WorldWideScience

Sample records for volcano puffs ash

  1. Analysis and Optimization of a Lagrangian Volcanic Ash Particle Tracking Model called Puff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R.; Dean, K.

    2002-12-01

    Volcanic ash tracking models are important for airborne and ground hazard mitigation. Volcanic ash can have devastating effects on aircraft during flight, and ground sedimentation is potentially hazardous in populated areas. Because ash dispersion is controlled primarily by atmospheric winds, analytic solutions are impractical and must be numerically solved. Two distinct modeling techniques, Lagrangian and Eulerian, are currently used for both regional and global tracking models. Recently, the Lagrangian technique has appeared to be more accurate and efficient for tracking volcanic ash plumes, particularly for small eruptions and at early times during the eruption. Modeling ash plume dispersion is complicated by several factors including particle sedimentation and aggregation, and varying wind-field dynamics from the near surface to upper atmosphere. Furthermore, there exists a very limited data set pertaining to past eruptions with which tracking models can be tested and validated. Due primarily to this dearth of data on past eruptions, tracking models have erred on the side of excess when including potentially important factors in describing particle dynamics. The most recent version of Puff includes eleven distinct, adjustable parameters that are intended to describe various processes that effect airborne particle dynamics. The analysis described here was undertaken to better understand the sensitivity of the model to each of the eleven parameters independently. As a result, an improved understanding of how best to parameterize the model has been gained, as well as several methods to optimize performance and the predictive capability has been discovered. Since Puff includes random perturbations in the ash particle trajectories using a Monte Carlo-type technique, large numbers of successive simulations were performed in the analysis, and the averaged overall behavior was analyzed. Model run groups of 100, 500, and 5000 simulations were performed. The eleven

  2. Predicting and validating the motion of an ash cloud during the 2006 eruption of Mount Augustine volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Richard L.; Fochesatto, Javier; Sassen, Kenneth; Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, David E.; Dean, Kenneson G.; Cahill, Catherine F.; Mizutani, Kohei

    2007-01-01

    On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20- year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash (or aerosol) cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. Aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Two lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the ash cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be undetectable by any other means but are

  3. Observation of Eyjafjallajökull volcano ash over Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Makuch, P.; Kowalczyk, J.; Rozwadowska, A.; Drozdowska, V.; Markowicz, K.; Malinowski, S.; Kardas, A.; Posyniak, M.; Jagodnicka, A. K.; Stacewicz, T.; Piskozub, J.

    2010-05-01

    The plume of Eyjafjallajökull volcano ash has been identified over Poland using three instruments (two lidars and a ceilometer) stationed in two locations: Sopot in northern Poland and Warsaw in central-eastern Poland. The observations made it possible to establish the base of the ash layer. However ash concentration could not be determined.

  4. Development of a GNSS Volcano Ash Plume Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Palo, S. E.; Larson, K. M.; Naik, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), broadcast signals continuously from mid Earth orbit at a frequency near 1.5GHz. Of the four GNSS constellations, GPS and GLONASS are complete with more than 55 satellites in total. While GNSS signals are intended for navigation and timing, they have also proved to be useful for remote sensing applications. Reflections of the GNSS signals have been used to sense soil moisture, snow depth, and wind speed while refraction of the signals through the atmosphere has provided data on the electron density in the ionosphere as well as water vapor and temperature in the troposphere. Now analysis at the University of Colorado has shown that the attenuation of GNSS signals by volcanic ash plumes can be used to measure the presence and structure of the ash plume. This discovery is driving development of a distributed GNSS sensor network to complement existing optical and radar based ash plume monitoring systems. A GNSS based sensing system operating in L-band is unaffected by weather conditions or time of day. Additionally, the use of an existing signal source greatly reduces the per sensor cost and complexity compared to a radar system. However since any one measurement using this method provides only the total attenuation between the GNSS satellite and the receiver, full tomographic imaging of a plume requires a large number of sensors observing over a diversity of geometries. This presentation will provide an overview of the ongoing development of the GNSS sensor system. Evaluation of low priced commercial GNSS receivers will be discussed, as well as details on the inter sensor network. Based on analysis of existing GPS receivers near volcanic vents, the baseline configuration for an ash plume monitoring network is a 1km spaced ring of receivers 5km from the vent updating every 5 seconds. Preliminary data from field tests will be presented to show the suitability of the sensor system for this configuration near an active volcano.

  5. ARAC simulations of the ash plume from the December 1997 eruption of Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J S; Lefevre, R J; Pace, J C; Vogt, P J; Voight, B

    1998-10-01

    Ash clouds generated by erupting volcanoes represent a serious hazard to military and civil aviation. The dispersion modeling system of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) has been used to model the cloud resulting from the eruption of the Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat in December 1997. A clone of parts of the ARAC system, now being installed at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), will enable AFWA to provide hazard guidance to military operations in the vicinity of erupting volcanoes. This paper presents ARAC's modeling results and discusses potential application of similar calculations for AFWA support during future events.

  6. Characterization of fine volcanic ash from explosive eruption from Sakurajima volcano, South Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayama, F.; Furukawa, R.; Ishizuka, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Geshi, N.; Oishi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can affect infrastructure and ecosystem by their dispersion of the volcanic particle. Characterization of volcanic particle expelled by explosive eruption is crucial for evaluating for quantitative hazard assessment by future volcanic eruption. Especially for fine volcanic ash less than 64 micron in diameter, it can disperse vast area from the source volcano and be easily remobilized by surface wind and precipitation after the deposition. As fine volcanic ash is not preserved well at the earth surface and in strata except for enormously large scale volcanic eruption. In order to quantify quantitative characteristics of fine volcanic ash particle, we sampled volcanic ash directly falling from the eruption cloud from Showa crater, the most active vent of Sakurajima volcano, just before landing on ground. We newly adopted high precision digital microscope and particle grain size analyzer to develop hazard evaluation method of fine volcanic ash particle. Field survey was performed 5 sequential days in January, 2013 to take tamper-proof volcanic ash samples directly obtained from the eruption cloud of the Sakurajima volcano using disposable paper dishes and plastic pails. Samples were taken twice a day with time-stamp in 40 localities from 2.5 km to 43 km distant from the volcano. Japan Meteorological Agency reported 16 explosive eruptions of vulcanian style occurred during our survey and we took 140 samples of volcanic ash. Grain size distribution of volcanic ash was measured by particle grain size analyzer (Mophologi G3S) detecting each grain with parameters of particle diameter (0.3 micron - 1 mm), perimeter, length, area, circularity, convexity, solidity, and intensity. Component of volcanic ash was analyzed by CCD optical microscope (VHX-2000) which can take high resolution optical image with magnifying power of 100-2500. We discriminated each volcanic ash particle by color, texture of surface, and internal structure. Grain size

  7. Volcanic ash hazard climatology for an eruption of Hekla Volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbetter, Susan J.; Hort, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Ash produced by a volcanic eruption on Iceland can be hazardous for both the transatlantic flight paths and European airports and airspace. In order to begin to quantify the risk to aircraft, this study explored the probability of ash from a short explosive eruption of Hekla Volcano (63.98°N, 19.7°W) reaching European airspace. Transport, dispersion and deposition of the ash cloud from a three hour 'explosive' eruption with an initial plume height of 12 km was simulated using the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment, NAME, the model used operationally by the London Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre. Eruptions were simulated over a six year period, from 2003 until 2008, and ash clouds were tracked for four days following each eruption. Results showed that a rapid spread of volcanic ash is possible, with all countries in Europe facing the possibility of an airborne ash concentration exceeding International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) limits within 24 h of an eruption. An additional high impact, low probability event which could occur is the southward spread of the ash cloud which would block transatlantic flights approaching and leaving Europe. Probabilities of significant concentrations of ash are highest to the east of Iceland, with probabilities exceeding 20% in most countries north of 50°N. Deposition probabilities were highest at Scottish and Scandinavian airports. There is some seasonal variability in the probabilities; ash is more likely to reach southern Europe in winter when the mean winds across the continent are northerly. Ash concentrations usually remain higher for longer during summer when the mean wind speeds are lower.

  8. Fluoride in ash leachates: environmental implications at Popocatépetl volcano, central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Armienta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ash emitted by volcanic eruptions, even of moderate magnitude, may affect the environment and the health of humans and animals through different mechanisms at distances significantly larger than those indicated in the volcanic hazard maps. One such mechanism is the high capacity of ash to transport toxic volatiles like fluoride, as soluble condensates on the particles' surface. The mobilization and hazards related to volcanic fluoride are discussed based on the data obtained during the recent activity of Popocatépetl volcano in Central Mexico.

  9. The dispersal of ash during explosive eruptions from central volcanoes and calderas: an underestimated hazard for the central Mediterranean area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulpizio, Roberto [CIRISIVU, c/o Dipartimento Geomineralogico, via Orabona 4, 70125, Bari (Italy); Caron, Benoit; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Santacroce, Roberto [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, via S. Maria 53, 56126, Pisa (Italy); Giaccio, Biagio [Istituto di Geologia Ambientale e Geoingegneria, CNR, Via Bolognola 7, 00138 Rome (Italy); Paterne, Martine [LSCE, Laboratoire Mixte CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Avenue de la Terrasse 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Siani, Giuseppe [IDES-UMR 8148, Universite Paris-XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)], E-mail: r.sulpizio@geomin.uniba.it

    2008-10-01

    The central Mediterranean area comprises some of the most active volcanoes of the northern hemisphere. Some of their names recall myths or events in human history: Somma-Vesuvius, Etna, Stromboli, Vulcano, Ischia and Campi Flegrei. These volcanoes are still active today, and produce both effusive and explosive eruptions. In particular, explosive eruptions can produce and disperse large amount of volcanic ash, which pose a threat to environment, economy and human health over a large part of the Mediterranean area. We present and discuss data of ash dispersal from some explosive eruptions of southern Italy volcanoes, which dispersed centimetre -thick ash blankets hundred of kilometres from the source, irrespective of the more limited dispersal of the respective coarse grained fallout and PDC deposits. The collected data also highlight the major role played by lower atmosphere winds in dispersal of ash from weak plumes and ash clouds that accompany PDC emplacement.

  10. Characterization of the recent ash emissions at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Del Pozzo, A. L.; González-Morán, T.; Espinasa-Pereña, R.; Butron, M. A.; Reyes, M.

    2008-02-01

    Nine representative ash emissions from 1994-1997 were studied to characterize the recent activity and the eruptive process at Popocatepetl. A series of tephra eruptions began on December 21, 1994 and intermittent activity continues to present. The first eruptions were phreatomagmatic but in mid-March 1996 they turned magmatic. Cumulative volumes (529-1810 × 10 3 m 3), were determined for the first eruptions. However, when eruptions grew larger, more widely spaced (and magmatic), the volumes were then calculated individually (22-1107 × 10 3 m 3), both using the Simpson Rule and based on 244 sampling sites. This numerical integration method is more precise than other methods especially since sub-mm isopachs are neglected in most cases. Dominant winds carried ash mainly to the east (January through April 1995 and April 1996) except for the summer months when ash fell on Mexico City to the northwest (October 28 1996 and June 30 1997). In March 1996, changing wind direction produced ash fall to the southwest as well. During the first year, volume calculations indicated that emission rate was higher at the beginning of the eruptions and then declined and stopped. Activity resumed the following year with a similar pattern until larger amounts of magma ascended. Detailed studies of the ashfall provided constraints on the dynamics of the volcanic plumbing system. Tephra emission was related with clearing (December 1994 to March 1995), and clogging of the vent (May 1995 to February 1996), until a larger new ascending batch was able to clear its way to the surface (March 1996). After April 1996, dome formation and explosive destruction were related to individual small ascending magma batches. Tephra from December 1994 to early March 1996 was made up mostly of andesitic lithic clasts and plagioclase and pyroxene crystals with minor amounts of accidental and accessory minerals. In March 1996, prior to dome formation, glass was also detected. Afterwards, ash components were

  11. Eruptive Dynamics Inferred from Textural Analysis of Ash Time Series: The 2015 Reawakening of Cotopaxi Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, H. E.; Bernard, B.; Hidalgo, S.; Proaño, A.; Wright, H. M. N.; Mothes, P. A.; Criollo, E.

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of the composition and texture of ash ejected during eruptive episodes can provide valuable information about magma storage and ascent conditions. After 73 years of repose, Cotopaxi volcano erupted after approximately four months of precursory activity that included an increase in seismicity, gas emissions, and minor ground deformation. High frequency ash sampling was realized throughout the new eruptive period and near real-time petrological monitoring of ash samples was used to infer eruption dynamics at Cotopaxi volcano. We collected twenty ash samples between August 14 and November 23, 2015 from a seismic monitoring site on the west flank of the volcano. We classified the different components of the ash into four groups: hydrothermal/altered grains, lithic fragments, potentially juvenile material, and free crystals. The relative proportions of theses grains evolved as the eruption progressed, with increasing amounts of potentially juvenile material and a decrease in hydrothermally altered material through time. Potentially juvenile grains from the initial explosion are microlite-poor and contain hydrothermal minerals (opal and alunite) in contact with fresh glass. The interaction of juvenile magma with the hydrothermal system may have provided the energy to trigger phreatomagmatic explosions at Cotopaxi. However, only the initial explosions preserve textural evidence for this process. Completely aphyric, glassy fragments are absent; likewise, the absence of highly vesiculated pumice or scoria indicates that fragmentation was not the result of bubble wall breakage due to rapid exsolution and expansion of gas in the melt. Furthermore, the crystallinity of juvenile particles increased through time, indicating slowing integrated ascent rates. Nevertheless, continued high SO2 emission rates indicate that the system was open to gas loss, which inhibited the pressurization of the conduit through gas accumulation, reducing the short term possibility of a large

  12. The enormous Chillos Valley Lahar: An ash-flow-generated debris flow from Cotopaxi Volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, P.A.; Hall, M.L.; Janda, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Chillos Valley Lahar (CVL), the largest Holocene debris flow in area and volume as yet recognized in the northern Andes, formed on Cotopaxi volcano's north and northeast slopes and descended river systems that took it 326 km north-northwest to the Pacific Ocean and 130+ km east into the Amazon basin. In the Chillos Valley, 40 km downstream from the volcano, depths of 80-160 m and valley cross sections up to 337000m2 are observed, implying peak flow discharges of 2.6-6.0 million m3/s. The overall volume of the CVL is estimated to be ???3.8 km3. The CVL was generated approximately 4500 years BP by a rhyolitic ash flow that followed a small sector collapse on the north and northeast sides of Cotopaxi, which melted part of the volcano's icecap and transformed rapidly into the debris flow. The ash flow and resulting CVL have identical components, except for foreign fragments picked up along the flow path. Juvenile materials, including vitric ash, crystals, and pumice, comprise 80-90% of the lahar's deposit, whereas rhyolitic, dacitic, and andesitic lithics make up the remainder. The sand-size fraction and the 2- to 10-mm fraction together dominate the deposit, constituting ???63 and ???15 wt.% of the matrix, respectively, whereas the silt-size fraction averages less than ???10 wt.% and the clay-size fraction less than 0.5 wt.%. Along the 326-km runout, these particle-size fractions vary little, as does the sorting coefficient (average = 2.6). There is no tendency toward grading or improved sorting. Limited bulking is recognized. The CVL was an enormous non-cohesive debris flow, notable for its ash-flow origin and immense volume and peak discharge which gave it characteristics and a behavior akin to large cohesive mudflows. Significantly, then, ash-flow-generated debris flows can also achieve large volumes and cover great areas; thus, they can conceivably affect large populated regions far from their source. Especially dangerous, therefore, are snowclad volcanoes

  13. Volcanic ash and daily mortality in Sweden after the Icelandic volcano eruption of May 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudin, Anna; Carlsen, Hanne K; Forsberg, Bertil; Johansson, Christer

    2013-12-10

    In the aftermath of the Icelandic volcano Grimsvötn's eruption on 21 May 2011, volcanic ash reached Northern Europe. Elevated levels of ambient particles (PM) were registered in mid Sweden. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the Grimsvötn eruption had an effect on mortality in Sweden. Based on PM measurements at 16 sites across Sweden, data were classified into an ash exposed data set (Ash area) and an unexposed data set (No ash area). Data on daily all-cause mortality were obtained from Statistics Sweden for the time period 1 April through 31 July 2011. Mortality ratios were calculated as the ratio between the daily number of deaths in the Ash area and the No ash area. The exposure period was defined as the week following the days with elevated particle concentrations, namely 24 May through 31 May. The control period was defined as 1 April through 23 May and 1 June through 31 July. There was no absolute increase in mortality during the exposure period. However, during the exposure period the mean mortality ratio was 2.42 compared with 2.17 during the control period, implying a relatively higher number of deaths in the Ash area than in the No ash area. The differences in ratios were mostly due to a single day, 31 May, and were not statistically significant when tested with a Mann-Whitney non-parametric test (p > 0.3). The statistical power was low with only 8 days in the exposure period (24 May through 31 May). Assuming that the observed relative differences were not due to chance, the results would imply an increase of 128 deaths during the exposure period 24-31 May. If 31 May was excluded, the number of extra deaths was reduced to 20. The results of the present study are contradicting and inconclusive, but may indicate that all-cause mortality was increased by the ash-fall from the Grimsvötn eruption. Meta-analysis or pooled analysis of data from neighboring countries might make it possible to reach sufficient statistical power to study effects

  14. Iron-bearing minerals in ashes emanated from Osorno volcano, in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Alexandre Christófaro; Escudey, Mauricio; Förster, Juan Enrique; Pizarro, Carmen; Ardisson, José Domingos; Barral, Uidemar Morais; Pereira, Márcio César; Fabris, José Domingos

    2014-01-01

    A sample of volcanic ashes emanated from the Osorno volcano, southern Chile, was characterized with X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, in an attempt to identify the iron-bearing minerals of that geologically recent magmatic deposit. X-ray patterns indicated that the sample is mainly constituted of anorthite, Fe-diopside-type and Ca-magnetite. The crystallographic structures of these dominant iron minerals are proposed on basis of their chemical composition and corresponding Mössbauer data to support models refined by fitting powder X-ray diffraction data with the Rietveld algorithm.

  15. Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MuñOz, O.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.; Veihelmann, B.; van der Zande, W. J.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Rose, W. I.

    2004-08-01

    We present measurements of the whole scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle at a wavelength of 632.8 nm in the scattering angle range 3°-174° of randomly oriented particles taken from seven samples of volcanic ashes corresponding to four different volcanic eruptions: the 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption, the 1989-1990 Redoubt eruption, and the 18 August and 17 September 1992 Mount Spurr eruptions. The samples were collected at different distances from the vent. The samples studied contain large mass fractions of fine particles and were chosen to represent ash that could remain in the atmosphere for at least hours or days. They include fine ashfall samples that fell at a variety of distances from the volcano and pyroclastic flows that retained their fine fractions. Together, they represent a range of ashes likely to remain in the atmosphere in volcanic clouds following eruptions from convergent plate boundary volcanoes, Earth's most important group of explosive sources of ash. All measured scattering matrix elements are confined to rather limited domains when plotted as functions of the scattering angle following the general trends presented by irregular mineral particles. This similarity in the scattering behavior justifies the construction of an average scattering matrix for volcanic ash particles as a function of the scattering angle. To facilitate the use of the average scattering matrix for multiple-scattering calculations with polarization included, we present a synthetic scattering matrix based on the average scattering matrix for volcanic ashes and the assumption that the diffraction forward scattering peak is the same for randomly oriented nonspherical particles and projected-surface-area-equivalent spheres. This synthetic scattering matrix is normalized so that the average of its 1-1 element over all directions equals unity. It is available in the full range from 0° to 180° and can be used, for example, for interpretation of

  16. Classification of volcanic ash particles from Sakurajima volcano using CCD camera image and cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, T.; Shimano, T.; Nishimura, T.

    2012-12-01

    total luminance=(R+G+B)/665. We classify the volcanic ash particles from the Dendrograms into three groups based on the euclid distance. The groups are named as Group A, B and C in order of increasing of the average value of total luminance. The classification shows that the numbers of particles belonging to Group A, B and C are 77, 25 and 6 in Feb, 09, 2009 sample, and 102, 19 and 6 in Jan, 13, 2010 sample, respectively. The examination under stereoscopic microscope suggests that Group A, B and C mainly correspond with juvenile, altered and free-crystal particles, respectively. So the result of classification by present method demonstrates a difference in the contribution of juvenile material between the two days. To evaluate reliability of our classification, we classify pseudo-samples in which errors of 10% are added in the measured parameters. We apply our method to one thousand psuedo-samples, and the result shows that the numbers of particles classified into the three groups vary less than 20 % of the total number of 235 particles. Our system can classify 120 particles within 6 minutes so that we easily increase the number of ash particles, which enable us to improve reliabilities and resolutions of the classification and to speedily capture temporal changes of the property of ash particles from active volcanoes.

  17. Seismicity of block-and-ash flows occurring during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRoin, Nicole; McNutt, Stephen R.; Sentman, Davis D.; Reyes, Celso

    2012-02-01

    In January 2006, Augustine Volcano began erupting following an increase in seismicity that was first noted in late April 2005. Thirteen large explosive eruptions of Augustine occurred from January 11 to 28, 2006, followed by a continuously erupting phase and then by a dome growth phase in which numerous pyroclastic flows and block-and-ash flows occurred. As a new steep-sided and unstable dome grew in spring 2006, rockfalls and related events, likely block-and-ash flows, dominated the seismic record. Relative amplitudes at pairs of seismic stations for 68 block-and-ash flow events were examined to constrain locations of the flow-events. Higher amplitudes were associated with events closer to a given station. These relations were confirmed by images collected on a low-light camera. Captured images show a correlation between flow direction and seismic amplitude ratios from nearby stations AUE and AUW. Seismic amplitudes and energies of the flow signals, measured in several different ways, were found to correlate with the surface areas and run-out distances of the flows. The ML range of rockfalls was 0.1 to 1.1, and seismic efficiencies were estimated to be much less than 1%. Particle motion analyses showed that the seismic waves contained both body waves and surface waves and demonstrate that the flows were acting as moving sources with velocities of 30-93 m/s.

  18. The bioreactivity of the sub-10 μm component of volcanic ash: Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Timothy; Bérubé, Kelly

    2011-10-30

    With the recent eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyafallajökull and resulting ash cloud over much of Europe there was considerable concern about possible respiratory hazards. Volcanic ash can contain minerals that are known human respiratory health hazards such as cristobalite. Short-term ash exposures can cause skin sores, respiratory and ocular irritations and exacerbation of pre-existing lung conditions such as asthma. Long-term occupational level exposures to crystalline silicon dioxide can cause lung inflammation, oedema, fibrosis and cancer. The potential health effects would be dependent on factors including mineralogy, surface chemistry, size, and levels and duration of exposure. Bulk ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano was sourced and inhalable (<2.5 μm) ash samples prepared and physicochemically characterised. The fine ash samples were tested for bioreactivity by SDS-PAGE which determined the strength of binding between mineral grains and lung proteins. Selected proteins bound tightly to cristobalite, and bound loosely to other ash components. A positive correlation was seen between the amount of SiO(2) in the sample and the strength of the binding. The strength of binding is a function of the mineral's bioreactivity, and therefore, a potential geo-biomarker of respiratory risk.

  19. Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkleff, P. G.; Cahill, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual glass shard ash particles are angular, uniformly-sized, consist of calc-alkaline whole-rock elements (Si, Al, Fe, Na, and Ca) and are not collocated on the sample media with non-silicate, Cl and S bearing sea salt particles. Aggregate particles occur as two types: pure ash aggregates and sea salt-cored aggregates. Pure ash aggregates are made up of only ash particles and contain no other constituents. Sea salt-cored aggregates are ash particles commingled with sea salts. Determining the formation processes of the different ash particle types need further investigation but some possibilities are proposed here. Individual ash particles may exist when the ambient air is generally dry, little electrical charge exists on ash particles, the eruptive cloud is generally dry, or the number of individual particles exceeds the scavenging capacity of the water droplets present. Another possibility is that ash aggregates may break apart as relative humidity drops over time and causes ash-laden water droplets to evaporate and subsequently break apart. Pure ash aggregates may form when the ambient air and plume is relatively dry but the ash has a significant charge to cause ash to aggregate. Or they could form during long-range transport when turbulent or Brownian motion can cause ash particles to collide and coagulate. Pure ash aggregates could also form as a result of water droplet scavenging and subsequent evaporation of water droplets, leaving behind only ash. In this case, droplets would not have interacted with a sea salt

  20. Environmental hazards of fluoride in volcanic ash: a case study from Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Shane J.; Neall, V. E.; Lecointre, J. A.; Hedley, M. J.; Loganathan, P.

    2003-03-01

    The vent-hosted hydrothermal system of Ruapehu volcano is normally covered by a c. 10 million m 3 acidic crater lake where volcanic gases accumulate. Through analysis of eruption observations, granulometry, mineralogy and chemistry of volcanic ash from the 1995-1996 Ruapehu eruptions we report on the varying influences on environmental hazards associated with the deposits. All measured parameters are more dependent on the eruptive style than on distance from the vent. Early phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruption phases from crater lakes similar to that on Ruapehu are likely to contain the greatest concentrations of environmentally significant elements, especially sulphur and fluoride. These elements are contained within altered xenolithic material extracted from the hydrothermal system by steam explosions, as well as in residue hydrothermal fluids adsorbed on to particle surfaces. In particular, total F in the ash may be enriched by a factor of 6 relative to original magmatic contents, although immediately soluble F does not show such dramatic increases. Highly soluble NaF and CaSiF 6 phases, demonstrated to be the carriers of 'available' F in purely magmatic eruptive systems, are probably not dominant in the products of phreatomagmatic eruptions through hydrothermal systems. Instead, slowly soluble compounds such as CaF 2, AlF 3 and Ca 5(PO 4) 3F dominate. Fluoride in these phases is released over longer periods, where only one third is leached in a single 24-h water extraction. This implies that estimation of soluble F in such ashes based on a single leach leads to underestimation of the F impact, especially of a potential longer-term environmental hazard. In addition, a large proportion of the total F in the ash is apparently soluble in the digestive system of grazing animals. In the Ruapehu case this led to several thousand sheep deaths from fluorosis.

  1. Smectites and zeolites in ash from the 2010 summit eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paque, M.; Detienne, M.; Maters, E. C.; Delmelle, P.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrothermal alteration minerals are often incorporated in volcanic ash from phreatic and phreatomagmatic activity. Here we assess the presence and abundance of such minerals in the ash materials produced during the April-May 2010 initial phreatomagmatic ( phase I) and subsequent magmatic ( phases II and III) eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland. The results of X-ray diffraction analyses reveal significant quantities of smectites (up to 4 wt%, mainly as saponite) and zeolites (up to 7 wt%) in ash from phase I. While a minor amount of smectites (<0.5 wt%) is present in ash from the subsequent weak explosive activity ( phase II), both smectites and zeolites are absent in phase III ash. This material was generated following abrupt rejuvenation of explosive activity in the absence of magma-ice/water interaction. Smectites and zeolites in phase I ash result primarily from scouring of altered volcanic rocks in the subsurface, although some may derive also from water-rock interaction within the summit ice cauldrons through which fragmented magma was injected. We show that incorporation of smectites and zeolites in phase I ash can explain its anomalously high specific surface area. Further, the presence of these minerals in ash may enhance its ability to act as ice nuclei as well as favour particle aggregation processes in the volcanic plume/cloud. Finally, the Eyjafjallajökull eruption represents another case in which ash fallout acted as an exogenic source of 2:1-type clay minerals in volcanic soils.

  2. The ash-fall hazard from a Plinian eruption at Colima Volcano, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Fonseca

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The historical eruptive activity at Colima Volcano has been characterized by Strombolian and Merapi type eruptions and Vulcanian explosions associated with dome growth, which have ended in a Plinian eruption about every 100 years. The situation now prevailing at Colima Volcano is similar to that which preceded these explosive eruptions, when a dome fills the crater. This study proposes seven scenarios for the ash-fall from a Plinian eruption, based on historical eruptive activity, isopach thickness from the 1913 Plinian eruption, land use, socioeconomic data, and a 15-year statistical wind study realized with daily radiosonde data grouped according to four altitudinal levels: 4,000-9,000 (I; 9,000-14,000 (II; 14,000-17,000 (III and 17,000-28,000 (IV m a.s.l., based on common wind speeds and directions. We have integrated the wind distribution at level IV and estimated the ash dispersion for a Plinian eruption. From January to March, the main impact would be towards the northeast, in April and in October, towards the east, in May, towards the north-northeast or north-northwest, from June to August, towards the northwest, in September, towards the west, and in November and December, towards the west-southwest. The fallout would damage the coniferous forests of the Colima National Park, two lagoons and three lakes. More than 30 million people living in Guadalajara, Mexico City, Leon and Colima would suffer eye, respiratory and skin problems. The proximal areas, such as Ciudad Guzman, would be subject to roof collapsing and communication problems. The agricultural and livestock sectors would suffer severe financial losses. The Queseria sugar mill, the Atenquique paper mill, and the cement plants in Zapotiltic would halt work due to chimney obstruction and machinery abrasion. Four thermoelectric plants, twenty airports and four commercial ports would be affected if the eruption occurs in summer.

  3. Effect of volcano ash additions on nutrient concentrations, bloom dynamics and community metabolism in a short-term experiment in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbauer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Volcano ash deposition is now considered as an important source of inorganic bioavailable iron which can relieve Fe-limitation in the ocean. As volcano ash also releases PO4, a experiment was performed in the NW Mediterranean Sea to test whether volcano ash deposition can affect nutrient dynamics and bloom development in a P-limited system. In a 54h experiment, it was shown that the development of a phytoplankton bloom was not enhanced or even repressed by ash additions of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas higher ash concentrations (200 mg l-1) induced a phytoplankton bloom as indicated by elevated Chlorophyll-a levels. Concurrently, net community production (NCP) and gross primary production (GPP) were enhanced at T24h at the highest ash additions. The metabolic balance was roughly neutral at low or no ash additions, but shifted towards phototrophy at the highest ash additions. The data on inorganic nutrient development and release estimates from ash material assays suggest relieving of P-limitation concomitant with NO3 and silicate use from ash. The concentration of TEP increased with increasing ash levels. The abundances of the heterotrophic compartment (bacteria, viruses and ciliates) also indicated dose-dependent responses. Our data suggest that heterotrophs won the competition for inorganic nutrients at ash levels of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas phytoplankton won at levels of 200 mg l-1. Overall, our experiments point to a strong potential of volcano ash deposition as forcing factor for nutrient dynamics and the activity of microbial plankton in a P-limited system.

  4. Characterization of moderate ash-and-gas explosions at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, from infrasound waveform inversion and thermal infrared measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, S. De; Lamb, O. D.; Lamur, A.; Hornby, A. J.; Aulock, F. W.; Chigna, G.; Lavallée, Y.; Rietbrock, A.

    2016-06-01

    The rapid discharge of gas and rock fragments during volcanic eruptions generates acoustic infrasound. Here we present results from the inversion of infrasound signals associated with small and moderate gas-and-ash explosions at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, to retrieve the time history of mass eruption rate at the vent. Acoustic waveform inversion is complemented by analyses of thermal infrared imagery to constrain the volume and rise dynamics of the eruption plume. Finally, we combine results from the two methods in order to assess the bulk density of the erupted mixture, constrain the timing of the transition from a momentum-driven jet to a buoyant plume, and to evaluate the relative volume fractions of ash and gas during the initial thrust phase. Our results demonstrate that eruptive plumes associated with small-to-moderate size explosions at Santiaguito only carry minor fractions of ash, suggesting that these events may not involve extensive magma fragmentation in the conduit.

  5. Airborne observations of the Eyjafjalla volcano ash cloud over Europe during air space closure in April and May 2010

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    U. Schumann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of Lidar backscatter, aerosol concentrations (particle diameters of 4 nm to 50 μm, trace gas mixing ratios (SO2, CO, O3, H2O, single particle properties, and meteorological parameters have been performed in volcanic ash plumes with the Falcon aircraft operated by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR. A series of 17 flights was performed over Europe between Southern Germany and Iceland during the eruption period of the Eyjafjalla1 volcano between 19 April and 18 May 2010. Flight planning and measurement analyses were supported by a refined Meteosat ash product and trajectory model analysis. The volcanic ash plume was observed with Lidar directly over the volcano and up to a distance of 2700 km downwind. Lidar and in-situ measurements covered plume ages of 7 h to 120 h. Aged ash layers were between a few 100 m to 3 km deep, occurred between 1 and 7 km altitude, and were typically 100 to 300 km wide. Particles collected by impactors had diameters up to 20 μm diameter, with size and age dependent composition. Ash mass concentration was evaluated for a material density of 2.6 g cm−3 and for either weakly or moderately absorbing coarse mode particles (refractive index 1.59+0i or 1.59+0.004i. In the absorbing case, the ash concentration is about a factor of four larger than in the non-absorbing limit. Because of sedimentation constraints, the smaller results are the more realistic ones for aged plumes. The Falcon flew in ash clouds up to about 1 mg m−3 for a few minutes and in an ash cloud with more than 0.2 mg m−3 mean-concentration for about one hour without engine damages. In fresh plumes, the SO2 concentration was correlated with the ash mass concentration. Typically, 0.5 mg m−3 ash concentration was related to about 100 nmol mol−31 SO2 mixing ratio and 70 nmol mol

  6. Estimating rates of decompression from textures of erupted ash particles produced by 1999-2006 eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Heather M.N.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Mothes, Patricia A.; Hall, Minard L.; Ruiz, Andrés Gorki; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Persistent low- to moderate-level eruptive activity of andesitic volcanoes is difficult to monitor because small changes in magma supply rates may cause abrupt transitions in eruptive style. As direct measurement of magma supply is not possible, robust techniques for indirect measurements must be developed. Here we demonstrate that crystal textures of ash particles from 1999 to 2006 Vulcanian and Strombolian eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, provide quantitative information about the dynamics of magma ascent and eruption that is difficult to obtain from other monitoring approaches. We show that the crystallinity of erupted ash particles is controlled by the magma supply rate (MSR); ash erupted during periods of high magma supply is substantially less crystalline than during periods of low magma supply. This correlation is most easily explained by efficient degassing at very low pressures (<<50 MPa) and degassing-driven crystallization controlled by the time available prior to eruption. Our data also suggest that the observed transition from intermittent Vulcanian explosions at low MSR to more continuous periods of Strombolian eruptions and lava fountains at high MSR can be explained by the rise of bubbles through (Strombolian) or trapping of bubbles beneath (Vulcanian) vent-capping, variably viscous (and crystalline) magma.

  7. Contribution of volcanic ashes to the regional geochemical balance: the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, F; Fernandez-Turiel, J L; Saavedra, J; Gimeno, D; Polanco, E; Amigo, A; Galindo, G; Caselli, A

    2012-05-15

    The environmental geochemical behaviour of the rhyolitic ashes from the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Southern Chile, has been studied. After the bulk characterisation, the potential contribution to the regional geochemical fluxes was examined using: i) single batch leaching tests to provide a rapid screening of the implied major and trace elements; and ii) column experiments to evaluate the temporal mobility of leached elements. The environmental concerns of these ashes are related to the fine grained component present in each sample (independent of distance from the source), in particular the presence of cristobalite, and the geochemical hazards posed by ash-water interaction. Leaching experiments show the fast dissolution of surface salts and aerosols, which dominate over glass dissolution during the first steps of the ash-water interaction. Chaitén ashes could transfer to the environment more than 1×10(10)g or 10,000 metric tonnes (mt) of Cl, S, Ca, Na, Si, and K; between 1000 and 10,000 mt of F, Mg, and Al; between 100 and 1000 mt of As, Pb, P, Fe, Sr, Zn, Mn, and Br; between 10 and 100 mt of Ba, Li, Ti, Ni, Nb, Cu, Rb, Zr, V, Mo, Co, and Sc; and less than 10 mt of Cr, Sb, Ce, Ga, Cs, and Y. These results show the fertilising potential of the ashes (e.g., providing Ca and Fe) but also the input of potentially toxic trace elements (e.g., F and As) in the regional geochemical mass balance. The Chaitén results evidence lower potentials for poisoning and fertilising than low silica ashes due to the lower contents released of practically all elements.

  8. Controls on variations in cristobalite abundance in ash generated by the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat in the period 1997 to 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Horwell, C. J.; Hillman, S.E.; Cole, P.D.; Loughlin, S.C.; Llewellin, E.W.; Damby, D. E.; Christopher, T.E.

    2014-01-01

    The Soufrière Hills Volcano (SHV) crystallizes cristobalite (crystalline silica) in its lava domes, and inhalation of cristobalite-rich ash may pose a chronic respiratory hazard. We investigate the causes of variation in cristobalite abundance (measured by X-ray diffraction) in ash from dome collapses, explosions and ash venting from 1997 to 2010. Cristobalite abundance in bulk dome-collapse ash varies between 4 and 23 wt%. During periods of slow lava extrusion (5 m3 s−1), cristobalite ab...

  9. Holocene block-and-ash flows from summit dome activity of Citlaltépetl volcano, Eastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo

    1999-01-01

    A major eruption produced several block-and-ash flows about 4,100 years B.P. at Citlaltépetl volcano (Pico de Orizaba), an ice-capped, 5670-m-high, andesitic, active stratovolcano located at the eastern end of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Repetitive gravitational collapse of a dacitic dome at the summit crater produced a series of block-and-ash flows, lahars, and floods, which were channeled through two main river-valleys on the west and south flanks of the volcano. The total erupted volume is estimated to be at least 0.27 km 3. The deposits in both areas are similar in composition, and size, but they differ in the area covered, distribution, and structure. The western deposits form a large fan, cover a larger area, and include numerous laharic and fluviatile deposits. In contrast, the southern deposits form prominent terraces where confined in narrow channels, and have associated laharic units in distal areas, where the flows reach a maximum distance of 30 km from the vent. Directed disruptions of a central summit dome occurred, possibly first to the west and then to the southeast, perhaps due to minor modifications of the summit dome morphology, producing the voluminous block-and-ash flow deposits documented here. The flows were strongly controlled by topography, influencing the deposition of the moving particles. Grain-size variations along the flow paths are hardly detectable suggesting no evident lateral downstream transformations. Because sudden changes in dome morphology may cause significant variations in the direction of future dome collapse, specific areas of potential affectation cannot be predicted. Therefore, about 350,000 inhabitants living within a radius of 35-km from the vent could be potentially impacted if catastrophic block-and-ash flows were to recur in the future from similar summit dome activity. Recognition of these deposits is therefore important for hazard assessment because some seemingly safe areas may be at high risk.

  10. Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or more from a volcano. Before a Volcanic Eruption The following are things you can do to ... in case of an emergency. During a Volcanic Eruption Follow the evacuation order issued by authorities and ...

  11. Juvenile magma recognition and eruptive dynamics inferred from the analysis of ash time series: The 2015 reawakening of Cotopaxi volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, H. Elizabeth; Bernard, Benjamin; Hidalgo, Silvana; Proaño, Antonio; Wright, Heather; Mothes, Patricia; Criollo, Evelyn; Kueppers, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    Forecasting future activity and performing hazard assessments during the reactivation of volcanoes remain great challenges for the volcanological community. On August 14, 2015 Cotopaxi volcano erupted for the first time in 73 years after approximately four months of precursory activity, which included an increase in seismicity, gas emissions, and minor ground deformation. Here we discuss the use of near real-time petrological monitoring of ash samples as a complementary aid to geophysical monitoring, in order to infer eruption dynamics and evaluate possible future eruptive activity at Cotopaxi. Twenty ash samples were collected between August 14 and November 23, 2015 from a monitoring site on the west flank of the volcano. These samples contain a range of grain types that we classified as: hydrothermal/altered, lithic, juvenile, and free crystals. The relative proportions of theses grains evolved as the eruption progressed, with increasing amounts of juvenile material and a decrease in hydrothermally altered material. In samples from the initial explosion, juvenile grains are glassy, microlite-poor and contain hydrothermal minerals (opal and alunite). The rising magma came in contact with the hydrothermal system under confinement, causing hydro-magmatic explosions that cleared the upper part of the plumbing system. Subsequently, the magmatic column produced a thermal aureole in the conduit and dried out the hydrothermal system, allowing for dry eruptions. Magma ascent rates were low enough to allow for efficient outgassing and microlite growth. Constant supply of magma from below caused quasi-continuous disruption of the uppermost magma volume through a combination of shear-deformation and gas expansion. The combination of increasing crystallinity of juvenile grains, and high measured SO2 flux indicate decreasing integrated magma ascent rates and clearing of the hydrothermal system along transport pathways in a system open to gas loss. The near real-time monitoring

  12. Juvenile magma recognition and eruptive dynamics inferred from the analysis of ash time series: The 2015 reawakening of Cotopaxi volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, H. Elizabeth; Bernard, Benjamin; Hidalgo, Silvana; Proano, Antonio; Wright, Heather M.; Mothes, Patricia; Criollo, Evelyn; Kueppers, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future activity and performing hazard assessments during the reactivation of volcanoes remain great challenges for the volcanological community. On August 14, 2015 Cotopaxi volcano erupted for the first time in 73 years after approximately four months of precursory activity, which included an increase in seismicity, gas emissions, and minor ground deformation. Here we discuss the use of near real-time petrological monitoring of ash samples as a complementary aid to geophysical monitoring, in order to infer eruption dynamics and evaluate possible future eruptive activity at Cotopaxi. Twenty ash samples were collected between August 14 and November 23, 2015 from a monitoring site on the west flank of the volcano. These samples contain a range of grain types that we classified as: hydrothermal/altered, lithic, juvenile, and free crystals. The relative proportions of theses grains evolved as the eruption progressed, with increasing amounts of juvenile material and a decrease in hydrothermally altered material. In samples from the initial explosion, juvenile grains are glassy, microlite-poor and contain hydrothermal minerals (opal and alunite). The rising magma came in contact with the hydrothermal system under confinement, causing hydro-magmatic explosions that cleared the upper part of the plumbing system. Subsequently, the magmatic column produced a thermal aureole in the conduit and dried out the hydrothermal system, allowing for dry eruptions. Magma ascent rates were low enough to allow for efficient outgassing and microlite growth. Constant supply of magma from below caused quasi-continuous disruption of the uppermost magma volume through a combination of shear-deformation and gas expansion. The combination of increasing crystallinity of juvenile grains, and high measured SO2 flux indicate decreasing integrated magma ascent rates and clearing of the hydrothermal system along transport pathways in a system open to gas loss. The near real

  13. Volcanoes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the past thousand years,volcanoes have claimed more than 300,000 lives. Volcanology is ayoung and dangerous science that helps us against the power of the Earth itself.We live on a fiery planet. Nearly 2000 miles beneath our feet, the Earth's inner core reachestemperatures of 12,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Molten rock or magma, rises to the earth's surface. Acold, rigid crust fractured into some twenty plates. When magma breaks through crust it becomes

  14. Distinguishing styles of explosive eruptions at Erebus, Redoubt and Taupo volcanoes using multivariate analysis of ash morphometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Meredith R.; Panter, Kurt S.; Gorsevski, Pece V.

    2017-02-01

    The style and dynamics of volcanic eruptions control the level and type of hazards posed for local populations and can have a temporary long-range impact on climate if eruptions are extremely energetic. The purpose of this study is to provide a statistical approach to ash morphometrics in order to provide a means by which to evaluate diverse eruption styles and mechanisms of fragmentation. The methodology presented can be applied to tephra deposits worldwide and may aid volcanic hazard mitigation by better defining a volcano's history of explosive behavior. Ash-sized grains were collected from tephra deposits on Mount Erebus, Antarctica (imaged by scanning electron microscopy. Morphometric properties were determined using image processing software and then evaluated by several statistical methods. Discriminant analysis of all parameters was found to be the best at differentiating the tephra deposits and allowing for interpretation of eruptive styles in conjunction with field observations. A linear array of data forming a positive slope in factor space, which explains > 99% of the total data variance, is interpreted to represent a continuum between fragmentations involving water-magma interaction ("wet") to grains that were formed predominately by magmatic ("dry") fragmentation mechanisms. The Taupo Hatepe ash, which was deposited from a phreatoplinian eruption column, has the highest factor values in the array, which signifies, in part, more rectangular/blocky morphologies with smooth grain edges. Factor values for the 2009 Redoubt eruption (events 2-4) are nearly as high as Hatepe ash and based on this we suggest that it was produced, in part, by phreatomagmatic fragmentation. This is supported by field observations that document melting and eruption through glacial ice during the early phases of the 2009 activity. Redoubt ash grains from later stages of the same eruption (events 9-18) show a significant shift to lower values in factor space (more irregular

  15. Underestimated risks of recurrent long-range ash dispersal from northern Pacific Arc volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, A. J.; Abbott, P. M.; Albert, P. G.; Cook, E.; Pearce, N. J. G.; Ponomareva, V.; Svensson, A.; Davies, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    Widespread ash dispersal poses a significant natural hazard to society, particularly in relation to disruption to aviation. Assessing the extent of the threat of far-travelled ash clouds on flight paths is substantially hindered by an incomplete volcanic history and an underestimation of the potential reach of distant eruptive centres. The risk of extensive ash clouds to aviation is thus poorly quantified. New evidence is presented of explosive Late Pleistocene eruptions in the Pacific Arc, currently undocumented in the proximal geological record, which dispersed ash up to 8000 km from source. Twelve microscopic ash deposits or cryptotephra, invisible to the naked eye, discovered within Greenland ice-cores, and ranging in age between 11.1 and 83.7 ka b2k, are compositionally matched to northern Pacific Arc sources including Japan, Kamchatka, Cascades and Alaska. Only two cryptotephra deposits are correlated to known high-magnitude eruptions (Towada-H, Japan, ca 15 ka BP and Mount St Helens Set M, ca 28 ka BP). For the remaining 10 deposits, there is no evidence of age- and compositionally-equivalent eruptive events in regional volcanic stratigraphies. This highlights the inherent problem of under-reporting eruptions and the dangers of underestimating the long-term risk of widespread ash dispersal for trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic flight routes.

  16. Underestimated risks of recurrent long-range ash dispersal from northern Pacific Arc volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, A J; Abbott, P M; Albert, P G; Cook, E; Pearce, N J G; Ponomareva, V; Svensson, A; Davies, S M

    2016-01-01

    Widespread ash dispersal poses a significant natural hazard to society, particularly in relation to disruption to aviation. Assessing the extent of the threat of far-travelled ash clouds on flight paths is substantially hindered by an incomplete volcanic history and an underestimation of the potential reach of distant eruptive centres. The risk of extensive ash clouds to aviation is thus poorly quantified. New evidence is presented of explosive Late Pleistocene eruptions in the Pacific Arc, currently undocumented in the proximal geological record, which dispersed ash up to 8000 km from source. Twelve microscopic ash deposits or cryptotephra, invisible to the naked eye, discovered within Greenland ice-cores, and ranging in age between 11.1 and 83.7 ka b2k, are compositionally matched to northern Pacific Arc sources including Japan, Kamchatka, Cascades and Alaska. Only two cryptotephra deposits are correlated to known high-magnitude eruptions (Towada-H, Japan, ca 15 ka BP and Mount St Helens Set M, ca 28 ka BP). For the remaining 10 deposits, there is no evidence of age- and compositionally-equivalent eruptive events in regional volcanic stratigraphies. This highlights the inherent problem of under-reporting eruptions and the dangers of underestimating the long-term risk of widespread ash dispersal for trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic flight routes.

  17. Phreatomagmatic and phreatic fall and surge deposits from explosions at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, 1790 a.d.: Keanakakoi Ash Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhie, J.; Walker, G.P.L.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    In or around 1790 a.d. an explosive eruption took place in the summit caldera of Kilauea shield volcano. A group of Hawaiian warriors close to the caldera at the time were killed by the effects of the explosions. The stratigraphy of pyroclastic deposits surrounding Kilauea (i.e., the Keanakakoi Ash Member) suggests that the explosions referred to in the historic record were the culmination of a prolonged hydrovolcanic eruption consisting of three main phases. The first phase was phreatomagmatic and generated well-bedded, fine fallout ash rich in glassy, variably vesiculated, juvenile magmatic and dense, lithic pyroclasts. The ash was mainly dispersed to the southwest of the caldera by the northeasterly trade winds. The second phase produced a Strombolian-style scoria fall deposit followed by phreatomagmatic ash similar to that of the first phase, though richer in accretionary lapilli and lithics. The third and culminating phase was phreatic and deposited lithic-rich lapilli and block fall layers, interbedded with cross-bedded surge deposits, and accretionary lapilli-rich, fine ash beds. These final explosions may have been responsible for the deaths of the warriors. The three phases were separated by quiescent spells during which the primary deposits were eroded and transported downwind in dunes migrating southwestward and locally excavated by fluvial runoff close to the rim. The entire hydrovolcanic eruption may have lasted for weeks or perhaps months. At around the same time, lava erupted from Kilauea's East Rift Zone and probably drained magma from the summit storage. The earliest descriptions of Kilauea (30 years after the Keanakakoi eruption) emphasize the great depth of the floor (300-500 m below the rim) and the presence of stepped ledges. It is therefore likely that the Keanakakoi explosions were deepseated within Kilauea, and that the vent rim was substantially lower than the caldera rim. The change from phreatomagmatic to phreatic phases may reflect the

  18. Volcanic-ash hazard to aviation during the 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Ewert, J.W.; Gallina, G.M.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Swanson, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    Within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Anatahan is one of nine active subaerial volcanoes that pose hazards to major air-traffic routes from airborne volcanic ash. The 2003-2004 eruptive activity of Anatahan volcano affected the region's aviation operations for 3 days in May 2003. On the first day of the eruption (10 May 2003), two international flights from Saipan to Japan were cancelled, and several flights implemented ash-avoidance procedures. On 13 May 2003, a high-altitude flight through volcanic gas was reported, with no perceptible damage to the aircraft. TOMS and MODIS analysis of satellite data strongly suggests that no significant ash and only minor amounts of SO2 were involved in the incident, consistent with crew observations. On 23 May 2003, airport operations were disrupted when tropical-cyclone winds dispersed ash to the south, dusting Saipan with light ashfall and causing flight cancellations there and at Guam 320 km south of the volcano. Operational (near-real-time) monitoring of ash clouds produced by Anatahan has been conducted since the first day of the eruption on 10 May 2003 by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC). The VAAC was among the first groups outside of the immediate area of the volcano to detect and report on the unexpected eruption of Anatahan. After being contacted about an unusual cloud by National Weather Service forecasters in Guam at 1235 UTC on 10 May 2003, the VAAC analyzed GOES 9 images, confirming Anatahan as the likely source of an ash cloud and estimating that the eruption began at about 0730 UTC. The VAAC issued its first Volcanic Ash Advisory for Anatahan at 1300 UTC on 10 May 2003 more than 5 h after the start of the eruption, the delay reflecting the difficulty of detecting and confirming a surprise eruption at a remote volcano with no in situ real-time geophysical monitoring. The initial eruption plume reached 10.7-13.4 km (35,000-44,000 ft), well into jet cruise altitudes

  19. Environmental adaptability of Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta to sandy ash soil of Merapi Volcano, Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Wardoyo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies on volcanic ash of Mount Merapi erupted in 2010 are limited to only characterization of mineralogical, physical, chemical, and biological properties of the volcanic ash. In order to speed up rehabilitation of soils affected by the volcanic ash, it is necessary to study the application of suitable plant species, which is called bio-mechanic conservation. The purpose of this study was to test the environmental adaptability of Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta in sandy soil covered by volcanic ash of Mount Merapi. This study was carried out using 2x4 Split-plot randomized block design with three replicates. The main plot of the design was plant species (Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta, while the sub plot was the dose of organic matter application (0, 20, 40, and 60 t / ha. Soil parameters measured were N-total, P-total, available P, available K, and organic matter contents. Plant parameters measured were plant dry weight and plant height. The results showed no significant differences in soil N, P and K contents of all treatments tested in this study after 9 weeks, except C organic content. Canavalia virosa grew well until 9 weeks, whereas Flemingia congesta started to die a 9 weeks after planting.

  20. Hydrovolcanic ash emission between August 14 and 24, 2015 at Cotopaxi volcano (Ecuador): Characterization and eruption mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncoso, Liliana; Bustillos, Jorge; Romero, Jorge E.; Guevara, Alicia; Carrillo, Janina; Montalvo, Estefano; Izquierdo, Tatiana

    2017-07-01

    Cotopaxi is an active, hazardous and ice-covered stratovolcano 60 km southeast of Quito, (Ecuador) whose last major eruption occurred in 1877. During 2001-2002, volcanic unrest characterized by volcanic seismicity and deformation ended without eruptive activity. On April 2015, a new increase of seismicity, SO2 emissions, thermal anomalies and edifice deformation, evolved into the onset of a new eruptive cycle, beginning August 14. We sampled and measured the ash fall deposits to the west of Cotopaxi between August 14 and 24, 2015. The ash collected was analyzed using grain size, X-Ray fluorescence, X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDS), revealing the eruptive products to be compound of dense fragments (mostly lithics), diverse types of scoria, pumice, free fractured crystals, glassy particles and aggregates. Most of hydrothermal alteration is observed during the initial stage of the eruption (14-15 August; including Cu oxides and Fe minerals in the lithics). The glassy particles were blocky morphology, and textural changes were recognized over 10 days of eruption, varying from null or low vesicularity to low-to-moderate vesicularity, occasionally exhibiting molten or subrounded textures. The bulk ash has a basaltic-andesitic composition ( 55.67 wt% of SiO2), while clusters of selected particles (likely juvenile) analyzed through SEM + EDS reveal dacitic composition (65.67 and 65.8 wt% SiO2). Plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene are the main minerals present, with accessory anhydrite, melanterite and pyrite (these typically observed during the initial stage of eruption). These variations in addition to the geophysical background, led us to interpret this eruption as the result of the volcano's hydrothermal system disruption due to a shallow, low-volume magma input, which initially evolved into phreatic activity at surface level. Further activity up to 24 August was triggered by the indirect interaction between magma and the depleted

  1. The Uwekahuna Ash Member of the Puna Basalt: product of violent phreatomagmatic eruptions at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, between 2800 and 2100 14C years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurisin, D.; Lockwood, J.P.; Casadevall, T.J.; Rubin, M.

    1995-01-01

    Kilauea volcano's reputation for relatively gentle effusive eruptions belies a violent geologic past, including several large phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions that are recorded by Holocene pyroclastic deposits which mantle Kilauea's summit area and the southeast flank of adjacent Mauna Loa volcano. The most widespread of these deposits is the Uwekahuna Ash Member, a basaltic surge and fall deposit emplaced during two or more eruptive episodes separated by a few decades to several centuries. It is infered that the eruptions which produced the Uwekahuna were driven by water interacting with a fluctuating magma column. The volume, extent and character of the Uwekahuna deposits underscore the hazards posed by relatively infrequent but potentially devastating explosive eruptions at Kilauea, as well as at other basaltic volcanoes. -from Authors

  2. Chemistry of ash-leachates to monitor volcanic activity: An application to Popocatepetl volcano, central Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armienta, M.A., E-mail: victoria@geofisica.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito Exterior, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico); De la Cruz-Reyna, S. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito Exterior, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Soler, A. [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Dep. Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Diposits Minerals, Fac. Geologia, Universidad de Barcelona (Spain); Cruz, O.; Ceniceros, N.; Aguayo, A. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito Exterior, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-08-15

    Monitoring volcanic activity and assessing volcanic risk in an on-going eruption is a problem that requires the maximum possible independent data to reduce uncertainty. A quick, relatively simple and inexpensive method to follow the development of an eruption and to complement other monitoring parameters is the chemical analysis of ash leachates, particularly in the case of eruptions related to dome emplacement. Here, the systematic analysis of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Cl{sup -} and F{sup -} concentrations in ash leachates is proposed as a valuable tool for volcanic activity monitoring. However, some results must be carefully assessed, as is the case for S/Cl ratios, since eruption of hydrothermally altered material may be confused with degassing of incoming magma. Sulfur isotopes help to identify SO{sub 4} produced by hydrothermal processes from magmatic SO{sub 2}. Lower S isotopic values correlated with higher F{sup -} percentages represent a better indicator of fresh magmatic influence that may lead to stronger eruptions and emplacement of new lava domes. Additionally, multivariate statistical analysis helps to identify different eruption characteristics, provided that the analyses are made over a long enough time to sample different stages of an eruption.

  3. Long-range hazard assessment of volcanic ash dispersal for a Plinian eruptive scenario at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico): implications for civil aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasia, Rosanna; Scaini, Chirara; Capra, Lucia; Nathenson, Manuel; Siebe, Claus; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Folch, Arnau

    2013-01-01

    Popocatépetl is one of Mexico’s most active volcanoes threatening a densely populated area that includes Mexico City with more than 20 million inhabitants. The destructive potential of this volcano is demonstrated by its Late Pleistocene–Holocene eruptive activity, which has been characterized by recurrent Plinian eruptions of large magnitude, the last two of which destroyed human settlements in pre-Hispanic times. Popocatépetl’s reawakening in 1994 produced a crisis that culminated with the evacuation of two villages on the northeastern flank of the volcano. Shortly after, a monitoring system and a civil protection contingency plan based on a hazard zone map were implemented. The current volcanic hazards map considers the potential occurrence of different volcanic phenomena, including pyroclastic density currents and lahars. However, no quantitative assessment of the tephra hazard, especially related to atmospheric dispersal, has been performed. The presence of airborne volcanic ash at low and jet-cruise atmospheric levels compromises the safety of aircraft operations and forces re-routing of aircraft to prevent encounters with volcanic ash clouds. Given the high number of important airports in the surroundings of Popocatépetl volcano and considering the potential threat posed to civil aviation in Mexico and adjacent regions in case of a Plinian eruption, a hazard assessment for tephra dispersal is required. In this work, we present the first probabilistic tephra dispersal hazard assessment for Popocatépetl volcano. We compute probabilistic hazard maps for critical thresholds of airborne ash concentrations at different flight levels, corresponding to the situation defined in Europe during 2010, and still under discussion. Tephra dispersal mode is performed using the FALL3D numerical model. Probabilistic hazard maps are built for a Plinian eruptive scenario defined on the basis of geological field data for the “Ochre Pumice” Plinian eruption (4965 14C

  4. A new simplified approach for simultaneous retrieval of SO2 and ash content of tropospheric volcanic clouds: an application to the Mt Etna volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pugnaghi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure is presented for simultaneous estimation of SO2 and ash abundance in a volcanic plume, using thermal infrared (TIR MODIS data. Plume altitude and temperature are the only two input parameters required to run the procedure, while surface emissivity, temperature, atmospheric profiles, ash optical properties, and radiative transfer models are not necessary to perform the atmospheric corrections. The procedure gives the most reliable results when the surface under the plume is uniform, for example above the ocean, but still produces fairly good estimates in more challenging and not easily modelled conditions, such as above land or meteorological cloud layers. The developed approach was tested on the Etna volcano. By linearly interpolating the radiances surrounding a detected volcanic plume, the volcanic plume removal (VPR procedure described here computes the radiances that would have been measured by the sensor in the absence of a plume, and reconstructs a new image without plume. The new image and the original data allow computation of plume transmittance in the TIR-MODIS bands 29, 31, and 32 (8.6, 11.0 and 12.0 μm by applying a simplified model consisting of a uniform plume at a fixed altitude and temperature. The transmittances are then refined with a polynomial relationship obtained by means of MODTRAN simulations adapted for the geographical region, ash type, and atmospheric profiles. Bands 31 and 32 are SO2 transparent and, from their transmittances, the effective ash particle radius (Re, and aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550 are computed. A simple relation between the ash transmittances of bands 31 and 29 is demonstrated and used for SO2 columnar content (cs estimation. Comparing the results of the VPR procedure with MODTRAN simulations for more than 200 000 different cases, the frequency distribution of the differences shows the following: the Re error is less than ±0.5 μm in more than 60% of cases; the AOD550 error

  5. Airborne Measurement in the Ash Plume from Mount Sakurajima: Analysis of Gravitational Effects on Dispersion and Fallout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Eliasson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash concentrations in the plume from Sakurajima volcano in Japan are observed from airplanes equipped with optical particle counters and GPS tracking devices. The volcano emits several puffs a day. The puffs are also recorded by the Sakurajima Volcanological Observatory. High concentrations are observed in the puffs and fallout driven by vertical air current, called streak fallout. Puffs dispersion is analyzed by the classical diffusion-advection method and a new gravitational dispersion method. The fluid mechanic of the gravitational dispersion, streak fallout, and classical diffusion-advection theory is described in three separate appendices together with methods to find the time gravitational dispersion constant and the diffusion coefficient from satellite photos. The diffusion-advection equation may be used to scale volcanic eruptions so the same eruption plumes can be scaled to constant flux and wind conditions or two eruptions can be scaled to each other. The dispersion analyses show that dispersion of volcanic plumes does not follow either theories completely. It is most likely diffusion in the interface of the plume and the ambient air, together with gravitational flattening of the plumes core. This means larger boundary concentration gradients and smaller diffusion coefficients than state of the art methods can predict.

  6. Major Holocene block-and-ash fan at the western slope of ice-capped Pico de Orizaba volcano, México: Implications for future hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebe, Claus; Abrams, Michael; Sheridan, Michael F.

    1993-12-01

    A major block-and-ash fan extends more than 14 km westward from the summit of Pico de Orizaba volcano in the eastern part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Radiocarbon dating of charcoal within the fan deposits yielded Holocene ages that range between 4040 ± 80 and 4660 ± 100 y.B.P. Stratigraphical, sedimentological, geochemical, and scanning electron microscope studies indicate that this fan originated within a relatively short time-span by multiple volcanic explosions at the summit crater. This activity produced a series of pyroclastic flows (mainly block-and-ash flows) and lahars which were channelized by a glacial cirque and connecting U-shaped valleys as they descended toward the base of the volcano. A recurrence of a similar eruption today would pose severe hazards to the population of more than 50,000 people, who live in a potentially dangerous zone. A detailed reconstruction of the sequence of events that led to the formation of the block-and-ash fan is presented to help mitigate the risk. Special attention is given to the effects of an ice-cap and the role of pre-existing glacial morphology on the distribution of products from such an eruption.

  7. Hazard assessment of far-range volcanic ash dispersal from a violent Strombolian eruption at Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Naples, Italy: implications on civil aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, Roberto; Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Scaini, Chiara; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2012-11-01

    Long-range dispersal of volcanic ash can disrupt civil aviation over large areas, as occurred during the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland. Here we assess the hazard for civil aviation posed by volcanic ash from a potential violent Strombolian eruption of Somma-Vesuvius, the most likely scenario if eruptive activity resumed at this volcano. A Somma-Vesuvius eruption is of concern for two main reasons: (1) there is a high probability (38 %) that the eruption will be violent Strombolian, as this activity has been common in the most recent period of activity (between AD 1631 and 1944); and (2) violent Strombolian eruptions typically last longer than higher-magnitude events (from 3 to 7 days for the climactic phases) and, consequently, are likely to cause prolonged air traffic disruption (even at large distances if a substantial amount of fine ash is produced such as is typical during Vesuvius eruptions). We compute probabilistic hazard maps for airborne ash concentration at relevant flight levels using the FALL3D ash dispersal model and a statistically representative set of meteorological conditions. Probabilistic hazard maps are computed for two different ash concentration thresholds, 2 and 0.2 mg/m3, which correspond, respectively, to the no-fly and enhanced procedure conditions defined in Europe during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption. The seasonal influence of ash dispersal is also analysed by computing seasonal maps. We define the persistence of ash in the atmosphere as the time that a concentration threshold is exceeded divided by the total duration of the eruption (here the eruption phase producing a sustained eruption column). The maps of averaged persistence give additional information on the expected duration of the conditions leading to flight disruption at a given location. We assess the impact that a violent Strombolian eruption would have on the main airports and aerial corridors of the Central Mediterranean area, and this assessment

  8. Ellipsometry and electronic microscopy of ashes swept of the Popocatepetl volcano; Elipsometria y microscopia electronica de barrido de las cenizas del volcan Popocatepetl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Aaron; Munoz, Rafel; Falcon, Nelson [Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia (Venezuela); Chavira, Enrique [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, Puebla (Mexico)

    2001-12-01

    The ellipsometry and the scanning electronic microscopy is applied to the study of the optic properties of Popocatepetl volcano ash in connection with the form, ruggedness and elemental chemical composition of the microparticles, also to argue about the relation with atmospheric conditions. [Spanish] Se aplica la eliposometria y la microscopia electronica de barrido al estudio de las propiedades opticas de las cenizas de volcan Popocatepetl en relacion con la forma, rugosidad y composicion quimica elemental de las microparticulas, destacandose su vinculacion con las condiciones de visibilidad.

  9. Estimates of total ash content from 2006 and 2009 explosion events at Bezymianny volcano with use of a regional atmospheric modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseenko, K. B.; Malik, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    The December 24, 2006, and December 16, 2009, strong explosion events at Bezymianny Volcano (Kamchatka Peninsula) were accompanied by extensive ash-falls in proximal and medium-distal area (events and quantify effects of atmospheric dispersal, gravitational settling, and particle aggregation on the observed ash-fall deposit patterns. It was found that the orography-induced atmospheric disturbances provided first-order influence on ash dispersal regime in the events owing to enhanced turbulence rates in a free troposphere above mountains and low-level airflows generated by mesoscale pressure perturbations. A total mass of ash from these eruptions is inverted based on grain-size sample data and model-calculated Green's function for atmospheric transport with use of a multiple regression approach. We demonstrate that in the absence of precise data on individual and collective settling rates the proposed inversion technique, which explicitly constrains fall velocity spectrum within individual sieve classes and aggregated modes, provides more reliable estimate for total erupted mass compared to procedures employing constant shape factor or prescribed settling rates within the framework of a simple linear regression model.

  10. Mineralogical study on volcanic ash of the eruption on September 27, 2014 at Ontake volcano, central Japan: correlation with porphyry copper systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yusuke; Imura, Takumi; Hayashi, Shintaro; Ohba, Tsukasa

    2016-04-01

    The volcanic ash of the eruption on September 27, 2014 at Ontake volcano consists mostly of altered rock fragments. The ash contains partly altered volcanic rock fragments consisting of primary igneous minerals (plagioclase, orthopyroxene, titanomagnetite, and feldspars) and volcanic glass accompanied by alteration minerals to some extents, and contains no juvenile fragments. These features indicate that the eruption was a non-juvenile hydrothermal eruption that was derived from the hydrothermal system developed under the crater. The major minerals derived from hydrothermal alteration zones are silica mineral, kaolin-group mineral, smectite, pyrophyllite, muscovite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, pyrite, K-feldspar, albite, and rutile. Minor chlorite, biotite, and garnet are accompanied. Five types of alteration mineral associations are identified from observations on individual ash particles: silica-pyrite, silica-pyrite ± alunite ± kaolin, silica-pyrophyllite-pyrite, silica-muscovite ± chlorite, and silica-K-feldspar ± albite ± garnet ± biotite. The associations indicate development of advanced argillic, sericite, and potassic alteration zones under the crater. Occurrence of anhydrite veinlet and the set of alteration zones indicate hydrothermal alteration zones similar to late-stage porphyry copper systems. Comparing the mineral associations with the geologic model of the late-stage porphyry copper systems, the source depths of mineral associations are estimated to range from near surface to >2 km. The depths of advanced argillic alteration, sericite, and potassic zones are 0 to ~2, ~1.5 to ~2, and >2 km, respectively.

  11. Relationship between volcanic ash fallouts and seismic tremor: quantitative assessment of the 2015 eruptive period at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Battaglia, Jean; Proaño, Antonio; Hidalgo, Silvana; Vásconez, Francisco; Hernandez, Stephen; Ruiz, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the relationships between geophysical signals and volcanic products is critical to improving real-time volcanic hazard assessment. Thanks to high-frequency sampling campaigns of ash fallouts (15 campaigns, 461 samples), the 2015 Cotopaxi eruption is an outstanding candidate for quantitatively comparing the amplitude of seismic tremor with the amount of ash emitted. This eruption emitted a total of 1.2E + 9 kg of ash ( 8.6E + 5 m3) during four distinct phases, with masses ranging from 3.5E + 7 to 7.7E + 8 kg of ash. We compare the ash fallout mass and the corresponding cumulative quadratic median amplitude of the seismic tremor and find excellent correlations when the dataset is divided by eruptive phase. We use scaling factors based on the individual correlations to reconstruct the eruptive process and to extract synthetic Eruption Source Parameters (daily mass of ash, mass eruption rate, and column height) from the seismic records. We hypothesize that the change in scaling factor through time, associated with a decrease in seismic amplitudes compared to ash emissions, is the result of a more efficient fragmentation and transport process. These results open the possibility of feeding numerical models with continuous geophysical data, after adequate calibration, in order to better characterize volcanic hazards during explosive eruptions.

  12. Interactive Volcano Studies and Education Using Virtual Globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2006-12-01

    Internet-based virtual globe programs such as Google Earth provide a spatial context for visualization of monitoring and geophysical data sets. At the Alaska Volcano Observatory, Google Earth is being used to integrate satellite imagery, modeling of volcanic eruption clouds and seismic data sets to build new monitoring and reporting tools. However, one of the most useful information sources for environmental monitoring is under utilized. Local populations, who have lived near volcanoes for decades are perhaps one of the best gauges for changes in activity. Much of the history of the volcanoes is only recorded through local legend. By utilizing the high level of internet connectivity in Alaska, and the interest of secondary education in environmental science and monitoring, it is proposed to build a network of observation nodes around local schools in Alaska and along the Aleutian Chain. A series of interactive web pages with observations on a volcano's condition, be it glow at night, puffs of ash, discolored snow, earthquakes, sounds, and even current weather conditions can be recorded, and the users will be able to see their reports in near real time. The database will create a KMZ file on the fly for upload into the virtual globe software. Past observations and legends could be entered to help put a volcano's long-term activity in perspective. Beyond the benefit to researchers and emergency managers, students and teachers in the rural areas will be involved in volcano monitoring, and gain an understanding of the processes and hazard mitigation efforts in their community. K-12 students will be exposed to the science, and encouraged to participate in projects at the university. Infrastructure at the university can be used by local teachers to augment their science programs, hopefully encouraging students to continue their education at the university level.

  13. Simulation of block-and-ash flows and ash-cloud surges of the 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano with a two-layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelfoun, Karim; Gueugneau, Valentin; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Aisyah, Nurnaning; Cholik, Noer; Merciecca, Charley

    2017-06-01

    A new depth-averaged model has been developed for the simulation of both concentrated and dilute pyroclastic currents and their interactions. The capability of the model to reproduce a real event is tested for the first time with two well-studied eruptive phases of the 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia). We show that the model is able to reproduce quite accurately the dynamics of the currents and the characteristics of the deposits: thickness, extent, volume, and trajectory. The model needs to be tested on other well-studied eruptions and the equations could be refined, but this new approach is a promising tool for the understanding of pyroclastic currents and for a better prediction of volcanic hazards.

  14. Collateral variations between the concentrations of mercury and other water soluble ions in volcanic ash samples and volcanic activity during the 2014-2016 eruptive episodes at Aso volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Kohji; Sudo, Yasuaki; Nagamatsu, Yoshizumi

    2017-07-01

    During 2014-2016, the Aso volcano, located in the center of the Kyushu Islands, Japan, erupted and emitted large amounts of volcanic gases and ash. Two episodes of the eruption were observed; firstly Strombolian magmatic eruptive episodes from 25 November 2014 to the middle of May 2015, and secondly phreatomagmatic and phreatic eruptive episodes from September 2015 to February 2016. Bulk chemical analyses on total mercury (Hg) and major ions in water soluble fraction in volcanic ash fall samples were conducted. During the Strombolian magmatic eruptive episodes, total Hg concentrations averaged 1.69 ± 0.87 ng g- 1 (N = 33), with a range from 0.47 to 3.8 ng g- 1. In addition, the temporal variation of total Hg concentrations in volcanic ash varied with the amplitude change of seismic signals. In the Aso volcano, the volcanic tremors are always observed during eruptive stages and quiet interludes, and the amplitudes of tremors increase at eruptive stages. So, the temporal variation of total Hg concentrations could provide an indication of the level of volcanic activity. During the phreatomagmatic and phreatic eruptive episodes, on the other hand, total Hg concentrations in the volcanic ash fall samples averaged 220 ± 88 ng g- 1 (N = 5), corresponding to 100 times higher than those during the Strombolian eruptive episode. Therefore, it is possible that total Hg concentrations in volcanic ash samples are largely varied depending on the eruptive type. In addition, the ash fall amounts were also largely different among the two eruptive episodes. This can be also one of the factors controlling Hg concentrations in volcanic ash.

  15. Ash aggregation during the 11 February 2010 partial dome collapse of the Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Bonadonna, C.; Pioli, L.; Cole, P. D.; Stinton, A.

    2017-04-01

    On 11 February 2010, Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, underwent a partial dome collapse ( 50 × 106 m3) and a short-lived Vulcanian explosion towards the end. Three main pyroclastic units were identified N and NE of the volcano: dome-collapse pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits, fountain-collapse PDC deposits formed by the Vulcanian explosion, and tephra-fallout deposits associated with elutriation from the dome-collapse and fountain-collapse PDCs (i.e. co-PDC fallout deposit). The fallout associated with the Vulcanian explosion was mostly dispersed E and SE by high altitude winds. All units N and NE of the volcano contain variable amounts and types of particle aggregates, although the co-PDC fallout deposit is associated with the largest abundance (i.e. up to 24 wt%). The size of aggregates found in the co-PDC fallout deposit increases with distance from the volcano and proximity to the sea, reaching a maximum diameter of 12 mm about 500 m from the coast. The internal grain size of all aggregates have nearly identical distributions (with Mdϕ ≈ 4-5), with particles in the size categories > 3 ϕ (i.e. single-layer aggregates), while others have one or two additional layers accreted over the core (multiple-layer aggregates). Calculated aggregate porosity and settling velocity vary between 0.3 and 0.5 and 11-21 m s- 1, respectively. The aggregate size shows a clear correlation with both the core size and the size of the largest particles found in the core. The large abundance of aggregates in the co-PDC fallout deposits suggests that the buoyant plumes elutriated above PDCs represent an optimal environment for the formation (particle collision) and development (aggregate layering) of particle aggregates. However, specific conditions are required, including i) a large availability of water (in this case provided by the steam plumes associated with the entrance of PDCs into the ocean), ii) presence of plume regions with different grain-size features (i

  16. What makes hydromagmatic eruptions violent? Some insights from the Keanakāko'i Ash, Kı̄lauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Larry G.; Christiansen, Robert L.; Thornber, Carl R.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Beeson, Melvin H.

    2004-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions at the summit of Ki??ilauea volcano, Hawai'i, are of two dramatically contrasting types: (1) benign lava flows and lava fountains; and (2) violent, mostly prehistoric eruptions that dispersed tephra over hundreds of square kilometers. The violence of the latter eruptions has been attributed to mixing of water and magma within a wet summit caldera; however, magma injection into water at other volcanoes does not consistently produce widespread tephras. To identify other factors that may have contributed to the violence of these eruptions, we sampled tephra from the Keanaka??ko'i Ash, the most recent large hydromagmatic deposit, and measured vesicularity, bubble-number density and dissolved volatile content of juvenile matrix glass to constrain magma ascent rate and degree of degassing at the time of quenching. Bubble-number densities (9 ?? 104- 1 ?? 107 cm-3) of tephra fragments exceed those of most historically erupted Ki??lauean tephras (3 ?? 103-1.8 ?? 105 cm-3), and suggest exceptionally high magma effusion rates. Dissolved sulfur (average = 330 ppm) and water (0.15-0.45 wt.%) concentrations exceed equilibrium-saturation values at 1 atm pressure (100-150 ppm and ???0.09%, respectively), suggesting that clasts quenched before equilibrating to atmospheric pressure. We interpret these results to suggest rapid magma injection into a wet crater, perhaps similar to continuous-uprush jets at Surtsey. Estimates of Reynolds number suggest that the erupting magma was turbulent and would have mixed with surrounding water in vortices ranging downward in size to centimeters. Such fine-scale mixing would have ensured rapid heat exchange and extensive magma fragmentation, maximizing the violence of these eruptions.

  17. Analysis of the 2006 block-and-ash flow deposits of Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia, using high-spatial resolution IKONOS images and complementary ground based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gupta, Avijit; Liew, Soo Chin; Lube, Gert; Cronin, Shane J.; Surono, Dr

    2010-05-01

    On 16 June 2006 an overpass of IKONOS coincided with the emplacement of an active block-and-ash flow fed by a lava dome collapse event at Merapi Volcano (Java, Indonesia). This was the first satellite image recorded for a moving pyroclastic flow. The very high-spatial resolution data displayed the extent and impact of the pyroclastic deposits emplaced during and prior to, the day of image acquisition. This allowed a number of features associated with high-hazard block-and-ash flows emplaced in narrow, deep gorges to be mapped, interpreted and understood. The block-and-ash flow and surge deposits recognized in the Ikonos images include: (1) several channel-confined flow lobes and tongues in the box-shaped valley; (2) thin ash-cloud surge deposit and knocked-down trees in constricted areas on both slopes of the gorge; (3) fan-like over bank deposits on the Gendol-Tlogo interfluves from which flows were re-routed in the Tlogo secondary valley; (4) massive over bank lobes on the right bank from which flows devastated the village of Kaliadem 0.5 km from the main channel, a small part of this flow being re-channeled in the Opak secondary valley. The high-resolution IKONOS images also helped us to identify geomorphic obstacles that enabled flows to ramp and spill out from the sinuous channel, a process called flow avulsion. Importantly, the avulsion redirected flows to unexpected areas away from the main channel. In the case of Merapi we see that the presence of valley fill by previous deposits, bends and man-made dams influence the otherwise valley-guided course of the flows. Sadly, Sabo dams (built to ameliorate the effect of high sediment load streams) can actually cause block-and-ash flows to jump out of their containing channel and advance into sensitive areas. Very-high-spatial resolution satellite images are very useful for mapping and interpreting the distribution of freshly erupted volcanic deposits. IKONOS-type images with 1-m resolution provide opportunities to

  18. Physicochemical and toxicological profiling of ash from the 2010 and 2011 eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn volcanoes, Iceland using a rapid respiratory hazard assessment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwell, C J; Baxter, P J; Hillman, S E; Calkins, J A; Damby, D E; Delmelle, P; Donaldson, K; Dunster, C; Fubini, B; Kelly, F J; Le Blond, J S; Livi, K J T; Murphy, F; Nattrass, C; Sweeney, S; Tetley, T D; Thordarson, T; Tomatis, M

    2013-11-01

    The six week eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in 2010 produced heavy ash fall in a sparsely populated area of southern and south eastern Iceland and disrupted European commercial flights for at least 6 days. We adopted a protocol for the rapid analysis of volcanic ash particles, for the purpose of informing respiratory health risk assessments. Ash collected from deposits underwent a multi-laboratory physicochemical and toxicological investigation of their mineralogical parameters associated with bio-reactivity, and selected in vitro toxicology assays related to pulmonary inflammatory responses. Ash from the eruption of Grímsvötn, Iceland, in 2011 was also studied. The results were benchmarked against ash from Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, which has been extensively studied since the onset of eruptive activity in 1995. For Eyjafjallajökull, the grain size distributions were variable: 2-13 vol% of the bulk samples were <4 µm, with the most explosive phases of the eruption generating abundant respirable particulate matter. In contrast, the Grímsvötn ash was almost uniformly coarse (<3.5 vol%<4 µm material). Surface area ranged from 0.3 to 7.7 m2 g(-1) for Eyjafjallajökull but was very low for Grímsvötn (<0.6 m2 g(-1)). There were few fibre-like particles (which were unrelated to asbestos) and the crystalline silica content was negligible in both eruptions, whereas Soufrière Hills ash was cristobalite-rich with a known potential to cause silicosis. All samples displayed a low ability to deplete lung antioxidant defences, showed little haemolysis and low acute cytotoxicity in human alveolar type-1 like epithelial cells (TT1). However, cell-free tests showed substantial hydroxyl radical generation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide for Grímsvötn samples, as expected for basaltic, Fe-rich ash. Cellular mediators MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-8 showed chronic pro-inflammatory responses in Eyjafjallajökull, Grímsvötn and Soufrière Hills samples

  19. Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madankan, R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pouget, S. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Singla, P., E-mail: psingla@buffalo.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Bursik, M. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Dehn, J. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States); Jones, M. [Center for Computational Research, University at Buffalo (United States); Patra, A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pavolonis, M. [NOAA-NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research (United States); Pitman, E.B. [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo (United States); Singh, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Webley, P. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions – height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters – are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 14–16 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

  20. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    Iliamna Volcano is a 3,053-meter-high, ice- and snow-covered stratovolcano in the southwestern Cook Inlet region about 225 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and about 100 kilometers northwest of Homer. Historical eruptions of Iliamna Volcano have not been positively documented; however, the volcano regularly emits steam and gas, and small, shallow earthquakes are often detected beneath the summit area. The most recent eruptions of the volcano occurred about 300 years ago, and possibly as recently as 90-140 years ago. Prehistoric eruptions have generated plumes of volcanic ash, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that extended to the volcano flanks and beyond. Rock avalanches from the summit area have occurred numerous times in the past. These avalanches flowed several kilometers down the flanks and at least two large avalanches transformed to cohesive lahars. The number and distribution of known volcanic ash deposits from Iliamna Volcano indicate that volcanic ash clouds from prehistoric eruptions were significantly less voluminous and probably less common relative to ash clouds generated by eruptions of other Cook Inlet volcanoes. Plumes of volcanic ash from Iliamna Volcano would be a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International Airport and other local airports, and depending on wind direction, could drift at least as far as the Kenai Peninsula and beyond. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Because Iliamna Volcano has not erupted for several hundred years, a future eruption could involve significant amounts of ice and snow that could lead to the formation of large lahars and downstream flooding. The greatest hazards in order of importance are described below and shown on plate 1.

  1. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca(2 +) signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca(2 +) from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca(2 +) provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca(2 +) signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca(2 +) channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca(2 +) buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  2. Multi-variable X-band radar observation and tracking of ash plume from Mt. Etna volcano on November 23, 2013 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Riccci, Matteo; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca; Marzano, Frank S.

    2015-04-01

    Ground based weather radar observations of volcanic ash clouds are gaining momentum after recent works which demonstrated their potential use either as stand alone tool or in combination with satellite retrievals. From an operational standpoint, radar data have been mainly exploited to derive the height of ash plume and its temporal-spatial development, taking into account the radar limitation of detecting coarse ash particles (from approximately 20 microns to 10 millimeters and above in terms of particle's radius). More sophisticated radar retrievals can include airborne ash concentration, ash fall rate and out-flux rate. Marzano et al. developed several volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR) schemes, even though their practical use is still subject to a robust validation activity. The latter is made particularly difficult due to the lack of field campaigns with multiple observations and the scarce repetition of volcanic events. The radar variable, often used to infer the physical features of actual ash clouds, is the radar reflectivity named ZHH. It is related to ash particle size distribution and it shows a nice power law relationship with ash concentration. This makes ZHH largely used in radar-volcanology studies. However, weather radars are often able to detect Doppler frequency shifts and, more and more, they have a polarization-diversity capability. The former means that wind speed spectrum of the ash cloud is potentially inferable, whereas the latter implies that variables other than ZHH are available. Theoretically, these additional radar variables are linked to the degree of eccentricity of ash particles, their orientation and density as well as the presence of strong turbulence effects. Thus, the opportunity to refine the ash radar estimates so far developed can benefit from the thorough analysis of radar Doppler and polarization diversity. In this work we show a detailed analysis of Doppler shifts and polarization variables measured by the X band radar

  3. Comment on 'Consequences of phase separation on the distribution of hydrothermal fluids at ASHES vent field, axial volcano, Juan de Fuca ridge' by Christopher G. Fox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, M. A.; Ingebritsen, S. E.; Essaid, H. I.

    1993-02-01

    Fox (1990), in order to explain observations during the Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emissions Study (ASHES), proposed a conceptual model for a two-phase subsea hydrothermal system in which steam controlled flow patterns by blocking liquid flow. An attempt is made here to demonstrate with a very general model that relative permeability contrasts by themselves do not cause spatial isolation of phases in steam/liquid water systems and that density segregation, independent of relative permeability effects, should not be ruled out as an explanation for the observations at the ASHES site. Fox replies that density segregation is probably not the only mechanism at work.

  4. Coevolution: puff pollination in tropical flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Joan

    2014-07-21

    A new study shows that birds plucking anthers of the Melastome, Axinaea, demonstrate a novel bird pollination mechanism. Each stamen of Axinaea offers a nutrient-rich, berry-like food body that, when bitten, releases a puff of pollen allowing transfer to stigmas by wind or the pollen-dusted bird.

  5. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-03-02

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  6. Characteristics of puffing activity revealed by ground-based, thermal infrared imaging: the example of Stromboli Volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Damien; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Harris, Andrew; Bombrun, Maxime; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Ricci, Tullio

    2017-03-01

    Puffing, i.e., the frequent (1 s ca.) release of small (0.1-10 m3), over-pressurized pockets of magmatic gases, is a typical feature of open-conduit basaltic volcanoes worldwide. Despite its non-trivial contribution to the degassing budget of these volcanoes and its recognized role in volcano monitoring, detection and metering tools for puffing are still limited. Taking advantage of the recent developments in high-speed thermal infrared imaging, we developed a specific processing algorithm to detect the emission of individual puffs and measure their duration, size, volume, and apparent temperature at the vent. As a test case, we applied our method at Stromboli Volcano (Italy), studying "snapshots" of 1 min collected in the years 2012, 2013, and 2014 at several vents. In all 3 years, puffing occurred simultaneously at three or more vents with variable features. At the scale of the single vent, a direct relationship links puff temperature and radius, suggesting that the apparent temperature is mostly a function of puff thickness, while the real gas temperature is constant for all puffs. Once released in the atmosphere, puffs dissipate in less than 20 m. On a broader scale, puffing activity is highly variable from vent to vent and year to year, with a link between average frequency, temperature, and volume from 136 puffs per minute, 600 K above ambient temperature, 0.1 m3, and the occasional ejection of pyroclasts to 20 puffs per minute, 3 K above ambient, 20 m3, and no pyroclasts. Frequent, small, hot puffs occur at random intervals, while as the frequency decreases and size increases, an increasingly longer minimum interval between puffs, up to 0.5 s, appears. These less frequent and smaller puffs also display a positive correlation between puff volume and the delay from the previous puff. Our results suggest an important role of shallow bubble coalescence in controlling puffing activity. The smaller and more frequent puffing at "hotter" vents is in agreement with

  7. Volcano Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You might feel better to learn that an ‘active’ volcano is one that has erupted in the past ... miles away. If you live near a known volcano, active or dormant, following these tips will help you ...

  8. Volcanic Ash fall Impact on Vegetation, Colima 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. G.; Martin, A.; Fonseca, R.; Nieto, A.; Radillo, R.; Armienta, M.

    2007-05-01

    An ash sampling network was established arround Colima Volcano in 2005. Ash fall was sampled on the North, Northeast, East, Southeast, South, Southwest and West of the volcano. Samples were analyzed for ash components, geochemistry and leachates. Ash fall ocurred on April (12), May (10, 23), June (2, 6, 9, 10, 12, 14), July (27), September (27), October (23) and November (24). Most of the ash is made of andesitic dome-lithics but shows diferences in crystal, juvenile material and lithic content. In May, some samples contained grey and dark pumice (scoria). Texture varies from phi >4 to phi 0. Leachate concentration were low: SO4 (7.33-54.19) Cl- (2.29-4.97) and F- (0.16-0.37). During 2005, Colima Volcano's ash fall rotted some of the guava and peach fruits and had a drying effect on spearment and epazote plants. Even these small ash amounts could have hindered sugar cane and agave growth.

  9. Supersonic gas shell for puff pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. S., III; Doggett, W. O.; Roth, I.; Stallings, C.

    1982-09-01

    An easy-to-fabricate, conical, annular supersonic nozzle has been developed for use in high-power, puff gas z-pinch experiments. A fast responding conical pressure probe has also been developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the nozzle. Density profile measurements show that the magnitude and radial position of the gas annulus are fairly constant with distance from the nozzle, but the gas density in the center of the annulus increases with distance from the nozzle.

  10. 湖光岩火山灰古剂量的两种计算比较%Comparison of Calculated Paleodoses of Volcano Ash beside Huguang Maar Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁萍; 熊正烨; 王文华; 李永强; 唐强; 黄存友

    2011-01-01

    Based on the thermoluminescence (TL) data, the paleodose of volcanic ash near Huguangyan Maar Lake was calculated with sensitized revision technique. The calculated paleodose depending on TL about 330 ℃ is (75.3±4.8) Gy, while the calculated paleodose depending on TL about 400 ℃ is (115±8)Gy. A physical model is set up to analyze the difference between the two results.%根据热释光测量结果,用敏化修正方法计算了湖光岩玛珥湖周围岩洞内的火山灰的古剂量.用330℃附近的热释光峰作为剂量响应计算出的结果为(75.3±4.8)Gy,但取400℃附近的热释光作为剂量响应计算出的结果为(115±8)Gy.建立物理模型分析了这两种结果不同的内在原因.

  11. Laboratory Studies of Ice Nucleation on Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect human respiratory health, atmospheric transport, and global climate. We have performed laboratory studies of the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (Basaltic Ash, Guatemala), Soufriere Hills (Andesetic Ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Rhyolitic Ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. We find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.1. For immersion freezing, however, only the Taupo ash exhibited efficient heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  12. Ash cloud aviation advisories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S. [EG and G, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1992-06-25

    During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

  13. Ash leachates from some recent eruptions of Mount Etna (Italy and Popocatépetl (Mexico volcanoes and their impact on amphibian living freshwater organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D'Addabbo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Leaching experiments were carried out on fresh ash samples from Popocatépetl 2012, Etna 2011 and 2012 eruptions, in order to investigate the release of compounds in both double-deionised and lake (Ohrid lake, FYR of Macedonia waters. The experiments were carried out using different grain sizes and variable time of stirring (from 30 min to 7 days. Results were discussed in the light of changing pH and release of compounds for the different leachates. In particular, Etna samples induced alkalinisation and Popocatépetl samples induced acidification of the corresponding leachates. The release of different elements does not show correlation with time of stirring, with the measured maximum concentrations reached in the first hours of washing. General inverse correlation with grain size was observed only for Na+, K+, Cl−, Ca2+, Mg2+, SO42−, and Mn2+, while the other analysed elements show complex, scattering relationship with grain size. Geochemical modelling highlights leachates saturation only for F and Si, with Popocatépetl samples sometimes showing saturation in Fe. The analysed leachates are classified as undrinkable for humans on the basis of Italian laws, due to excess in F−, Mn2+, Fe, and SO42− (the latter only for Popocatépetl samples. Finally, the Etna 2012 and Popocatépetl leachates were used for toxicity experiments on living biota (Xenopus laevis. They are mild toxic, and no significant differences exist between the toxic profiles of the two leachates. In particular, no significant embryo mortality was observed, while even at high dilutions the leachates produced more than 20 % of malformed larvae.

  14. Ash leachates from some recent eruptions of Mount Etna (Italy) and Popocatépetl (Mexico) volcanoes and their impact on amphibian living freshwater organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addabbo, M.; Sulpizio, R.; Guidi, M.; Capitani, G.; Mantecca, P.; Zanchetta, G.

    2015-12-01

    Leaching experiments were carried out on fresh ash samples from Popocatépetl 2012, Etna 2011, and Etna 2012 eruptions, in order to investigate the release of compounds in both double-deionized and lake (Lake Ohrid, FYR of Macedonia) waters. The experiments were carried out using different grain sizes and variable stirring times (from 30 min to 7 days). Results were discussed in the light of changing pH and release of compounds for the different leachates. In particular, Etna samples induced alkalinization, and Popocatépetl samples induced acidification of the corresponding leachates. The release of different elements does not show correlation with the stirring time, with the measured maximum concentrations reached in the first hours of washing. General inverse correlation with grain size was observed only for Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+, Mg2+, SO42-, and Mn2+, while the other analysed elements show a complex, scattering relationship with grain size. Geochemical modelling highlights leachates' saturation only for F and Si, with Popocatépetl samples sometimes showing saturation in Fe. The analysed leachates are classified as undrinkable for humans on the basis of European laws, due to excess in F-, Mn2+, Fe, and SO42- (the latter only for Popocatépetl samples). Finally, the Etna 2012 and Popocatépetl leachates were used for toxicity experiments on living biota (Xenopus laevis). They are mildly toxic, and no significant differences exist between the toxic profiles of the two leachates. In particular, no significant embryo mortality was observed; while even at high dilutions, the leachates produced more than 20 % of malformed larvae.

  15. Vanishing Volcano

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨树仁

    1995-01-01

    Mauna Loa, the world’s largest active volcano,is sinking into the Pacific Ocean——and it’s taking the main island of Hawaii with it! The problem:The mighty volcano has gained too much weight, says Peter Lipman of the U. S. Geological Survey.

  16. Lahar-hazard zonation for San Miguel volcano, El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Chesner, C.A.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Miguel volcano, also known as Chaparrastique, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. The volcano, located in the eastern part of the country, rises to an altitude of about 2130 meters and towers above the communities of San Miguel, El Transito, San Rafael Oriente, and San Jorge. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and the PanAmerican and coastal highways cross the lowermost northern and southern flanks of the volcano. The population density around San Miguel volcano coupled with the proximity of major transportation routes increases the risk that even small volcano-related events, like landslides or eruptions, may have significant impact on people and infrastructure. San Miguel volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in El Salvador; it has erupted at least 29 times since 1699. Historical eruptions of the volcano consisted mainly of relatively quiescent emplacement of lava flows or minor explosions that generated modest tephra falls (erupted fragments of microscopic ash to meter sized blocks that are dispersed into the atmosphere and fall to the ground). Little is known, however, about prehistoric eruptions of the volcano. Chemical analyses of prehistoric lava flows and thin tephra falls from San Miguel volcano indicate that the volcano is composed dominantly of basalt (rock having silica content

  17. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Waitt, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Augustine Volcano is a 1250-meter high stratovolcano in southwestern Cook Inlet about 280 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and within about 300 kilometers of more than half of the population of Alaska. Explosive eruptions have occurred six times since the early 1800s (1812, 1883, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, and 1986). The 1976 and 1986 eruptions began with an initial series of vent-clearing explosions and high vertical plumes of volcanic ash followed by pyroclastic flows, surges, and lahars on the volcano flanks. Unlike some prehistoric eruptions, a summit edifice collapse and debris avalanche did not occur in 1812, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, or 1986. However, early in the 1883 eruption, a portion of the volcano summit broke loose forming a debris avalanche that flowed to the sea. The avalanche initiated a small tsunami reported on the Kenai Peninsula at English Bay, 90 kilometers east of the volcano. Plumes of volcanic ash are a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International and other local airports. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Eruptions similar to the historical and prehistoric eruptions are likely in Augustine's future.

  18. Remote Sensing of Active Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter; Rothery, David

    The synoptic coverage offered by satellites provides unparalleled opportunities for monitoring active volcanoes, and opens new avenues of scientific inquiry. Thermal infrared radiation can be used to monitor levels of activity, which is useful for automated eruption detection and for studying the emplacement of lava flows. Satellite radars can observe volcanoes through clouds or at night, and provide high-resolution topographic data. In favorable conditions, radar inteferometery can be used to measure ground deformation associated with eruptive activity on a centimetric scale. Clouds from explosive eruptions present a pressing hazard to aviation; therefore, techniques are being developed to assess eruption cloud height and to discriminate between ash and meterological clouds. The multitude of sensors to be launched on future generations of space platforms promises to greatly enhance volcanological studies, but a satellite dedicated to volcanology is needed to meet requirements of aviation safety and volcano monitoring.

  19. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  20. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (sustained plume attended by concomitant production of pyroclastic density currents. The size and internal structure of the armoured lapilli provide constraints on the nature of the initial explosive phase of eruption at Kima'Kho. Their proximity to the vent also indicates rapid aggregation within the eruption plume. Within both sequences rapid aggregation of ash particles occurred in proximity to the vent. However, the conditions were substantially different leading to the production of armoured

  1. Dante's volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  2. Geology of Kilauea volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.B. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Federal Center); Trusdell, F.A. (Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory)

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. 71 refs., 2 figs.

  3. What Are Volcano Hazards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sheet 002-97 Revised March 2008 What Are Volcano Hazards? Volcanoes give rise to numerous geologic and ... as far as 15 miles from the volcano. Volcano Landslides A landslide or debris avalanche is a ...

  4. Connection between full-lifetime and breakdown of puffs in transitional pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Mina; Ertunç, Özgür; Delgado, Antonio

    Puff splitting was studied by direct measurement of the full-lifetime (LT full ) of transitional structures (puffs) in low Reynolds number pipe flows. During the investigations, a fully developed laminar pipe flow was triggered by an iris diaphragm with pre-defined amplitude and lapse time and the evolution of puffs was monitored by the transients of pressure drop along the pipe and the hot wire anemometry at the pipe exit. Those complementary measurements showed that a single puff favors to breakdown into two or more (splitting) puffs and later into slug-like puffs at Re ≈ 2300, where they are expected to have infinite LT full .

  5. The Unexpected Awakening of Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon A.; Zogorski, John S.; Lara, Luis; Ewert, John W.; Watt, Sebastian; Prata, Alfred J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Villarosa, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    On 2 May 2008, a large eruption began unexpectedly at the inconspicuous Chaitén volcano in Chile's southern volcanic zone. Ash columns abruptly jetted from the volcano into the stratosphere, followed by lava dome effusion and continuous low-altitude ash plumes [Lara, 2009]. Apocalyptic photographs of eruption plumes suffused with lightning were circulated globally. Effects of the eruption were extensive. Floods and lahars inundated the town of Chaitén, and its 4625 residents were evacuated. Widespread ashfall and drifting ash clouds closed regional airports and cancelled hundreds of domestic flights in Argentina and Chile and numerous international flights [Guffanti et al., 2008]. Ash heavily affected the aquaculture industry in the nearby Gulf of Corcovado, curtailed ecotourism, and closed regional nature preserves. To better prepare for future eruptions, the Chilean government has boosted support for monitoring and hazard mitigation at Chaitén and at 42 other highly hazardous, active volcanoes in Chile.

  6. The Unexpected Awakening of Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon A.; Pallister, John S.; Lara, Luis; Ewert, John W.; Watt, Sebastian; Prata, Alfred J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Villarosa, Gustavo

    2009-06-01

    On 2 May 2008, a large eruption began unexpectedly at the inconspicuous Chaitén volcano in Chile's southern volcanic zone. Ash columns abruptly jetted from the volcano into the stratosphere, followed by lava dome effusion and continuous low-altitude ash plumes [Lara, 2009]. Apocalyptic photographs of eruption plumes suffused with lightning were circulated globally. Effects of the eruption were extensive. Floods and lahars inundated the town of Chaitén, and its 4625 residents were evacuated. Widespread ashfall and drifting ash clouds closed regional airports and cancelled hundreds of domestic flights in Argentina and Chile and numerous international flights [Guffanti et al., 2008]. Ash heavily affected the aquaculture industry in the nearby Gulf of Corcovado, curtailed ecotourism, and closed regional nature preserves. To better prepare for future eruptions, the Chilean government has boosted support for monitoring and hazard mitigation at Chaitén and at 42 other highly hazardous, active volcanoes in Chile.

  7. On the evolution of particle-puffs in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Stefano; Celani, Antonio; Cencini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of turbulent puffs by means of high-resolution numerical simulations. Puffs are bunches of passive particles released from an initially spherical distribution at regular time intervals of the order of the Kolmogorov time. The instantaneous shapes of particle puffs, in particular their asphericity and prolateness, are characterized by measuring the gyration tensor. Analysis has been performed by following, up to one large scale eddy-turn-over time, more than $10^4$ different puffs, each made of 2000 particle tracers, emitted from different places in a homogeneous and isotropic turbulent fluid with Taylor-scale Reynolds number $Re_\\lambda \\sim 300$. We also analyze the probability of hitting a given target placed downstream with respect to the local wind at the time of emission, presenting data for three different cases: (i) without any reconstruction of the shape, i.e. considering the bunch of point tracers, and approximating the particle-puff as a (ii) sphere or as an (iii) ellipsoid. T...

  8. Volcanic hazards at Atitlan volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, J.M.; Escobar Wolf, R.; Vallance, James W.; Rose, William I.; Griswold, J.P.; Schilling, S.P.; Ewert, J.W.; Mota, M.

    2006-01-01

    Atitlan Volcano is in the Guatemalan Highlands, along a west-northwest trending chain of volcanoes parallel to the mid-American trench. The volcano perches on the southern rim of the Atitlan caldera, which contains Lake Atitlan. Since the major caldera-forming eruption 85 thousand years ago (ka), three stratovolcanoes--San Pedro, Toliman, and Atitlan--have formed in and around the caldera. Atitlan is the youngest and most active of the three volcanoes. Atitlan Volcano is a composite volcano, with a steep-sided, symmetrical cone comprising alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs. Eruptions of Atitlan began more than 10 ka [1] and, since the arrival of the Spanish in the mid-1400's, eruptions have occurred in six eruptive clusters (1469, 1505, 1579, 1663, 1717, 1826-1856). Owing to its distance from population centers and the limited written record from 200 to 500 years ago, only an incomplete sample of the volcano's behavior is documented prior to the 1800's. The geologic record provides a more complete sample of the volcano's behavior since the 19th century. Geologic and historical data suggest that the intensity and pattern of activity at Atitlan Volcano is similar to that of Fuego Volcano, 44 km to the east, where active eruptions have been observed throughout the historical period. Because of Atitlan's moderately explosive nature and frequency of eruptions, there is a need for local and regional hazard planning and mitigation efforts. Tourism has flourished in the area; economic pressure has pushed agricultural activity higher up the slopes of Atitlan and closer to the source of possible future volcanic activity. This report summarizes the hazards posed by Atitlan Volcano in the event of renewed activity but does not imply that an eruption is imminent. However, the recognition of potential activity will facilitate hazard and emergency preparedness.

  9. Assimilating aircraft-based measurements to improve forecast accuracy of volcanic ash transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Lin, H.X.; Heemink, A.W.; Segers, A.J.; Lu, S.; Palsson, T.

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption had serious consequences to civil aviation. This has initiated a lot of research on volcanic ash transport forecast in recent years. For forecasting the volcanic ash transport after eruption onset, a volcanic ash transport and diffusion model (VATDM) needs

  10. Assimilating aircraft-based measurements to improve forecast accuracy of volcanic ash transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Lin, H.X.; Heemink, A.W.; Segers, A.J.; Lu, S.; Palsson, T.

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption had serious consequences to civil aviation. This has initiated a lot of research on volcanic ash transport forecast in recent years. For forecasting the volcanic ash transport after eruption onset, a volcanic ash transport and diffusion model (VATDM) needs

  11. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Heemink, A.; Lu, S.; Segers, A.; Weber, K.; Lin, H.X.

    2016-01-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain,

  12. ITER helium ash accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  13. Plasma-puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kwang S.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Eun H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, J. H.; Nguyen, D. X.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for an azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide ranges of fill gas pressures of Ar, He and N2. The optimal fill gas pressures for the azimuthally uniform plasma-puff were about 120 mTorr less than P(sub opt) less than 450 Torr for He and N2. For Argon 20 mTorr is less than P(sub opt) is less than 5 Torr. The inverse pinch switch was triggered with the plasma-puff and the switching capability under various electrical parameters and working gas pressures of Ar, He and N2 was determined. It was also shown that the azimuthally uniform switching discharges were dependent on the type of fill gas and its fill pressure. A new concept of plasma-focus driven plasma-puff was also discussed in comparison with hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff triggering. The main discharge of the inverse pinch switch with the plasma-focus driven plasma-puff trigger is found to be more azimuthally uniform than that with the hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff trigger in a gas pressure region between 80 mTorr and 1 Torr. In order to assess the effects of plasma current density on material erosion of electrodes, emissions from both an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) and from a spark gap switch under test were studied with an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). The color temperature of the argon plasma was approximately 4,000 K which corresponded with the peak continuum emission near 750 nm. There are the strong line emissions of argon in the 650 - 800 nm range and a lack of line emissions of copper and other solid material used in the switch. This indicates that the plasma current density during closing is low and the hot spot or hot filament in the switch is negligible. This result also indicates considerable reduction of line emission with the INPIStron switch over that of a spark-gap switch. However, a strong carbon

  14. Note: Infrared laser diagnostics for deuterium gas puff Z pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. V.; McKee, E. S.; Hammel, B. D.; Darling, T. W.; Swanson, K. J.; Covington, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    Deuterium gas puff Z pinches have been used for generation of strong neutron fluxes on the MA class pulse power machines. Due to the low electron density of deuterium Z-pinch plasma, regular laser diagnostics in the visible range cannot be used for observation and study of the pinch. Laser probing at the wavelength of 1064 nm was used for visualization of deuterium plasma. Infrared schlieren and interferometry diagnostics showed the deuterium gas puff plasma dynamics, instabilities, and allowed for the reconstruction of the profile of the plasma density.

  15. Italian Volcano Supersites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, G.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the geohazards that may have a substantial economic and social impact, even at worldwide scale. Large populated regions are prone to volcanic hazards worldwide. Even local phenomena may affect largely populated areas and in some cases even megacities, producing severe economic losses. On a regional or global perspective, large volcanic eruptions may affect the climate for years with potentially huge economic impacts, but even relatively small eruptions may inject large amounts of volcanic ash in the atmosphere and severely affect air traffic over entire continents. One of main challenges of the volcanological community is to continuously monitor and understand the internal processes leading to an eruption, in order to give substantial contributions to the risk reduction. Italian active volcanoes constitute natural laboratories and ideal sites where to apply the cutting-edge volcano observation systems, implement new monitoring systems and to test and improve the most advanced models and methods for investigate the volcanic processes. That's because of the long tradition of volcanological studies resulting into long-term data sets, both in-situ and from satellite systems, among the most complete and accurate worldwide, and the large spectrum of the threatening volcanic phenomena producing high local/regional/continental risks. This contribution aims at presenting the compound monitoring systems operating on the Italian active volcanoes, the main improvements achieved during the recent studies direct toward volcanic hazard forecast and risk reductions and the guidelines for a wide coordinated project aimed at applying the ideas of the GEO Supersites Initiative at Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei / Vesuvius areas.

  16. Fusion characteristics of volcanic ash relevant to aviation hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Damby, David E.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-04-01

    The fusion dynamics of volcanic ash strongly impacts deposition in hot parts of jet engines. In this study, we investigate the sintering behavior of volcanic ash using natural ash of intermediate composition, erupted in 2012 at Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala. A material science procedure was followed in which we monitored the geometrical evolution of cylindrical-shaped volcanic ash compact upon heating from 50 to 1400°C in a heating microscope. Combined morphological, mineralogical, and rheological analyses helped define the evolution of volcanic ash during fusion and sintering and constrain their sticking potential as well as their ability to flow at characteristic temperatures. For the ash investigated, 1240°C marks the onset of adhesion and flowability. The much higher fusibility of ash compared to that of typical test sands demonstrates for the need of a more extensive fusion characterization of volcanic ash in order to mitigate the risk posed on jet engine operation.

  17. MODIS volcanic ash retrievals vs FALL3D transport model: a quantitative comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Folch, A.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite retrievals and transport models represents the key tools to monitor the volcanic clouds evolution. Because of the harming effects of fine ash particles on aircrafts, the real-time tracking and forecasting of volcanic clouds is key for aviation safety. Together with the security reasons also the economical consequences of a disruption of airports must be taken into account. The airport closures due to the recent Icelandic Eyjafjöll eruption caused millions of passengers to be stranded not only in Europe, but across the world. IATA (the International Air Transport Association) estimates that the worldwide airline industry has lost a total of about 2.5 billion of Euro during the disruption. Both security and economical issues require reliable and robust ash cloud retrievals and trajectory forecasting. The intercomparison between remote sensing and modeling is required to assure precise and reliable volcanic ash products. In this work we perform a quantitative comparison between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals of volcanic ash cloud mass and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) with the FALL3D ash dispersal model. MODIS, aboard the NASA-Terra and NASA-Aqua polar satellites, is a multispectral instrument with 36 spectral bands operating in the VIS-TIR spectral range and spatial resolution varying between 250 and 1000 m at nadir. The MODIS channels centered around 11 and 12 micron have been used for the ash retrievals through the Brightness Temperature Difference algorithm and MODTRAN simulations. FALL3D is a 3-D time-dependent Eulerian model for the transport and deposition of volcanic particles that outputs, among other variables, cloud column mass and AOD. Three MODIS images collected the October 28, 29 and 30 on Mt. Etna volcano during the 2002 eruption have been considered as test cases. The results show a general good agreement between the retrieved and the modeled volcanic clouds in the first 300 km from the vents. Even if the

  18. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA

  19. SIMPLODE: An Imploding Gas Puff Plasma Model. I. Neon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    cylindrical annular gas puff plasma of uniform density carrying a uniform current in the Z- direction. Only the radial motion is considered - hence...suggest that the relationship between current and yield is a linear one, because it is not, it is only indicative that in general, for optimum kinematics

  20. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P.; Skoog, R.

    2006-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Google Earth is being used as a visualization tool for operational satellite monitoring of the region's volcanoes. Through the abilities of the Keyhole Markup Language (KML) utilized by Google Earth, different datasets have been integrated into this virtual globe browser. Examples include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays with dynamic control, to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through the Google Earth interface to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits; and animated models of ash plumes within Google Earth, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages. The globe also provides an ideal interface for displaying near real-time information on detected thermal anomalies or "hotspot"; pixels in satellite images with elevated brightness temperatures relative to the background temperature. The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska collects AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) through its own receiving station. The automated processing that follows includes application of algorithms that search for hotspots close to volcano location, flagging those that meet certain criteria. Further automated routines generate folders of KML placemarkers, which are linked to Google Earth through the network link function. Downloadable KML files have been created to provide links to various data products for different volcanoes and past eruptions, and to demonstrate examples of the monitoring tools developed. These KML files will be made accessible through a new website that will become publicly available in December 2006.

  1. Volcanic ash at Santiaguito dome complex, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Adrian; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Cimarelli, Corrado; von Aulock, Felix; Rhodes, Emma; Kennedy, Ben; Wadsworth, Fabian

    2015-04-01

    Dome-building volcanoes often suffer episodic explosions. Examination of eruptive activity at Santiaguito dome complex (Guatemala) reveals that gas-and-ash explosions are concordant with rapid inflation/ deflation cycles of the active dome. During these explosions strain is accommodated along marginal faults, where tensional fracture mechanisms and friction dominate, complicating the model of ash generation by bubble rupture in magma. Here, we describe textural features, morphology and petrology of ash collected before, during and after a dome collapse event at Santiaguito dome complex on the 28th November 2012. We use QEM-scan (on more than 35000 grains), laser diffraction granulometry and optical and scanning microscopy to characterise the samples. The ash samples show a bimodal size distribution and a range of textures, crystal content and morphologies. The ash particles are angular to sub-angular and are relatively dense, so do not appear to comprise of pore walls. Instead the ash is generally blocky (>70%), similar to the products of shear magma failure. The ash samples show minor variation before, during and after dome collapse, specifically having a smaller grain size and a higher fraction of phenocrysts fragments before collapse. Textural analysis shows vestiges of chemically heterogeneous glass (melt) filaments originating from the crystals and crosscut by fragmentation during volcanic ash formation. High-velocity friction can induce melting of dome lavas, producing similar disequilibrium melting textures. This work shows the importance of deformation mechanisms in ash generation at lava domes and during Vulcanian activity.

  2. Santorini Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  3. Gluttony Causes Death in Juvenile Puff Adder Bitis arietans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Haagner

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the predator/prey relationship in reptiles. The puff adder Bitis arietans is known to feed on a variety of food items, their diet consisting mainly of rodents, while birds, lizards and toads may be included (Broadley 1983, FitzSimons' Snakes of Southern Africa, Johannesburg: Delta Books. Pitman (1974, The Snakes of Uganda, Glasgow: Wheldon and Wesley recorded larger prey for puff adders in East Africa, while Robertson, Chapman & Chapman (1965, Puku 3: 149-170 reported on the diet of puff adders in Tanzania and Zambia, respectively. A gravid puff adder was collected in the Manyeleti Game Reserve in the Mhala district (24@38'S, 31@28'E of Gazankulu. On 12 February 1986 she gave birth to 28 young. The average length of the fry was 219,12 mm (S.D. 9,72 mm and their average mass 15, 72 g (S.D. 0,67 g. The young were separated from the mother and placed in another cage. The first ecdysis was com- pleted within 24 hours. After 10 days some newly weaned mice were placed in the cage. On subsequent inspection, it was found that a young snake gorged itself to death. The young puff adder contained three young mice with a total mass of 13,8 g, while the post-mortem mass of the snake was 14,2 g. Having swallowed 97,2 of its own body weight, the snake evidently died of suffocation. The specimen was preserved and is now part of the Transvaal Museum collection in Pretoria (TM 64088.

  4. Importance of nanoparticles and colloids from volcanic ash for riverine transport of trace elements to the ocean: evidence from glacial-fed rivers after the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepe, Nathalie; Bau, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Volcanic ashes are often referenced as examples for natural nanoparticles, yet the particle size distribution glacial-fed rivers, glacial surface runoff, glacial base flow, and pure glacial meltwater from southern Iceland, that had been sampled 25 days after the explosive eruptions at Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. In addition to the dissolved concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), Zr, Hf, Nb, and Th in the 450 nm-filtered waters, we also studied the respective filter residues (river particulates >450 nm) and volcanic ash. In spite of the low solubilities and high particle-reactivities of the elements studied, most water samples show high dissolved concentrations, such as up to 971 ng/kg of Ce and 501 ng/kg of Zr. Except for the pure glacial meltwater and glacial base flow, all waters display the same shale-normalized REE patterns with pronounced light and heavy REE depletion and positive Eu anomalies. While such patterns are unusual for river waters, they are similar to those of the respective river particulates and the volcanic ash, though at different concentration levels. The distribution of dissolved Zr, Hf, Nb, and Th in the waters also matches that of filter residues and ash. This strongly suggests that in all 450 nm-filtered river waters, the elements studied are associated with solid ash particles smaller than 450 nm. This reveals that volcanic ash-derived nanoparticles and colloids are present in these glacial-fed rivers and that such ultrafine particles control the trace element distribution in the surface runoff. Subsequent to explosive volcanic eruptions, these waters provide terrigenous input from landmasses to estuaries, that is characterized by a unique trace element signature and that subsequent to modification by estuarine processes delivers a pulse of nutrients to coastal seawater in regions not affected by plume fall-out.

  5. Use of magnetic hysteresis properties and electron spin resonance spectroscopy for the identification of volcanic ash: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawse, Archana; Beske-Diehl, Suzanne; Marshall, S. A.

    1998-03-01

    This initial study investigates the possible use of hysteresis parameters and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to identify and correlate volcanic ash. ESR and hysteresis properties are sensitive to characteristics such as the chemical composition, mineralogy, and grain size and shape. These characteristics are determined by the tectonic setting of the volcano and by the magmatic and eruptive history of the volcanic ash. Hysteresis properties and ESR spectra, therefore, should be distinct for each ash eruption and may help to identify the eruptive source of the ash and to correlate ash from unknown sources. We conducted ESR spectroscopy at room temperature and magnetic hysteresis measurements on 19 samples of a single ash, the 1974 October 14 eruption of the Fuego volcano, Guatemala, and on single samples of ash obtained from eight different volcanoes. The Fuego ash samples were obtained at increasing distances from the volcano. For the single Fuego ash, ESR spectra and hysteresis parameters become increasingly similar as the distance from the volcano increases. At distances greater than 30km, ESR spectra and hysteresis properties are uniform. The variability of magnetic and ESR properties with distance from Fuego is due to the preferential fall-out of phenocrysts closer to the volcano. At large distances, the ash is more uniform, containing more glass and microcrystals. All eight ash samples from the different volcanoes can be distinguished from the distal Fuego 1974 October 14 ash using ESR spectra and hysteresis parameters. These results suggest that ESR and hysteresis measurements have a potential to be used as tools to identify distal ash when used in conjunction with geochemical, mineralogical and/or other types of data.

  6. Simulations with Conventional and Gas Puff Plasma Focus Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Liu, Mahe; Lee, Paul; Lee, Sing

    2000-10-01

    An energy consistent plasma focus model is improved by considering the plasma ionization states based on the corona equilibrium. This provides the model with the capability of calculating the plasma dynamics and states for different gases in plasma focus. The model is employed to simulate the behavior of the NX2 plasma focus, with both neon and argon gases. The results show that much lower pressure is required to work with argon for x-ray. The model has also been modified to describe a gas-puff plasma focus based on a measured pressure distribution profile. The simulation result reveals that the gas-puff scheme is more efficient in plasma heating and can improve the stability of the plasma column. By comparing with the published results, agreements have been obtained between the computations and experiments of both machines in the major points regarding plasma dynamics, plasma column stability and appearances, plasma temperatures, and x-ray radiation properties.

  7. Characterizing uncertainty in the motion, future location and ash concentrations of volcanic plumes and ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, P.; Patra, A. K.; Bursik, M. I.; Pitman, E. B.; Dehn, J.; Singh, T.; Singla, P.; Stefanescu, E. R.; Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Jones, M.; Morton, D.; Pavolonis, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Forecasting the location and airborne concentrations of volcanic ash plumes and their dispersing clouds is complex and knowledge of the uncertainty in these forecasts is critical to assess and mitigate the hazards that could exist. We show the results from an interdisciplinary project that brings together scientists drawn from the atmospheric sciences, computer science, engineering, mathematics, and geology. The project provides a novel integration of computational and statistical modeling with a widely-used volcanic particle dispersion code, to provide quantitative measures of confidence in predictions of the motion of ash clouds caused by volcanic eruptions. We combine high performance computing and stochastic analysis, resulting in real time predictions of ash cloud motion that account for varying wind conditions and a range of model variables. We show how coupling a real-time model for ash dispersal, PUFF, with a volcanic eruption model, BENT, allows for the definition of the variability in the dispersal model inputs and hence classify the uncertainty that can then propagate for the ash cloud location and downwind concentrations. We additionally analyze the uncertainty in the numerical weather prediction forecast data used by the dispersal model by using ensemble forecasts and assess how this affects the downwind concentrations. These are all coupled together and by combining polynomical chaos quadrature with stochastic integration techniques, we provide a quantitative measure of the reliability (i.e. error) of those predictions. We show comparisons of the downwind height calculations and mass loadings with observations of ash clouds available from satellite remote sensing data. The aim is to provide a probabilistic forecast of location and ash concentration that can be generated in real-time and used by those end users in the operational ash cloud hazard assessment environment.

  8. Volcanic ash plume identification using polarization lidar: Augustine eruption, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhu, Jiang; Webley, Peter W.; Dean, K.; Cobb, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    During mid January to early February 2006, a series of explosive eruptions occurred at the Augustine volcanic island off the southern coast of Alaska. By early February a plume of volcanic ash was transported northward into the interior of Alaska. Satellite imagery and Puff volcanic ash transport model predictions confirm that the aerosol plume passed over a polarization lidar (0.694 mm wavelength) site at the Arctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. For the first time, lidar linear depolarization ratios of 0.10 – 0.15 were measured in a fresh tropospheric volcanic plume, demonstrating that the nonspherical glass and mineral particles typical of volcanic eruptions generate strong laser depolarization. Thus, polarization lidars can identify the volcanic ash plumes that pose a threat to jet air traffic from the ground, aircraft, or potentially from Earth orbit.

  9. Kamchatka and North Kurile Volcano Explosive Eruptions in 2015 and Danger to Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girina, Olga; Melnikov, Dmitry; Manevich, Alexander; Demyanchuk, Yury; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Petrova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    There are 36 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka and North Kurile, and several of them are continuously active. In 2015, four of the Kamchatkan volcanoes (Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky) and two volcanoes of North Kurile (Alaid and Chikurachki) had strong and moderate explosive eruptions. Moderate gas-steam activity was observing of Bezymianny, Kizimen, Avachinsky, Koryaksky, Gorely, Mutnovsky and other volcanoes. Strong explosive eruptions of volcanoes are the most dangerous for aircraft because they can produce in a few hours or days to the atmosphere and the stratosphere till several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2015: on 07, 12, and 15 January, 01, 17, and 28 February, 04, 08, 16, 21-22, and 26 March, 07 and 12 April: ash plumes rose up to 7-12 km a.s.l. and extended more 900 km to the different directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Ust'-Kamchatsk on 16 March, and Klyuchi on 30 October. Strong and moderate hot avalanches from the lava dome were observing more often in the second half of the year. Aviation color code of Sheveluch was Orange during the year. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Explosive-effusive eruption of Klyuchevskoy volcano lasted from 01 January till 24 March. Strombolian explosive volcanic activity began from 01 January, and on 08-09 January a lava flow was detected at the Apakhonchich chute on the southeastern flank of the volcano. Vulcanian activity of the volcano began from 10 January. Ashfalls

  10. Ash3d: A finite-volume, conservative numerical model for ash transport and tephra deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop a transient, 3-D Eulerian model (Ash3d) to predict airborne volcanic ash concentration and tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. This model simulates downwind advection, turbulent diffusion, and settling of ash injected into the atmosphere by a volcanic eruption column. Ash advection is calculated using time-varying pre-existing wind data and a robust, high-order, finite-volume method. Our routine is mass-conservative and uses the coordinate system of the wind data, either a Cartesian system local to the volcano or a global spherical system for the Earth. Volcanic ash is specified with an arbitrary number of grain sizes, which affects the fall velocity, distribution and duration of transport. Above the source volcano, the vertical mass distribution with elevation is calculated using a Suzuki distribution for a given plume height, eruptive volume, and eruption duration. Multiple eruptions separated in time may be included in a single simulation. We test the model using analytical solutions for transport. Comparisons of the predicted and observed ash distributions for the 18 August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr in Alaska demonstrate to the efficacy and efficiency of the routine.

  11. The climatic impact of supervolcanic ash blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Sparks, R.S.J. [University of Bristol, Department of Earth Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom); Valdes, Paul J. [University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Supervolcanoes are large caldera systems that can expel vast quantities of ash, volcanic gases in a single eruption, far larger than any recorded in recent history. These super-eruptions have been suggested as possible catalysts for long-term climate change and may be responsible for bottlenecks in human and animal populations. Here, we consider the previously neglected climatic effects of a continent-sized ash deposit with a high albedo and show that a decadal climate forcing is expected. We use a coupled atmosphere-ocean General Circulation Model (GCM) to simulate the effect of an ash blanket from Yellowstone volcano, USA, covering much of North America. Reflectivity measurements of dry volcanic ash show albedo values as high as snow, implying that the effects of an ash blanket would be severe. The modeling results indicate major disturbances to the climate, particularly to oscillatory patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Atmospheric disruptions would continue for decades after the eruption due to extended ash blanket longevity. The climatic response to an ash blanket is not significant enough to investigate a change to stadial periods at present day boundary conditions, though this is one of several impacts associated with a super-eruption which may induce long-term climatic change. (orig.)

  12. 3-D numerical simulations of volcanic ash transport and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y. J.; Koyaguchi, T.

    2012-12-01

    During an explosive volcanic eruption, volcanic gas and pyroclasts are ejected from the volcanic vent. The pyroclasts are carried up within a convective plume, advected by the surrounding wind field, and sediment on the ground depending on their terminal velocity. The fine ash are expected to have atmospheric residence, whereas the coarser particles form fall deposits. Accurate modeling of particle transport and deposition is of critical importance from the viewpoint of disaster prevention. Previously, some particle-tracking models (e.g., PUFF) and advection-diffusion models (e.g., TEPHRA2 and FALL3D) tried to forecast particle concentration in the atmosphere and particle loading at ground level. However, these models assumed source conditions (the grain-size distribution, plume height, and mass release location) based on the simple 1-D model of convective plume. In this study, we aim to develop a new 3-D model which reproduces both of the dynamics of convective plume and the ash transport. The model is designed to describe the injection of eruption cloud and marker particles from a circular vent above a flat surface into the stratified atmosphere. Because the advection is the predominant mechanism of particle transport near the volcano, the diffusive process is not taken into account in this model. The distribution of wind velocity is given as an initial condition. The model of the eruption cloud dynamics is based on the 3-D time-dependent model of Suzuki et al. (2005). We apply a pseudo-gas model to calculate the eruption cloud dynamics: the effect of particle separation on the cloud dynamics is not considered. In order to reproduce the drastic change of eruption cloud density, we change the effective gas constant and heat capacity of the mixture in the equation of state for ideal gases with the mixing ratio between the ejected material and entrained air. In order to calculate the location and movement of ash particles, the present model employs Lagrangian marker

  13. Twilight Phenomena Caused by the Eruption of Agung Volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, F E

    1964-05-29

    Increase in twilight glow and in the dust stripes in the twilight arch have been observed from several places in the northern hemisphere from the fall of 1963 until now. Measurements of the twilight brightness indicate a considerable increase of dustiness in the stratosphere; this turbidity may be due to drifting ashes from the eruption of Agung volcano on Bali.

  14. Redoubt Volcano: 2009 Eruption Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, K. F.

    2009-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a 3110-m glaciated stratovolcano located 170 km SW of Anchorage, Alaska, on the W side of Cook Inlet. The edifice comprises a oil production in Cook Inlet was halted for nearly five months. Unrest began in August, 2008 with reports of H2S odor. In late September, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)’s seismic network recorded periods of volcanic tremor. Throughout the fall, AVO noted increased fumarolic emissions and accompanying ice- and snow-melt on and around the 1990 dome, and gas measurements showed elevated H2S and CO2 emissions. On January 23, seismometers recorded 48 hrs of intermittent tremor and discrete, low-frequency to hybrid events. Over the next 6 weeks, seismicity waxed and waned, an estimated 5-6 million m3 of ice were lost due to melting, volcanic gas emissions increased, and debris flows emerged repeatedly from recently formed ice holes near the 1990 dome, located on the crater’s N (“Drift”) side. On March 15, a phreatic explosion deposited non-juvenile ash from a new vent in the summit ice cap just S of the 1990 dome. Ash from the explosion rose to ~4500 m above sea level (asl). The plume was accompanied by weak seismicity. The first magmatic explosion occurred on March 22. Over the next two weeks, more than 19 explosions destroyed at least two lava domes and produced ash plumes that reached 6-18 km asl. Tephra was deposited along variable azimuths including trace to minor amounts on Anchorage and Kenai Peninsula communities, and reached Fairbanks, ~800 km to the N. Several lahars were produced by explosive disruption and melting of the “Drift” glacier. The largest lahars followed explosions on March 23 and April 4 and inundated the Drift River valley to the coast, causing temporary evacuation of the Drift River Oil Terminal, ~40 km from the vent. Time-lapse images captured pyroclastic flows and lahars in the “Drift” glacier valley during several of the explosions. Ballistics and pyroclastic flow deposits were

  15. The 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska: a spatter eruption at an ice- and snow-clad volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Haney, Matthew M.; Fee, David; Schneider, David J.; Wech, Aaron G.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska began on 13 May and ended 49 days later on 1 July. The eruption was characterized by persistent lava fountaining from a vent just north of the summit, intermittent strombolian explosions, and ash, gas, and aerosol plumes that reached as high as 8 km above sea level and on several occasions extended as much as 500 km downwind of the volcano. During the first several days of the eruption, accumulations of spatter near the vent periodically collapsed to form small pyroclastic avalanches that eroded and melted snow and ice to form lahars on the lower north flank of the volcano. Continued lava fountaining led to the production of agglutinate lava flows that extended to the base of the volcano, about 3–4 km beyond the vent. The generation of fountain-fed lava flows was a dominant process during the 2013 eruption; however, episodic collapse of spatter accumulations and formation of hot spatter-rich granular avalanches was a more efficient process for melting snow and ice and initiating lahars. The lahars and ash plumes generated during the eruption did not pose any serious hazards for the area. However, numerous local airline flights were cancelled or rerouted, and trace amounts of ash fall occurred at all of the local communities surrounding the volcano, including Cold Bay, Nelson Lagoon, Sand Point, and King Cove.

  16. Computational modeling of Krypton Gas Puffs on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Christopher

    2014-10-01

    Large diameter multi-shell gas puffs rapidly imploded by high current (~20 MA, ~100 ns) on the Z generator of Sandia National Laboratories are able to produce high-intensity K-shell radiation. Experiments are currently underway to produce Krypton K-shell emission at ~13 keV, from double annular shell gas puffs imploded from a 12 cm diameter onto a central gas jet. Efficiently radiating at these high photon energies represents a significant challenge which necessitates the careful design and optimization of the gas distribution. To facilitate this we hydro-dynamically model the gas flow out of the nozzle, before imploding that mass distribution using a 3-dimensional resistive, radiative MHD code (GORGON). We present details of how modeled gas profiles are validated against 2-dimensional interferometric measurements of the initial gas distribution, and MHD calculations are validated against power, yield, spectral and imaging diagnostics of the experiments. This approach has enabled us to iterate between modeling the implosion and gas flow from the nozzle to optimize radiative output from this combined system. Guided by our implosion calculations we have designed and implemented gas profiles that help mitigate disruption from Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor implosion instabilities, while preserving sufficient kinetic energy to thermalize to the high temperatures required for K-shell emission. Predicted increases in yield from introducing a relief feature into the inner gas nozzle to create a radially increasing density distribution were recovered in experiment. K-shell yield is predicted to further increase by the introduction of an on-axis gas jet, although the mass of this jet must be carefully selected with respect to the delivered current to avoid reducing the yield. For Kr gas puffs the predicted K-shell yield increase from addition of a light central jet was realized in the experiments, considerably increasing the yield over previous results. Further confidence in our

  17. Global Volcano Locations Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC maintains a database of over 1,500 volcano locations obtained from the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program, Volcanoes of the World publication. The...

  18. Aircraft observations and model simulations of concentration and particle size distribution in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Dacre, H. F.; A. L. M. Grant; Johnson, B. T.

    2013-01-01

    The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland emitted a cloud of ash into the atmosphere during April and May 2010. Over the UK the ash cloud was observed by the FAAM BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft which was equipped with in-situ probes measuring the concentration of volcanic ash carried by particles of varying sizes. The UK Met Office Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) has been used to simulate the evolution of the ash cloud emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano...

  19. Aircraft observations and model simulations of concentration and particle size distribution in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Dacre, H. F.; A. L. M. Grant; Johnson, B. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland emitted a cloud of ash into the atmosphere during April and May 2010. Over the UK the ash cloud was observed by the FAAM BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft which was equipped with in-situ probes measuring the concentration of volcanic ash carried by particles of varying sizes. The UK Met Office Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) has been used to simulate the evolution of the ash cloud emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano...

  20. Air-Puff Conditioning Audiometry: Extending Its Applicability with Multiply Handicapped Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, G. E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the use of air-puff conditioning audiometry in the hearing assessment of 12 multiply handicapped (including severe/profound mental retardation) subjects, ages 9-32. Ten subjects reached criterion conditioning and then completed the hearing assessment with the air-puff procedure while one reached criterion with a modified…

  1. 2014 volcanic activity in Alaska: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Christopher F.; Schaefer, Janet R.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2017-09-07

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2014. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash eruptions from long-active Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands, and two eruptive episodes at Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. Semisopochnoi and Akutan volcanoes had seismic swarms, both likely the result of magmatic intrusion. The AVO also installed seismometers and infrasound instruments at Mount Cleveland during 2014.

  2. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  3. Reactive puff model SCICHEM: Model enhancements and performance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, B.; Karamchandani, P. K.; Sykes, R. I.; Henn, D. S.; Knipping, E.

    2015-09-01

    The SCICHEM model incorporates complete gas phase, aqueous and aerosol phase chemistry within a state-of-the-science Gaussian puff model SCIPUFF (Second-order Closure Integrated Puff). The model is a valuable tool that can be used to calculate the impacts of a single source or a small number of sources on downwind ozone and PM2.5. The model has flexible data requirements: it can be run with routine surface and upper air observations or with prognostic meteorological model outputs and source emissions are specified in a simple text format. This paper describes significant advances to the dispersion and chemistry components of the model in the latest release, SCICHEM 3.0. Some of the major advancements include modeling of skewed turbulence for convective boundary layer and updated chemistry schemes (CB05 gas phase chemical mechanism; AERO5 aerosol and aqueous modules). The results from SCICHEM 3.0 are compared with observations from a tracer study as well as aircraft measurements of reactive species in power plant plumes from two field studies. The results with the tracer experiment (Copenhagen study) show that the incorporation of skewed turbulence improves the calculation of tracer dispersion and transport. The comparisons with the Cumberland and Dolet Hills power plume measurements show good correlation between the observed and predicted concentrations of reactive gaseous species at most downwind distances from the source.

  4. Volcanic Ashes Intercalated with Cultural Vestiges at Archaeological Sites from the Piedmont to the Amazon, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Viviana; Mothes, Patricia; Andrade, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A mineralogical analysis was done on 70 volcanic ashes; 9 corresponding to proximal samples of seven volcanoes: Cotopaxi (4500 yBP), Guagua Pichincha (3300 yBP, 1000 yBP and 1660 yAD), Cuicocha (3100 yBP), Pululahua (2400 yBP), Ninahuilca (2350 yBP and 4600 yBP) and 61 to distal ashes collected at eight archaeological sites in the Coastal, Sierra and Amazon regions of Ecuador. Cultural vestiges are from Pre-ceramic, Formative, Regional Development and Integration periods, with the exception of a site denominated Hacienda Malqui, which also has Inca vestiges. The sampling process was done in collaboration with various archaeologists in 2011-2013. The volcanic ashes were washed, dried and divided in order to obtain a representative fraction and their later analysis with binocular microscope. The microscope analysis allowed determination of the characteristics of each component of volcanic ash. These main elements are: pumice fragments, minerals, volcanic glass, lithics and exogenous material (non volcanic). The petrographic analysis of distal volcanic ash layers at each archaeological site was correlated by their components and characteristics with proximal volcanic ashes of source volcanoes. Some correlations permitted obtaining a relative age for the layers of distal volcanic ash in the archaeological sites. The petrographic analysis showed a correlation between the archaeological sites of Las Mercedes - Los Naranjos, Rumipamba and El Condado (located west of Quito) with the eruptive activity of Guagua Pichincha volcano (3300 yBP, 1000 yBP and 1660 yAD) and Pululahua volcano (2400 yBP). Also, a correlation with eruptive activity of Ninahuilca (2350 yBP), Cotopaxi (4500 yBP) and Quilotoa (800 yBP) volcanoes at Hda. Malqui (60 km west of Latacunga) was provided by mineralogy of the respective ashes expulsed by these volcanoes. The ash layers at Cuyuja (50 km east of Quito) are mostly superficial; they are associated with Quilotoa's 800 yBP plinian. Finally at the

  5. Volcanic ash as fertiliser for the surface ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is a key limiting micro-nutrient for marine primary productivity. It can be supplied to the ocean by atmospheric dust deposition. Volcanic ash deposition into the ocean represents another external and so far largely neglected source of iron. This study demonstrates strong evidence for natural fertilisation in the iron-limited oceanic area of the NE Pacific, induced by volcanic ash from the eruption of Kasatochi volcano in August 2008. Atmospheric and oceanic conditions were favourable to generate a massive phytoplankton bloom in the NE Pacific Ocean which for the first time establishes a causal connection between oceanic iron-fertilisation and volcanic ash supply.

  6. Volcanic ash as fertiliser for the surface ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is a key limiting micro-nutrient for marine primary productivity. It can be supplied to the ocean by atmospheric dust deposition. Volcanic ash deposition into the ocean represents another external and so far largely neglected source of iron. This study demonstrates strong evidence for natural fertilisation in the iron-limited oceanic area of the NE Pacific, induced by volcanic ash from the eruption of Kasatochi volcano in August 2008. Atmospheric and oceanic conditions were favourable to generate a massive phytoplankton bloom in the NE Pacific Ocean which for the first time strongly suggests a connection between oceanic iron-fertilisation and volcanic ash supply.

  7. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, W.; Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2009-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), remote sensing is an important component of its daily monitoring of volcanoes. AVO’s remote sensing group (AVORS) primarily utilizes three satellite datasets; Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Satellites (POES), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Terra and Aqua satellites, and NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) data. AVHRR and MODIS data are collected by receiving stations operated by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska’s Geophysical Institute. An additional AVHRR data feed is supplied by NOAA’s Gilmore Creek satellite tracking station. GOES data are provided by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Monterey Bay. The ability to visualize these images and their derived products is critical for the timely analysis of the data. To this end, AVORS has developed javascript web interfaces that allow the user to view images and metadata. These work well for internal analysts to quickly access a given dataset, but they do not provide an integrated view of all the data. To do this AVORS has integrated its datasets with Keyhole Markup Language (KML) allowing them to be viewed by a number of virtual globes or other geobrowsers that support this code. Examples of AVORS’ use of KML include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through KML to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits using polygons; and animated models of ash plumes, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages.

  8. Volcano seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic

  9. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  10. Hazard information management, interagency coordination, and impacts of the 2005-2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano: Chapter 28 in The 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Murray, Thomas L.; Power, John A.; Adleman, Jennifer N.; Whitmore, Paul M.; Osiensky, Jeffery M.; Power, John A.; Coombs, Michelle L.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissemination of volcano-hazard information in coordination with other Federal, State, and local agencies is a primary responsibility of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). During the 2005-6 eruption of Augustine Volcano in Alaska, AVO used existing interagency relationships and written protocols to provide hazard guidance before, during, and after eruptive events. The 2005-6 eruption was notable because of the potential for volcanogenic tsunami, which required establishment of a new procedure for alerts of possible landslide-induced tsunami in Cook Inlet. Despite repeated ash-cloud generating explosions and far-traveled ash clouds, impacts from the event were relatively minor. Primary economic losses occurred when air carriers chose to avoid flights into potentially unsafe conditions. Post-eruption evaluations by agencies involved in the response indicated weaknesses in information centralization and availability of specific information regarding ash fall hazards in real time.

  11. Analysis of Distribution of Volcanoes around the Korean Peninsula and the Potential Effects on Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-kyeong; Kim, Sung-wook

    2017-04-01

    Since the scale and disaster characteristics of volcanic eruptions are determined by their geological features, it is important not only to grasp the current states of the volcanoes in neighboring countries around the Korean Peninsula, but also to analyze the tectonic settings, tectonic regions, geological features, volcanic types, and eruption histories of these volcanoes. Volcanic data were based on the volcano information registered with the Global Volcanism Program at the Smithsonian Institute. We created a database of 289 volcanoes around Korea, Japan, China, Taiwan, and the Kamchatka area in Russia, and then identified a high-risk group of 29 volcanoes that are highly likely to affect the region, based on conditions such as volcanic activity, types of rock at risk of eruption, distance from Seoul, and volcanoes having Plinian eruption history with volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of 4 or more. We selected 29 hazardous volcanoes, including Baekdusan, Ulleungdo, and 27 Japanese volcanoes that can cause widespread ashfall on the Korean peninsula by potentially explosive eruptions. In addition, we identified ten volcanoes that should be given the highest priority, through an analysis of data available in literature, such as volcanic ash dispersion results from previous Japanese eruptions, the definition of a large-scale volcano used by Japan's Cabinet Office, and examination of cumulative magma layer volumes from Japan's quaternary volcanoes. We expect that predicting the extent of the spread of ash caused by this hazardous activity and analyzing its impact on the Korean peninsula will be help to predict volcanic ash damage as well as provide direction for hazard mitigation research. Acknowledgements This research was supported by a grant [MPSS-NH-2015-81] through the Disaster and Safety Management Institute funded by Ministry of Public Safety and Security of Korean government.

  12. Geoheritage value of the UNESCO site at Leon Viejo and Momotombo volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Navarro, Martha; Espinoza, Eveling; Delgado, Hugo

    2017-04-01

    The Momotombo volcano has a special place in the history of Nicaragua. It is perfectly visible from the Capital, Managua, and from the major city of Leon. The old capital "Leon Viejo", founded in 1524 was abandoned in 1610, after a series of earthquakes and some major eruptions from Momotombo. The site was subsequently covered by Momotombo ash. A major geothermal power plant stands at the base of the volcano. Momotombo had been dormant for a hundred years, but had maintained high fumarole temperatures (900°C), indicating magma had been close to the surface for decades. In recent years, seismic activity has increased around the volcano. In December 2015, after a short ash eruption phase the volcano erupted lava, then a string of Vulcanian explosions. The volcano is now in a phase of small Vulcanian explosions and degassing. The Leon Viejo World Heritage site is at risk to mainly ash fall from the volcano, but the abandonment of the old city was primarily due to earthquakes. Additional risks come from high rainfall during hurricanes. There is an obvious link between the cultural site (inscribed under UNESCO cultural criteria) and the geological environment. First, the reactivation of Momotombo volcano makes it more important to revise the hazard of the site. At the same time, Leon Viejo can provide a portal for outreach related to the volcano and for geological risk in general. To maximise this, we provide a geosite inventory of the main features of Momotombo, and it's environs, that can be used as the first base for such studies. The volcano was visited by many adventure tourists before the 2015/2016 eruption, but is out of bounds at present. Alternative routes, around the volcano could be made, to adapt to the new situation and to show to visitors more of the geodiversity of this fascinating volcano-tectonic and cultural area.

  13. Implementation of routine ash predictions using a general purpose atmospheric dispersion model (HYSPLIT) adapted for calculating ash thickness on the ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Tony; Davis, Cory; Deligne, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    GNS Science currently produces twice-daily forecasts of the likely ash deposition if any of the active or recently active volcanoes in New Zealand was to erupt, with a number of alternative possible eruptions for each volcano. These use our ASHFALL program for calculating ash thickness, which uses 1-D wind profiles at the location of each volcano derived from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model output supplied by MetService. HYSPLIT is a hybrid Lagrangian dispersion model, developed by NOAA/ARL, which is used by MetService in its role as a Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre, to model airborne volcanic ash, with meteorological data provided by external and in-house NWP models. A by-product of the HYSPLIT volcanic ash dispersion simulations is the deposition rate at the ground surface. Comparison of HYSPLIT with ASHFALL showed that alterations to the standard fall velocity model were required to deal with ash particles larger than about 50 microns, which make up the bulk of ash deposits near a volcano. It also required the ash injected into the dispersion model to have a concentration based on a typical umbrella-shaped eruption column, rather than uniform across all levels. The different parameters used in HYSPLIT also caused us to revisit what possible combinations of eruption size and column height were appropriate to model as a likely eruption. We are now running HYSPLIT to produce alternative ash forecasts. It is apparent that there are many times at which the 3-D wind model used in HYSPLIT gives a substantially different ash deposition pattern to the 1-D wind model of ASHFALL, and the use of HYSPLIT will give more accurate predictions. ASHFALL is likely still to be used for probabilistic hazard forecasting, in which very large numbers of runs are required, as HYSPLIT takes much more computer time.

  14. Hazard maps of Colima volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero Ayala, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Colima volcano, also known as Volcan de Fuego (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W), is located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima and is the most active volcano in Mexico. Began its current eruptive process in February 1991, in February 10, 1999 the biggest explosion since 1913 occurred at the summit dome. The activity during the 2001-2005 period was the most intense, but did not exceed VEI 3. The activity resulted in the formation of domes and their destruction after explosive events. The explosions originated eruptive columns, reaching attitudes between 4,500 and 9,000 m.a.s.l., further pyroclastic flows reaching distances up to 3.5 km from the crater. During the explosive events ash emissions were generated in all directions reaching distances up to 100 km, slightly affected nearby villages as Tuxpan, Tonila, Zapotlán, Cuauhtemoc, Comala, Zapotitlan de Vadillo and Toliman. During the 2005 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano due to low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time. Shows the updating of the volcanic hazard maps published in 2001, where we identify whit SPOT satellite imagery and Google Earth, change in the land use on the slope of volcano, the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano, the population inhabiting the area is approximately 517,000 people, and growing at an annual rate of 4.77%, also the region that has shown an increased in the vulnerability for the development of economic activities, supported by the construction of highways, natural gas pipelines and electrical infrastructure that connect to the Port of Manzanillo to Guadalajara city. The update the hazard maps are: a) Exclusion areas and moderate hazard for explosive events

  15. Particle size and compositional retrievals of the Chaiten volcanic ash from spaceborne, high spectral resolution infrared AIRS and IASI measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, F.; Gangale, G.; Clarisse, L.

    2008-12-01

    The eruption of Chaiten volcano in early May 2008 produced copious amounts of ash and little SO2 gas. The ash clouds could be detected very well by several satellite instruments, but was unusual in that true- colour daytime MODIS satellite imagery showed the ash to be quite light in colour and difficult to distinguish from ordinary meteorological clouds. High spectral resolution infrared spectrometer and interferometer measurements from AIRS and IASI were analysed to investigate the spectral signature of the Chaiten ash clouds and compare these with ash clouds from other volcanoes, which generally appear much darker in visible imagery. It was found that the Chaiten ash had a distinctive spectral signature between 800 to 1200 wavenumbers and that this correlated very well with the signature expected from rhyolitic ash. A radiative transfer code and an ash microphysical model were used to retrieve the mean particle size of fine ash in the Chaiten clouds and best fits were found for rhyolitic particles with small (less than 2 micron) radii. These results suggest that infrared spectra may be used to retrieve both compositional and particle size information in ash clouds. Based on the spectral signatures found for these ash clouds, a new ash detection algorithm was designed and found to have improved sensitivity to thin (low opacity) ash clouds and low sensitivity to surface effects. The new algorithm offers the possibility of tracking ash clouds for longer periods of time and over greater distances. Results from both the AIRS and IASI measurements are presented for the May ash clouds from Chaitén volcano and compared with the signatures of ash clouds from andesitic volcanic clouds and quartz dominated windblown dust.

  16. Effects of design parameters and puff topography on heating coil temperature and mainstream aerosols in electronic cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tongke; Shu, Shi; Guo, Qiuju; Zhu, Yifang

    2016-06-01

    Emissions from electronic cigarettes (ECs) may contribute to both indoor and outdoor air pollution and the number of users is increasing rapidly. ECs operate based on the evaporation of e-liquid by a high-temperature heating coil. Both puff topography and design parameters can affect this evaporation process. In this study, both mainstream aerosols and heating coil temperature were measured concurrently to study the effects of design parameters and puff topography. The heating coil temperatures and mainstream aerosols varied over a wide range across different brands and within same brand. The peak heating coil temperature and the count median diameter (CMD) of EC aerosols increased with a longer puff duration and a lower puff flow rate. The particle number concentration was positively associated with the puff duration and puff flow rate. These results provide a better understanding of how EC emissions are affected by design parameters and puff topography and emphasize the urgent need to better regulate EC products.

  17. The reliability of puff topography and subjective responses during ad lib smoking of a single cigarette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Karelitz, Joshua L; Giedgowd, Grace E; Conklin, Cynthia A

    2012-04-01

    Acute smoking behavior (i.e., puff topography) and subjective responses during the ad lib smoking of a single cigarette in the laboratory may provide useful measures of smoking reinforcement and reward, respectively. However, the reliability of such measures is not clear, leaving uncertain the utility of a single assessment of smoking behavior as an individual difference measure. Dependent smokers (N = 94) smoked normally prior to each of 4 laboratory sessions during which they were instructed to smoke 1 cigarette of their preferred brand in ad libitum and unblinded fashion and then rate it for subjective effects. Puff topography (puff number, total volume, and maximum volume) was assessed via portable Clinical Research Support System device. Subjective reward and perception were assessed by visual analog scales of "liking" and "how strong," respectively. The reliability of puff topography and subjective measures was determined across days by intra-class correlations (ICCs). Differences due to sex and nicotine dependence (high and low Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence score) were also examined. Reliability was highly significant for each measure. ICCs were .70 for total puff volume, .60 for maximum puff volume, .73 for puff number, .64 for liking, and .78 for how strong. Reliability generally did not differ by sex or dependence, but absolute values for total volume and maximum puff volume were greater in men and in high dependent smokers. Liking was also greater in high dependent smokers. Puff topography and subjective measures during the ad lib smoking of a single cigarette are highly reliable. Smoking responses during a single ad lib smoking session may be useful in identifying stable individual differences in smoking reinforcement and reward.

  18. Air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Sato, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Air puff-induced ultrasonic vocalizations in adult rats, termed "22-kHz calls," have been applied as a useful animal model to develop psychoneurological and psychopharmacological studies focusing on human aversive affective disorders. To date, all previous studies on air puff-induced 22-kHz calls have used outbred rats. Furthermore, newly developed gene targeting technologies, which are essential for further advancement of biomedical experiments using air puff-induced 22-kHz calls, have enabled the production of genetically modified rats using inbred rat strains. Therefore, we considered it necessary to assess air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred rats. In this study, we assessed differences in air puff-induced 22-kHz calls between inbred F344 rats and outbred Wistar rats. Male F344 rats displayed similar total (summed) duration of air puff-induced 22 kHz vocalizations to that of male Wistar rats, however, Wistar rats emitted fewer calls of longer duration, while F344 rats emitted higher number of vocalizations of shorter duration. Additionally, female F344 rats emitted fewer air puff-induced 22-kHz calls than did males, thus confirming the existence of a sex difference that was previously reported for outbred Wistar rats. The results of this study could confirm the reliability of air puff stimulus for induction of a similar amount of emissions of 22-kHz calls in different rat strains, enabling the use of air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in inbred F344 rats and derived genetically modified animals in future studies concerning human aversive affective disorders.

  19. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  20. Excitability in a stochastic differential equation model for calcium puffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, S

    2014-06-01

    Calcium dynamics are essential to a multitude of cellular processes. For many cell types, localized discharges of calcium through small clusters of intracellular channels are building blocks for all spatially extended calcium signals. Because of the large noise amplitude, the validity of noise-approximating model equations for this system has been questioned. Here we revisit the master equations for local calcium release, examine the multiple scales of calcium concentrations in the cluster domain, and derive adapted stochastic differential equations. We show by comparison of discrete and continuous trajectories that the Langevin equations can be made consistent with the master equations even for very small channel numbers. In its deterministic limit, the model reveals that excitability, a dynamical phenomenon observed in many natural systems, is at the core of calcium puffs. The model also predicts a bifurcation from transient to sustained release which may link local and global calcium signals in cells.

  1. Puff models for simulation of fugitive radioactive emissions in atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Camila P. da, E-mail: camila.costa@ufpel.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Matematica. Dept. de Matematica e Estatistica; Pereira, Ledina L., E-mail: ledinalentz@yahoo.com.b [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil); Vilhena, Marco T., E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Tirabassi, Tiziano, E-mail: t.tirabassi@isac.cnr.i [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (CNR/ISAC), Bologna (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    A puff model for the dispersion of material from fugitive radioactive emissions is presented. For vertical diffusion the model is based on general techniques for solving time dependent advection-diffusion equation: the ADMM (Advection Diffusion Multilayer Method) and GILTT (Generalized Integral Laplace Transform Technique) techniques. The first one is an analytical solution based on a discretization of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in sub-layers where the advection-diffusion equation is solved by the Laplace transform technique. The solution is given in integral form. The second one is a well-known hybrid method that had solved a wide class of direct and inverse problems mainly in the area of Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics and the solution is given in series form. Comparisons between values predicted by the models against experimental ground-level concentrations are shown. (author)

  2. Insight of the fusion behavior of volcanic ash: Implications for Volcanic ash Hazards to Aircraft Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Küppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Cimarelli, Corrado; Lavallée, Yan; Sohyun, Park; Gattermann, Ulf; Müller, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of volcanic ash with jet turbines during via ingestion of ash into engines operating at supra-volcanic temperatures is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for jet aircraft. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The fusibility of volcanic ash is believed to impact strongly its deposition in the hotter parts of jet engines. Despite this, explicit investigation of ash sintering using standardized techniques is in its infancy. Volcanic ash may vary widely in its physical state and chemical composition between and even within explosive volcanic eruptions. Thus a comparative study of the fusibility of ash which involves a standard recognized techniques would be highly desirable. In this work, nine samples of fine ash, deposited from co-pyroclastic offrom nine different volcanoes which cover a broad range of chemical composition, were investigated. Eight of them were collected from 2001-2009 eruptions. Because of the currently elevated level of eruptive activity and its potential hazards to aircraft safety and the remaining one sample was collected from a 12,121 ± 114 yr B.P. eruption. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by defining four characteristic temperatures (shrinkage temperature, deformation temperature, hemispherical temperature, and flow temperature) by means of heating microscope instrument and different thermal analysis methods. Here, we find that there are similar sticking ability and flow behavior of

  3. Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Eruption – A Brief Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OROIAN I.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the main aspects of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption in Iceland. The process ispresented in the context of Iceland location on tectonic plates’ distribution. Aspects concerning Eyjafjallajökull positionon volcanic landscape of Iceland, both eruption phases and ash composition are briefly described. There are alsoemphasized the effects of the event on main common life aspects it affected (aircraft in Europe and farming in Iceland.The influence of the volcano eruption on the climate change is also discussed.

  4. Tracking Pyroclastic Flows at Soufrière Hills Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, Maurizio; De Angelis, Silvio; Lacanna, Giorgio; Poggi, Pasquale; Williams, Carlisle; Marchetti, Emanuele; Delle Donne, Dario; Ulivieri, Giacomo

    2009-07-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions typically show a huge column of ash and debris ejected into the stratosphere, crackling with lightning. Yet equally hazardous are the fast moving avalanches of hot gas and rock that can rush down the volcano's flanks at speeds approaching 280 kilometers per hour. Called pyroclastic flows, these surges can reach temperatures of 400°C. Fast currents and hot temperatures can quickly overwhelm communities living in the shadow of volcanoes, such as what happened to Pompeii and Herculaneum after the 79 C.E. eruption of Italy's Mount Vesuvius or to Saint-Pierre after Martinique's Mount Pelée erupted in 1902.

  5. Foci of Volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, I.

    1974-01-01

    One may assume a center of volcanic activities beneath the edifice of an active volcano, which is here called the focus of the volcano. Sometimes it may be a ''magma reservoir''. Its depth may differ with types of magma and change with time. In this paper, foci of volcanoes are discussed from the viewpoints of four items: (1) Geomagnetic changes related with volcanic activities; (2) Crustal deformations related with volcanic activities; (3) Magma transfer through volcanoes; and (4) Subsurface structure of calderas.

  6. Deposition and immersion-mode nucleation of ice by three distinct samples of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ice nucleation of volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect atmospheric transport and global climate. Previously, it has been suggested that there is one characteristic ice nucleation efficiency for all volcanic ash, regardless of its composition, when accounting for surface area; however, this claim is derived from data from only two volcanic eruptions. In this work, we have studied the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (basaltic ash, Guatemala), Soufrière Hills (andesitic ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Oruanui eruption, rhyolitic ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. In the present study, we find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice from 225 to 235 K at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.01, comparable to the mineral dust proxy kaolinite. Since depositional ice nucleation will be more important at colder temperatures, fine volcanic ash may represent a global source of cold-cloud ice nuclei. For immersion freezing relevant to mixed-phase clouds, however, only the Oruanui ash exhibited appreciable heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of dispersion modeling of volcanic ash from Eyjafjallajökull in May 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenish, B. J.; Francis, P. N.; Johnson, B. T.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Thomson, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of a mathematical model of volcanic ash dispersion in the atmosphere to the representation of key physical processes. These include the parameterization of subgrid-scale atmospheric processes and source parameters such as the height of the eruption column, the mass emission rate, the size of the particulates, and the amount of ash that falls out close to the source. By comparing the results of the mathematical model with satellite and airborne observations of the ash cloud that erupted from Eyjafjallajökull volcano in May 2010, we are able to gain some insight into the processes and parameters that govern the long-range dispersion of ash in the atmosphere. The structure of the ash cloud, particularly its width and depth, appears to be sensitive to the source profile (i.e., whether ash is released over a deep vertical column or not) and to the level of subgrid diffusion. Of central importance to the quantitative estimates of ash concentration in the distal ash cloud is the fallout of ash close to the source. By comparing the mass of the ash and the column loadings in the modeled and observed distal ash cloud, we estimate the fraction of fine ash that survives into the distal ash cloud albeit with considerable uncertainty. The processes that contribute to this uncertainty are discussed.

  8. Using thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) to distinguish block and ash flow and debris flow deposits, and to estimate their emplacement temperature: 1991-1995 lava dome eruption at Mt. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, D.; Cas, R. A. F.; Folkes, C.; Takarada, S.; Oda, H.; Porreca, M.

    2015-09-01

    The 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption (Kyushu, Japan) produced 13 lava domes, approximately 9400 block and ash pyroclastic flows (BAF) resulting from lava dome collapse events and syn- and post-dome collapse debris flow (DF) events. In the field, it can be very difficult to distinguish from field facies characteristics which deposits are primary hot BAF, cold BAF or rock avalanche, or secondary DF deposits. In this study we use a combination of field observations and thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) analysis of juvenile, lava dome derived clasts from seven deposits of the 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption in order to distinguish between primary BAF deposits and secondary DF deposits and to determine their emplacement temperature. Four major TRM patterns were identified: (1) Type I: clasts with a single magnetic component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time and site of emplacement. This indicates that these deposits were deposited at very high temperature, between the Curie temperature of magnetite (~ 540 °C) and the glass transition temperature of the lava dome (~ 745 °C). These clasts are found in high temperature BAF deposits. (2) Type II: clasts with two magnetic components of magnetisation. The lower temperature magnetic components are parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time of the Unzen eruption. Temperature estimations for these deposits can range from 80 to 540 °C. We found this paleomagnetic behaviour in moderate temperature BAF or warm DF deposits. (3) Type III: clasts with three magnetic components, with a lower temperature component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at Unzen. The individual clast temperatures estimated for this kind of deposit are usually less than 300 °C. We interpret this paleomagnetic behaviour as the effect of different thermal events during their emplacement history. There are several interpretations for this paleomagnetic behaviour including remobilisation of moderate temperature BAF, warm DF

  9. Electrical properties of volcanic ash samples from Eyjafjallaj\\"okull and Gr\\'imsv\\"otn

    CERN Document Server

    Houghton, I M; Nicoll, K A

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic ash is known to charge electrically, producing some of the most spectacular displays of lightning in nature. Here we investigate the electrical characteristics of ash from two different Icelandic volcanoes - Eyjafjallaj\\"okull in 2010 and Gr\\'imsv\\"otn in 2011. Laboratory tests investigated the charge transferred to a conducting plate due to fall of volcanic ash through an insulating cylinder. Ash from the Eyjafjallaj\\"okull eruption was found to charge slightly positively, whilst Gr\\'imsv\\"otn ash was substantially negatively charged. Measurement of the volumetric ratio of particle diameters showed the Eyjafjallaj\\"okull ash to have a bimodal distribution, and the Gr\\'imsv\\"otn ash a monomodal distribution. Previous experiments with single-material particle systems show that smaller particles charge negatively and larger ones positively. Since charge is carried by individual particles, the charging is likely to be dominated by the number size distribution, therefore the large negative charge of the ...

  10. Improved prediction and tracking of volcanic ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, P.; Mastin, L.

    2009-01-01

    During the past 30??years, more than 100 airplanes have inadvertently flown through clouds of volcanic ash from erupting volcanoes. Such encounters have caused millions of dollars in damage to the aircraft and have endangered the lives of tens of thousands of passengers. In a few severe cases, total engine failure resulted when ash was ingested into turbines and coating turbine blades. These incidents have prompted the establishment of cooperative efforts by the International Civil Aviation Organization and the volcanological community to provide rapid notification of eruptive activity, and to monitor and forecast the trajectories of ash clouds so that they can be avoided by air traffic. Ash-cloud properties such as plume height, ash concentration, and three-dimensional ash distribution have been monitored through non-conventional remote sensing techniques that are under active development. Forecasting the trajectories of ash clouds has required the development of volcanic ash transport and dispersion models that can calculate the path of an ash cloud over the scale of a continent or a hemisphere. Volcanological inputs to these models, such as plume height, mass eruption rate, eruption duration, ash distribution with altitude, and grain-size distribution, must be assigned in real time during an event, often with limited observations. Databases and protocols are currently being developed that allow for rapid assignment of such source parameters. In this paper, we summarize how an interdisciplinary working group on eruption source parameters has been instigating research to improve upon the current understanding of volcanic ash cloud characterization and predictions. Improved predictions of ash cloud movement and air fall will aid in making better hazard assessments for aviation and for public health and air quality. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Optimization of Fat-Reduced Puff Pastry Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silow, Christoph; Zannini, Emanuele; Axel, Claudia; Belz, Markus C E; Arendt, Elke K

    2017-02-22

    Puff pastry is a high-fat bakery product with fat playing a key role, both during the production process and in the final pastry. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) was successfully used to evaluate puff pastry quality for the development of a fat-reduced version. The technological parameters modified included the level of roll-in fat, the number of fat layers (50-200) and the final thickness (1.0-3.5 mm) of the laminated dough. Quality characteristics of puff pastry were measured using the Texture Analyzer with an attached Extended Craft Knife (ECK) and Multiple Puncture Probe (MPP), the VolScan and the C-Cell imaging system. The number of fat layers and final dough thickness, in combination with the amount of roll-in fat, had a significant impact on the internal and external structural quality parameters. With technological changes alone, a fat-reduced (≥30%) puff pastry was developed. The qualities of fat-reduced puff pastries were comparable to conventional full-fat (33 wt %) products. A sensory acceptance test revealed no significant differences in taste of fatness or 'liking of mouthfeel'. Additionally, the fat-reduced puff pastry resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) positive correlation to 'liking of flavor' and overall acceptance by the assessors.

  12. Optimization of Fat-Reduced Puff Pastry Using Response Surface Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silow, Christoph; Zannini, Emanuele; Axel, Claudia; Belz, Markus C. E.; Arendt, Elke K.

    2017-01-01

    Puff pastry is a high-fat bakery product with fat playing a key role, both during the production process and in the final pastry. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) was successfully used to evaluate puff pastry quality for the development of a fat-reduced version. The technological parameters modified included the level of roll-in fat, the number of fat layers (50–200) and the final thickness (1.0–3.5 mm) of the laminated dough. Quality characteristics of puff pastry were measured using the Texture Analyzer with an attached Extended Craft Knife (ECK) and Multiple Puncture Probe (MPP), the VolScan and the C-Cell imaging system. The number of fat layers and final dough thickness, in combination with the amount of roll-in fat, had a significant impact on the internal and external structural quality parameters. With technological changes alone, a fat-reduced (≥30%) puff pastry was developed. The qualities of fat-reduced puff pastries were comparable to conventional full-fat (33 wt %) products. A sensory acceptance test revealed no significant differences in taste of fatness or ‘liking of mouthfeel’. Additionally, the fat-reduced puff pastry resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) positive correlation to ‘liking of flavor’ and overall acceptance by the assessors. PMID:28231095

  13. Estimating the frequency of volcanic ash clouds over northern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, E. J.; Swindles, G. T.; Savov, I. P.; Lawson, I. T.; Connor, C. B.; Wilson, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Fine ash produced during explosive volcanic eruptions can be dispersed over a vast area, where it poses a threat to aviation, human health and infrastructure. Here, we focus on northern Europe, which lies in the principal transport direction for volcanic ash from Iceland, one of the most active volcanic regions in the world. We interrogate existing and newly produced geological and written records of past ash fallout over northern Europe in the last 1000 years and estimate the mean return (repose) interval of a volcanic ash cloud over the region to be 44 ± 7 years. We compare tephra records from mainland northern Europe, Great Britain, Ireland and the Faroe Islands, with records of proximal Icelandic volcanism and suggest that an Icelandic eruption with a Volcanic Explosivity Index rating (VEI) ≥ 4 and a silicic magma composition presents the greatest risk of producing volcanic ash that can reach northern Europe. None of the ash clouds in the European record which have a known source eruption are linked to a source eruption with VEI < 4. Our results suggest that ash clouds are more common over northern Europe than previously proposed and indicate the continued threat of ash deposition across northern Europe from eruptions of both Icelandic and North American volcanoes.

  14. Gas/aerosol-ash interaction in volcanic plumes: New insights from surface analyses of fine ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Lambert, Mathieu; Dufrêne, Yves; Gerin, Patrick; Óskarsson, Niels

    2007-07-01

    The reactions occurring between gases/aerosols and silicate ash particles in volcanic eruption plumes remain poorly understood, despite the fact that they are at the origin of a range of volcanic, environmental, atmospheric and health effects. In this study, we apply X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a surface-sensitive technique, to determine the chemical composition of the near-surface region (2-10 nm) of nine ash samples collected from eight volcanoes. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to image the nanometer-scale surface structure of individual ash particles isolated from three samples. We demonstrate that rapid acid dissolution of ash occurs within eruption plumes. This process is favoured by the presence of fluoride and is believed to supply the cations involved in the deposition of sulphate and halide salts onto ash. AFM imaging also has permitted the detection of extremely thin (< 10 nm) coatings on the surface of ash. This material is probably composed of soluble sulphate and halide salts mixed with sparingly soluble fluoride compounds. The surface approach developed here offers promising aspects for better appraising the role of gas/aerosol-ash interaction in dictating the ability of ash to act as sinks for various volcanic and atmospheric chemical species as well as sources for others.

  15. Detecting Volcanic Ash Plumes with GNSS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Larson, K. M.; Palo, S. E.; Mattia, M.; Rossi, M.; Coltelli, M.; Roesler, C.; Fee, D.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are commonly placed near volcanic sites to measure ground deformation. In addition to the carrier phase data used to measure ground position, these receivers also record Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) data. Larson (2013) showed that attenuations in SNR data strongly correlate with ash emissions at a series of eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. This finding has been confirmed at eruptions for Tongariro, Mt Etna, Mt Shindake, and Sakurajima. In each of these detections, very expensive geodetic quality GNSS receivers were used. If low-cost GNSS instruments could be used instead, a networked array could be deployed and optimized for plume detection and tomography. The outputs of this sensor array could then be used by both local volcanic observatories and Volcano Ash Advisory Centers. Here we will describe progress in developing such an array. The sensors we are working with are intended for navigation use, and thus lack the supporting power and communications equipment necessary for a networked system. Reliably providing those features is major challenge for the overall sensor design. We have built prototypes of our Volcano Ash Plume Receiver (VAPR), with solar panels, lithium-ion batteries and onboard data storage for preliminary testing. We will present results of our field tests of both receivers and antennas. A second critical need for our array is a reliable detection algorithm. We have tested our algorithm on data from recent eruptions and have incorporated the noise characteristics of the low-cost GNSS receiver. We have also developed a simulation capability so that the receivers can be deployed to optimize vent crossing GNSS signals.

  16. Discovering Miss Puff: a new method of communication in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Masi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years animation has been considered of one of the pillars ofthe creative industry by the Chinese government. For this reason both the central and local government has been investing and supporting this sector, effectively becoming the first manufacturer. In parallel with the industrial production there is another kind of production, totally independent, that tries to find its audience on theInternet, creating many interesting animations absolutely different from the traditional ones. This study will attempt to explain one of these famous animations using the case study approach and it will focus on one of the most representative products of these years, that is Miss Puff. The Director of this animation is Pi San who is considered, in China, both the master of animation created with Flash and a revolutionary, because of his innovative ideas. This article is based on an interview to the Director Pi San. The interview wasconducted in the study Hutoon of Beijing in July 2012.

  17. Explosive activity of turrialva volcano (costa rica) in 2010-2016

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo E. Alvarado

    2016-01-01

    The most recent eruptive activity of Turrialba volcano began on the 5th of January 2010, after more than one century of dormancy. The fragmentation process and aerodynamic behavior of ash from Turrialba vulcanian eruptions were investigated by combining grain-size, petrography, mineralogy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive System (EDS) analyses. The ash components include by variable percentages of accessory fresh (no necessary juvenile) to hydrothermally altered lithic...

  18. [Ash Meadows Purchase Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A proposal sent to the Richard King Mellon Foundation for a loan to fund the purchase of Ash Meadows by the Nature Conservancy. Ash Meadows, set outside of Las Vegas...

  19. Material Properties from Air Puff Corneal Deformation by Numerical Simulations on Model Corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorronsoro, Carlos; de la Hoz, Andrés; Marcos, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Objective To validate a new method for reconstructing corneal biomechanical properties from air puff corneal deformation images using hydrogel polymer model corneas and porcine corneas. Methods Air puff deformation imaging was performed on model eyes with artificial corneas made out of three different hydrogel materials with three different thicknesses and on porcine eyes, at constant intraocular pressure of 15 mmHg. The cornea air puff deformation was modeled using finite elements, and hyperelastic material parameters were determined through inverse modeling, minimizing the difference between the simulated and the measured central deformation amplitude and central-peripheral deformation ratio parameters. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed on the model cornea materials as well as on corneal strips, and the results were compared to stress-strain simulations assuming the reconstructed material parameters. Results The measured and simulated spatial and temporal profiles of the air puff deformation tests were in good agreement (< 7% average discrepancy). The simulated stress-strain curves of the studied hydrogel corneal materials fitted well the experimental stress-strain curves from uniaxial extensiometry, particularly in the 0–0.4 range. Equivalent Young´s moduli of the reconstructed material properties from air-puff were 0.31, 0.58 and 0.48 MPa for the three polymer materials respectively which differed < 1% from those obtained from extensiometry. The simulations of the same material but different thickness resulted in similar reconstructed material properties. The air-puff reconstructed average equivalent Young´s modulus of the porcine corneas was 1.3 MPa, within 18% of that obtained from extensiometry. Conclusions Air puff corneal deformation imaging with inverse finite element modeling can retrieve material properties of model hydrogel polymer corneas and real corneas, which are in good correspondence with those obtained from uniaxial extensiometry

  20. Strombolian surface activity regimes at Yasur volcano, Vanuatu, as observed by Doppler radar, infrared camera and infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, K.; Hort, M.; Wassermann, J.; Garaebiti, E.

    2016-08-01

    In late 2008 we recorded a continuous multi-parameter data set including Doppler radar, infrared and infrasound data at Yasur volcano, Vanuatu. Our recordings cover a transition in explosive style from ash-rich to ash-free explosions followed again by a phase of high ash discharge. To assess the present paradigm of Strombolian behavior in this study we investigate the geophysical signature of these different explosive episodes and compare our results to observations at Stromboli volcano, Italy. To this end we characterize Yasur's surface activity in terms of material movement, temperature and excess pressure. The joint temporal trend in these data reveals smooth variations of surface activity and regime-like persistence of individual explosion forms over days. Analysis of all data types shows ash-free and ash-rich explosive styles similar to those found at Stromboli volcano. During ash-free activity low echo powers, high explosion velocities and high temperatures result from the movement of isolated hot ballistic clasts. In contrast, ash-rich episodes exhibit high echo powers, low explosion velocities and low temperatures linked to the presence of colder ash-rich plumes. Furthermore ash-free explosions cause high excess pressure signals exhibiting high frequencies opposed to low-amplitude, low-frequency signals accompanying ash-rich activity. To corroborate these findings we compare fifteen representative explosions of each explosive episode. Explosion onset velocities derived from Doppler radar and infrared camera data are in excellent agreement and consistent with overall observations in each regime. Examination of infrasound recordings likewise confirms our observations, although a weak coupling between explosion velocity and excess pressure indicates changes in wave propagation. The overall trend in explosion velocity and excess pressure however demonstrates a general correlation between explosive style and explosion intensity, and points to stability of the

  1. Antarctic volcanoes: A remote but significant hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Alex; Folch, Arnau; Giralt, Santiago

    2017-04-01

    Ash emitted during explosive volcanic eruptions can be dispersed over massive areas of the globe, posing a threat to both human health and infrastructures, such as the air traffic. Some of the last eruptions occurred during this decade (e.g. 14/04/2010 - Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland; 24/05/2011-Grímsvötn, Iceland; 05/06/2011-Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, Chile) have strongly affected the air traffic in different areas of the world, leading to economic losses of billions of euros. From the tens of volcanoes located in Antarctica, at least nine are known to be active and five of them have reported volcanic activity in historical times. However, until now, no attention has been paid to the possible social, economical and environmental consequences of an eruption that would occur on high southern latitudes, perhaps because it is considered that its impacts would be minor or local, and mainly restricted to the practically inhabited Antarctic continent. We show here, as a case study and using climate models, how volcanic ash emitted during a regular eruption of one of the most active volcanoes in Antarctica, Deception Island (South Shetland Islands), could reach the African continent as well as Australia and South America. The volcanic cloud could strongly affect the air traffic not only in the region and at high southern latitudes, but also the flights connecting Africa, South America and Oceania. Results obtained are crucial to understand the patterns of volcanic ash distribution at high southern latitudes with obvious implications for tephrostratigraphical and chronological studies that provide valuable isochrones with which to synchronize palaeoclimate records. This research was partially funded by the MINECO grants VOLCLIMA (CGL2015-72629-EXP)and POSVOLDEC(CTM2016-79617-P)(AEI/FEDER, UE), the Ramón y Cajal research program (RYC-2012-11024) and the NEMOH European project (REA grant 34 agreement n° 289976).

  2. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Katharine F.; Cameron, Cheryl; Coombs, Michelle L.; Diefenbach, Angie; Lopez, Taryn; McNutt, Steve; Neal, Christina; Payne, Allison; Power, John A.; Schneider, David J.; Scott, William E.; Snedigar, Seth; Thompson, Glenn; Wallace, Kristi; Waythomas, Christopher F.; Webley, Peter; Werner, Cynthia A.; Schaefer, Janet R.

    2012-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano, an ice-covered stratovolcano on the west side of Cook Inlet, erupted in March 2009 after several months of escalating unrest. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano shares many similarities with eruptions documented most recently at Redoubt in 1966–68 and 1989–90. In each case, the eruptive phase lasted several months, consisted of multiple ashproducing explosions, produced andesitic lava and tephra, removed significant amounts of ice from the summit crater and Drift glacier, generated lahars that inundated the Drift River valley, and culminated with the extrusion of a lava dome in the summit crater. Prior to the 2009 explosive phase of the eruption, precursory seismicity lasted approximately six months with the fi rst weak tremor recorded on September 23, 2008. The first phreatic explosion was recorded on March 15, and the first magmatic explosion occurred seven days later, at 22:34 on March 22. The onset of magmatic explosions was preceded by a strong, shallow swarm of repetitive earthquakes that began about 04:00 on March 20, 2009, less than three days before an explosion. Nineteen major ash-producing explosions generated ash clouds that reached heights between 17,000 ft and 62,000 ft (5.2 and 18.9 km) ASL. During ash fall in Anchorage, the Ted Stevens International Airport was shut down for 20 hours, from ~17:00 on March 28 until 13:00 on March 29. On March 23 and April 4, lahars with fl ow depths to 10 m in the upper Drift River valley inundated parts of the Drift River Terminal (DRT). The explosive phase ended on April 4 with a dome collapse at 05:58. The April 4 ash cloud reached 50,000 ft (15.2 km) and moved swiftly to the southeast, depositing up to 2 mm of ash fall in Homer, Anchor Point, and Seldovia. At least two and possibly three lava domes grew and were destroyed by explosions prior to the final lava dome extrusion that began after the April 4 event. The fi nal lava dome ceased growth by July 1, 2009, with an estimated volume of 72

  3. Volcanoes - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes Holocene volcanoes, which are those thought to be active in the last 10,000 years, that are within an extended area of the northern...

  4. Italian active volcanoes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RobertoSantacroce; RenawCristofolini; LuigiLaVolpe; GiovanniOrsi; MauroRosi

    2003-01-01

    The eruptive histories, styles of activity and general modes of operation of the main active Italian volcanoes,Etna, Vulcano, Stromboli, Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei and Ischia, are described in a short summary.

  5. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) International Airways Volcano Watch. This plan defines agency responsibilities, provides a comprehensive description of an interagency standard for volcanic ash products and their formats, describes the agency backup procedures for operational products, and outlines the actions to be taken by each agency following an occurrence of a volcanic eruption that subsequently affects and impacts aviation services. Since our most recent International Conference on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety, volcanic ash-related product and service activities have grown considerably along with partnerships and alliances throughout the aviation community. In January 2005, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environment Prediction began running the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model in place of the Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport and Dispersion (VAFTAD) model, upgrading support to the volcanic ash advisory community. Today, improvements to the HYSPLIT model are ongoing based on recommendations by the OFCM-sponsored Joint Action Group for the Selection and Evaluation of Atmospheric Transport and Diffusion Models and the Joint Action Group for Atmospheric Transport and Diffusion Modeling (Research and Development Plan). Two international workshops on volcanic ash have already taken place, noticeable improvements and innovations in education, training, and outreach have been made, and federal and public education and training programs on volcanic ash-related products, services, and procedures iv continue to evolve. For example, in partnership with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and other academic institutions, volcanic ash hazard and mitigation training has been incorporated into aviation meteorology courses. As an essential next step, our volcanic ash-related efforts in the near term will be centered on the development of an interagency implementation plan to

  6. CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Kovar, M.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

    1999-02-24

    The application cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in a attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir.

  7. 2003 Eruption of Chikurachki Volcano, Paramushir Island, Northern Kuriles, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. J.; Girina, O. A.; Neal, C. A.; Kotenko, L.; Terentiev, N. S.; Izbekov, P.; Belousov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Ovsyannikov, A. A.

    2003-12-01

    Chikurachki Volcano in the northern Kurile Islands erupted for the second time in two years in mid-April 2003. Although the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT) received word of a possible eruption from residents of Paramushir Island on April 17, poor weather precluded confirmation of volcanic activity, and the exact start date is uncertain. On April 18, during routine satellite image analysis, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) detected an ash cloud from Chikurachki in GMS data and immediately notified the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), National Weather Service, and other agencies. Subsequent formal alerts were issued through aviation and meteorological channels as outlined in the Alaska Interagency Operating Plan for Volcanic Ash Episodes. Thermal infrared imagery and trajectory models suggested the initial cloud was relatively low-level (below 25,000 ft ASL), however this height was not well constrained. Over the next several months, activity at Chikurachki consisted largely of strombolian bursts producing intermittent ash clouds reaching heights of generally less than 10-13,000 ft. ASL. Ash fall was noted as far as 60 km downwind. The last confirmed eruptive activity was June 16, 2003. During the eruption, AVHRR, MODIS, and GMS satellites captured images of the ash cloud as far as 300 km generally east and southeast of the volcano in the region heavily traveled North Pacific air routes. The propagation of volcanic clouds was monitored using visual and infrared channels and included a routine split-window analysis. Weak thermal anomalies were detected in AVHRR images suggesting minimal effusive activity near the central vent. Over the course of the eruption, aviation and meteorological authorities in Russia, the U.S., and Japan issued official notices regarding the eruption and the position and estimated height of the ash plume. Impacts to aviation were minor due to the low-level and intermittent nature of the eruption. Chikurachki is a

  8. Study on the volcanic ash cloud with Feng Yun-3 meteorological satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Cai-lan T.; Jiang, Shan; Hu, Yong; Meng, Peng

    2013-09-01

    Volcano eruption can produce a mass of volcanic ash floating in the air for a long period, which will seriously threaten the aerial planes safety, and cause the air pollution, it could do harm to people's living environment and their health. Take the Iceland Eyjafjallajokull volcano as an example which erupted in April to May 2010, the volcano ash cloud were derived with the visible and infrared scanning radiometer of FengYun-3(FY-3 VIRR) meteorological satellite data. The medium wave infrared (MWIR) and the thermal infrared split windows (THIR-SW) data were used separately. the MODIS THIR-SW data were also be used to retrieve ash cloud to test the results derived from FY-3 VIRR data. It showed that the MWIR was more applicable for the ash cloud retrieving than the THIR-SW with FY-3 VIRR data, and the threshold value should be adjusted to around negative 1 rather than 0 for VIRR THIR-SW data. And the threshold should be adjusted with the THIR-SW of FY-3. The ash cloud radiation and bright temperature(BT), spatial distribution characteristics were also analyzed quantitatively with the two channels data. The study could provide parameters for the prediction of volcanic ash cloud dispersion simulate. When the real temperature of lava flow were high enough, the sensor will show a false bright temperature, how to retrieve the real temperature of the higher lava flow is a problem need to be studied in the future.

  9. Deposition and immersion mode nucleation of ice by three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect atmospheric transport and global climate. Previously, it has been suggested that there is one characteristic ice nucleation efficiency for all volcanic ash, regardless of its composition, when accounting for surface area; however, this claim is derived from data from only two volcanic eruptions. In this work, we have studied the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (basaltic ash, Guatemala), Soufrière Hills (andesitic ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Oruanui euption, rhyolitic ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. In the present study, we find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice from 225-235 K at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.01, comparable to the mineral dust proxy kaolinite. Since depositional ice nucleation will be more important at colder temperatures, fine volcanic ash may represent a global source of cold-cloud ice nuclei. For immersion freezing relevant to mixed-phase clouds, however, only the Oruanui ash exhibited heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  10. Multifrequency radar imaging of ash plumes: an experiment at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnadieu, Franck; Freret-Lorgeril, Valentin; Delanoë, Julien; Vinson, Jean-Paul; Peyrin, Frédéric; Hervier, Claude; Caudoux, Christophe; Van Baelen, Joël; Latchimy, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash emissions in the atmosphere are hazardous to aviation while ash fallout affects people and human activities and may cause damage to infrastructures and economic losses. In the framework of the French Government Laboratory of Excellence ClerVolc initiative, an experiment was carried out on Stromboli volcano (Italy), between 28 September and 4 October 2015. The aim was to retrieve various physical properties of the ash plumes, especially the mass loading parameters which are critical for the modelling of ash dispersal. We used a complementary set of cutting edge techniques recording in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The innovative instrument setup consisted in three radars, hyperspectral thermal infrared and dual-band UV cameras, a mini DOAS-Flyspec and a multigas sensor. A drone equipped with differential GPS was flown near the ash plumes with several sensors including SO2, CO2 and particle counter. We mainly focus on radar measurements of over 200 ash plumes and present some preliminary comparisons at three frequencies. The BASTA Doppler radar at 95 GHz, originally designed for atmospheric studies, was deployed at about 2.2 km in slant distance from the eruptive craters. It was configured to observe volumes above one of the active craters with a spatio-temporal resolution of 12.5 m and 1 s. From the same location, a 1.2 GHz volcano Doppler radar (VOLDORAD) was recording the signature of ballistics and small lapilli at 0.15 s in 60 m-deep volumes. In addition, a commercial 24 GHz micro rain Doppler radar (MRR) simultaneously recorded activity from the Rochette station, at 400 to 650 m from the active craters with a sampling rate of 10 s and a resolution of 25 m. The latter was pointing almost perpendicularly to the other radar beams. Reflectivity factors were measured inside the ash plume above the source vent by the BASTA radar (3 mm wavelength) spanning -9 to +21 dBZ. Fallout could sometimes be tracked during several minutes within

  11. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: VOLCANOS (Volcano Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the locations of volcanos in Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Vector points in the data set represent the location of the volcanos....

  12. A sip-and-puff wireless remote control for the Apple iPod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael; Grogg, Kevin; Anschutz, John; Fierman, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This brief technical note describes the authors' efforts to modify an existing wireless remote control for the Apple iPod so it could be operated using sip-and-puff switches by individuals with limited upper extremity dexterity due to cervical level spinal cord injury. The authors were able to successfully interface the wireless controller with sip-and-puff switches so that users could play, pause, and fast forward through a song list on the iPod. Details of the interface are described, and limitations of the current system are discussed.

  13. Serotonergic neurons of the Drosophila air-puff-stimulated flight circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sufia Sadaf; Gaiti Hasan

    2014-09-01

    Monoaminergic modulation of insect flight is well documented. Recently, we demonstrated that synaptic activity is required in serotonergic neurons for Drosophila flight. This requirement is during early pupal development, when the flight circuit is formed, as well as in adults. Using a Ca2+-activity-based GFP reporter, here we show that serotonergic neurons in both prothoracic and mesothoracic segments are activated upon air-puff-stimulated flight. Moreover ectopic activation of the entire serotonergic system by TrpA1, a heat activated cation channel, induces flight, even in the absence of an air-puff stimulus.

  14. Directed percolation describes lifetime and growth of turbulent puffs and slugs

    CERN Document Server

    Sipos, Maksim

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenology of pipe flow is characterized by complex turbulent structures, puffs and slugs, whose behavior is still not fully understood. In this Letter, we show that transitional turbulence in a pipe can be quantitatively modeled by directed percolation (DP). The active (turbulent) states in subcritical DP exhibit superexponentially diverging characteristic lifetime, similar to that observed of turbulent puffs. Above the percolation threshold, active (turbulent) clusters expand into the inactive (laminar) phase with a well-defined velocity whose scaling with control parameter (Reynolds number or percolation probability) is consistent with experimental results.

  15. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  16. Late Holocene history of Chaitén Volcano: new evidence for a 17th century eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Luis E.; Moreno, Rodrigo; Amigo, Álvaro; Hoblitt, Richard P.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Prior to May 2008, it was thought that the last eruption of Chaitén Volcano occurred more than 5,000 years ago, a rather long quiescent period for a volcano in such an active arc segment. However, increasingly more Holocene eruptions are being identified. This article presents both geological and historical evidence for late Holocene eruptive activity in the 17th century (AD 1625-1658), which included an explosive rhyolitic eruption that produced pumice ash fallout east of the volcano and caused channel aggradation in the Chaitén River. The extents of tephra fall and channel aggradation were similar to those of May 2008. Fine ash, pumice and obsidian fragments in the pre-2008 deposits are unequivocally derived from Chaitén Volcano. This finding has important implications for hazards assessment in the area and suggests the eruptive frequency and magnitude should be more thoroughly studied.

  17. Mainstream Smoke Gas Phase Filtration Performance of Adsorption Materials Evaluated With A Puff-by-Puff Multiplex GC-MS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The mainstream smoke filtration performance of activated carbon, silica gel and polymeric aromatic resins for gas-phase components was evaluated using a puff-by-puff multiplex gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis method (1. The sample 1R4F Kentucky reference cigarettes were modified by placing the adsorbents in a plug/space/plug filter configuration. Due to differences in surface area and structural characteristics, the adsorbent materials studied showed different levels of filtration activities for the twenty-six constituents monitored. Activated carbon had significant adsorption activity for all the gas-phase smoke constituents observed except ethane and carbon dioxide, while silica gel had significant activities for polar components such as aldehydes, acrolein, ketones, and diacetyl. XAD-16 polyaromatic resins showed varied levels of activity for aromatic compounds, cyclic dienes and ketones.

  18. Developmental ecdysteroid titers and DNA puffs in larvae of two sciarid species, Rhynchosciara americana and Rhynchosciara milleri (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, M A M; Hartfelder, K; Tesserolli de Souza, J M; Stocker, A J

    2015-10-01

    Ecdysteroid titers, developmental landmarks and the presence of prominent amplifying regions (DNA puffs) have been compared during late larval to pupal development in four groups of Rhynchosciara americana larvae and in R. americana and Rhynchosciara milleri. Three prominent DNA puffs (B2, C3 and C8) expand and regress sequentially on the rising phase of the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) titer in R. americana as a firm, cellular cocoon is being constructed. A sharp rise in 20E coincides with the regression of these puffs. The shape of the 20E curve is similar in R. milleri, a species that does not construct a massive cocoon, but the behavior of certain DNA puffs and their temporal relationship to the curve differs. Regions corresponding to B2 and C3 can be identified in R. milleri by banding pattern similarity with R. americana chromosomes and, in the case of B2, by hybridization to an R. americana probe. A B2 puff appears in R. milleri as the 20E titer rises but remains small in all gland regions. A puff similar to the R. americana C3 puff occurs in posterior gland cells of R. milleri (C3(Rm)) after the B2 puff, but this site did not hybridize to R. americana C3 probes. C3(Rm) incorporated (3)H-thymidine above background, but showed less post-puff DNA accumulation than C3 of R. americana. R. americana C8 probes hybridized to a more distal region of the R. milleri C chromosome that did not appear to amplify or form a large puff. These differences can be related to developmental differences, in particular differences in cocoon construction between the two species.

  19. The Source of Volcanic Ash in Late Classic Maya Pottery at El Pilar, Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlin, B. L.; Ford, A.; Spera, F. J.

    2007-12-01

    The presence of volcanic ash used as temper in Late Classic Maya pottery (AD 600-900) at El Pilar has been long known although the volcano(s) contributing ash have not been identified. We use geochemical fingerprinting, comparing compositions of glass shards in potsherds with volcanic sources to identify the source(s). El Pilar is located in the Maya carbonate lowlands distant from volcanic sources. It is unlikely Maya transported ash from distant sites: ash volumes are too large, the terrain too rugged, and no draft animals were available. Ash layer mining is unlikely because mine sites have not been found despite intensive surveys. Nearest volcanic sources to El Pilar, Belize and Guatemala, are roughly 450 km to the south and east. The ash found in potsherds has a cuspate morphology. This suggests ash was collected during, or shortly after, an ash airfall event following eruption. Analyses of n=333 ash shards from 20 ceramic (pottery) sherds was conducted by electron microprobe for major elements, and LA-ICPMS for trace elements and Pb isotopes. These analyses can be compared to volcanic materials from candidate volcanoes in the region. The 1982 El Chichon eruption caused airfall deposition (pot firing on glass compositional changes, experiments were conducted in which high silica volcanic glass was fired with clay according to heating schedules used by Maya potters. Two important changes are that Na is rapidly lost preferentially to K and that the Si/Ca ratio decreases due to Ca diffusion from matrix into glass during firing. One expects that ratios of the refractory trace elements such as La/Yb and Zr/Hf are less susceptible to modification. Further experiments of trace element mobility during firing are underway.

  20. Volcano monitoring with an infrared camera: first insights from Villarrica Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas Sotomayor, Florencia; Amigo Ramos, Alvaro; Velasquez Vargas, Gabriela; Medina, Roxana; Thomas, Helen; Prata, Fred; Geoffroy, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    This contribution focuses on the first trials of the, almost 24/7 monitoring of Villarrica volcano with an infrared camera. Results must be compared with other SO2 remote sensing instruments such as DOAS and UV-camera, for the ''day'' measurements. Infrared remote sensing of volcanic emissions is a fast and safe method to obtain gas abundances in volcanic plumes, in particular when the access to the vent is difficult, during volcanic crisis and at night time. In recent years, a ground-based infrared camera (Nicair) has been developed by Nicarnica Aviation, which quantifies SO2 and ash on volcanic plumes, based on the infrared radiance at specific wavelengths through the application of filters. Three Nicair1 (first model) have been acquired by the Geological Survey of Chile in order to study degassing of active volcanoes. Several trials with the instruments have been performed in northern Chilean volcanoes, and have proven that the intervals of retrieved SO2 concentration and fluxes are as expected. Measurements were also performed at Villarrica volcano, and a location to install a ''fixed'' camera, at 8km from the crater, was discovered here. It is a coffee house with electrical power, wifi network, polite and committed owners and a full view of the volcano summit. The first measurements are being made and processed in order to have full day and week of SO2 emissions, analyze data transfer and storage, improve the remote control of the instrument and notebook in case of breakdown, web-cam/GoPro support, and the goal of the project: which is to implement a fixed station to monitor and study the Villarrica volcano with a Nicair1 integrating and comparing these results with other remote sensing instruments. This works also looks upon the strengthen of bonds with the community by developing teaching material and giving talks to communicate volcanic hazards and other geoscience topics to the people who live "just around the corner" from one of the most active volcanoes

  1. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  2. Shedding of ash deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zbogar, Ana; Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2009-01-01

    Ash deposits formed during fuel thermal conversion and located on furnace walls and on convective pass tubes, may seriously inhibit the transfer of heat to the working fluid and hence reduce the overall process efficiency. Combustion of biomass causes formation of large quantities of troublesome...... ash deposits which contain significant concentrations of alkali, and earth-alkali metals. The specific composition of biomass deposits give different characteristics as compared to coal ash deposits, i.e. different physical significance of the deposition mechanisms, lower melting temperatures, etc....... Low melting temperatures make straw ashes especially troublesome, since their stickiness is higher at lower temperatures, compared to coal ashes. Increased stickiness will eventually lead to a higher collection efficiency of incoming ash particles, meaning that the deposit may grow even faster...

  3. Optical modeling of volcanic ash particles using ellipsoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikallio, Sini; Muñoz, Olga; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Virtanen, Timo H.; Horttanainen, Matti; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Nousiainen, Timo

    2015-05-01

    The single-scattering properties of volcanic ash particles are modeled here by using ellipsoidal shapes. Ellipsoids are expected to improve the accuracy of the retrieval of aerosol properties using remote sensing techniques, which are currently often based on oversimplified assumptions of spherical ash particles. Measurements of the single-scattering optical properties of ash particles from several volcanoes across the globe, including previously unpublished measurements from the Eyjafjallajökull and Puyehue volcanoes, are used to assess the performance of the ellipsoidal particle models. These comparisons between the measurements and the ellipsoidal particle model include consideration of the whole scattering matrix, as well as sensitivity studies on the point of view of the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) instrument. AATSR, which flew on the ENVISAT satellite, offers two viewing directions but no information on polarization, so usually only the phase function is relevant for interpreting its measurements. As expected, ensembles of ellipsoids are able to reproduce the observed scattering matrix more faithfully than spheres. Performance of ellipsoid ensembles depends on the distribution of particle shapes, which we tried to optimize. No single specific shape distribution could be found that would perform superiorly in all situations, but all of the best-fit ellipsoidal distributions, as well as the additionally tested equiprobable distribution, improved greatly over the performance of spheres. We conclude that an equiprobable shape distribution of ellipsoidal model particles is a relatively good, yet enticingly simple, approach for modeling volcanic ash single-scattering optical properties.

  4. The United States national volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albersheim, Steven; Guffanti, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic-ash clouds are a known hazard to aviation, requiring that aircraft be warned away from ash-contaminated airspace. The exposure of aviation to potential hazards from volcanoes in the United States is significant. In support of existing interagency operations to detect and track volcanic-ash clouds, the United States has prepared a National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation to strengthen the warning process in its airspace. The US National Plan documents the responsibilities, communication protocols, and prescribed hazard messages of the Federal Aviation Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, and Air Force Weather Agency. The plan introduces a new message format, a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation, to provide clear, concise information about volcanic activity, including precursory unrest, to air-traffic controllers (for use in Notices to Airmen) and other aviation users. The plan is online at http://www.ofcm.gov/p35-nvaopa/pdf/FCM-P35-2007-NVAOPA.pdf. While the plan provides general operational practices, it remains the responsibility of the federal agencies involved to implement the described procedures through orders, directives, etc. Since the plan mirrors global guidelines of the International Civil Aviation Organization, it also provides an example that could be adapted by other countries.

  5. An Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Puff Hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidi MS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The permeability of a tobacco rod in a cigarette increases as it converts into char and ash in the coal. The hot coal introduces a significant resistance to the air flow when air passes through. Through a series of experiments, the cigarette burn line and burn rate, the centerline temperature, and the pressure drop were measured for continuous puffing conditions. The gas viscosity was calculated from the temperature distribution inside the cigarette and applying Sutherland's law. Then, the experimental setup was mathematically modeled from a commercially available CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics code and, by matching the numerical and experimental results, the changes in coal and filter permeability during puffing were estimated. The numerical simulation successfully reproduced the results of experiments on the air flow through the coal, ventilation holes and paper wrapper.

  6. Organizational changes at Earthquakes & Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Primary responsibility for the preparation of Earthquakes & Volcanoes within the Geological Survey has shifted from the Office of Scientific Publications to the Office of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering (OEVE). As a consequence of this reorganization, Henry Spall has stepepd down as Science Editor for Earthquakes & Volcanoes(E&V).

  7. Atmospheric and environmental impacts of volcanic ash particle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Globally, at any one time, there may be 20 volcanoes erupting that collectively emit a constant flux of gases and aerosol, including silicate particles (tephra), to the atmosphere which influences processes including cloud microphysics, heterogeneous chemistry and radiative balance. The nature and impact of atmospheric volcanic particle fluxes depend on total mass erupted, emission rate, emission source location, physical and chemical properties of the particles, and the location and residence time of the particles in the atmosphere. Removal of ash particles from the atmosphere through sedimentation is strongly influenced by particle aggregation through hydrometeor formation, and convective instabilities such as mammatus. I will address the following questions: What are the atmospheric impacts of volcanic ash emissions? What controls the residence time of volcanic particles in the atmosphere? What affects particle accumulation at the surface? And what are the human and environmental impacts of ash fallout?

  8. Controls on the surface chemical reactivity of volcanic ash investigated with probe gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maters, Elena C.; Delmelle, Pierre; Rossi, Michel J.; Ayris, Paul M.; Bernard, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Increasing recognition that volcanic ash emissions can have significant impacts on the natural and human environment calls for a better understanding of ash chemical reactivity as mediated by its surface characteristics. However, previous studies of ash surface properties have relied on techniques that lack the sensitivity required to adequately investigate them. Here we characterise at the molecular monolayer scale the surfaces of ash erupted from Eyjafjallajökull, Tungurahua, Pinatubo and Chaitén volcanoes. Interrogation of the ash with four probe gases, trimethylamine (TMA; N(CH3)3), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA; CF3COOH), hydroxylamine (HA; NH2OH) and ozone (O3), reveals the abundances of acid-base and redox sites on ash surfaces. Measurements on aluminosilicate glass powders, as compositional proxies for the primary constituent of volcanic ash, are also conducted. We attribute the greater proportion of acidic and oxidised sites on ash relative to glass surfaces, evidenced by comparison of TMA/TFA and HA/O3 uptake ratios, in part to ash interaction with volcanic gases and condensates (e.g., H2O, SO2, H2SO4, HCl, HF) during the eruption. The strong influence of ash surface processing in the eruption plume and/or cloud is further supported by particular abundances of oxidised and reduced sites on the ash samples resulting from specific characteristics of their eruptions of origin. Intense interaction with water vapour may result in a higher fraction of oxidised sites on ash produced by phreatomagmatic than by magmatic activity. This study constitutes the first quantification of ash chemical properties at the molecular monolayer scale, and is an important step towards better understanding the factors that govern the role of ash as a chemical agent within atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic or biotic systems.

  9. Volcanic ash as an iron-fertilizer in ocean surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgun, N.; Duggen, S.; Croot, P.; Dietze, H.; Schacht, U.; Oskarsson, N.; Siebe, C.; Auer, A.

    2007-12-01

    Surface ocean fertilisation with iron may affect the marine primary productivity, C-cycles and eventually climate development. Volcanic ash has the potential to release iron on contact with seawater and to stimulate phytoplankton growth (1,2) but the relative importance of volcanism at destructive plate margins (subduction zones, SZ) and intraplate volcanic settings (ocean islands at hot spots) remains unknown. Here we present new results from geochemical experiments with natural seawater and numerous volcanic ash samples from SZ volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire (Alaska, Japan, Kamchatka, Northern and Central America and Papua New Guinea) and hot spot volcanoes (on Iceland and Hawaii). The release of iron as a function of time was determined in situ in seawater by means of Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry. Our experiments show that: A) volcanic ash from both SZ and hot spot volcanic areas mobilise significant amounts of iron, B) with the highest mobilisation rates within the first 10-20 minutes and C) indicate that volcanic ash from hot spot volcanoes mobilise less iron than volcanic ash from SZ. We propose that the higher iron-mobilisation potential of SZ volcanic ash results from higher HCl/HF ratios in SZ volcanic gases that seem to be involved in the formation of Fe-bearing soluble salt coatings (condensed gases and adsorbed aerosols) on ash particles (1,2,3). Higher HCl/HF ratios in SZ volcanic gases thus appear to be linked to the recycling of seawater through subduction of oceanic lithosphere at destructive plate margins. Together, taking into account differences in ash-fluxes from SZ and hot spot volcanoes into the oceans, our study suggests that SZ volcanic ash plays a more important role for the global surface ocean iron budget than ash from volcanoes in hot spot areas. 1 Frogner, Gislason, Oskarsson (2001). Geology, 29, 487-490. 2 Duggen, Croot, Schacht, Hofmann (2007) Geoph. Res. Letters 34, 5. 3 Oskarsson (1980), J. Volc. and Geoth. Res. 8, 251-266.

  10. Hawaii's volcanoes revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Naka, Jiro; Smith, John R.; Takahashi, Eiichi; Clague, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes typically evolve in four stages as volcanism waxes and wanes: (1) early alkalic, when volcanism originates on the deep sea floor; (2) shield, when roughly 95 percent of a volcano's volume is emplaced; (3) post-shield alkalic, when small-volume eruptions build scattered cones that thinly cap the shield-stage lavas; and (4) rejuvenated, when lavas of distinct chemistry erupt following a lengthy period of erosion and volcanic quiescence. During the early alkalic and shield stages, two or more elongate rift zones may develop as flanks of the volcano separate. Mantle-derived magma rises through a vertical conduit and is temporarily stored in a shallow summit reservoir from which magma may erupt within the summit region or be injected laterally into the rift zones. The ongoing activity at Kilauea's Pu?u ?O?o cone that began in January 1983 is one such rift-zone eruption. The rift zones commonly extend deep underwater, producing submarine eruptions of bulbous pillow lava. Once a volcano has grown above sea level, subaerial eruptions produce lava flows of jagged, clinkery ?a?a or smooth, ropy pahoehoe. If the flows reach the ocean they are rapidly quenched by seawater and shatter, producing a steep blanket of unstable volcanic sediment that mantles the upper submarine slopes. Above sea level then, the volcanoes develop the classic shield profile of gentle lava-flow slopes, whereas below sea level slopes are substantially steeper. While the volcanoes grow rapidly during the shield stage, they may also collapse catastrophically, generating giant landslides and tsunami, or fail more gradually, forming slumps. Deformation and seismicity along Kilauea's south flank indicate that slumping is occurring there today. Loading of the underlying Pacific Plate by the growing volcanic edifices causes subsidence, forming deep basins at the base of the volcanoes. Once volcanism wanes and lava flows no longer reach the ocean, the volcano continues to submerge, while

  11. Radial and Azimuthal Velocity Profiles in Gas-Puff Z-Pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Sophia; Engelbrecht, Joseph; Banasek, Jacob; de Grouchy, Philip; Qi, Niansheng; Hammer, David

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of neon, argon, and krypton (either singly or in combination) gas puff z-pinch plasmas are studied on Cornell's 1MA, 100-200ns rise-time COBRA pulsed power generator. The triple-nozzle gas puff valve, consisting of two annular gas puffs and a central jet, allows radial tailoring of the gas puff mass-density profile and the use of 1, 2 or 3 different gases at different pressures. Interferometry supplies information on sheath thickness and electron density, variously filtered PCDs and silicon diodes measure hard and soft x-ray production, and multi frame visible and extreme UV imaging systems allow tracking of the morphology of the plasma. A 527nm, 10J Thomson scattering diagnostic system is used to determine radial and azimuthal velocities. Implosion velocities of 170km/s (Kr) and 300km/s (Ne/Ar) are observed. We are investigating the correlations between instability growth, plasma density profile, velocity partitioning as a function of radius, and radiation production. Research supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836.

  12. High-energy electron acceleration in the gas-puff Z-pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasugi, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Takanori; Nishio, Mineyuki

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of hard x-ray generation were examined in the gas-puff z-pinch experiment. The experiment on reversing the voltage was conducted. In both of the positive and negative discharges, the x-ray was generated only from the anode surface, so it was considered that the electrons were accelerated by the induced electromagnetic force at the pinch time.

  13. High-energy electron acceleration in the gas-puff Z-pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasugi, Keiichi, E-mail: takasugi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp [Institute of Quantum Science, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Miyazaki, Takanori [Institute of Quantum Science, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308, Japan and Dept. Innovation Systems Eng., Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Nishio, Mineyuki [Anan National College of Technology, 265 Aoki, Minobayashi, Anan, Tokushima 774-0017 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The characteristics of hard x-ray generation were examined in the gas-puff z-pinch experiment. The experiment on reversing the voltage was conducted. In both of the positive and negative discharges, the x-ray was generated only from the anode surface, so it was considered that the electrons were accelerated by the induced electromagnetic force at the pinch time.

  14. Technical description of the RIVM/KNMI PUFF dispersion model. Version 4.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pul WAJ

    1992-01-01

    This report provides a technical description of the RIVM/KNMI PUFF model. The model may be used to calculate, given wind and rain field data, the dispersion of components emitted following an accident, emergency or calamity; the model area may be freely chosen to match the area of concern. The re

  15. Case report: Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of puff adder (Bitis arietans) bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Peter P; Kaufmann, Peter; Smolle-Juettner, Freyja M; Krejs, Guenter J

    2010-01-01

    The puff adder (Bitis arietans) is a venomous viper mainly found in sub-Saharan Africa. Due to its common occurrence and potent venom, it is considered to be the most dangerous snake in Africa, responsible for most snakebite fatalities there. Puff adder bites outside Africa are rare and involve captive vipers. We present the unusual case of puff adder envenomation in an Austrian man. A 26-year-old Austrian man was bitten by a puff adder that he kept illegally in his home. On admission he showed signs of local and systemic toxicity. He was stabilized with antivenom, intravenous fluids, catecholamines and packed platelets. Hyperbaric oxygenation was begun due to incipient compartment syndrome on the second day and continued until the eleventh day, when the patient had recovered completely and could be discharged. The venom of Bitis arietans can cause serious systemic and local complications. Our patient suffered from both. Systemic signs included hemodynamic as well as hemostaseologic impairment. Local effects included swelling and incipient compartment syndrome. Systemic and local treatment, including hyperbaric oxygenation, effected a full recovery. We suggest that, whenever feasible, hyperbaric oxygenation should be considered as adjunct treatment in snake bites to avert adverse outcomes.

  16. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J. D.; Neuberg, J. W.; O’Sullivan, D.; Wilson, T. W.; Whale, T. F.; Neve, L.; Umo, N. S.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2017-01-01

    Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry. PMID:28056077

  17. Tephra hazard assessment at Concepción Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaini, C.; Folch, A.; Navarro, M.

    2012-03-01

    Concepción volcano in Ometepe Island, Nicaragua, is a highly active volcano with a rich historical record of explosive eruptions. Tephra fallout from Concepción jeopardizes the surrounding populations, whereas volcanic ash clouds threat aerial navigation at a regional level. The assessment of these hazards is important for territorial planning and adoption of mitigation measures. Here we compute probabilistic hazard maps for Concepción volcano considering three different eruptive scenarios based on past reference events. Previous geological analysis is used to quantify the eruption parameters of the reference events. We account for uncertainties in the definition of the scenarios trough probability density functions. A representative meteorological dataset is created for each scenario by running the WRF-ARW mesoscale meteorological model over a typical meteorological year, defined in terms of wind speed and direction at a given atmospheric height. Tephra transport and deposition under different eruption and wind conditions is modelled using the FALL3D dispersion model. For each scenario, simulations are combined to build probabilistic hazard maps for critical values of tephra load and for threshold values of airborne ash concentration at relevant flight levels. Results are useful to identify the expected impacts for each eruption type and aim at improving the assessment and management of risk in the region.

  18. Trace elements in coal ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Doughten, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Coal ash is a residual waste product primarily produced by coal combustion for electric power generation. Coal ash includes fly ash, bottom ash, and flue-gas desulfurization products (at powerplants equipped with flue-gas desulfurization systems). Fly ash, the most common form of coal ash, is used in a range of products, especially construction materials. A new Environmental Protection Agency ruling upholds designation of coal ash as a non-hazardous waste under Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, allowing for the continued beneficial use of coal ash and also designating procedures and requirements for its storage.

  19. Utilizing natural gas huff and puff to enhance production in heavy oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenlong, G.; Shuhong, W.; Jian, Z.; Xialin, Z. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]|[PetroChina Co. Ltd., Beijing (China); Jinzhong, L.; Xiao, M. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China)

    2008-10-15

    The L Block in the north structural belt of China's Tuha Basin is a super deep heavy oil reservoir. The gas to oil ratio (GOR) is 12 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3} and the initial bubble point pressure is only 4 MPa. The low production can be attributed to high oil viscosity and low flowability. Although steam injection is the most widely method for heavy oil production in China, it is not suitable for the L Block because of its depth. This paper reviewed pilot tests in which the natural gas huff and puff process was used to enhance production in the L Block. Laboratory experiments that included both conventional and unconventional PVT were conducted to determine the physical property of heavy oil saturated by natural gas. The experiments revealed that the heavy oil can entrap the gas for more than several hours because of its high viscosity. A pseudo bubble point pressure exists much lower than the bubble point pressure in manmade foamy oils, which is relative to the depressurization rate. Elastic energy could be maintained in a wider pressure scope than natural depletion without gas injection. A special experimental apparatus that can stimulate the process of gas huff and puff in the reservoir was also introduced. The foamy oil could be seen during the huff and puff experiment. Most of the oil flowed to the producer in a pseudo single phase, which is among the most important mechanisms for enhancing production. A pilot test of a single well demonstrated that the oil production increased from 1 to 2 cubic metres per day to 5 to 6 cubic metres per day via the natural gas huff and puff process. The stable production period which was 5 to 10 days prior to huff and puff, was prolonged to 91 days in the first cycle and 245 days in the second cycle. 10 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  20. El Chichon volcanic ash in the stratosphere - Particle abundances and size distributions after the 1982 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Clanton, U. S.; Gabel, E. M.; Warren, J. L.

    1983-11-01

    Volcanic ash particles collected from the stratosphere after the March/April, 1982 explosive eruption of El Chichon volcano, Mexico, were mostly 2-40 micron vesicular shards of silicic volcanic glass that varied in abundance, at 16.8-19.2 km altitude, from 200 per cu m (30-49 deg N lat.) in May to 1.3 per cu m (45-75 deg N) in October. At the minimum, the ash cloud covered latitudes 10-60 deg N in July and 10 deg S-75 deg N in October. In May and July, ash particles were mostly free, individual shards (and clusters of shards) but, by October, were intimately associated with liquid droplets (presumably, sulfuric acid). In May 1982, the total stratospheric burden of ash was at least 240 tons (2.2 x 10 to the 8th g) although the total ash injected into the stratosphere by the eruption was probably 480-8400 tons.

  1. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  2. Anatomy of a volcano

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull caused major disruption in European airspace last year. According to his co-author, Freysteinn Sigmundsson, the reconstruction published in Nature six months later by aerospace engineering researcher, Dr Andy Hooper, opens up a new direction in volcanology. “W

  3. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  4. Evaluation of techniques for sampling volatile arsenic on volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Julia; Ilgen, Gunter; Planer-Friedrich, Britta

    2017-02-01

    Volatile arsenic (As) species, like arsine, mono-, di-, and trimethylarsine (AsH3, MeAsH2, Me2AsH, Me3As) are reported to be released from volcanoes but their determination is difficult because of low concentrations, low boiling points, and high reactivity, especially in the presence of volcanic gases like H2S and SO2. We tested needle trap devices (NTDs), cryotrapping, and Tedlar® bags for quantitative and species-preserving sampling. NTDs did not trap AsH3, MeAsH2, Me2AsH, did not release sorbed Me3As quantitatively, and lead to artifact formation of dimethylchloroarsine, which also questions the reliability of previous reports from solid phase micro extraction fibers using the same sorption materials. Cryotrapping in dry ice was insufficient to trap AsH3 and MeAsH2; Me2AsH and Me3As were only partially retained. Sampling in Tedlar® bags remained the best alternative. Stability of all four arsines was confirmed for dark storage at 5 °C for 19 days in a matrix of dry N2, 11 days in 20% O2, and 19 days in 3800 ppmv CO2 (> 80% recovery for all species), while in the presence of H2S, Me3As recovery was only 67% and in the presence of SO2, Me2AsH and Me3As recovery was 40 and 11%, respectively. Removing interfering reactive gases by a NaOH trap, we sampled natural volcanic emissions at fumaroles of Vulcano and Solfatara (Italy). Detected total arsine concentrations of 0.5-77 ng·m- 3 were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the calculated background. Inorganic arsine was the dominant species suggesting that secondary microbially catalyzed methylation is a process of minor importance in the fumarolic gases.

  5. Invoering van het luchtverspreidingsmodel NPK-PUFF, versie 1.0, voor toepassing in de NPK-organisatie

    OpenAIRE

    Uijt de Haag PAM; Geertsema GT; Kroonenberg FC; Aldenkamp FJ; Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut (KNMI), De Bilt; LSO; KNMI,

    1998-01-01

    Following the accident at the nuclear power station in Chernobyl, KNMI and RIVM developed a model for the long-range atmospheric transport of radionuclides. This model, the RIVM/KNMI PUFF model, is in use for application in the National Plan for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response. The PUFF-model is used at KNMI and RIVM. However, differences exist between the two versions of the model due to new model developments. It is therefore decided to create a new version of the PUFF model, the NP...

  6. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction...... of melt in the investigated ashes has been determined as a function of temperature. Ash fusion results have been correlated to the chemical and mineralogical composition of the ashes, to results from a standard ash fusion test and to results from sintering experiments. Furthermore, the ash fusion results......-firing, the model only had a qualitative agreement with the measured ash deposit formation rates.Sintering measurements were carried out by means of compression strength testing of ash pellets. This method showed to not be applicable for the salt rich fly ash derived from straw combustion. For the fly ashes...

  7. Galactic Super-volcano in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    "eruption" with the galaxy's environment to be very similar to that of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano, which forced much of Europe to close its airports earlier this year. With Eyjafjallajokull, pockets of hot gas blasted through the surface of the lava, generating shock waves that can be seen passing through the grey smoke of the volcano. The hot gas then rises up in the atmosphere, dragging the dark ash with it. This process can be seen in a movie of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano where the shock waves propagating in the smoke are followed by the rise of dark ash clouds into the atmosphere. In the analogy with Eyjafjallajokull, the energetic particles produced in the vicinity of the black hole rise through the X-ray emitting atmosphere of the cluster, lifting up the coolest gas near the center of M87 in their wake, much like the hot volcanic gases drag up the clouds of dark ash. And just like the volcano here on Earth, shockwaves can be seen when the black hole pumps energetic particles into the cluster gas. "This analogy shows that even though astronomical phenomena can occur in exotic settings and over vast scales, the physics can be very similar to events on Earth," said co-author Aurora Simionescu also of the Kavli Institute. In M87, the plumes of cooler gas being lifted upwards contain as much mass as all of the gas contained within 12,000 light years of the center of the galaxy cluster. This shows the black hole-powered volcano is very efficient at blasting the galaxy free of the gas that would otherwise cool and form stars. "This gas could have formed hundreds of millions of stars if the black hole had not removed it from the center of the galaxy. That seems like a much worse disruption than what the airline companies on Earth had to put up with earlier this year," said Evan Million, a graduate student at Stanford University and lead-author of the other paper to be published about this deep study of M87. The eruption in M87 that lifted up the cooler gas must have

  8. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  9. Volcanic Environments Monitoring by Drones Mud Volcano Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, S.; Turci, M.; Giulietti, F.; Giammanco, S.; Buongiorno, M. F.; La Spina, A.; Spampinato, L.

    2013-08-01

    Volcanic activity has often affected human life both at large and at small scale. For example, the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption caused severe economic damage at continental scale due to its strong effect on air traffic. At a local scale, ash fall and lava flow emission can cause harm and disruption. Understanding precursory signals to volcanic eruptions is still an open and tricky challenge: seismic tremor and gas emissions, for example, are related to upcoming eruptive activity but the mechanisms are not yet completely understood. Furthermore, information related to gases emission mostly comes from the summit crater area of a volcano, which is usually hard to investigate with required accuracy. Although many regulation problems are still on the discussion table, an increasing interest in the application of cutting-edge technology like unmanned flying systems is growing up. In this sense, INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) started to investigate the possibility to use unmanned air vehicles for volcanic environment application already in 2004. A flight both in visual- and radio-controlled mode was carried out on Stromboli volcano as feasibility test. In this work we present the preliminary results of a test performed by INGV in collaboration with the University of Bologna (aerospace division) by using a multi-rotor aircraft in a hexacopter configuration. Thermal camera observations and flying tests have been realised over a mud volcano located on its SW flank of Mt. Etna and whose activity proved to be related to early stages of magma accumulation within the volcano.

  10. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embley, Robert W; Chadwick, William W; Baker, Edward T; Butterfield, David A; Resing, Joseph A; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lupton, John E; Juniper, S Kim; Rubin, Kenneth H; Stern, Robert J; Lebon, Geoffrey T; Nakamura, Ko-ichi; Merle, Susan G; Hein, James R; Wiens, Douglas A; Tamura, Yoshihiko

    2006-05-25

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes.

  11. Eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Pedersen, Rikke; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Thorbjarnardóttir, Bergthóra; Jakobsdóttir, Steinunn; Roberts, Matthew J.

    2010-05-01

    The April 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano (Figure 1), located on Iceland's southern coast, created unprecedented disruptions to European air traffic during 15-20 April, costing the aviation industry an estimated $250 million per day (see the related news item in this issue). This cost brings into focus how volcanoes can affect communities thousands of miles away. Eyjafjallajökull rises to 1666 meters above sea level and hosts agricultural land on its southern slopes, with farms located as close as 7 kilometers from the summit caldera. In the past 1500 years, Eyjafjallajökull has produced four comparatively small eruptions. The eruption previous to 2010 began in December 1821 and lasted for over a year, with intermittent explosive activity spreading a thin layer of tephra (ash and larger ejected clasts) over the surrounding region. In contrast, the explosive 2010 eruption, sourced within the ice-capped summit of the volcano, so far is larger and characterized by magma of a slightly different composition. This may suggest that deep within the volcano, the 1821 magma source is mixing with new melt, or that residual melt from past intrusive events is being pushed out by new magma.

  12. Reexamination of the ancient literature on activities of Kuju volcano, central Kyushu, Japan; Kuju kazan no rekishi jidai no katsudo kiroku no saikento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imura, R.; Kamata, H. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-04-25

    In order to identify activities of Kuju Volcano in historic times, reviews were given on records with reference to original literature of historical documents. Kuju Volcano has erupted in October 1995, and rows of craters lying from east to west were created near the place called Mt. Iou on a hillside of the volcano. The smoke from the craters reached as high as 1000 meters in the air, and the ash fall was observed in the city of Kumamoto which is 60 km away from the volcano. Many of what has been recorded conventionally as eruption records of Kuju Volcano are surmised to have described explosions of eruptive gases on the surface area or events of gas bursts. They are not thought to be describing such eruptions as ones gushing a great amount of volcanic ash. Therefore, the activity in 1995 of Kuju Volcano that has created new rows of craters in points several hundred meters away from the eruptive gas area, and caused ash fall that accumulated thinly in surround area has a possibility that the eruption was the one much greater than those written in the records that have been known to date, rather than the one first in 257 years. Activities of Kuju Volcano in historic times must be evaluated quantitatively by continuing excavation of new historic materials and geological verifications. 25 refs.

  13. Characteristics of the Seismicity in the San Martin Tuxtla volcano area, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, M.

    2012-12-01

    San Martin Tuxtla volcano (18.572N, 95.169W, 1650 masl) is a large volcano rising in the midst of the Tuxtla volcanic field in the State of Veracruz, eastern México. The last eruption of this volcano occurred in 1793 and produced thick ash fall deposits in its vicinity. Due to increasing population in the area, the volcano poses a significant risk. To determine the seismic characteristics of the area and evaluate their possible relationship with the volcano we installed a network of three seismic stations in its surroundings. The array has recorded the seismic activity from 2007 to 2011. We present the results of the analysis of the records of this period, which in general show that the seismicity in the area is relatively low both in frequency and magnitude: only 51 events of magnitude (Mc) less than 2.5 were observed and located. Most of the earthquakes are typical volcano tectonic events occurring at shallow depths (<< 12 km) around the volcano. This low level of seismicity is probably a characteristic of the area and not of the particular period studied, as has been observed in other areas of basaltic volcanism, and could be used to establish any unusual seismicity that could be related to impending volcanic activity.

  14. Volcanic tremor and plume height hysteresis from Pavlof Volcano, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, David; Haney, Matthew M; Matoza, Robin S; Eaton, Alexa R; Cervelli, Peter; Schneider, David J; Iezzi, Alexandra M

    2017-01-06

    The March 2016 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, produced an ash plume that caused the cancellation of more than 100 flights in North America. The eruption generated strong tremor that was recorded by seismic and remote low-frequency acoustic (infrasound) stations, including the EarthScope Transportable Array. The relationship between the tremor amplitudes and plume height changes considerably between the waxing and waning portions of the eruption. Similar hysteresis has been observed between seismic river noise and discharge during storms, suggesting that flow and erosional processes in both rivers and volcanoes can produce irreversible structural changes that are detectable in geophysical data. We propose that the time-varying relationship at Pavlof arose from changes in the tremor source related to volcanic vent erosion. This relationship may improve estimates of volcanic emissions and characterization of eruption size and intensity.

  15. A Device to Measure a Smoker’s Puffing Topography and Real-Time Puff-By-Puff “Tar” Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slayford Sandra J.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A device for measuring the flow, duration and volume characteristics of human puffing behaviour when smoking cigarettes is described. Cigarettes are smoked through a holder comprising a measured pressure drop across a critical orifice. The holder also contains a Light Emitting Diode (LED and photodetector that measures light obscuration in order to estimate nicotine-free dry particulate matter (NFDPM, “tar” delivery. All data are recorded on a puff-by-puff basis and displayed in real time. These NFDPM estimates are known as optical “tar” (OT, and are derived from the calibration of the OT measurement versus gravimetric NFDPM yields of cigarettes under a range of smoking regimes. In a test study, puff volumes from 20-80 mL were recorded to ± 6.0% of a pre-set volume, with an absolute error of 4.7 mL for an 80 mL volume drawn on a lit cigarette, and an average error of less than 2.0 mL across the range 20-80 mL. The relationship between NFDPM and OT was linear (R2 = 0.99 and accurate to ± 1.3 mg per cigarette over the range 1-23 mg per cigarette. The device provides an alternative to the widely used part filter methodology for estimating mouth level exposure with an added benefit that no further laboratory smoking replication or analysis is required. When used in conjunction with the part filter methodology, the puffing behaviour recorded can explain anomalies in the data while providing a second independent estimate.

  16. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  17. Volcano-hazard zonation for San Vicente volcano, El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Vicente volcano, also known as Chichontepec, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. This composite volcano, located about 50 kilometers east of the capital city San Salvador, has a volume of about 130 cubic kilometers, rises to an altitude of about 2180 meters, and towers above major communities such as San Vicente, Tepetitan, Guadalupe, Zacatecoluca, and Tecoluca. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and major transportation routes are located near the lowermost southern and eastern flanks of the volcano. The population density and proximity around San Vicente volcano, as well as the proximity of major transportation routes, increase the risk that even small landslides or eruptions, likely to occur again, can have serious societal consequences. The eruptive history of San Vicente volcano is not well known, and there is no definitive record of historical eruptive activity. The last significant eruption occurred more than 1700 years ago, and perhaps long before permanent human habitation of the area. Nevertheless, this volcano has a very long history of repeated, and sometimes violent, eruptions, and at least once a large section of the volcano collapsed in a massive landslide. The oldest rocks associated with a volcanic center at San Vicente are more than 2 million years old. The volcano is composed of remnants of multiple eruptive centers that have migrated roughly eastward with time. Future eruptions of this volcano will pose substantial risk to surrounding communities.

  18. Evolution of transitional structures from puff to slug through multiple splitting in a pipe flow at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, J.; Ertunç, Ö.; Ostwald, Ch; Lienhart, H.; Delgado, A.

    2011-12-01

    During laminar-to-turbulent transition in low Reynolds pipe flows, three main types of flow structures occur: traveling waves and the turbulent flow structures, namely puffs and slugs. In the present work, detailed experiments on the probability of occurrence and propagation speed of puffs, splitting puffs and slugs were conducted with the transition pipe-flow facility of LSTM-Erlangen. During the investigations, fully developed laminar pipe flow was triggered by an iris diaphragm with a pre-defined amplitude and lapse time. Different types of single and multiple puffs are classified and the probability of their occurrence as well as their propagation speed at the end of pipes with different lengths are evaluated.

  19. Evolution of transitional structures from puff to slug through multiple splitting in a pipe flow at low Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, J; Ertunc, Oe; Ostwald, Ch; Lienhart, H; Delgado, A, E-mail: jens.krauss@lstm.uni-erlangen.de [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, FAU Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2011-12-22

    During laminar-to-turbulent transition in low Reynolds pipe flows, three main types of flow structures occur: traveling waves and the turbulent flow structures, namely puffs and slugs. In the present work, detailed experiments on the probability of occurrence and propagation speed of puffs, splitting puffs and slugs were conducted with the transition pipe-flow facility of LSTM-Erlangen. During the investigations, fully developed laminar pipe flow was triggered by an iris diaphragm with a pre-defined amplitude and lapse time. Different types of single and multiple puffs are classified and the probability of their occurrence as well as their propagation speed at the end of pipes with different lengths are evaluated.

  20. Non-contact investigation of the corneal biomechanics with air-puff swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maczynska, Ewa; Karnowski, Karol; Kaluzny, Bartlomiej; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we use swept source optical coherence tomography combined with air-puff module (air-puff SS-OCT) to investigate the properties of the cornea. During OCT measurement the cornea was stimulated by short, air pulse, and corneal response was recorded. In this preliminary study, the air-puff SS-OCT instrument was applied to measure behavior of the porcine corneas under varied, well-controlled intraocular pressure conditions. Additionally, the biomechanical response of the corneal tissue before, during and after crosslinking procedure (CXL) was assessed. Air-puff swept source OCT is a promising tool to extract information about corneal behavior as well as to monitor and assess the effect of CXL.

  1. Radar observations of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska: Initial deployment of a transportable Doppler radar system for volcano-monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoblitt, R. P.; Schneider, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The rapid detection of explosive volcanic eruptions and accurate determination of eruption-column altitude and ash-cloud movement are critical factors in the mitigation of volcanic risks to aviation and in the forecasting of ash fall on nearby communities. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a transportable Doppler radar during the precursory stage of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and it provided valuable information during subsequent explosive events. We describe the capabilities of this new monitoring tool and present data that it captured during the Redoubt eruption. The volcano-monitoring Doppler radar operates in the C-band (5.36 cm) and has a 2.4-m parabolic antenna with a beam width of 1.6 degrees, a transmitter power of 330 watts, and a maximum effective range of 240 km. The entire disassembled system, including a radome, fits inside a 6-m-long steel shipping container that has been modified to serve as base for the antenna/radome, and as a field station for observers and other monitoring equipment. The radar was installed at the Kenai Municipal Airport, 82 km east of Redoubt and about 100 km southwest of Anchorage. In addition to an unobstructed view of the volcano, this secure site offered the support of the airport staff and the City of Kenai. A further advantage was the proximity of a NEXRAD Doppler radar operated by the Federal Aviation Administration. This permitted comparisons with an established weather-monitoring radar system. The new radar system first became functional on March 20, roughly a day before the first of nineteen explosive ash-producing events of Redoubt between March 21 and April 4. Despite inevitable start-up problems, nearly all of the events were observed by the radar, which was remotely operated from the Alaska Volcano Observatory office in Anchorage. The USGS and NEXRAD radars both detected the eruption columns and tracked the directions of drifting ash clouds. The USGS radar scanned a 45-degree sector

  2. Monitoring Volcanic Ash with MSG Seviri Image and RGB Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Aydin Gurol; Kerkman, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The eruption from the Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland recently became a high importance for the Meteorological Institutes, Aviation, Satellite Centers and other related institutions. Urgent forecasts were requested by the air control centers, aviation industry and even the passengers who stuck at the airports. It was announced that thousands of flights are canceled; hundreds of thousands of passengers affected and the airlines lost around 1.7 billion dollars in April-May 2010. This is the worst aviation crises. MSG (METEOSAT Second Generation) SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imagery) with its 11 narrow and 1 broad band channels have been providing a worth of data sources for nowcasting and very short forecasting. SEVIRI images and RGB applications have been acted an important role to monitor Volcanic Ash during above aviation crises. SEVIRI has an infrared channel (centered @8.7 micron) which is sensitive sand, dust and ash in the atmosphere. In this study we present Ash RGB applications derived from SEVIRI data to monitor and track Ash clouds over Europe. Two main eruptions during 14-20 April and 7-17 May 2010 will be demonstrated. In addition to this, we will propose an Ash product algorithm and discuss its weakness and strength.

  3. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eaton, Alexa R; Mastin, Larry G; Herzog, Michael; Schwaiger, Hans F; Schneider, David J; Wallace, Kristi L; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-08-03

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized 'wet' eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits and numerical modelling demonstrate that hail-forming processes in the eruption plume triggered aggregation of ∼95% of the fine ash and stripped much of the erupted mass out of the atmosphere within 30 min. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like ash aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and occurrence of concentrically layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  4. Volcanoes and atmospheres; catastrophic influences on the planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    For a rare and brief instant in geologic time, we can imagine that the sulfurous, chromatic surface of Io (one of the satellites of Jupiter) lies quiet. Perhaps stars glisten brilliantly through the tenuous nigh sky. Here and there, thick icy fogs enshroud fumaroles where sulfur dioxide leaks from the underworld. Suddenly, a fissure splits the surface and billowing clouds of sulfurous gases and ice hurl orange and black ash into the atmosphere. Minute by minute, the intensity of the eruption builds; stars begin disappearing from the night sky. The rising plume inhales the nearby atmosphere, mixing it with the exhalations from the volcano. Particles of sulfur, sulfur dioxide snow and ash rise to 300 kilometers, later raining down across the planet a thousand kilometers away. 

  5. 4D volcano gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the

  6. Pairing the Volcano

    CERN Document Server

    Ionica, Sorina

    2011-01-01

    Isogeny volcanoes are graphs whose vertices are elliptic curves and whose edges are $\\ell$-isogenies. Algorithms allowing to travel on these graphs were developed by Kohel in his thesis (1996) and later on, by Fouquet and Morain (2001). However, up to now, no method was known, to predict, before taking a step on the volcano, the direction of this step. Hence, in Kohel's and Fouquet-Morain algorithms, many steps are taken before choosing the right direction. In particular, ascending or horizontal isogenies are usually found using a trial-and-error approach. In this paper, we propose an alternative method that efficiently finds all points $P$ of order $\\ell$ such that the subgroup generated by $P$ is the kernel of an horizontal or an ascending isogeny. In many cases, our method is faster than previous methods. This is an extended version of a paper published in the proceedings of ANTS 2010. In addition, we treat the case of 2-isogeny volcanoes and we derive from the group structure of the curve and the pairing ...

  7. Study of noncontact air-puff applanation tonometry IOP measurement on irregularly-shaped corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wai W.; Wang, Kuo-Jen; Tsai, Che-Liang; Wang, I.-Jong

    2017-04-01

    Abnormal corneas with corneal tissue defects like ulceration, melting, laceration, thinning scar, keratoconus etc., poses special challenges for ophthalmologist to measure intraocular pressure (IOP) correctly using air-puff noncontact applanation tonometry. Here, we propose an novel model, Abnormal Applanation IOP Model (AAIOP), to simulate IOP in these abnormal corneas on an air-puff noncontact applanation tonometry system, and the simulated IOP results are correctly fit in those of IOP measured database on human eyes of 91,024 patients (174,666 eyes)1). Our simulated IOP indicates that every 10 μm of central corneal thickness change results in 0.36 mmHg of IOP change. Using our simulation model, the IOP on abnormal eyes with irregularly-shaped corneas can be correctly expected and reported.

  8. Investigation on Soft X-Ray Lasers with a Picosecond-Laser-Irradiated Gas Puff Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowiez, H; Bartnik, A; Jarocki, R; Rakowski, R; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Hilsen, J; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2002-10-09

    We present results of experimental studies on transient gain soft x-ray lasers with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target. The target in a form of an elongated gas sheet is formed by pulsed injection of gas through a slit nozzle using a high-pressure electromagnetic valve developed and characterized at the Institute of Optoelectronics. The x-ray laser experiments were performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using the tabletop Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser to irradiate argon, krypton or xenon gas puff targets. Soft x-ray lasing in neon-like argon on the 3p-3s transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d-3p transition at 45.1 nm have been demonstrated, however, no amplification for nickel-like krypton or xenon was observed. Results of the experiments are presented and discussed.

  9. Corneal Viscoelastic Properties from Finite-Element Analysis of In Vivo Air-Puff Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Sabine; Bekesi, Nandor; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Pascual, Daniel; Marcos, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical properties are an excellent health marker of biological tissues, however they are challenging to be measured in-vivo. Non-invasive approaches to assess tissue biomechanics have been suggested, but there is a clear need for more accurate techniques for diagnosis, surgical guidance and treatment evaluation. Recently air-puff systems have been developed to study the dynamic tissue response, nevertheless the experimental geometrical observations lack from an analysis that addresses specifically the inherent dynamic properties. In this study a viscoelastic finite element model was built that predicts the experimental corneal deformation response to an air-puff for different conditions. A sensitivity analysis reveals significant contributions to corneal deformation of intraocular pressure and corneal thickness, besides corneal biomechanical properties. The results show the capability of dynamic imaging to reveal inherent biomechanical properties in vivo. Estimates of corneal biomechanical parameters will contribute to the basic understanding of corneal structure, shape and integrity and increase the predictability of corneal surgery. PMID:25121496

  10. Glacier melting during lava dome growth at Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico): Evidences of a major threat before main eruptive phases at ice-caped volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, L.; Roverato, M.; Groppelli, G.; Caballero, L.; Sulpizio, R.; Norini, G.

    2015-03-01

    Nevado de Toluca volcano is one of the largest stratovolcanoes in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. During Late Pleistocene its activity was characterized by large dome growth and subsequent collapse emplacing large block and ash flow deposits, intercalated by Plinian eruptions. Morphological and paleoclimate studies at Nevado de Toluca and the surrounding area evidenced that the volcano was affected by extensive glaciation during Late Pleistocene and Holocene. During the older recognized glacial period (27-60 ka, MIS 3), the glacier was disturbed by the intense magmatic and hydrothermal activity related to two dome extrusion episodes (at 37 ka and 28 ka). Glacier reconstruction indicates maximum ice thickness of 90 m along main valleys, as at the Cano ravines, the major glacial valley on the northern slope of the volcano. Along this ravine, both 37 and 28 ka block-and-ash deposits are exposed, and they directly overlay a fluviatile sequence, up to 40 m-thick, which 14C ages clearly indicate that their emplacement occurred just before the dome collapsed. These evidences point to a clear interaction between the growing dome and its hydrothermal system with the glacier. During dome growth, a large amount of melting water was released along major glacial valleys forming thick fluvioglacial sequences that were subsequently covered by the block-and-ash flow deposits generated by the collapse of the growing dome. Even though this scenario is no longer possible at the Nevado de Toluca volcano, the data presented here indicate that special attention should be paid to the possible inundation areas from fluviatile/lahar activity prior to the main magmatic eruption at ice-capped volcanoes.

  11. Volcanic ash and meteorological clouds detection by neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchiani, Matteo; Del Frate, Fabio; Stefano, Corradini; Piscini, Alessandro; Merucci, Luca; Chini, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The recent eruptions of the Icelandic Eyjafjallajokull and Grímsvötn volcanoes occurred in 2010 and 2011 respectively have been highlighted the necessity to increase the accuracy of the ash detection and retrieval. Follow the evolution of the ash plume is crucial for aviation security. Indeed from the accuracy of the algorithms applied to identify the ash presence may depend the safety of the passengers. The difference between the brightness temperatures (BTD) of thermal infrared channels, centered around 11 µm and 12 µm, is suitable to distinguish the ash plume from the meteorological clouds [Prata, 1989] on satellite images. Anyway in some condition an accurate interpretation is essential to avoid false alarms. In particular Corradini et al. (2008) have developed a correction procedure aimed to avoid the atmospheric water vapour effect that tends to mask, or cancel-out, the ash plume effects on the BTD. Another relevant issue is due to the height of the meteorological clouds since their brightness temperatures is affected by this parameter. Moreover the overlapping of ash plume and meteorological clouds may affects the retrieval result since this latter is dependent by the physical temperature of the surface below the ash cloud. For this reason the correct identification of such condition, that can require a proper interpretation by the analyst, is crucial to address properly the inversion of ash parameters. In this work a fast and automatic procedure based on multispectral data from MODIS and a neural network algorithm is applied to the recent eruptions of Eyjafjallajokull and Grímsvötn volcanoes. A similar approach has been already tested with encouraging results in a previous work [Picchiani et al., 2011]. The algorithm is now improved in order to distinguish the meteorological clouds from the ash plume, dividing the latter between ash above sea and ash overlapped to meteorological clouds. The results have been compared to the BTD ones, properly

  12. 2015 Volcanic activity in Alaska—Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Iezzi, Alexandra M.; Wallace, Kristi

    2017-09-28

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 14 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2015. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of continuing intermittent ash eruptions from Cleveland and Shishaldin volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands. Two eruptive episodes, at Veniaminof and Pavlof, on the Alaska Peninsula ended in 2015. During 2015, AVO re-established the seismograph network at Aniakchak, installed six new broadband seismometers throughout the Aleutian Islands, and added a Multiple component Gas Analyzer System (MultiGAS) station on Augustine.

  13. Horizontal and vertical structure of the Eyjafjallajökull ash cloud over the UK: a comparison of airborne lidar observations and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. M. Grant

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available During April and May 2010 the ash cloud from the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull caused widespread disruption to aviation over northern Europe. The location and impact of the eruption led to a wealth of observations of the ash cloud were being obtained which can be used to assess modelling of the long range transport of ash in the troposphere. The UK FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-146-301 research aircraft overflew the ash cloud on a number of days during May. The aircraft carries a downward looking lidar which detected the ash layer through the backscatter of the laser light. In this study ash concentrations derived from the lidar are compared with simulations of the ash cloud made with NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment, a general purpose atmospheric transport and dispersion model.

    The simulated ash clouds are compared to the lidar data to determine how well NAME simulates the horizontal and vertical structure of the ash clouds. Comparison between the ash concentrations derived from the lidar and those from NAME is used to define the fraction of ash emitted in the eruption that is transported over long distances compared to the total emission of tephra. In making these comparisons possible position errors in the simulated ash clouds are identified and accounted for.

    The ash layers seen by the lidar considered in this study were thin, with typical depths of 550–750 m. The vertical structure of the ash cloud simulated by NAME was generally consistent with the observed ash layers, although the layers in the simulated ash clouds that are identified with observed ash layers are about twice the depth of the observed layers. The structure of the simulated ash clouds were sensitive to the profile of ash emissions that was assumed. In terms of horizontal and vertical structure the best results were obtained by assuming that the emission occurred at the top of

  14. The Global Framework for Providing Information about Volcanic-Ash Hazards to International Air Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, R. W.; Guffanti, M.

    2009-12-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) created the International Airways Volcano Watch (IAVW) in 1987 to establish a requirement for international dissemination of information about airborne ash hazards to safe air navigation. The IAVW is a set of operational protocols and guidelines that member countries agree to follow in order to implement a global, multi-faceted program to support the strategy of ash-cloud avoidance. Under the IAVW, the elements of eruption reporting, ash-cloud detecting, and forecasting expected cloud dispersion are coordinated to culminate in warnings sent to air traffic controllers, dispatchers, and pilots about the whereabouts of ash clouds. Nine worldwide Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) established under the IAVW have the responsibility for detecting the presence of ash in the atmosphere, primarily by looking at imagery from civilian meteorological satellites, and providing advisories about the location and movement of ash clouds to aviation meteorological offices and other aviation users. Volcano Observatories also are a vital part of the IAVW, as evidenced by the recent introduction of a universal message format for reporting the status of volcanic activity, including precursory unrest, to aviation users. Since 2003, the IAVW has been overseen by a standing group of scientific, technical, and regulatory experts that assists ICAO in the development of standards and other regulatory material related to volcanic ash. Some specific problems related to the implementation of the IAVW include: the lack of implementation of SIGMET (warning to aircraft in flight) provisions and delayed notifications of volcanic eruptions. Expected future challenges and developments involve the improvement in early notifications of volcanic eruptions, the consolidation of the issuance of SIGMETs, and the possibility of determining a “safe” concentration of volcanic ash.

  15. Volcanic ash detection and retrievals from MODIS data by means of Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchiani, M.; Chini, M.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Sellitto, P.; Del Frate, F.; Stramondo, S.

    2011-05-01

    Volcanic ash clouds detection and retrieval represent a key issue for the aviation safety due to the harming effects they can provoke on aircrafts. A lesson learned from the recent Icelandic Eyjafjalla volcano eruption is the need to obtain accurate and reliable retrievals on a real time basis. The current most widely adopted procedures for ash detection and retrieval are based on the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD) inversion observed at 11 and 12 μm that allows volcanic and meteo clouds discrimination. While ash cloud detection can be readily obtained, a reliable quantitative ash cloud retrieval can be so time consuming to prevent its utilization during the crisis phase. In this work a fast and accurate Neural Network (NN) approach to detect and retrieve volcanic ash cloud properties has been developed using multispectral IR measurements collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) over Mt. Etna volcano during 2001, 2002 and 2006 eruptive events. The procedure consists in two separate steps: the ash detection and ash mass retrieval. The detection is reduced to a classification problem by identifying two classes of "ashy" and "non-ashy" pixels in the MODIS images. Then the ash mass is estimated by means of the NN, replicating the BTD-based model performances. The results obtained from the entire procedure are very encouraging; indeed the confusion matrix for the test set has an accuracy greater than 90 %. Both ash detection and retrieval show a good agreement when compared to the results achieved by the BTD-based procedure. Moreover, the NN procedure is so fast to be extremely attractive in all the cases when the quick response time of the system is a mandatory requirement.

  16. Volcanic ash detection and retrievals from MODIS data by means of Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Picchiani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash clouds detection and retrieval represent a key issue for the aviation safety due to the harming effects they can provoke on aircrafts. A lesson learned from the recent Icelandic Eyjafjalla volcano eruption is the need to obtain accurate and reliable retrievals on a real time basis.

    The current most widely adopted procedures for ash detection and retrieval are based on the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD inversion observed at 11 and 12 μm that allows volcanic and meteo clouds discrimination. While ash cloud detection can be readily obtained, a reliable quantitative ash cloud retrieval can be so time consuming to prevent its utilization during the crisis phase.

    In this work a fast and accurate Neural Network (NN approach to detect and retrieve volcanic ash cloud properties has been developed using multispectral IR measurements collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS over Mt. Etna volcano during 2001, 2002 and 2006 eruptive events.

    The procedure consists in two separate steps: the ash detection and ash mass retrieval. The detection is reduced to a classification problem by identifying two classes of "ashy" and "non-ashy" pixels in the MODIS images. Then the ash mass is estimated by means of the NN, replicating the BTD-based model performances.

    The results obtained from the entire procedure are very encouraging; indeed the confusion matrix for the test set has an accuracy greater than 90 %. Both ash detection and retrieval show a good agreement when compared to the results achieved by the BTD-based procedure. Moreover, the NN procedure is so fast to be extremely attractive in all the cases when the quick response time of the system is a mandatory requirement.

  17. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    OpenAIRE

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma def...

  18. The Pulsed Fission-Fusion (PUFF) Concept for Deep Space Exploration and Terrestrial Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert; Cassibry, Jason; Schillo, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This team is exploring a modified Z-pinch geometry as a propulsion system, imploding a liner of liquid lithium onto a pellet containing both fission and fusion fuel. The plasma resulting from the fission and fusion burn expands against a magnetic nozzle, for propulsion, or a magnetic confinement system, for terrestrial power generation. There is considerable synergy in the concept; the lithium acts as a temporary virtual cathode, and adds reaction mass for propulsion. Further, the lithium acts as a radiation shield against generated neutrons and gamma rays. Finally, the density profile of the column can be tailored using the lithium sheath. Recent theoretical and experimental developments (e.g. tailored density profile in the fuel injection, shear stabilization, and magnetic shear stabilization) have had great success in mitigating instabilities that have plagued previous fusion efforts. This paper will review the work in evaluating the pellet sizes and z-pinch conditions for optimal PuFF propulsion. Trades of pellet size and composition with z-pinch power levels and conditions for the tamper and lithium implosion are evaluated. Current models, both theoretical and computational, show that a z-pinch can ignite a small (1 cm radius) fission-fusion target with significant yield. Comparison is made between pure fission and boosted fission targets. Performance is shown for crewed spacecraft for high speed Mars round trip missions and near interstellar robotic missions. The PuFF concept also offers a solution for terrestrial power production. PuFF can, with recycling of the effluent, achieve near 100% burnup of fission fuel, providing a very attractive power source with minimal waste. The small size of PuFF relative to today's plants enables a more distributed power network and less exposure to natural or man-made disruptions.

  19. Airborne volcanic ash; a global threat to aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Guffanti, Marianne C.

    2010-01-01

    The world's busy air traffic corridors pass over or downwind of hundreds of volcanoes capable of hazardous explosive eruptions. The risk to aviation from volcanic activity is significant - in the United States alone, aircraft carry about 300,000 passengers and hundreds of millions of dollars of cargo near active volcanoes each day. Costly disruption of flight operations in Europe and North America in 2010 in the wake of a moderate-size eruption in Iceland clearly demonstrates how eruptions can have global impacts on the aviation industry. Airborne volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even hundreds of miles from an eruption. Encounters with high-concentration ash clouds can diminish visibility, damage flight control systems, and cause jet engines to fail. Encounters with low-concentration clouds of volcanic ash and aerosols can accelerate wear on engine and aircraft components, resulting in premature replacement. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with national and international partners, is playing a leading role in the international effort to reduce the risk posed to aircraft by volcanic eruptions.

  20. Assimilating Aircraft-based measurements to improve the State of Distal Volcanic Ash Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Lin, Hai Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Lu, Sha; Palsson, Thorgeir

    2015-04-01

    The sudden eruption at the 1666 m high, ice-capped Eyjafjallajökull volcano, in south Iceland during 14 April to 23 May 2010, had caused an unprecedented closure of the European and North Atlantic airspace resulting in global economic losses of US5 billion. This has initiated a lot of research on how to improve aviation advice after eruption onset. Good estimation of both the state of volcanic ash cloud and the emission of volcano are crucial for providing a successful aviation advice. Currently most of the approaches, employing satellite-based and ground-based measurements, are in the focus of improving the definition of Eruption Source Parameters (ESPs) such as plume height and mass eruption rate, which are certainly very important for estimating volcano emission and state of volcanic ash cloud near to the volcano. However, for ash cloud state in a far field, these approaches can hardly make improvements. This is mainly because the influence of ESPs on the ash plume becomes weaker as the distance to the volcano is getting farther, thus for a distal plume the information of ESPs will have little influence. This study aims to find an efficient way to improve the state of distal volcanic ash cloud. We use real-life aircraft-based observations, measured along Dutch border between Borken and Twist during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an data assimilation system combining with a transport model to identify the potential benefit of this kind of observations and the influence on the ash state around Dutch border. We show that assimilating aircraft-based measurements can significantly improve the state of distal ash clouds, and further provide an improved aviation advice on distal ash plume. We compare the performances of different sequential data assimilation methods. The results show standard Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) works better than others, which is because of the strong nonlinearity of the dynamics and the EnKF's resampling Gaussianity nature

  1. MESOI Version 2. 0: an interactive mesoscale Lagrangian puff dispersion model with deposition and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Glantz, C.S.

    1983-11-01

    MESOI Version 2.0 is an interactive Lagrangian puff model for estimating the transport, diffusion, deposition and decay of effluents released to the atmosphere. The model is capable of treating simultaneous releases from as many as four release points, which may be elevated or at ground-level. The puffs are advected by a horizontal wind field that is defined in three dimensions. The wind field may be adjusted for expected topographic effects. The concentration distribution within the puffs is initially assumed to be Gaussian in the horizontal and vertical. However, the vertical concentration distribution is modified by assuming reflection at the ground and the top of the atmospheric mixing layer. Material is deposited on the surface using a source depletion, dry deposition model and a washout coefficient model. The model also treats the decay of a primary effluent species and the ingrowth and decay of a single daughter species using a first order decay process. This report is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the theoretical and mathematical bases upon which MESOI Version 2.0 is based. The second part contains the MESOI computer code. The programs were written in the ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and were developed on a VAX 11/780 computer. 43 references, 14 figures, 13 tables.

  2. Comparison of Ash from PF and CFB Boilers and Behaviour of Ash in Ash Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arro, H.; Pihu, T.; Prikk, A.; Rootamm, R.; Konist, A.

    Over 90% of electricity produced in Estonia is made by power plants firing local oil shale and 25% of the boilers are of the circulating fluidised bed (CFB) variety. In 2007 approximately 6.5 million tons of ash was acquired as a byproduct of using oil shale for energy production. Approximately 1.5 million tons of that was ash from CFB boilers. Such ash is deposited in ash fields by means ofhydro ash removal.

  3. Agricultural Fragility Estimates Subjected to Volcanic Ash Fall Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, H. J.; Lee, S.; Choi, S. H.; Yun, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural Fragility Estimates Subjected to Volcanic Ash Fall Hazards Hee Jung Ham1, Seung-Hun Choi1, Woo-Seok Yun1, Sungsu Lee2 1Department of Architectural Engineering, Kangwon National University, Korea 2Division of Civil Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Korea ABSTRACT In this study, fragility functions are developed to estimate expected volcanic ash damages of the agricultural sector in Korea. The fragility functions are derived from two approaches: 1) empirical approach based on field observations of impacts to agriculture from the 2006 eruption of Merapi volcano in Indonesia and 2) the FOSM (first-order second-moment) analytical approach based on distribution and thickness of volcanic ash observed from the 1980 eruption of Mt. Saint Helens and agricultural facility specifications in Korea. Fragility function to each agricultural commodity class is presented by a cumulative distribution function of the generalized extreme value distribution. Different functions are developed to estimate production losses from outdoor and greenhouse farming. Seasonal climate influences vulnerability of each agricultural crop and is found to be a crucial component in determining fragility of agricultural commodities to an ash fall. In the study, the seasonality coefficient is established as a multiplier of fragility function to consider the seasonal vulnerability. Yields of the different agricultural commodities are obtained from Korean Statistical Information Service to create a baseline for future agricultural volcanic loss estimation. Numerically simulated examples of scenario ash fall events at Mt. Baekdu volcano are utilized to illustrate the application of the developed fragility functions. Acknowledgements This research was supported by a grant 'Development of Advanced Volcanic Disaster Response System considering Potential Volcanic Risk around Korea' [MPSS-NH-2015-81] from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Research Group, Ministry of Public Safety and Security of

  4. Orographic effects on the transport and deposition of volcanic ash: A case study of Mount Sakurajima, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulidis, Alexandros P.; Takemi, Tetsuya; Iguchi, Masato; Renfrew, Ian A.

    2017-09-01

    Volcanic ash is a major atmospheric hazard that has a significant impact on local populations and international aviation. The topography surrounding a volcano affects the transport and deposition of volcanic ash, but these effects have not been studied in depth. Here we investigate orographic impacts on ash transport and deposition in the context of the Sakurajima volcano in Japan, using the chemistry-resolving version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Sakurajima is an ideal location for such a study because of the surrounding mountainous topography, frequent eruptions, and comprehensive observing network. At Sakurajima, numerical experiments reveal that across the 2-8ϕ grain size range, the deposition of "medium-sized" ash (3-5ϕ) is most readily affected by orographic flows. The direct effects of resolving fine-scale orographic phenomena are counteracting: mountain-induced atmospheric gravity waves can keep ash afloat, while enhanced downslope winds in the lee of mountains (up to 50% stronger) can force the ash downward. Gravity waves and downslope winds were seen to have an effect along the dispersal path, in the vicinity of both the volcano and other mountains. Depending on the atmospheric conditions, resolving these orographic effects means that ash can be transported higher than the initial injection height (especially for ash finer than 2ϕ), shortly after the eruption (within 20 min) and close to the vent (within the first 10 km), effectively modifying the input plume height used in an ash dispersal model—an effect that should be taken into account when initializing simulations.

  5. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    The ash fusion characteristics are important parameters for thermochemical utilization of biomass. In this research, a method for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash by Thermo-mechanical Analyzer, TMA, is described. The typical TMA shrinking ratio curve can be divided into two...... stages, which are closely related to ash melting behaviors. Several characteristics temperatures based on the TMA curves are used to assess the ash fusion characteristics. A new characteristics temperature, Tm, is proposed to represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. The fusion...... characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates....

  6. Uncertainty in volcanic ash particle size distribution and implications for infrared remote sensing and airspace management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western, L.; Watson, M.; Francis, P. N.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic ash particle size distributions are critical in determining the fate of airborne ash in drifting clouds. A significant amount of global airspace is managed using dispersion models that rely on a single ash particle size distribution, derived from a single source - Hobbs et al., 1991. This is clearly wholly inadequate given the range of magmatic compositions and eruptive styles that volcanoes present. Available measurements of airborne ash lognormal particle size distributions show geometric standard deviation values that range from 1.0 - 2.5, with others showing mainly polymodal distributions. This paucity of data pertaining to airborne sampling of volcanic ash results in large uncertainties both when using an assumed distribution to retrieve mass loadings from satellite observations and when prescribing particle size distributions of ash in dispersion models. Uncertainty in the particle size distribution can yield order of magnitude differences to mass loading retrievals of an ash cloud from satellite observations, a result that can easily reclassify zones of airspace closure. The uncertainty arises from the assumptions made when defining both the geometric particle size and particle single scattering properties in terms of an effective radius. This has significant implications for airspace management and emphasises the need for an improved quantification of airborne volcanic ash particle size distributions.

  7. Lahar Hazard Modeling at Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, O. E.; Rose, W. I.; Jaya, D.

    2003-04-01

    Tungurahua Volcano (Lat. 01^o28'S; Long. 78^o27'W), located in the central Ecuadorian Andes, is an active edifice that rises more than 3 km above surrounding topography. Since European settlement in 1532, Tungurahua has experienced four major eruptive episodes: 1641-1646, 1773-1781, 1886-1888 and 1916-1918 (Hall et al, JVGR V91; p1-21, 1999). In September 1999, Tungurahua began a new period of activity that continues to the present. During this time, the volcano has erupted daily, depositing ash and blocks on its steep flanks. A pattern of continuing eruptions, coupled with rainfall up to 28 mm in a 6 hour period (rain data collected in Baños at 6-hr intervals, 3000 meters below Tungurahua’s summit), has produced an environment conducive to lahar mobilization. Tungurahua volcano presents an immediate hazard to the town of Baños, an important tourist destination and cultural center with a population of about 25,000 residents located 8 km from the crater. During the current eruptive episode, lahars have occurred as often as 3 times per week on the northern and western slopes of the volcano. Consequently, the only north-south trending highway on the west side of Tungurahua has been completely severed at the intersection of at least ten drainages, where erosion has exceeded 10 m since 1999. The La Pampa quebrada, located 1 km west of Baños, is the most active of Tungurahua's drainages. At this location, where the slope is moderate, lahars continue to inundate the only highway linking Baños to the Pan American Highway. Because of steep topography, the conventional approach of measuring planimetric inundation areas to determine the scale of lahars could not be employed. Instead, cross sections were measured in the channels using volume/cross-sectional inundation relationships determined by (Iverson et al, GSABull V110; no. 8, p972-984, 1998). After field observations of the lahars, LAHARZ, a program used in a geographic information system (GIS) to objectively map

  8. Geologic Mapping of the Olympus Mons Volcano, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Williams, D. A.; Shean, D.; Greeley, R.

    2012-01-01

    We are in the third year of a three-year Mars Data Analysis Program project to map the morphology of the Olympus Mons volcano, Mars, using ArcGIS by ESRI. The final product of this project is to be a 1:1,000,000-scale geologic map. The scientific questions upon which this mapping project is based include understanding the volcanic development and modification by structural, aeolian, and possibly glacial processes. The project s scientific objectives are based upon preliminary mapping by Bleacher et al. [1] along a approx.80-km-wide north-south swath of the volcano corresponding to High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) image h0037. The preliminary project, which covered approx.20% of the volcano s surface, resulted in several significant findings, including: 1) channel-fed lava flow surfaces are areally more abundant than tube-fed surfaces by a ratio of 5:1, 2) channel-fed flows consistently embay tube-fed flows, 3) lava fans appear to be linked to tube-fed flows, 4) no volcanic vents were identified within the map region, and 5) a Hummocky unit surrounds the summit and is likely a combination of non-channelized flows, dust, ash, and/or frozen volatiles. These results led to the suggestion that the volcano had experienced a transition from long-lived tube-forming eruptions to more sporadic and shorter-lived, channel-forming eruptions, as seen at Hawaiian volcanoes between the tholeiitic shield building phase (Kilauea to Mauna Loa) and alkalic capping phase (Hualalai and Mauna Kea).

  9. Ash Properties of Alternative Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capablo, Joaquin; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Pedersen, Kim Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    The ash behavior during suspension firing of 12 alternative solid biofuels, such as pectin waste, mash from a beer brewery, or waste from cigarette production have been studied and compared to wood and straw ash behavior. Laboratory suspension firing tests were performed on an entrained flow...... analysis into three main groups depending upon their ash content of silica, alkali metal, and calcium and magnesium. To further detail the biomass classification, the relative molar ratio of Cl, S, and P to alkali were included. The study has led to knowledge on biomass fuel ash composition influence...... on ash transformation, ash deposit flux, and deposit chlorine content when biomass fuels are applied for suspension combustion....

  10. Strategies for the implementation of a European Volcano Observations Research Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Active volcanic areas in Europe constitute a direct threat to millions of people on both the continent and adjacent islands. Furthermore, eruptions of "European" volcanoes in overseas territories, such as in the West Indies, an in the Indian and Pacific oceans, can have a much broader impacts, outside Europe. Volcano Observatories (VO), which undertake volcano monitoring under governmental mandate and Volcanological Research Institutions (VRI; such as university departments, laboratories, etc.) manage networks on European volcanoes consisting of thousands of stations or sites where volcanological parameters are either continuously or periodically measured. These sites are equipped with instruments for geophysical (seismic, geodetic, gravimetric, electromagnetic), geochemical (volcanic plumes, fumaroles, groundwater, rivers, soils), environmental observations (e.g. meteorological and air quality parameters), including prototype deployment. VOs and VRIs also operate laboratories for sample analysis (rocks, gases, isotopes, etc.), near-real time analysis of space-borne data (SAR, thermal imagery, SO2 and ash), as well as high-performance computing centres; all providing high-quality information on the current status of European volcanoes and the geodynamic background of the surrounding areas. This large and high-quality deployment of monitoring systems, focused on a specific geophysical target (volcanoes), together with the wide volcanological phenomena of European volcanoes (which cover all the known volcano types) represent a unique opportunity to fundamentally improve the knowledge base of volcano behaviour. The existing arrangement of national infrastructures (i.e. VO and VRI) appears to be too fragmented to be considered as a unique distributed infrastructure. Therefore, the main effort planned in the framework of the EPOS-PP proposal is focused on the creation of services aimed at providing an improved and more efficient access to the volcanological facilities

  11. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  12. Volcanic ash detection and retrievals using MODIS data by means of neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Picchiani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash clouds detection and retrieval represent a key issue for aviation safety due to the harming effects on aircraft. A lesson learned from the recent Eyjafjallajokull eruption is the need to obtain accurate and reliable retrievals on a real time basis.

    In this work we have developed a fast and accurate Neural Network (NN approach to detect and retrieve volcanic ash cloud properties from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data in the Thermal InfraRed (TIR spectral range. Some measurements collected during the 2001, 2002 and 2006 Mt. Etna volcano eruptions have been considered as test cases.

    The ash detection and retrievals obtained from the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD algorithm are used as training for the NN procedure that consists in two separate steps: ash detection and ash mass retrieval. The ash detection is reduced to a classification problem by identifying two classes: "ashy" and "non-ashy" pixels in the MODIS images. Then the ash mass is estimated by means of the NN, replicating the BTD-based model performances. A segmentation procedure has also been tested to remove the false ash pixels detection induced by the presence of high meteorological clouds. The segmentation procedure shows a clear advantage in terms of classification accuracy: the main drawback is the loss of information on ash clouds distal part.

    The results obtained are very encouraging; indeed the ash detection accuracy is greater than 90%, while a mean RMSE equal to 0.365 t km−2 has been obtained for the ash mass retrieval. Moreover, the NN quickness in results delivering makes the procedure extremely attractive in all the cases when the rapid response time of the system is a mandatory requirement.

  13. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards of the Mount Hood Region, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Scott, W.E.; Pierson, T.C.; Costa, J.E.; Gardner, C.A.; Vallance, J.W.; Major, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Snow-clad Mount Hood dominates the Cascade skyline from the Portland metropolitan area to the wheat fields of Wasco and Sherman Counties. The mountain contributes valuable water, scenic, and recreational resources that help sustain the agricultural and tourist segments of the economies of surrounding cities and counties. Mount Hood is also one of the major volcanoes of the Cascade Range, having erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, most recently during two episodes in the past 1,500 yr. The last episode ended shortly before the arrival of Lewis and Clark in 1805. When Mount Hood erupts again, it will severely affect areas on its flanks and far downstream in the major river valleys that head on the volcano. Volcanic ash may fall on areas up to several hundred kilometers downwind. The purpose of the volcano hazard report USGS Open-File Report 97-89 (Scott and others, 1997) is to describe the kinds of hazardous geologic events that have happened at Mount Hood in the past and to show which areas will be at risk when such events occur in the future. This data release contains the geographic information system (GIS) data layers used to produce the Mount Hood volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-89. Both proximal and distal hazard zones were delineated by scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory and depict various volcano hazard areas around the mountain. A second data layer contains points that indicate estimated travel times of lahars.

  14. Improvements on Near Real Time Detection of Volcanic Ash Emissions for Emergency Monitoring with Limited Satellite Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torge Steensen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying volcanic ash emissions syneruptively is an important task for the global aviation community. However, due to the near real time nature of volcano monitoring, many parameters important for accurate ash mass estimates cannot be obtained easily. Even when using the best possible estimates of those parameters, uncertainties associated with the ash masses remain high, especially if the satellite data is only available in the traditional 10.8 and 12.0 μm bands. To counteract this limitation, we developed a quantitative comparison between the ash extents in satellite and model data. The focus is the manual cloud edge definition based on the available satellite reverse absorption (RA data as well as other knowledge like pilot reports or ground-based observations followed by an application of the Volcanic Ash Retrieval on the defined subset with an RA threshold of 0 K. This manual aspect, although subjective to the experience of the observer, can show a significant improvement as it provides the ability to highlight ash that otherwise would be obscured by meteorological clouds or, by passing over different surfaces with unaccounted temperatures, might be lost entirely and thus remains undetectable for an automated satellite approach. We show comparisons to Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion models and outline a quantitative match as well as percentages of overestimates based on satellite or dispersion model data which can be converted into a level of reliability for near real time volcano monitoring. 

  15. MAT 126 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    stylia

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 126 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Written Assignment (Arithmetic and geometric sequence) (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Assignment Is It Fat Free (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Assignment Quadratic Equations (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126...

  16. Characteristics and management of the 2006-2008 volcanic crisis at the Ubinas volcano (Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Marco; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Mariño, Jersy; Berolatti, Rossemary; Fuentes, José

    2010-12-01

    Ubinas volcano is located 75 km East of Arequipa and ca. 5000 people are living within 12 km from the summit. This composite cone is considered the most active volcano in southern Peru owing to its 24 low to moderate magnitude (VEI 1-3) eruptions in the past 500 years. The onset of the most recent eruptive episode occurred on 27 March 2006, following 8 months of heightened fumarolic activity. Vulcanian explosions occurred between 14 April 2006 and September 2007, at a time ejecting blocks up to 40 cm in diameter to distances of 2 km. Ash columns commonly rose to 3.5 km above the caldera rim and dispersed fine ash and aerosols to distances of 80 km between April 2006 and April 2007. Until April 2007, the total volume of ash was estimated at 0.004 km 3, suggesting that the volume of fresh magma was small. Ash fallout has affected residents, livestock, water supplies, and crop cultivation within an area of ca. 100 km 2 around the volcano. Continuous degassing and intermittent mild vulcanian explosions lasted until the end of 2008. Shortly after the initial explosions on mid April 2006 that spread ash fallout within 7 km of the volcano, an integrated Scientific Committee including three Peruvian institutes affiliated to the Regional Committee of Civil Defense for Moquegua, aided by members of the international cooperation, worked together to: i) elaborate and publish volcanic hazard maps; ii) inform and educate the population; and iii) advise regional authorities in regard to the management of the volcanic crisis and the preparation of contingency plans. Although the 2006-2008 volcanic crisis has been moderate, its management has been a difficult task even though less than 5000 people now live around the Ubinas volcano. However, the successful management has provided experience and skills to the scientific community. This volcanic crisis was not the first one that Peru has experienced but the 2006-2008 experience is the first long-lasting crisis that the Peruvian civil

  17. Dense Local Seismic Network at Villarrica Volcano (Southern Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Stock, C.; Thorwart, M.; Dzieran, L.; Rabbel, W.

    2013-12-01

    Villarrica volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Southern Andes. It has been presenting constant fumarole activity and seismicity since its last eruption in 1984-85. A local network was installed at Villarrica volcano (Southern Chile) during the first two weeks of March, 2012. In total, 75 DSS-Cube short-period stations (30 3-Component, 45 1-Component) were deployed at and around the volcano area, covering approx. 63 km x 55 km. The average station spacing is 1.5 km for stations inside the perimeter of the volcanic edifice, and 5km outside this perimeter. The network recorded ca. 94 volcano tectonic (VT) events located SSW, SSE and North of the crater, with clear P- and S-wave arrivals. Many others, ca.73 events, could be classified as 'hybrid' events (HB), which present high frequencies at the beginning of the signal, and a sharp and notorious S-wave at the crater stations, but a strong scattering, lower frequency content, and elongated coda on the stations along the volcanic edifice. This strong scattering effect is probably caused by the heterogeneous ash layers on the edifice structure. Few long period events (LP), with main frequencies between 2-4 Hz, were observed. From the tectonic regional events, three sets of events can be distinguished. One coming from the southern end of the focal plane of the Maule earthquake (2010), with S-P wave travel time difference of ca. 30 s or more. Another closer group with S-P wave travel time difference between 10 s and 20 s, and the last group with S-P wave travel time difference of 10 s or less. A cross-correlation analysis to the travel times of the regional events and a teleseismic event from Argentina was applied in order to determine the average velocity structure of the volcano, and obtained an average P-wave velocity of 3.6 km/s for the volcanic edifice inside a radius of 6.5 km, and 4.1 km/s for the surrounding area outside this radius. This model serves as a starting point for local earthquake

  18. Elementary analysis of data from Tianchi Volcano

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guo-ming; ZHANG Heng-rong; KONG Qing-jun; WU Cheng-zhi; GUO Feng; ZHANG Chao-fan

    2004-01-01

    Tianchi Volcano is the largest potential erupticve volcano in China. Analyzing these data on seismic monitoring, deformation observation and water chemistry investigation gained from the Tianchi Volcano Observatory (TVO), the authors consider that the Tianchi Volcano is in going into a new flourishing time.

  19. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

    2010-05-01

    ), Stromboli and Volcano (Italy), Hilo (Hawai), Mt. St. Helens (United States), CTM (Coherent Target Monitoring): Cumbre Vieja (La Palma) To generate products either Envisat ASAR, Radarsat 1or ALOS PALSAR data have been used. Surface Thermal Anomalies Volcanic hot-spots detection, radiant flux and effusion rate (where applicable) calculation of high temperature surface thermal anomalies such as active lava flow, strombolian activity, lava dome, pyroclastic flow and lava lake can be performed through MODIS (Terra / Aqua) MIR and TIR channels, or ASTER (Terra), HRVIR/HRGT (SPOT4/5) and Landsat family SWIR channels analysis. ASTER and Landsat TIR channels allow relative radiant flux calculation of low temperature anomalies such as lava and pyroclastic flow cooling, crater lake and low temperature fumarolic fields. MODIS, ASTER and SPOT data are processed to detect and measure the following volcanic surface phenomena: Effusive activity Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion Island); Mt Etna (Italy). Lava dome growths, collapses and related pyroclastic flows Soufrière Hills (Montserrat); Arenal - (Costa Rica). Permanent crater lake and ephemeral lava lake Karthala (Comores Islands). Strombolian activity Stromboli (Italy). Low temperature fumarolic fields Nisyros (Greece), Vulcano (Italy), Mauna Loa (Hawaii). Volcanic Emission The Volcanic Emission Service is provided to the users by a link to GSE-PROMOTE - Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). The aim of the service is to deliver in near-real-time data derived from satellite measurements regarding SO2 emissions (SO2 vertical column density - Dobson Unit [DU]) possibly related to volcanic eruptions and to track the ash injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic eruption. SO2 measurements are derived from different satellite instruments, such as SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The tracking of volcanic ash is accomplished by using SEVIRI-MSG data and, in particular, the following channels VIS 0.6 and IR 3.9, and along with IR8.7, IR 10

  20. Modulation of elementary calcium release mediates a transition from puffs to waves in an IP3R cluster model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rückl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The oscillating concentration of intracellular calcium is one of the most important examples for collective dynamics in cell biology. Localized releases of calcium through clusters of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channels constitute elementary signals called calcium puffs. Coupling by diffusing calcium leads to global releases and waves, but the exact mechanism of inter-cluster coupling and triggering of waves is unknown. To elucidate the relation of puffs and waves, we here model a cluster of IP3R channels using a gating scheme with variable non-equilibrium IP3 binding. Hybrid stochastic and deterministic simulations show that puffs are not stereotyped events of constant duration but are sensitive to stimulation strength and residual calcium. For increasing IP3 concentration, the release events become modulated at a timescale of minutes, with repetitive wave-like releases interspersed with several puffs. This modulation is consistent with experimental observations we present, including refractoriness and increase of puff frequency during the inter-wave interval. Our results suggest that waves are established by a random but time-modulated appearance of sustained release events, which have a high potential to trigger and synchronize activity throughout the cell.

  1. Impact of low-trans fat compositions on the quality of conventional and fat-reduced puff pastry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silow, Christoph; Zannini, Emanuele; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-04-01

    Four vegetable fat blends (FBs) with low trans-fatty acid (TFA ≤ 0.6 %) content with various ratios of palm stearin (PS) and rapeseed oil (RO) were characterised and examined for their application in puff pastry production. The amount of PS decreased from FB1 to FB4 and simultaneously the RO content increased. A range of analytical methods were used to characterise the FBs, including solid fat content (SFC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), cone penetrometry and rheological measurements. The internal and external structural quality parameters of baked puff pastry were investigated using texture analyser equipped with an Extended Craft Knife (ECK), VolScan and C-Cell image system. Puff pastry containing FB1 and FB2 achieved excellent baking results for full fat and fat-reduced puff pastry; hence these FBs contained adequate shortening properties. A fat reduction by 40 % using FB2 and a reduction of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) by 49 %, compared to the control, did not lead to adverse effects in lift and specific volume. The higher amount of RO and the lower SAFA content compared to FB1 coupled with the satisfying baking results makes FB2 the fat of choice in this study. FB3 and FB4 were found to be unsuitable for puff pastry production because of their melting behaviour.

  2. An aggregation model for ash particles in volcanic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, A.; Folch, A.; Macedonio, G.; Durant, A.

    2009-12-01

    A large fraction of fine ash particles injected into the atmosphere during explosive eruptions aggregate through complex interactions of surface liquid layers, electrostatic forces, and differences in particle settling velocities. The aggregates formed have a different size and density compared to primary particles formed during eruption which dramatically changes the dynamics of sedimentation from the volcanic cloud. Consequently, the lifetime of ash particles in the atmosphere is reduced and a distal mass deposition maximum is often generated in resulting tephra deposits. A complete and rigorous description of volcanic ash fallout requires the full coupling of models of volcanic cloud dynamics and dispersion, and ash particle transport, aggregation and sedimentation. Furthermore, volcanic ash transport models should include an aggregation model that accounts for the interaction of all particle size classes. The problem with this approach is that simulations would require excessively long computational times thereby prohibiting its application in an operational setting during an explosive volcanic eruption. Here we present a simplified model for ash particle transport and aggregation that includes the effects of water in the volcanic cloud and surrounding atmosphere. The aggregation model assumes a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in aggregates, average sticking efficiency factors, and collision frequency functions that account for Brownian motion, laminar and turbulent fluid shear, and differential settling velocity. A parametric study on the key parameters of the model was performed. We implemented the aggregation model in the WRF+FALL3D coupled modelling system and applied it to different eruptions where aggregation has been recognized to play an important role, including the August and September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions and the 1980 Mt St Helens eruption. In these cases, mass deposited as a function of deposit area and the particle

  3. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  4. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Teng [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Sino-Danish Center for Education and Research, Beijing, 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Songgeng, E-mail: sgli@ipe.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Song, Wenli [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Lin, Weigang [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-08-20

    Highlights: • A novel method is proposed to analyze fusion characteristics of biomass ash. • T{sub m} can represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. • Compared with AFT, TMA is the better choice to analyze the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. - Abstract: The ash fusion characteristics are important parameters for thermochemical utilization of biomass. In this research, a method for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash by Thermo-mechanical Analyzer, TMA, is described. The typical TMA shrinking ratio curve can be divided into two stages, which are closely related to ash melting behaviors. Several characteristics temperatures based on the TMA curves are used to assess the ash fusion characteristics. A new characteristics temperature, T{sub m}, is proposed to represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. The fusion characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates.

  5. Electrodialytic treatment of fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie

    Heavy metals are removed from the fly ashes by an electrodialytic treatment with the aim of up-grading the ashes for reuse in stead of disposal in landfill.A great potential for upgrading of bio- and waste incineration ashes by electrodialytic treatment exists. In the future, the applicability...

  6. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eaton, Alexa; Mastin, Larry G.; Herzog, M.; Schwaiger, Hans F.; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized ‘wet’ eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits, and numerical modeling demonstrate that volcanic hail formed rapidly in the eruption plume, leading to mixed-phase aggregation of ~95% of the fine ash and stripping much of the cloud out of the atmosphere within 30 minutes. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and the occurrence of concentrically-layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  7. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  8. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  9. El Misti Volcano and the City of Arequipa, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This three-dimensional perspective view was created from an Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Digital Elevation Model combined with a simulated natural color ASTER image, acquired July 13, 2001. It shows El Misti volcano towering 5822 meters high above the second city of Peru, Arequipa, with a population of more than one million. Geologic studies indicate that El Misti has had five minor eruptions this century, and a major eruption in the 15th century when residents were forced to flee the city. Despite the obvious hazard, civil defense authorities see it as a remote danger, and city planners are not avoiding development on the volcano side of the city. This view shows human development extending up the flanks of the volcano along gullies which would form natural channels for flows of lava, superheated ash and gas, or melted ice, snow, and mud from the summit snowfield in the event of an eruption. Image by Mike Abrams, NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  10. Volcano-related materials in concretes: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Gaochuang; Noguchi, Takafumi; Degée, Hervé; Zhao, Jun; Kitagaki, Ryoma

    2016-04-01

    Massive volcano-related materials (VRMs) erupted from volcanoes bring the impacts to natural environment and humanity health worldwide, which include generally volcanic ash (VA), volcanic pumice (VP), volcanic tuff (VT), etc. Considering the pozzolanic activities and mechanical characters of these materials, civil engineers propose to use them in low carbon/cement and environment-friendly concrete industries as supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) or artificial/natural aggregates. The utilization of VRMs in concretes has attracted increasing and pressing attentions from research community. Through a literature review, this paper presents comprehensively the properties of VRMs and VRM concretes (VRMCs), including the physical and chemical properties of raw VRMs and VRMCs, and the fresh, microstructural and mechanical properties of VRMCs. Besides, considering environmental impacts and the development of long-term properties, the durability and stability properties of VRMCs also are summarized in this paper. The former focuses on the resistance properties of VRMCs when subjected to aggressive environmental impacts such as chloride, sulfate, seawater, and freezing-thawing. The latter mainly includes the fatigue, creep, heat-insulating, and expansion properties of VRMCs. This study will be helpful to promote the sustainability in concrete industries, protect natural environment, and reduce the impacts of volcano disaster. Based on this review, some main conclusions are discussed and important recommendations regarding future research on the application of VRMs in concrete industries are provided.

  11. Update of the volcanic risk map of Colima volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nuñez Cornu, F. J.; Marquez-Azua, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Colima volcano, located in western Mexico (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W) began its current eruptive process in February 10, 1999. This event was the basis for the development of two volcanic hazard maps: one for ballistics (rock fall) lahars, and another one for ash fall. During the period of 2003 to 2008 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-Plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano thanks to the low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time The current volcanic activity has triggered ballistic projections, pyroclastic and ash flows, and lahars, all have exceeded the maps limits established in 1999. Vulnerable elements within these areas have gradually changed due to the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano. On the slopes of the northwest side, new blue agave Tequilana weber and avocado orchard crops have emerged along with important production of greenhouse tomato, alfalfa and fruit (citrus) crops that will eventually be processed and dried for exportation to the United States and Europe. Also, in addition to the above, large expanses of corn and sugar cane have been planted on the slopes of the volcano since the nineteenth century. The increased agricultural activity has had a direct impact in the reduction of the available forest land area. Coinciding with this increased activity, the 0.8% growth population during the period of 2000 - 2005, - due to the construction of the Guadalajara-Colima highway-, also increased this impact. The growth in vulnerability changed the level of risk with respect to the one identified in the year 1999 (Suarez, 2000), thus motivating us to perform an update to the risk map at 1:25,000 using vector models of the INEGI, SPOT images of different dates, and fieldwork done in order

  12. Degassing Processes at Persistently Active Explosive Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekens, Jean-Francois

    Among volcanic gases, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is by far the most commonly measured. More than a monitoring proxy for volcanic degassing, SO 2 has the potential to alter climate patterns. Persistently active explosive volcanoes are characterized by short explosive bursts, which often occur at periodic intervals numerous times per day, spanning years to decades. SO 2 emissions at those volcanoes are poorly constrained, in large part because the current satellite monitoring techniques are unable to detect or quantify plumes of low concentration in the troposphere. Eruption plumes also often show high concentrations of ash and/or aerosols, which further inhibit the detection methods. In this work I focus on quantifying volcanic gas emissions at persistently active explosive volcanoes and their variations over short timescales (minutes to hours), in order to document their contribution to natural SO2 flux as well as investigate the physical processes that control their behavior. In order to make these measurements, I first develop and assemble a UV ground-based instrument, and validate it against an independently measured source of SO2 at a coal-burning power plant in Arizona. I establish a measurement protocol and demonstrate that the instrument measures SO 2 fluxes with explosions with periods of minutes to hours for the past several decades. Semeru produces an average of 21-71 tons of SO2 per day, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Mt. Using the Semeru data, along with a 1-D transient numerical model of magma ascent, I test the validity of a model in which a viscous plug at the top of the conduit produces cycles of eruption and gas release. I find that it can be a valid hypothesis to explain the observed patterns of degassing at Semeru. Periodic behavior in such a system occurs for a very narrow range of conditions, for which the mass balance between magma flux and open-system gas escape repeatedly generates a viscous plug, pressurizes the magma beneath the plug, and

  13. 'Is Ash Falling?', an online ashfall reporting tool in support of improved ashfall warnings and investigations of ashfall processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kristi; Snedigar, Seth; Cameron, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    The primary volcano hazard in Alaska is airborne ash, which endangers aircraft flying the busy North Pacific air routes and consequently affects global commerce. Downwind ashfall is also a significant threat to commerce, transportation and day-to-day activities in nearby Alaska communities. A web-enabled database, "Is Ash Falling?" has been developed to collect ashfall observations and encourage sample collections from the public during eruptions, enabling volcano observatory staff to concentrate on eruption response. Knowing the locations of filed ashfall reports improves public ashfall warnings and forecasts by providing on-the-ground checks for ash dispersion and fallout computer models and satellite imagery interpretation. Reports of ashfall are shared with emergency management agencies and the wider public. These reports also give scientists a more complete record of the amount, duration and other conditions of ashfall.

  14. Active Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands: A Reference Guide for Aviation Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Rybin, Alexander; Chibisova, Marina; Miller, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The many volcanoes of the remote and mostly uninhabited Kurile Island arc (fig. 1; table 1) pose a serious hazard for air traffic in the North Pacific. Ash clouds from Kurile eruptions can impact some of the busiest air travel routes in the world and drift quickly into airspace managed by three countries: Russia, Japan, and the United States. Prevailing westerly winds throughout the region will most commonly send ash from any Kurile eruption directly across the parallel North Pacific airways between North America and Asia (Kristine A. Nelson, National Weather Service, oral commun., 2006; fig. 1). This report presents maps showing locations of the 36 most active Kurile volcanoes plotted on Operational Navigational Charts published by the Defense Mapping Agency (map sheets ONC F-10, F-11, and E-10; figs. 1, 2, 3, 4). These maps are intended to assist aviation and other users in the identification of restless Kurile volcanoes. A regional map is followed by three subsections of the Kurile volcanic arc (North, Central, South). Volcanoes and selected primary geographic features are labeled. All maps contain schematic versions of the principal air routes and selected air navigational fixes in this region.

  15. Comparison of Puff Volume With Cigarettes per Day in Predicting Nicotine Uptake Among Daily Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Nicolle M; Chen, Allshine; Zhu, Junjia; Sun, Dongxiao; Liao, Jason; Stennett, Andrea L; Muscat, Joshua E

    2016-07-01

    The role of inhalation behaviors as predictors of nicotine uptake was examined in the Pennsylvania Adult Smoking Study (2012-2014), a study of 332 adults whose cigarette smoking was measured in a naturalistic environment (e.g., at home) with portable handheld topography devices. Piecewise regression analyses showed that levels of salivary cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and total salivary nicotine metabolites (cotinine + trans-3'-hydroxycotinine) increased linearly up to a level of about 1 pack per day (20 cigarettes per day (CPD)) (P < 0.01). Total daily puff volume (TDPV; in mL) (P < 0.05) and total daily number of puffs (P < 0.05), but not other topographical measures, increased linearly with CPD up to a level of about 1 pack per day. The mean level of cotinine per cigarette did not change above 20 CPD and was 36% lower in heavy smokers (≥20 CPD) than in lighter smokers (<20 CPD) (15.6 ng/mL vs. 24.5 ng/mL, respectively; P < 0.01). Mediation models showed that TDPV accounted for 43%-63% of the association between CPD and nicotine metabolites for smokers of <20 CPD. TDPV was the best predictor of nicotine metabolite levels in light-to-moderate smokers (1-19 CPD). In contrast, neither CPD, total daily number of puffs, nor TDPV predicted nicotine metabolite levels above 20 CPD (up to 40 CPD). Finally, although light smokers are traditionally considered less dependent on nicotine, these findings suggest that they are exposed to more nicotine per cigarette than are heavy smokers due to more frequent, intensive puffing.

  16. Characterization of pulsed capillary channel gas puff target using EUV shadowgraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, P.W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.com; Bartnik, A.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Fok, T.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Jarocki, R.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2015-02-15

    Characterization measurements of a pulsed capillary channel gas puff target, developed for applications in laser-matter interaction experiments, are presented. The target is produced by pulsed injection of gas through a slit-shaped nozzle into a capillary channel and has been characterized by EUV radiography at 13.5 nm wavelength. Time dependent gas flow effects and flow shaping by capillary walls were visualized. Density measurements for argon were performed on axis for variable timing conditions and variable backing pressures. This target, due to its advantages, might be an interesting alternative for lower repetition rate and higher energy laser-matter interaction experiments.

  17. MGT 330 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    alfoniz

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 330 Week 1 Individual Assignment Functions of Management Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 3 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Team Assignment External Internal Factors Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Individual Assignment Delegation (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 W...

  18. Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Founded in 1912 at the edge of the caldera of Kīlauea Volcano, HVO was the vision of Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., a geologist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, whose studies of natural disasters around the world had convinced him that systematic, continuous observations of seismic and volcanic activity were needed to better understand—and potentially predict—earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Jaggar summarized the aim of HVO by stating that “the work should be humanitarian” and have the goals of developing “prediction and methods of protecting life and property on the basis of sound scientific achievement.” These goals align well with those of the USGS, whose mission is to serve the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage natural resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life.

  19. Simulations of gas puff effects on edge density and ICRF coupling in ASDEX upgrade using EMC3-Eirene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W., E-mail: wei.zhang@ipp.mpg.de [Applied Physics Department, University of Ghent, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Lunt, T.; Bobkov, V.; Coster, D.; Brida, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Applied Physics Department, University of Ghent, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Jacquet, P. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Feng, Y. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    Simulations were carried out with the 3D plasma transport code EMC3-EIRENE, to study the deuterium gas (D{sub 2}) puff effects on edge density and the coupling of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) power in ASDEX Upgrade. Firstly we simulated an inter-ELM phase of an H-mode discharge with a moderate (1.2 × 10{sup 22} electrons/s) lower divertor gas puff. Then we changed the gas source positions to the mid-plane or top of machine while keeping other conditions the same. Cases with different mid-plane or top gas valves are investigated. Our simulations indicate that compared to lower divertor gas puffing, the mid-plane gas puff can enhance the local density in front of the antennas most effectively, while a rather global (toroidally uniform) but significantly smaller enhancement is found for top gas puffing. Our results show quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  20. 5-Bromo-2’-deoxyuridine induces visible morphological alteration in the DNA puffs of the anterior salivary gland region of Bradysia hygida (Diptera, Sciaridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. de Almeida

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available 5-Bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd has long been known to interfere with cell differentiation. We found that treatment ofBradysia hygida larvae with BrdUrd during DNA puff anlage formation in the polytene chromosomes of the salivary gland S1 region noticeably affects anlage morphology. However, it does not affect subsequent metamorphosis to the adult stage. The chromatin of the chromosomal sites that would normally form DNA puffs remains very compact and DNA puff expansion does not occur with administration of 4 to 8 mM BrdUrd. Injection of BrdUrd at different ages provoked a gradient of compaction of the DNA puff chromatin, leading to the formation of very small to almost normal puffs. By immunodetection, we show that the analogue is preferentially incorporated into the DNA puff anlages. When BrdUrd is injected in a mixture with thymidine, it is not incorporated into the DNA, and normal DNA puffs form. Therefore, incorporation of this analogue into the amplified DNA seems to be the cause of this extreme compaction. Autoradiographic experiments and silver grains counting showed that this treatment decreases the efficiency of RNA synthesis at DNA puff anlages.

  1. Cloning of a gene localized and expressed at the ecdysteroid regulated puff 74EF in salivary glands of Drosophila larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möritz, T; Edström, J E; Pongs, O

    1984-02-01

    The puffing cycle of salivary gland chromosomes of Drosophila larvae, which initiates the developmental path to pupariation, is induced by ecdysteroid hormone. Its action leads to prominent puffs at loci 2B5, 74EF and 75B. Fragments of the 74EF puff of the D. melanogaster 3L chromosome were microdissected from salivary gland squashes. EcoRI-digested DNA of these fragments was cloned into lambda phage. Clones were screened with puff stage-specific cDNA probes. Thirteen out of 650 clones hybridized preferentially with puff stage 4-specific cDNA. The prominent early puffs at 74EF and 75B are most active between puff stage 4 and 6. Therefore, one of the 13 lambda phages was chosen for further analysis. It was used to isolate 24 kb of Drosophila DNA from genomic libraries. The DNA hybridized in situ to locus 74F. The 74F DNA coded for a transcript, which was made in salivary glands, but not in fat body of third instar larvae. It accumulated in K(C) cells in response to ecdysteroid treatment. The polyadenylated transcript size was 2.7 kb as judged by Nothern blot analysis. The transcription start site of the 74F gene has been mapped. Sequences upstream of the transcription site contain several sequence elements common to other eucaryotic genes, including potential Z-DNA forming sequences. Also, there is sequence homology to upstream sequences, which have been involved in the regulation of transcription of the salivary gland glue protein 4 gene.

  2. Volcanoes in Eruption - Set 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The word volcano is used to refer to the opening from which molten rock and gas issue from Earth's interior onto the surface, and also to the cone, hill, or mountain...

  3. Volcanoes in Eruption - Set 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The word volcano is used to refer to the opening from which molten rock and gas issue from Earth's interior onto the surface, and also to the cone, hill, or mountain...

  4. USGS Volcano Notification Service (VNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Website provides a subscription service to receive an email when changes occur in the activity levels for monitored U.S. volcanoes and/or when information releases...

  5. Volcanic hazard zonation of the Nevado de Toluca volcano, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, L.; Norini, G.; Groppelli, G.; Macías, J. L.; Arce, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    The Nevado de Toluca is a quiescent volcano located 20 km southwest of the City of Toluca and 70 km west of Mexico City. It has been quiescent since its last eruptive activity, dated at ˜ 3.3 ka BP. During the Pleistocene and Holocene, it experienced several eruptive phases, including five dome collapses with the emplacement of block-and-ash flows and four Plinian eruptions, including the 10.5 ka BP Plinian eruption that deposited more than 10 cm of sand-sized pumice in the area occupied today by Mexico City. A detailed geological map coupled with computer simulations (FLOW3D, TITAN2D, LAHARZ and HAZMAP softwares) were used to produce the volcanic hazard assessment. Based on the final hazard zonation the northern and eastern sectors of Nevado de Toluca would be affected by a greater number of phenomena in case of reappraisal activity. Block-and-ash flows will affect deep ravines up to a distance of 15 km and associated ash clouds could blanket the Toluca basin, whereas ash falls from Plinian events will have catastrophic effects for populated areas within a radius of 70 km, including the Mexico City Metropolitan area, inhabited by more than 20 million people. Independently of the activity of the volcano, lahars occur every year, affecting small villages settled down flow from main ravines.

  6. The 2008 Eruption of Chaitén Volcano, Chile and National Volcano-Monitoring Programs in the U.S. and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, J. W.; Lara, L. E.; Moreno, H.

    2008-12-01

    Chaitén volcano, southern Chile, began erupting on 2 May 2008. The eruption produced 3 Plinian eruption pulses between May 2 and 8. Between Plinian phases the volcano emitted a constant column of ash to approximately 10 km, gradually diminishing to approximately 3 km by the end of June. The eruption of Chaitén was remarkable on several counts--it was the first rhyolite eruption on the planet since Novarupta (Katmai) erupted in 1912, and Chaitén had apparently lain dormant for approximately 9300 years. Though Chaitén is located in a generally sparsely populated region, the eruption had widespread impacts. More than 5000 people had to be quickly evacuated from proximal areas and aviation in southern South America was disrupted for weeks. Within 10 days secondary lahars had overrun much of the town of Chaitén complicating the prospects of the townspeople to return to their homes. Prior to the eruption onset, the nearest real-time seismic station was 300 km distant, and earthquakes were not felt by local citizens until approximately 30 hours before the eruption onset. No other signs of unrest were noted. Owing to the lack of near-field monitoring, and the nighttime eruption onset, there was initial confusion about which volcano was erupting: Chaitén or nearby Michinmahuida. Lack of monitoring systems at Chaitén meant that warning time for the public at risk was extremely short, and owing to the nature of the eruption and the physical geography of the area, it was very difficult to install monitoring instruments to track its progress after the eruption started. The lack of geophysical monitoring also means that an important data set on precursory behavior for silicic systems was not collected. With more than 120 Pleistocene to Holocene-age volcanoes within its continental territory, Chile is one of the more volcanically active countries in the world. The eruption of Chaitén has catalyzed the creation of a new program within the Servicio Nacional de Geología y

  7. GLACIERS OF THE KORYAK VOLCANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Manevich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents main glaciological characteristics of present-day glaciers located on the Koryaksky volcano. The results of fieldwork (2008–2009 and high-resolution satellite image analysis let us to specify and complete information on modern glacial complex of Koryaksky volcano. Now there are seven glaciers with total area 8.36 km2. Three of them advance, two are in stationary state and one degrades. Moreover, the paper describes the new crater glacier.

  8. Mahukona: The missing Hawaiian volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.O.; Muenow, D.W. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA)); Kurz, M.D. (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    New bathymetric and geochemical data indicate that a seamount west of the island of Hawaii, Mahukona, is a Hawaiian shield volcano. Mahukona has weakly alkalic lavas that are geochemically distinct. They have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios (12-21 times atmosphere), and high H{sub 2}O and Cl contents, which are indicative of the early state of development of Hawaiian volcanoes. The He and Sr isotopic values for Mahukona lavas are intermediate between those for lavas from Loihi and Manuna Loa volcanoes and may be indicative of a temporal evolution of Hawaiian magmas. Mahukona volcano became extinct at about 500 ka, perhaps before reaching sea level. It fills the previously assumed gap in the parallel chains of volcanoes forming the southern segment of the Hawaiian hotspot chain. The paired sequence of volcanoes was probably caused by the bifurcation of the Hawaiian mantle plume during its ascent, creating two primary areas of melting 30 to 40 km apart that have persisted for at least the past 4 m.y.

  9. French airborne lidar measurements for Eyjafjallajökull ash plume survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chazette

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An Ultra-Violet Rayleigh-Mie lidar has been integrated aboard the French research aircraft Falcon 20 in order to monitor the ash plume emitted by the Eyjafjallajökul volcano in April–May 2010. Three operational flights were carried out on 21 April, 12 and 16 May 2010 inside French, Spanish and British air spaces, respectively. The original purpose of the flights was to provide the French civil aviation authorities with objective information on the presence and location of the ash plume. The present paper presents the results of detailed analyses elaborated after the volcano crisis. They bear on the structure of the ash clouds and their optical properties such as ash extinction coefficient and lidar ratio. Lidar ratios were measured in the range of 33 to 48 sr, in good agreement with the ratios derived from ground-based lidar measurements performed near Paris (France in April 2010 (∼47 sr. The ash signature in terms of particulate depolarization was consistent around 45 ± 7% during all flights. Such a value seems to be a good identification parameter for ash. Using specific cross-sections between 0.29 and 1.1 m2 g−1, the minimum (maximal mass concentrations in the ash plumes are derived for the flights on 12 and 16 May. They were 190 (2300 and 270 (1600 μg m−3, respectively. It may be rather less than, or of the order of the critical level of damage (2 mg m−3 for the aircraft engines, but well above the 200 μg m−3 warning level.

  10. Observing changes at Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala with an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Aulock, Felix W.; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian J.; Lamb, Oliver D.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.

    2016-04-01

    Santiaguito Volcano (Guatemala) is one of the most active volcanoes in Central America, producing several ash venting explosions per day for almost 100 years. Lahars, lava flows and dome and flank collapses that produce major pyroclastic density currents also present a major hazard to nearby farms and communities. Optical observations of both the vent as well as the lava flow fronts can provide scientists and local monitoring staff with important information on the current state of volcanic activity and hazard. Due to the strong activity, and difficult terrain, unmanned aerial vehicles can help to provide valuable data on the activities of the volcano at a safe distance. We collected a series of images and video footage of A.) The active vent of Caliente and B.) The flow front of the active lava flow and its associated lahar channels, both in May 2015 and in December 2015- January 2016. Images of the crater and the lava flows were used for the reconstruction of 3D terrain models using structure-from-motion. These were supported by still frames from the video recording. Video footage of the summit crater (during two separate ash venting episodes) and the lava flow fronts indicate the following differences in activity during those two field campaigns: A.) - A new breach opened on the east side of the crater rim, possibly during the collapse in November 2015. - The active lava dome is now almost completely covered with ash, only leaving the largest blocks and faults exposed in times without gas venting - A recorded explosive event in December 2015 initiates at subparallel linear faults near the centre of the dome, rather than arcuate or ring faults, with a later, separate, and more ash-laden burst occurring from an off-centre fracture, however, other explosions during the observation period were seen to persist along the ring fault system observed on the lava dome since at least 2007 - suggesting a diversification of explosive activity. B.) - The lava flow fronts did

  11. An ambusher's arsenal: chemical crypsis in the puff adder (Bitis arietans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ashadee Kay; Maritz, Bryan; McKay, Shannon; Glaudas, Xavier; Alexander, Graham J

    2015-12-22

    Ambush foragers use a hunting strategy that places them at risk of predation by both visual and olfaction-oriented predators. Resulting selective pressures have driven the evolution of impressive visual crypsis in many ambushing species, and may have led to the development of chemical crypsis. However, unlike for visual crypsis, few studies have attempted to demonstrate chemical crypsis. Field observations of puff adders (Bitis arietans) going undetected by several scent-orientated predator and prey species led us to investigate chemical crypsis in this ambushing species. We trained dogs (Canis familiaris) and meerkats (Suricata suricatta) to test whether a canid and a herpestid predator could detect B. arietans using olfaction. We also tested for chemical crypsis in five species of active foraging snakes, predicted to be easily detectable. Dogs and meerkats unambiguously indicated active foraging species, but failed to correctly indicate puff adder, confirming that B. arietans employs chemical crypsis. This is the first demonstration of chemical crypsis anti-predatory behaviour, though the phenomenon may be widespread among ambushers, especially those that experience high mortality rates owing to predation. Our study provides additional evidence for the existence of an ongoing chemically mediated arms race between predator and prey species.

  12. 3D simulations of gas puff effects on edge plasma and ICRF coupling in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Jacquet, P.; Lerche, E.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Coster, D.; Feng, Y.; Guillemaut, C.; Goniche, M.; Harting, D.; Lunt, T.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Szepesi, G.; Van Eester, D.; JET Contributors, the

    2017-05-01

    Recent JET (ITER-Like Wall) experiments have shown that the fueling gas puffed from different locations of the vessel can result in different scrape-off layer (SOL) density profiles and therefore different radio frequency (RF) coupling. To reproduce the experimental observations, to understand the associated physics and to optimize the gas puff methods, we have carried out three-dimensional (3D) simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code in JET-ILW including a realistic description of the vessel geometry and the gas injection modules (GIMs) configuration. Various gas puffing methods have been investigated, in which the location of gas fueling is the only variable parameter. The simulation results are in quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements. They confirm that compared to divertor gas fueling, mid-plane gas puffing increases the SOL density most significantly but locally, while top gas puffing increases it uniformly in toroidal direction but to a lower degree. Moreover, the present analysis corroborates the experimental findings that combined gas puff scenarios—based on distributed main chamber gas puffing—can be effective in increasing the RF coupling for multiple antennas simultaneously. The results indicate that the spreading of the gas, the local ionization and the transport of the ionized gas along the magnetic field lines connecting the local gas cloud in front of the GIMs to the antennas are responsible for the enhanced SOL density and thus the larger RF coupling.

  13. Generation of soft x-ray radiation by laser irradiation of a gas puff xenon target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Szczurek, M. [Military Univ. of Technology, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Optoelectronics] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Plasmas produced from laser-irradiated gas puff xenon targets, created by pulsed injection of xenon with high-pressure solenoid valve, offer the possibility of realizing a debrisless x-ray point source for the x-ray lithography applications. In this paper the authors present results of the experimental investigations on the x-ray generation from a gas puff xenon target irradiated with nanosecond high-power laser pulses produced using two different laser facilities: a Nd:glass laser operating at 1.06 {micro}m, which generated 10--15 J pulses in 1 ns FWHM, and Nd:glass slab laser, producing pulses of 10 ns duration with energy reaching 12 J for a 0.53 {micro}m wavelength or 20 J for 1.05 {micro}m. To study the x-ray emission different x-ray diagnostic methods have been used. X-ray spectra were registered using a flat CsAP crystal spectrograph with an x-ray film or a curved KAP crystal spectrograph with a convex curvature to an x-ray CCD readout detector. X-ray images have been taken using pinhole cameras with an x-ray film or a CCD array. X-ray yield was measured with the use of semiconductor detectors (silicon photodiodes or diamond photoconductors).

  14. X-ray laser experiments by using a gas puff target with the ASTERIX IV facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Fill, E.; Li, Y.; Pretzler, G.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-05-01

    We report the first X-ray laser experiments with the use of laser-irradiated gas puff targets. The targets, produced by pulsed injection of a small amount of gas from a high-pressure solenoid valve through a nozzle in a form of a slit, has been characterized by optical interferometry and X-ray backlighting. The formation of elongated hot plasma columns up to 30-mm long is demonstrated. The spatial uniformity of the column was monitored by means of an X-ray pinhole camera. XUV spectra measurements for SF{sub 6} gas puff targets show predominant 3{endash}2 line of hydrogenic fluorine ({lambda}=8.1 nm), however, only linear increasing of its intensity with the target length was observed. An inversion on the lithium-like 4{ital d}-3{ital p} line can be inferred from the relative intensities of the Li-like resonance lines. Results for Kr target indicate that the plasma temperature was too low to create Ne-like ions. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Can one puff really make an adolescent addicted to nicotine? A critical review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frenk Hanan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rationale In the past decade, there have been various attempts to understand the initiation and progression of tobacco smoking among adolescents. One line of research on these issues has made strong claims regarding the speed in which adolescents can become physically and mentally addicted to smoking. According to these claims, and in contrast to other models of smoking progression, adolescents can lose autonomy over their smoking behavior after having smoked one puff in their lifetime and never having smoked again, and can become mentally and physically "hooked on nicotine" even if they have never smoked a puff. Objectives To critically examine the conceptual and empirical basis for the claims made by the "hooked on nicotine" thesis. Method We reviewed the major studies on which the claims of the "hooked on nicotine" research program are based. Results The studies we reviewed contained substantive conceptual and methodological flaws. These include an untenable and idiosyncratic definition of addiction, use of single items or of very lenient criteria for diagnosing nicotine dependence, reliance on responders' causal attributions in determining physical and mental addiction to nicotine and biased coding and interpretation of the data. Discussion The conceptual and methodological problems detailed in this review invalidate many of the claims made by the "hooked on nicotine" research program and undermine its contribution to the understanding of the nature and development of tobacco smoking in adolescents.

  16. 2006-2008 Eruptions and Volcano Hazards Of Soputan Volcano, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendratno, K.; Pallister, J. S.; McCausland, W. A.; Kristianto, M.; Bina, F. R.; Carn, S. A.; Haerani, N.; Griswold, J.; Keeler, R.

    2010-12-01

    typical of basalt volcanoes. The current open vent structure and frequent eruptions indicate that Soputan will likely erupt again in the next decade, perhaps repeatedly. Eruptions are likely to be explosive, in the VEI 2-3 range, with a small chance of larger VEI 4 eruptions. A rapid ramp up in seismicity preceding the 2008 eruptions suggests that future eruptions may have only a few days of seismic warning. Risk to population in the region is greatest for villages located on the southern and western flanks of the volcano where flow and fall deposits are most likely, for rock miners who frequent the upper slopes of the western flank, and for tourists who visit the National Park on the upper eastern flank. In addition, Soputan’s eruptions produce high-altitude ash clouds, which can drift long distances and pose a risk to air traffic throughout the region.

  17. Permanent Infrasound Monitoring of Active Volcanoes in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, M. C.; Yepes, H. A.; Steele, A.; Segovia, M.; Vaca, S.; Cordova, A.; Enriquez, W.; Vaca, M.; Ramos, C.; Arrais, S.; Tapa, I.; Mejia, F.; Macias, C.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2006, infrasound monitoring has become a permanent tool for observing, analyzing and understanding volcanic activity in Ecuador. Within the framework of a cooperative project between the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Instituto Geofísico to enhance volcano monitoring capabilities within the country, 10 infrasound sensors were deployed in conjunction with broadband seismic stations at Cotopaxi and Tungurahua volcanoes. Each station comprises 1 ACO microphone (model 7144) and an amplifier with a flat response down to 0.1 Hz. At Tungurahua, between July 2006 and July 2013, the network recorded more than 5,500 explosion events with peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes larger than 45 Pa at station Mason (BMAS) which is located ~ 5.5 km from the active crater. This includes 3 explosions with pressure amplitudes larger than 1,000 Pa and which all have exhibited clear shock wave components. Two seismic and infrasound arrays were also installed in 2006 under the Acoustic Surveillance for Hazardous Eruptions (ASHE) project, used in volcano monitoring at Tungurahua, Sangay, and Reventador. This venture was led by the Geological Survey of Canada and the University of Hawaii. Through the SENESCYT-IGEPN project, the Instituto Geofísico is currently installing a regional network of MB2005 microbarometers with the aim to enhance monitoring of active and potentially active volcanoes that include Reventador, Guagua Pichincha, Chimborazo, Antisana, Sangay, and Volcán Chico in the Galapagos Islands. Through the infrasound monitoring station at Volcán Chico it is also possible to extend observations to any activity initiated from Sierra Negra, Fernandina, Cerro Azul, and Alcedo volcanoes. During the past decade, a series of temporary acoustic arrays have also been deployed around Ecuador's most active volcanoes, helping to aid in short term volcanic monitoring and/or used in a series of research projects aimed at better understanding volcanic systems

  18. Validation and Analysis of SRTM and VCL Data Over Tropical Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    which are usually identifiable. Due to the delay in the release of the SRTM data following the February 2000 flight, a significant part of our effort was devoted to the analog studies of the SRTM topographic data using topographic data from airborne interferometric radars. As part of the original SRTM Science Team, we proposed four study sites (Kilauea, Hawaii; Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines; Cerro Am1 and Femandina volcanoes, Galapagos Islands; and Tengger caldera, Java) where we could conduct detailed geologic studies to evaluate the uses of SRTM data for the analysis of lava flows, lahars, erosion of ash deposits, and an evaluation of the structural setting of the volcanoes. Only near the end of this project was one of these SRTM Science Team products (Luzon Island, the Philippines) released to the community, and we only had limited time to work on these data.

  19. Increased Melting of Glaciers during Cotopaxi volcano awakening in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Patricio; Vallejo, Silvia; Almeida, Marco; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Caceres, Bolivar

    2016-04-01

    Cotopaxi (5897 m), located about 50 km south of Quito (Ecuador), is one of the most active volcanoes in the Andes and its historical eruptions have caused a great impact on the population by the generation of lahars along its three main drainages (N, S, E). Starting on April 2015 the seismic monitoring networks and the SO2 gas detection network in May 2015 showed a significant increase from their background values, in June a geodetic instrument located in the NE flank started to record inflation; all this indicated the beginning of a new period of unrest. On August 14, five small phreatic explosions occurred, accompanied by large gas and ash emissions, ash falls were reported to the W of the volcano and to the S of Quito capital city. Three new episodes of ash and gas emissions occurred afterwards and towards the end of November 2015, the different monitoring parameters indicated a progressive reduction in the activity of the volcano. Since August 18 almost weekly overflights were made in order to conduct thermal (FLIR camera), visual and SO2 gas monitoring. Towards the end of August thermal measurements showed for the first time the presence of new thermal anomalies (13.5 to 16.3 °C) located in the crevices of the N glaciers, at the same time fumarolic gases were observed coming out from those fractures. On a flight made on September 3, the presence of water coming out from the basal fronts of the northern glaciers was clearly observed and the formation of narrow streams of water running downslope, while it was evident the appearance of countless new crevices in the majority of glacier ends, but also new cracks and rockslides on the upper flanks. All this led to the conclusion that an abnormal process was producing the melting of the glaciers around the volcano. Starting on September it was possible to observe the presence of small secondary lahars descending several streams and we estimated that many of them are due to increased glacier melting. Later

  20. Ash Management Review—Applications of Biomass Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpuneet S. Ghuman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In industrialized countries, it is expected that the future generation of bioenergy will be from the direct combustion of residues and wastes obtained from biomass. Bioenergy production using woody biomass is a fast developing application since this fuel source is considered to be carbon neutral. The harnessing of bioenergy from these sources produces residue in the form of ash. As the demand for bioenergy production increases, ash and residue volumes will increase. Major challenges will arise relating to the efficient management of these byproducts. The primary concerns for ash are its storage, disposal, use and the presence of unburned carbon. The continual increase in ash volume will result in decreased ash storage facilities (in cases of limited room for landfill expansion, as well as increased handling, transporting and spreading costs. The utilization of ash has been the focus of many studies, hence this review investigates the likely environmental and technological challenges that increased ash generation may cause. The presence of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, chlorine, sulphur and silicon influences the reactivity and leaching to the inorganic phases which may have significant impacts on soils and the recycling of soil nutrient. Discussed are some of the existing technologies for the processing of ash. Unburned carbon present in ash allows for the exploration of using ash as a fuel. The paper proposes sieve fractionation as a suitable method for the separation of unburnt carbon present in bottom ash obtained from a fixed-bed combustion system, followed by the application of the gasification technology to particle sizes of energy importance. It is hoped that this process will significantly reduce the volume of ash disposed at landfills.

  1. "Mediterranean volcanoes vs. chain volcanoes in the Carpathians"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivarean, Radu

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes have always represent an attractive subject for students. Europe has a small number of volcanoes and Romania has none active ones. The curricula is poor in the study of volcanoes. We want to make a parallel between the Mediterranean active volcanoes and the old extinct ones in the Oriental Carpathians. We made an comparison of the two regions in what concerns their genesis, space and time distribution, the specific relief and the impact in the landscape, consequences of their activities, etc… The most of the Mediterranean volcanoes are in Italy, in the peninsula in Napoli's area - Vezuviu, Campi Flegrei, Puzzoli, volcanic islands in Tirenian Sea - Ischia, Aeolian Islands, Sicily - Etna and Pantelleria Island. Santorini is located in Aegean Sea - Greece. Between Sicily and Tunisia there are 13 underwater volcanoes. The island called Vulcano, it has an active volcano, and it is the origin of the word. Every volcano in the world is named after this island, just north of Sicily. Vulcano is the southernmost of the 7 main Aeolian Islands, all volcanic in origin, which together form a small island arc. The cause of the volcanoes appears to be a combination of an old subduction event and tectonic fault lines. They can be considered as the origin of the science of volcanology. The volcanism of the Carpathian region is part of the extensive volcanic activity in the Mediterranean and surrounding regions. The Carpathian Neogene/Quaternary volcanic arc is naturally subdivided into six geographically distinct segments: Oas, Gutai, Tibles, Calimani, Gurghiu and Harghita. It is located roughly between the Carpathian thrust-and-fold arc to the east and the Transylvanian Basin to the west. It formed as a result of the convergence between two plate fragments, the Transylvanian micro-plate and the Eurasian plate. Volcanic edifices are typical medium-sized andesitic composite volcanoes, some of them attaining the caldera stage, complicated by submittal or peripheral domes

  2. MGT 401 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    kennith

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 401 Week 1 Individual Assignment Strategic Management Process Paper (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 Class Activity Week 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Learning Team Business Model Comparison Example (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Class Activity (Ash) MGT 401 Week 3 Individual Assignment Business Plan Evaluation (Ash) ...

  3. Ash in the Soil System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.

    2012-04-01

    Ash is the organic and inorganic residue produced by combustion, under laboratory and field conditions. This definition is far away to be accepted. Some researchers consider ash only as the inorganic part, others include also the material not completely combusted as charcoal or biochar. There is a need to have a convergence about this question and define clear "what means ash". After the fire and after spread ash onto soil surface, soil properties can be substantially changed depending on ash properties, that can be different according to the burned residue (e.g wood, coal, solid waste, peppermill, animal residues), material treatment before burning, time of exposition and storage conditions. Ash produced in boilers is different from the produced in fires because of the material diferent propertie and burning conditions. In addition, the ash produced in boilers is frequently treated (e.g pelletization, granulation, self curing) previously to application, to reduce the negative effects on soil (e.g rapid increase of pH, mycorrhiza, fine roots of trees and microfauna). These treatments normally reduce the rate of nutrients dissolution. In fires this does not happen. Thus the implications on soil properties are logically different. Depending on the combustion temperature and/or severity, ash could have different physical (e.g texture, wettability) and chemical properties (e.g amount and type of total and leached nutrients) and this will have implications on soil. Ash can increase and decrease soil aggregation, wettablity and water retention, bulk density, runoff and water infiltration. Normally, ash increases soil pH, Electrical Conductivity, and the amount of some basic nutrients as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. However it is also a potential source of heavy metals, especially if ash pH is low. However the effect of ash on soil in space and time depends especially of the ash amount and characteristics, fire temperature, severity, topography, aspect

  4. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 31, 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. In the last week, volcanic flows have been seen on the volcano's flanks. An ASTER thermal image was acquired at night at 22:50 AST on January 31, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The image shows three volcanic flows down the north flank of Augustine as white (hot) areas. The eruption plume spreads out to the east in a cone shape: it appears dark blue over the summit because it is cold and water ice dominates the composition; further downwind a change to orange color indicates that the plume is thinning and the signal is dominated by the presence of ash. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion

  5. Thermal precursors in satellite images of the 1999 eruption of Shishaldin Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, Jonathan; Dean, Kenneson; Engle, Kevin; Izbekov, Pavel

    2002-07-01

    Shishaldin Volcano, Unimak Island Alaska, began showing signs of thermal unrest in satellite images on 9 February 1999. A thermal anomaly and small steam plume were detected at the summit of the volcano in short-wave thermal infrared AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer) satellite data. This was followed by over 2 months of changes in the observed thermal character of the volcano. Initially, the thermal anomaly was only visible when the satellite passed nearly directly over the volcano, suggesting a hot source deep in the central crater obscured from more oblique satellite passes. The "zenith angle" needed to see the anomaly increased with time, presumably as the thermal source rose within the conduit. Based on this change, an ascent rate of ca. 14 m per day for the thermal source was estimated, until it reached the summit on around 21 March. It is thought that Strombolian activity began around this time. The precursory activity culminated in a sub-Plinian eruption on 19 April, ejecting ash to over 45,000 ft. (13,700 m). The thermal energy output through the precursory period was calculated based on geometric constraints unique to Shishaldin. These calculations show fluctuations that can be tied to changes in the eruptive character inferred from seismic records and later geologic studies. The remote location of this volcano made satellite images a necessary observation tool for this eruption. To date, this is the longest thermal precursory activity preceding a sub-Plinian eruption recorded by satellite images in the region. This type of thermal monitoring of remote volcanoes is central in the efforts of the Alaska Volcano Observatory to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruption, and mitigate their associated hazards to air-traffic and local residents.

  6. GEOBOTANICAL COMPARISON BETWEEN TWO JAPANESE VOLCANOES: MT. FUJI AND MT. ASAMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. POLI MARCHESE

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mt. Fuji and Mt. Asama are two of the highest Japanese volcanoes. reaching 3776 and 2542 m a.s.l. respectively. The former is dormant but the latter is an active volcano. This study is based on our own unpublished data, which inc1udes a total of 152 phytosociological relevés. and on previous studies of the vegetation of both volcanoes. On the basis of the data collected al different times a geobotanical comparison between the two vo1canoes as regards their high moutain regions was made. In this region the following belts may be distinguished on both volcanoes: - a subalpinc belt, characterized on its upper zone by shrub communities with some Ericaceae, larch (Larix leptolepis, Salix reinii and other dwarf woody species; - an alpine belt, where there is scattered herbaceous vegetation, mostly dominated by Polygonum weyrichii v. alpinum. In this belt on Mt. Fuji, the following communities may be distinguished: the Arabis serrata-Polygonum alpinum community on the lowest altitudes; the Stellaria nipponica-Polygonum alpinum community and at higher altitudes a very sparse poor community characterized by Cassiope lycopodioides. In the highest region up to the summit there are moss and lichen communities only. On the southeastern side on the 1707 ash and scoria there is pioneer vegetation dominated by Cirsium purpuratum and Campanula hondoensis. On Mt. Asama the high-mountain vegetation is dominated by the Polygonum alpinum community. It occupies a narrower belt. Here the volcanic activity doesn't allow the vegetation to reach the top. In the highest region of the volcano there is a bare sterile zone. The differences found in the altitudinal distribution of vegetation on the two volcanoes can partIy be attributed to the fact that one (Mt. Fuji is dormant, while the other (Mt. Asama is active. On active volcanoes the ecological factors related to the volcanic activity have a strong influence on the vegetation and its distribution.

  7. Fifteen years of thermal activity at Vanuatu's volcanoes (2000-2015) revealed by MIROVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, D.; Laiolo, M.; Cigolini, C.

    2016-08-01

    The Vanuatu archipelago consists of 80 islands and hosts 5 subaerial volcanoes (Yasur, Lopevi, Ambrym, Aoba and Gaua) that have shown sign of activity during the past decade. In this contribution we provide a 15 years-long datasets (2000-2015) of the thermal activity recorded at these active volcanoes by means of MIROVA (Middle InfraRed Observation of Volcanic Activity) a new volcanic hotspot detection system based on MODIS data. The analyzed volcanoes are characterized by a spectrum of volcanic activities whose thermal signature has been tracked and carefully analyzed. These include strombolian-vulcanian explosions at Yasur, lava flows at Lopevi, lava lakes at Ambrym, surtseyan-type eruptions within the Voui crater lake of Aoba and ash-dominated eruptions with strong degassing at Gaua. The collected data reveal several details of the long term eruptive dynamics at single sites such as a monthly long pulse in thermal emissions at Yasur volcano as well as at the two active craters of Ambrym (Benbow and Marum). Heating cycles within Aoba crater lake and intermittent pressurized eruptions at Lopevi volcano has also been detected and shed light in the eruptive dynamics of the analyzed volcanoes. In addition we were able to track a two years long intensification of thermal output at Benbow crater (Ambrym) that preceded the occurrence of the first intra-caldera eruptions of this volcano since 1989. We emphasize how the data provided by MIROVA represent a new, safe and affordable method for monitoring in near-real time a large spectrum of volcanic activities taking place at Vanuatu and other volcanic areas.

  8. Short-term seismic quiescence immediately preceding explosions during the 2011 eruption of Telica Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M.; Roman, D. C.; Geirsson, H.; La Femina, P. C.; Muñoz, A.; Tenorio, V.

    2013-12-01

    Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, experienced a VEI 2 eruptive episode from March-June 2011. The eruption consisted of numerous small to moderate ash explosions, many of which were observed visually and recorded by a local broadband seismic network (the TESAND network). Seismicity at Telica during both background and eruptive periods is characterized by generally high and variable rates of low-magnitude volcano-seismic events. Explosions at Telica are also detected seismically and distinguished from volcanic earthquakes by the length of the seismic signal, their emergent nature and 'cigar-shaped' envelope, and broadband spectral content. During the month of May 2011, we identified 16 explosion events on a seismometer located 0.5 km from the crater vent, some of which correlate with visually observed explosions. From May 1-12, ten explosions are apparent in continuous seismic data. During this period, the rate of volcano-seismic events is relatively low (0-20 events/hour with an average of 4 events per hour). Prior to eight of the 10 explosions, there were no detected seismic events within one hour of the explosion. From May 13-31, seven explosions were identified in the continuous seismic data. During this period, the rate of volcano-seismic events is relatively high (0-48 events per hour, with an average of 18 events per hour). In the hour preceding all seven explosions, there were no detected volcano-seismic events. Visual inspection of the continuous seismic data confirms that a strong decrease in the number of volcano-seismic events immediately preceded most of the 2011 explosions at Telica Volcano. We suggest that the apparent short-term decrease in seismicity before explosions at Telica is related to a cycle of pressure buildup and release in the shallow magmatic-hydrothermal system, with an increase in pressure prior to the explosions both resulting from and reflecting constriction of gas pathways.

  9. Combining observations and model simulations to reduce the hazard of Etna volcanic ash plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, Simona; Boselli, Antonella; Coltelli, Mauro; Leto, Giuseppe; Pisani, Gianluca; Prestifilippo, Michele; Spinelli, Nicola; Wang, Xuan; Zanmar Sanchez, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world with a recent activity characterized by powerful lava fountains that produce several kilometres high eruption columns and disperse volcanic ash in the atmosphere. It is well known that, to improve the volcanic ash dispersal forecast of an ongoing explosive eruption, input parameters used by volcanic ash dispersal models should be measured during the eruption. In this work, in order to better quantify the volcanic ash dispersal, we use data from the video-surveillance system of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, and from the lidar system together with a volcanic ash dispersal model. In detail, the visible camera installed in Catania, 27 km from the vent is able to evaluate the evolution of column height with time. The Lidar, installed at the "M.G. Fracastoro" astrophysical observatory (14.97° E, 37.69° N) of the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Catania, located at a distance of 7 km from the Etna summit craters, uses a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser source operating at a 532-nm wavelength, with a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Backscattering and depolarization values measured by the Lidar system can give, with a certain degree of uncertainty, an estimation of volcanic ash concentration in atmosphere. The 12 August 2011 activity is considered a perfect test case because volcanic plume was retrieved by both camera and Lidar. We evaluated the mass eruption rate from the column height and used best fit procedures comparing simulated volcanic ash concentrations with those extracted by the Lidar data. During this event, powerful lava fountains were well visible at about 08:30 GMT and a sustained eruption column was produced since about 08:55 GMT. Ash emission completely ceased around 11:30 GMT. The proposed approach is an attempt to produce more robust ash dispersal forecasts reducing the hazard to air traffic during Etna volcanic crisis.

  10. Invoering van het luchtverspreidingsmodel NPK-PUFF, versie 1.0, voor toepassing in de NPK-organisatie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijt de Haag PAM; Geertsema GT; Kroonenberg FC; Aldenkamp FJ; Koninklijk Nederlands; LSO; KNMI

    1998-01-01

    Following the accident at the nuclear power station in Chernobyl, KNMI and RIVM developed a model for the long-range atmospheric transport of radionuclides. This model, the RIVM/KNMI PUFF model, is in use for application in the National Plan for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response. The

  11. Spatial trends in S and Cl in ash leachates of the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mt. St Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayris, Paul M.; Delmelle, Pierre; Durant, Adam J.; Damby, David E.; Maters, Elena C.

    2014-05-01

    It has long been known that surficial deposits of salts and acids on volcanic ash particles derive from interactions of ash with sulphur and halide species within the eruption plume and volcanic cloud. These compounds are mobilised as ash particles are wetted, and beneficial or detrimental environmental and health impacts may be induced where the most concentrated solutions are produced. However, limited mechanistic understanding of gas-ash interactions currently precludes prediction of the spatial distribution or variation in leachate chemistry and concentration following an eruption. Sampling and leachate analysis of freshly-fallen ash therefore offers the sole method by which such variations can be observed. Previous ash leachate studies often involve a limited number of ash samples, and utilise a 'one-dimensional' analysis that considers variation in terms of absolute distance from the source volcano. Here, we demonstrate that extensive sampling and a 'two-dimensional' analysis can uncover more complex spatial trends. We compiled over 358 leachate compositions from the May 18th 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Of the water-extracted leachates, only 95 compositions from ash sampled at 45 localities between 35 and 1129 km from the volcano are sufficiently documented to be retrospectively comparable. To consider the effects of intra-deposit variability, we calculated average concentrations of leachate data within 11×22 km grid cells across the region, and defined a data quality parameter to reflect confidence in the derived values. To investigate any dependence of leachate composition on the grain size distribution, we generated an interpolated map of geometric specific surface area variation across the deposit, normalising ash leachate data to the calculated specific surface area at the corresponding sampling location. The data treatment identifies S and Cl enrichments in proximal blast deposits; relatively constant Cl concentrations across the ashfall deposits

  12. Preliminary hyperspectral volcano observations using Airborne Radiative Spectral Scanner (ARTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitsufuchi, T.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne-imaging spectral systems can often efficiently identify volcanic phenomena that are difficult to detect by satellite imagery. Since 1990, the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has been developing our original airborne-imaging spectral systems for volcano observations. In 2006, we developed a new airborne hyperspectral sensor, the Airborne Radiative Transfer Spectral Scanner (ARTS), for hyperspectral volcano observations. ARTS is a push-broom imaging spectrometer covering wavelengths from 380 to 1100nm (VNIR; 288 bands), 950 to 2450nm (SWIR; 101 bands), and 8000 to 11500nm (LWIR; 32 bands) and has precise position and attitude measurement systems (GPS/IMU) to achieve direct geo-correction of the acquired image. The ARTS specifications were planned to provide hyperspectral images to support developing algorithms for remotely sensing the geothermal distribution, ash- fall areas, and content of volcanic gas columns. ARTS will also be useful for operational volcanic observations to assess volcanic activity and to mitigate volcanic disasters.Before beginning the operational use of ARTS, it is important to validate its in-flight performance. Therefore, we have been conducting validation on the B200 platform. In this study, we present the results of two experiment observations, the overflight of ARTS instrument at the NIED building site on April 5, 2007, and the volcano observations flight over active volcano (Sakurajima volcano) just after its eruption on April 8, 2008. At the NIED building site, we validated the radiometric fidelity of all bands and the accuracy of geo-corrections. At the Sakurajima volcano, we tried to demonstrate the functions of ARTS, especially those for volcano observation. At the NIED building site, the validation results indicate that the geo-correction accuracy is typically less than a two-pixel difference (RMS), and that there was good agreement between the predicted radiance at the sensor and

  13. Mud Volcanoes Formation And Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliyev, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are natural phenomena, which occur throughout the globe. They are found at a greater or lesser scale in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, on the Kerch and Taman peninsulas, on Sakhalin Island, in West Kuban, Italy, Romania, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Ecuador. Mud volcanoes are most well-developed in Eastern Azerbaijan, where more than 30% of all the volcanoes in the world are concentrated. More than 300 mud volcanoes have already been recognized here onshore or offshore, 220 of which lie within an area of 16,000 km2. Many of these mud volcanoes are particularly large (up to 400 m high). The volcanoes of the South Caspian form permanent or temporary islands, and numerous submarine banks. Many hypotheses have been developed regarding the origin of mud volcanoes. Some of those hypotheses will be examined in the present paper. Model of spontaneous excitation-decompaction (proposed by Ivanov and Guliev, 1988, 2002). It is supposed that one of major factors of the movement of sedimentary masses and formation of hydrocarbon deposits are phase transitions in sedimentary basin. At phase transitions there are abnormal changes of physical and chemical parameters of rocks. Abnormal (high and negative) pressure takes place. This process is called as excitation of the underground environment with periodicity from several tens to several hundreds, or thousand years. The relationship between mud volcanism and the generation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, is considered to be a critical factor in mud volcano formation. At high flow rates the gas and sediment develops into a pseudo-liquid state and as flow increases the mass reaches the "so-called hover velocity" where mass transport begins. The mass of fluid moves as a quasi-uniform viscous mass through the sediment pile in a piston like manner until expelled from the surface as a "catastrophic eruption

  14. BREEDING SUPER-EARTHS AND BIRTHING SUPER-PUFFS IN TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: evelee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The riddle posed by super-Earths (1–4R{sub ⊕}, 2–20M{sub ⊕}) is that they are not Jupiters: their core masses are large enough to trigger runaway gas accretion, yet somehow super-Earths accreted atmospheres that weigh only a few percent of their total mass. We show that this puzzle is solved if super-Earths formed late, as the last vestiges of their parent gas disks were about to clear. This scenario would seem to present fine-tuning problems, but we show that there are none. Ambient gas densities can span many (in one case up to 9) orders of magnitude, and super-Earths can still robustly emerge after ∼0.1–1 Myr with percent-by-weight atmospheres. Super-Earth cores are naturally bred in gas-poor environments where gas dynamical friction has weakened sufficiently to allow constituent protocores to gravitationally stir one another and merge. So little gas is present at the time of core assembly that cores hardly migrate by disk torques: formation of super-Earths can be in situ. The basic picture—that close-in super-Earths form in a gas-poor (but not gas-empty) inner disk, fed continuously by gas that bleeds inward from a more massive outer disk—recalls the largely evacuated but still accreting inner cavities of transitional protoplanetary disks. We also address the inverse problem presented by super-puffs: an uncommon class of short-period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4–10R{sub ⊕}, 2–6M{sub ⊕}). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ∼1 AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. Unlike super-Earths, which can form in situ, super-puffs probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit greater water content. We close by confronting observations and itemizing remaining questions.

  15. Deuterium gas puff Z-pinch at currents of 2 to 3 mega-ampere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klir, D.; Shishlov, A. V.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Fursov, F. I.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Kravarik, J.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2012-03-01

    Deuterium gas-puff experiments have been carried out on the GIT-12 generator at the Institute of High Current Electronics in Tomsk. The emphasis was put on the study of plasma dynamics and neutron production in double shell gas puffs. A linear mass density of deuterium (D2) varied between 50 and 85 μg/cm. Somewhat problematic was a spread of the D2 gas at a large diameter in the central anode-cathode region. The generator operated in two regimes, with and without a plasma opening switch (POS). When the POS was used, a current reached a peak of 2.7 MA with a 200 ns rise time. Without the POS, a current rise time approached 1500 ns. The influence of different current rise times on neutron production was researched. Obtained results were important for comparison of fast deuterium Z-pinches with plasma foci. Average DD neutron yields with and without the POS were about 1011. The neutron yield seems to be dependent on a peak voltage at the Z-pinch load. In all shots, the neutron emission started during stagnation. At the beginning of the neutron production, the neutron emission correlated with soft x-rays and a significant fraction of neutrons could be explained by the thermonuclear mechanism. Nevertheless, a peak of the neutron emission occurred 40 ns after a soft x-ray peak. At this very moment, hard x-rays above 1 MeV were detected and a rapid expansion with a velocity of 3×105 m/s was observed. In the case of the POS, 1 MeV widths of radial neutron spectra implied that there are deuterons with the energy above 200 keV moving in the radial direction. On the basis of D2 gas puff experiments in the 0.3-17 MA region, the neutron yield dependence on a current as Y∝I3.0±0.2 was proposed.

  16. Beware of the Permanganate Volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ellie

    1980-01-01

    Discusses hazards associated with the permanganate demonstration of volcanic eruptions. Alternate demonstrations are described, including the ammonium dichromate reaction, lava flow demonstration with baking soda and vinegar, and punk to illustrate air pollution from volcanic ash and cinders. (CS)

  17. Dielectric properties of fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Raghavendra; R L Raibagkar; A B Kulkarni

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports the dielectric properties of fly ash. The dielectric measurements were performed as a function of frequency and temperature. The sample of fly ash shows almost similar behaviour in the frequency and temperature range studied. The large value of dielectric constant in the typical frequency range is because of orientation polarization and tight binding force between the ions or atoms in the fly ash. The sample of fly ash is of great scientific and technological interest because of its high value of dielectric constant (104).

  18. Late Pleistocene Holocene stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating of La Malinche volcano, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Govea, Renato; Siebe, Claus

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies of La Malinche identified and radiocarbon dated several volcanic layers, the youngest of which yielded an age of ca. 7.5 ka. An additional ash fallout layer that crops out at high altitudes was considered the most recent deposit, with an estimated age of 6 ka. In the present work 38 new radiocarbon ages are presented. From these, several date the young ash fallout layer and lie around 3.1 ka. With the aid of these dates a new and comprehensive stratigraphy documenting the Late Pleistocene-Holocene eruptive history of La Malinche is presented. The stratigraphy indicates two main stages of volcanic activity: Pre-Malinche and Malinche. The first undoubtedly comprises the major part of the eruptive history, but its deposits are largely covered by the products of the latter stage, on which this study is focused. The Malinche stage was subdivided into three eruptive periods. Period 1 started with the emplacement of the Huamantla Pumice more than 45 ka ago. This deposit consists of a thick pumice fallout overlain by pyroclastic flow deposits. Subsequently, several episodes of construction and collapse of summit domes occurred. The oldest dome was dated at ca. 45 ka. Period 2 started 21.5 ka ago with the Malinche Pumice I, a widespread pumice fallout covering the entire slopes of the volcano. Pyroclastic flows and lahars related to this eruption were channeled along deep barrancas and reached considerable distances. Deposits produced by partial sector collapse and dated at ca. 20.9 ka, and a pumice-and-ash flow deposit dated at 15.9 ka were also generated during this period. The last period started with the eruption of the Malinche Pumice II, a distinctive fallout deposit overlain by ash flow deposits on the NE slope of the volcano. The age of this pumice layer is estimated between 12 and 9 ka. Formation of block-and-ash flows, lahars and pumice-and-ash flows followed during this period, and peaked in a most intensive episode that was dated at 7.5 ka

  19. The Investigation and Development of Kuandian Volcano Cluster Liaoning%辽宁宽甸火山群特征与开发利用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑晓非

    2001-01-01

    Kuandian volcano cluster lies in Kuandian county,Liaoning. It is one o f three volcano clusters in the southeast of the northeast China and it is the f arest south volcano cluster. This article delimits the range and boundary of Kuand ian volcano cluster on the base of outdoor investigation and analyses the geolog ical enviro nment, volcano tectonic, volcano geomorphic and the cross-section c haracter of volcano ash soil. Finally we discuss the significance of investiga tion and exploitation of the Kuandian volcano cluster.%宽甸火山群是 东北东南部3个火山群之一,也是东北地区最南端的火山群,位于辽宁省宽甸县境内.在野 外考察的基 础上,划定了宽甸火山群的范围与界限.以黄椅山为例分析了其地质环境、火山构造、火山 岩相、火山地貌以及火山灰土的剖面特征,讨论了考察研究和开发利用宽甸火山群的意义.

  20. Validation of ASH Optical Depth and Layer Height from IASI using Earlinet Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balis, D.; Siomos, N.; Koukouli, M.; Clarisse, L.; Carboni, E.; Ventress, L.; Grainger, R.; Mona, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2016-06-01

    The 2010 eruptions of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull attracted the attention of the public and the scientific community to the vulnerability of the European airspace to volcanic eruptions. The European Space Agency project "Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards", called for the creation of an optimal End-to-End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Prediction. This system is based on improved and dedicated satellite-derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide level assessments, as well as an extensive validation, using among others ground-based measurements (Koukouli et al., 2014). The validation of volcanic ash levels and height extracted from IASI/MetopA is presented in this work with emphasis on the ash plume height and ash optical depth levels. European Aerosol Research Lidar Network [EARLINET] lidar measurements are compared to different satellite estimates for two eruptive episodes. The validation results are extremely promising within the estimated uncertainties of each of the comparative datasets.

  1. Directed Volcanic Blast as a Tragedy of October 26Th, 2010 at Merapi Volcano, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igan S. Sutawidjaja

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i3.163Merapi is an active strato volcano located in Central Java. This volcano is regarded as the most active and most dangerous volcano in Indonesia. Since the twentieth century, the activities have comprised mainly the effusive growth of viscous lava domes and lava tongues, with occasional gravitational collapses of parts of over-steepened domes producing pyroclastic flows, commonly defined as “Merapi-Type”. Since October 2010, however, explosive eruptions of a relatively large size have occurred to VEI 4, and some associated pyroclastic flows were larger and had farther reach than any produced on July 2006. These events may also be regarded as another type of eruptions for Merapi. On October26th, 2010 such event happened, even though it was not caused by pyroclastic flows of the dome collapses, about thirty people were killed including Mbah Marijan, known as the Merapi volcano's spiritual gatekeeper, who was found dead at his home approximately 4 km from the crater. The Yogyakarta Palace subsequently confirmed his death. This time the disaster was caused by a sudden directed blast that took place at 17:02 pm throughout Cangkringan, Kinahrejo Village, at the south flank of Merapi Volcano. The victims were the local people who did not predict the blast threatened their areas, because they believed that the pyroclastic flows from the dome collapses as long as they knew, did not threaten their areas, and pyroclastic flows would flow down following the Boyong River as the closest valley to their village. The blast swept an area about 8 km2, reaching about 5 km in distance, deposited thin ash, and toppled all trees to the south around the Kinahrejo and Pakem areas. The blast that reached Kinahrejo Village seemed to have moderate temperatures, because all trees facing the crater were not burnt. However, the victims were affected by dehydration and blanketed by fine ash.

  2. The 1793 eruption of San Martín Tuxtla volcano, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndola, J. M.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, M. L.; Schaaf, P.; Rodríguez, S. R.

    2010-11-01

    San Martín Tuxtla (N18.562°; W95.199°, 1659 masl) is a basaltic volcano located in southern Veracruz, a Mexican State bordering the Gulf of Mexico. It rises in a volcanic field strewn with monogenetic volcanic cones, maars and three other large volcanoes mostly dormant since the late Pliocene: Santa Marta, San Martín Pajapan and Cerro El Vigía. The latest eruptive event of San Martín occurred in 1793 and was described by Don José Mariano Moziño, a naturalist under the commission of the Viceroy of the then New Spain. In this work we present results of the study of this eruption based on historical accounts and field observations. We identified an ash deposit around the volcano related to the 1793 eruption, mapped its distribution and determined its granulometric, petrographic and geochemical characteristics. These studies suggest that the volcano began its activity with explosive phreatomagmatic explosions, which were followed by Strombolian activity; this period lasting from March to October 1793. The activity continued with an effusive phase that lasted probably 2 years. The eruption covered an area of about 480 km 2 with at least 1 cm of ash; the fines reaching distances greater than 300 km from the crater. A total mass of about 2.5 × 10 14 g was ejected and the volcanic columns probably reached altitudes of the order of 10 km during the most explosive phases. The lava emitted formed a coulee that descended the northern flank of the volcano and has an approximate volume of 2.0 × 10 7 m 3.

  3. Ash plume properties retrieved from infrared images: a forward and inverse modeling approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cerminara, Matteo; Valade, Sébastien; Harris, Andrew J L

    2014-01-01

    We present a coupled fluid-dynamic and electromagnetic model for volcanic ash plumes. In a forward approach, the model is able to simulate the plume dynamics from prescribed input flow conditions and generate the corresponding synthetic thermal infrared (TIR) image, allowing a comparison with field-based observations. An inversion procedure is then developed to retrieve ash plume properties from TIR images. The adopted fluid-dynamic model is based on a one-dimensional, stationary description of a self-similar (top-hat) turbulent plume, for which an asymptotic analytical solution is obtained. The electromagnetic emission/absorption model is based on the Schwarzschild's equation and on Mie's theory for disperse particles, assuming that particles are coarser than the radiation wavelength and neglecting scattering. [...] Application of the inversion procedure to an ash plume at Santiaguito volcano (Guatemala) has allowed us to retrieve the main plume input parameters, namely the initial radius $b_0$, velocity $U_...

  4. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kylling

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry are calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres are found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates will underestimate the mass loading by several tens of percent compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles.

  5. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylling, A.; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; Nousiainen, T.

    2013-10-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry are calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres are found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates will underestimate the mass loading by several tens of percent compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles.

  6. Amplification and expression of a salivary gland DNA puff gene in the prothoracic gland of Bradysia hygida (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido-Silva, Juliana Aparecida; Machado, Maiaro Cabral Rosa; Hartfelder, Klaus Hartmann; de Almeida, Jorge Cury; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa; Monesi, Nadia

    2015-03-01

    The DNA puff BhC4-1 gene, located in DNA puff C4 of Bradysiahygida, is amplified and expressed in the salivary gland at the end of the fourth larval instar as a late response to the increase in 20-hydroxyecdysone titer that triggers metamorphosis. Functional studies revealed that the mechanisms that regulate BhC4-1 expression in the salivary gland are conserved in transgenic Drosophila. These studies also led to the identification of a cis-regulatory module that drives developmentally regulated expression of BhC4-1-lacZ in the prothoracic gland cells of the ring gland, a compound organ which in Drosophila results from the fusion of the prothoracic glands, the corpus allatum and the corpus cardiacum. Here we have investigated the occurrence of BhC4-1 expression in B. hygida prothoracic glands. We report the identification of the B. hygida prothoracic gland and demonstrate that it releases ecdysone. Using RT-qPCR, western blots and immunolocalization experiments, we demonstrate that the BhC4-1 mRNA and the BhC4-1 protein are both expressed in the B. hygida prothoracic glands at the same time that DNA puff C4 is formed in the salivary gland. We also show that BhC4-1 is concomitantly amplified 4.8-fold in the prothoracic gland and 23-fold in the salivary gland. Our results reveal the occurrence of stage specific expression of a DNA puff gene in the prothoracic glands of B. hygida, and extend previous studies that have shown that DNA puff genes expression is not restricted to the salivary gland. In addition, the description of stage specific gene amplification in the prothoracic glands of B. hygida constitutes the first demonstration that gene amplification in Diptera might occur concomitantly in two different tissues in the same developmental stage.

  7. Volcanic Ash -Aircraft Encounter Damages: in Volcanological Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydar, Erkan; Aladaǧ, Çaǧdaş Hakan; Menteş, Turhan

    2017-04-01

    The jet era or age began at 1930 and 40's in aviation sector, with the production of first jet engine for the aircrafts. Since 1950's, the commercial aviation with regular flights were established. Civil aviation and air-transport drastically increased due to intensive demand, and declared at least 10 fold since 1970 by IATA report. Parallelly to technological and economical developpement, the commercial jets became more comfortable, secure and rapid, bringing the world smaller, the countries closer. On the other hand, according to Global Volcanism Program Catalogues of Smithsonian Institute, about 1,500 volcanoes have erupted in the Holocene, 550 of them have had historical eruptions and considered as active. Besides an average of 55-60 volcanoes erupt each year, and about 8-10 of these eruptions produce ash clouds that reach aircraft flight altitudes (Salinas and Watt, 2004). Volcanic ash can be expected to be in air routes at altitudes greater than 9 km (30,000 ft) for roughly 20 days per year worldwide (Miller &Casadeval, 2000). A precious compilation of incidents due to encounters of aircrafts with volcanic ash clouds covering the years between 1953 and 2009 was used in this work (Guffanti et al., 2010-USGS Report) with an additional information on Eyfjallajökull-2010 eruption. According to this compilation,129 incidents happened within the concerned time interval. The damages, in general, fall in second and third class of Severity index, indicating the damages are limited on airframe of the planes, or some abrasions in jet engine, windblast etc.. We focused on fourth class of severity index involving the damages on jet engine of aircraft (engine fail) due to ingestion of volcanic ash and investigate eruption style and caused damage relationships. During the eruptive sequences of Mts Saint Helen (USA), Galunggung (Indonesia, 2 incidents), Redoubt (USA), Pinatubo (Philipinnes), Unzen (Japan), Manam (Papua New Guinea), Soufriere Hills (Lesser Antilles), Chaiten

  8. Global Volcano Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

  9. Influence of Bed Ash and Fly Ash Replacement in Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Summoogum-Utchanah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluates the influence of fly ash and bottom ash as partial cement substitutes in mortars by studying the particle size distribution, consistency, flow, fresh density, air content, compressive strength and flexural strength characteristics. The results revealed that fly ash and cement had relatively the same particle size distribution unlike bottom ash. In the fresh state, as the amount of pozzolans increased in the mixtures, the mortars showed an enhancement in workability, were susceptible to water loss by bleeding, and exhibited a decline in fresh density. The early strength gains of the fly ash samples were low but reached higher than the control after 28 days of curing. The flexural strength increased as the fly ash content rose to reach a maximum at 20 % replacement. However, the 2-day compressive strength of bottom ash samples was higher than the control but decreased after 28 days of curing while the flexural strength declined with addition of bottom ash except at 5 % substitution.

  10. Acoustic Surveillance of Hazardous Eruptions (ASHE) in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, M. A.; Taisne, B.; Blanc, E.; Tupper, A. C.; Ngemaes, M.; Mialle, P.; Murayama, T.

    2015-12-01

    The ASHE Ecuador (2004-2012) collaboration between Ecuador, Canada, and the US demonstrated the capability to use real-time infrasound to provide low-latency volcanic eruption notifications to the Volcano Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) in Washington DC. The Atmospheric dynamics Research Infrastructure in Europe (ARISE, 2012-2018) supported by the European Commission fosters integrating innovative methods for remote detection and characterization of distant eruptive sources through collaborations with the VAAC Toulouse and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The ASHE Asia project proposes an international collaboration between the Earth Observatory of Singapore, the VAAC Darwin, the Palau National Weather Service, and US and Asian partners, and will receive the support of ARISE, to provide improved early notification of potentially hazardous eruptions in Asia and the Western Pacific using a combination of established technologies and next-generation mobile sensing systems. The increased availability of open seismo-acoustic data in the ASEAN region as well as recent advances in mobile distributed sensors networks will facilitate unprecedented rapid progress in monitoring remote regions for early detection of hazardous volcanic eruptions and other natural disasters.

  11. Mount Rainier: A decade volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Donald A.; Malone, Stephen D.; Samora, Barbara A.

    Mount Rainier, the highest (4392 m) volcano in the Cascade Range, towers over a population of more than 2.5 million in the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, and its drainage system via the Columbia River potentially affects another 500,000 residents of southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon (Figure 1). Mount Rainier is the most hazardous volcano in the Cascades in terms of its potential for magma-water interaction and sector collapse. Major eruptions, or debris flows even without eruption, pose significant dangers and economic threats to the region. Despite such hazard and risk, Mount Rainier has received little study; such important topics as its petrologic and geochemical character, its proximal eruptive history, its susceptibility to major edifice failure, and its development over time have been barely investigated. This situation may soon change because of Mount Rainier's recent designation as a “Decade Volcano.”

  12. Systematic radon survey over active volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M.; Garcia Vindas, J.R. [Centre National de la Recherche Cientifique, Montpellier (France). Lab. GBE; Ricard, L.P.; Staudacher, T. [Observatoire Volcanologique Du Pitou de la Fournaise, La Plaine des Cafres (France)

    1999-08-01

    Data obtained since 1993 on Costa Rica volcanos are presented and radon anomalies recorded before the eruption of the Irazu volcano (December 8, 1994) are discussed. The Piton de la Fournaise volcano is inactive since mid 1992. The influence of the external parameters on the radon behaviour is studied and the type of perturbations induced on short-term measurements are individuate.

  13. Application of bio-huff-`n`-puff technology at Jilin oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiu-Yuan Wang; Yan-Fed Xue; Gang Dai; Ling Zhao [Institute of Microbiology, Beijing (China)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    An enriched culture 48, capable of adapting to the reservoir conditions and fermenting molasses to produce gas and acid, was used as an inoculum for bio- huff-`n`-puff tests at Fuyu oil area of Jilin oil field. The production well was injected with water containing 4-6% (v/v) molasses and inoculum, and then shut in. After 15-21 days, the well was placed back in operation. A total of 44 wells were treated, of which only two wells showed no effects. The daily oil production of treated wells increased by 33.3-733.3%. Up to the end of 1994, the oil production was increased by 204 tons per well on average. Results obtained from various types of production wells were discussed.

  14. Computational modeling of Krypton gas puffs with tailored mass density profiles on Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Lamppa, D. C.; Hansen, S. B.; Jones, B.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Jobe, M.; Strizic, T.; Reneker, J.; Rochau, G. A.; Cuneo, M. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Large diameter multi-shell gas puffs rapidly imploded by high current (∼20 MA, ∼100 ns) on the Z generator of Sandia National Laboratories are able to produce high-intensity Krypton K-shell emission at ∼13 keV. Efficiently radiating at these high photon energies is a significant challenge which requires the careful design and optimization of the gas distribution. To facilitate this, we hydrodynamically model the gas flow out of the nozzle and then model its implosion using a 3-dimensional resistive, radiative MHD code (GORGON). This approach enables us to iterate between modeling the implosion and gas flow from the nozzle to optimize radiative output from this combined system. Guided by our implosion calculations, we have designed gas profiles that help mitigate disruption from Magneto-Rayleigh–Taylor implosion instabilities, while preserving sufficient kinetic energy to thermalize to the high temperatures required for K-shell emission.

  15. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlmann, Flavio R; Cappelli, Mark A; Rieker, Gregory B

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  16. Predicting Dendroctonus pseudotsugae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) antiaggregation pheromone concentrations using an instantaneous puff dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Tara M; Ross, Darrell W; Thistle, Harold W; Ragenovich, Iral R; Guerra, Ivonne Matos; Lamb, Brian K

    2012-04-01

    An instantaneous puff dispersion model was used to assess concentration fields of the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins, antiaggregation pheromone, 3-methylcyclohex-2-en-1-one (MCH), within a 1-ha circular plot. Several combinations of MCH release rate and releaser spacing were modeled to theoretically analyze optimal deployment strategies. The combinations of MCH release rate and releaser spacing used in the modeling exercise were based on results of previous field studies of treatment efficacy. Analyses of model results suggest that a release rate up to six times the initial standard, at a correspondingly wider spacing to keep the total amount of pheromone dispersed per unit area constant, may be effective at preventing Douglas-fir beetle infestation. The model outputs also provide a visual representation of pheromone dispersion patterns that can occur after deployment of release devices in the field. These results will help researchers and practitioners design more effective deployment strategies.

  17. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  18. Fly ash quality and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Beer, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  19. The in vitro respiratory toxicity of cristobalite-bearing volcanic ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damby, David E; Murphy, Fiona A; Horwell, Claire J; Raftis, Jennifer; Donaldson, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Ash from dome-forming volcanoes poses a unique hazard to millions of people worldwide due to an abundance of respirable cristobalite, a crystalline silica polymorph. Crystalline silica is an established respiratory hazard in other mixed dusts, but its toxicity strongly depends on sample provenance. Previous studies suggest that cristobalite-bearing volcanic ash is not as bio-reactive as may be expected for a dust containing crystalline silica. We systematically address the hazard posed by volcanic cristobalite by analysing a range of dome-related ash samples, and interpret the crystalline silica hazard according to the mineralogical nature of volcanic cristobalite. Samples are sourced from five well-characterized dome-forming volcanoes that span a range of magmatic compositions, specifically selecting samples rich in cristobalite (up to 16wt%). Isolated respirable fractions are used to investigate the in vitro response of THP-1 macrophages and A549 type II epithelial cells in cytotoxicity, cellular stress, and pro-inflammatory assays associated with crystalline silica toxicity. Dome-related ash is minimally reactive in vitro for a range of source compositions and cristobalite contents. Cristobalite-based toxicity is not evident in the assays employed, supporting the notion that crystalline silica provenance influences reactivity. Macrophages experienced minimal ash-induced cytotoxicity and intracellular reduction of glutathione; however, production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were sample-dependent. Lung epithelial cells experienced moderate apoptosis, sample-dependent reduction of glutathione, and minimal cytokine production. We suggest that protracted interaction between particles and epithelial cells may never arise due to effective clearance by macrophages. However, volcanic ash has the propensity to incite a low, but significant, and sample-dependent response; the effect of this response in vivo is unknown and prolonged exposure may yet pose a hazard.

  20. French airborne lidar measurements for Eyjafjallajökull ash plume survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chazette

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An Ultra-Violet Rayleigh-Mie lidar has been integrated aboard the French research aircraft Falcon20 in order to monitor the ash plume emitted by the Eyjafjallajökul volcano in April–May 2010. Three operational flights were carried out on 21 April, 12 and 16 May 2010 inside French, Spanish and British air spaces, respectively. The original purpose of the flights was to provide the French civil aviation authorities with objective information on the presence and location of the ash plume. The present paper presents the results of detailed analyses elaborated after the volcano crisis. They bear on the structure of the ash clouds and their optical properties such as the extinction coefficient and the lidar ratio. Lidar ratios were measured in the range of 43 to 50 sr, in good agreement with the ratios derived from ground-based lidar near Paris (France in April 2010 (~48 sr. The ash signature in terms of particulate depolarization was consistent during all flights (between 34 ± 3 % and 38 ± 3%. Such a value seems to be a good identification parameter for volcanic ash. Using specific cross-sections between 0.19 and 1.1 m2 g−1, the minimum (maximal mass concentrations in the ash plumes derived for the flights on 12 and 16 May were 140 (2300 and 250 (1500 μg m−3, respectively. It may be rather less than, or of the order of the critical level of damage (2 mg m−3 for the aircraft engines, but well above the 200 μg m−3 warning level.

  1. Modernization of the International Volcanic Ash Website - a global resource for ashfall preparedness and impact guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K.; Leonard, G.; Stewart, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Randall, M.; Stovall, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    The internationally collaborative volcanic ash website (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/ash/) has been an important global information resource for ashfall preparedness and impact guidance since 2004. Recent volcanic ashfalls with significant local, regional, and global impacts highlighted the need to improve the website to make it more accessible and pertinent to users worldwide. Recently, the Volcanic Ash Impacts Working Group (Cities and Volcanoes Commission of IAVCEI) redesigned and modernized the website. Improvements include 1) a database-driven back end, 2) reorganized menu navigation, 3) language translation, 4) increased downloadable content, 5) addition of ash-impact case studies, 7) expanded and updated references , 8) an image database, and 9) inclusion of cooperating organization's logos. The database-driven platform makes the website more dynamic and efficient to operate and update. New menus provide information about specific impact topics (buildings, transportation, power, health, agriculture, water and waste water, equipment and communications, clean up) and updated content has been added throughout all topics. A new "for scientists" menu includes information on ash collection and analysis. Website translation using Google translate will significantly increase user base. Printable resources (e.g. checklists, pamphlets, posters) provide information to people without Internet access. Ash impact studies are used to improve mitigation measures during future eruptions, and links to case studies will assist communities' preparation and response plans. The Case Studies menu is intended to be a living topic area, growing as new case studies are published. A database of all images from the website allows users to access larger resolution images and additional descriptive details. Logos clarify linkages among key contributors and assure users that the site is authoritative and science-based.

  2. Phylogeography of the widespread African puff adder (Bitis arietans) reveals multiple Pleistocene refugia in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Axel; Baker, Karis; Hendry, Catriona R; Peppin, Lindsay; Phelps, Tony; Tolley, Krystal A; Wüster, Catharine E; Wüster, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    Evidence from numerous Pan-African savannah mammals indicates that open-habitat refugia existed in Africa during the Pleistocene, isolated by expanding tropical forests during warm and humid interglacial periods. However, comparative data from other taxonomic groups are currently lacking. We present a phylogeographic investigation of the African puff adder (Bitis arietans), a snake that occurs in open-habitat formations throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Multiple parapatric mitochondrial clades occur across the current distribution of B. arietans, including a widespread southern African clade that is subdivided into four separate clades. We investigated the historical processes responsible for generating these phylogeographic patterns in southern Africa using species distribution modelling and genetic approaches. Our results show that interior regions of South Africa became largely inhospitable for B. arietans during glacial maxima, whereas coastal and more northerly areas remained habitable. This corresponds well with the locations of refugia inferred from mitochondrial data using a continuous phylogeographic diffusion model. Analysis of data from five anonymous nuclear loci revealed broadly similar patterns to mtDNA. Secondary admixture was detected between previously isolated refugial populations. In some cases, this is limited to individuals occurring near mitochondrial clade contact zones, but in other cases, more extensive admixture is evident. Overall, our study reveals a complex history of refugial isolation and secondary expansion for puff adders and a mosaic of isolated refugia in southern Africa. We also identify key differences between the processes that drove isolation in B. arietans and those hypothesized for sympatric savannah mammals.

  3. Processing Neutron Cross Section Covariances using NJOY-99 and PUFF-IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcilla,R.; Kahler, A.C.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-06-24

    With the growing demand for multigroup covariances, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) has been experiencing an upsurge in its covariance data processing activities using the two US codes NJOY-99 (LANL) and PUFF-IV (ORNL). The code NJOY-99 was upgraded by incorporating the new module ERRORJ-2.3, while the NNDC served as the active user and provided feedback. The NNDC has been primarily processing neutron cross section covariances on its 64-bit Linux cluster in support of two DOE programs, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). For GNEP, the NNDC used NJOY-99.259 to generate multigroup covariance matrices of {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U from the JENDL-3.3 library using the 15-, 33-, and 230-energy group structures. These covariance matrices will be used to test a new collapsing algorithm which will subsequently be employed to calculate uncertainties on integral parameters in different fast neutron-based systems. For NCSP, we used PUFF-IV 1.0.4 to verify the processability of new evaluated covariance data of {sup 55}Mn, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U generated by a collaboration of ORNL and LANL. For the data end-users at large, the NNDC has made available a Web site which provides a static visualization interface for all materials with covariance data in the four major data libraries: ENDF/B-VI.8 (47 materials), ENDF/B-VII.0 (26 materials), JEFF-3.1 (37 materials) and JENDL-3.3 (20 materials).

  4. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  5. Retrieval of volcanic ash particle size, mass and optical depth from a ground-based thermal infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, A. J.; Bernardo, C.

    2009-09-01

    Volcanoes can emit fine-sized ash particles (1-10 μm radii) into the atmosphere and if they reach the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, these particles can have deleterious effects on the atmosphere and climate. If they remain within the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere, the particles can lead to health effects in humans and animals and also affect vegetation. It is therefore of some interest to be able to measure the particle size distribution, mass and other optical properties of fine ash once suspended in the atmosphere. A new imaging camera working in the infrared region between 7-14 μm has been developed to detect and quantify volcanic ash. The camera uses passive infrared radiation measured in up to five spectral channels to discriminate ash from other atmospheric absorbers (e.g. water molecules) and a microphysical ash model is used to invert the measurements into three retrievable quantities: the particle size distribution, the infrared optical depth and the total mass of fine particles. In this study we describe the salient characteristics of the thermal infrared imaging camera and present the first retrievals from field studies at an erupting volcano. An automated ash alarm algorithm has been devised and tested and a quantitative ash retrieval scheme developed to infer particle sizes, infrared optical depths and mass in a developing ash column. The results suggest that the camera is a useful quantitative tool for monitoring volcanic particulates in the size range 1-10 μm and because it can operate during the night, it may be a very useful complement to other instruments (e.g. ultra-violet spectrometers) that only operate during daylight.

  6. HIS 103 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 1

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 1 (Transition to Agriculture) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 2 (Early Complex Societies) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Assignment (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Assignment Greco Roman Influence Paper (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 1 Chinese Social and Political Order Systems (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 2 Caste System (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 3 Assignment Black Death Dra...

  7. Local Short Period Seismic Network at Villarrica Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Stock, Cindy; Thorwart, Martin; Dzieran, Laura; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Since its last eruption in 1984-85, the Villarrica volcano has been presenting both seismic and fumarolic activity, accompanied by an open vent and a refulgent lava lake. To study its activity, a local seismic network of 75 DSS-Cubes short-period stations was deployed at and around the volcano. During the first two weeks of March, 2012, 30 3-Component and 45 1-Component stations were installed in a 63 km x 55 km area, with spacing between stations of 1.5 km for stations inside the perimeter of the volcanic edifice, and 5 km outside this perimeter. In total, approximately 94 volcano tectonic (VT) events with clear P- and S- wave arrivals were located to the SSW, SSE and North of the Crater at an average depth of 3 km below sea level. At least 73 events classified as "hybrids" (HB) were observed, predominantly about 2 km above sea level near or at the conduit. They present emergent higher frequencies at the beginning of the signal, and sharp S-wave at the crater stations, but a strong scattering, lower frequency content, and elongated coda on the stations along the volcanic edifice, probably due to ash layers and heterogeneities at the edifice. A few long period events (LP) with frequencies between 2-4 Hz were observed during the two weeks. Three set of groups can be distinguished for the regional tectonic events: aftershocks on the southern end of the rupture of the Maule 2010 event, with S-P wave travel time difference of ca. 30 s or more; a second group with S-P travel time difference between 10 s and 20s; and the much closer group with S-P wave difference of 10 s or less. To determine the average velocity structure of the volcano, a cross-correlation analysis of the waves from a M6.1 event in Argentina and other regional events was performed. The model used was a cylindric model of 6.5 km radius inside the volcanic edifice, which gave a P-wave velocity of 3.6 km/s, and a region outside this radius with a velocity of 4.1 km. The network was divided into five zones

  8. Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an invasive beetle from Asia that has caused large scale ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in North America. This book chapter reviews the taxonomy, biology, life history of this invasive pest and its associated natural enemies in both its native ...

  9. Leaching from biomass combustion ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomass combustion ashes for fertilizing and liming purposes has been widely addressed in scientific literature. Nevertheless, the content of potentially toxic compounds raises concerns for a possible contamination of the soil. During this study five ash samples generated at four...

  10. Aircraft observations and model simulations of concentration and particle size distribution in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacre, H. F.; Grant, A. L. M.; Johnson, B. T.

    2013-02-01

    The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland emitted a cloud of ash into the atmosphere during April and May 2010. Over the UK the ash cloud was observed by the FAAM BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft which was equipped with in-situ probes measuring the concentration of volcanic ash carried by particles of varying sizes. The UK Met Office Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) has been used to simulate the evolution of the ash cloud emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano during the period 4-18 May 2010. In the NAME simulations the processes controlling the evolution of the concentration and particle size distribution include sedimentation and deposition of particles, horizontal dispersion and vertical wind shear. For travel times between 24 and 72 h, a 1/t relationship describes the evolution of the concentration at the centre of the ash cloud and the particle size distribution remains fairly constant. Although NAME does not represent the effects of microphysical processes, it can capture the observed decrease in concentration with travel time in this period. This suggests that, for this eruption, microphysical processes play a small role in determining the evolution of the distal ash cloud. Quantitative comparison with observations shows that NAME can simulate the observed column-integrated mass if around 4% of the total emitted mass is assumed to be transported as far as the UK by small particles (< 30 μm diameter). NAME can also simulate the observed particle size distribution if a distal particle size distribution that contains a large fraction of < 10 μm diameter particles is used, consistent with the idea that phraetomagmatic volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, emit very fine particles.

  11. Aircraft observations and model simulations of concentration and particle size distribution in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Dacre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland emitted a cloud of ash into the atmosphere during April and May 2010. Over the UK the ash cloud was observed by the FAAM BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft which was equipped with in-situ probes measuring the concentration of volcanic ash carried by particles of varying sizes. The UK Met Office Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME has been used to simulate the evolution of the ash cloud emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano during the period 4–18 May 2010. In the NAME simulations the processes controlling the evolution of the concentration and particle size distribution include sedimentation and deposition of particles, horizontal dispersion and vertical wind shear. For travel times between 24 and 72 h, a 1/t relationship describes the evolution of the concentration at the centre of the ash cloud and the particle size distribution remains fairly constant. Although NAME does not represent the effects of microphysical processes, it can capture the observed decrease in concentration with travel time in this period. This suggests that, for this eruption, microphysical processes play a small role in determining the evolution of the distal ash cloud. Quantitative comparison with observations shows that NAME can simulate the observed column-integrated mass if around 4% of the total emitted mass is assumed to be transported as far as the UK by small particles (< 30 μm diameter. NAME can also simulate the observed particle size distribution if a distal particle size distribution that contains a large fraction of < 10 μm diameter particles is used, consistent with the idea that phraetomagmatic volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, emit very fine particles.

  12. Aircraft observations and model simulations of concentration and particle size distribution in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Dacre

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland emitted a cloud of ash into the atmosphere during April and May 2010. Over the UK the ash cloud was observed by the FAAM BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft which was equipped with in-situ probes measuring the concentration of volcanic ash carried by particles of varying sizes. The UK Met Office Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME has been used to simulate the evolution of the ash cloud emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano during the period 4–18 May 2010. In the NAME simulations the processes controlling the evolution of the concentration and particle size distribution include sedimentation and deposition of particles, horizontal dispersion and vertical wind shear. For travel times between 24 and 72 h a 1/t relationship describes the evolution of the concentration at the centre of the ash cloud and the particle size distribution remains fairly constant. Although NAME does not represent the effects of microphysical processes it can capture the observed decrease in concentration with travel time in this period. This suggests that, for this eruption, microphysical processes play a small role in determining the evolution of the distal ash cloud. Quantitative comparison with observations shows that NAME can simulate the observed column integrated mass if around 4% of the total emitted mass is assumed to be transported as far as the UK by small (<30 m diameter particles. NAME can also simulate the observed particle size distribution if a distal particle size distribution that contains a large fraction of <10 m diameter particles is used, consistent with the idea that phraetomagmatic volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, emit very fine particles.

  13. Volcanic ash modeling with the online NMMB/BSC-ASH-v1.0: A novel multiscale meteorological model for operational forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Alejandro; Folch, Arnau; Jorba, Oriol; Janjic, Zavisa

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash forecast became a research priority and a social concern as a consequence of the severe air-traffic disruptions caused by the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland, 2010) and Cordón Caulle (Chile, 2011) volcanoes. Significant progress has taken place in the aftermath of these dramatic events to improve the accuracy of Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersal (VATD) models and lessen its associated uncertainties. Various levels of uncertainties affect both the quantification of the source term and the driving meteorological inputs. Substantial research is being performed to reduce and quantify epistemic and aleatoric uncertainties affecting the source term. However, uncertainties arising from the driving NWPMs and its coupling offline with the VATDMs have received little attention, even if the experience from other communities (e.g. air quality) highlights the importance of coupling online dispersal and meteorological modeling. Consequently, the need for integrated predictions to represent these two-way feedback effects of the volcanic pollutants on local-scale meteorology is timely. The aim of this talk is to present the NMMB/BSC-ASH, a new on-line multi-scale meteorological model to simulate the emission, transport and deposition of tephra particles released from volcanic eruptions. The model builds on the NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model (NMMB/BSC-CTM), which we have modified to account for the specifics of volcanic particles. The final objective in developing the NMMB/BSC-ASH model is two-fold. On one hand, at a research level, we aim at studying the differences between the online/offline approaches and quantify the two-way feedback effect of dense volcanic ash clouds on the radiative budget and regional meteorology. On the other hand, at an operational level, the low computational cost of the NMMB dynamic core suggests that NMMB/BSC-ASH could be applied in a future for more accurate online operational forecasting of volcanic ash clouds.

  14. August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska-resetting an Island Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, W.E.; Nye, C.J.; Waythomas, C.F.; Neal, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Kasatochi Island, the subaerial portion of a small volcano in the western Aleutian volcanic arc, erupted on 7-8 August 2008. Pyroclastic flows and surges swept the island repeatedly and buried most of it and the near-shore zone in decimeters to tens of meters of deposits. Several key seabird rookeries in taluses were rendered useless. The eruption lasted for about 24 hours and included two initial explosive pulses and pauses over a 6-hr period that produced ash-poor eruption clouds, a 10-hr period of continuous ash-rich emissions initiated by an explosive pulse and punctuated by two others, and a final 8-hr period of waning ash emissions. The deposits of the eruption include a basal muddy tephra that probably reflects initial eruptions through the shallow crater lake, a sequence of pumiceous and lithic-rich pyroclastic deposits produced by flow, surge, and fall processes during a period of energetic explosive eruption, and a fine-grained upper mantle of pyroclastic-fall and -surge deposits that probably reflects the waning eruptive stage as lake and ground water again gained access to the erupting magma. An eruption with similar impact on the island's environment had not occurred for at least several centuries. Since the 2008 eruption, the volcano has remained quiet other than emission of volcanic gases. Erosion and deposition are rapidly altering slopes and beaches. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  15. The effects of volcanoes on health: preparedness in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeballos, J L; Meli, R; Vilchis, A; Barrios, L

    1996-01-01

    The article reviews the most important aspects of volcanic eruptions and presents a summary of the harmful materials they emit. The main health effects can be classified as either physical (trauma, respiratory diseases, etc.) or psychological (depression, anxiety, nightmares, neurosis, etc.). Popocatépetl, the most famous active volcano in Mexico, lies on the borders of the States of Mexico, Puebla and Morelos. In 1993, seismic activity intensified, as did as the emission of fumaroles, followed in December 1994 by moderate tremors and strong emissions of gases and ash. In 1996, a number of seismic events led to an unexpected explosion. A daily emission of 8,000 to 15,000 tonnes of sulfur dioxide has been measured. Popocatépetl is located in a densely populated region of Mexico. A complex network to monitor the volcano using sophisticated equipment has been set up, including visual surveillance, seismic, geochemical and geodesic monitoring. An early warning system (SINAPROC/CENAPRED) has been developed to keep the population permanently informed. The warning system uses colour codes: green for normal, yellow for alert, and red for warning and evacuation. An emergency plan has been prepared, including evacuation and preparation for medical centres and hospitals in the region, as well as intense public information campaigns.

  16. Evolution of {sup 222} Rn and chemical species related with eruptive processes of the Popocatepetl volcano; Evolucion de {sup 222} Rn y especies quimicas relacionadas con procesos eruptivos del volcan Popocatepetl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranda, P.; Ceballos, S.; Cruz, D.; Hernandez, A.; Lopez, R.; Pena, P.; Salazar, S.; Segovia, N.; Tamez, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The {sup 222} Rn monitoring in the Popocatepetl volcano was initiated on 1993. At December 21, 1994 it is initiated an eruptive stage in the volcano with gas emission, ashes and the lava dome formation on the crater at middle 1996. During all this time it has been determined radon concentrations on soils with active and passive detectors. In this work the changes in radon contents are reported also the physicochemical parameters in spring water related with the volcanic building associated to the recent activity of the volcano. (Author)

  17. Mount Rainier, a decade volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, S.C.; Hooper, P.R. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Geology); Eggers, A.E. (Univ. of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Mount Rainier, recently designated as a decade volcano, is a 14,410 foot landmark which towers over the heavily populated southern Puget Sound Lowland of Washington State. It last erupted in the mid-1800's and is an obvious threat to this area, yet Rainier has received little detailed study. Previous work has divided Rainier into two distinct pre-glacial eruptive episodes and one post-glacial eruptive episode. In a pilot project, the authors analyzed 253 well-located samples from the volcano for 27 major and trace elements. Their objective is to test the value of chemical compositions as a tool in mapping the stratigraphy and understanding the eruptive history of the volcano which they regard as prerequisite to determining the petrogenesis and potential hazard of the volcano. The preliminary data demonstrates that variation between flows is significantly greater than intra-flow variation -- a necessary condition for stratigraphic use. Numerous flows or groups of flows can be distinguished chemically. It is also apparent from the small variation in Zr abundances and considerable variation in such ratios as Ba/Nb that fractional crystallization plays a subordinate role to some form of mixing process in the origin of the Mount Rainier lavas.

  18. Evolution of Irruputuncu volcano, Central Andes, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, I.; Roche, O.; Moune, S.; Aguilera, F.; Campos, E.; Pizarro, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Irruputuncu is an active volcano located in northern Chile within the Central Andean Volcanic Zone (CAVZ) and that has produced andesitic to trachy-andesitic magmas over the last ˜258 ± 49 ka. We report petrographical and geochemical data, new geochronological ages and for the first time a detailed geological map representing the eruptive products generated by the Irruputuncu volcano. The detailed study on the volcanic products allows us to establish a temporal evolution of the edifice. We propose that the Irruputuncu volcanic history can be divided in two stages, both dominated by effusive activity: Irruputuncu I and II. The oldest identified products that mark the beginning of Irruputuncu I are small-volume pyroclastic flow deposits generated during an explosive phase that may have been triggered by magma injection as suggested by mingling features in the clasts. This event was followed by generation of large lava flows and the edifice grew until destabilization of its SW flank through the generation of a debris avalanche, which ended Irruputuncu I. New effusive activity generated lavas flows to the NW at the beginning of Irruputuncu II. In the meantime, lava domes that grew in the summit were destabilized, as shown by two well-preserved block-and-ash flow deposits. The first phase of dome collapse, in particular, generated highly mobile pyroclastic flows that propagated up to ˜8 km from their source on gentle slopes as low as 11° in distal areas. The actual activity is characterized by deposition of sulfur and permanent gas emissions, producing a gas plume that reaches 200 m above the crater. The maximum volume of this volcanic system is of ˜4 km3, being one of the smallest active volcano of Central Andes.

  19. Felsic maar-diatreme volcanoes: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Pierre-Simon; Carrasco Núñez, Gerardo; Hayman, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    breccias (Kelian, Mt. Rawdon). Pyroclastic rocks in the diatreme are typically poorly sorted, and ash-rich. They contain a heterolithic mix of juvenile clasts and lithic clasts from various stratigraphic levels. Megablocks derived from the ejecta ring or the country rocks are often found in the diatremes. Evidence for multiple explosions is in the form of steep crosscutting pyroclastic bodies within some diatremes and fragments of pyroclastic rocks within other pyroclastic facies. Pyroclastic rocks are cut by coherent felsic dikes and plugs which may have been feeders to lava domes at the surface. Allowing for the difference in magma composition, felsic maar-diatreme volcanoes have many similarities with their ultramafic to mafic equivalents. Differences include a common association with felsic domes, inside the crater or just outside (Wau), although the domes within the crater may be destroyed during the eruption (Hoya de Estrada, Tepexitl); the dikes and plugs feeding and invading felsic diatremes seem larger; the processes of phreatomagmatic explosions involving felsic magmas may be different.

  20. Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Model Volcanic Hazard Risk Levels in Areas Surrounding the Copahue Volcano in the Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, A. M.; Weigel, A. M.; Rivas, J.

    2014-12-01

    Copahue is a stratovolcano located along the rim of the Caviahue Caldera near the Chile-Argentina border in the Andes Mountain Range. There are several small towns located in proximity of the volcano with the two largest being Banos Copahue and Caviahue. During its eruptive history, it has produced numerous lava flows, pyroclastic flows, ash deposits, and lahars. This isolated region has steep topography and little vegetation, rendering it poorly monitored. The need to model volcanic hazard risk has been reinforced by recent volcanic activity that intermittently released several ash plumes from December 2012 through May 2013. Exposure to volcanic ash is currently the main threat for the surrounding populations as the volcano becomes more active. The goal of this project was to study Copahue and determine areas that have the highest potential of being affected in the event of an eruption. Remote sensing techniques were used to examine and identify volcanic activity and areas vulnerable to experiencing volcanic hazards including volcanic ash, SO2 gas, lava flow, pyroclastic density currents and lahars. Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI), EO-1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI), Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), ISS ISERV Pathfinder, and Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) products were used to analyze volcanic hazards. These datasets were used to create a historic lava flow map of the Copahue volcano by identifying historic lava flows, tephra, and lahars both visually and spectrally. Additionally, a volcanic risk and hazard map for the surrounding area was created by modeling the possible extent of ash fallout, lahars, lava flow, and pyroclastic density currents (PDC) for future eruptions. These model results were then used to identify areas that should be prioritized for disaster relief and evacuation orders.

  1. Upgrading the seismic and geodetic network of the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Marco; Iglesias Mendoza, Arturo; Legrand, Denis; Valdés González, Carlos Miguel; Perez Campos, Xyoli

    2017-04-01

    The Popocatépetl is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico and is located only 70 km from Mexico City, populated by more than 20 millions of people, and only 35 km from the Puebla municipality with almost 1.5 millions of people living. The recent activity of the volcano is generally marked by explosions emitting ash plumes often reaching the densely populated regions. In the framework of the Mexican Fund for Prevention of Natural Disasters (FOPREDEN) we are renovating and upgrading the existing geodetic and seismic networks monitoring the volcano. In this project we are installing 10 broadband seismic stations (120s-050Hz) in shallow boreholes (3-5m depth) and 4 GPS with real time sampling rate of 1 Hz. All instruments are equipped with continuous recording systems for real time monitoring purposes and research. The Popocatépetl exceeds 5400m, and the altitude of the stations ranges from 2200 m to 4300 m making it difficult their installation and maintenance. Because of ash emissions and the hard working condition, the real-time transmission is split into two systems in order to ensure the monitoring of the volcano also during the highest expected activity. Therefore we set up a network of "first order", consisting of four stations located about 20 km from the crater and equipped with satellite transmission. These stations, being far enough from the crater, ensure the real time monitoring of the major events also during intense periods of activity of the volcano. The remaining six stations are installed near to the crater (less than 10 km) and take part of the "second order" network equipped with a telemetered radio system transmitting the data either directly to the National Center of Disaster Prevention (CENAPRED) and National Seismological Service (SSN) or to the first order stations (for the sites that have not direct visible line with the monitoring centers). The four GPS sensors are all installed in the second order sites in order to monitor the largest

  2. Hazard map for volcanic ballistic impacts at El Chichón volcano (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, Miguel; Ramos-Hernández, Silvia; Jiménez-Aguilar, Julio

    2014-05-01

    The 1982 eruption of El Chichón Volcano in southeastern Mexico had a strong social and environmental impact. The eruption resulted in the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of Mexico, causing about 2,000 casualties, displacing thousands, and producing severe economic losses. Even when some villages were relocated after the 1982 eruption, many people still live and work in the vicinities of the volcano and may be affected in the case of a new eruption. The hazard map of El Chichón volcano (Macías et al., 2008) comprises pyroclastic flows, pyroclastic surges, lahars and ash fall but not ballistic projectiles, which represent an important threat to people, infrastructure and vegetation in the case of an eruption. In fact, the fatalities reported in the first stage of the 1982 eruption were caused by roof collapse induced by ashfall and lithic ballistic projectiles. In this study, a general methodology to delimit the hazard zones for volcanic ballistic projectiles during volcanic eruptions is applied to El Chichón volcano. Different scenarios are defined based on the past activity of the volcano and parameterized by considering the maximum kinetic energy associated with ballistic projectiles ejected during previous eruptions. A ballistic model is used to reconstruct the "launching" kinetic energy of the projectiles observed in the field. The maximum ranges expected for the ballistics in the different explosive scenarios defined for El Chichón volcano are presented in a ballistic hazard map which complements the published hazard map. These maps assist the responsible authorities to plan the definition and mitigation of restricted areas during volcanic crises.

  3. Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes, central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, J.L.; Garcia, P.A.; Arce, J.L.; Siebe, C.; Espindola, J.M.; Komorowski, J.C.; Scott, K.

    1997-01-01

    This field guide describes a five day trip to examine deposits of Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes in central Mexico. We will discuss the stratigraphy, petrology, and sedimentological characteristics of these deposits which provide insights into the eruptive history, type of volcanic activity, and transport and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic materials. These parameters will allow us to discuss the kinds of hazards and the risk that they pose to populations around these volcanoes. The area to be visited is tectonically complex thus we will also discuss the location of the volcanoes with respect to the tectonic environment. The first four days of the field trip will be dedicated to Nevado de Toluca Volcano (19 degrees 09'N; 99 degrees 45'W) located at 23 km. southwest of the City of Toluca, and is the fourth highest peak in the country, reaching an elevation of 4,680 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.). Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano, composed of a central vent excavated upon the remains of older craters destroyed by former events. Bloomfield and Valastro, (1974, 1977) concluded that the last cycle of activity occurred nearly equal 11,600 yr. ago. For this reason Nevado de Toluca has been considered an extinct volcano. Our studies, however, indicate that Nevado de Toluca has had at least two episodes of cone destruction by sector collapse as well as several explosive episodes including plinian eruptions and dome-destruction events. These eruptions occurred during the Pleistocene but a very young eruption characterized by surge and ash flows occurred ca. 3,300 yr. BP. This new knowledge of the volcano's eruptive history makes the evaluation of its present state of activity and the geological hazards necessary. This is important because the area is densely populated and large cities such as Toluca and Mexico are located in its proximity.

  4. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards of the Three Sisters Region, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Scott, W.E.; Iverson, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Three Sisters is one of three active volcanic centers that lie close to rapidly growing communities and resort areas in Central Oregon. The major composite volcanoes of this area are clustered near the center of the region and include South Sister, Middle Sister, and Broken Top. Additionally, hundreds of mafic volcanoes are scattered throughout the Three Sisters area. These range from small cinder cones to large shield volcanoes like North Sister and Belknap Crater. Hazardous events include landslides from the steep flanks of large volcanoes and floods, which need not be triggered by eruptions, as well as eruption-triggered events such as fallout of tephra (volcanic ash) and lava flows. A proximal hazard zone roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter surrounding the Three Sisters and Broken Top could be affected within minutes of the onset of an eruption or large landslide. Distal hazard zones that follow river valleys downstream from the Three Sisters and Broken Top could be inundated by lahars (rapid flows of water-laden rock and mud) generated either by melting of snow and ice during eruptions or by large landslides. Slow-moving lava flows could issue from new mafic volcanoes almost anywhere within the region. Fallout of tephra from eruption clouds can affect areas hundreds of kilometers (miles) downwind, so eruptions at volcanoes elsewhere in the Cascade Range also contribute to volcano hazards in Central Oregon. Scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory created a geographic information system (GIS) data set which depicts proximal and distal lahar hazard zones as well as a regional lava flow hazard zone for Three Sisters (USGS Open-File Report 99-437, Scott and others, 1999). The various distal lahar zones were constructed from LaharZ software using 20, 100, and 500 million cubic meter input flow volumes. Additionally, scientists used the depositional history of past events in the Three Sisters Region as well as experience and judgment derived from the

  5. Investigation of laser produced x-ray plasma created from high pressure gas-puff target using Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki [School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Daido, Hiroyuki; Choi, I.W. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering] (and others)

    2000-03-01

    We characterize a laser produced gas puff plasma for soft x-ray generation. Strong emission in 11.4 nm wavelength region was observed, using krypton and xenon gas puff targets irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser with an energy of 0.7 J/8 ns. Space resolved x-ray spectral measurement indicated that the source size on the Rayleigh length and the gas density profile. (author)

  6. A Multi-Sensor Approach for Volcanic Ash Cloud Retrieval and Eruption Characterization: The 23 November 2013 Etna Lava Fountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Corradini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic activity is observed worldwide with a variety of ground and space-based remote sensing instruments, each with advantages and drawbacks. No single system can give a comprehensive description of eruptive activity, and so, a multi-sensor approach is required. This work integrates infrared and microwave volcanic ash retrievals obtained from the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI, the polar-orbiting Aqua-MODIS and ground-based weather radar. The expected outcomes are improvements in satellite volcanic ash cloud retrieval (altitude, mass, aerosol optical depth and effective radius, the generation of new satellite products (ash concentration and particle number density in the thermal infrared and better characterization of volcanic eruptions (plume altitude, total ash mass erupted and particle number density from thermal infrared to microwave. This approach is the core of the multi-platform volcanic ash cloud estimation procedure being developed within the European FP7-APhoRISM project. The Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy volcano lava fountaining event of 23 November 2013 was considered as a test case. The results of the integration show the presence of two volcanic cloud layers at different altitudes. The improvement of the volcanic ash cloud altitude leads to a mean difference between the SEVIRI ash mass estimations, before and after the integration, of about the 30%. Moreover, the percentage of the airborne “fine” ash retrieved from the satellite is estimated to be about 1%–2% of the total ash emitted during the eruption. Finally, all of the estimated parameters (volcanic ash cloud altitude, thickness and total mass were also validated with ground-based visible camera measurements, HYSPLIT forward trajectories, Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI satellite data and tephra deposits.

  7. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than...

  8. Tephra-Producing Eruptions of Holocene Age at Akutan Volcano, Alaska; Frequency, Magnitude, and Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K. L.; Schwaiger, H.

    2012-12-01

    Akutan Volcano in the eastern Aleutian Islands of Alaska is one of the most historically active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc (43 eruptions in about the past 250 years). Explosive eruptions pose major hazards to aircraft flying north Pacific air routes and to local infrastructure on Akutan and neighboring Unalaska Island. Air travel, infrastructure, and population in the region have steadily increased during the past several decades, and thus it is important to better understand the frequency, magnitude, and characteristics of tephra-producing eruptions. The most recent eruption was a VEI 2 event on March 8-May 21, 1992 that resulted in minor ash emissions and trace amounts of proximal fallout. Nearly continuous low-level emission of ash and steam is typical of historical eruptions, and most of the historical events have been similar in magnitude to the 1992 event. The most recent major eruption occurred about 1600 yr. B.P. and likely produced the ca. 2-km diameter summit caldera and inundated valleys that head on the volcano with pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits that are tens of meters thick. The 1600 yr. B.P. eruption covered most of Akutan Island with up to 2.5 m of coarse scoriaceous tephra fall, including deposits 0.5-1 m thick near the City of Akutan. Tephra-fall deposits associated with this eruption exhibit a continuous sequence of black, fine to coarse scoriaceous lapilli overlain by a lithic-rich facies and finally a muddy aggregate-rich facies indicating water involvement during the latter stages of the eruption. Other tephra deposits of Holocene age on Akutan Island include more than a dozen discrete fine to coarse ash beds and 3-6 beds of scoriaceous, coarse lapilli tephra indicating that there have been several additional major eruptions (>VEI 3) of Akutan Volcano during the Holocene. Radiocarbon dates on these events are pending. In addition to tephra falls from Akutan, other fine ash deposits are found on the island that originated from other

  9. Dynamics of strombolian eruptions at Batu Tara volcano (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlato, P.; Del Bello, E.; Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J.; Ricci, T.; Cesaroni, C.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2014, high-speed imaging and acoustic data were acquired during 3 days of almost continuous recording (04-06/09/2015) at Batu Tara Volcano, in the small isolated island of Pulau Komba, in the Flores Sea (about 50 km N of Lembata). This volcano is very similar to the Italian Stromboli Volcano in both eruptive style and edifice morphology. The field experiment aimed at investigating degassing and explosive dynamics using a combination of GPS synchronized devices deployed in direct view of the active vent: i) a high-speed visible camera acquiring images at 500 frames per second (fps),ii) a thermal infrared (FLIR) camera acquiring at 50-200 fps, iii) a visible time lapse camera (GO-PRO) acquiring at 0.2-0.5 Hz (2 - 5 s interval), iv) two broadband microphones (Freq. range of kHz to 0.1 Hz) sampled at 10 kHz. Explosions can be discriminated in type according to their visual, thermal and acoustic features.Some explosions are characterized by a first sudden radial ejection of large spatter and bombs (main pulse), eventually followed by other similar events (secondary pulses), with very little amount of ash involved. In these eruptions, infrasonic waveforms are characterized by a first, high amplitude transient, with a first positive peak pressure followed by rapid dampening, typical of a Strombolian eruption.Other explosions are characterized by the sustained ejection of a dense jet of ash, with abundant decimeter to meter sized spatter and hot blocks.These eruptions are not accompanied by a maximum peak pressure at the eruption onset. Spectrograms show a high frequency component propagating for the entire duration of the signal.These two distinct types are sometimes overlapping and eruptions show a high amplitude transient followed by a high frequency coda. These different evolutions suggest that there are at least two repeatable explosion dynamics occurring in the conduit, with comparable gas overpressure, source depth and amount of gas involved

  10. Design and initial results from a kilojoule level dense plasma focus with hollow anode and cylindrically symmetric gas puff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, J. L.; Falabella, S.; Tang, V.; Schmidt, A.; Guethlein, G.; Hawkins, S.; Rusnak, B.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and built a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) Z-pinch device using a kJ-level capacitor bank and a hollow anode, and fueled by a cylindrically symmetric gas puff. Using this device, we have measured peak deuteron beam energies of up to 400 keV at 0.8 kJ capacitor bank energy and pinch lengths of ˜6 mm, indicating accelerating fields greater than 50 MV/m. Neutron yields of on the order of 107 per shot were measured during deuterium operation. The cylindrical gas puff system permitted simultaneous operation of DPF with a radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator for beam-into-plasma experiments. This paper describes the machine design, the diagnostic systems, and our first results.

  11. Generation and characterization of plasma channels in gas puff targets using soft X-ray radiography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, P. W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.com; Bartnik, A.; Jarocki, R.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Jabczyński, J.; Fiedorowicz, H. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    We present our recent results of a formation and characterization of plasma channels in elongated krypton and xenon gas puff targets. The study of their formation and temporal expansion was carried out using a combination of a soft X-ray radiography (shadowgraphy) and pinhole camera imaging. Two high-energy short laser pulses were used to produce the channels. When a pumping laser pulse was shaped into a line focus, using cylindrical and spherical lenses, the channels were not produced because much smaller energy density was deposited in the gas puff target. However, when a point focus was obtained, using just a spherical lens, the plasma channels appeared. The channels were up to 9 mm in length, had a quite uniform density profile, and expanded in time with velocities of about 2 cm/μs.

  12. Demonstration of a neonlike argon soft-x-ray laser with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A L; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2001-09-15

    We demonstrate a neonlike argon-ion x-ray laser, using a short-pulse laser-irradiated gas puff target. The gas puff target was formed by pulsed injection of gas from a high-pressure solenoid valve through a nozzle in the form of a narrow slit and irradiated with a combination of long, 600-ps and short, 6-ps high-power laser pulses with a total of 10 J of energy in a traveling-wave excitation scheme. Lasing was observed on the 3p (1)S(0)?3s (1)P(1) transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d (1)P(1)?3p (1)P(1) transition at 45.1 nm. A gain of 11 cm(-1) was measured on these transitions for targets up to 0.9 cm long.

  13. The 2007 eruption of Kelut volcano (East Java, Indonesia): Phenomenology, crisis management and social response

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bélizal, Édouard; Lavigne, Franck; Gaillard, J. C.; Grancher, Delphine; Pratomo, Indyo; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We focus in this paper on the processes and consequences of an unusual volcanic eruption at Kelut volcano, East Java. In November 2007, after two months of worrying precursor signs, Kelut volcano erupted. But neither explosions nor the usual hazards observed during the historic eruptions happened (e.g. ash falls, volcanic bombs and pyroclastic flows). Instead of an explosive eruption, the 2007 eruption was extrusive. Given than such an eruption could not be predicted, the authorities had to manage a new situation. We conducted interviews with nine stakeholders of the crisis management team, and undertook a questionnaire-based survey in the settlement nearest to the crater, in order to understand how the authorities managed the crisis, and how people reacted. Inquiries and questionnaires were carried out shortly after the end of the evacuation process, when the volcano was still under surveillance for fear of an explosive phase. The results display a real gap in what it takes to manage a crisis or live through a crisis. This suggests that the "unusual" eruption pattern of Kelut volcano was not the only factor of the misunderstanding between the authorities and the population. These problems stem from more structural causes such as the lack of communication and information when there is a need to adapt to a new scenario. In such a situation, the inability of the crisis management system to take decisions underscored the intrinsic vulnerability of the population despite a hierarchical and strategic top-down crisis management approach.

  14. a Reconstruction of the 1793 Eruption of San Martin Tuxtla Volcano, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, L.

    2013-05-01

    San Martin Volcano is located in the State of Veracruz, Eastern Mexico (18.572N, 95.169W, 1650 masl). The last eruption of this volcano occurred in 1793. The activity, which was documented lasted for several months and produced thick ashfall deposits in its vicinity. The blasts were heard in the coast of Tampico some 500km NW from the volcano. There are also reports of noticeable ashfall at distances as far as 200 Km from the crater. No casualties from the eruption were reported but the economic and other human activities were greatly perturbed. The center of emission eruption was a cinder cone located within the 500 wide crater in the summit of the volcano. We present isopach maps of the airfall deposits from this eruption. The 5cm isopach covers an area roughly 200 Km2 with downwind axis towards the W-SW. Based on this information we reconstructed some of the characteristics of the eruption by fitting the theoretical isopachs obtained from the well known model of ash deposition by Suzuki to the observed isopachs. The estimated height of the eruptive column is of the order of 10 km for a mass erupted of 0.5 cubic km. We used wind data from the nearby meteorological station of the city of Veracruz.

  15. Geotourism and volcanoes: health hazards facing tourists at volcanic and geothermal destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W

    2009-09-01

    Volcano tourism and tourism to geothermal destinations is increasingly popular. If such endeavors are to be a sustainable sector of the tourism industry, tourists must be made aware of the potential health hazards facing them in volcanic environments. With the aim of creating awareness amongst the tourism industry and practitioners of travel medicine, this paper reviews the potential influences and effects of volcanic gases such as carbon dioxide (CO(2)), hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), and hydrogen chloride/hydrochloric acid (HCl). It also reviews the negative health impacts of tephra and ash, lava flows, landslides, and mudflows. Finally, future research striving to quantify the health risks facing volcano tourists is recommended.

  16. The microphysics of ash tribocharging: New insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua, M. S.; Dufek, J.

    2014-12-01

    The spectacular lightning strokes observed during eruptions testify to the enormous potentials that can be generated within plumes. Related to the charging of individual ash particles, large electric fields and volcanic lightning have been observed at Eyjafjallajokull, Redoubt, and Sakurajima, among other volcanoes. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for plume electrification, including charging from the brittle failure of rock, charging due to phase change as material is carried aloft, and triboelectric charging, also known as contact charging. While the first two mechanisms (fracto-emission and volatile charging) have been described by other authors (James et al, 2000 and McNutt et al., 2010, respectively), the physics of tribocharging--charging related to the collisions of particles--of ash are still relatively unknown. Because the electric fields and lightning present in volcanic clouds result from the multiphase dynamics of the plume itself, understanding the electrodynamics of these systems may provide a way to detect eruptions and probe the interior of plumes remotely. In the present work, we describe two sets of experiments designed to explore what controls the exchange of charge during particle collisions. We employ natural material from Colima, Mt. Saint Helens, and Tungurahua. Our experiments show that the magnitude and temporal behavior of ash charging depend on a number of factors, including particle size, shape, chemistry, and collisional energy. The first set of experiments were designed to determine the time-dependent electrostatic behavior of a parcel of ash. These experiments consist of fluidizing an ash bed and monitoring the current induced in a set of ring electrodes. As such, we are able to extract charging rates for ash samples driven by different flow rates. The second experimental setup allows us to measure how much charge is exchanged during a single particle-particle collision. Capable of measuring charges as small as 1 fC, this

  17. Characterization of neutron emission from mega-ampere deuterium gas puff Z-pinch at microsecond implosion times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klir, D.; Shishlov, A. V.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kubes, P.; Labetsky, A. Yu; Rezac, K.; Cikhardt, J.; Fursov, F. I.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Kravarik, J.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Sila, O.; Stodulka, J.

    2013-08-01

    Experiments with deuterium (D2) triple shell gas puffs were carried out on the GIT-12 generator at a 3 MA current level and microsecond implosion times. The outer, middle and inner nozzle diameters were 160 mm, 80 mm and 30 mm, respectively. The influence of the mass of deuterium shells on neutron emission times, neutron yields and neutron energy spectra was studied. The injected linear mass of deuterium varied between 50 and 255 µg cm-1. Gas puffs imploded onto the axis before the peak of generator current at 700-1100 ns. Most of the neutrons were emitted during the second neutron pulse after the development of instabilities. Despite higher currents, heavier gas puffs produced lower neutron yields. Optimal mass and a short time delay between the valve opening and the generator triggering were more important than the better coincidence of stagnation with peak current. The peak neutron yield from D(d, n)3He reactions reached 3 × 1011 at 2.8 MA current, 90 µg cm-1 injected linear mass and 37 mm anode-cathode gap. In the case of lower mass shots, a large number of 10 MeV neutrons were produced either by secondary DT reactions or by DD reactions of deuterons with energies above 7 MeV. The average neutron yield ratio Y>10 MeV/Y2.5 MeV reached (6 ± 3) × 10-4. Such a result can be explained by a power law distribution for deuterons as \\rmd N_d/\\rmd E_d\\propto E_d^{-3} . The optimization of a D2 gas puff Z-pinch and similarities to a plasma focus and its drive parameter are described.

  18. Lab-scale EUV nano-imaging employing a gas-puff-target source: image quality versus plasma radiation characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we report a desk-top microscopy reaching 50nm spatial resolution in very compact setup using a gas-puff laser plasma EUV source. We present the study of source bandwidth influence on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscope spatial resolution. EUV images of object obtained by illumination with variable bandwidth EUV radiation were compared in terms of knife-edge spatial resolution to study the wide bandwidth parasitic influence on spatial resolution in the EUV microscopy.

  19. Characterization of shape and terminal velocity of tephra particles erupted during the 2002 eruption of Etna volcano, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltelli, M.; Miraglia, L.; Scollo, S.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we present a complete morphological characterization of the ash particles erupted on 18 December 2002 from Etna volcano, Italy. The work is based on the acquisition and processing of bidimensional digital images carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to obtain shape parameters by image analysis. We measure aspect ratio (AR), form factor (FF), compactness (CC), and rectangularity (RT) of 2065 ash particles with size between 0.026 and 1.122 mm. We evaluate the variation of these parameters as a function of the grain-size. Ash particles with a diameter of 0.250 mm are subelongate. We find that, on average, particles with a diameter of 0.50 mm are angular. Using this morphological analysis and an empirical relation between the drag coefficient ( C D) and Reynolds number ( R e) of Wilson and Huang (Earth Planet Sci Lett 44:311-324, 1979), we calculate the terminal settling velocities ( V WH). The comparisons between these velocities and those calculated with the formula of Kunii and Levenspiel ( Fluidization engineering. Wiley, New York, pp 97, 1969) ( V KL), which considers ash particles as spheres, show that V KL are in average 1.28 greater than V WH. Hence, we quantify the systematic error on the spatial distribution of the mass computed around the volcano carried out by tephra dispersal models when the particles are assumed to be spherical.

  20. Design and Validation of a Research-Grade Waterpipe Equipped With Puff Topography Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Marielle C; Kim, Hyoshin; Gordon, Sydney M; Kroeger, Robyn R; Reyes, Iza L; Deojay, Dawn M; Chitwood, Caleb; Lane, Timothy E; Clark, Pamela I

    2016-05-01

    Worldwide, commercially available waterpipes vary widely in design and durability, including differences in fabrication materials, degree of leak-tight fit, and flow path diameter. Little is known about how the components of the waterpipe may influence puffing behavior and user's exposure to toxins. To systematically evaluate exposure, it is necessary to use a standardized research-grade waterpipe (RWP) when conducting clinical and laboratory-based trials. We developed a RWP that is configured with an in-line topography system which allows real-time measurement and recording of the smoke volume drawn through the RWP. The RWP was calibrated across the flow rate range expected for waterpipe tobacco smoking and the calibration was verified for known puff volumes using a smoking machine. Operation of the RWP was qualified in a cohort of experienced waterpipe smokers, each smoker using the RWP ad libitum in a laboratory setting while smoker topography and subjective effects data were collected. RWP machine smoking was highly reproducible and yielded puff volumes that agreed well with true values. User acceptance was comparable, and puffing behavior was similar in pattern, with more frequent puffing in the beginning of the session, but significantly different in intensity from that used to estimate the majority of toxicant exposure reported in the literature. The RWP operates with known precision and accuracy and is well accepted by experienced smokers. This tool can be used to determine the extent to which puffing behaviors are affected by the waterpipe design, components, and/or accessories, tobacco nicotine content, sweet flavorings and/or additives known to increase addictiveness. This study describes a standardized RWP, equipped with a puffing topography analyzer, which can operate with known precision and accuracy, and is well-accepted by experienced smokers in terms of satisfaction and reward. The RWP is an important tool for determining if puffing behaviors, and

  1. Peptides from puff adder Bitis arietans venom, novel inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Serebryakova, Marina V; Shelukhina, Irina V; Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Kryukova, Elena V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Kopylova, Nina V; Zhmak, Maxim N; Ivanov, Igor A; Kudryashova, Ksenia S; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2016-10-01

    Phospholipase A2 (named bitanarin) possessing capability to block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was isolated earlier (Vulfius et al., 2011) from puff adder Bitis arietans venom. Further studies indicated that low molecular weight fractions of puff adder venom inhibit nAChRs as well. In this paper, we report on isolation from this venom and characterization of three novel peptides called baptides 1, 2 and 3 that reversibly block nAChRs. To isolate the peptides, the venom of B. arietans was fractionated by gel-filtration and reversed phase chromatography. The amino acid sequences of peptides were established by de novo sequencing using MALDI mass spectrometry. Baptide 1 comprised 7, baptides 2 and 3-10 amino acid residues, the latter being acetylated at the N-terminus. This is the first indication for the presence of such post-translational modification in snake venom proteins. None of the peptides contain cysteine residues. For biological activity studies the peptides were prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis. Baptide 3 and 2 blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents in isolated Lymnaea stagnalis neurons with IC50 of about 50 μM and 250 μM, respectively. In addition baptide 2 blocked acetylcholine-induced currents in muscle nAChR heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes with IC50 of about 3 μM. The peptides did not compete with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and α7 nAChRs at concentration up to 200 μM that suggests non-competitive mode of inhibition. Calcium imaging studies on α7 and muscle nAChRs heterologously expressed in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells showed that on α7 receptor baptide 2 inhibited acetylcholine-induced increasing intracellular calcium concentration with IC50 of 20.6 ± 3.93 μM. On both α7 and muscle nAChRs the suppression of maximal response to acetylcholine by about 50% was observed at baptide 2 concentration of 25 μM, the value being close to IC50 on α7 nAChR. These data are in

  2. Volcanic ash forecast – application to the May 2008 Chaitén eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Folch

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We model the transport and subsequent deposition of ash from Chaitén volcano, Chile, during the first week of May 2008. The simulation couples the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF meteorological model with the FALL3D dispersion model. We only use semi-quantitative volcanological inputs based on the first eruption reports. We consider two different run types based on forecasted and hindcasted meteorological conditions. The first simulation type can be regarded as a syn-eruptive operational forecast for the 2–8 May period. We predict the evolution of the ash cloud position, the concentration of ash on air, the expected deposit thickness, and the ash accumulation rates at different localities. The comparison of model results with observed cloud arrival times and satellite images shows the goodness of the combined WRF+FALL3D forecast system and points out the feasibility of combining these two models for short-term forecast of volcanic clouds and ash fallout.

  3. In vivo effects of ecdysterone on puff formation, and RNA and protein synthesis in the salivary glands of Rhynchosciara americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, C A; Winter, C E; Stocker, A J; Pueyo, M T; Lara, F J

    1991-01-01

    1. Fourth-instar larvae of Rhynchosciara americana were injected with the insect molting hormone, ecdysterone, giving final hemolymph concentrations from 4.46 to 223 microM. 2. Induction of the DNA puff, B2b, in the proximal (S1) region of the salivary glands of Rhynchosciara americana by 22.6 microM ecdysterone, was accompanied by the production of an mRNA and a polypeptide with the same characteristics as B2b products produced during normal development. This mRNA and polypeptide were restricted to the proximal region of the gland, as is the B2b puff. 3. Synthesis of other poly(A)+RNAs was also stimulated in S1 by ecdysterone, and other puffs that appear during normal development were induced. However, rRNA production in S1 goes through a pattern of inhibition, followed by recovery when B2b is puffed, and subsequent inhibition. 4. Low molecular weight RNA, with a peak in the region of 4S, is stimulated after ecdysterone administration.

  4. Initial magnetic field compression studies using gas-puff Z-pinches and thin liners on COBRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Concepcion, R. J.; Evans, M. T.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Hoyt, C. L.; Kroupp, E.; Kusse, B. R.; Maron, Y.; Novick, A. S.; Pikuz, S. A.; Qi, N.; Rondeau, G.; Rosenberg, E.; Schrafel, P. C.; Seyler, C. E.; Shelkovenko, T. C.

    2013-08-01

    This magnetic compression of cylindrical liners filled with DT gas has promise as an efficient way to achieve fusion burn using pulsed-power machines. However, to avoid rapid cooling of the fuel by transfer of heat to the liner an axial magnetic field is required. This field has to be compressed during the implosion since the thermal insulation is more demanding as the compressed DT plasma becomes hotter and its volume smaller. This compression of the magnetic field is driven both by the imploding liner and plasma. To highlight how this magnetic field compression by the plasma and liner evolves we have separately studied Z-pinch implosions generated by gas puff and liner loads. The masses of the gas puff and liner loads were adjusted to match COBRA's current rise times. Our results have shown that Ne gas-puff implosions are well described by a snowplow model where electrical currents are predominately localized to the outer surface of the imploding plasma and the magnetic field is external to the imploding plasma. Liner implosions are dominated by the plasma ablation process on the inside surface of the liner and the electrical currents and magnetic fields are advected into the inner plasma volume; the sharp radial gradient associated with the snowplow process is not present.

  5. Field-trip guide to the geologic highlights of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.

    2017-08-09

    Newberry Volcano and its surrounding lavas cover about 3,000 square kilometers (km2) in central Oregon. This massive, shield-shaped, composite volcano is located in the rear of the Cascades Volcanic Arc, ~60 km east of the Cascade Range crest. The volcano overlaps the northwestern corner of the Basin and Range tectonic province, known locally as the High Lava Plains, and is strongly influenced by the east-west extensional environment. Lava compositions range from basalt to rhyolite. Eruptions began about half a million years ago and built a broad composite edifice that has generated more than one caldera collapse event. At the center of the volcano is the 6- by 8-km caldera, created ~75,000 years ago when a major explosive eruption of compositionally zoned tephra led to caldera collapse, leaving the massive shield shape visible today. The volcano hosts Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which encompasses the caldera and much of the northwest rift zone where mafic eruptions occurred about 7,000 years ago. These young lava flows erupted after the volcano was mantled by the informally named Mazama ash, a blanket of volcanic ash generated by the eruption that created Crater Lake about 7,700 years ago. This field trip guide takes the visitor to a variety of easily accessible geologic sites in Newberry National Volcanic Monument, including the youngest and most spectacular lava flows. The selected sites offer an overview of the geologic story of Newberry Volcano and feature a broad range of lava compositions. Newberry’s most recent eruption took place about 1,300 years ago in the center of the caldera and produced tephra and lava of rhyolitic composition. A significant mafic eruptive event occurred about 7,000 years ago along the northwest rift zone. This event produced lavas ranging in composition from basalt to andesite, which erupted over a distance of 35 km from south of the caldera to Lava Butte where erupted lava flowed west to temporarily block the Deschutes

  6. AshMeadowsNaucorid_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Naucorid (Ambrysus amargosus) occur. "Nevada, Nye County. Point of Rocks Springs and...

  7. AshMeadowsNaucorid_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Naucorid (Ambrysus amargosus) occur. "Nevada, Nye County. Point of Rocks Springs and...

  8. Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the respiratory toxicity of volcanic ash in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J.; Damby, David E.; Ayris, Paul M.; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2016-04-01

    Human exposure to inhalable volcanic ash particles following an eruption is a health concern, as respirable-sized particles can potentially contribute towards adverse respiratory health effects, such as the onset or exacerbation of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Although there is substantial information on the mineralogical properties of volcanic ash that may influence its biological reactivity, knowledge as to how external factors, such as air pollution, contribute to and augment the potential reactivity is limited. To determine the respiratory effects of volcanic particle interactions with anthropogenic pollution and volcanic gases we will experimentally assess: (i) physicochemical characteristics of volcanic ash relevant to respiratory toxicity; (ii) the effects of simultaneously inhaling anthropogenic pollution (i.e. diesel exhaust particles (DEP)) and volcanic ash (of different origins); (iii) alteration of volcanic ash toxicity following interaction with volcanic gases. In order to gain a first understanding of the biological impact of the respirable fraction of volcanic ash when inhaled with DEP in vitro, we used a sophisticated 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier. The multi-cellular system was exposed to DEP [0.02 mg/mL] and then exposed to either a single or repeated dose of well-characterised respirable volcanic ash (0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm2, respectively) from the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 hours using a pseudo-air liquid interface approach. Cultures were subsequently assessed for adverse biological endpoints including cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and (pro)-inflammatory responses. Results indicated that the combination of DEP and respirable volcanic ash at sub-lethal concentrations incited a significant release of pro-inflammatory markers that was greater than the response for either DEP or volcanic ash, independently. Further work is planned, to determine if

  9. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: VOLCANOS (Volcano Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains point locations of active volcanoes as compiled by Motyka et al., 1993. Eighty-nine volcanoes with eruptive phases in the Quaternary are...

  10. Re-awakening of a Volcano: The 3. November 2002 eruption of El Reventador, NE Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reischmann, T.; Toulkeridis, T.; Aguillera, E.

    2003-04-01

    At 3 Nov 2002, 7.15 after a repose of 26 years "El Reventador" exploded unexpectedly forming a vulcanian type eruption with a volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of 4. Ecuador's easternmost and second most active continental volcano covered with a few million tons of ash a huge area of Ecuador, parts of Colombia, Peru and Brazil reaching even the islands of Galapagos. Reventador belongs to the few stratovolcanoes on the western edge of the Amazonian platform well east of the principal volcanic axis of the North Andean Volcanic Zone. The ca. 20.000 year old andesitic steep-sloping cone of the active volcano Reventador III is situated within the western end of an older steep-walled horse-shoe shaped caldera, which is open to the ESE. This caldera was formed by the previous volcanoes Reventador I and II, which reached an estimated height of ca. 600 m high above the actual edifice before their activities terminated in a sector collapse and lateral blast to the ESE. Lavas, pyroclastic flows, debris flows and lahars of Reventador III then filled the ca. 4 km wide caldera. In the morning of 3 Nov, unpredicted and within seconds, the volcano's WNW flank slided away in a large landslide against the western caldera wall, triggering a destructive, lateral blast of hot gas, steam, ash and rock debris that swept across the landscape. More than a third of the actual cone disappeared in Ecuador's biggest explosion of the last 120 years. Ongoing decompression of the magma caused the continuing eruption and the formation of an eruption column reaching 16 km height. A few hours later another ca. 12 km high eruption followed. Further minor eruptions generated lavas and pyroclasitic flows until the end of November while the emission of ash and gases (mainly H_2O and SO_2) continued until January. The porphyric volcanic rocks contain plag (An 40--70%), cpx, opx, occasionally amphibole and Fe-Ti oxides. Ash and rock fragments of the pyroclasitic flows have almost identical andesitic

  11. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  12. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  13. Temporal variations in the constituents of volcanic ash and adherent water-soluble components in the Unzen Fugendake eruption during 1990-1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, K.; Hirabayashi, J.; Ohba, T.; Ossaka, J.; Yamamoto, M.; Akagi, S.; Ozawa, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2001-07-01

    A change in the chemical compositions of volcanic gases is one of the noticeable phenomena that frequently occurs prior to an eruption. Analysis of the water-soluble components adhering to volcanic ash is available for remote monitoring of volcanic gases from inaccessible volcanoes. It is a secure method for monitoring volcanic activity without using particular devices. Prolonged volcanic eruption at the Unzen Fugendake volcano from 1990 to 1995 started with a phreatic eruption after 198 years of dormancy. Volcanic activity changed from a phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruption to a magmatic eruption with pyroclastic flows in May 1991. The relationship between the chemical composition of volcanic ash and the contents of the water-soluble components adhering to it are discussed in relation to the early stage of the long-term eruption. Volcanic ash ejected by phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruption before dome formation was the product of the alteration in the volcanoclastic materials beneath the surface. The ash had a high content of water-soluble components, which was caused by the absorption of hydrogen chloride and sulfur dioxide gases from magma into wet debris before dome formation. Volcanic ashes which were generated by pyroclastic flows after dome formation were fresh lava fragments. While the contents of water-soluble sulfate adhering to the ash noticeably decreased, those of water-soluble chloride adhering to the ash hardly decreased. The considerable decrease in the contents of water-soluble sulfate was caused by the reaction of volcanic gases with dry lava fragments. Contrary to this, the concentration of hydrogen chloride gas in ash clouds was extremely high, which obstructed the decrease in the water-soluble chloride content in the ash. Volatility of chlorine and sulfur from volcanic rock suggests that the inner temperature of pyroclastic flows was higher than 600~700° C at least.

  14. Modeling eruptions of Karymsky volcano

    OpenAIRE

    Ozerov, A.; Ispolatov, I.; Lees, J.

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed to explain temporal patterns of activity in a class of periodically exploding Strombolian-type volcanos. These patterns include major events (explosions) which follow each other every 10-30 minutes and subsequent tremor with a typical period of 1 second. This two-periodic activity is thought to be caused by two distinct mechanisms of accumulation of the elastic energy in the moving magma column: compressibility of the magma in the lower conduit and viscoelastic response of...

  15. Risk-Free Volcano Observations Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter: seismic observations near the active vent of Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Yasuda, A.; Watanabe, A.; Takeo, M.; Honda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kanda, W.; Iguchi, M.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    Observations in the vicinity of summit area of active volcanoes are important not only for understanding physical processes in the volcanic conduit but also for eruption prediction and volcanic hazards mitigation. It is, however, challenging to install observation sensors near active vents because of the danger of sudden eruptions. We need safe and efficient ways of installing sensors near the summit of active volcanoes. We have been developing an volcano observation system based on an unmanned autonomous vehicle (UAV) for risk-free volcano observations. Our UAV is an unmanned autonomous helicopter manufactured by Yamaha-Motor Co., Ltd. The UAV is 3.6m long and weighs 84kg with maximum payload of 10kg. The UAV can aviate autonomously along a previously programmed path within a meter accuracy using real-time kinematics differential GPS equipment. The maximum flight time and distance from the operator are 90 minutes and 5km, respectively. We have developed various types of volcano observation techniques adequate for the UAV, such as aeromagnetic survey, taking infrared and visible images from onboard high-resolution cameras, volcanic ash sampling in the vicinity of active vents. Recently, we have developed an earthquake observation module (EOM), which is exclusively designed for the UAV installation in the vicinity of active volcanic vent. In order to meet the various requirements for UAV installation, the EOM is very compact, light-weight (5-6kg), and is solar-powered. It is equipped with GPS for timing, a communication device using cellular-phone network, and triaxial accelerometers. Our first application of the EOM installation using the UAV is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, Sakurajima volcano. Since 2006, explosive eruptions have been continuing at the reopened Showa crater at the eastern flank near the summit of Sakurajima. Entering the area within 2 km from the active craters is prohibited, and thus there were no observation station in the vicinity

  16. Measurement of an electronic cigarette aerosol size distribution during a puff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belka, Miloslav; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav; Pospisil, Jiri

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have become very popular recently because they are marketed as a healthier alternative to tobacco smoking and as a useful tool to smoking cessation. E-cigarettes use a heating element to create an aerosol from a solution usually consisting of propylene glycol, glycerol, and nicotine. Despite the wide spread of e-cigarettes, information about aerosol size distributions is rather sparse. This can be caused by the relative newness of e-cigarettes and by the difficulty of the measurements, in which one has to deal with high concentration aerosol containing volatile compounds. Therefore, we assembled an experimental setup for size measurements of e-cigarette aerosol in conjunction with a piston based machine in order to simulate a typical puff. A TSI scanning mobility particle sizer 3936 was employed to provide information about particle concentrations and sizes. An e-cigarette commercially available on the Czech Republic market was tested and the results were compared with a conventional tobacco cigarette. The particles emitted from the e-cigarette were smaller than those of the conventional cigarette having a CMD of 150 and 200 nm. However, the total concentration of particles from e-cigarette was higher.

  17. Measurement of an electronic cigarette aerosol size distribution during a puff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belka Miloslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes have become very popular recently because they are marketed as a healthier alternative to tobacco smoking and as a useful tool to smoking cessation. E-cigarettes use a heating element to create an aerosol from a solution usually consisting of propylene glycol, glycerol, and nicotine. Despite the wide spread of e-cigarettes, information about aerosol size distributions is rather sparse. This can be caused by the relative newness of e-cigarettes and by the difficulty of the measurements, in which one has to deal with high concentration aerosol containing volatile compounds. Therefore, we assembled an experimental setup for size measurements of e-cigarette aerosol in conjunction with a piston based machine in order to simulate a typical puff. A TSI scanning mobility particle sizer 3936 was employed to provide information about particle concentrations and sizes. An e-cigarette commercially available on the Czech Republic market was tested and the results were compared with a conventional tobacco cigarette. The particles emitted from the e-cigarette were smaller than those of the conventional cigarette having a CMD of 150 and 200 nm. However, the total concentration of particles from e-cigarette was higher.

  18. Upgrade to the Gas Puff Imaging Diagnostic that Views Alcator C-Mod's Inboard Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierchio, J. M.; Terry, J. L.

    2012-10-01

    We describe an upgrade of Alcator C-Mod's Gas Puff Imaging system which views the inboard plasma edge and SOL along lines-of-sight that are approximately parallel to the local magnetic field. The views are arranged in a 2D (R,Z) array with ˜2.8 cm radial coverage and ˜2.4 cm poloidal coverage. 23 of 54 available views were coupled via fibers to individual interference filters and PIN photodiode detectors. We are in the process of upgrading the system in order to increase the sensitivity of the system by replacing the PIN photodiodes with a 4x8 array of Avalanche Photo-Diodes (APD). Light from 30 views is coupled to the single-chip APD array through a single interference filter. We expect an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio of more than 10x. The frequency response of the system will increase from ˜400 kHz to 1MHz. The dynamic range of the new system is manipulated by changing the high-voltages on the APDs. Test results of the detectors' channel-to-channel cross-talk, frequency response, and gain curves will be presented, along with schematics of the experimental setup. The upgraded system allows for more study of inboard edge fluctuations, including whether the quasi-coherent fluctuations observed in the outboard edge also exist inboard.

  19. Soft X-ray Images of Krypton Gas-Puff Z-Pinches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孟通; 蒯斌; 曾正中; 吕敏; 王奎禄; 邱爱慈; 张美; 罗建辉

    2002-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out on Qiang-guang Ⅰ generator to study the dynamics of krypton gas-puff Z-pinches. The generator was operated at a peak current of 1.5 MA with a rise-time of 80 ns. The specific linear mass of gas liner was about 20 μg/cm in these experiments. In the diagnostic system, a four-frame x-ray framing camera and a pinhole camera were employed. A novel feature of this camera is that it can give time-resolved x-ray images with four frames and energy-resolved x-ray images with two different filters and an array of 8 pinholes integrated into one compact assemble. As a typical experimental result, an averaged radial imploding velocity of 157 km/s over 14 ns near the late phase of implosion was measured from the time-resolved x-ray images. From the time-integrated x-ray image an averaged radial convergence of 0.072 times of the original size was measured. An averaged radial expansion velocity was 130 km/s and the maximum radial convergence of 0.04 times of the original size were measured from the time-resolved x-ray images. The dominant axial wavelengths of instabilities in the plasma were between 1 and 2 mm. The change in average photons energy was observed from energy spectrum- and time-resolved x-ray images.

  20. Shock formation in Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe on DD gas puff implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkis, J.; Rahman, H. U.; Wessel, F. J.; Ney, P.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    1- and 2-D simulations of a 1-cm radius, gas-puff implosion of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe liners onto a DD target are conducted using the discharge parameters for the Univ. Nevada, Reno, Zebra (1 MA, 125 ns) voltage driver and the resistive MHD code MACH2. During the run-in phase, initial†shock heating preheats the DD plasma, with subsequent stable, adiabatic compression heating the target to high energy density. The dynamics of the former in both the liner and target are investigated. It is shown that magnetic field transport to the liner/target interface does not occur prior to the run-in phase in Ne and Ar liners, yet does occur in Kr and Xe liners, and that magnetic field transport to the interface is a requirement for shock initiation, thus demonstrating the necessity for using a high-Z material in the Staged Z-pinch. Shock reflection off the axis and subsequent collision with the interface results in partial transmission into the liner, which manifests as current reversal, and consequently an enhanced Bθ gradient. 2-D simulations show that magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth decreases with increasing Z, with shock formation providing sufficient isolation to reproduce the current reversal and enhanced Bθ gradient observed in 1-D simulations. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  1. Comparison of velocimetry techniques for turbulent structures in gas-puff imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierchio, J M; Cziegler, I; Terry, J L; White, A E; Zweben, S J

    2016-02-01

    Recent analysis of Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) data from Alcator C-Mod found blob velocities with a modified tracking time delay estimation (TDE). These results disagree with velocity analysis performed using direct Fourier methods. In this paper, the two analysis methods are compared. The implementations of these methods are explained, and direct comparisons using the same GPI data sets are presented to highlight the discrepancies in measured velocities. In order to understand the discrepancies, we present a code that generates synthetic sequences of images that mimic features of the experimental GPI images, with user-specified input values for structure (blob) size and velocity. This allows quantitative comparison of the TDE and Fourier analysis methods, which reveals their strengths and weaknesses. We found that the methods agree for structures of any size as long as all structures move at the same velocity and disagree when there is significant nonlinear dispersion or when structures appear to move in opposite directions. Direct Fourier methods used to extract poloidal velocities give incorrect results when there is a significant radial velocity component and are subject to the barber pole effect. Tracking TDE techniques give incorrect velocity measurements when there are features moving at significantly different speeds or in different directions within the same field of view. Finally, we discuss the limitations and appropriate use of each of methods and applications to the relationship between blob size and velocity.

  2. Diagnostics of Fast Axial Ions Produced in Deuterium Gas-Puff Z-Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Cikhardt, J.; Kubes, P.; Sila, O.; Kravarik, J.; Shishlov, A. V.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Orcikova, H.; Turek, K.; Dudkin, N.; Padalko, V. N.; GIT-12 Team

    2016-10-01

    An unexpected advantage of some Z-pinch configurations is a possibility of an acceleration of ions to high energies. One of these configurations is a deuterium gas-puff with outer plasma shell, where hydrogen ions with energies up to 40 MeV has been observed during Z-pinch experiments on the GIT-12 generator since 2013. During the recent campaign in 2016, the source of high energetic ions and also parameters of ion pulses have been studied by various in-chamber diagnostics in 24 experimental shots on the current level below 3 MA. Principal aims were (i) to find a spatial distribution of ion sources, (ii) localization of ion sources on the z-axis and (iii) determine the ion energy spectra by an unfold technique. All of these has been done with the help of a new diagnostic setup consists of an ion pinhole camera, an ion 3-pinhole camera, a multi-pinhole camera and a detector of spatial ion beam profile. The ion diagnostics contained stacks with various absorbers, CR-39 track detectors, HD-V2 and EBT-3 radio-chromic films. One more aim, (iv) the study of a difference in production time of axial ion pulses with off-axis pulses, were accomplished by LiF samples and nTOF signals. This work was supported by the projects GACR 16-07036S, MSMT LD14089, CTU. SGS16/223/OHK3/3T/13, IAEA RC17088.

  3. Volcanic-Ash Hazards to Aviation—Changes and Challenges since the 2010 Eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Tupper, A.; Mastin, L. G.; Lechner, P.

    2012-12-01

    In response to the severe disruptions to civil aviation that resulted from atmospheric transport of ash from the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland in April and May 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) quickly formed the International Volcanic Ash Task Force (IVATF), charging it to support the accelerated development of a global risk-management framework for volcanic-ash hazards to aviation. Recognizing the need for scientifically based advice on best methods to detect ash in the atmosphere and depict zones of hazardous airspace, the IVATF sought input from the global scientific community, primarily by means of the Volcanic Ash Scientific Advisory Group which was established in May 2010 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics to serve as a scientific resource for ICAO. The IVATF finished its work in June 2012 (see http://www.icao.int/safety/meteorology/ivatf/Pages/default.aspx for a record of its results). A major science-based outcome is that production of charts depicting areas of airspace expected to have specific ash-concentration values (e.g. 4 mg/cu. m) will not be required of the world's nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs). The VAACs are responsible for issuing warning information to the aviation sector regarding ash-cloud position and expected movement. Forecast concentrations in these charts are based primarily on dispersion models that have at least an order of magnitude in uncertainty in their output and therefore do not delineate hazardous airspace with the level of confidence needed by the aviation sector. The recommended approach to improving model-forecast accuracy is to assimilate diverse observations (e.g., satellite thermal-infrared measurements, lidar, radar, direct airborne sampling, visual sightings, etc.) into model simulations; doing that during an eruption in the demanding environment of aviation operations is a substantial challenge. A

  4. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  5. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes and Forecast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiapas, E.

    2009-04-01

    EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (CAUSES AND FORECAST) ELIAS TSIAPAS RESEARCHER NEA STYRA, EVIA,GREECE TEL.0302224041057 tsiapas@hol.gr The earthquakes are caused by large quantities of liquids (e.g. H2O, H2S, SO2, ect.) moving through lithosphere and pyrosphere (MOHO discontinuity) till they meet projections (mountains negative projections or projections coming from sinking lithosphere). The liquids are moved from West Eastward carried away by the pyrosphere because of differential speed of rotation of the pyrosphere by the lithosphere. With starting point an earthquake which was noticed at an area and from statistical studies, we know when, where and what rate an earthquake may be, which earthquake is caused by the same quantity of liquids, at the next east region. The forecast of an earthquake ceases to be valid if these components meet a crack in the lithosphere (e.g. limits of lithosphere plates) or a volcano crater. In this case the liquids come out into the atmosphere by the form of gasses carrying small quantities of lava with them (volcano explosion).

  6. Elemental characterization of Mt. Sinabung volcanic ash, Indonesia by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmartini, I.; Syahfitri, W. Y. N.; Kurniawati, S.; Lestiani, D. D.; Santoso, M.

    2017-06-01

    Mount Sinabung is a volcano located in North Sumatera, Indonesia which has been recorded not erupted since 1600. However in 2013 it has been erupted and cause of black thick smog, rain sand and volcanic ash. Volcanic ash containing trace elements material that can be utilized in various applications but still has potential danger of heavy metals. In order to obtain an elemental composition data of volcanic ash, the characterization of volcanic ash were carried out using Neutron Activation Analysis. The volcanic ash was taken from Mt. Sinabung eruption. Samples were irradiated at the rabbit system in the reactor G.A Siwabessy facilities with neutron flux ˜ 1013 n.cm-2.s-1 and then counted using HPGe detector. Method validation was carried out by SRM NIST Coal Fly Ash 1633b and NIST 2711a Montana II Soil with recovery values were in the range of 96-108% and 95-106% respectively. The results showed that major elements; Al, Na, Ca and Fe, concentrations were 8.7, 1.05, 2.98 and 7.44 %, respectively, minor elements K, Mg, Mn, Ti, V and Zn were 0.87%, 0.78%, 0.18%, 0.62%, 197.13 ppm and 109.35 ppm, respectively, heavy metals; As, Cr, Co and Sb, contents were 4.48, 11.75, 17.13 and 0.35 ppm, respectively while rare earth elements such as Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Yb were 45.33, 1.22, 19.63, 20.34, 3.86, and 2.57 ppm respectively. The results of the elemental contents of volcanic ash that has been obtained can be used as the scientific based data for volcanic material utilization by considering the economic potential of elements contained and also the danger of the heavy metals content.

  7. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  8. Campgrounds in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset provides campground locations in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Information about facilities, water availability, permit requirements and type of...

  9. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kylling; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; T. Nousiainen

    2013-01-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furtherm...

  10. Emplacement temperatures of the November 22, 1994 nuee ardente deposits, Merapi Volcano, Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voight, B.; Davis, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    A study of emplacement temperatures was carried out for the largest of the 22 November 1994 nuée ardente deposits at Merapi Volcano, based mainly on the response of plastic and woody materials subjected to the hot pyroclastic current and the deposits, and to some extent on eyewitness observations. The study emphasizes the Turgo–Kaliurang area in the distal part of the area affected by the nuée ardente, where nearly 100 casualties occurred. The term nuée ardente as used here includes channeled block-and-ash flows, and associated ash-clouds of surge and fallout origins. The emplacement temperature of the 8 m thick channeled block-and-ash deposit was relatively high, ∼550°C, based mainly on eyewitness reports of visual thermal radiance. Emplacement temperatures for ash-cloud deposits a few cm thick were deduced from polymer objects collected at Turgo and Kaliurang. Most polymers do not display a sharp melting range, but polyethylene terephthalate used in water bottles melts between 245 and 265°C, and parts of the bottles that had been deformed during fabrication molding turn a milky color at 200°C. The experimental evidence suggests that deposits in the Turgo area briefly achieved a maximum temperature near 300°C, whereas those near Kaliurang were <200°C. Maximum ash deposit temperatures occurred in fallout with a local source in the channeled block-and-ash flow of the Boyong river valley; the surge deposit was cooler (∼180°C) due to entrainment of cool air and soils, and tree singe-zone temperatures were around 100°C.

  11. Variability in eruption style and associated very long period events at Fuego volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Gregory P.; Nadeau, Patricia A.; Lyons, John J.

    2013-04-01

    Repeated short-term deployments of seismic, infrasound, video, and gas-emission instruments at Fuego volcano, Guatemala have revealed three types of very long period (VLP) events associated with conduit sealing, pressure accumulation, and release. In 2008, ash-rich explosions issued from a vent on the western flank and produced one type of VLP (Type 1). Impulsive, bomb-rich explosions from the summit vent in 2009 produced a shorter period VLP (Type 2), but also generated ash release. Type 3 VLP events occurred during ash-free exhalations from the summit in 2008 and had waveform shapes similar to Type 2 events. Weak infrasound records for Type 1 explosions compared to Type 2 suggest lower pressures and higher magma porosity for Type 1. Type 3 events correlate with spikes in SO2 emission rate and are driven by partial sealing and rapid release of ash-free gas at the summit vent. Variations in the VLP period may provide a new tool for monitoring conditions within the conduit.

  12. Eyjafjallajokull Volcano Plume Particle-Type Characterization from Space-Based Multi-angle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Limbacher, James

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Research Aerosol algorithm makes it possible to study individual aerosol plumes in considerable detail. From the MISR data for two optically thick, near-source plumes from the spring 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallaj kull volcano, we map aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients and changing aerosol particle types with this algorithm; several days downwind, we identify the occurrence of volcanic ash particles and retrieve AOD, demonstrating the extent and the limits of ash detection and mapping capability with the multi-angle, multi-spectral imaging data. Retrieved volcanic plume AOD and particle microphysical properties are distinct from background values near-source, as well as for overwater cases several days downwind. The results also provide some indication that as they evolve, plume particles brighten, and average particle size decreases. Such detailed mapping offers context for suborbital plume observations having much more limited sampling. The MISR Standard aerosol product identified similar trends in plume properties as the Research algorithm, though with much smaller differences compared to background, and it does not resolve plume structure. Better optical analogs of non-spherical volcanic ash, and coincident suborbital data to validate the satellite retrieval results, are the factors most important for further advancing the remote sensing of volcanic ash plumes from space.

  13. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, C.; Graf, H. F.; Herzog, M.; Oberhuber, J. M.; Rose, William I.; Ernst, G. G. J.

    2006-02-01

    The aggregation of volcanic ash particles within the eruption column of explosive eruptions has been observed at many volcanoes. It influences the residence time of ash in the atmosphere and the radiative properties of the umbrella cloud. However, the information on the processes leading to aggregate formation are still either lacking or very incomplete. We examine the fate of ash particles through numerical experiments with the plume model ATHAM (Active Tracer High resolution Atmospheric Model) in order to determine the conditions that promote ash particle aggregation. In this paper we describe the microphysics and parameterization of ash and hydrometeors. In a companion paper (this issue) we use this information in a series of numerical experiments. The parameterization includes the condensation of water vapor in the rising eruption column. The formation of liquid and solid hydrometeors and the effect of latent heat release on the eruption column dynamics are considered. The interactions of hydrometeors and volcanic ash within the eruption column that lead to aggregate formation are simulated for the first time within a rising eruption column. The microphysical parameterization follows a modal approach. The hydrometeors are described by two size classes, each of which is divided into a liquid and a frozen category. By analogy with the hydrometeor classification, we specify four categories of volcanic ash particles. We imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can be contained in all categories of hydrometeors, thus forming mixed particles of any composition reaching from mud rain to accretionary lapilli. Collisions are caused by gravitational capture of particles with different fall velocity. Coalescence of hydrometeor-ash aggregates is assumed to be a function of the hydrometeor mass fraction within the mixed particles. The parameterization also includes simplified descriptions of electrostatics and salinity

  14. Effect of salt reduction on wheat-dough properties and quality characteristics of puff pastry with full and reduced fat content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silow, Christoph; Zannini, Emanuele; Axel, Claudia; Lynch, Kieran M; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-11-01

    Puff pastry is a major contributor of fat and sodium intake in many countries. The objective of this research was to determine the impact of salt (0-8.4g/100g flour) on the structure and quality characteristics of puff pastry with full and reduced (-40%) fat content as well as the rheological properties of the resulting dough. Therefore, empirical rheological tests were carried out including dough extensibility, dough stickiness and GlutoPeak test. The quality of the puff pastry was characterized with the VolScan, Texture Analyzer and C-Cell. NaCl reduction significantly changed rheological properties of the basic dough as well as a number of major quality characteristics of the puff pastry. Significant differences due to NaCl addition were found in particular for dough resistance, dough stickiness, Peak Maximum Time and Maximum Torque (p<0.05). Peak firmness and total firmness decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing salt levels for puff pastry containing full fat. Likewise, maximal lift, specific volume, number of cells and slice brightness increased with increasing NaCl at both fat levels. Although a sensorial comparison of puff pastries revealed that salt reduction (30%) was perceptible, no significant differences were found for all other investigated attributes. Nevertheless, a reduction of 30% salt and 40% fat in puff pastry is achievable as neither the perception and visual impression nor attributes such as volume, firmness and flavour of the final products were significantly affected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of volcanic ash from the 2011 Grímsvötn eruption by means of single-particle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieke, K. I.; Kristensen, T. B.; Korsholm, U. S.; Sørensen, J. H.; Kandler, K.; Weinbruch, S.; Ceburnis, D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Bilde, M.

    2013-11-01

    This work focuses on transport and properties of ash from the Icelandic volcano Grímsvötn that erupted in spring 2011. Atmospheric transport of volcanic ash from the eruption was simulated using the Danish Emergency Response Model of the Atmosphere (DERMA). The arrivals of volcanic particles were detected on-line at Mace Head at the West coast of Ireland during volcanic plume advection identified by high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-ToF AMS). Based on DERMA information aerosol particles were collected in Copenhagen, Denmark, before predicted arrival of the ash plume and during a period where ash was present in the air. Analysis of the meteorological conditions shows that the particles collected before arrival of the volcanic ash may serve as a good reference sample allowing identification of significant changes in ambient aerosol properties during the volcanic ash event over Copenhagen. Using single particle analysis in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), data on structure, chemical composition, size and morphology of individual volcanic ash particles from the Grímsvötn eruption after atmospheric transport to Scandinavia are provided. Particles were sliced with Focused Ion Beam (FIB). Element mappings from cross-sections through collected volcanic ash particles reveal inhomogeneous distributions of the elements K, Mg, Fe and Ti.

  16. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for the Katmai volcanic cluster, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierstein, Judy; Hildreth, Wes

    2000-01-01

    The world’s largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century broke out at Novarupta (fig. 1) in June 1912, filling with hot ash what came to be called the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes and spreading downwind more fallout than all other historical Alaskan eruptions combined. Although almost all the magma vented at Novarupta, most of it had been stored beneath Mount Katmai 10 km away, which collapsed during the eruption. Airborne ash from the 3-day event blanketed all of southern Alaska, and its gritty fallout was reported as far away as Dawson, Ketchikan, and Puget Sound (fig. 21). Volcanic dust and sulfurous aerosol were detected within days over Wisconsin and Virginia; within 2 weeks over California, Europe, and North Africa; and in latter-day ice cores recently drilled on the Greenland ice cap. There were no aircraft in Alaska in 1912—fortunately! Corrosive acid aerosols damage aircraft, and ingestion of volcanic ash can cause abrupt jet-engine failure. Today, more than 200 flights a day transport 20,000 people and a fortune in cargo within range of dozens of restless volcanoes in the North Pacific. Air routes from the Far East to Europe and North America pass over and near Alaska, many flights refueling in Anchorage. Had this been so in 1912, every airport from Dillingham to Dawson and from Fairbanks to Seattle would have been enveloped in ash, leaving pilots no safe option but to turn back or find refuge at an Aleutian airstrip west of the ash cloud. Downwind dust and aerosol could have disrupted air traffic anywhere within a broad swath across Canada and the Midwest, perhaps even to the Atlantic coast. The great eruption of 1912 focused scientific attention on Novarupta, and subsequent research there has taught us much about the processes and hazards associated with such large explosive events (Fierstein and Hildreth, 1992). Moreover, work in the last decade has identified no fewer than 20 discrete volcanic vents within 15 km of Novarupta (Hildreth and others

  17. Morphological changes at Colima volcano caused the 2015 Hurricane Patricia investigated by repeated drone surveys and time lapse cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Thomas R.; Navarro, Carlos; Arambula, Raul; Salzer, Jackie; Reyes, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Colima is one of the most active volcanoes in Latin America, with frequent dome building eruptions and pyroclastic flow hazards. In July 2015 Colima had a new climax of eruptive activity, profoundly changing the summit morphology and redistributing volcanic ashes to the lower volcano apron. These unconsolidated ashes are prone to be mobilized by rainfall events, and therefore required close monitoring. A major hurricane then had landfall in western Mexico in October 2015, accumulating c. 450 mm of rainfall at a meteorological station at Nevado de Colima (3461 m) and immense lahar and ash deposit mobilization from Colima Volcano. Hurricane Patricia was the largest ever recorded category 5 storm, directly crossing the state of Colima. Due to the successful scientific advice and civil protection no human losses were directly associated to this lahar hazards. We have conducted drone overflight in profound valleys that directed the pyroclastic flows and lahars two days before and three days after the hurricane. Over 8,000 close range aerial photographs could be recorded, along with GPS locations of ground stations. Images were processed using the structure from motion methodology, and digital elevation models compared. Erosion locally exceeded 10 m vertically and caused significant landscape change. Mass mobilization unloaded the young pyroclastic deposits and led to significant underground heat loss and water boiling in the affected areas. We also firstly report the use of camera array set-ups along the same valley to monitor lahar deposition and erosion from different perspectives. Combining these photos using photogrammetric techniques allow time series of digital elevation change studies at the deepening erosional ravines, with large potential for future geomorphic monitoring. This study shows that photo monitoring is very useful for studying the link of volcano landscape evolution and hydrometerological extremes and for rapid assessment of indirect volcanic hazards.

  18. The human impact of volcanoes: a historical review of events 1900-2009 and systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Daniels, Amy; Dooling, Shayna; Gorokhovich, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. More than 500 million people live within the potential exposure range of a volcano. The risk of catastrophic losses in future eruptions is significant given population growth, proximities of major cities to volcanoes, and the possibility of larger eruptions. The objectives of this review are to describe the impact of volcanoes on the human population, in terms of mortality, injury, and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters. Methods. Data on the impact of volcanoes were compiled using two methods, a historical review of volcano events from 1900 to 2009 from multiple databases and a systematic literature review of publications ending in October 2012. Analysis included descriptive statistics and bivariate tests for associations between volcano mortality and characteristics using STATA 11. Findings. There were a total of 91,789 deaths (range: 81,703-102,372), 14,068 injuries (range 11,541-17,922), and 4.72 million people affected by volcanic events between 1900 and 2008. Inconsistent reporting suggests this is an underestimate, particularly in terms of numbers injured and affected. The primary causes of mortality in recent volcanic eruptions were ash asphyxiation, thermal injuries from pyroclastic flow, and trauma. Mortality was concentrated with the ten deadliest eruptions accounting for more than 80% of deaths; 84% of fatalities occurred in four locations (the Island of Martinique (France), Colombia, Indonesia, and Guatemala). Conclusions. Changes in land use practices and population growth provide a background for increasing risk; in conjunction with increasing urbanization in at risk areas, this poses a challenge for future volcano preparedness and mitigation efforts.

  19. Characterization of ashes from biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, F.J.; Hansen, L.A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. Dept. of Chemical Engineering (Denmark); Soerensen, H.S. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (Denmark); Hjuler, K. [dk-TEKNIK. Energy and Environment (Denmark)

    1998-02-01

    One motivation for initiating the present project was that the international standard method of estimating the deposit propensity of solid fuels, of which a number of variants exist (e.g. ISO, ASTM, SD, DIN), has shown to be unsuitable for biomass ashes. This goal was addressed by the development of two new methods for the detection of ash fusibility behaviour based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) and High Temperature Light Microscopy (HTLM), respectively. The methods were developed specifically for ashes from biofuels, but are suitable for coal ashes as well. They have been tested using simple salt mixtures, geological standards and samples from straw CHP and coal-straw PF combustion plants. All samples were run in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C/min. In comparison with the standard method, the new methods are objective and have superior repeatability and sensitivity. Furthermore, the two methods enable the melting behavior to be characterized by a continuous measurement of melt fraction versus temperature. Due to this two-dimensional resolution of the results, the STA and HTLM methods provide more information than the standard method. The study of bottom ash and fly ash as well as deposit samples from straw test firings at the Haslev and Slagelse Combined Heat and Power plants resulted in a better understanding of mineral behaviour during straw grate firing. In these tests a number of straws were fired which had been carefully selected for having different qualities with respect to sort and potassium and chlorine contents. By studying bottom ashes from Slagelse it was found that the melting behaviour correlated with the deposition rate on a probe situated at the outlet part of the combustion zone. (EG)

  20. Eruptive history, current activity and risk estimation using geospatial information in the Colima volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Flores-Peña, S.

    2013-12-01

    Colima volcano, also known as Volcan de Fuego (19 30.696 N, 103 37.026 W), is located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima, and is the most active volcano in Mexico. In January 20, 1913, Colima had its biggest explosion of the twentieth century, with VEI 4, after the volcano had been dormant for almost 40 years. In 1961, a dome reached the northeastern edge of the crater and started a new lava flow, and from this date maintains constant activity. In February 10, 1999, a new explosion occurred at the summit dome. The activity during the 2001-2005 period was the most intense, but did not exceed VEI 3. The activity resulted in the formation of domes and their destruction after explosive events. The explosions originated eruptive columns, reaching altitudes between 4,500 and 9,000 masl, further pyroclastic flows reaching distances up to 3.5 km from the crater. During the explosive events, ash emissions were generated in all directions reaching distances up to 100 km, slightly affecting the nearby villages: Tuxpan, Tonila, Zapotlan, Cuauhtemoc, Comala, Zapotitlan de Vadillo and Toliman. During 2005 to July 2013, this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity; similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1905. That was before the Plinian eruption of 1913, where pyroclastic flows reached a distance of 15 km from the crater. In this paper we estimate the risk of Colima volcano through the analysis of the vulnerability variables, hazard and exposure, for which we use: satellite imagery, recurring Fenix helicopter over flights of the state government of Jalisco, the use of the images of Google Earth and the population census 2010 INEGI. With this information and data identified changes in economic activities, development, and use of land. The expansion of the agricultural frontier in the lower sides of the volcano Colima, and with the advancement of traditional crops of sugar cane and corn, increased the growth of

  1. Research on Methods for Building Volcano Disaster Information System--taking Changbai Mountain as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuexia; BO Liqun; LU Xingchang

    2001-01-01

    Volcano eruption is one of the most serious geological disasters in the world. There are volcanoes in every territory on the earth, about a thousand in China, among which Changbai Mountain Volcano, Wudalianchi Volcano and Tengchong Volcano are the most latent catastrophic eruptive active volcanoes. The paper, following an instance of Changbai Mountain Volcano, expounds that monitoring, forecasting and estimating volcano disaster by building Volcano Disaster Information System (VDIS) is feasible to alleviate volcano disaster.

  2. Soluble iron inputs to the Southern Ocean through recent andesitic to rhyolitic volcanic ash eruptions from the Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonella, L. E.; Palomeque, M. E.; Croot, P. L.; Stein, A.; Kupczewski, M.; Rosales, A.; Montes, M. L.; Colombo, F.; García, M. G.; Villarosa, G.; Gaiero, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    Patagonia, due to its geographic position and the dominance of westerly winds, is a key area that contributes to the supply of nutrients to the Southern Ocean, both through mineral dust and through the periodic deposits of volcanic ash. Here we evaluate the characteristics of Fe dissolved (into soluble and colloidal species) from volcanic ash for three recent southern Andes volcanic eruptions having contrasting features and chemical compositions. Contact between cloud waters (wet deposition) and end-members of andesitic (Hudson volcano) and rhyolitic (Chaitén volcano) materials was simulated. Results indicate higher Fe release and faster liberation rates in the andesitic material. Fe release during particle-seawater interaction (dry deposition) has higher rates in rhyolitic-type ashes. Rhyolitic ashes under acidic conditions release Fe in higher amounts and at a slower rate, while in those samples containing mostly glass shards, Fe release was lower and faster. The 2011 Puyehue eruption was observed by a dust monitoring station. Puyehue-type eruptions can contribute soluble Fe to the ocean via dry or wet deposition, nearly reaching the limit required for phytoplankton growth. In contrast, the input of Fe after processing by an acidic eruption plume could raise the amount of dissolved Fe in surface ocean waters several times, above the threshold required to initiate phytoplankton blooms. A single eruption like the Puyehue one represents more than half of the yearly Fe flux contributed by dust.

  3. Controlling formaldehyde emissions with boiler ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Jennifer; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba; Banerjee, Sujit

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized wood ash reduces formaldehyde in air from about 20 to formaldehyde reduction increases with increasing moisture content of the ash. Sorption of formaldehyde to ash can be substantially accounted for by partitioning to the water contained in the ash followed by rate-controlling binding to the ash solids. Adsorption occurs at temperatures of up to 165 degrees C; oxidation predominates thereafter. It is proposed that formaldehyde could be stripped from an air stream in a fluidized bed containing ash, which could then be returned to a boiler to incinerate the formaldehyde.

  4. Fractionation and Mobility of Thallium in Volcanic Ashes after Eruption of Eyjafjallajökull (2010) in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowska, Bozena; Zembrzuski, Wlodzimierz

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic ash contains thallium (Tl), which is highly toxic to the biosphere. The aim of this study was to determine the Tl concentration in fractions of volcanic ash samples originating from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano. A sequential extraction scheme allowed for a study of element migration in the environment. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using a flow measuring system was selected as the analytical method to determine Tl content. The highest average content of Tl in volcanic ash was determined in the fraction entrapped in the aluminosilicate matrix (0.329 µg g(-1)), followed by the oxidizable fraction (0.173 µg g(-1)). The lowest content of Tl was found in the water soluble fraction (0.001 µg g(-1)); however, this fraction is important due to the fact that Tl redistribution among all the fractions occurs through the aqueous phase.

  5. Inversion Technique for Estimating Emissions of Volcanic Ash from Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelley, Rachel; Cooke, Michael; Manning, Alistair; Thomson, David; Witham, Claire; Hort, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    When using dispersion models such as NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment) to predict the dispersion of volcanic ash, a source term defining the mass release rate of ash is required. Inversion modelling using observations of the ash plume provides a method of estimating the source term for use in NAME. Our inversion technique makes use of satellite retrievals, calculated using data from the SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) instrument on-board the MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) satellite, as the ash observations. InTEM (Inversion Technique for Emission Modelling) is the UK Met Office's inversion modelling system. Recently the capability to estimate time and height varying source terms has been implemented and applied to volcanic ash. InTEM uses a probabilistic approach to fit NAME model concentrations to satellite retrievals. This is achieved by applying Bayes Theorem to give a cost function for the source term. Source term profiles with lower costs generate model concentrations that better fit the satellite retrievals. InTEM uses the global optimisation technique, simulated annealing, to find the minimum of the cost function. The use of a probabilistic approach allows the uncertainty in the satellite retrievals to be incorporated into the inversion technique. InTEM makes use of satellite retrievals of both ash column loadings and of cloud free regions. We present a system that allows InTEM to be used during an eruption. The system is automated and can produce source term updates up to four times a day. To allow automation hourly satellite retrievals of ash are routinely produced using conservative detection limits. The conservative detection limits provide good detection of the ash plume while limiting the number of false alarms. Regions which are flagged as ash contaminated or free from cloud (both meteorological and ash) are used in the InTEM system. This approach is shown to improve the concentrations in the

  6. 卷烟主流烟气粒相物中逐口生物碱含量测定及其递送规律%Analysis of Alkaloids in TPM of Mainstream Cigarette Smoke Puff by Puff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁超; 徐如彦; 张洪召; 殷延齐; 陈新亚; 李春雷

    2011-01-01

    In order to determinate the alkaloids (nicotine, nornicotine, myosmine, anabasine and anatabine) in total particulate matter ( TPM) of mainstream cigarette smoke puff by puff, cigarettes were smoked by a modified Borgwaldt RM20/CS smoking machine.TPM per puff of 20 cigarettes was trapped on individual Cambridge filter pad, the filter pad was extracted under ultrasonic, then centrifugalized, the supernatant liquid of the extract was analyzed by GC/MS.The results showed that; 1) the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the 5 alkaloids ranged from 1.33% to 7.58% with the recoveries from 94% to 106% ; 2) the per puff deliveries of TPM, nicotine and myosmine in mainstream cigarette smoke showed an ascending trend, especially for TPM and nicotine; 3 ) the delivery of nornicotine in mainstream smoke of all samples was lower, there was no obvious change between puffs, and the total content of nornicotine in mainstream smoke of blended type cigarette sample F was the highest.4) the per puff deliveries of the 5 alkaloids in mainstream smoke of low tar cigarettes and blended cigarettes, samples D, F and G, were lower than those of other cigarettes.This method is suitable for determining alkaloids in TPM of mainstream cigarette smoke.%为测定卷烟烟气总粒相物中5种生物碱(烟碱、降烟碱、麦斯明、假木贼碱和新烟草碱),采用经改造的吸烟机对卷烟进行抽吸,用剑桥滤片捕集20支卷烟的每口烟气总粒相物,滤片经超声波萃取、离心后,取上层清液用GC/MS进行测定分析.结果显示:①利用该方法在所测定的5种生物碱中,测定结果的相对标准偏差为1.33%~7.58%,各生物碱的加标回收率为94%~106%;②逐口TPM量、逐口烟碱量以及逐口麦斯明量逐渐升高,逐口TPM量和逐口烟碱量在每口间传递的规律性最强;③降烟碱量都比较低,没有发现降烟碱逐口量随口数的明显变化趋势,每口之间都比较平稳,混合型卷烟F

  7. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Ash in fire affected ecosystems Ash lefts an important footprint in the ecosystems and has a key role in the immediate period after the fire (Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). It is an important source of nutrients for plant recover (Pereira et al., 2014a), protects soil from erosion and controls soil hydrological process as runoff, infiltration and water repellency (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2012, Pereira et al., 2014b). Despite the recognition of ash impact and contribution to ecosystems recuperation, it is assumed that we still have little knowledge about the implications of ash in fire affected areas. Regarding this situation we wanted to improve our knowledge in this field and understand the state of the research about fire ash around world. The special issue about "The role of ash in fire affected ecosystems" currently in publication in CATENA born from the necessity of joint efforts, identify research gaps, and discuss future cooperation in this interdisciplinary field. This is the first special issue about fire ash in the international literature. In total it will be published 10 papers focused in different aspects of the impacts of ash in fire affected ecosystems from several parts of the world: • Fire reconstruction using charcoal particles (Burjachs and Espositio, in press) • Ash slurries impact on rheological properties of Runoff (Burns and Gabet, in press) • Methods to analyse ash conductivity and sorbtivity in the laboratory and in the field (Balfour et al., in press) • Termogravimetric and hydrological properties of ash (Dlapa et al. in press) • Effects of ash cover in water infiltration (Leon et al., in press) • Impact of ash in volcanic soils (Dorta Almenar et al., in press; Escuday et al., in press) • Ash PAH and Chemical extracts (Silva et al., in press) • Microbiology (Barreiro et al., in press; Lombao et al., in press) We believe that this special issue will contribute importantly to the better understanding of

  8. Cotopaxi volcano's unrest and eruptive activity in 2015: mild awakening after 73 years of quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Silvana; Bernard, Benjamin; Battaglia, Jean; Gaunt, Elizabeth; Barrington, Charlotte; Andrade, Daniel; Ramón, Patricio; Arellano, Santiago; Yepes, Hugo; Proaño, Antonio; Almeida, Stefanie; Sierra, Daniel; Dinger, Florian; Kelly, Peter; Parra, René; Bobrowski, Nicole; Galle, Bo; Almeida, Marco; Mothes, Patricia; Alvarado, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Cotopaxi volcano (5,897 m) is located 50 km south of Quito, the capital of Ecuador. The most dangerous hazards of this volcano are the devastating lahars that can be generated by the melting of its ice cap during pyroclastic flow-forming eruptions. The first seismic station was installed in 1976. Cotopaxi has been monitored by the Instituto Geofísico (Escuela Politécnica Nacional) since 1983. Presently the monitoring network is comprised of 11 broadband and 5 short period seismometers, 4 scanning DOAS, 1 infrared and 5 visible cameras, 7 DGPS, 5 tiltmeters, 11 AFM (lahar detectors) and a network of ashmeters. Due to the recent unrest, the monitoring of the volcano has been complemented by campaign airborne Multi-GAS and thermal IR measurements and ground-based mobile DOAS and stationary solar FTIR. After 73 years of quiescence, the first sign of unrest was a progressive increase in the amplitude of transient seismic events in April 2015. Since May 20, an increase in SO2 emissions from ˜500 t/d to ˜3 kt/day was detected followed by the appearance of seismic tremor on June 4. Both SO2 emissions of up to 5 kt/day and seismic tremor were observed until August 14 when a swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes preceded the first phreatic explosions. These explosions produced ash and gas columns reaching up to 9 km above the crater. The ash fall produced by the opening phase covered over 500 km2 with a submillimetric deposit corresponding to a mass of 1.65E+8 kg (VEI 1). During this period of explosions, SO2 emission rates up to 24 kt/day were observed, the highest thus far. The ash was dominantly hydrothermally altered and oxidized lithic fragments, hydrothermal minerals (alunite, gypsum), free crystals of plagioclase and pyroxenes, and little juvenile material. Unrest continued after August 14, with three episodes of ash emission. However, the intensity of ash fallout, average seismic amplitude, and SO2 emissions during each successive episode progressively decreased

  9. Atmospheric processes affecting the separation of volcanic ash and SO2 in volcanic eruptions: inferences from the May 2011 Grímsvötn eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Fred; Woodhouse, Mark; Huppert, Herbert E.; Prata, Andrew; Thordarson, Thor; Carn, Simon

    2017-09-01

    The separation of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas is sometimes observed during volcanic eruptions. The exact conditions under which separation occurs are not fully understood but the phenomenon is of importance because of the effects volcanic emissions have on aviation, on the environment, and on the earth's radiation balance. The eruption of Grímsvötn, a subglacial volcano under the Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland during 21-28 May 2011 produced one of the most spectacular examples of ash and SO2 separation, which led to errors in the forecasting of ash in the atmosphere over northern Europe. Satellite data from several sources coupled with meteorological wind data and photographic evidence suggest that the eruption column was unable to sustain itself, resulting in a large deposition of ash, which left a low-level ash-rich atmospheric plume moving southwards and then eastwards towards the southern Scandinavian coast and a high-level predominantly SO2 plume travelling northwards and then spreading eastwards and westwards. Here we provide observational and modelling perspectives on the separation of ash and SO2 and present quantitative estimates of the masses of ash and SO2 that erupted, the directions of transport, and the likely impacts. We hypothesise that a partial column collapse or sloughing fed with ash from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) occurred during the early stage of the eruption, leading to an ash-laden gravity intrusion that was swept southwards, separated from the main column. Our model suggests that water-mediated aggregation caused enhanced ash removal because of the plentiful supply of source water from melted glacial ice and from entrained atmospheric water. The analysis also suggests that ash and SO2 should be treated with separate source terms, leading to improvements in forecasting the movement of both types of emissions.

  10. Atmospheric processes affecting the separation of volcanic ash and SO2 in volcanic eruptions: inferences from the May 2011 Grímsvötn eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Prata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The separation of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide (SO2 gas is sometimes observed during volcanic eruptions. The exact conditions under which separation occurs are not fully understood but the phenomenon is of importance because of the effects volcanic emissions have on aviation, on the environment, and on the earth's radiation balance. The eruption of Grímsvötn, a subglacial volcano under the Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland during 21–28 May 2011 produced one of the most spectacular examples of ash and SO2 separation, which led to errors in the forecasting of ash in the atmosphere over northern Europe. Satellite data from several sources coupled with meteorological wind data and photographic evidence suggest that the eruption column was unable to sustain itself, resulting in a large deposition of ash, which left a low-level ash-rich atmospheric plume moving southwards and then eastwards towards the southern Scandinavian coast and a high-level predominantly SO2 plume travelling northwards and then spreading eastwards and westwards. Here we provide observational and modelling perspectives on the separation of ash and SO2 and present quantitative estimates of the masses of ash and SO2 that erupted, the directions of transport, and the likely impacts. We hypothesise that a partial column collapse or sloughing fed with ash from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs occurred during the early stage of the eruption, leading to an ash-laden gravity intrusion that was swept southwards, separated from the main column. Our model suggests that water-mediated aggregation caused enhanced ash removal because of the plentiful supply of source water from melted glacial ice and from entrained atmospheric water. The analysis also suggests that ash and SO2 should be treated with separate source terms, leading to improvements in forecasting the movement of both types of emissions.

  11. Effect of Initial Conditions on Gas-Puff Z-Pinch Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gus Gordon

    This dissertation concerns the effects initial conditions have on the dynamics of an imploded, annular gas-puff z-pinch. The influence of axial magnetic fields, nozzle size and composition, different gases, pre-ionization, and electrode design on pinch quality and x-ray yield is investigated. The experiment uses a 5-kJ capacitor bank to deliver 0.35 MA to the pinch load in 1.4 mu rm s. This research establishes parameters important to increasing the x-ray yield of dense z-pinches. The initial stage of the implosion is diagnosed with a framing camera that photographs visible light emitted from z-pinch gas breakdown. Data from subsequent stages of the pinch is recorded with a B-dot probe, filtered x-ray diodes, an x-ray filtered pinhole camera, and a nitrogen laser interferometer. Applied axial magnetic fields of ~100 gauss increase average x-ray yield by more than 20%. A substantial increase of K-shell x -ray yield of more than 200% was obtained by increasing the energy delivered to the plasma by enlarging the nozzle diameter from 4 to 5 cm. The use of a Teflon outer-mantle for the nozzle resulted in less uniform gas breakdown as compared to graphite and copper outer-mantles, but x-ray yield and final state uniformity were not reduced. Lower Z gases showed poorer breakdown uniformity. Pre-ionization improved the uniformity of helium and neon breakdown but did not appear to affect subsequent dynamics. X-ray yield was significantly higher using a knife-edge annular anode, as opposed to a flat stainless steel honeycomb anode. Annular anodes with diameters more than a few millimeters different than the nozzle diameter produced low quality pinches with substantially lower x-ray yield.

  12. Correlation Between Ammonia and Routine Analytes in Particulate Matters of Mainstream Cigarette Smoke Puff by Puff%逐口主流烟气粒相物中氨与烟气常规成分的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈晓晨; 张映; 庄亚东; 张媛; 熊晓敏

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the delivery behavior of ammonia and its correlation with routine analytes in mainstream cigarette smoke, including tar, nicotine and moisture content, 8 cigarette samples of different specifications and price categories were tested. The contents of ammonia, tar, nicotine and moisture content in particulate matters were determined respectively puff-by-puff; and the correlation of ammonia with tar, nicotine and moisture deliveries was analyzed. The multiple linear regression equation was developed. The results showed that: 1) Ammonia delivery increased linearly puff by puff, which was extremely significantly positively correlated to the contents of tar and nicotine and negatively correlated to moisture content. 2) The developed regression equation fitted pretty well.%为了解卷烟在逐口抽吸过程中氨的释放特性以及氨与常规烟气检测成分焦油、烟碱、水分的相关性,选取8种不同规格不同档次的卷烟,逐口测定了烟气粒相物中氨和常规烟气检测成分焦油、烟碱以及水分的含量,分析了卷烟在逐口抽吸过程中氨的释放特性以及氨与烟气焦油、烟碱、水分的相关性,并建立了以焦油、烟碱、水分为自变量的氨释放量多元线性回归方程.结果表明:卷烟主流烟气中氨的释放量逐口线性增加;氨与烟气焦油量及烟碱量呈极显著正相关,氨与烟气水分呈负相关;建立的数学回归模型拟合效果较好.

  13. Predictability of Volcano Eruption: lessons from a basaltic effusive volcano

    CERN Document Server

    Grasso, J R

    2003-01-01

    Volcano eruption forecast remains a challenging and controversial problem despite the fact that data from volcano monitoring significantly increased in quantity and quality during the last decades.This study uses pattern recognition techniques to quantify the predictability of the 15 Piton de la Fournaise (PdlF) eruptions in the 1988-2001 period using increase of the daily seismicity rate as a precursor. Lead time of this prediction is a few days to weeks. Using the daily seismicity rate, we formulate a simple prediction rule, use it for retrospective prediction of the 15 eruptions,and test the prediction quality with error diagrams. The best prediction performance corresponds to averaging the daily seismicity rate over 5 days and issuing a prediction alarm for 5 days. 65% of the eruptions are predicted for an alarm duration less than 20% of the time considered. Even though this result is concomitant of a large number of false alarms, it is obtained with a crude counting of daily events that are available fro...

  14. The beginning of explosive eruptions on a location lacking volcanoes: A case study on the Hijiori volcano, Northeastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, I.

    2006-12-01

    The volcanic activity of Hijiori volcano (N38 36°f 35°f°f, E140 9°f 20°f°f, WGS84) is reported in detail as a case study to understand how a new felsic volcano commences the activity. Hijiori volcano, a small caldera with approximately 2 km in diameter, is one of the 108 active volcanoes in Japan, which erupted at about 12,000 years ago (in Calendar age) on the location where no volcanic body existed before the activity. From the field survey, it turns out that the suite of activities initiated by the major eruption that deposited a valley filling non-welded pumice flows. Finally the pumice flows covered the range 5 km to the southward and 9 km to the northward with total maximum thickness of about 150 m. The accompanying pumice fall and ash fall extends 60 km to the eastward. Although span of the activity is as short as the resolving power of radiocarbon dating, there recognized a quiescence for three times. After the every quiescence, phreatic (or phreatomagmatic) activities deposited lapilli falls and flows in the proximity. Total volume of the valley filling pyroclastic flows and the air falls are estimated to be 1.4 and 0.6 cubic km, respectively. All the pumices from the three major eruptions are similar in their phenocryst content (50- vol. percent), phenocryst assemblages (Pl, Qz, OPx, Hb, and Mt), bulk chemistry (c.a. 64 wt. percent SiO2), and in isotopic (Sr, Nd) compositions. Mt phenocrysts have no zoning profiles and their chemical compositions (Al2O3, Mg/Mn) are mostly unique through the eruptive sequences, suggesting that the physicochemical conditions of the magma were the same just before the each eruption. On the contrary Pl, Qz, OPx and Hb phenocrysts showed distinct zoning, suggesting that the magma chamber of Hijiori volcano had been disturbed repeatedly by such as magma mixing that continued intermittently before and during the eruptive activities. The observed difference between Mt and the other phenocrysts implies that there were

  15. Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joel E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows are found within the Newberry National Volcanic Monument in central Oregon. Established November 5, 1990, the monument is managed by the U.S. Forest Service as part of the Deschutes National Forest. Since 2011, a series of aerial surveys over the monument collected elevation data using lidar (light detection and ranging) technology, which uses lasers to directly measure the ground surface. These data record previously unseen detail in the volcano’s numerous lava flows and vents. On average, a laser return was collected from the ground’s surface every 2.17 feet (ft) with ±1.3 inches vertical precision.

  16. Volcanic eruptions, hazardous ash clouds and visualization tools for accessing real-time infrared remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, P.; Dehn, J.; Dean, K. G.; Macfarlane, S.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are a global hazard, affecting local infrastructure, impacting airports and hindering the aviation community, as seen in Europe during Spring 2010 from the Eyjafjallajokull eruption in Iceland. Here, we show how remote sensing data is used through web-based interfaces for monitoring volcanic activity, both ground based thermal signals and airborne ash clouds. These ‘web tools’, http://avo.images.alaska.edu/, provide timely availability of polar orbiting and geostationary data from US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration and Japanese Meteorological Agency satellites for the North Pacific (NOPAC) region. This data is used operationally by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) for monitoring volcanic activity, especially at remote volcanoes and generates ‘alarms’ of any detected volcanic activity and ash clouds. The webtools allow the remote sensing team of AVO to easily perform their twice daily monitoring shifts. The web tools also assist the National Weather Service, Alaska and Kamchatkan Volcanic Emergency Response Team, Russia in their operational duties. Users are able to detect ash clouds, measure the distance from the source, area and signal strength. Within the web tools, there are 40 x 40 km datasets centered on each volcano and a searchable database of all acquired data from 1993 until present with the ability to produce time series data per volcano. Additionally, a data center illustrates the acquired data across the NOPAC within the last 48 hours, http://avo.images.alaska.edu/tools/datacenter/. We will illustrate new visualization tools allowing users to display the satellite imagery within Google Earth/Maps, and ArcGIS Explorer both as static maps and time-animated imagery. We will show these tools in real-time as well as examples of past large volcanic eruptions. In the future, we will develop the tools to produce real-time ash retrievals, run volcanic ash dispersion

  17. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 12, 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. An ASTER image was acquired at 12:42 AST on January 12, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The perspective rendition shows the eruption plume derived from the ASTER image data. ASTER's stereo viewing capability was used to calculate the 3-dimensional topography of the eruption cloud as it was blown to the south by prevailing winds. From a maximum height of 3060 m (9950 ft), the plume cooled and its top descended to 1900 m (6175 ft). The perspective view shows the ASTER data draped over the plume top topography, combined with a base image acquired in 2000 by the Landsat satellite, that is itself draped over ground elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The topographic relief has been increased 1.5 times for this illustration. Comparison of the ASTER plume topography data with ash dispersal models and weather radar data will allow the National Weather Service to validate and improve such models. These models are used to forecast volcanic ash plume trajectories and provide hazard alerts and warnings to aircraft in the Alaska region. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with

  18. Emerald ash borer biocontrol in ash saplings: the potential for early stage recovery of North American ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many parts of North America, ash stands have been reduced by the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) invasion to a few surviving mature trees and young basal sprouts, saplings, and seedlings. Without a seed bank, ash tree recovery will require survival and maturation of these younger cohorts...

  19. A comparison of contaminant plume statistics from a Gaussian puff and urban CFD model for two large cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, Julie; Boris, Jay P.; Young, Theodore; Patnaik, Gopal; Iselin, John

    This paper quantitatively assesses the spatial extent of modeled contaminated regions resulting from hypothetical airborne agent releases in major urban areas. We compare statistics from a release at several different sites in Washington DC and Chicago using a Gaussian puff model (SCIPUFF, version 1.3, with urban parameter settings) and a building-resolving computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model (FAST3D-CT). For a neutrally buoyant gas source term with urban meteorology, we compare near-surface dosage values within several kilometers of the release during the first half hour, before the gas is dispersed beyond the critical lethal level. In particular, using "fine-grain" point-wise statistics such as fractional bias, spatial correlations and the percentage of points lying within a factor of two, we find that dosage distributions from the Gaussian puff and CFD model share few features in common. Yet the "coarse-grain" statistic that compares areas contained within a given contour level reveals that the differences between the models are less pronounced. Most significant among these distinctions is the rapid lofting, leading to enhanced vertical mixing, and projection downwind of the contaminant by the interaction of the winds with the urban landscape in the CFD model. This model-to-model discrepancy is partially ameliorated by supplying the puff model with more detailed information about the urban boundary layer that evolves on the CFD grid. While improving the correspondence of the models when using the "coarse-grain" statistic, the additional information does not lead to quite as substantial an overall agreement between the models when the "fine-grain" statistics are compared. The taller, denser and more variable building landscape of Chicago created increased sensitivity to release site and led to greater divergence in FAST3D-CT and SCIPUFF results relative to the flatter, sparser and more uniform urban morphology of Washington DC.

  20. Transcriptomic signatures of ash (Fraxinus spp. phloem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ash (Fraxinus spp. is a dominant tree species throughout urban and forested landscapes of North America (NA. The rapid invasion of NA by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, a wood-boring beetle endemic to Eastern Asia, has resulted in the death of millions of ash trees and threatens billions more. Larvae feed primarily on phloem tissue, which girdles and kills the tree. While NA ash species including black (F. nigra, green (F. pennsylvannica and white (F. americana are highly susceptible, the Asian species Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica is resistant to A. planipennis perhaps due to their co-evolutionary history. Little is known about the molecular genetics of ash. Hence, we undertook a functional genomics approach to identify the repertoire of genes expressed in ash phloem. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using 454 pyrosequencing we obtained 58,673 high quality ash sequences from pooled phloem samples of green, white, black, blue and Manchurian ash. Intriguingly, 45% of the deduced proteins were not significantly similar to any sequences in the GenBank non-redundant database. KEGG analysis of the ash sequences revealed a high occurrence of defense related genes. Expression analysis of early regulators potentially involved in plant defense (i.e. transcription factors, calcium dependent protein kinases and a lipoxygenase 3 revealed higher mRNA levels in resistant ash compared to susceptible ash species. Lastly, we predicted a total of 1,272 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 980 microsatellite loci, among which seven microsatellite loci showed polymorphism between different ash species. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The current transcriptomic data provide an invaluable resource for understanding the genetic make-up of ash phloem, the target tissue of A. planipennis. These data along with future functional studies could lead to the identification/characterization of defense genes involved in resistance of ash to A. planipennis

  1. Settling characteristics of some Indian fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, M.K.; Sastry, B.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharapur (India). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2003-07-01

    The paper examines the aspects of the solid liquid separation (settling characteristics) of some of the fly ash obtained from coal-fired power plants in India. The application of a coagulating or flocculating agent (polymer) to improve the two properties as indicated is a typical industrial practice. The sources for this study comprise of fly ash, pond ash, and bottom ash and the settling characteristics are studied in conjunction with the flocculating agent polyacrylamide. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Modeling of ns and ps laser-induced soft X-ray sources using nitrogen gas puff target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbova, M.; Zakharov, S. V.; Zakharov, V. S.

    2014-07-01

    Gas puff laser plasma is studied as a source of water window radiation with 2.88 nm wavelength, corresponding to quantum transition 1s2 → 1s2p of helium-like nitrogen ions. Spatial development of plasma induced by Nd:YAG laser beam is simulated by 2D Radiation-Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic code Z*. The results for nitrogen gas layer (0.72 mm thickness, 1 bar pressure) and two different laser pulses (600 mJ/7 ns and 525 mJ/170 ps), corresponding to the experiments done in Laser Laboratory Gottingen are presented.

  3. Characterization of multi-jet gas puff targets for high-order harmonic generation using EUV shadowgraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, P.W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. Gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Bartnik, A.; Jarocki, R.; Fiedorowicz, H. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. Gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    Characterization measurements of multi-jet gas puff targets, developed for investigations on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) by a focused laser beam in a gas medium of modulated density, are presented. The targets produced by pulsed injection of gas through a nozzle in a form of a chain of small orifices have been characterized by EUV backlighting at 13.5 nm wavelength. Measurements were performed for nozzles with 5, 7 and 9 orifices of 0.5 mm in diameter each. Density profiles for argon targets have been obtained for the first time.

  4. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  5. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  6. Satellite and ground observations of the June 2009 eruption of Sarychev Peak volcano, Matua Island, Central Kuriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, A.; Chibisova, M.; Webley, P.; Steensen, T.; Izbekov, P.; Neal, C.; Realmuto, V.

    2011-01-01

    After 33 years of repose, one of the most active volcanoes of the Kurile island arc-Sarychev Peak on Matua Island in the Central Kuriles-erupted violently on June 11, 2009. The eruption lasted 9 days and stands among the largest of recent historical eruptions in the Kurile Island chain. Satellite monitoring of the eruption, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Meteorological Agency Multifunctional Transport Satellite, and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data, indicated at least 23 separate explosions between 11 and 16 June 2009. Eruptive clouds reached altitudes of generally 8-16 km above sea level (ASL) and in some cases up to 21 km asl. Clouds of volcanic ash and gas stretched to the north and northwest up to 1,500 km and to the southeast for more than 3,000 km. For the first time in recorded history, ash fall occurred on Sakhalin Island and in the northeast sector of the Khabarovsky Region, Russia. Based on satellite image analysis and reconnaissance field studies in the summer of 2009, the eruption produced explosive tephra deposits with an estimated bulk volume of 0. 4 km3. The eruption is considered to have a Volcanic Explosivity Index of 4. Because the volcano is remote, there was minimal risk to people or infrastructure on the ground. Aviation transport, however, was significantly disrupted because of the proximity of air routes to the volcano. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  7. An Early-Warning System for Volcanic Ash Dispersal: The MAFALDA Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, S.; Nannipieri, L.; Neri, A.

    2006-12-01

    Forecasts of the dispersal of volcanic ash is a fundamental goal in order to mitigate its potential impact on urbanized areas and transport routes surrounding explosive volcanoes. To this aim we developed an early- warning procedure named MAFALDA (Modeling And Forecasting Ash Loading and Dispersal in the Atmosphere). Such tool is able to quantitatively forecast the atmospheric concentration of ash as well as the ground deposition as a function of time over a 3D spatial domain.\\The main features of MAFALDA are: (1) the use of the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code VOL-CALPUFF able to describe both the rising column phase and the atmospheric dispersal as a function of weather conditions, (2) the use of high-resolution weather forecasting data, (3) the short execution time that allows to analyse a set of scenarios and (4) the web-based CGI software application (written in Perl programming language) that shows the results in a standard graphical web interface and makes it suitable as an early-warning system during volcanic crises.\\MAFALDA is composed by a computational part that simulates the ash cloud dynamics and a graphical interface for visualizing the modelling results. The computational part includes the codes for elaborating the meteorological data, the dispersal code and the post-processing programs. These produces hourly 2D maps of aerial ash concentration at several vertical levels, extension of "threat" area on air and 2D maps of ash deposit on the ground, in addition to graphs of hourly variations of column height.\\The processed results are available on the web by the graphical interface and the users can choose, by drop-down menu, which data to visualize. \\A first partial application of the procedure has been carried out for Mt. Etna (Italy). In this case, the procedure simulates four volcanological scenarios characterized by different plume intensities and uses 48-hrs weather forecasting data with a resolution of 7 km provided by the Italian Air Force.

  8. Depositional and Immersion-Mode Ice Nucleation of Fine-Grained Volcanic Ash Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloer, S.; Woods, T.; Genareau, K. D.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic lightning is a common phenomenon during explosive eruptions; occurring as vent discharges, near-vent discharges, and plume lightning. Plume lightning is most similar to thunderstorm lightning, where volcanic ash may act as ice nuclei. Volcanic ash samples derived from eight volcanoes: Augustine, Crater Peak, Katmai, Okmok, Redoubt (Alaska, U.S.A.), Lathrop Well (Nevada, U.S.A.), Taupo (New Zealand), and Valles Caldera (New Mexico, U.S.A.); were used to determine what roles ash mineralogy, particularly Fe-oxide-bearing minerals and silica-enriched minerals, grain shape, and grain size have in the nucleation of ice, which can generate plume lightning. Depositional and immersion-mode ice nucleation experiments were performed using a Nicolet Almega XR Dispersive Raman spectrometer, following the methods of Schill et al. (2015), where samples were shaken for 24 h prior to experiments in ultra-pure water, then nebulized to super micron droplets. Depositional nucleation experiments were conducted from 225-235 K, and immersion-mode nucleation experiments were conducted from 233-278 K. A JEOL JSM 6010 Plus/LA scanning electron microscope (SEM), along with Image-J freeware, was used to quantify the number density of Fe-oxide mineral phases in backscattered electron images, with an x-ray diffractometer (XRD) used to determine bulk mineral abundance and an x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine bulk ash composition. Based on previous studies, we hypothesize that all ash samples will efficiently form depositional ice nuclei; however, certain mineral phases will dictate the efficiency of immersion-mode ice nucleation including K or Na / Ca feldspars, which have been shown to be efficient nuclei, and Fe-oxide-bearing minerals. These results will shed new light on volcanic cloud dynamics and add new parameters for atmospheric models, which currently only address effects of mineral dust as ice nuclei and overlook the potential role of volcanic ash.

  9. DURABILITY OF HARDENED FLY ASH PASTE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical properties and durability ( mainly frost-resistance and carbonation resistance ) of fly ash-CaO-CaSO4 .2H2O hardened paste are studied. The relationship among durability of harden ed fly ash paste, the quantity and distribution of hydrates and the initial p aste texture of hardened fly ash paste is presented.

  10. A method for treating bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Van Craaikamp, H.; Berkhout, S.P.M.; Sierhuis, W.; Van Kooy, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    A method for treating bottom ash from a waste incineration plant. The invention relates in particular to a method for treating bottom ash from a domestic waste incineration plant. In accordance with the invention bottom ash having a size ranging up to 2 mm is treated by removing a previously determi

  11. Unmanned Airborne System Deployment at Turrialba Volcano for Real Time Eruptive Cloud Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, J. A.; Pieri, D. C.; Fladeland, M. M.; Bland, G.; Corrales, E.; Alan, A., Jr.; Alegria, O.; Kolyer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The development of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) with a variety of instrument packages enables in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes, even when the active conditions of the volcano do not allow volcanologists and emergency response personnel to get too close to the erupting crater. This has been demonstrated this year by flying a sUAS through the heavy ash driven erupting volcanic cloud of Turrialba Volcano, while conducting real time in situ measurement of gases over the crater summit. The event also achieved the collection of newly released ash samples from the erupting volcano. The interception of the Turrialba ash cloud occurred during the CARTA 2015 field campaign carried out as part of an ongoing program for remote sensing satellite calibration and validation purposes, using active volcanic plumes. These deployments are timed to support overflights of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) onboard the NASA Terra satellite on a bimonthly basis using airborne platforms such as tethered balloons, free-flying fixed wing small UAVs at altitudes up to 12.5Kft ASL within about a 5km radius of the summit crater. The onboard instrument includes the MiniGas payload which consists of an array of single electrochemical and infrared gas detectors (SO2, H2S CO2), temperature, pressure, relative humidity and GPS sensors, all connected to an Arduino-based board, with data collected at 1Hz. Data are both stored onboard and sent by telemetry to the ground operator within a 3 km range. The UAV can also carry visible and infrared cameras as well as other payloads, such as a UAV-MS payload that is currently under development for mass spectrometer-based in situ measurements. The presentation describes the ongoing UAV- based in situ remote sensing validation program at Turrialba Volcano, the results of a fly-through the eruptive cloud, as well as future plans to continue these efforts. Work presented here was

  12. Remote sensing measurements of the volcanic ash plume over Poland in April 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz, K. M.; Zielinski, T.; Pietruczuk, A.; Posyniak, M.; Zawadzka, O.; Makuch, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Jagodnicka, A. K.; Petelski, T.; Kumala, W.; Sobolewski, P.; Stacewicz, T.

    2012-03-01

    This work provides information on selected optical parameters related to volcanic ash produced during the eruption of the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland in 2010. The observations were made between 16 and 18 April 2010 at four stations representative for northern (Sopot), central (Warsaw, Belsk) and south-eastern (Strzyzow) regions of Poland. The largest ash plume (in terms of aerosol optical thickness) over Poland was observed at night of 16/17 April 2010 in the layer between 4 and 5.5 km a.s.l. The highest values of the aerosol extinction coefficient reached 0.06-0.08 km -1 at 532 nm (based on lidar observations in Warsaw) and 0.02-0.04 km -1 at 1064 nm (based on ceilometer observations in Warsaw). The corresponding optical thickness due to volcanic ash reached values of about 0.05 at 532 nm and about 0.03 at 1064 nm. These values are similar to those reported for the Belsk station based on lidar observations. The ash mass concentration estimated based on the maximum aerosol extinction coefficient reached 0.22 ± 0.11 mg m -3. This value is significantly lower than the limit (2 mg m -3) for the aircraft operation.

  13. Optical, microphysical and compositional properties of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rocha-Lima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Microphysical, optical, and compositional properties of the volcanic ash from the April–May (2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption are presented. Samples of the volcanic ash were taken on the ground in the vicinity of the volcano. The material was sieved, re-suspended, and collected on filters, separating particle sizes into coarse and fine modes. The spectral mass absorption efficiency αabs [m2 g−1] was determined for coarse and fine particles in the wavelength range from 300 to 2500 nm. Size distribution of particles on filters was obtained using a semi-automatic software to analyze images obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The grain density of the volcanic ash was determined as 2.16(13 g cm−3 by measuring the variation of air volume in a system with volcanic ash and air under compression. Using Mie–Lorenz and T-matrix theories, the imaginary part of the refractive index was derived. Results show the spectral imaginary refractive index ranging from 0.001 to 0.005. Fine and coarse particles were analyzed by X-Ray fluorescence for elemental composition. Fine and coarse mode particles exhibit distinct compositional and optical differences.

  14. Kulanaokuaiki Tephra (ca, A.D. 400-1000): Newly recognized evidence for highly explosive eruptions at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, R.S.; Rose, T.R.; Swanson, D.A.; Champion, D.E.; McGeehin, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    K??lauea may be one of the world's most intensively monitored volcanoes, but its eruptive history over the past several thousand years remains rather poorly known. Our study has revealed the vestiges of thin basaltic tephra deposits, overlooked by previous workers, that originally blanketed wide, near-summit areas and extended more than 17 km to the south coast of Hawai'i. These deposits, correlative with parts of tephra units at the summit and at sites farther north and northwest, show that K??lauea, commonly regarded as a gentle volcano, was the site of energetic pyroclastic eruptions and indicate the volcano is significantly more hazardous than previously realized. Seventeen new calibrated accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon ages suggest these deposits, here named the Kulanaokuaiki Tephra, were emplaced ca. A.D. 400-1000, a time of no previously known pyroclastic activity at the volcano. Tephra correlations are based chiefly on a marker unit that contains unusually high values of TiO2 and K2O and on paleomagnetic signatures of associated lava flows, which show that the Kulanaokuaiki deposits are the time-stratigraphic equivalent of the upper part of a newly exhumed section of the Uw??kahuna Ash in the volcano's northwest caldera wall. This section, thought to have been permanently buried by rockfalls in 1983, is thicker and more complete than the previously accepted type Uw??kahuna at the base of the caldera wall. Collectively, these findings justify the elevation of the Uw??kahuna Ash to formation status; the newly recognized Kulanaokuaiki Tephra to the south, the chief focus of this study, is defined as a member of the Uw??kahuna Ash. The Kulanaokuaiki Tephra is the product of energetic pyroclastic falls; no surge- or pyroclastic-flow deposits were identified with certainty, despite recent interpretations that Uw??kahuna surges extended 10-20 km from K??lauea's summit. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  15. Strong soft X-ray emission from a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Rakowski, R.; Szczurek, M. [Military Univ. of Technology, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Optoelectronics; Daido, H.; Suzuki, M.; Yamagami, S.; Choi, I.W.; Tang, H.J. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Soft X-ray emission from a new double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond, high-power Nd:YAG laser pulse has been studied. The target was formed by pulsed injection of gas into a hollow gas stream made from helium by using a double-nozzle setup. Strong X-ray emissions near 10 nm from the double-stream krypton/helium, near 11 nm from the xenon/helium, and at 13 nm from the oxygen/helium targets were observed. The emission from the double-stream gas puff target was several times higher as compared to the ordinary gas puff targets, and comparable to the emission from the solid targets irradiated in the same conditions. (orig.)

  16. Update of map the volcanic hazard in the Ceboruco volcano, Nayarit, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    (Hibiscus sabdariffa). Recently it has established tomato and green pepper crops in greenhouses. The regional commercial activities are concentrated in the localities of Ixtlán, Jala and Ahuacatlán. The updated hazard maps are: a) Hazard map of pyroclastic flows, b) Hazard map of lahars and debris flow, and c) Hazard map of ash-fall. The cartographic and database information obtained will be the basis for updating the Operational Plan of the Ceboruco Volcano by the State Civil & Fire Protection Unit of Nayarit, Mexico, and the urban development plans of surrounding municipalities, in order to reduce their vulnerability to the hazards of the volcanic activity.

  17. Was the 12.1 ka Icelandic Vedde Ash one of a kind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, C. S.; Blockley, S. P. E.; Mangerud, J.; Smith, V. C.; Lohne, Ø. S.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Matthews, I. P.; Lotter, A. F.

    2012-02-01

    The Vedde Ash is the most important volcanic event marker layer for the correlation of Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental archives in Europe and the North Atlantic. First defined from its type site localities near Ålesund, Western Norway, the Vedde Ash has now been traced across much of northern and central Europe, into northwest Russia, within North Atlantic marine sediments and into the Greenland ice cores. The Vedde Ash is thought to derive from an eruption of the Katla volcano in Iceland that occurred midway through the Younger Dryas/Greenland Stadial 1 (GS-1), ˜12.1 ka BP. Visible and cryptotephra deposits of the Vedde Ash have been found in numerous stratified sites with robust chronologies, which allow its age to be constrained and its dispersal to be mapped. The eruption must have been highly explosive, however few proximal outcrops have been confirmed and this crucial ash layer remains almost exclusively distally-described and characterised using major element glass compositions. The widespread distribution, stratigraphic associations and consistent major element glass chemistry have led the Quaternary tephrochronological community to see the Vedde Ash as a robust and unique chronological marker layer for the Last Glacial to Interglacial Transition (˜10-18 ka BP). Here we present new glass analyses of the Vedde Ash from multiple sites around the dispersal area, using a full suite of compositional analysis, including for the first time, single-grain trace element data. These data demonstrate the strong compositional coherence of Vedde Ash deposits. However, comparison with major, minor, and trace element compositional data from several other distally-described Icelandic tephras reveals that both before and after the Younger Dryas chronozone, there were eruptions that generated widespread tephra layers that have comparable glass shard compositions to the Vedde Ash. This implies that these numerous events not only hail from the same volcanic system, but

  18. Comparison between volcanic ash satellite retrievals and FALL3D transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca; Folch, Arnau

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent one of the most important sources of natural pollution because of the large emission of gas and solid particles into the atmosphere. Volcanic clouds can contain different gas species (mainly H2O, CO2, SO2 and HCl) and a mix of silicate-bearing ash particles in the size range from 0.1 μm to few mm. Determining the properties, movement and extent of volcanic ash clouds is an important scientific, economic, and public safety issue because of the harmful effects on environment, public health and aviation. In particular, real-time tracking and forecasting of volcanic clouds is key for aviation safety. Several encounters of en-route aircrafts with volcanic ash clouds have demonstrated the harming effects of fine ash particles on modern aircrafts. Alongside these considerations, the economical consequences caused by disruption of airports must be also taken into account. Both security and economical issues require robust and affordable ash cloud detection and trajectory forecasting, ideally combining remote sensing and modeling. We perform a quantitative comparison between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals of volcanic ash cloud mass and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) with the FALL3D ash dispersal model. MODIS, aboard the NASA-Terra and NASA-Aqua polar satellites, is a multispectral instrument with 36 spectral bands from Visible (VIS) to Thermal InfraRed (TIR) and spatial resolution varying between 250 and 1000 m at nadir. The MODIS channels centered around 11 and 12 mm have been used for the ash retrievals through the Brightness Temperature Difference algorithm and MODTRAN simulations. FALL3D is a 3-D time-dependent Eulerian model for the transport and deposition of volcanic particles that outputs, among other variables, cloud column mass and AOD. We consider the Mt. Etna volcano 2002 eruptive event as a test case. Results show a good agreement between the mean AOT retrieved and the spatial ash dispersion in the

  19. Experiments on gas-ash separation processes in volcanic umbrella plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holasek, Rick E.; Woods, Andrew W.; Self, Stephen

    1996-03-01

    We present a series of analogue laboratory experiments which simulate the separation of ash and gas and the formation of secondary intrusions from finite volcanic umbrella plumes. We examined the lateral spreading of mixtures of freshwater and particles released into a laboratory tank containing a uniformly stratified aqueous solution. For times smaller than the sedimentation time of particles through the intrusion, the current remains coherent and intrudes laterally. As some of the particles settle into the underlying ambient fluid, a layer of particle-depleted fluid develops below the upper surface of the current and the density of the residual fluid is reduced. Over longer times, the intrusion ceases to be coherent, with small fingers of relatively buoyant, particle-depleted fluid rising from the upper part of the intrusion into the overlying fluid. Meanwhile, the lateral motion of the injected solution induces a return flow in the ambient fluid which sweeps some of the particles sedimenting from the lower surface of the intrusion inwards. As a result, relatively dense particle-laden fluid collects below the intrusion and then sinks into the underlying fluid. Eventually this fluid reaches a new neutral buoyancy height, where it intrudes to form a second laterally spreading current below the original intrusion. The process then repeats to form further weaker intrusions below. These results of the separation of the ash and volcanic gas in an umbrella plume are consistent with field observations at Sakurajima volcano where positively charged plumes, thought to consist of volcanic gas, have been observed above negatively charged plumes of ash. This work also suggests that volcanic aerosols may form up to a kilometer above the original injection height of the ash. In a strong wind shear, this could result in very different trajectories of the ash and gas and so be important for evaluating the impact of ash plumes on both aviation safety and volcanic aerosol formation

  20. Impact of tephra falls on Andean communities: The influences of eruption size and weather conditions during the 1999-2001 activity of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Ruiz, Gorki A.; Ramón, Patricio; Palacios, Enrique; Mothes, Patricia; Yepes, Hugo

    2012-03-01

    Repeated ash fall events have occurred during the 1999-ongoing eruption of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, notably during the late 1999 and August 2001 eruptive phases. While the eruptive styles were similar, these two phases had different impacts on nearby rural and urban Andean populations: ash falls in late 1999 had limited effects on human health and farming, whereas the 2001 phase resulted in medical problems, death of animals in livestock, and damages to houses and crops. Here we investigate the origin of this difference by estimating the size of the August 2001 event (VEI, magnitude, intensity), and by comparing monitoring information of the 1999 and 2001 phases (duration, explosion rate, column height, SO2 output rate). The results show that both phases ranked at VEI 3, although the longer 1999 phase was likely larger than the 2001 phase. Mass magnitude (M) and intensity (I) indexes calculated for the 2001 phase reach M ≈ 2.7 and I ≈ 6.5 when based on ash fall layer data, but increase to M ≈ 3.2 and I ≈ 7.0 when ballistic products are included. We investigated the influence of rain fall and wind flow regimes on ash dispersion, sedimentation and remobilization. The analysis indicates that the harmful effect of the 2001 phase resulted from unfavorable conditions that combined volcanological and seasonal origins, including: a) a low elevation of the ash plume above rural regions owed to a usually bent-over column, b) ash sedimentation in a narrow area west of the volcano under sub-steady wind directions, c) anticipated ash settling by frequent rain flushing of low intensity, and d) formation of a wet cohesive ash coating on buildings and harvests. Conversely, the stronger 1999 phase injected a large amount of ash at higher elevation in the dry season; the ash was widely disseminated across the whole Ecuadorian territory and beyond, and was frequently removed by rain and winds. In summary, our study illustrates the influences of eruption size and weather

  1. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for examp