designing inhalable liposome carriers for the treatment of other lung diseases, including pulmonary cancers. The successful development of anticancer liposomes for inhalation may depend on the future development of effective aerosolisation devices and better targeted liposomes to maximise the benefit of therapy and reduce the potential for local and systemic adverse effects.

  4. Epigenetic Therapy for Solid Tumors: Highlighting the Impact of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaliny Ramachandran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, epigenetics has emerged as an exciting new field in development and disease, with a more recent focus towards cancer. Epigenetics has classically referred to heritable patterns of gene expression, primarily mediated through DNA methylation patterns. More recently, it has come to include the reversible chemical modification of histones and DNA that dictate gene expression patterns. Both the epigenetic up-regulation of oncogenes and downregulation of tumor suppressors have been shown to drive tumor development. Current clinical trials for cancer therapy include pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation, with the aim of reversing these cancer-promoting epigenetic changes. However, the DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase inhibitors have met with less than promising results in the treatment of solid tumors. Regions of hypoxia are a common occurrence in solid tumors. Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased aggressiveness and therapy resistance, and importantly, hypoxic tumor cells have a distinct epigenetic profile. In this review, we provide a summary of the recent clinical trials using epigenetic drugs in solid tumors, discuss the hypoxia-induced epigenetic changes and highlight the importance of testing the epigenetic drugs for efficacy against the most aggressive hypoxic fraction of the tumor in future preclinical testing.

  5. Comparing Color and Leader Line Highlighting Strategies in Coordinated View Geovisualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Amy L; Robinson, Anthony C

    2015-03-01

    In most coordinated view geovisualization tools, a transient visual effect is used to highlight observations across views when brushed with a mouse or other input device. Most current geovisualization and information visualization systems use colored outlines or fills to highlight observations, but there remain a wide range of alternative visual strategies that can also be implemented and compared to color highlighting to evaluate user performance. This paper describes the results of an experiment designed to compare user performance with two highlighting methods; color and leader lines. Our study methodology uses eye-tracking to capture participant eye fixations while they answer questions that require attention to highlighted observations in multiple views. Our results show that participants extract information as efficiently from coordinated view displays that use leader line highlighting to link information as they do from those that use a specific color to highlight items. We also found no significant differences when changing the color of the highlighting effect from red to black. We conclude that leader lines show significant potential for use as an alternative highlighting method in coordinated multiple view visualizations, allowing color to be reserved for representing thematic attributes of data.

  6. Highlights Eurosites insights; highlights on image, implementation, interpretation and integration of Natura 2000 in European perspective; United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain, France and Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neven, M.G.G.; Kistenkas, F.H.

    2005-01-01

    Highlighting the main report Eurosites Insights this comparative study analyses Natura 2000 nature conservation (EU Birds- and Habitats Directives) alongside the key issues of image, implementation, interpretation and integration. Having quick scanned the EU25, five member states have been selected

  7. North-American Conference Highlights the Treatment of Trauma Utilizing Guided Imagery and Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Montcrieff, Suzannah; Beck, Bolette Daniels; Montgomery, Erin

    2015-01-01

    A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma.......A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma....

  8. The Effects of Highlighting, Validity, and Feature Type on Air-to-Ground Target Acquisition Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    cultura I taget Target type Validity X target X leadin interaction on initial response time (highlighted trials) WRONG HIGHLIGHTING ÖU - M ea...natural - leadin cultural ndurd cultura taget I taget Target type Figure 3.10: Validity X lead-in X Target interaction Confirmation time A

  9. Blue hypertext is a good design decision: no perceptual disadvantage in reading and successful highlighting of relevant information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Gagl

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Highlighted text in the Internet (i.e., hypertext is predominantly blue and underlined. The perceptibility of these hypertext characteristics was heavily questioned by applied research and empirical tests resulted in inconclusive results. The ability to recognize blue text in foveal and parafoveal vision was identified as potentially constrained by the low number of foveally centered blue light sensitive retinal cells. The present study investigates if foveal and parafoveal perceptibility of blue hypertext is reduced in comparison to normal black text during reading. Methods A silent-sentence reading study with simultaneous eye movement recordings and the invisible boundary paradigm, which allows the investigation of foveal and parafoveal perceptibility, separately, was realized (comparing fixation times after degraded vs. un-degraded parafoveal previews. Target words in sentences were presented in either black or blue and either underlined or normal. Results No effect of color and underlining, but a preview benefit could be detected for first pass reading measures. Fixation time measures that included re-reading, e.g., total viewing times, showed, in addition to a preview effect, a reduced fixation time for not highlighted (black not underlined in contrast to highlighted target words (either blue or underlined or both. Discussion The present pattern reflects no detectable perceptual disadvantage of hyperlink stimuli but increased attraction of attention resources, after first pass reading, through highlighting. Blue or underlined text allows readers to easily perceive hypertext and at the same time readers re-visited highlighted words longer. On the basis of the present evidence, blue hypertext can be safely recommended to web designers for future use.

  10. Where there's a will: can highlighting future youth-targeted marketing increase support for soda taxes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Sungjong; Schuldt, Jonathon P

    2014-12-01

    Amid concern about high rates of obesity and related diseases, the marketing of nutritionally poor foods to young people by the food industry has come under heavy criticism by public health advocates, who cite decades of youth-targeted marketing in arguing for reforms. In light of recent evidence that the same event evokes stronger emotional reactions when it occurs in the future versus the past, highlighting youth-targeted marketing that has yet to occur may evoke stronger reactions to such practices, and perhaps, greater support for related health policy initiatives. In a between-subjects experiment, Web participants (N = 285) read that a major soda company had already launched (past condition) or was planning to launch (future condition) an advertising campaign targeting children. Measures included support for a soda tax and affective responses to the company's actions. Greater support for the soda tax was observed in the future condition than in the past condition. Moreover, participants in the future condition reported heightened negative emotions about the company's actions, which mediated the observed effect on soda tax support. The same action undertaken by the food industry (here, marketing soda to children) may evoke stronger negative emotions and greater support for a health policy initiative when it is framed prospectively rather than retrospectively.

  11. Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1992 and 1993 highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W. [eds.

    1993-09-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Westinghouse Hanford Company to design and test an earthen cover system that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company provided engineering design support for the program. Work on barrier design has been under way at Hanford for nearly 10 years. The comprehensive development of a long-term barrier, formerly the Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program, was initiated in FY 1986, and a general field-tested design is expected to be completed by FY 1998. Highlights of efforts in FY 1992 and FY 1993 included the resumption of field testing, the completion of the prototype barrier design, and the convening of an external peer review panel, which met twice with the barrier development team. The review panel provided helpful guidance on current and future barrier development activities, while commending the program for its significant technical contributions to innovative barrier technology development.

  12. Visible Wavelength Reflectance Spectra of Near-Earth Objects from Apache Point Observatory: Science Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammergren, Mark; Brucker, Melissa; Nault, Kristie A.; Gyuk, Geza

    2016-10-01

    In January 2015 we began a program of near-Earth object (NEO) astrometric follow-up and physical characterization using a 17% share of time on the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO). Our roughly 500 hours of annual observing time are split into 2 hour runs usually in the middle of every other night (see poster by K. Nault et al.), and frequent half-night runs devoted to physical characterization (this poster). NEO surface compositions are investigated with 0.36-1.0 μm reflectance spectroscopy using the Dual Imaging Spectrograph instrument. As of June 22, 2016 we have obtained reflectance spectra of 129 unique NEOs, ranging in diameter from approximately 5 m to 6 km.Highlights of this work presented here include 106 spectra of (357439) 2004 BL86 spanning 3 hours 4.5 minutes, more than a full rotation, and spectra of 18 objects with diameters comparable to historical Earth impactors (e.g., Tunguska, Chelyabinsk and smaller bolides).This work is based on observations obtained with the APO 3.5-meter telescope, which is owned and operated by ARC. We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA NEOO award NNX14AL17G, and thank the University of Chicago Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics for observing time in 2014.

  13. Nanog Fluctuations in Embryonic Stem Cells Highlight the Problem of Measurement in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Stumpf, Patrick S; Ridden, Sonya J; Sim, Aaron; Filippi, Sarah; Harrington, Heather A; MacArthur, Ben D

    2017-06-20

    A number of important pluripotency regulators, including the transcription factor Nanog, are observed to fluctuate stochastically in individual embryonic stem cells. By transiently priming cells for commitment to different lineages, these fluctuations are thought to be important to the maintenance of, and exit from, pluripotency. However, because temporal changes in intracellular protein abundances cannot be measured directly in live cells, fluctuations are typically assessed using genetically engineered reporter cell lines that produce a fluorescent signal as a proxy for protein expression. Here, using a combination of mathematical modeling and experiment, we show that there are unforeseen ways in which widely used reporter strategies can systematically disturb the dynamics they are intended to monitor, sometimes giving profoundly misleading results. In the case of Nanog, we show how genetic reporters can compromise the behavior of important pluripotency-sustaining positive feedback loops, and induce a bifurcation in the underlying dynamics that gives rise to heterogeneous Nanog expression patterns in reporter cell lines that are not representative of the wild-type. These findings help explain the range of published observations of Nanog variability and highlight the problem of measurement in live cells. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An historical overview of signed language interpreting research: Featuring highlights of personal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemina Napier

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7968.2010v2n26p63 In the last twenty-five years research into signed language interpreting has burgeoned as a sub-discipline of translation and interpreting studies. Grbic’s (2007 bibliometric analysis of signed language interpreting (SLI research provides an interesting picture of the research that has been conducted over the years. In developing a database of SLI literature, Grbic analysed 908 research texts produced from 1970 to 2005. She found that that there was a significant increase in production over that time, which accelerated in the mid to late 1990s. The majority of texts were published as journal articles or in collections, and covered several key themes including discussions of settings and modes, professional issues, quality issues, ethics, role and socio-cultural issues, linguistic issues, cognitive issues and research issues. In her conclusion Grbic states "The data revealed that research into SL interpreting can contribute to the enhancement of knowledge and to the general understanding of interpreting as a topic of scientific research" (p.45 Thus in order to inform interpreting studies more generally, it is worth canvassing some of the key areas of SLI research. Drawing on two other articles (J. Napier, 2005, forthcoming, this article provides a selective overview of SLI research, then focuses on a key area of SLI research: educational interpreting, with some highlights from personal research studies on SLI in university lectures.

  15. The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC, 2015: overall activities and outcome highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abu-Elmagd

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC was organised by the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. This conference is a continuation of a series of meetings, which began with the first International Genomic Medicine Conference (1st IGMC, 2011 followed by the second International Genomic Medicine Conference (2nd IGMC, 2013. The 3rd IGMC meeting presented as a timely opportunity to bring scientists from across the world to gather, discuss, and exchange recent advances in the field of genomics and genetics in general as well as practical information on using these new technologies in different basic and clinical applications. The meeting undoubtedly inspired young male and female Saudi researchers, who attended the conference in large numbers, as evidenced by the oversubscribed oral and poster presentations. The conference also witnessed the launch of the first content for npj Genomic Medicine, a high quality new journal was established in partnership by CEGMR with Springer Nature and published as part of the Nature Partner Journal series. Here, we present a brief summary report of the 2-day meeting including highlights from the oral presentations, poster presentations, workshops, poster prize-winners and comments from the distinguished scientists.

  16. Highlights from the First Ever Demographic Study of Solar Physics, Space Physics, and Upper Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; White, S. C.; Ivie, R.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Education & Workforce Working Group and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) conducted the first ever National Demographic Survey of working professionals for the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey to learn about the demographics of this sub-field of space science. The instrument contained questions for participants on: the type of workplace; basic demographic information regarding gender and minority status, educational pathways (discipline of undergrad degree, field of their PhD), how their undergraduate and graduate student researchers are funded, participation in NSF and NASA funded spaceflight missions and suborbital programs, and barriers to career advancement. Using contact data bases from AGU, the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (AAS-SPD), attendees of NOAA's Space Weather Week and proposal submissions to NSF's Atmospheric, Geospace Science Division, the AIP's Statistical Research Center cross correlated and culled these data bases resulting in 2776 unique email addresses of US based working professionals. The survey received 1305 responses (51%) and generated 125 pages of single space answers to a number of open-ended questions. This talk will summarize the highlights of this first-ever demographic survey including findings extracted from the open-ended responses regarding barriers to career advancement which showed significant gender differences.

  17. Highlighting Relationships of a Smartphone's Social Ecosystem in Potentially Large Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, Panagiotis; Oikonomou, George; Tryfonas, Theo; Li, Shancang

    2016-09-01

    Social media networks are becoming increasingly popular because they can satisfy diverse needs of individuals (both personal and professional). Modern mobile devices are empowered with increased capabilities, taking advantage of the technological progress that makes them smarter than their predecessors. Thus, a smartphone user is not only the phone owner, but also an entity that may have different facets and roles in various social media networks. We believe that these roles can be aggregated in a single social ecosystem, which can be derived by the smartphone. In this paper, we present our concept of the social ecosystem in contemporary devices and we attempt to distinguish the different communities that occur from the integration of social networking in our lives. In addition, we propose techniques to highlight major actors within the ecosystem. Moreover, we demonstrate our suggested visualization scheme, which illustrates the linking of entities that live in separate communities using data taken from the smartphone. Finally, we extend our concept to include various parallel ecosystems during potentially large investigations and we link influential entities in a vertical fashion. We particularly examine cases where data aggregation is performed by specific applications, producing volumes of textual data that can be analyzed with text mining methods. Our analysis demonstrates the risks of the rising "bring your own device" trend in enterprise environments.

  18. The Oldest Actinopterygian Highlights the Cryptic Early History of the Hyperdiverse Ray-Finned Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Giles, Sam; Friedman, Matt; den Blaauwen, Jan L; Zhu, Min

    2016-06-20

    Osteichthyans comprise two divisions, each containing over 32,000 living species [1]: Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods) and Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes). Recent discoveries from China highlight the morphological disparity of early sarcopterygians and extend their origin into the late Silurian [2-4]. By contrast, the oldest unambiguous actinopterygians are roughly 30 million years younger, leaving a long temporal gap populated by fragments and rare body fossils of controversial phylogenetic placement [5-10]. Here we reinvestigate the enigmatic osteichthyan Meemannia from the Early Devonian (∼415 million years ago) of China, previously identified as an exceptionally primitive lobe-finned fish [3, 7, 11, 12]. Meemannia combines "cosmine"-like tissues taken as evidence of sarcopterygian affinity with actinopterygian-like skull roof and braincase geometry, including endoskeletal enclosure of the spiracle and a lateral cranial canal. We report comparable histological structures in undoubted ray-finned fishes and conclude that they are general osteichthyan features. Phylogenetic analysis places Meemannia as an early-diverging ray-finned fish, resolving it as the sister lineage of Cheirolepis [13] plus all younger actinopterygians. This brings the first appearance of ray-fins more in line with that of lobe-fins and fills a conspicuous faunal gap in the otherwise diverse late Silurian-earliest Devonian vertebrate faunas of the South China Block [4]. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The ISOLDE facility and the HIE-HISOLDE project: Recent highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borge, M. J. G. [ISOLDE-PH, CERN, 1211 Geneva-23, Switzerland and Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113bis, 28006-Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-23

    The ISOLDE facility at CERN has as objective the production, study and research of nuclei far from stability. The facility provides low energy radioactive beams and post-accelerated beams. In the last 45 years the ISOLDE facility has gathered unique expertise in research with radioactive beams. Over 700 isotopes of more than 70 elements have been used in a wide range of research domains, including cutting edge studies in nuclear structure, atomic physics, nuclear astrophysics, and fundamental interactions. These nuclear probes are also used to do frontier research in solid state and life sciences. There is an on-going upgrade of the facility, the HIE-ISOLDE project, which aims to improve the ISOLDE capabilities in a wide front, from an energy increase of the post-accelerated beam to improvements in beam quality and beam purity. The first phase of HIE-ISOLDE will start for physics in the autumn of 2015 with an upgrade of energy for all post-accelerated ISOLDE beams up to 5.5 MeV/u. In this contribution the most recent highlights of the facility are presented.

  20. The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC, 2015): overall activities and outcome highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Assidi, Mourad; Dallol, Ashraf; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Al-Hamzi, Emad; Shay, Jerry W; Scherer, Stephen W; Agarwal, Ashok; Budowle, Bruce; Gari, Mamdooh; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-10-17

    The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3(rd) IGMC) was organised by the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR) at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). This conference is a continuation of a series of meetings, which began with the first International Genomic Medicine Conference (1(st) IGMC, 2011) followed by the second International Genomic Medicine Conference (2(nd) IGMC, 2013). The 3(rd) IGMC meeting presented as a timely opportunity to bring scientists from across the world to gather, discuss, and exchange recent advances in the field of genomics and genetics in general as well as practical information on using these new technologies in different basic and clinical applications. The meeting undoubtedly inspired young male and female Saudi researchers, who attended the conference in large numbers, as evidenced by the oversubscribed oral and poster presentations. The conference also witnessed the launch of the first content for npj Genomic Medicine, a high quality new journal was established in partnership by CEGMR with Springer Nature and published as part of the Nature Partner Journal series. Here, we present a brief summary report of the 2-day meeting including highlights from the oral presentations, poster presentations, workshops, poster prize-winners and comments from the distinguished scientists.

  1. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Its legacy of UV surveys, and science highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) imaged the sky in the Ultraviolet (UV) for almost a decade, delivering the first sky surveys at these wavelengths. Its database contains far-UV (FUV, $\\lambda$$_{eff}$ $\\sim$ 1528\\AA) and near-UV (NUV, $\\lambda$$_{eff}$ $\\sim$ 2310\\AA) images of most of the sky, including deep UV-mapping of extended galaxies, over 200 million source measurements, and more than 100,000 low-resolution UV spectra. The GALEX archive will remain a long-lasting resource for statistical studies of hot stellar objects, QSOs, star-forming galaxies, nebulae and the interstellar medium. It provides an unprecedented road-map for planning future UV instrumentation and follow-up observing programs in the UV and at other wavelengths. We review the characteristics of the GALEX data, and describe final catalogs and available tools, that facilitate future exploitation of this database. We also recall highlights from the science results uniquely enabled by GALEX data so far.

  2. Clinical case reviews and poster sessions in multiple sclerosis spasticity: main outcomes and highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojano, Maria; Celius, Elisabeth G; Donzé, Cecile; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Patti, Francesco; Pöhlau, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity present with a range of symptoms and disability levels that are frequently challenging to manage. Summary : Clinical case reviews in treatment-resistant MS spasticity were presented in five country-specific sessions conducted in parallel at the MS Experts Summit. Attendees at the Norwegian session discussed early response to new treatments for severe spasticity and highlighted the importance of titrating THC:CBD oromucosal spray (Sativex®) when adding it to baclofen. The French group focussed on MS symptoms and patient characteristics that interact with spasticity and agreed on a list of minimum ratings for diagnosis of MS spasticity symptoms. Attendees at the Spanish session concurred that THC:CBD oromucosal spray is effective and well tolerated as add-on therapy in treatment-resistant MS spasticity, particularly for pain, spasms and gait disturbances. The Italian group discussed the use of add-on THC:CBD oromucosal spray and other possible combination therapies for treatment-resistant MS spasticity. Attendees at the German session highlighted the need to address trigger factors for MS spasticity to reduce the potential for impact on activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (QoL). Three innovative studies of MS spasticity from the poster session were selected for closer review. The MOVE 1 EU epidemiological study indicated that, across western Europe, patients with MS spasticity continue to have unmet management needs. A literature review demonstrated that symptomatic relief of MS spasticity in patients who respond to THC:CBD oromucosal spray translates into sustainable improvements in ADL and QoL. Enriched-design studies of medications targeting the endocannabinoid system require careful interpretation due to possible pharmacodynamic 'priming', i.e. carry-over effects of successful active treatment during the enrichment phase. Key Messages: Sharing experiences of clinical practice, including

  3. A straightforward and quantitative approach for characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Pei, Zhiguo; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2010-11-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of highlighter fluorescence proteins (FPs) is crucial for screening better highlighter FPs and optimizing the photoactivation efficiency of a certain highlighter FP. Currently, photoactivation contrast and half-time values of photoactivation and photobleaching processes are used for such purpose. However, the relations among these parameters are not clear, and little guidance for practical experiments could be obtained from the half-time values. Here, we show that light dose dependent fluorescence curve, which is calculated from activation-intensity-dependent photoactivation and photobleaching rates, is capable of quantifying the photoactivation performance straightforwardly. Moreover, the photoactivation contrast is easily obtained from the curve.

  4. EPA Regional Administrator Highlights the Benefits of Reducing Food Waste in South Bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    (SOUTH BEND, IND. - November 5, 2015) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Administrator Susan Hedman joined South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg today at Ivy Tech Community College's culinary school to highlight the benefits of diverting food waste fr

  5. Highlights from U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Recovery Act Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office

    2012-05-01

    This fact sheets highlights U.S. Department of Energy fuel cell projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). More than 1,000 fuel cell systems have been deployed through Recovery Act funding.

  6. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Atomic Physics" by E. Uggerhoj

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  7. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics: "Light Antiprotonic Atoms" by R. Hayano

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  8. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Antiproton Mass" by G. Gabrielse

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  9. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Nuclear Physics" by T. von Egidy

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 145 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  10. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Annihilation in Flight" by D. Hertzog

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  11. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : R. Landua (chairman)

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  12. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Annihilation at Rest" by U. Gastaldi

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  13. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "CP Violation" by P. Pavlopoulos

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  14. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "LEAR Performance" by M. Chanel

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields: M. Chanel "LEAR Performance"

  15. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "AD Project" by S. Maury

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields: S. Maury "AD Project"

  16. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Meson spectroscopy" by H. Koch

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  17. FY2017 Defense Appropriations Fact Sheet: Selected Highlights of H.R. 5293 and S. 3000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-17

    FY2017 Defense Appropriations Fact Sheet: Selected Highlights of H.R. 5293 and S . 3000 Pat Towell Specialist in U.S. Defense Policy and Budget...Appropriations Fact Sheet: Selected Highlights of H.R. 5293 and S . 300 Congressional Research Service Summary This Fact Sheet summarizes selected...Appropriations Committee on May 26, 2016 ( S . 3000). Congressional action on the FY2017 defense appropriations act has been fundamentally shaped by the

  18. Fiber-optic system for monitoring fast photoactivation dynamics of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhiguo; Qin, Lingsong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2011-08-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins is crucial to the realization of photoactivation localization microscopy. In contrast to those fluorescence-based approaches that require complex data processing and calibration procedures, here we report a simple and quantitative alternative, which relies on the measurement of small absorption spectra changes over time with a fiber-optic system. Using Dronpa as a representative highlighter protein, we have investigated the capacity of this system in monitoring the fast photoactivation process.

  19. Highlights of Space Weather Services/Capabilities at NASA/GSFC Space Weather Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Zheng, Yihua; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Maria; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Mays, Leila; Chulaki, Anna; Lee, Hyesook

    2012-01-01

    The importance of space weather has been recognized world-wide. Our society depends increasingly on technological infrastructure, including the power grid as well as satellites used for communication and navigation. Such technologies, however, are vulnerable to space weather effects caused by the Sun's variability. NASA GSFC's Space Weather Center (SWC) (http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov//674/swx services/swx services.html) has developed space weather products/capabilities/services that not only respond to NASA's needs but also address broader interests by leveraging the latest scientific research results and state-of-the-art models hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC: http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov). By combining forefront space weather science and models, employing an innovative and configurable dissemination system (iSWA.gsfc.nasa.gov), taking advantage of scientific expertise both in-house and from the broader community as well as fostering and actively participating in multilateral collaborations both nationally and internationally, NASA/GSFC space weather Center, as a sibling organization to CCMC, is poised to address NASA's space weather needs (and needs of various partners) and to help enhancing space weather forecasting capabilities collaboratively. With a large number of state-of-the-art physics-based models running in real-time covering the whole space weather domain, it offers predictive capabilities and a comprehensive view of space weather events throughout the solar system. In this paper, we will provide some highlights of our service products/capabilities. In particular, we will take the 23 January and the 27 January space weather events as examples to illustrate how we can use the iSWA system to track them in the interplanetary space and forecast their impacts.

  20. Comparative analysis of transposable elements highlights mobilome diversity and evolution in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalopin, Domitille; Naville, Magali; Plard, Floriane; Galiana, Delphine; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-01-09

    Transposable elements (TEs) are major components of vertebrate genomes, with major roles in genome architecture and evolution. In order to characterize both common patterns and lineage-specific differences in TE content and TE evolution, we have compared the mobilomes of 23 vertebrate genomes, including 10 actinopterygian fish, 11 sarcopterygians, and 2 nonbony vertebrates. We found important variations in TE content (from 6% in the pufferfish tetraodon to 55% in zebrafish), with a more important relative contribution of TEs to genome size in fish than in mammals. Some TE superfamilies were found to be widespread in vertebrates, but most elements showed a more patchy distribution, indicative of multiple events of loss or gain. Interestingly, loss of major TE families was observed during the evolution of the sarcopterygian lineage, with a particularly strong reduction in TE diversity in birds and mammals. Phylogenetic trends in TE composition and activity were detected: Teleost fish genomes are dominated by DNA transposons and contain few ancient TE copies, while mammalian genomes have been predominantly shaped by nonlong terminal repeat retrotransposons, along with the persistence of older sequences. Differences were also found within lineages: The medaka fish genome underwent more recent TE amplification than the related platyfish, as observed for LINE retrotransposons in the mouse compared with the human genome. This study allows the identification of putative cases of horizontal transfer of TEs, and to tentatively infer the composition of the ancestral vertebrate mobilome. Taken together, the results obtained highlight the importance of TEs in the structure and evolution of vertebrate genomes, and demonstrate their major impact on genome diversity both between and within lineages.

  1. Comparative Analysis Highlights Variable Genome Content of Wheat Rusts and Divergence of the Mating Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A. Cuomo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Three members of the Puccinia genus, Puccinia triticina (Pt, P. striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst, and P. graminis f.sp. tritici (Pgt, cause the most common and often most significant foliar diseases of wheat. While similar in biology and life cycle, each species is uniquely adapted and specialized. The genomes of Pt and Pst were sequenced and compared to that of Pgt to identify common and distinguishing gene content, to determine gene variation among wheat rust pathogens, other rust fungi, and basidiomycetes, and to identify genes of significance for infection. Pt had the largest genome of the three, estimated at 135 Mb with expansion due to mobile elements and repeats encompassing 50.9% of contig bases; in comparison, repeats occupy 31.5% for Pst and 36.5% for Pgt. We find all three genomes are highly heterozygous, with Pst [5.97 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs/kb] nearly twice the level detected in Pt (2.57 SNPs/kb and that previously reported for Pgt. Of 1358 predicted effectors in Pt, 784 were found expressed across diverse life cycle stages including the sexual stage. Comparison to related fungi highlighted the expansion of gene families involved in transcriptional regulation and nucleotide binding, protein modification, and carbohydrate degradation enzymes. Two allelic homeodomain pairs, HD1 and HD2, were identified in each dikaryotic Puccinia species along with three pheromone receptor (STE3 mating-type genes, two of which are likely representing allelic specificities. The HD proteins were active in a heterologous Ustilago maydis mating assay and host-induced gene silencing (HIGS of the HD and STE3 alleles reduced wheat host infection.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Transposable Elements Highlights Mobilome Diversity and Evolution in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalopin, Domitille; Naville, Magali; Plard, Floriane; Galiana, Delphine; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are major components of vertebrate genomes, with major roles in genome architecture and evolution. In order to characterize both common patterns and lineage-specific differences in TE content and TE evolution, we have compared the mobilomes of 23 vertebrate genomes, including 10 actinopterygian fish, 11 sarcopterygians, and 2 nonbony vertebrates. We found important variations in TE content (from 6% in the pufferfish tetraodon to 55% in zebrafish), with a more important relative contribution of TEs to genome size in fish than in mammals. Some TE superfamilies were found to be widespread in vertebrates, but most elements showed a more patchy distribution, indicative of multiple events of loss or gain. Interestingly, loss of major TE families was observed during the evolution of the sarcopterygian lineage, with a particularly strong reduction in TE diversity in birds and mammals. Phylogenetic trends in TE composition and activity were detected: Teleost fish genomes are dominated by DNA transposons and contain few ancient TE copies, while mammalian genomes have been predominantly shaped by nonlong terminal repeat retrotransposons, along with the persistence of older sequences. Differences were also found within lineages: The medaka fish genome underwent more recent TE amplification than the related platyfish, as observed for LINE retrotransposons in the mouse compared with the human genome. This study allows the identification of putative cases of horizontal transfer of TEs, and to tentatively infer the composition of the ancestral vertebrate mobilome. Taken together, the results obtained highlight the importance of TEs in the structure and evolution of vertebrate genomes, and demonstrate their major impact on genome diversity both between and within lineages. PMID:25577199

  3. Genomic expansion of Domain Archaea highlights roles for organisms from new phyla in anaerobic carbon cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelle, Cindy; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Thomas, Brian C.; Hug, Laura A.; Brown, Christopher T.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Singh, Andrea; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-03-01

    Domain Archaea is currently represented by one phylum (Euryarchaeota) and two superphyla (TACK and DPANN). However, gene surveys indicate the existence of a vast diversity of uncultivated archaea for which metabolic information is lacking. We sequenced DNA from complex sediment- and groundwater-associated microbial communities sampled prior to and during an acetate biostimulation field experiment to investigate the diversity and physiology of uncultivated subsurface archaea. We sampled 15 genomes that improve resolution of a new phylum within the TACK superphylum and 119 DPANN genomes that highlight a major subdivision within the archaeal domain that separates DPANN from TACK/Euryarchaeota lineages. Within the DPANN superphylum, which lacks any isolated representatives, we defined two new phyla using sequences from 100 newly sampled genomes. The first new phylum, for which we propose the name Woesearchaeota, was defined using 54 new sequences. We reconstructed a complete (finished) genome for an archaeon from this phylum that is only 0.8 Mb in length and lacks almost all core biosynthetic pathways, but has genes encoding enzymes predicted to interact with bacterial cell walls, consistent with a symbiotic lifestyle. The second new phylum, for which we propose the name Pacearchaeota, was defined based on 46 newly sampled archaeal genomes. This phylum includes the first non-methanogen with an intermediate Type II/III RuBisCO. We also reconstructed a complete (1.24 Mb) genome for another DPANN archaeon, a member of the Diapherotrites phylum. Metabolic prediction and transcriptomic data indicate that this organism has a fermentation-based lifestyle. In fact, genomic analyses consistently indicate lack of recognizable pathways for sulfur, nitrogen, methane, oxygen, and metal cycling, and suggest that symbiotic and fermentation-based lifestyles are widespread across the DPANN superphylum. Thus, as for a recently identified superphylum of bacteria with small genomes and no

  4. Radiotelemetry and wildlife: Highlighting a gap in the knowledge on radiofrequency radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmori, Alfonso, E-mail: balmaral@jcyl.es

    2016-02-01

    Radio transmitters and associated devices may induce negative effects that can bias the results of ongoing research. The main documented effects of radio transmitters on animals include reduced survival, decreased productivity, changes in behaviour and movement patterns and a biased sex ratio. The only factors that have claimed responsibility for these possible damages are the weight of the radio transmitter and associated devices, and the attachment type. The electromagnetic radiation produced by radio transmitters has not been considered so far in research. There have been no studies evaluating the effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation (radiofrequency signals) necessary for tracking, although the problems found were significantly associated with the length of time that animals had been carrying their radio transmitters. Similar problems as those in radiotracked animals have been found in numerous studies with animals exposed to radiofrequency radiation for a sufficient amount of time. Laboratory scientists investigating the orientation of animals know they have to shield the place where experiments are performed to prevent interference from man-made radiation, as anthropogenic signals may distort the results. It is paradoxical that, at the same time, field scientists investigating the movements and other aspects of animal biology are providing animals with radio transmitters that emit the same type of radiation, since this may affect the results concerning their orientation and movement. This paper identifies gaps in the knowledge that should be investigated in-depth. The possibility that the radiofrequency radiation from radiotracking devices is responsible for the findings should be considered. Considering this factor may allow researchers to best understand the long-term effects found. - Highlights: • Radiotracking may induce negative effects that can bias the results. • Effects have been documented on survival, reproduction and behaviour.

  5. Chlorophyll b degradation by chlorophyll b reductase under high-light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Rei; Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2015-12-01

    The light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein complex of photosystem II (LHCII) is the main antenna complex of photosystem II (PSII). Plants change their LHCII content depending on the light environment. Under high-light conditions, the content of LHCII should decrease because over-excitation damages the photosystem. Chlorophyll b is indispensable for accumulating LHCII, and chlorophyll b degradation induces LHCII degradation. Chlorophyll b degradation is initiated by chlorophyll b reductase (CBR). In land plants, NON-YELLOW COLORING 1 (NYC1) and NYC1-Like (NOL) are isozymes of CBR. We analyzed these mutants to determine their functions under high-light conditions. During high-light treatment, the chlorophyll a/b ratio was stable in the wild-type (WT) and nol plants, and the LHCII content decreased in WT plants. The chlorophyll a/b ratio decreased in the nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants, and a substantial degree of LHCII was retained in nyc1/nol plants after the high-light treatment. These results demonstrate that NYC1 degrades the chlorophyll b on LHCII under high-light conditions, thus decreasing the LHCII content. After the high-light treatment, the maximum quantum efficiency of the PSII photochemistry was lower in nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants than in WT and nol plants. A larger light-harvesting system would damage PSII in nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants. The fluorescence spectroscopy of the leaves indicated that photosystem I was also damaged by the excess LHCII in nyc1/nol plants. These observations suggest that chlorophyll b degradation by NYC1 is the initial reaction for the optimization of the light-harvesting capacity under high-light conditions.

  6. USDA forest service global change research program highlights: 1991-1995. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdsey, R.; Mickler, R.; Sandberg, D.; Tinus, R.; Zerbe, J.

    1997-12-29

    The report summarizes research findings of the USDA Forest Service`s Global Change Research Program. Research highlights are presented at national and regional scales within the following topic areas: atmosphere/biosphere gas and energy exchange; ecosystem dynamics; disturbance ecology; and human activities and natural resource interactions. Selected topics are reviewed in depth with individual papers covering the global carbon cycle, climate scenarios, multiple stress studies, changes in vegetation distribution, the United States carbon budget, and the human dimensions of global change. Also included is a progress report on development of an integrated national model of the effects of global change on forests and people.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of pancreatic cells across distant species highlights novel important regulator genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarifeño-Saldivia, Estefania; Lavergne, Arnaud; Bernard, Alice; Padamata, Keerthana; Bergemann, David; Voz, Marianne L; Manfroid, Isabelle; Peers, Bernard

    2017-03-21

    Defining the transcriptome and the genetic pathways of pancreatic cells is of great interest for elucidating the molecular attributes of pancreas disorders such as diabetes and cancer. As the function of the different pancreatic cell types has been maintained during vertebrate evolution, the comparison of their transcriptomes across distant vertebrate species is a means to pinpoint genes under strong evolutionary constraints due to their crucial function, which have therefore preserved their selective expression in these pancreatic cell types. In this study, RNA-sequencing was performed on pancreatic alpha, beta, and delta endocrine cells as well as the acinar and ductal exocrine cells isolated from adult zebrafish transgenic lines. Comparison of these transcriptomes identified many novel markers, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components, specific for each cell type. By performing interspecies comparisons, we identified hundreds of genes with conserved enriched expression in endocrine and exocrine cells among human, mouse, and zebrafish. This list includes many genes known as crucial for pancreatic cell formation or function, but also pinpoints many factors whose pancreatic function is still unknown. A large set of endocrine-enriched genes can already be detected at early developmental stages as revealed by the transcriptomic profiling of embryonic endocrine cells, indicating a potential role in cell differentiation. The actual involvement of conserved endocrine genes in pancreatic cell differentiation was demonstrated in zebrafish for myt1b, whose invalidation leads to a reduction of alpha cells, and for cdx4, selectively expressed in endocrine delta cells and crucial for their specification. Intriguingly, comparison of the endocrine alpha and beta cell subtypes from human, mouse, and zebrafish reveals a much lower conservation of the transcriptomic signatures for these two endocrine cell subtypes compared to the signatures of pan

  8. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... and Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Haemophilus influenzae , including Hib, disease causes different symptoms depending on ...

  9. Progressive IRP Models for Power Resources Including EPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the view of optimizing regional power supply and demand, the paper makes effective planning scheduling of supply and demand side resources including energy efficiency power plant (EPP, to achieve the target of benefit, cost, and environmental constraints. In order to highlight the characteristics of different supply and demand resources in economic, environmental, and carbon constraints, three planning models with progressive constraints are constructed. Results of three models by the same example show that the best solutions to different models are different. The planning model including EPP has obvious advantages considering pollutant and carbon emission constraints, which confirms the advantages of low cost and emissions of EPP. The construction of progressive IRP models for power resources considering EPP has a certain reference value for guiding the planning and layout of EPP within other power resources and achieving cost and environmental objectives.

  10. The Physics of Semiconductors An Introduction Including Devices and Nanophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Grundmann, Marius

    2006-01-01

    The Physics of Semiconductors provides material for a comprehensive upper-level-undergrauate and graduate course on the subject, guiding readers to the point where they can choose a special topic and begin supervised research. The textbook provides a balance between essential aspects of solid-state and semiconductor physics, on the one hand, and the principles of various semiconductor devices and their applications in electronic and photonic devices, on the other. It highlights many practical aspects of semiconductors such as alloys, strain, heterostructures, nanostructures, that are necessary in modern semiconductor research but typically omitted in textbooks. For the interested reader some additional advanced topics are included, such as Bragg mirrors, resonators, polarized and magnetic semiconductors are included. Also supplied are explicit formulas for many results, to support better understanding. The Physics of Semiconductors requires little or no prior knowledge of solid-state physics and evolved from ...

  11. Improving the strength of amalgams by including steel fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Calvin T. [Hendrix College, Conway, AR 72032 (United States); Van Hoose, James R. [Siemens, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); McGill, Preston B. [Marshall Space Flight Center, EM20, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Grugel, Richard N., E-mail: richard.n.grugel@nasa.gov [Marshall Space Flight Center, EM30, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A room temperature liquid Ga-In alloy was successfully substituted for mercury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physically sound amalgams with included steel fibers can be made. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small volume fraction inclusion of fibers increased strength by {approx}20%. - Abstract: Mercury amalgams, due to their material properties, are widely and successfully used in dental practice. They are, however, also well recognized as having poor tensile strength. With the possibility of expanding amalgam applications it is demonstrated that tensile strength can be increased some 20% by including a small amount of steel fibers. Furthermore, it is shown that mercury can be replaced with a room temperature liquid gallium-indium alloy. Processing, microstructures, and mechanical test results of these novel amalgams are presented and discussed in view of means to further improve their properties.

  12. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  13. Static, Lightweight Includes Resolution for PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hills, M.A.; Klint, P.; Vinju, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic languages include a number of features that are challenging to model properly in static analysis tools. In PHP, one of these features is the include expression, where an arbitrary expression provides the path of the file to include at runtime. In this paper we present two complementary analy

  14. Extracting Objects and Events from MPEG Videos for Highlight-based Indexing and Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinchang Ren

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Automatic recognition of highlights from videos is a fundamental and challenging problem for content-based indexing and retrieval applications. In this paper, we propose techniques to solve this problem using knowledge supported extraction of semantics, and compressed-domain processing is employed for efficiency. Firstly, knowledgebased rules are utilized for shot detection on extracted DCimages, and statistical skin detection is applied for human object detection. Secondly, through filtering outliers in motion vectors, improved detection of camera motions like zooming, panning and tilting are achieved. Video highlight high-level semantics are then automatically extracted via low-level analysis in the detection of human objects and camera motion events, and finally these highlights are taken for shot-level annotation, indexing and retrieval. Results using a large test video data set have demonstrated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed techniques.

  15. Highlights lecture EANM 2014: ''Gimme gimme gimme those nuclear Super Troupers''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Laere, Koen van [University Hospital and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    The EANM Congress 2014 took place in Gothenburg, Sweden, from 18 to 22 October under the presidency of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. Prof. Peter Gjertsson chaired the Local Organizing Committee, according to the standardized EANM congress structure. The meeting was a highlight for the multidisciplinary community that forms the heart and soul of nuclear medicine; attendance was exceptionally high. In total almost 5,300 participants came to Gothenburg, and 1,397 colleagues participated via the EANM LIVE sessions (http://eanmlive.eanm.org/index.php). Participants from all continents were presented with an excellent programme consisting of symposia, scientific and featured sessions, CME sessions, and plenary lectures. These lectures were devoted to nuclear medicine therapy, hybrid imaging and molecular life sciences. Two tracks were included in the main programme, clustering multi-committee involvement: the 5th International Symposium on Targeted Radionuclide-therapy and Dosimetry (ISTARD) and the first Molecules to Man (M2M) track, an initiative of the EANM Committees for Translational Molecular Imaging, Radiopharmacy and Drug Development. The industry made a substantial contribution to the success of the congress demonstrating the latest technology and innovations in the field. During the closing Highlights Lecture, a selection of the best-rated abstracts was presented including diverse areas of nuclear medicine: physics and instrumentation, radiopharmacy, preclinical imaging, oncology (with a focus on the clinical application of newly developed tracers) and radionuclide therapy, cardiology and neurosciences. This Highlights Lecture could only be a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed during the meeting, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress proceedings book, published as Volume 41, Supplement 2 of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging in October 2014. (orig.)

  16. Struggling readers learning with graphic-rich digital science text: Effects of a Highlight & Animate Feature and Manipulable Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrance, Nancy L.

    Technology offers promise of 'leveling the playing field' for struggling readers. That is, instructional support features within digital texts may enable all readers to learn. This quasi-experimental study examined the effects on learning of two support features, which offered unique opportunities to interact with text. The Highlight & Animate Feature highlighted an important idea in prose, while simultaneously animating its representation in an adjacent graphic. It invited readers to integrate ideas depicted in graphics and prose, using each one to interpret the other. The Manipulable Graphics had parts that the reader could operate to discover relationships among phenomena. It invited readers to test or refine the ideas that they brought to, or gleaned from, the text. Use of these support features was compulsory. Twenty fifth grade struggling readers read a graphic-rich digital science text in a clinical interview setting, under one of two conditions: using either the Highlight & Animate Feature or the Manipulable Graphics. Participants in both conditions made statistically significant gains on a multiple choice measure of knowledge of the topic of the text. While there were no significant differences by condition in the amount of knowledge gained; there were significant differences in the quality of knowledge expressed. Transcripts revealed that understandings about light and vision, expressed by those who used the Highlight & Animate Feature, were more often conceptually and linguistically 'complete.' That is, their understandings included both a description of phenomena as well as an explanation of underlying scientific principles, which participants articulated using the vocabulary of the text. This finding may be attributed to the multiple opportunities to integrate graphics (depicting the behavior of phenomena) and prose (providing the scientific explanation of that phenomena), which characterized the Highlight & Animate Condition. Those who used the

  17. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Alaska Region: Highlights from the 2012 Summer Field Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, M.; Bierma, R. M.; Boyce, E. S.; Willoughby, H.; Fend, M.; Feaux, K.

    2012-12-01

    UNAVCO has now completed its fourth year of operation and maintenance of the 138 continuous GPS stations, 12 tiltmeters and 31 data communications relays that comprise the Alaska region of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The successful operation of the autonomous GPS and tiltmeter network in Alaska continues to be a challenge, because of logistics, weather, and other difficulties related to working in Alaska. PBO engineers continue to work on network enhancements to make the stations more robust, while improving overall data quality and station uptime to better serve the EarthScope science community. In the summer of 2012, PBO engineers completed maintenance activities in Alaska, which resulted in a 95% operational status for the Alaska network within PBO. PBO engineers completed a total of 87 maintenance visits in the summer of FY2012, including 62 routine maintenance and 25 unscheduled maintenance visits to GPS and data communications stations. We present a number of highlights and accomplishments from the PBO 2012 summer field season in Alaska, for example the deployment of a newly designed methanol fuel cell at AV35, a critical station that serves as the main repeater for the real time network on Unimak Island. In addition, PBO engineers also completed the installation of three Inmarsat BGAN terminals for data telemetry following successful testing at AC60 Shemya. Lastly, PBO engineers completed scheduled battery replacements at most of the PBO stations on Unimak Island, in collaboration with the USGS/Alaska Volcano Observatory. In addition to routine maintenance and planned station improvements to sites in Alaska, numerous critical repairs were made at stations on Unimak Island and elsewhere to ensure that the PBO network continues to function well and continues to meet the requirements stipulated by the NSF. We also present some of the station failures unique to Alaska, which we encountered during the course of the 2012 field season, as well

  18. Addressing Issues of Broadening Participation Highlighted in the Report on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Manduca, C. A.; Macdonald, H.; Iverson, E. A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The final report for the Summit on the Future of Geoscience Education lays out a consensus on issues that must be tackled by the geoscience community collectively if there are to be enough qualified people to fill the large number of expected geoscience job vacancies over the coming decade. Focus areas cited in the report include: Strengthening the connections between two-year colleges and four-year institutions Sharing and making use of successful recruitment and retention practices for students from underrepresented groups Making students aware of high-quality job prospects in the geosciences as well as its societal relevance The InTeGrate STEP Center for the Geosciences, the Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education at Two-Year Colleges (SAGE 2YC) program, and the Building Strong Geoscience Departments (BSGD) project together have developed a suite of web resources to help faculty and program leaders begin to address these and other issues. These resources address practices that support the whole student, both in the classroom and as a part of the co-curriculum as well as information on geoscience careers, guidance for developing coherent degree programs, practical advice for mentoring and advising, and many others. In addition to developing web resources, InTeGrate has also undertaken an effort to profile successful program practices at a variety of institutions. An analysis of these data shows several common themes (e.g. proactive marketing, community building, research experiences) that align well with the existing literature on what works to support student success. But there are also indications of different approaches and emphases between Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) and Primarily White Institutions (PWIs) as well as between different kinds of MSIs. Highlighting the different strategies in use can point both MSIs and PWIs to possible alternate solutions to the challenges their students face. InTeGrate - http

  19. Variability in Antibiotic Regimens for Surgical Necrotizing Enterocolitis Highlights the Need for New Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Brian P; Hunter, Catherine J; Grabowski, Julia

    Necrotizing enterocolitis or NEC is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in the newborn. The etiology of NEC remains unknown, and treatment consists of antibiotic therapy and supportive care with the addition of surgical intervention as necessary. Unlike most surgical diseases, clear guidelines for the type and duration of peri-operative antibiotic therapy have not been established. Our aim was to review the antibiotic regimen(s) applied to surgical patients with NEC within a single neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and to evaluate outcomes and help develop guidelines for antibiotic administration in this patient population. A single-center retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent surgical intervention for NEC from August 1, 2005 through August 1, 2015. Relevant data were extracted including gestational age, age at diagnosis, gender, pre-operative antibiotic treatment, post-operative antibiotic treatment, development of stricture, and mortality. Patients were excluded if there was incomplete data documentation. A total of 90 patients were identified who met inclusion criteria. There were 56 male patients and 34 female patients. The average gestational age was 30 5/7 wks and average age of diagnosis 16.7 d. A total of 22 different pre-operative antibiotic regimens were identified with an average duration of 10.6 d. The most common pre-operative regimen was ampicillin, gentamicin, and metronidazole for 14 d. A total of 15 different post-operative antibiotic regimens were identified with an average duration of 6.6 d. The most common post-operative regimen was ampicillin, gentamicin, and metronidazole for two days. There were 26 strictures and 15 deaths. No regimen or duration proved superior. We found that there is a high degree of variability in the antibiotic regimen for the treatment of NEC, even within a single NICU, with no regimen appearing superior over another. As data emerge that demonstrate the adverse effects of

  20. Low prevalence of Salmonella in Swedish dairy herds highlight differences between serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ågren, Estelle C C; Sternberg Lewerin, Susanna; Wahlström, Helene; Emanuelson, Ulf; Frössling, Jenny

    2016-03-01

    Legislated Salmonella control in Sweden has been in place since the 1960s. The purpose of this study was to investigate presence of Salmonella antibodies in dairy cattle herds and to provide a basis for decisions on how surveillance and control can be improved. Bulk milk samples from all Swedish dairy herds (n=4 683) were analysed with two different ELISAs; one detecting antibodies against Salmonella Dublin (Dublin ELISA), and one detecting antibodies against several of the serotypes causing bovine salmonellosis including S. Dublin (Bovine ELISA). Information about herds, i.e. geographical location, local animal density, number of test positive herds within 5km, animal trade and herd size, was based on register data. The results confirm a very low prevalence of Salmonella in Swedish dairy herds throughout the country with the exception of an island in the southeast. The test positive herds split into two groups; 41 herds (1%) positive in the Dublin ELISA, and 101 herds (2%) positive in the Bovine ELISA but negative in the Dublin ELISA. Geographical location of positive herds, and comparison of the results of the screening with serotypes previously isolated from some of the herds, indicated that the first group represents herds presently or previously infected with S. Dublin while the second group represents herds presently or previously infected with other serotypes. Differences in serological status between herds in different regions, of different size, with different animal purchase patterns et cetera, were tested using logistic regression. Presence of positive herds within 5km was significantly associated to testing positive. For herds testing positive in the Dublin ELISA, significant associations were also seen with herd size. Purchase of animals during the last year was not significantly associated with the outcome in the final models. We conclude that for future surveillance, the Bovine ELISA can be used to help in identifying infected herds, and the Dublin

  1. The Probability Evaluation Game: An Instrument to Highlight the Skill of Reflexive Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Clare

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Probability Evaluation Game (PEG): an innovative teaching instrument that emphasises the sophistication of listening and highlights listening as a key skill for accounting practitioners. Whilst in a roundtable format, playing PEG involves participants individually evaluating a series of probability terms…

  2. Highlights from Educating for Democracy: Preparing Undergraduates for Responsible Political Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Anne; Beaumont, Elizabeth; Ehrlich, Thomas; Corngold, Josh

    2007-01-01

    This paper, highlights the forthcoming book "Educating for Democracy." The book articulates the conditions under which political teaching and learning in college is and is not legitimate, making the case that education for political development can and should be conducted in a manner that is consistent with the core values of higher education…

  3. The Water Quality in Rio Highlights the Global Public Health Concern Over Untreated Sewage Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality issues in Rio have been widely publicized because of the 2016 Olympics. Recent concerns about polluted waters that athletes may be exposed to highlights the conditions that more than a billion people globally are exposed to daily. Despite these unhealthy conditions,...

  4. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2014 highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detandt, Yves

    2015-11-01

    The Council of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC) supports and promotes the interests of the scientific and industrial aeroacoustics community on an European scale and European aeronautics activities internationally. Each year the committee highlights some of the research and development projects in Europe. This paper is the 2014 issue of this collection of Aeroacoustic Highlights, compiled from informations submitted to the CEAS-ASC. The contributions are classified in different topics; the first categories being related to specific aeroacoustic challenges (airframe noise, fan and jet noise, helicopter noise, aircraft interior noise) and two last sections are respectively devoted to recent improvements and emerging techniques and to general advances in aeroacoustics. For each section, the present paper focus on accomplished projects, providing the state of the art in each research category in 2014. A number of research programmes involving aeroacoustics were funded by the European Commission. Some of the highlights from these programmes are summarised in this paper, as well as highlights funded by national programmes or by industry.

  5. Highlighted scientific findings of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Quigley; Heidi. Bigler Cole

    1997-01-01

    Decisions regarding 72 million acres of Forest Service- and Bureau of Land Management- administered lands will be based on scientific findings brought forth in the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. Some highlights of the scientific findings are presented here. Project scientists drew three general conclusions: (1) Conditions and trends differ widely...

  6. Teaching World Geography to Late-Arrival Immigrant Students: Highlighting Practice and Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Cinthia; Franquiz, Maria E.; Reidel, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    In this case study, the work of an exemplary high school social studies teacher is highlighted. In her class, late-arrival immigrant students participated in oral, writing, and demonstration activities as they learned the physical, cultural, and historical traditions of geography education. As newcomers to the English language, the students'…

  7. Frontiers: Research highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  8. Highlights and conclusions from the Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET) conference 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nsour, M; Kaiser, R; Abd Elkreem, E; Walke, H; Kandeel, A; Bloland, R

    2012-02-01

    As a follow up of a short communication that the Eastern Mediterranean Health journal published in December 2011, this article reports on highlights and conclusions from scientific abstracts, methodology workshops and plenary sessions that were presented as part of the Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET) conference held from 6 to 9 December 2011 in Sharm Al Sheikh, Egypt.

  9. Highlight of Grid-connected PV systems in administrative buildings in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Said

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy applications are becoming increasingly common in Egypt. The abundant sunshine in Egypt, as well as the increasing competitiveness of solar energy systems including- but not limited to photovoltaic (PV, – predicts that these technologies could be weighed to be raised in Egypt.PV systems are installed on roof tiles or other parts of building structures to supplement grid utility, reduce electric bills, and provide emergency back–up energy. Moreover, they simultaneously reduce significant amounts of CO2 emissions. It is foreseen, a number of residential and public buildings in Egypt are using solar power to cut electric utility bills significantly. The approximately payback period to recover the investment costs for PV systems is up to about 5 years.  In addition, it is more economical to use PV system than grid utility systems. The two components that determine the total initial price of a grid- connected PV system are the modules and the balance of systems (BOS. The BOS includes different components such as mounting frames, inverters and site- specific installation hardware.The Government of Egypt (GOE has endorsed the deployment of PV systems through three approaches. It started with a prime minister decree to install PV projects on one-thousand of the governmental buildings. This was followed by as an initiative called "Shamsk ya Masr", and finally the Feed-in Tariff (FiT projects.Following the prime minster decree the Egyptian Electricity Holding Company (EEHC and its affiliated companies took the lead to install PV systems at the top roof of their administrative buildings and interconnect these systems to the electricity network where the suitable locations have been selected for mounting them. About 90 PV systems have been already mounted with about a capacity of 9 MW. On the other hand, "Shamsk ya Masr" has considered energy efficiency (EE so as to complement the PV systems, which will be installed on administrative

  10. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  11. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  12. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...., drunkenness, vagrancy, disturbing the peace, curfew violation, loitering, false fire alarm, non-specific charges of suspicion or investigation, and traffic violations (except data will be included on arrests...

  13. Including risk in the balanced scorecard

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kirstam

    iiSouthern African Business Review Special Edition Accounting Research 2015. Including risk in the .... customer, internal business process and learning and growth perspectives comprise ...... Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Kaplan ...

  14. Including Indigenous Minorities in Decision-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand......Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand...

  15. Neutrinos from Cosmic Accelerators including Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Winter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the particle physics ingredients affecting the normalization, shape, and flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos fluxes, such as different production modes, magnetic field effects on the secondaries (muons, pions, and kaons, and flavor mixing, where we focus on pγ interactions. We also discuss the interplay with neutrino propagation and detection, including the possibility to detect flavor and its application in particle physics, and the use of the Glashow resonance to discriminate pγ from pp interactions in the source. We illustrate the implications on fluxes and flavor composition with two different models: (1 the target photon spectrum is dominated by synchrotron emission of coaccelerated electrons and (2 the target photon spectrum follows the observed photon spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. In the latter case, the multimessenger extrapolation from the gamma-ray fluence to the expected neutrino flux is highlighted.

  16. The physics of semiconductors an introduction including nanophysics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grundmann, Marius

    2016-01-01

    The 3rd edition of this successful textbook contains ample material for a comprehensive upper-level undergraduate or beginning graduate course, guiding readers to the point where they can choose a special topic and begin supervised research. The textbook provides a balance between essential aspects of solid-state and semiconductor physics, on the one hand, and the principles of various semiconductor devices and their applications in electronic and photonic devices, on the other. It highlights many practical aspects of semiconductors such as alloys, strain, heterostructures, nanostructures, that are necessary in modern semiconductor research but typically omitted in textbooks. Coverage also includes additional advanced topics, such as Bragg mirrors, resonators, polarized and magnetic semiconductors, nanowires, quantum dots, multi-junction solar cells, thin film transistors, carbon-based nanostructures and transparent conductive oxides. The text derives explicit formulas for many results to support better under...

  17. The action principle for generalized fluid motion including gyroviscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingam, M., E-mail: manasvi@physics.utexas.edu; Morrison, P.J., E-mail: morrison@physics.utexas.edu

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Method for constructing action principles for a diverse class of fluids with gyroscopic momentum transport is described. • General criteria for the conservation of momentum and angular momentum via Noether's theorem are obtained. • Fluids with intrinsic angular momentum are built as an illustration of the method. - Abstract: A general set of fluid equations that allow for energy-conserving momentum transport by gyroscopic motion of fluid elements is obtained. The equations are produced by a class of action principles that yield a large subset of the known fluid and magnetofluid models, including gyroviscosity. Analysis of the action principle yields broad, model-independent results regarding the conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momenta. The formalism is illustrated by studying fluid models with intrinsic angular momentum that may appear in the contexts of condensed matter, biological, and other areas of physics.

  18. The Physics of Semiconductors An Introduction Including Nanophysics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grundmann, Marius

    2010-01-01

    The Physics of Semiconductors contains ample material for a comprehensive upper-level undergraduate or beginning graduate course, guiding readers to the point where they can choose a special topic and begin supervised research. The textbook provides a balance between essential aspects of solid-state and semiconductor physics, on the one hand, and the principles of various semiconductor devices and their applications in electronic and photonic devices, on the other. It highlights many practical aspects of semiconductors such as alloys, strain, heterostructures, nanostructures, that are necessary in modern semiconductor research but typically omitted in textbooks. Coverage also includes additional advanced topics, such as Bragg mirrors, resonators, polarized and magnetic semiconductors. The text derives explicit formulas for many results to support better understanding of the topics. The Physics of Semiconductors requires little or no prior knowledge of solid-state physics and evolved from a highly regarded two...

  19. Highlights from the SOAP project survey. What Scientists Think about Open Access Publishing

    CERN Document Server

    Dallmeier-Tiessen, Suenje; Goerner, Bettina; Hyppoelae, Jenni; Igo-Kemenes, Peter; Kahn, Deborah; Lambert, Simon; Lengenfelder, Anja; Leonard, Chris; Mele, Salvatore; Nowicka, Malgorzata; Polydoratou, Panayiota; Ross, David; Ruiz-Perez, Sergio; Schimmer, Ralf; Swaisland, Mark; van der Stelt, Wim

    2011-01-01

    The SOAP (Study of Open Access Publishing) project has run a large-scale survey of the attitudes of researchers on, and the experiences with, open access publishing. Around forty thousands answers were collected across disciplines and around the world, showing an overwhelming support for the idea of open access, while highlighting funding and (perceived) quality as the main barriers to publishing in open access journals. This article serves as an introduction to the survey and presents this and other highlights from a preliminary analysis of the survey responses. To allow a maximal re-use of the information collected by this survey, the data are hereby released under a CC0 waiver, so to allow libraries, publishers, funding agencies and academics to further analyse risks and opportunities, drivers and barriers, in the transition to open access publishing.

  20. Recent developments in superconducting materials including ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Kyoji

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the history of superconduction starting in 1911, when the superconducting phenomenon was first observed in murcury, until the recent discovery of superconducting materials with high critical temperatures. After outlining the BCS theory, basic characteristics are discussed including the critical temperature, magnetic field and current density to be reached for realizing the superconducting state. Various techniques for practical superconducting materials are discussed, including methods for producing extra fine multiconductor wires from such superconducting alloys as Nb-Ti, intermetallic Nb/sub 3/Sn compound and V/sub 3/Ga, as well as methods for producing wires of Nb/sub 3/Al, Nb/sub 3/(Al, Ge) and Nb/sub 3/Ge such as continuous melt quenching, electron beam irradiation, laser beam irradiation and chemical evaporation. Characteristics of superconducting ceramics are described, along with their applications including superconducting magnets and superconducting elements. (15 figs, 1 tab, 19 refs)

  1. Highlights of pancreatobiliary endoscopy in international digestive endoscopy network 2012: how much has it advanced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Seok Ho

    2012-09-01

    The pancreatobiliary organ is composed of one of the most complicated structures and complex physiological functions among other digestive organs in our body. This is why endoscopic procedure in pancreaticobiliary system requires rather complicated techniques. In International Digestive Endoscopy Network (IDEN) 2012, many interesting pancreatobiliay endoscopy related topics were presented. Basic procedures like endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EPBD), advanced techniques like endoscopic necrosectomy, prevention and management of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and spyglass system are reviewed in this highlight summary.

  2. Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, John-Paul; Patel, Amit R; Fernandes, Juliano Lara

    2013-07-19

    The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year's meeting.

  3. Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb: Highlights from a pioneer of biomedical research, physician and scientist

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The article highlights the career of Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb (1910 – 1973; DKSM, Dip Bact, FRCPath, FRCP [Lond]), a pioneer worker in health, medical services, biomedical research and medical education in the Sudan. After his graduation from the Kitchener School of Medicine (renamed, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum [U of K]) in 1934, he devoted his life for the development of laboratory medicine. He became the first Sudanese Director of Stack Medical Research Laboratories (19...

  4. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  5. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-12-31

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory`s activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  6. Identifying gaps in the locoregional management of early breast cancer: highlights from the kyoto consensus conference.

    OpenAIRE

    Toi, Masakazu; Winer, Eric P.; INAMOTO, TAKASHI; BENSON, JOHN R.; Forbes, John F.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Robertson, John F. R.; Sasano, Hironobu; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Yamauchi, Akira; KLIMBERG, V. SUZANNE

    2011-01-01

    A consensus conference was held to investigate issues related to the local management of early breast cancer. Here, we highlight the major topics discussed at the conference and propose ideas for future studies. Regarding axillary management, we examined three major issues. First, we discussed whether the use of axillary reverse mapping could clarify the lymphatic system of breast and whether the ipsilateral arm might help avoid lymphedema. Second, the use of an indocyanine green fluorescent ...

  7. Highlights from Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC and the Acoustics of the Little Bangs

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, heavy nuclei are collided at high energies to create matter that is hot enough and dense enough to dissolve hadrons into a quark-gluon-plasma (QGP). In this lecture, dedicated to the memory of Aditya Sambamurti, I present an introduction to heavy-ion collisions and highlights from the first decade of RHIC results.

  8. Recent highlights in anti-protozoan drug development and resistance research

    OpenAIRE

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Waters, Norman C; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the highlights of research presented in January, 2012, at the Keystone Symposium on “Drug Discovery for Protozoan Parasites” held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This symposium which convenes approximately every 2 years provides a forum for leading investigators around the world to present data covering basic sciences to clinical trials relating to anti-protozoan drug development and drug resistance. Many talks focused on malaria, but other protozoan diseases receiving attent...

  9. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  10. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  11. Highly activatable and environment-insensitive optical highlighters for selective spatiotemporal imaging of target proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tomonori; Komatsu, Toru; Kamiya, Mako; Campos, Cláudia; González-Gaitán, Marcos; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2012-07-11

    Optical highlighters are photoactivatable fluorescent molecules that exhibit pronounced changes in their spectral properties in response to irradiation with light of a specific wavelength and intensity. Here, we present a novel design strategy for a new class of caged BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene) fluorophores, based on the use of photoremovable protecting groups (PRPGs) with high reduction potentials that serve as both a photosensitive unit and a fluorescence quencher via photoinduced electron transfer (PeT). 2,6-Dinitrobenzyl (DNB)-caged BODIPY was efficiently photoactivated, with activation ratios exceeding 600-fold in aqueous solutions. We then combined this photoactivatable fluorophore with a SNAP (mutant of O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase) ligand to obtain a small-molecule-based optical highlighter for visualization of protein dynamics, using the well-established SNAP tag technology. As proof of concept, we demonstrate spatiotemporal imaging of the fusion protein of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with SNAP tag in living cells. We also demonstrate highlighting of cells of interest in live zebrafish embryos, using the fusion protein of histone 2A with SNAP tag.

  12. The Case for Strategies that Include Men

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Case for Strategies that Include Men. Denise M Roth and .... one set of approaches advocated using medical cri- teria to identify and ... planning, offering services for the prevention and ..... are equipped with the basic minimum needed to respond to ..... Lane SD Television minidramas: social marketing and evaluation in ...

  13. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has great potential as an outcome in rheumatoid arthritis trials for detecting bone erosions, synovitis, tendon disease, and enthesopathy. It has a number of distinct advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including good patient tolerability and ability to scan multiple joint...

  14. An acoustic finite element including viscothermal effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.; Wijnant, Y.H.; Boer, de A.

    2007-01-01

    In acoustics it is generally assumed that viscous- en thermal boundary layer effects play a minor role in the propagation of sound waves. Hence, these effects are neglected in the basic set of equations describing the sound field. However, for geometries that include small confinements of air or thi

  15. 47 CFR 65.820 - Included items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Included items. 65.820 Section 65.820 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE...) Cash working capital. The average amount of investor-supplied capital needed to provide funds for...

  16. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  17. Including the Excluded: One School for All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EFA 2000 Bulletin, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of "EFA 2000" focuses on the theme of inclusive education, i.e., including children with disabilities in general education classrooms. The cover story discusses a 1995 UNESCO survey of 63 countries that showed that integration of children with disabilities in regular schools is a declared policy in almost every country.…

  18. Scientific Highlights of INDEPTH: Our Still-Evolving Understanding of Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemperer, S. L.; Science Teams, I.

    2011-12-01

    : INDEPTH field activities began in 1992 as a modest Sino-US reflection profile in the Tethyan Himalaya; after 20 years it has spanned the Tibet to cross the KunLun mountains. Three major field campaigns after the first modest test were each spring-boarded by a major discovery in the preceding phase, that in each case highlighted the value of a new scientific technique. INDEPTH-1 imaged the Main Himalayan Thrust for the first time, and wide-angle recording demonstrated India must penetrate north of the Indus-Tsangpo suture at mid-crustal levels. INDEPTH-2 additionally harnessed passive seismic and magneto-telluric recording to discover widespread crustal melting in the Lhasa terrane above subducting India, leading directly to the influential channel-flow model of the development of orogens. INDEPTH-3 crossed into the Qiangtang (northern Tibet), imaged the Indian slab descending into the mantle, and discovering the dramatic change in anisotropy properties of the lithosphere north and south of the Banggong-Nujiang suture. INDEPTH-4 focussed on the interaction of the Qaidam Basin with the high Tibetan plateau, by indentation into the weaker Tibetan crust of the Songpan-Ganzi terrane, and at greater depth provided new images of possible Asian subduction from the north beneath Tibet. Although INDEPTH has provided iconic images of the lithosphere, these have not always translated into agreement about fundamental concerns: the northern limit of Indian crust as part of Tibetan lithosphere (mantle suture) remains debated; and north of that mantle suture, the degree of crust-mantle coupling remains more in the realm of modelers than observational geophysics. Beyond the principal INDEPTH transect, dispersed MT studies in particular have been used to argue the essential collinearity of the Himalayan orogen, and these and passive seismic recordings have suggested relatively uniform plateau-wide processes controlled by a pervasively deforming crust. But as we have deployed more

  19. Canadian Thoracic Society Recommendations for Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease – 2008 Update – Highlights for Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis E O’Donnell

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major respiratory illness in Canada that is preventable and treatable but unfortunately remains underdiagnosed. The purpose of the present article from the Canadian Thoracic Society is to provide up-to-date information so that patients with this condition receive optimal care that is firmly based on scientific evidence. Important summary messages for clinicians are derived from the more detailed Update publication and are highlighted throughout the document. Three key messages contained in the update are: use targeted screening spirometry to establish a diagnosis and initiate prompt management (including smoking cessation of mild COPD; improve dyspnea and activity limitation in stable COPD using new evidence-based treatment algorithms; and understand the importance of preventing and managing acute exacerbations, particularly in moderate to severe disease.

  20. SKIRT: Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baes, Maarten; Dejonghe, Herwig; Davies, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    SKIRT is a radiative transfer code based on the Monte Carlo technique. The name SKIRT, acronym for Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer, reflects the original motivation for its creation: it has been developed to study the effects of dust absorption and scattering on the observed kinematics of dusty galaxies. In a second stage, the SKIRT code was extended with a module to self-consistently calculate the dust emission spectrum under the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. This LTE version of SKIRT has been used to model the dust extinction and emission of various types of galaxies, as well as circumstellar discs and clumpy tori around active galactic nuclei. A new, extended version of SKIRT code can perform efficient 3D radiative transfer calculations including a self-consistent calculation of the dust temperature distribution and the associated FIR/submm emission with a full incorporation of the emission of transiently heated grains and PAH molecules.

  1. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  2. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  3. Opioid dependence treatment, including buprenorphine/naloxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisch, Dennis W; Fye, Carol L; Boardman, Kathy D; Sather, Mike R

    2002-02-01

    To review opioid dependence (OD) and its treatment. Pharmacologic treatments, including the use of buprenorphine/naloxone, are presented. Pharmaceutical care functions for outpatient OD treatment are discussed. Primary and review articles were identified by MEDLINE and HEALTHSTAR searches (from 1966 to November 2000) and through secondary sources. Tertiary sources were also reviewed regarding general concepts of OD and its treatment. Relevant articles were reviewed after identification from published abstracts. Articles were selected based on the objectives for this article. Studies of the treatment of OD with buprenorphine were selected based on the topic (pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, adverse reactions) and study design (randomized, controlled clinical trials in patients with OD with active/placebo comparisons and/or comparisons of active OD treatments). Articles regarding pharmacists' activities in the treatment and prevention of OD were reviewed for the pharmaceutical care section. OD is considered a medical disorder with costly adverse health outcomes. Although methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is cost-effective for OD, only about 12% of individuals with OD receive this treatment. Psychological and pharmacologic modalities are used to treat OD, but patients often relapse. Drug therapy includes alpha 2-agonists for withdrawal symptoms, detoxification regimens with or without opioids, opioid antagonists, and opioid replacement including methadone, levomethadyl acetate, and buprenorphine. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 1999 allows for office-based opioid replacement therapies. Sublingual buprenorphine with naloxone can be used in this milieu. Buprenorphine with naloxone is currently under new drug application review with the Food and Drug Administration. Clinical research shows buprenorphine to be equal in effectiveness to methadone, but safer in overdose due to its ceiling effect on respiratory depression. It has lower abuse potential and fewer

  4. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has great potential as an outcome in rheumatoid arthritis trials for detecting bone erosions, synovitis, tendon disease, and enthesopathy. It has a number of distinct advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including good patient tolerability and ability to scan multiple joints...... pathologies. This article presents the first report from the OMERACT ultrasound special interest group, which has compared US against the criteria of the OMERACT filter. Also proposed for the first time are consensus US definitions for common pathological lesions seen in patients with inflammatory arthritis....

  5. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  6. Automated PDF highlighting to support faster curation of literature for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honghan; Oellrich, Anika; Girges, Christine; de Bono, Bernard; Hubbard, Tim J P; Dobson, Richard J B

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease are devastating and costly illnesses, a source of major global burden. In order to provide successful interventions for patients and reduce costs, both causes and pathological processes need to be understood. The ApiNATOMY project aims to contribute to our understanding of neurodegenerative disorders by manually curating and abstracting data from the vast body of literature amassed on these illnesses. As curation is labour-intensive, we aimed to speed up the process by automatically highlighting those parts of the PDF document of primary importance to the curator. Using techniques similar to those of summarisation, we developed an algorithm that relies on linguistic, semantic and spatial features. Employing this algorithm on a test set manually corrected for tool imprecision, we achieved a macro F 1 -measure of 0.51, which is an increase of 132% compared to the best bag-of-words baseline model. A user based evaluation was also conducted to assess the usefulness of the methodology on 40 unseen publications, which reveals that in 85% of cases all highlighted sentences are relevant to the curation task and in about 65% of the cases, the highlights are sufficient to support the knowledge curation task without needing to consult the full text. In conclusion, we believe that these are promising results for a step in automating the recognition of curation-relevant sentences. Refining our approach to pre-digest papers will lead to faster processing and cost reduction in the curation process. https://github.com/KHP-Informatics/NapEasy.

  7. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Farley Norman

    Full Text Available It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped "glaven" for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers or 8 (for glavens simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object's shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette, specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions-e.g., the participants' performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions. The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision.

  8. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  9. Responses of the central nervous system to high linear energy transfer radiation: NSCOR project highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory; Fike, John; Limoli, Charles; Obenaus, André; Raber, Jacob; Soltesz, Ivan; Vlkolinský, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Overview: The five-university NSCOR project investigates the responses of the central nervous system to space-like charged particle exposure by evaluating: synaptic function, in vitro and in vivo neurogenesis, behavior and behaviorally induced gene expression, and oxidative stress of the mouse hippocampus and cultured neural precursor cells. To test the role of reactive oxygen species in mediating the effects of radiation exposure, we compare responses in a catalase overexpressing transgenic mouse strain to wild type. We also use computational models of the hippocampus in three dimensions, informed by experimental measurements, to provide insight into network behavior. Radiation exposure protocols include single, acute whole-body exposures to 1H, 28Si and 56Fe ions and mixed field exposures using 1H + 56Fe ions (24 h later). The animal models are 10-week-old C57BL/6J and MCATtg males which are evaluated at 30 and 90 days postirradiation. In vitro models are cultured murine and human neural stem cells irradiated with 1H, 16O, 28Si and 56Fe ions at multiple energies and are evaluated at times from days to weeks. Highlights: Neural stem cells organized into neurospheres were irradiated with several ions at doses as low as 0.75 cGy. Data show that significant oxidative stress occurs that alters survival, proliferation and differentiation. Overall trends indicate that changes in oxidative stress (persisting for weeks) correlate with particle linear energy transfer (LET). 56Fe ions elicited the largest and most persistent changes in stress markers, including antioxidant enzyme expression levels. The hippocampus-dependent contextual fear conditioning (CFC) and novel object recognition (NOR) paradigms were used to assess cognition and showed cognitive deficits after irradiation with the NOR paradigm more sensitive than CFC. Analysis of neurogenesis indicates that overall neurogenesis is inhibited at doses ≥1 Gy, but newly born activated microglia are significantly

  10. Retroperitoneal Inflammatory Liposarcoma in a Patient with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report Highlighting Diagnostic Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy S. Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Well differentiated liposarcoma (WDLS is the commonest subtype of liposarcoma. Recognised subtypes of WDLSs are lipoma-like, sclerosing, spindle cell and inflammatory. The inflammatory variant of WDLS also known as “lymphocyte-rich liposarcoma” is rare. We present a case of inflammatory WDLS occurring in the retroperitoneum, in a patient with a past history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We outline the histological features, discuss the differential diagnoses and highlight the diagnostic pitfalls in interpretation of this lesion on fine needle biopsy.

  11. Environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B

    1978-12-01

    Environmental Sciences is one of the four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It carries out a wide range of activities in atmospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, oceanographic sciences, and land and freshwater environmental sciences. In general, these programs are concerned with identification and measurement of pollutants introduced into the environment by energy-related activities and the evaluation and prediction of the effects or potential effects of these pollutants on the environment. This highlights report for Environmental Programs covers the year 1978 and describes the objectives and funding levels of each of the programs, major accomplishments during the year, planned future activities, and current publications.

  12. A Method of Removing Reflected Highlight on Images Based on Polarimetric Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanchao Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of removing reflected highlight is proposed on polarimetric imaging. Polarization images (0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° and the reflection angle are required in this reflected light removal algorithm. This method is based on the physical model of reflection and refraction, and no additional image processing algorithm is necessary in this algorithm. Compared to traditional polarization method with single polarizer, restricted observation angle of Brewster is not demanded and multiple reflection areas of different polarization orientations can be removed simultaneously. Experimental results, respectively, demonstrate the features of this reflected light removal algorithm, and it can be considered very suitable in polarization remote sensing.

  13. Selection, Appraisal, and Retention of Digital Scientific Data: Highlights of an ERPANET/CODATA Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Esanu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CODATA and ERPANET collaborated to convene an international archiving workshop on the selection, appraisal, and retention of digital scientific data, which was held on 15-17 December 2003 at the Biblioteca Nacional in Lisbon, Portugal. The workshop brought together more than 65 researchers, data and information managers, archivists, and librarians from 13 countries to discuss the issues involved in making critical decisions regarding the long-term preservation of the scientific record. One of the major aims for this workshop was to provide an international forum to exchange information about data archiving policies and practices across different scientific, institutional, and national contexts. Highlights from the workshop discussions are presented.

  14. Aeroacoustics research in Europe: The CEAS-ASC report on 2003 highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, W.

    2004-11-01

    This is a report on some highlights of aeroacoustics research in Europe in 2003, compiled from information provided to the Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee of the Confederation of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS). The CEAS currently comprises the national Aerospace Societies of France (Association Aéronautique et Astronautique de France), Germany (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrt), Italy (Associazione Italiana di Aeronautica e Astronautica), The Netherlands (Nederlandse Vereniging voor Luchtvaarttechniek), Spain (Asociación de Ingenieros Aeronáuticos de España), Sweden (Flygtekniska Föreningen), Switzerland (Schweizerische Vereinigung für Flugwissenschaften) and the UK (The Royal Aeronautical Society).

  15. Highlights from the CERN/ESO/NordForsk ''Gender in Physics Day''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primas, F.; Guinot, G.; Strandberg, L.

    2017-03-01

    In their role as observers on the EU Gender Equality Network in the European Research Area (GENERA) project, funded under the Horizon 2020 framework, CERN, ESO and NordForsk joined forces and organised a Gender in Physics Day at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation. The one-day conference aimed to examine innovative activities promoting gender equality, and to discuss gender-oriented policies and best practice in the European Research Area (with special emphasis on intergovernmental organisations), as well as the importance of building solid networks. The event was very well attended and was declared a success. The main highlights of the meeting are reported.

  16. Environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B

    1978-12-01

    Environmental Sciences is one of the four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It carries out a wide range of activities in atmospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, oceanographic sciences, and land and freshwater environmental sciences. In general, these programs are concerned with identification and measurement of pollutants introduced into the environment by energy-related activities and the evaluation and prediction of the effects or potential effects of these pollutants on the environment. This highlights report for Environmental Programs covers the year 1978 and describes the objectives and funding levels of each of the programs, major accomplishments during the year, planned future activities, and current publications.

  17. The wonderous chaperones: A highlight on therapeutics of cancer and potentially malignant disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutan Tyagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse environmental and physiological factors are known to induce the transcription of a set of genes encoding special protective molecules known as "molecular chaperones" within our cells. Literature abounds in evidence regarding the varied roles; these "guides" can effectively perform in our system. Highly conserved through evolution, from the prokaryotes to the eukaryotes, these make perfect study tools for verifying their role in both the pathogenesis as well as the therapeutics of varied neurodegenerative, autoimmune and potentially malignant disorders and varied cancer states. We present a concise review of this ever dynamic molecule, highlighting the probable role in a potentially malignant disorder, oral lichen planus.

  18. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 2010 (January 1, 2010 through March 31, 2010)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Staci A.; Showalter, Mary Ann; Manke, Kristin L.; Carper, Ross R.; Wiley, Julie G.; Beckman, Mary T.

    2010-04-20

    The Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. EMSL is operated by PNNL for the DOE-Office of Biological and Environmental Research. At one location, EMSL offers a comprehensive array of leading-edge resources and expertise. Access to the instrumentation and expertise is obtained on a peer-reviewed proposal basis. Staff members work with researchers to expedite access to these capabilities. The "EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report" documents current research and activities of EMSL staff and users.

  19. Highlights from Faraday Discussion 184: Single-Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy, London, UK, September 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellings, E; Faez, S; Piatkowski, L

    2016-02-07

    The 2015 Faraday Discussion on single-molecule microscopy and spectroscopy brought together leading scientists involved in various topics of single-molecule research. It attracted almost a hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels - from experimentalists to theoreticians, from biologists to materials scientists, from masters students to Nobel Prize Laureates. The meeting was merely a reflection of how big of an impact the ability to detect individual molecules has had on science over the past quarter of a century. In the following we give an overview of the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation.

  20. Inlet Guide Vane Wakes Including Rotor Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R. T.; Fleeter, S.

    2001-02-01

    Fundamental experiments are described directed at the investigation of forcing functions generated by an inlet guide vane (IGV) row, including interactions with the downstream rotor, for application to turbomachine forced response design systems. The experiments are performed in a high-speed research fan facility comprised of an IGV row upstream of a rotor. IGV-rotor axial spacing is variable, with the IGV row able to be indexed circumferentially, thereby allowing measurements to be made across several IGV wakes. With an IGV relative Mach number of 0.29, measurements include the IGV wake pressure and velocity fields for three IGV-rotor axial spacings. The decay characteristics of the IGV wakes are compared to the Majjigi and Gliebe empirical correlations. After Fourier decomposition, a vortical-potential gust splitting analysis is implemented to determine the vortical and potential harmonic wake gust forcing functions both upstream and downstream of the rotor. Higher harmonics of the vortical gust component of the IGV wakes are found to decay at a uniform rate due to viscous diffusion.

  1. Including supplementary elements in a compositional biplot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunis-i-Estadella, J.; Thió-Henestrosa, S.; Mateu-Figueras, G.

    2011-05-01

    The biplot is a widely and powerful methodology used with multidimensional data sets to describe and display the relationships between observations and variables in an easy way. Compositional data are vectors with positive components, whose sum is constant because they represent a relative contribution of different parts to a whole; due to this property standard biplots cannot be performed with compositional data, instead of a previous transformation of the data is performed. In this paper, we extend the compositional biplot defined by Aitchison and Greenacre (2002), in order to include in the display supplementary elements which are not used in the definition of the compositional biplot. Different types of supplementary elements are considered: supplementary parts of the composition, supplementary continuous variables external to the composition, supplementary categorical variables and supplementary observations. The projection of supplementary parts of the composition is done by means of the equivalence of clr and lr biplots. The other supplementary projections are done by classical methodology. An application example with a real geological data is included.

  2. Remote observations of reentering spacecraft including the space shuttle orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Cagle, Melinda F.; Grinstead, Jay H.; Gibson, David M.

    Flight measurement is a critical phase in development, validation and certification processes of technologies destined for future civilian and military operational capabilities. This paper focuses on several recent NASA-sponsored remote observations that have provided unique engineering and scientific insights of reentry vehicle flight phenomenology and performance that could not necessarily be obtained with more traditional instrumentation methods such as onboard discrete surface sensors. The missions highlighted include multiple spatially-resolved infrared observations of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter during hypersonic reentry from 2009 to 2011, and emission spectroscopy of comparatively small-sized sample return capsules returning from exploration missions. Emphasis has been placed upon identifying the challenges associated with these remote sensing missions with focus on end-to-end aspects that include the initial science objective, selection of the appropriate imaging platform and instrumentation suite, target flight path analysis and acquisition strategy, pre-mission simulations to optimize sensor configuration, logistics and communications during the actual observation. Explored are collaborative opportunities and technology investments required to develop a next-generation quantitative imaging system (i.e., an intelligent sensor and platform) with greater capability, which could more affordably support cross cutting civilian and military flight test needs.

  3. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

    2011-04-14

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  4. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  5. Reconnection experiments including 3D magnetic nulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, A.; Egedal, J.; Vrublevskis, A.

    2010-11-01

    A rich collection of magnetic reconnection scenarios is possible in three dimensions depending on the topological and geometric structure of the magnetic field [1]. In recent experiments at the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) three-dimensional effects were essential even in nearly axisymmetric plasmas with a non-vanishing toroidal field [2]. To explore reconnection in 3D geometries including magnetic null points, a new adjustable set of coils will be installed in the vacuum chamber of VTF. The range of vacuum magnetic field topologies attainable in VTF will be explored numerically. Plasma reconnection experiments will be run in these configurations, and measurements will be presented if available. [4pt] [1] CE Parnell, et al., (2009) ``Three-Dimensional Magnetic Reconnection, in Magnetic Coupling between the Interior and the Atmosphere of the Sun,'' eds. S.S. Hasan and R.J. Rutten, Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, Berlin. [0ex] [2] Katz, N. et al., (2010) Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 255004.

  6. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  7. CLIC expands to include the Southern Hemisphere

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Australia has recently joined the CLIC collaboration: the enlargement will bring new expertise and resources to the project, and is especially welcome in the wake of CERN budget redistributions following the recent adoption of the Medium Term Plan.   The countries involved in CLIC collaboration With the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 26 August 2010, the ACAS network (Australian Collaboration for Accelerator Science) became the 40th member of in the multilateral CLIC collaboration making Australia the 22nd country to join the collaboration. “The new MoU was signed by the ACAS network, which includes the Australian Synchrotron and the University of Melbourne”, explains Jean-Pierre Delahaye, CLIC Study Leader. “Thanks to their expertise, the Australian institutes will contribute greatly to the CLIC damping rings and the two-beam test modules." Institutes from any country wishing to join the CLIC collaboration are invited to assume responsibility o...

  8. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course pr...

  9. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" trainings have been recently changed to include, respectively, an introduction and an expert training on the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to develop expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepare...

  10. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepares participants to develop test and measurement, da...

  11. Should Broca's area include Brodmann area 47?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Understanding brain organization of speech production has been a principal goal of neuroscience. Historically, brain speech production has been associated with so-called Broca’s area (Brodmann area –BA- 44 and 45), however, modern neuroimaging developments suggest speech production is associated with networks rather than with areas. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the connectivity of BA47 ( pars orbitalis) in relation to language . A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the language network in which BA47 is involved. The Brainmap database was used. Twenty papers corresponding to 29 experimental conditions with a total of 373 subjects were included. Our results suggest that BA47 participates in a “frontal language production system” (or extended Broca’s system). The BA47  connectivity found is also concordant with a minor role in language semantics. BA47 plays a central role in the language production system.

  12. ACCREDITATION FOR TECHNICAL ABILITIES INCLUDING COMPUTER SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit Hami OZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sector Skills are defined by state-sponsored, employer-led organizations that cover specific economic sectors in the European Union and other countries in the world to reduce skills gaps and shortages, improve productivity, boost the skills of their sector workforces and improve learning supply. The accreditation and registration systems used by professional bodies raise the profile of the profession. In many countries including the European Union, professional associations are beginning to accept practice-based accreditation, generally as an alternative to their mainstream systems. Besides studying the certain agencies in the European Union for assessing/accreditating practical abilities , Accreditation for practical abilities of Information Communication Technology and Business Management/Language domains developed by Accreditation Council for Practical abilities are also studied in detail as an example to establish a similar agency in Turkey.

  13. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S.J.; Day, J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  14. Models of bovine babesiosis including juvenile cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Babesiosis in cattle is caused by the transmission of protozoa of Babesia spp. by ticks as vectors. Juvenile cattle (Babesiosis, rarely show symptoms, and acquire immunity upon recovery. Susceptibility to the disease varies between breeds of cattle. Models of the dynamics of Bovine Babesiosis transmitted by the cattle tick that include these factors are formulated as systems of ordinary differential equations. Basic reproduction numbers are calculated, and it is proved that if these numbers are below the threshold value of one, then Bovine Babesiosis dies out. However, above the threshold number of one, the disease may approach an endemic state. In this case, control measures are suggested by determining target reproduction numbers. The percentage of a particular population (for example, the adult bovine population) needed to be controlled to eradicate the disease is evaluated numerically using Columbia data from the literature.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF WATER CIRCULATION MODEL INCLUDING IRRIGATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsuki, Shunji; Tanaka, Kenji; Kojiri, Toshiharu; Hamaguchi, Toshio

    It is well known that since agricultural water withdrawal has much affect on water circulation system, accurate analysis of river discharge or water balance are difficult with less regard for it. In this study, water circulation model composed of land surface model and distributed runoff model is proposed at 10km 10km resolution. In this model, irrigation water, which is estimated with land surface model, is introduced to river discharge analysis. The model is applied to the Chao Phraya River in Thailand, and reproduced seasonal water balance. Additionally, the discharge on dry season simulated with the model is improved as a result of including irrigation. Since the model, which is basically developed from global data sets, simulated seasonal change of river discharge, it can be suggested that our model has university to other river basins.

  16. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...... surgical techniques and better outcome after peripheral nerve injury. Decision making in peripheral nerve surgery continues to be a complex challenge, where the mechanism of injury, repeated clinical evaluation, neuroradiological and neurophysiological examination, and detailed knowledge of the peripheral...... nervous system response to injury are prerequisite to obtain the best possible outcome. Surgery continues to be the primary treatment modality for peripheral nerve tumors and advances in adjuvant oncological treatment has improved outcome after malignant peripheral nerve tumors. The present chapter...

  17. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course pr...

  18. Expression QTL analysis of top loci from GWAS meta-analysis highlights additional schizophrenia candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Simone; van Eijk, Kristel R; Zeegers, Dave W L H; Strengman, Eric; Janson, Esther; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Boks, Marco P M; Ophoff, Roel A

    2012-09-01

    There is genetic evidence that schizophrenia is a polygenic disorder with a large number of loci of small effect on disease susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia have had limited success, with the best finding at the MHC locus at chromosome 6p. A recent effort of the Psychiatric GWAS consortium (PGC) yielded five novel loci for schizophrenia. In this study, we aim to highlight additional schizophrenia susceptibility loci from the PGC study by combining the top association findings from the discovery stage (9394 schizophrenia cases and 12 462 controls) with expression QTLs (eQTLs) and differential gene expression in whole blood of schizophrenia patients and controls. We examined the 6192 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with significance threshold at Pschizophrenia cases and controls (n=202). After correction for multiple testing, the eQTL analysis yielded 40 significant cis-acting effects of the SNPs. Seven of these transcripts show differential expression between cases and controls. Of these, the effect of three genes (RNF5, TRIM26 and HLA-DRB3) coincided with the direction expected from meta-analysis findings and were all located within the MHC region. Our results identify new genes of interest and highlight again the involvement of the MHC region in schizophrenia susceptibility.

  19. Robust Background Subtraction with Shadow and Highlight Removal for Indoor Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jwu-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a robust background subtraction scheme involving shadow and highlight removal for indoor environmental surveillance. Foreground regions can be precisely extracted by the proposed scheme despite illumination variations and dynamic background. The Gaussian mixture model (GMM is applied to construct a color-based probabilistic background model (CBM. Based on CBM, the short-term color-based background model (STCBM and the long-term color-based background model (LTCBM can be extracted and applied to build the gradient-based version of the probabilistic background model (GBM. Furthermore, a new dynamic cone-shape boundary in the RGB color space, called a cone-shape illumination model (CSIM, is proposed to distinguish pixels among shadow, highlight, and foreground. A novel scheme combining the CBM, GBM, and CSIM is proposed to determine the background which can be used to detect abnormal conditions. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated via experiments with several video clips collected in a complex indoor environment.

  20. Design of a detection system of highlight LED arrays' effect on the human organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuwang; Shi, Guiju; Xue, Tongze; Liu, Yanming

    2009-05-01

    LED (Light Emitting Diode) has many advantages in the intensity, wavelength, practicality and price, so it is feasible to apply in biomedicine engineering. A system for the research on the effect of highlight LED arrays to human organization is designed. The temperature of skin surface can rise if skin and organization are in irradiation by highlight LED arrays. The metabolism and blood circulation of corresponding position will be quicker than those not in the shine, so the surface temperature will vary in different position of skin. The structure of LED source arrays system is presented and a measure system for studying LED's influence on human organization is designed. The temperature values of shining point are detected by infrared temperature detector. Temperature change is different according to LED parameters, such as the number, irradiation time and luminous intensity of LED. Experimental device is designed as an LED arrays pen. The LED arrays device is used to shine the points of human body, then it may effect on personal organization as well as the acupuncture. The system is applied in curing a certain skin disease, such as age pigment, skin cancer and fleck.

  1. Best of failure analysis of turbomachinery components. Highlights from two decades' of laboratory practice; Best of Schadensanalyse an Turbomaschinen. Die Highlights aus 20 Jahren Laborpraxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidel, Andreas; Cagliyan, Erhan; Gaedicke, Tobias; Giller, Madleine; Hartanto, Vincentius; Kramm, Christine; Riesenbeck, Susanne; Ullrich, Thomas; Wallich, Sebastian; Woehl, Eric [Siemens AG, Power and Gas, Berlin (Germany). Werkstoffprueflabor

    2017-01-15

    In this contribution, the most interesting and educational failure cases are presented that the author came across during his over twenty years of laboratory practice as manager of the Materials Testing Laboratory of the Berlin Gas Turbine Plant of Siemens' Power and Gas Division. The case studies are presented and categorised in accordance with VDI Guideline 3822, the German failure analyst's guide to the subject of how to organise and run a root cause failure analysis. An effort was made to have each of the main four categories of failure causes represented, namely failures due to mechanical loading, corrosive failures, failures due to thermal loading, and tribological failures. Case studies include turbomachinery components that failed due to tensile overload, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, hot cracking, fretting, erosion, and galling. Affected components include valves, retaining rings, tubing and piping, burners, rotor disks, lifting lugs, and casings. Some of the presented cases were published in the new section ''Failure Analysis'' of Practical Metallography between October 2011 and the present time. Others were oral presentations at the Metallography conferences and at the annual failure analysis conferences ''VDI Jahrestagung Schadensanalyse'', held during that time. The focus of discussion of the failure cases in this paper is the metallurgical evaluation of failure causes. This is the approach taken in many small and industrial laboratories. A holistic approach of a failure case, which includes calculation and simulation methods such as finite element analysis, and which also implies a knowledge of the service stresses intended by design as well as the actual loading situation of the failed part, is not the aim of this contribution.

  2. Intestinal fermentation of lactose and prebiotic lactose derivatives, including human milk oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the recent advances in technology to study fermentation of lactose and its prebiotic derivatives, including human milk oligosaccharides. Novel molecular tools to identify members of the microbiota that ferment these substrates are highlighted, as well as the use of stable isoto

  3. Imaging of axial spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, J; Baraliakos, X

    2011-03-01

    New bone formation of the vertebral column is pathognomonic for ankylosing spondylitis (AS), while acute and/or chronic changes in the sacroiliac joints are relevant for diagnosis. The 'gold standard' for assessment of structural changes in AS are conventional radiographs, while MRI is useful to assess inflammation. Recent MRI studies have shown that the lower half of the thoracic spine is most commonly affected in AS. Scoring tools for spinal inflammation such as the ASspiMRI-a have been proposed, successfully used in large clinical trials and compared in a multireader experiment; none was finally preferred by OMERACT. Quantification of structural spinal AS changes is performed by the modified Stokes AS Spine Score (mSASSS), which evaluates lateral cervical and lumbar radiographs. Two years was identified as the shortest possible follow-up time based on the reliability and sensitivity to change of the mSASSS. A potential disadvantage of the mSASSS is that the thoracic spine is not included. Recent data based on the mSASSS have suggested that tumour necrosis factor blockers do not inhibit radiographic progression in AS. Since the mean radiographic change is reported to be less than 1 syndesmophyte over 2 years, the sensitivity to change of the mSASSS has been questioned. However, in one study where continuous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use was compared with on-demand use, a difference between these two methods of drug intake was reported. The face and construct validity of the mSASSS has been criticised because a score of ´1´ contains a mixture of osteodestructive (erosions) and osteoproliferative changes (squaring and sclerosis). A new scoring system, the RASSS, which concentrates only on bone formation and which includes the lower part of the thoracic spine is currently being evaluated. The relationship between inflammation and new bone formation in AS has recently been investigated. Low sclerostin and DKK-1 serum levels, both inhibitors of bone

  4. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  5. Full Boltzmann equations for leptogenesis including scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn-Woernle, F; Wong, Y Y Y

    2009-01-01

    We study the evolution of a cosmological baryon asymmetry produced via leptogenesis by means of the full classical Boltzmann equations, without the assumption of kinetic equilibrium and including all quantum statistical factors. Beginning with the full mode equations we derive the usual equations of motion for the right-handed neutrino number density and integrated lepton asymmetry, and show explicitly the impact of each assumption on these quantities. For the first time, we investigate also the effects of scattering of the right-handed neutrino with the top quark to leading order in the Yukawa couplings by means of the full Boltzmann equations. We find that in our full Boltzmann treatment the final lepton asymmetry can be suppressed by as much as a factor of 1.5 in the weak wash-out regime (K1), the full Boltzmann treatment and the integrated approach give nearly identical final lepton asymmetries (within 10 % of each other at K>3). Finally, we show that the opposing effects of quantum statistics on decays/i...

  6. Extending Newtonian Dynamics to Include Stochastic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2009-01-01

    A paper presents further results of continuing research reported in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, the two most recent being Stochastic Representations of Chaos Using Terminal Attractors (NPO-41519), [Vol. 30, No. 5 (May 2006), page 57] and Physical Principle for Generation of Randomness (NPO-43822) [Vol. 33, No. 5 (May 2009), page 56]. This research focuses upon a mathematical formalism for describing post-instability motions of a dynamical system characterized by exponential divergences of trajectories leading to chaos (including turbulence as a form of chaos). The formalism involves fictitious control forces that couple the equations of motion of the system with a Liouville equation that describes the evolution of the probability density of errors in initial conditions. These stabilizing forces create a powerful terminal attractor in probability space that corresponds to occurrence of a target trajectory with probability one. The effect in configuration space (ordinary three-dimensional space as commonly perceived) is to suppress exponential divergences of neighboring trajectories without affecting the target trajectory. As a result, the post-instability motion is represented by a set of functions describing the evolution of such statistical quantities as expectations and higher moments, and this representation is stable.

  7. Odontogenic fibroma, including amyloid and ossifying variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversole, Lewis R

    2011-12-01

    Sixty-five cases of odontogenic fibroma (OdonF) are herein presented having been segregated into peripheral, extra bony tumors (n = 40) and tumors arising in bone or centrally (n = 25). All cases were characterized microscopically by a fibrous proliferation that varied within and between cases in cellularity and collagen fibril diameter, with intermixed odontogenic epithelial islands and cords. All central lesions presented as well demarcated radiolucencies and resorption of contiguous tooth roots was a common finding. These intraosseous lesions were of the WHO type; the so-called nonWHO type was excluded as all lesions with this diagnosis were devoid of an epithelial component and could be reclassified as other soft tissue fibrogenic tumors. Neither the central tumors nor the peripheral lesions recurred following enucleation/curettage, with a mean follow-up of 4 and 3.4 years respectively. Three distinct microscopic variations were encountered in this series: (1) two cases of OdonF with giant cell reaction, (2) two instances of OdonF with ossifying fibroma; and (3) four instances of OdonF with odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM), an amyloid-like protein found deposited adjacent to epithelial cords plus CD1a+/S-100+ Langerhans dendritic cells entwined around the epithelial element. A single instance of the odontogenic fibroma-like hamartoma/enamel hypoplasia syndrome has been included in this series.

  8. Locomotive Assignment Optimization Including Train Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Kasalica

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Intention– Cyclic locomotive assignment planning is a specific type of organization of locomotive usage, and in fact, it means putting the complete workload to a closed chain, which is repeated periodically. The concept of cyclic locomotive assignment planning type organization in the area of train traction has proven in practice as the best one, but as it is made for in-advance defined timetable and without considering the stochastic nature of the timetable realization process, it leads to incompatibility in using locomotives. Methodology – Methodology defined in this paper contains: research of train delays on the Serbian Railways and Montenegrin Railways networks, analysis of the real system organization of locomotive usage in conditions of train delays, theoretical thesis of solving the problem of optimal cyclic locomotive assignment planning in conditions of train delays, designing of a model with algorithms, preparing the software package, testing the model and program with results, as well as the conclusions drawn from the complete research project. Results– The optimization model of cyclic locomotive assignment planning during the process of making timetable including train delays has been defined. Conclusion –The obtained results have shown as expected, that the larger delays of trains required a larger number of locomotives. However, by using this model it is possible to optimize the required number of locomotives, taking into account the real time delays of trains.

  9. SUPPORT PROGRAM FOR HIGHLIGHTS IN THE STATE OF SINALOA: A TIMELY NOTICE TO TALENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia López-Nevárez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present an analysis of scientific training outstanding students deepening into the elements and challenges that society demands. For Support Program Highlights were studied in the state of Sinaloa, by virtue of being a program that seeks to bring its full potential talent manifest in children and young Sinaloa. For research interviews, observation and document analysis using qualitative perspective, the perspective of philosophical model rhombus Renée Bédard were performed. The results show that students in the program are being formed with a scientific identity under environments that rescue creativity, commitment and momentum talent with the constituency in collaborative work and human development, also are working on research projects, product development and initiatives for the benefit of the state of Sinaloa.

  10. Etiology of Obesity Over the Life Span: Ecological and Genetic Highlights from Asian Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Pei Nee; Teh, Christinal Pey Wen; Poh, Bee Koon; Noor, Mohd Ismail

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic, and the prevalence rate has doubled since the 1980s. Asian countries are also experiencing the global epidemic of obesity with its related health consequences. The prevalence of overweight and obesity are increasing at an alarming rate across all age groups in Asia. These increases are mainly attributed to rapid economic growth, which leads to socio-economic, nutrition and lifestyle transitions, resulting in a positive energy balance. In addition, fat mass and obesity-associated gene variants, copy number variants in chromosomes and epigenetic modifications have shown positive associations with the risk of obesity among Asians. In this review highlights of prevalence and related ecological and genetic factors that could influence the rapid rise in obesity among Asian populations are discussed.

  11. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Åsa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W.H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M.; consortium, HRGEN; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Fabiola Del, Greco M.; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C.M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R.P.; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimäki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal Mendelian Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals we identified 35 common variant QT interval loci, that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 novel QT loci in 298 unrelated LQTS probands identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode for proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies novel candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS,and SCD. PMID:24952745

  12. Highlights from the COMPASS experiment at CERN -- Hadron spectroscopy and excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Nerling, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at the CERN-SPS studies the spectrum and the structure of hadrons by scattering high energy hadrons and polarised muons off various fixed targets. Recent results for the hadron programme comprise highlights from different topics. A selective overview is given and, among others, the following results are discussed. The precise determination of the pion polarisability, a long standing puzzle that has been solved now, is presented as well as measurements of radiative widths. The observation of a new narrow axial-vector state, the $a_1(1420)$, as well as deeper insights into the exotic $1^{-+}$-wave, which is under study since decades by several experiments, are discussed and further, the search for the charmonium-like exotic $Z_c(3900)$ state in the COMPASS data is covered.

  13. Highlights of the ARGO-YBJ Experiment at 4,300 m a.s.l

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zhen, E-mail: caozh@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment in Tibet, China has been operated to survey the northern sky for gamma ray sources, transient or steady, for nearly 6 years. Many astrophysics observational results will be highlighted in this paper, such as the sky survey results, extended source observation, diffuse gamma rays from the galactic plane, and emission mechanism of AGNs and their flares. As the unique detector for EAS with a continuously sensitive area of 5,600 m2, the ARGO-YBJ array catches almost all particles in the central part of showers. The high-quality data set for showers above few TeV has been used for cosmic ray measurements such as the energy spectrum and composition. All those results are summarized here. As one of the next generation ground-based high-altitude air shower detector, LHAASO is briefly introduced as the successor of ARGO-YBJ in the end of the paper. (author)

  14. Highlights of the ISOLDE facility and the HIE-ISOLDE Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borge M.J.G

    2016-01-01

    REX LINAC to 4.3 MeV/u reaching 5.5 MeV/u next spring. In this new energy regime the Coulomb excitation cross sections are strongly increased with respect to the previous energy of bearly 3 MeV/u and many transfer reaction channels will open. The second stage of the energy upgrade will allow energies of the beam up to 10 MeV/u for the worst scenario of A/q = 4.5. The funds are already secured and it is expected to be completed in 2017. In this contribution the present status of the ISOLDE facility will be discussed, some highlights will be briefly described to illustrate the advances of the facility. The HIEISOLDE project will be described together with a panorama of the physics cases to be addressed in the near future with emphasis in the day-one experiment to be done this year.

  15. Highlights of X-Stack ExM Deliverable: MosaStore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripeanu, Matei [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2016-07-20

    This brief report highlights the experience gained with MosaStore, an exploratory part of the X-Stack project “ExM: System support for extreme-scale, many-task applications”. The ExM project proposed to use concurrent workflows supported by the Swift language and runtime as an innovative programming model to exploit parallelism in exascale computers. MosaStore aims to support this endeavor by improving storage support for workflow-based applications, more precisely by exploring the gains that can be obtained from co-designing the storage system and the workflow runtime engine. MosaStore has been developed primarily at the University of British Columbia.

  16. Visual content highlighting via automatic extraction of embedded captions on MPEG compressed video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Boon-Lock; Liu, Bede

    1996-03-01

    Embedded captions in TV programs such as news broadcasts, documentaries and coverage of sports events provide important information on the underlying events. In digital video libraries, such captions represent a highly condensed form of key information on the contents of the video. In this paper we propose a scheme to automatically detect the presence of captions embedded in video frames. The proposed method operates on reduced image sequences which are efficiently reconstructed from compressed MPEG video and thus does not require full frame decompression. The detection, extraction and analysis of embedded captions help to capture the highlights of visual contents in video documents for better organization of video, to present succinctly the important messages embedded in the images, and to facilitate browsing, searching and retrieval of relevant clips.

  17. Highlighting the History of Astronomy in the Asia-Pacific Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Tsuko; Strom, Richard G; ICOA-6 Conference

    2011-01-01

    This book provides readers with the results of recent research from some of the world's leading historians of astronomy on aspects of Arabic, Australian, Chinese, Japanese, and North and South American astronomy and astrophysics. It contains peer-reviewed papers gathered from the International Conferences on Oriental Astronomy 6 (ICO-6) with the chosen theme of "Highlighting the History of Astronomy in the Asia-Pacific Region." Of particular note are the sections on Arabic astronomy, Asian applied astronomy and the history of Australian radio astronomy, and the chapter on Peruvian astronomy. This title is a valuable complement for those with research interests in applied historical astronomy; archaeoastronomy; calendars, manuscripts, and star charts; historical instruments and observatories, and the history of radio astronomy.

  18. Highlights of the 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsiou, Anastasia; Dorbala, Sharmila; Scholte, Arthur J H A

    2015-09-01

    The 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT was held from 3 to 5 May 2015 in Madrid, Spain. In this article, the three Congress Program Committee Chairs summarize selected highlights of the presented abstracts. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is being published concurrently in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology (10.1007/s12350-015-0260-y) and European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging (10.1093/ehjci/jev179). The articles are identical except for minor stylistic and spelling differences in keeping with each journal’s style. Either citation can be used when citing this article.

  19. Highlighting ethical decisions underlying the scoring of animal welfare in the Welfare Quality® scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veissier, I.; Jensen, Karsten Klint; Botreau, R.

    2011-01-01

    All systems of scoring animal units (groups, farms, slaughter plants, etc.) according to the level of the animals’ welfare are based inevitably on normative decisions. Similarly, all methods of labelling, in terms of acceptability, are based on choices reflecting ethical values. The evaluative...... dimension of scoring and labelling does not mean that we should reject them, but it does mean that we need to make the normative and ethical background explicit. The Welfare Quality® scoring system is used as a case study in order to highlight the role of underlying value-based decisions. In this scoring...... of welfare or be based on what can be achieved in practice – in other words, an absolute assessment or a relative one may be proposed. Welfare Quality® adopted an intermediate strategy: absolute limits between welfare categories (Not classified, Acceptable, Enhanced, or Excellent level of welfare) were set...

  20. Florbetapir (18F) for brain amyloid positron emission tomography: highlights on the European marketing approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Blanco, Anabel; Prieto-Yerro, Concha; Martinez-Lazaro, Raul; Zamora, Javier; Jiménez-Huete, Adolfo; Haberkamp, Marion; Pohly, Johannes; Enzmann, Harald; Zinserling, Jörg; Strassmann, Valerie; Broich, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Florbetapir (18F) for brain amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been recently approved in Europe to estimate β-amyloid neuritic plaque density in the brain when the subject is still alive. Such density is one of the key issues for the definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at autopsy. This capability of florbetapir (18F) is regarded as a significant improvement in the diagnostic procedures for adult patients with cognitive impairment who are being evaluated for AD and other causes of cognitive impairment. The current paper highlights the specific characteristics of the European marketing authorization of florbetapir (18F). Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Highlighting metabolic indicators of olive oil during storage by the AComDim method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korifi, R; Plard, J; Le Dréau, Y; Rébufa, C; Rutledge, D N; Dupuy, N

    2016-07-15

    Lipid oxidation during olive oil storage induces changes in the metabolite content of the oil, which can be measured using so-called quality indices. High values indicate poor quality oils that should be labeled accordingly or removed from the market. Based on quality indices measured over two years for two olive oils, the AComDim method was used to highlight the influence of five factors (olive oil type, oxygen, light, temperature and storage time) on oxidative stability during storage. To identify the significant factors, two full factorial experimental designs were built, each containing four of the five factors examined. The results showed that all five factors, as well as some two-factor interactions, were significant. Phenols and hydroperoxides were identified as being the most sensitive to these factors, and potential markers for the ageing of olive oil.

  2. Health anxiety and hypochondriasis: Description and treatment issues highlighted through a case illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, John; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2010-01-01

    Health anxiety and hypochondriasis are serious and debilitating conditions that are poorly understood by health care providers and general public. This is so partly because of the derogatory use of the term hypochondriasis by the general public. There has been a push by mental health professionals in recent years to use the term health anxiety and to use hypochondriasis only for its extreme form. The Internet has become a popular medium, through Web sites and chat rooms, for patients to seek information, reassurance, and exchange of medical information, sometimes of limited veracity. The term cyberchondria has even been coined to describe this phenomenon. The authors review the research literature related to health anxiety and discuss the beneficial treatments of CBT and pharmacology. The utilization of intensive cognitive-behavioral therapy is highlighted with a case illustration.

  3. Understanding Energy Impacts of Oversized Air Conditioners; NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This NREL highlight describes a simulation-based study that analyzes the energy impacts of oversized residential air conditioners. Researchers found that, if parasitic power losses are minimal, there is very little increase in energy use for oversizing an air conditioner. The research demonstrates that new residential air conditioners can be sized primarily based on comfort considerations, because capacity typically has minimal impact on energy efficiency. The results of this research can be useful for contractors and homeowners when choosing a new air conditioner or heat pump during retrofits of existing homes. If the selected unit has a crankcase heater, performing proper load calculations to be sure the new unit is not oversized will help avoid excessive energy use.

  4. Academy on Violence and Abuse: highlights of proceedings from the 2011 conference, "toward a new understanding".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronholm, Peter F; Ismailji, Tasneem; Mettner, Jeanne

    2013-10-01

    In April 2011, the Academy on Violence Abuse (http://www.avahealth.org/) convened a network of experts for its second annual conference, "Developing the Science of Violence and Abuse: Toward a New Understanding." The conference served as a forum for highlighting the growing body of research regarding the biological consequences and adverse health consequences of abuse. In doing so, it underscored an important scientific premise: By evaluating the impact of violence and abuse from birth to death, one can better evaluate the social, behavioral, psychological, and biological context and pathways that result in the morbidity, mortality, and quality of life of all affected individuals and communities. In this article, we summarize content presented by the conference's keynote speakers and provide citations that speakers have submitted to support their statements.

  5. Highlighting ethical decisions underlying the scoring of animal welfare in the Welfare Quality® scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veissier, I.; Jensen, Karsten Klint; Botreau, R.;

    2011-01-01

    dimension of scoring and labelling does not mean that we should reject them, but it does mean that we need to make the normative and ethical background explicit. The Welfare Quality® scoring system is used as a case study in order to highlight the role of underlying value-based decisions. In this scoring......), and any welfare scoring system will reflect a focus upon one or other definition. In Welfare Quality® 12 welfare criteria were defined, and the entire list of criteria was intended to cover relevant definitions of animal welfare. Second, two dimensions can structure an overall evaluation of animal welfare...... state of the animals or give priority to worse-off animals. In the Welfare Quality® scoring system the worse-off animals are treated as much more important than the others, but all welfare problems, major or minor, count. Fourth, one has to decide whether good scores on certain criteria can compensate...

  6. A bizarre theropod from the Early Cretaceous of Japan highlighting mosaic evolution among coelurosaurians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Yoichi; Xu, Xing; Shibata, Masateru; Kawabe, Soichiro; Miyata, Kazunori; Imai, Takuya

    2016-02-23

    Our understanding of coelurosaurian evolution, particularly of bird origins, has been greatly improved, mainly due to numerous recently discovered fossils worldwide. Nearly all these discoveries are referable to the previously known coelurosaurian subgroups. Here, we report a new theropod, Fukuivenator paradoxus, gen. et sp. nov., based on a nearly complete specimen from the Lower Cretaceous Kitadani Formation of the Tetori Group, Fukui, Japan. While Fukuivenator possesses a large number of morphological features unknown in any other theropod, it has a combination of primitive and derived features seen in different theropod subgroups, notably dromaeosaurid dinosaurs. Computed-tomography data indicate that Fukuivenator possesses inner ears whose morphology is intermediate between those of birds and non-avian dinosaurs. Our phylogenetic analysis recovers Fukuivenator as a basally branching maniraptoran theropod, yet is unable to refer it to any known coelurosaurian subgroups. The discovery of Fukuivenator considerably increases the morphological disparity of coelurosaurian dinosaurs and highlights the high levels of homoplasy in coelurosaurian evolution.

  7. Translating psychological science: Highlighting the media's contribution to contagion in mass shootings: Comment on Kaslow (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    In her presidential address, N. J. Kaslow (see record 2015-33530-002) argued that psychologists have a responsibility to translate psychological science to the public and identifies various platforms for doing so. In this comment on her article, I advocate that psychology as a field immediately heed her call in the area of psychological science highlighting the media's contribution to contagion in mass shootings. I point out the psychological science documenting media contagion for suicide and mass shootings, the World Health Organization's (2008) guidelines for media in reporting suicide deaths to prevent that contagion, and discuss ways-based on Dr. Kaslow's suggestions-that psychologists can disseminate psychological science to prevent similar tragedies in the future. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Use of solid film highlighter in automation of D sight image interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, David S.; Komorowski, Jerzy P.; Gould, Ronald W.

    1998-03-01

    Many studies have shown inspector variability to be a crucial parameter in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) reliability. Therefore it is desirable to automate the decision making process in NDE as much as possible. The automation of inspection data handling and interpretation will also enable use of data fusion algorithms currently being researched at IAR for increasing inspection reliability by combination of different NDE modes. Enhanced visual inspection techniques such as D Sight have the capability to rapidly inspect lap splice joints using D Sight and other optical methods. IARs NDI analysis software has been sued to perform analysis and feature extraction on D Sight inspections. Different metrics suitable for automated interpretation have been developed and tested on inspections of actual service-retired aircraft specimens using D Sight with solid film highlighter.

  9. Treatment regimens for rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis: highlighting a research gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, H R; Hatherell, H-A; Lipman, M C; Harris, R J; Abubakar, I

    2016-07-01

    Treatment guidance for non-multidrug-resistant (MDR) rifampicin-resistant (RMP-R) tuberculosis (TB) is variable. We aimed to undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis of the randomised controlled trial (RCT) data behind such guidelines to identify the most efficacious treatment regimens. Ovid MEDLINE, the Web of Science and EMBASE were mined using search terms for TB, drug therapy and RCTs. Despite 12 604 records being retrieved, only three studies reported treatment outcomes by regimen for patients with non-MDR RMP-R disease, preventing meta-analysis. Our systematic review highlights a substantial gap in the literature regarding evidence-based treatment regimens for RMP-R TB.

  10. Osteoarthritis year in review 2014: highlighting innovations in basic research and clinical applications in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Osch, G J V M

    2014-12-01

    Regenerative medicine is an emerging area that will influence the treatment of joint diseases in the future. It involves the use of biomaterials, cell therapy, and bioactive factors such as growth factors, drugs and small molecules, to regenerate damaged tissues. This "year in review" highlights a personal selection of promising studies published between March 2013 and March 2014 that inform on the direction in which this field is moving. This multidisciplinary field has been very active, with rapid development of new technologies that emerge from basic sciences such as the possibility to generate pluripotent stem cells without genetic modification and genetic engineering of growth factors to enhance their capacity to induce tissue repair. The increasing knowledge of the interaction between all tissues in the joint, such as the effect of bone remodeling and synovial inflammation on cartilage repair, will eventually make tissue regeneration in a compromised joint environment possible.

  11. The Water Quality in Rio Highlights the Global Public Health Concern Over Untreated Sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Joseph N.S.; Bartram, Jamie; Wade, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Water quality issues in Rio have been widely publicized because of the 2016 Olympics. Recent concerns about polluted waters that athletes may be exposed to highlights the conditions that more than a billion people globally are exposed to daily. Despite these unhealthy conditions, much is unknown about the risks and exposure pathways associated with bathing in or drinking untreated or partially treated sewage. Beyond acute illness, we are learning more about the chronic sequelae that arise from repeated exposure to pathogens found in sewage. Additionally, we do not know enough about how to measure water quality, especially in developing countries. A consequence of these knowledge gaps is that data from developed countries are used to guide public health approaches in low- and middle-income settings. More data that are locally specific are needed to inform guidelines for improving sanitation and water quality in Rio and other cities in developing countries. PMID:27689546

  12. Using qualitative problem-solving strategies to highlight the role of conceptual knowledge in solving problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, William J.; Dufresne, Robert J.; Mestre, Jose P.

    1996-12-01

    We report on the use of qualitative problem-solving strategies in teaching an introductory, calculus-based physics course as a means of highlighting the role played by conceptual knowledge in solving problems. We found that presenting strategies during lectures and in homework solutions provides an excellent opportunity to model for students the type of concept-based, qualitative reasoning that is valued in our profession, and that student-generated strategies serve a diagnostic function by providing instructors with insights on students' conceptual understanding and reasoning. Finally, we found strategies to be effective pedagogical tools for helping students both to identify principles that could be applied to solve specific problems, as well as to recall the major principles covered in the course months after it was over.

  13. INDICATORS APPLIED TO HIGHLIGHT THE VALORIZATION OF HUMAN CAPITAL IN SHIPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FILIP NISTOR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the shipping companies reconsidered their position regarding the importance of human capital because of the new trend in shipbuilding in conjunction with the enforcement of tighter regulations in shipping. Increasing profit of shipping companies was the result of valorization of human capital on board ships through acquirement of new skills and knowledge in accordance with technologies implemented on the new ships by training and development. Thus, identification of indicators that can be used to highlight the valorization of human capital in shipping is helpful. Measurement of indicators presented in this article can assist decision makers in identifying the best courses of action to improve human capital in shipping.

  14. Cardiovascular diseases and aging Highlights on World Congress of Cardiology 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The World Congress of Cardiology (WCC) 2006 was a joint meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)and the World Heart Federation (WHF) held in Barcelona Spain on September 2-5, 2006. The highlight scientific theme of this year's congress is cardiovascular diseases and aging.With the increase of aging population, the prevalence of many cardiovascular diseases increases exponentially, and the spectrum of our patients has changed to the elderly. It is a fact that management of older patients differs from that of younger patients and does not follow international recommendations. The WCC 2006 is the perfect opportunity to review in depth the grounds for this situation and examine solutions to improve it.

  15. Synthetic plasma edge diagnostics for EMC3-EIRENE, highlighted for Wendelstein 7-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, H.; Effenberg, F.; Schmitz, O.; Biedermann, C.; Feng, Y.; Jakubowski, M.; König, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Lore, J.; Niemann, H.; Pedersen, T. S.; Stephey, L.; Wurden, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    Interpretation of spectroscopic measurements in the edge region of high-temperature plasmas can be a challenge since line of sight integration effects make direct interpretation in terms of quantitative, local emission strengths often impossible. The EMC3-EIRENE code—a 3D fluid edge plasma and kinetic neutral gas transport code—is a suitable tool for full 3D reconstruction of such signals. A versatile synthetic diagnostic module has been developed recently which allows the realistic 3D setup of various plasma edge diagnostics to be captured. We highlight these capabilities with two examples for Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X): a visible camera for the analysis of recycling, and a coherent-imaging system for velocity measurements.

  16. Highlights and Conclusions of the Chalonge Meudon Workshop Dark Matter in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    de Vega, H J

    2010-01-01

    The CIAS Chalonge Workshop `Dark Matter in the Universe and Universal Properties of Galaxies: Theory and Observations', was held at the Meudon Ch^ateau of Observatoire de Paris on 8-11 June 2010. The Workshop approached DM in a fourfold way: astronomical observations of DM structures (galaxy properties, halos, rotation curves and density profiles), DM numerical simulations (with and without baryons), theoretical astrophysics and cosmology (kinetic theory, Boltzmann-Vlasov evolution), astroparticle physics. Peter Biermann, Alfonso Cavaliere, Hector J. de Vega, Gianfranco Gentile, Chandra Jog, Andrea Lapi, Paolo Salucci, Norma G. Sanchez, Pasquale Serpico, Rainer Stiele, Janine van Eymeren and Markus Weber present here their highlights of the Workshop. The summary and conclusions by H. J. de Vega and N. G. Sanchez stress among other points the growing evidence that DM particles have a mass in the keV scale and that those keV scale particles naturally produce the small scale structures observed in galaxies. Wimp...

  17. Nanoimprint lithography for green water-repellent film derived from biomass with high-light transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Newly eco-friendly high light transparency film with plant-based materials was investigated to future development of liquid crystal displays and optical devices with water repellency as a chemical design concept of nanoimprint lithography. This procedure is proven to be suitable for material design and the process conditions of ultraviolet curing nanoimprint lithography for green water-repellent film derived from biomass with high-light transparency. The developed formulation of advanced nanoimprinted materials design derived from lactulose and psicose, and the development of suitable UV nanoimprint conditions produced high resolutions of the conical shaped moth-eye regularly-nanostructure less than approximately 200 nm diameter, and acceptable patterning dimensional accuracy by the replication of 100 times of UV nanoimprint lithography cycles. The newly plant-based materials and the process conditions are expected as one of the defect less nanoimprint lithographic technologies in next generation electronic devices.

  18. Science highlights from MAVEN/IUVS after two years in Mars orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Stiepen, Arnaud; Lefevre, Franck; Jain, Sonal Kumar; Halekas, Jasper; Evans, Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Stewart, A. Ian F.; McClintock, William; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; Lo, Daniel; Holsclaw, Gregory; Clarke, John T.; Montmessin, Franck; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    The broad capabilities of the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph on the MAVEN mission are enabling new science ranging from Mars' lower atmosphere up though the escaping corona. After two years in Mars orbit, the instrument has yielded insights on the Mars dayglow, season cycles, nightglow, aurora, meteor showers, clouds, solar-planetary interactions and atmospheric escape. In this presentation we will highlight several new discoveries. First, IUVS has observed a third type of aurora not previously seen at Mars, indicative of a new kind of solar-planet interaction for non-magnetized planets. Second, spatial mapping of nitric oxide nightglow reveals regions of atmospheric downwelling necessitating substantial changes to global atmospheric circulation models. Finally, a new high-spatial-resolution UV imaging mode allows unprecedented determinations of Mars' low-altitude ozone, as well as detection of clouds from nadir to limb.

  19. Models in physics teaching: an approach to highlight the nature of knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho Kneubil, Fabiana

    2016-11-01

    In this work we show an approach based on models, for an usual subject in an introductory physics course, in order to foster discussions on the nature of physical knowledge. The introduction of elements of the nature of knowledge in physics lessons has been emphasised by many educators and one uses the case of metals to show the theoretical and phenomenological dimensions of physics. The discussion is made by means of four questions whose answers cannot be reached neither for theoretical elements nor experimental measurements. Between these two dimensions it is necessary to realise a series of reasoning steps to deepen the comprehension of microscopic concepts, such as electrical resistivity, drift velocity and free electrons. When this approach is highlighted, beyond the physical content, aspects of its nature become explicit and may improve the structuring of knowledge for learners on this subject.

  20. Highlights from the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Hadron spectroscopy and excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerling, Frank

    2016-11-01

    The COMPASS experiment at the CERN-SPS studies the spectrum and the structure of hadrons by scattering high energy hadrons and polarised muons off various fixed targets. Recent results for the hadron programme comprise highlights from different topics. A selective overview is given and, among others, the following results are discussed. The precise determination of the pion polarisability, a long standing puzzle that has been solved now, is presented as well as measurements of radiative widths. The observation of a new narrow axial-vector state, the a1(1420), as well as deeper insights into the exotic 1-+-wave, which is under study since decades by several experiments, are discussed and further, the search for the charmonium-like exotic Zc(3900) state in the COMPASS data is covered.