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Sample records for volcano iceland stretches

  1. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  2. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  3. Seismic unrest at Katla Volcano- southern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    jeddi, zeinab; Tryggvason, Ari; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Bödvarsson, Reynir; SIL Seismology Group

    2014-05-01

    Katla volcano is located on the propagating Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) in South Iceland. It is located beneath Mýrdalsjökull ice-cap which covers an area of almost 600 km2, comprising the summit caldera and the eruption vents. 20 eruptions between 930 and 1918 with intervals of 13-95 years are documented at Katla which is one of the most active subglacial volcanoes in Iceland. Eruptions at Katla are mainly explosive due to the subglacial mode of extrusion and produce high eruption columns and catastrophic melt water floods (jökulhlaups). The present long Volcanic repose (almost 96 years) at Katla, the general unrest since 1955, and the 2010 eruption of the neighbouring Eyjafjallajökull volcano has prompted concerns among geoscientists about an imminent eruption. Thus, the volcano has been densely monitored by seismologists and volcanologists. The seismology group of Uppsala University as a partner in the Volcano Anatomy (VA) project in collaboration with the University of Iceland and the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) installed 9 temporary seismic stations on and around the Mýrdalsjökull glacier in 2011. Another 10 permanent seismic stations are operated by IMO around Katla. The project's data collection is now finished and temporary stations were pulled down in August 2013. According to seismicity maps of the whole recording period, thousands of microearthquakes have occurred within the caldera region. At least three different source areas are active in Katla: the caldera region, the western Godaland region and a small cluster at the southern rim of Mýrdalsjökull near the glacial stream of Hafursarjökull. Seismicity in the southern flank has basically started after June 2011. The caldera events are mainly volcano-tectonic, while western and southern events are mostly long period (lp) and can be related to glacial or magmatic movement. One motivation of the VA Katla project is to better understand the physical mechanism of these lp events. Changes

  4. Degassing and differentiation in subglacial volcanoes, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.G.; Calk, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Within the neovolcanic zones of Iceland many volcanoes grew upward through icecaps that have subsequently melted. These steep-walled and flat-topped basaltic subglacial volcanoes, called tuyas, are composed of a lower sequence of subaqueously erupted, pillowed lavas overlain by breccias and hyaloclastites produced by phreatomagmatic explosions in shallow water, capped by a subaerially erupted lava plateau. Glass and whole-rock analyses of samples collected from six tuyas indicate systematic variations in major elements showing that the individual volcanoes are monogenetic, and that commonly the tholeiitic magmas differentiated and became more evolved through the course of the eruption that built the tuya. At Herdubreid, the most extensively studies tuya, the upward change in composition indicates that more than 50 wt.% of the first erupted lavas need crystallize over a range of 60??C to produce the last erupted lavas. The S content of glass commonly decreases upward in the tuyas from an average of about 0.08 wt.% at the base to crystallization that generates the more evolved, lower-temperature melts during the growth of the tuyas, apparently results from cooling and degassing of magma contained in shallow magma chambers and feeders beneath the volcanoes. Cooling may result from percolation of meltwater down cracks, vaporization, and cycling in a hydrothermal circulation. Degassing occurs when progressively lower pressure eruption (as the volcanic vent grows above the ice/water surface) lowers the volatile vapour pressure of subsurface melt, thus elevating the temperature of the liquidus and hastening liquid-crystal differentiation. ?? 1991.

  5. Imaging magma plumbing beneath Askja volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Tim; White, Robert S.

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes during repose periods are not commonly monitored by dense instrumentation networks and so activity during periods of unrest is difficult to put in context. We have operated a dense seismic network of 3-component, broadband instruments around Askja, a large central volcano in the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland, since 2006. Askja last erupted in 1961, with a relatively small basaltic lava flow. Since 1975 the central caldera has been subsiding and there has been no indication of volcanic activity. Despite this, Askja has been one of the more seismically active volcanoes in Iceland. The majority of these events are due to an extensive geothermal area within the caldera and tectonically induced earthquakes to the northeast which are not related to the magma plumbing system. More intriguing are the less numerous deeper earthquakes at 12-24km depth, situated in three distinct areas within the volcanic system. These earthquakes often show a frequency content which is lower than the shallower activity, but they still show strong P and S wave arrivals indicative of brittle failure, despite their location being well below the brittle-ductile boundary, which, in Askja is ~7km bsl. These earthquakes indicate the presence of melt moving or degassing at depth while the volcano is not inflating, as only high strain rates or increased pore fluid pressures would cause brittle fracture in what is normally an aseismic region in the ductile zone. The lower frequency content must be the result of a slower source time function as earthquakes which are both high frequency and low frequency come from the same cluster, thereby discounting a highly attenuating lower crust. To image the plumbing system beneath Askja, local and regional earthquakes have been used as sources to solve for the velocity structure beneath the volcano. Travel-time tables were created using a finite difference technique and the residuals were used to solve simultaneously for both the earthquake locations

  6. Basaltic cannibalism at Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic assimilation of felsic continental crust is a well-documented, relatively common phenomenon. The extent to which basaltic crust is assimilated by magmas, on the other hand, is not well known. Basaltic cannibalism, or the wholesale incorporation of basaltic crustal material into a basaltic magma, is thought to be uncommon because basalt requires more energy than higher silica rocks to melt. Basaltic materials that are unconsolidated, poorly crystalline, or palagonitized may be more easily ingested than fully crystallized massive basalt, thus allowing basaltic cannibalism to occur. Thrihnukagigur volcano, SW Iceland, offers a unique exposure of a buried cinder cone within its evacuated conduit, 100 m below the main vent. The unconsolidated tephra is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to a vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~4 Ka fissure eruption. Preliminary petrographic and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses indicate that there are two populations of plagioclase present in the system - Population One is stubby (aspect ratio 2.1), subhedral to euhedral, and has much higher Ba/Sr ratios. Population One crystals are observed in the cinder cone, dike, and surface lavas, whereas Population Two crystals are observed only in the dike and surface lavas. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single elongate population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the stubbier population of phenocrysts. This conceptual model for basaltic cannibalism is supported by field observations of large-scale erosion upward into the tephra, which is coated by magma flow-back indicating that magma was involved in the thermal etching. While the unique exposure at Thrihnukagigur makes it an exceptional place to investigate basaltic cannibalism, we suggest that it is not limited to this volcanic system. Rather it is a process that likely

  7. Eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Pedersen, Rikke; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Thorbjarnardóttir, Bergthóra; Jakobsdóttir, Steinunn; Roberts, Matthew J.

    2010-05-01

    The April 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano (Figure 1), located on Iceland's southern coast, created unprecedented disruptions to European air traffic during 15-20 April, costing the aviation industry an estimated $250 million per day (see the related news item in this issue). This cost brings into focus how volcanoes can affect communities thousands of miles away. Eyjafjallajökull rises to 1666 meters above sea level and hosts agricultural land on its southern slopes, with farms located as close as 7 kilometers from the summit caldera. In the past 1500 years, Eyjafjallajökull has produced four comparatively small eruptions. The eruption previous to 2010 began in December 1821 and lasted for over a year, with intermittent explosive activity spreading a thin layer of tephra (ash and larger ejected clasts) over the surrounding region. In contrast, the explosive 2010 eruption, sourced within the ice-capped summit of the volcano, so far is larger and characterized by magma of a slightly different composition. This may suggest that deep within the volcano, the 1821 magma source is mixing with new melt, or that residual melt from past intrusive events is being pushed out by new magma.

  8. Two differentiation trends in the Thingmuli volcano, Eastern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charreteur, G.; Tegner, C.; Haase, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    Since Carmichael’s study (1964), the Thingmúli central volcano (Tertiary Eastern Iceland) has been considered a complete and classic tholeiitic differentiation series from basalt to rhyolite. More recently the role of melting hydrated basaltic crust is often emphasized in the formation of rhyolite in Iceland. A new sample set collected on the Thingmúli central volcano demonstrates the existence of two distinct geochemical trends. For a MgO of 1.3%, a Fe-rich trend (HFe) contains about 13.4% FeO (total iron), while a Fe-poor trend (LFe) contains about 5.2% FeO. A few samples fall below the LFe trend, but they do not show a complete differentiation trend and are interpreted as an epiphenomenon of mixing between primitive basalt and rhyolite. The LFe trend displays a remarkably stable Mg# around 35 from the most evolved basalt (51 wt% SiO2) through to rhyolite with 72 wt% SiO2 before decreasing to almost zero through the rhyolitic field (up to 78 wt% SiO2). In contrast, Mg# of the HFe trend shows a progressive decrease from evolved basalt to rhyolite (52-77 wt% SiO2). Modeling using the MELTS algorithm indicates that the major element composition of the LFe trend can be explained by fractional crystallisation in system open to oxygen. The LFe trend, however, can also be explained by simple mixing between basaltic and rhyolitic magmas. The LFe-rhyolites show negative anomalies in Nb and Ta associated with positive anomalies in Pb. This favors mixing with melts originating by melting of hydrated crust as the dominant process resulting in the LFe trend. In contrast, the intermediate rocks of the HFe trend cannot be formed by any mixing process involving suitable basaltic and rhyolitic components. Instead, MELTS modeling assuming fractional crystallisation in a system closed to oxygen nicely reproduce the HFe trend. We therefore conclude that the Thingmúli volcano was fed by liquids originating from two magma chamber systems: one similar to Skaergaard producing Fe

  9. Extending permanent volcano monitoring networks into Iceland's ice caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Bergsson, Bergur H.; Kjartansson, Vilhjálmur; Jónsson, Thorsteinn; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.; Roberts, Matthew J.; Jóhannesson, Tómas; Pálsson, Finnur; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Erlendsson, Pálmi; Ingvarsson, Thorgils; Pálssson, Sighvatur K.

    2015-04-01

    The goals of the FUTUREVOLC project are the establishment of a volcano Supersite in Iceland to enable access to volcanological data from the country's many volcanoes and the development of a multiparametric volcano monitoring and early warning system. However, the location of some of Iceland's most active volcanoes inside the country's largest ice cap, Vatnajökull, makes these goals difficult to achieve as it hinders access and proper monitoring of seismic and deformation signals from the volcanoes. To overcome these obstacles, one of the developments in the project involves experimenting with extending the permanent real-time networks into the ice cap, including installation of stations in the glacier ice. At the onset of the project, only one permanent seismic and GPS site existed within Vatnajökull, on the caldera rim of the Grímsvötn volcano. Two years into the project both seismic and GPS stations have been successfully installed and operated inside the glacier; on rock outcrops as well as on the glacier surface. The specific problems to overcome are (i) harsh weather conditions requiring sturdy and resilient equipment and site installations, (ii) darkness during winter months shutting down power generation for several weeks, (iii) high snow accumulation burying the instruments, solar panels and communication and GPS antennae, and in some locations (iv) extreme icing conditions blocking transmission signals and connection to GPS satellites, as well as excluding the possibility of power generation by wind generators. In 2013, two permanent seismic stations and one GPS station were installed on rock outcrops within the ice cap in locations with 3G connections and powered by solar panels and enough battery storage to sustain operation during the darkest winter months. These sites have successfully operated for over a year with mostly regular maintenance requirements, transmitting data in real-time to IMO for analysis. Preparations for two permanent seismic

  10. Jakobssonite, CaAlF5, a new mineral from fumaroles at the Eldfell and Hekla volcanoes, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic Zunic, Tonci; Garavelli, A.; Mitolo, D.;

    2012-01-01

    The new mineral jakobssonite, ideally CaAlF5, was first found in crusts collected in 1988 from a fumarole on the Eldfell volcano, Heimaey Island, Iceland. It was subsequently found in similar crusts collected in 1991 from a fumarole on the Hekla volcano, Iceland. It is associated with leonardsenite...

  11. Inside the volcano: The how and why of Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFemina, Peter; Hudak, Michael; Feineman, Maureen; Geirsson, Halldor; Normandeau, Jim; Furman, Tanya

    2015-04-01

    The Thrihnukagigur volcano, located in the Brennisteinsfjöll fissure swarm on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland, offers a unique exposure of the upper magmatic plumbing system of a monogenetic volcano. The volcano formed during a dike-fed strombolian eruption ~3500 BP with flow-back leaving an evacuated conduit, elongated parallel to the regional maximum horizontal stress. At least two vents were formed above the dike, as well as several small hornitos south-southwest of the main vent. In addition to the evacuated conduit, a cave exists 120 m below the vent. The cave exposes stacked lava flows and a buried cinder cone. The unconsolidated tephra of the cone is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to the vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~3500 BP fissure eruption. We present geochemical, petrologic and geologic observations, including a high-resolution three-dimensional scan of the system that indicate the dike intersected, eroded and assimilated unconsolidated tephra from the buried cinder cone, thus excavating a region along the dike, allowing for future slumping and cave formation. Two petrographically distinct populations of plagioclase phenocrysts are present in the system: a population of smaller (maximum length 1 mm) acicular phenocrysts and a population of larger (maximum length 10 mm) tabular phenocrysts that is commonly broken and displays disequilibrium sieve textures. The acicular plagioclase crystals are present in the dike and lavas while the tabular crystals are in these units and the buried tephra. An intrusion that appears not to have interacted with the tephra has only acicular plagioclase. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single acicular population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the tabular population of phenocrysts from the cone. Petrographic thin-sections of lavas sampled near the vent show undigested fragments of tephra from

  12. The landscape evolution at Hekla volcano, Iceland: Integrating remote sensing data from the past 70yr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Gro; Belart, Joaquin M.-C.; Vilmundardóttir, Olga K.; Falco, Nicola; Sigurmundsson, Friðþór S.; Rustowicz, Rose; Tarquini, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Gísladóttir, Gudrun; Benediktsson, Jón A.

    2016-04-01

    Hekla volcano is one of the most active volcanic systems in Iceland and has erupted ~23 times since the settlement of Iceland in AD 874. Hekla is known for its mixed eruptions producing both explosive tephra deposits and effusive lava flows leaving a volcanically diverse landscape behind. The volcanic activity of Hekla has had a huge impact on the surrounding landscape and has changed the vegetation patterns and the depositional/erosional environments in different ways. Furthermore it has affected the human settlement since the occupation of Þjórsárdalur and in the past farms have been abandoned, destroyed or affected by tephra fall or by lava flows from Hekla, e.g., in AD 1104, 1389, 1436, 1693, 1725, and 1845. To understand the linkage between volcanic units, topography, vegetation patterns, erosional and depositional changes and in the end abandonments a cross-disciplinary study monitoring the temporal and spatial changes on a big scale, along with spatial modelling is necessary. In the project "Environmental Mapping and Monitoring of Iceland by Remote Sensing (EMMIRS)", the Hekla area is one of the two remote sensing supersites that are investigated. A benchmark repository is created, which consists of high spatial and spectral resolution data sets (LIDAR, hyperspectral and aerial photos), which were collected through an aerial survey in the summer 2015 by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) UK. This repository is used for both high-resolution ecological and geological mapping including classification of lava flows, their surface morphology as well as distribution of tephra deposits. Furthermore, a temporal remote sensing archive is created stretching back to 1945. This archive allows decadal reconstruction of the landscape by construction of digital elevation models, DEMs (ca. 5m/pixel), and ortho-photos (0.5-1m/pixel) using historical aerial stereo photos. These historical DEMs serve as pre and post-eruption DEMs for the five mixed Hekla

  13. Oskarssonite, AlF3, a new fumarolic mineral from Eldfell volcano, Heimaey, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Morten Jølnæs; Balic Zunic, Tonci; Mitolo, Donatella;

    2014-01-01

    The new mineral oskarssonite (IMA2012-088), with ideal formula AlF3, was found in August 2009 at the surface of fumaroles on the Eldfell volcano, Heimaey Island, Iceland (GPS coordinates 63º25’58.9’’N 20º14’50.3’’W). It occurs as sub-micron-sized crystals forming a white powder in association...

  14. Kilometer-scale Kaiser effect identified in Krafla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimisson, Elías Rafn; Einarsson, Páll; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Brandsdóttir, Bryndís.

    2015-10-01

    The Krafla rifting episode in 1975-1984, consisted of around 20 inflation-deflation events within the Krafla caldera, where magma accumulated during inflation periods and was intruded into the transecting fissure swarm during brief periods of deflation. We reanalyze geodetic and seismic data from the rifting episode and perform a time-dependent inversion of a leveling time series for a spherical point source in an elastic half-space. Using the volume change as a proxy for stress shows that during inflation periods the seismicity rate remains low until the maximum inflation of previous cycles is exceeded thus exhibiting the Kaiser effect. Our observations demonstrate that this phenomenon, commonly observed in small-scale experiments, is also produced in kilometer-scale volcanic deformation. This behavior sheds new light on the relationship between deformation and seismicity of a deforming volcano. As a consequence of the Kaiser effect, a volcano may inflate rapidly without significant changes in seismicity rate.

  15. The FUTUREVOLC Supersite's e-Infrastructure - A multidisciplinary data hub and data service for Icelandic Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Sverrisson, Sverrir Th.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur F.; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.; Arnarsson, Ólafur S.; Kristinsson, Ingvar; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Oddsdóttir, Thorarna Ýr; Bergsveinsson, Sölvi Th.; Hjartansson, Kristján R.

    2014-05-01

    The FUTUREVOLC volanological supersite will establish a data hub and dataservice, where researchers, hazard managers and other stake holders can freely obtain access to multidisciplinary data and products on activity, unrest and eruptions at Icelandic volcanoes. The supersite is firmly founded on close interaction between the main Icelandic volcanological research and monitoring institutions, in coordination with expertise from European researchers participating in FUTUREVOLC. The hub is located at the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO), an institution responsible for monitoring and archiving data on all natural hazards in Iceland and, which also has a mandate as the state volcano observatory. This association will ensure a long-term sustainable data service. The data accessible at the hub include in-situ and space-based observations, products and models from all the relevant disciplines contributing to volcanological research and local as well as cross-border hazard management, i.e. Earth sciences, atmospheric science, hydrology, remote sensing and space science. Access to the data will be in compliance with the access policy of the GEO (Group on Earth Observations), providing registered users with easy and timely access to data and products of documented quality. This commitment has already led to the acceptance of FUTUREVOLC as a permanent geohazard supersite by CEOS (Committee on Earth Observation Satellites), which will ensure access to additional satellite data and products on Icelandic volcanoes. To facilitate services to seismological data at the supersite hub, the IMO is reconstructing its existing data base and utilizing the SeisComp3 software to manage waveform and parameter data. The accompanying ArcLink component will be used to provide access to event data and waveforms. Access to GPS data will be provided by the GSAC web service which has been installed at the IMO through collaboration with UNAVCO. If appropriate, the format and data base

  16. 1993-2011 Time dependent deformation of Eyjafjallajokull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, T.; Feigl, K.; Pedersen, R.; Sigmundsson, F.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze synthetic aperture radar data acquired by ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat, TerraSAR-X and ALOS satellites between 1993 and 2011 to characterize the deformation associated with activity at Eyjafjallajokull. The volcano had shown intermittent unrest for 18 years before erupting in 2010. An effusive lava eruption occurred from 20th March to 12th April and was followed by an explosive summit eruption from 14th April to 22nd May, disrupting air traffic. Satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) captured intrusive events in 1994 and 1999 when several decimeters of deformation occurred on the volcanic edifice. By inverting the geodetic data, Pedersen et al. [2004; 2006] inferred that sills between depths of 5-7 km had increased in volume by approximately 10-17 and 21-31 million cubic meters during each of two intrusive events in 1994 and 1999, respectively. In this study, we extend the time series analysis to the pre-eruptive, co-eruptive, and post-eruptive deformation associated with the 2010 eruptions. To describe the pre-eruptive deformation over several months, Sigmundsson et al. [2010] estimate the total volume increase in two sills and a dike to be 49-71 million cubic meters. During the effusive eruption, no significant deformation was observed in the interferograms. During the explosive eruption, deflation was observed, that continued at a low rate after the eruption ceased. To estimate source parameters, we use the General Inversion of Phase Technique [GIPhT; Feigl and Thurber, 2009] that analyzes the gradient of phase without the need for unwrapping. To quantify the misfit between the observed and modeled values of the phase gradient, the objective function calculates the cost as the absolute value of their difference, averaged over all sampled pixels. To minimize the objective function we use a simulated annealing algorithm. For computational efficiency, we approximate the fitting function using Taylor series. Calculation of derivatives requires evaluating the

  17. Eldfellite, NaFe(SO4)2, a new fumarolic mineral from Eldfell volcano, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic Zunic, Tonci; Garavelli, A.; Acquafredda, P.

    2009-01-01

    A new mineral, eldfellite, was found among fumarolic encrustations collected in 1990 on the Eldfell volcano, Heimaey Island, Iceland. Associated minerals are ralstonite, anhydrite, gypsum, bassanite, hematite, opal and tamarugite, as well as a presumably new mineral with the composition Na3Fe(SO4...

  18. Volcano Deformation and Eruption Forecasting using Data Assimilation: Case of Grimsvötn volcano in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bato, Mary Grace; Pinel, Virginie; Yan, Yajing

    2016-04-01

    The recent advances in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) imaging and the increasing number of continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) networks recorded on volcanoes provide continuous and spatially extensive evolution of surface displacements during inter-eruptive periods. For basaltic volcanoes, these measurements combined with simple dynamical models (Lengliné et al. 2008 [1], Pinel et al, 2010 [2], Reverso et al, 2014 [3]) can be exploited to characterise and constrain parameters of one or several magmatic reservoirs using inversion methods. On the other hand, data assimilation-a time-stepping process that best combines models and observations, sometimes a priori information based on error statistics to predict the state of a dynamical system-has gained popularity in various fields of geoscience (e.g. ocean-weather forecasting, geomagnetism and natural resources exploration). In this work, we aim to first test the applicability and benefit of data assimilation, in particular the Ensemble Kalman Filter [4], in the field of volcanology. We predict the temporal behaviors of the overpressures and deformations by applying the two-magma chamber model of Reverso et. al., 2014 [3] and by using synthetic deformation data in order to establish our forecasting strategy. GPS time-series data of the recent eruptions at Grimsvötn volcano is used for the real case applicability of the method. [1] Lengliné, O., D Marsan, J Got, V. Pinel, V. Ferrazzini, P. Obuko, Seismicity and deformation induced by magma accumulation at three basaltic volcanoes, J. Geophys. Res., 113, B12305, 2008. [2] V. Pinel, C. Jaupart and F. Albino, On the relationship between cycles of eruptive activity and volcanic edifice growth, J. Volc. Geotherm. Res, 194, 150-164, 2010 [3] T. Reverso, J. Vandemeulebrouck, F. Jouanne, V. Pinel, T. Villemin, E. Sturkell, A two-magma chamber as a source of deformation at Grimsvötn volcano, Iceland, JGR, 2014 [4] Evensen, G., The Ensemble Kalman

  19. Crustal movements due to Iceland's shrinking ice caps mimic magma inflow signal at Katla volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaans, Karsten; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Hooper, Andrew; Ófeigsson, Benedikt Gunnar

    2015-05-20

    Many volcanic systems around the world are located beneath, or in close proximity to, ice caps. Mass change of these ice caps causes surface movements, which are typically neglected when interpreting surface deformation measurements around these volcanoes. These movements can however be significant, and may closely resemble movements due to magma accumulation. Here we show such an example, from Katla volcano, Iceland. Horizontal movements observed by GPS on the flank of Katla have led to the inference of significant inflow of magma into a chamber beneath the caldera, starting in 2000, and continuing over several years. We use satellite radar interferometry and GPS data to show that between 2001 and 2010, the horizontal movements seen on the flank can be explained by the response to the long term shrinking of ice caps, and that erratic movements seen at stations within the caldera are also not likely to signify magma inflow. It is important that interpretations of geodetic measurements at volcanoes in glaciated areas consider the effect of ice mass change, and previous studies should be carefully reevaluated.

  20. Origin of a rhyolite that intruded a geothermal well while drilling at the Krafla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W.A.; Fridleifsson, G.O.; Zierenberg, R.A.; Pope, E.C.; Mortensen, A.K.; Gudmundsson, A.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Marks, N.E.; Owens, L.; Bird, D.K.; Reed, M.; Olsen, N.J.; Schiffman, P.

    2011-01-01

    Magma flowed into an exploratory geothermal well at 2.1 km depth being drilled in the Krafla central volcano in Iceland, creating a unique opportunity to study rhyolite magma in situ in a basaltic environment. The quenched magma is a partly vesicular, sparsely phyric, glass containing ~1.8% of dissolved volatiles. Based on calculated H2O-CO2 saturation pressures, it degassed at a pressure intermediate between hydrostatic and lithostatic, and geothermometry indicates that the crystals in the melt formed at ~900 ??C. The glass shows no signs of hydrothermal alteration, but its hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios are much lower than those of typical mantle-derived magmas, indicating that this rhyolite originated by anhydrous mantle-derived magma assimilating partially melted hydrothermally altered basalts. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  1. Thermal surveillance of volcanoes of the Cascade Range and Iceland utilizing ERTS DCP systems and imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Significant results of the thermal surveillance of volcanoes experiment during 1972 included the design, construction, emplacement, and successful operation at volcanic sites in the Cascade Range, North America and on Surtsey, Iceland, of automated thermistor arrays which transmit ground and fumarole temperatures via the ERTS-1 data communication system to Goddard Space Flight Center. Temperature, radiance, and anomalous heat flow variations are being plotted by a U.S. Geological Survey IBM 360/65 computer program to show daily fluctuations at each of the sites. Results are being compiled in conjunction with NASA and USGS aircraft infrared survey data to provide thermal energy yield estimates during the current repose period of several Cascade Range volcanic systems. ERTS-1 MSS images have provided new information on the extent of structural elements controlling thermal emission at Lassen Volcanic National Park.

  2. Long-period seismic events with strikingly regular temporal patterns on Katla volcano's south flank (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Jeddi, Zeinab; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Einarsson, Páll; Tryggvason, Ari; Lund, Björn; Lucchi, Federico

    2016-09-01

    Katla is a threatening volcano in Iceland, partly covered by the Mýrdalsjökull ice cap. The volcano has a large caldera with several active geothermal areas. A peculiar cluster of long-period seismic events started on Katla's south flank in July 2011, during an unrest episode in the caldera that culminated in a glacier outburst. The seismic events were tightly clustered at shallow depth in the Gvendarfell area, 4 km south of the caldera, under a small glacier stream at the southern margin of Mýrdalsjökull. No seismic events were known to have occurred in this area before. The most striking feature of this seismic cluster is its temporal pattern, characterized by regular intervals between repeating seismic events, modulated by a seasonal variation. Remarkable is also the stability of both the time and waveform features over a long time period, around 3.5 years. We have not found any comparable examples in the literature. Both volcanic and glacial processes can produce similar waveforms and therefore have to be considered as potential seismic sources. Discerning between these two causes is critical for monitoring glacier-clad volcanoes and has been controversial at Katla. For this new seismic cluster on the south flank, we regard volcano-related processes as more likely than glacial ones for the following reasons: 1) the seismic activity started during an unrest episode involving sudden melting of the glacier and a jökulhlaup; 2) the glacier stream is small and stagnant; 3) the seismicity remains regular and stable for years; 4) there is no apparent correlation with short-term weather changes, such as rainstorms. We suggest that a small, shallow hydrothermal system was activated on Katla's south flank in 2011, either by a minor magmatic injection or by changes of permeability in a local crack system.

  3. 3D-ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography of Snæfellsjökull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Anne; Lupi, Matteo; Mordret, Aurélien; Jakobsdóttir, Steinunn S.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-05-01

    From May to September 2013, 21 seismic stations were deployed around the Snæfellsjökull volcano, Iceland. We cross-correlate the five months of seismic noise and measure the Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves to gain more information about the geological structure of the Snæfellsjökull volcano. In particular, we investigate the occurrence of seismic wave anomalies in the first 6 km of crust. We regionalize the group velocity dispersion curves into 2-D velocity maps between 0.9 and 4.8 s. With a neighborhood algorithm we then locally invert the velocity maps to obtain accurate shear-velocity models down to 6 km depth. Our study highlights three seismic wave anomalies. The deepest, located between approximately 3.3 and 5.5 km depth, is a high velocity anomaly, possibly representing a solidified magma chamber. The second anomaly is also a high velocity anomaly east of the central volcano that starts at the surface and reaches approximately 2.5 km depth. It may represent a gabbroic intrusion or a dense swarm of inclined magmatic sheets (similar to the dike swarms found in the ophiolites), typical of Icelandic volcanic systems. The third anomaly is a low velocity anomaly extending up to 1.5 km depth. This anomaly, located directly below the volcanic edifice, may be interpreted either as a shallow magmatic reservoir (typical of Icelandic central volcanoes), or alternatively as a shallow hydrothermal system developed above the cooling magmatic reservoir.

  4. The magmatic plumbing system of the Askja central volcano, Iceland, as imaged by seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Tim; White, Robert S.; Roecker, Steven

    2016-10-01

    The magmatic plumbing system beneath Askja, a volcano in the central Icelandic highlands, is imaged using local earthquake tomography. We use a catalog of more than 1300 earthquakes widely distributed in location and depth to invert for the P wave velocity (Vp) and the Vp/Vs ratio. Extensive synthetic tests show that the minimum size of any velocity anomaly recovered by the model is 4 km in the upper crust (depth < 8 km below sea level (bsl)), increasing to 10 km in the lower crust at a depth of 20 km bsl. The plumbing system of Askja is revealed as a series of high-Vp/Vs ratio bodies situated at discrete depths throughout the crust to depths of over 20 km. We interpret these to be regions of the crust which currently store melt with melt fractions of 10%. The lower crustal bodies are all seismically active, suggesting that melt is being actively transported in these regions. The main melt storage regions lie beneath Askja volcano, concentrated at depths of 5 km bsl with a smaller region at 9 km bsl. Their total volume is 100 km3. Using the recorded waveforms, we show that there is also likely to be a small, highly attenuating magmatic body at a shallower depth of about 2 km bsl.

  5. Long-period seismic events with strikingly regular temporal patterns on Katla volcano's south flank (Iceland)

    CERN Document Server

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Guðmundsson, Ólafur; Einarsson, Páll; Tryggvason, Ari; Lund, Björn; Lucchi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Katla is a threatening volcano in Iceland, partly covered by the M\\'yrdalsj\\"okull ice cap. The volcano has a large caldera with several active geothermal areas. A peculiar cluster of long-period seismic events started on Katla's south flank in July 2011, during an unrest episode in the caldera that culminated in a glacier outburst. The seismic events were tightly clustered at shallow depth in the Gvendarfell area, 4 km south of the caldera, under a small glacier stream on the southern margin of M\\'yrdalsj\\"okull. No seismic events were known to have occurred in this area before. The most striking feature of this seismic cluster is its temporal pattern, characterized by regular intervals between repeating seismic events, modulated by a seasonal variation. Remarkable is also the stability of both the time and waveform features over a long time period, around 3.5 years. No comparable examples have been found in the literature. Both volcanic and glacial processes can produce similar waveforms and therefore have ...

  6. Investigating the mechanisms controlling the eruptive frequency at Hekla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnardi, Marco; Hooper, Andrew; Dumont, Stéphanie

    2015-04-01

    Hekla is one of the most frequently erupting volcanoes in Iceland with 18 summit eruptions during the past 900 years, the last one in February-March 2000. Before 1970 the average repose period between eruptions was of ~60 years but since then Hekla has erupted four times, approximately every 10 years (in 1970, 1980-81, 1991 and 2000). Fifteen years have now passed since the last eruption, but no signs of unrest have yet been recorded. Did something change at Hekla since the last eruption in 2000? There are many factors that may control the eruptive frequency of the volcano, such as changes in the state of stress around its plumbing system or variations in the rate of magma supply from depth. For example, Hekla is located in a very dynamic area, at the intersection of the Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) and the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ). We therefore investigate the effects on the magmatic system caused by seismic activity in the SISZ, in particular the stress changes produced by the post-seismic relaxation following two earthquakes that occurred in June 2000 along faults located only 35-50 km west of Hekla. Since 2000 further stress changes may have also been caused by dike intrusions feeding the eruption of the neighboring volcano Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, or by changes in the rate of ice melting at the ice-caps in central and southern Iceland. In fact, previous studies have highlighted the possible influence of ice melting, and the consequent glacial isostatic adjustment of the crust, on the production of magma and its storage. Furthermore, at Hekla, a direct correlation exists between the duration of the repose period, the volume of the eruption and its silica content. An almost perfectly linear correlation can be found between time and the cumulative erupted volume, as the sum of both lava flows and tephra, between 1104 A.D. and 2010. From this correlation we can infer a conservative constant rate of magma supply to the volcano of ~0.013 km^3/yr. At this

  7. Volcanic ash hazard climatology for an eruption of Hekla Volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbetter, Susan J.; Hort, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Ash produced by a volcanic eruption on Iceland can be hazardous for both the transatlantic flight paths and European airports and airspace. In order to begin to quantify the risk to aircraft, this study explored the probability of ash from a short explosive eruption of Hekla Volcano (63.98°N, 19.7°W) reaching European airspace. Transport, dispersion and deposition of the ash cloud from a three hour 'explosive' eruption with an initial plume height of 12 km was simulated using the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment, NAME, the model used operationally by the London Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre. Eruptions were simulated over a six year period, from 2003 until 2008, and ash clouds were tracked for four days following each eruption. Results showed that a rapid spread of volcanic ash is possible, with all countries in Europe facing the possibility of an airborne ash concentration exceeding International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) limits within 24 h of an eruption. An additional high impact, low probability event which could occur is the southward spread of the ash cloud which would block transatlantic flights approaching and leaving Europe. Probabilities of significant concentrations of ash are highest to the east of Iceland, with probabilities exceeding 20% in most countries north of 50°N. Deposition probabilities were highest at Scottish and Scandinavian airports. There is some seasonal variability in the probabilities; ash is more likely to reach southern Europe in winter when the mean winds across the continent are northerly. Ash concentrations usually remain higher for longer during summer when the mean wind speeds are lower.

  8. Geodetic constraints on volcanic plume height at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Roberts, Matthew; Björnsson, Halldór; Grapenthin, Ronni; Arason, Pórdur; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Hólmjárn, Jósef; Geirsson, Halldór; Bennett, Richard; Gudmundsson, Magnús; Oddsson, Björn; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Villemin, Thierry; Jónsson, Torsteinn; Sturkell, Erik; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Larsen, Gudrún; Thordarson, Thor; Óladóttir, Bergrún

    2014-05-01

    In 2011 a VEI 4 explosive eruption took place at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland. Grímsvötn is a subglacial basaltic volcano beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap. It is Iceland's most frequently erupting volcano, with recent eruptions in 1983, 1998, 2004, and 2011. The volcano has a low seismic velocity anomaly down to about 3 km depth, interpreted as a magma chamber. A continuous GPS station and a tiltmeter are located on a nunatak, Mount Grímsfjall, which protrudes from the ice at the southern rim of the caldera. The 21-28 May 2011 eruption was Grímsvötn's largest since 1873, resulting in airspace closure in northern Europe and the cancellation of about 900 passenger flights. The eruption was preceded by gradual inflation following the 2004 eruption and progressive increase in seismicity. Kinematic 1 Hz solutions were derived for the position of the GPS station in the hours immediately before and during the 2011 eruption. The onset of deformation preceded the eruption by one hour and reached maximum of 0.57 m within 48 hours. Throughout the eruption the GPS station moved consistently in direction N38.4+/-0.5W, opposite to the direction of movements during the 2004-2011 inter eruptive phase. The deformation characteristics suggest that the signal was mostly due to pressure change in a source at 1.7 +/- 0.2 km depth. We use the geodetic measurements to infer co-eruptive pressure change in the magma chamber using the Mogi model. The rate of pressure drop is then used to estimate the magma flow rate from the chamber. Numerous studies have shown that plume height in explosive eruptions can be related to magma discharge. Using an empirical relationship between the volcanic plume height and magma flow rate (Mastin et al., 2009) we estimate the evolution of the plume height from the geodetic data. Two weather radars monitored the height of the volcanic plume during the eruption. A strong initial plume with peaks at 20-25 km was followed by a declining, pulsating activity

  9. Risk assessment for tephra dispersal and sedimentation: the example of four Icelandic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biass, Sebastien; Scaini, Chiara; Bonadonna, Costanza; Smith, Kate; Folch, Arnau; Höskuldsson, Armann; Galderisi, Adriana

    2014-05-01

    In order to assist the elaboration of proactive measures for the management of future Icelandic volcanic eruptions, we developed a new approach to assess the impact associated with tephra dispersal and sedimentation at various scales and for multiple sources. Target volcanoes are Hekla, Katla, Eyjafjallajökull and Askja, selected for their high probabilities of eruption and/or their high potential impact. We combined stratigraphic studies, probabilistic strategies and numerical modelling to develop comprehensive eruption scenarios and compile hazard maps for local ground deposition and regional atmospheric concentration using both TEPHRA2 and FALL3D models. New algorithms for the identification of comprehensive probability density functions of eruptive source parameters were developed for both short and long-lasting activity scenarios. A vulnerability assessment of socioeconomic and territorial aspects was also performed at both national and continental scales. The identification of relevant vulnerability indicators allowed for the identification of the most critical areas and territorial nodes. At a national scale, the vulnerability of economic activities and the accessibility to critical infrastructures was assessed. At a continental scale, we assessed the vulnerability of the main airline routes and airports. Resulting impact and risk were finally assessed by combining hazard and vulnerability analysis.

  10. Dispersal of key subplinian-Plinian tephras from Hekla volcano, Iceland: implications for eruption source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janebo, Maria H.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Houghton, Bruce F.; Bonadonna, Costanza; Larsen, Gudrun; Carey, Rebecca J.

    2016-10-01

    Hekla is the most active silicic volcano in Iceland, with 18 subplinian-Plinian eruptions since AD 1104. In the period 1970 to 2000, the frequency of such eruptions increased to once every decade. Hekla is currently inflated to above the levels observed prior to the most recent eruptions in 1991 and 2000. The next eruption could pose a hazard to air traffic between North America and Europe because explosive eruptions of Hekla, independent of size, typically start with a subplinian or Plinian phase that produces a sustained ash plume. We present an overview of five of the largest historical Hekla eruptions (taking place in 1104, 1158, 1300, 1693, and 1766). These eruptions cover a compositional range of rhyolite to andesite, previously estimated Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) values of 4-5 and are characterised by contrasting wind dispersal (dispersal axes NW-NE). New isopach maps show both greater deposit thicknesses in the proximal region and wider dispersal than previously inferred, resulting in different volume estimates (minimal values ranging between 0.18 and 0.91 km3). New isopleth maps were also compiled and resulted in inferred plume heights of about 13-25 km. These changes in the estimated values of volume and mass eruption rates have large implications on the forecasting and impacts of future Hekla eruptions.

  11. Volcanic ash and daily mortality in Sweden after the Icelandic volcano eruption of May 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudin, Anna; Carlsen, Hanne K; Forsberg, Bertil; Johansson, Christer

    2013-12-10

    In the aftermath of the Icelandic volcano Grimsvötn's eruption on 21 May 2011, volcanic ash reached Northern Europe. Elevated levels of ambient particles (PM) were registered in mid Sweden. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the Grimsvötn eruption had an effect on mortality in Sweden. Based on PM measurements at 16 sites across Sweden, data were classified into an ash exposed data set (Ash area) and an unexposed data set (No ash area). Data on daily all-cause mortality were obtained from Statistics Sweden for the time period 1 April through 31 July 2011. Mortality ratios were calculated as the ratio between the daily number of deaths in the Ash area and the No ash area. The exposure period was defined as the week following the days with elevated particle concentrations, namely 24 May through 31 May. The control period was defined as 1 April through 23 May and 1 June through 31 July. There was no absolute increase in mortality during the exposure period. However, during the exposure period the mean mortality ratio was 2.42 compared with 2.17 during the control period, implying a relatively higher number of deaths in the Ash area than in the No ash area. The differences in ratios were mostly due to a single day, 31 May, and were not statistically significant when tested with a Mann-Whitney non-parametric test (p > 0.3). The statistical power was low with only 8 days in the exposure period (24 May through 31 May). Assuming that the observed relative differences were not due to chance, the results would imply an increase of 128 deaths during the exposure period 24-31 May. If 31 May was excluded, the number of extra deaths was reduced to 20. The results of the present study are contradicting and inconclusive, but may indicate that all-cause mortality was increased by the ash-fall from the Grimsvötn eruption. Meta-analysis or pooled analysis of data from neighboring countries might make it possible to reach sufficient statistical power to study effects

  12. Precise hypocentre relocation of microearthquakes in a high-temperature geothermal field: the Torfajökull central volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, Regina; White, Robert S.; Soosalu, Heidi

    2005-01-01

    The Torfajökull volcanic system is one of approximately 30 active volcanoes comprising the neovolcanic zones of Iceland. The central volcano of the system is the largest silicic centre in Iceland with a caldera of approximately 12 km diameter. Its high-temperature geothermal system is one of the most powerful in Iceland. Torfajökull is a source of persistent seismicity, where both high- and low-frequency earthquakes occur. To study this microseismicity in detail, a temporary array of 20 broad-band seismic stations was deployed between 2002 June and November. These temporary stations were embedded in the permanent South Iceland Lowland (SIL) network and data from nine adjacent SIL stations were included in this study. A minimum one-dimensional (1-D) velocity model with station corrections was computed for earthquake relocation by inverting manually picked P- and S-wave arrival times from events occurring in the Torfajökull volcanic centre and its surroundings. High-frequency earthquakes from the Torfajökull volcanic centre were then relocated calculating a non-linear, probabilistic solution to the earthquake location problem. Subsequently, we correlated the waveforms of these 121 events (~2000 observations) to define linked events, calculated the relative traveltime difference between event pairs and solved for the hypocentral separation between these events. The resulting high-resolution pattern shows a tighter clustering in epicentre and focal depth when compared with original locations. Earthquakes are mainly located beneath the caldera with hypocentres between 1 and 6 km depth and lie almost exclusively within the geothermal system. A sharp cut-off in seismicity at 3 km suggests either that there is a marked temperature increase or that this is a structural boundary. No seismic activity was observed in the fissure swarms to the northeast (NE) and southwest (SW) of the volcanic centre.

  13. Habitat mapping using hyperspectral images in the vicinity of Hekla volcano in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmundardóttir, Olga K.; Sigurmundsson, Friðþór S.; Pedersen, Gro B. M.; Falco, Nicola; Rustowicz, Rose; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Benediktsson, Jón A.

    2016-04-01

    Hekla, one of the most active volcanoes in Iceland, has created a diverse volcanic landscape with lava flows, hyaloclastite and tephra fields. The variety of geological formations and different times of formation create diverse vegetation within Hekla's vicinity. The region is subjected to extensive loss of vegetation cover and soil erosion due to human utilization of woodlands and ongoing sheep grazing. The eolian activity and frequent tephra deposition has created vast areas of sparse vegetation cover. Over the 20th century, many activities have centered on preventing further loss of vegetated land and restoring ecosystems. The benefit of these activities is now noticeable in the increased vegetation and woodland cover although erosion is still active within the area. For mapping and monitoring this highly dynamic environment remote sensing techniques are extremely useful. One of the principal goals of the project 'Environmental Mapping and Monitoring of Iceland with Remote Sensing' (EMMIRS) is to use hyperspectral images and LiDAR data to classify and map the vegetation within the Hekla area. The data was collected in an aerial survey in summer 2015 by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), UK. The habitat type classification, currently being developed at the Icelandic Institute of Natural History and follows the structure of the EUNIS classification system, will be used for classifying the vegetation. The habitat map created by this new technique's outcome will be compared to the existent vegetation maps made by the conventional vegetation mapping method and the multispectral image classification techniques. In the field, vegetation cover, soil properties and spectral reflectance were measured within different habitat types. Special emphasis was on collecting data on vegetation and soil in the historical lavas from Hekla for assessing habitats forming over the millennia. A lava-chronosequence was established by measuring vegetation and soil in lavas

  14. Seismogenic ';trapdoors' during magma intrusion at Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. S.; Tarasewicz, J.; Brandsdottir, B.; Schonnman, C.

    2013-12-01

    Relocated earthquake hypocentres for >1000 microearthquakes that occurred prior to and during the 2010 fissure and summit eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland map out magma conduits from the upper mantle (30 km depth) to the surface. During the two weeks prior to the first, flank eruption, hypocentre locations lie predominantly in horizontally separated clusters at 3-4 km below sea level. They represent the filling with magma of an inflating sill beneath the eastern flank of the volcano, from which feeder dykes propagated laterally and vertically toward the flank eruption site three days prior to the eruption onset. The majority of events within some clusters of up to >100 earthquakes exhibit similar waveforms and identical patterns of P-wave first-motion polarities recorded across the monitoring network. In the clearest example, 104 out of 105 events in a single cluster appear to have the same source mechanism based on P-wave first-motion polarities and waveform similarity. These observations suggest that the clusters of similar events may comprise many earthquakes generated by source processes that have the same orientation of failure, perhaps even on the same rupture plane, in fixed locations that are repeatedly active. The epicentral clustering and similarity of source mechanisms suggest that much of the seismicity was generated at approximately static constrictions to magma flow in an inflating sill. These constrictions may act as a form of pressure valve or ';trapdoor' in the country rock, which ruptures when the melt pressure exceeds a critical level, then reseals after a pulse of melt has passed through. We infer that the magmatic intrusion causing the seismicity was likely to be a laterally inflating sill at 3-4 km depth, with seismogenic pinch-points occurring between aseismic compartments of the sill, or between adjacent magma lobes as they inflate. A second eruption followed from the summit, 8 km west of the first eruption site. During the

  15. Water-rich and volatile-undersaturated magmas at Hekla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucic, Gregor; Berg, Anne-Sophie; Stix, John

    2016-08-01

    Olivine-hosted melt inclusions from four eruptions at Hekla volcano in Iceland were analyzed for their dissolved H2O, CO2, S, and Cl contents. A positive correlation among the repose interval, magmatic evolution, and volatile contents of magmas is revealed. H2O is the dominant volatile species; it behaves as an incompatible component, increasing in concentration over time as a result of fractional crystallization in the magma. The full suite of H2O contents ranges from a low of 0.80 wt % in basaltic andesites to a maximum of 5.67 wt % in rhyolites. Decreasing H2O/K2O at fixed major element compositions suggests that syneruptive degassing reduces H2O contents significantly. Hekla magmas are CO2 poor, with very low concentrations present only in the most evolved compositions (˜20-30 ppm or less). The decrease in S content from basaltic andesite to rhyolite demonstrates that sulfide saturation is attained when the melt composition reaches basaltic andesite, resulting in the precipitation of pyrrhotite. Low CO2/Nb ratios suggest that vapor saturation is most likely reached during an early period of cooling and solidification in the crust. Fresh injections of mafic magma interact with previously solidified intrusives, producing new melts that are volatile undersaturated. Vapor saturation pressures obtained using the most volatile-rich melt inclusions suggest the presence of a magma chamber at a minimum depth of ˜7 km. This is in agreement with geophysical observations from recent small-volume eruptions, but given the possibility of volatile-undersaturated melts, some of the magmas may reside at greater depths.

  16. Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Stretching KidsHealth > For Teens > Stretching Print A A A ... full range of motion of the joints. continue Stretching Stretching used to be considered the main activity ...

  17. Morphology of the 1984 open-channel lava flow at Krafla volcano, northern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Matti J.

    1997-09-01

    An open-channel lava flow of olivine tholeiite basalt, 9 km long and 1-2 km wide, formed in a volcanic eruption that took place in the Krafla volcano, Iceland, on the 4-18 September 1984. The eruption started with emplacement of a pahoehoe sheet which was fed by a 8.5-km-long fissure. After two days of eruption, lava effusion from the fissure ceased but one crater at the northern end of the fissure continued to release lava for another twelve days. That crater supplied an open-channel flow that moved toward the north along the rift valley. The lava was emplaced on a slope of 1°. The final lava flow is composed of five flow facies: (1) the initial pahoehoe sheet; (2) proximal slab pahoehoe and aa; (3) shelly-type overflows from the channel; (4) distal rubbly aa lava; and (5) secondary outbreaks of toothpaste lava and cauliflower aa. The main lava channel within the flow is 6.4 km long. The mean width of this channel is 189 m (103 m S.D.). An initial lava channel that forms in a Bingham plastic substance is fairly constant in width. This channel, however, varies in width especially in the proximal part indicating channel erosion. Large drifted blocks of channel walls are found throughout the flow front area and on the top of overflow levees. This suggests that the channel erosion was mainly mechanical. The lava flow has a mean height of 6 m above its surroundings, measured at the flow margins. However, a study of the pre-flow topography indicates that the lava filled a considerable topographic depression. Combined surface and pre-flow profiles give an average lava-flow thickness of 11 m; the thickness of the initial sheet-flow is estimated as 2 m. The volume of the lava flow calculated from these figures is 0.11 km 3. The mean effusion rate was 91 m 3/s. When lava flow models are used to deduce the rheological properties of this type of lava flow, the following points must be considered: (1) when a lava flow is emplaced along tectonic lineaments, its depth and

  18. Plinian vs. phreatomagmatic eruptions at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Baptiste; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Larsen, Guðrún

    2016-04-01

    Grímsvötn is a subglacial central volcano located under the Vatnajökull ice cap, above the assumed centre of the Iceland mantle plume. Historical explosive eruptions are mostly of phreatomagmatic character whereas pure magmatic behaviour may characterize the largest eruptions. What causes this different eruption behaviour is uncertain. Here, we report petrological estimates of crystallization depth and volatile degassing as recorded by sulfur concentrations in melt inclusions (MI) hosted by ferromagnesian minerals and the groundmass glass. Tephra from four eruptions, AD 1823, 1873, 2004 and 2011, were selected. The 2011 and 1873 are the largest known historical eruptions, whereas the 2004 eruption is probably amongst the smallest. The repose time preceding those eruptions is surprisingly similar, or 6 to 7 years, and the major-element compositions are uniform. Plagioclase, clinopyroxene (cpx) and olivine are the three coexisting phases at the liquidus in the quartz-tholeiites of Grímsvötn. The cpx-melt geothermobarometer (Putirka 2008) applied to the 2011 tephra reveals that cpx crystallized over a large range of P from 60 to 640 MPa (depth range: 1.7-18km) and T between 1060 and 1175°C before the Plinian eruption, therefore mobilizing the entire crustal magma system. In contrast, the phreatomagmatic tephra do not record the shallowest crystallization but interestingly all four tephra have identical median entrapment pressure of approximately 400 MPa. Therefore, the depth from which the magma bodies are derived, does not explain the difference in explosivity between those eruptions nor the variable magma volume (V) produced. Sulfur concentrations in MI are only slightly higher in the Plinian products, the difference (10%) being insufficient to explain the different eruption regimes. The ΔS, the difference between the maximum S concentrations in MI and the mean of the groundmass glass for a given eruption, is higher in the Plinian tephra. Based on literature

  19. European collaboration for improved monitoring of Icelandic volcanoes: Status of the FUTUREVOLC project after the initial 18 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Vogfjörð, Kristín; Einarsdóttir, Heiðveig Maria; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús; Kristinsson, Ingvar; Loughlin, Sue; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Hooper, Andrew; Kylling, Arve; Witham, Claire; Bean, Chris; Braiden, Aoife; Ripepe, Maurizio; Prata, Fred; Pétur Heiðarsson, Einar; Other Members Of The Futurevolc Team

    2014-05-01

    The FUTUREVOLC project funded by the European Union (FP7) is devoted to volcanic hazard assessment and establishing an integrated volcanological monitoring procedure through a European collaboration. To reach these objectives the project combines broad expertise from 26 partners from 10 countries, focusing on the four most active volcanoes of Iceland: Grímsvötn, Katla, Hekla and Bárdarbunga. The geological setting of Iceland, the high rate of eruptions and the various eruption styles make this country an optimal natural laboratory to study volcanic processes from crustal depths to the atmosphere. The project, which began on 1 October 2012, integrates advanced monitoring and analytical techniques in an innovative way, focusing on (i) detailed monitoring to improve our understanding of the seismic/magmatic unrest, in order to estimate the amount of magma available for an eruption and to provide early warnings (ii) the dynamics of magma in the conduit and a near real time estimation of the mass eruption rate and (iii) observing and modelling the plume dynamics. The project design considers effective collaboration between partners and aims for efficient cross-disciplinary workflows. A major step during the first 18 months of the project was the installation of additional equipment in the volcanic regions of Iceland to reinforce and complement the existing monitoring. The instruments include: seismometers, GPS stations, MultigGAS detectors, DOAS, infrasonic arrays, electric field sensors, radars, and optical particle sizers. Data streaming is designed to withstand extreme weather conditions. The FUTUREVOLC project has an open data policy for real and near-time data. Implementation of a data hub is currently under way, based on open access to data from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Access to volcano monitoring data through a common interface will allow timely information on magma movements facilitated through combined analysis. A key part of the project is to

  20. Seismicity and Deformation of Krafla Volcano, Iceland. Intervals of Low Seismicity Rate during Rapid Inflation Explained By the Kaiser Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimisson, E. R.; Einarsson, P.; Sigmundsson, F.; Brandsdottir, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Krafla central volcano in NE-Iceland produced about 20 dike intrusions during a rifting episode 1975-1984. These intrusions were always preceded by inflation of the caldera. Once a dike started propagating rapid deflation was observed. The first deflation event began in December 1975 with a dike traveling laterally from the magma chamber. Leveling measurements revealed subsidence of 2 m close to the deflation center. In February 1976 a stage of inflation began and at the same time the seismicity rate in the caldera rose in good correlation with the inflation. A small intrusion started propagating in late September 1976 which was accompanied by maximum subsidence of about 14 cm. However in the next 3 inflation and deflation cycles the inflation periods were almost aseismic until the inflation level of previous cycle was exceeded. At that point a sharp increase in the caldera earthquake count was observed. This phenomenon was observed until late April 1977 when a fissure eruption occurred inside the caldera. By inverting leveling data from 87 stations for a Mogi source and regarding the volume change of the source as a measure of stress we suggest that this phenomenon can be explained by the Kaiser effect. The Kaiser effect is well known from rock mechanics where under cyclic loading and unloading rocks, and other materials, induce dramatic increase in acoustic emissions when the load exceeds that of previous cycles. Krafla demonstrated the same effect while the external stress field was not significantly changed during the aforementioned 3 inflation/deflation cycles. This condition was disturbed when eruption occurred inside the caldera. The state of stress in the vicinity of the magma chamber was changed and subsequent inflation periods were not accompanied by significant seismicity. These results indicate that the Kaiser effect is an important part of understanding the relationship between deformation and seismicity in active volcanoes. The importance of

  1. Post-emplacement cooling and contraction of lava flows: InSAR observations and thermal model for lava fields at Hekla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Werner; Dumont, Stephanie; Lavallee, Yan; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2016-04-01

    Gradual post-emplacement subsidence of lava flows has been observed at various volcanoes, e.g. Okmok volcano in Alaska, Kilauea volcano on Hawaii and Etna volcano on Sicily. In Iceland, this effect has been observed at Krafla volcano and Hekla volcano. The latter was chosen as a case study for investigating subsidence mechanisms, specifically thermal contraction. Effects like gravitational loading, clast repacking or creeping of a hot and liquid core can contribute to subsidence of emplaced lava flows, but thermal contraction is considered being a crucial effect. The extent to which it contributes to lava flow subsidence is investigated by mapping the relative movement of emplaced lava flows and flow substrate, and modeling the observed signal. The slow vegetation in Iceland is advantageous for Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and offers great coherence over long periods after lava emplacement, expanding beyond the outlines of lava flows. Due to this reason, InSAR observations over volcanoes in Iceland have taken place for more than 20 years. By combining InSAR tracks from ERS, Envisat and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites we gain six time series with a total of 99 interferograms. Making use of the high spatial resolution, a temporal trend of vertical lava movements was investigated over a course of over 23 years over the 1991 lava flow of Hekla volcano, Iceland. From these time series, temporal trends of accumulated subsidence and subsidence velocities were determined in line of sight of the satellites. However, the deformation signal of lava fields after emplacement is vertically dominated. Subsidence on this lava field is still ongoing and subsidence rates vary from 14.8 mm/year in 1995 to about 1.0 mm/year in 2014. Fitting a simple exponential function suggests a exponential decay constant of 5.95 years. Additionally, a one-dimensional, semi-analytical model was fitted to these data. While subsidence due to phase change is calculated analytically

  2. Can repeating glacial seismic events be used to monitor stress changes within the underlying volcano? -Case study from the glacier overlain Katla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, K.; Vogfjord, K. S.; Bean, C. J.; Martini, F.

    2013-12-01

    The glacier overlain Katla volcano in South Iceland, is one of the most active and hazardous volcano in Europe. Katla eruptions result in hazardous glacial floods and intense tephra fall. On average there are eruptions every 50 years but the volcano is long overdue and we are now witnessing the longest quiescence period in 1000 years or since the settlement. Because of the hazard the volcano poses, it is under constant surveillance and gets a good share of the seismic stations from the national seismic network. Every year the seismic network records thousands of seismic events at Katla with magnitudes seldom exceeding M3. The bulk of the seismicity is however not due to volcano tectonics but seems to be caused mainly by shallow processes involving glacial deformation. Katla's ice filled caldera forms a glacier plateau of several hundred meters thick ice. The 9x14 km oval caldera is surrounded by higher rims where the glacier in some places gently and in others abruptly falls off tens and up to hundred meters to the surrounding lowland. The glacier surface is marked with dozen depressions or cauldrons which manifest geothermal activity below, probably coinciding with circular faults around the caldera. Our current understanding is that there are several glacial processes which cause seismicity; these include dry calving, where steep valley glaciers fall off cliffs and movements of glacier ice as the cauldrons deform due to hydraulic changes and geothermal activity at the glacier/bedrock boundary. These glacial events share a common feature of containing low frequency (2-4 hz) and long coda. Because of their shallow origin, surface waves are prominent. In our analysis we use waveforms from all of Katla's seismic events between years 2003-2013, with the criteria M>1 and minimum 4 p-wave picks. We correlate the waveforms of these events with each other and group them into families of highly similar events. Looking at the occurrence of these families we find that

  3. Low-frequency earthquakes at the Torfajökull volcano, south Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soosalu, Heidi; Lippitsch, Regina; Einarsson, Páll

    2006-05-01

    Torfajökull is a large rhyolitic volcanic edifice with a 12-km-diameter caldera and abundant high-temperature geothermal activity. It is located in the neovolcanic zone in south Iceland, at the junction of the eastern rift zone and a transform zone with the intraplate volcanic flank zone of south Iceland. The latest eruption at Torfajökull occurred about 500 years ago. Torfajökull is a source of persistent small-scale seismicity, where two types of earthquakes occur. High-frequency events are concentrated in the western part of the caldera and low-frequency events cluster in the south. Small low-frequency earthquakes have been observed at Torfajökull since the installation of a local analogue seismograph station in 1985. They typically occur in swarms; up to 300 earthquakes per day have been observed. The low-frequency events have a frequency content of about 1-3 Hz, and are difficult to locate, because of the emergent nature of their phases. The 160 events located during the years 1994-2000 using the permanent Icelandic seismic network cluster in the southern part of the Torfajökull caldera. A closer study of low-frequency events was carried out between May and October 2002, with a dense network of twenty Güralp 6TD broadband seismometers in the Torfajökull area. No distinct swarm activity was observed during this period, but small low-frequency events occurred almost on a daily basis. About 330 low-frequency events were detected during the study period. They are located in the southern part of the caldera, between two small glaciers. Areas of intensive geothermal activity surround the cluster of low-frequency events. It is argued that these earthquakes are associated with active magma in the south part of the Torfajökull caldera, possibly a rising cryptodome.

  4. Seismic activity associated with the September 1977 deflation of the Krafla central volcano in NE-Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandsdottir, Bryndis; Einarsson, Pall

    1979-01-01

    The September 1977 deflation event in the Krafla caldera was one of a series of such events that has been in progress since December 1975. The operation of portable seismographs in the active region and favorable location of the main seismic activity with respect to the permanent seismograph network in NE-Iceland allow a more detailed study of this deflation event than most of the other events. Continuous volcanic tremor appeared on the local seismographs shortly before 16 h on September 8, 1977. Deflation of the volcano began at the same time. A small basaltic eruption broke out on a 0.9 km long fissure near the northern rim of the caldera at about 18 h. Earthquake activity increased soon after the beginning of the tremor and the first earthquakes were located in the caldera region. The earthquake activity then migrated southwards along the Krafla fault swarm with a speed of about 0.5 m sec{sup -1}, and culminated shortly before midnight with 8 earthquakes larger than magnitude 3 that were located near the Namafjall geothermal area 8 km south of the center of the caldera. Shortly after the earthquake activity migrated into the Namafjall area small amounts of basaltic pumice were erupted through a 1138 m deep drill hole there. Depths of earthquakes were 0-6 km in the northern part of the hypocentral zone and 0-4 in the southern part. The first motion pattern of P-waves suggests dip-slip faulting on steeply dipping fault planes consistent with the extensive normal faulting observed on the surface throughout the epicentral zone. The magnitude-frequency relationship was nonlinear and changed during the earthquake sequence. The seismological data strongly support the interpretation that deflation of the Krafla volcano is associated with horizontal migration of magma from the caldera region and formation of dykes in the Krafla fault swarm.

  5. Smectites and zeolites in ash from the 2010 summit eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paque, M.; Detienne, M.; Maters, E. C.; Delmelle, P.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrothermal alteration minerals are often incorporated in volcanic ash from phreatic and phreatomagmatic activity. Here we assess the presence and abundance of such minerals in the ash materials produced during the April-May 2010 initial phreatomagmatic ( phase I) and subsequent magmatic ( phases II and III) eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland. The results of X-ray diffraction analyses reveal significant quantities of smectites (up to 4 wt%, mainly as saponite) and zeolites (up to 7 wt%) in ash from phase I. While a minor amount of smectites (<0.5 wt%) is present in ash from the subsequent weak explosive activity ( phase II), both smectites and zeolites are absent in phase III ash. This material was generated following abrupt rejuvenation of explosive activity in the absence of magma-ice/water interaction. Smectites and zeolites in phase I ash result primarily from scouring of altered volcanic rocks in the subsurface, although some may derive also from water-rock interaction within the summit ice cauldrons through which fragmented magma was injected. We show that incorporation of smectites and zeolites in phase I ash can explain its anomalously high specific surface area. Further, the presence of these minerals in ash may enhance its ability to act as ice nuclei as well as favour particle aggregation processes in the volcanic plume/cloud. Finally, the Eyjafjallajökull eruption represents another case in which ash fallout acted as an exogenic source of 2:1-type clay minerals in volcanic soils.

  6. Seismic Study of the Velocity Structure and Earthquake FocalMechanisms beneath the Krafla Central Volcano, NE Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, H. R.; Schuler, J.; Greenfield, T. S.; White, R. S.; Roecker, S. W.; Brandsdottir, B.; Stock, J. M.; Tarasewicz, J.; Pugh, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the seismic velocity structure of the Krafla central volcano, NE Iceland, and its shallow geothermal fields. In our 3D tomographic inversions, we used passive seismic data recorded between 2009-2012 from a temporary local network as well as active seismic legacy data to constrain the velocity models. We find high P-wave velocities (Vp) underneath regions of elevated topographic relief as well as two low-Vp anomalies that coincide spatially with two attenuating bodies outlined from S-wave shadows during the Krafla rifting episode of 1974-1985. Within the Krafla geothermal reservoir, which is developed for energy production, we imaged a shallow low-Vp/Vs zone overlying a deeper high-Vp/Vs zone and interpreted them as steam- and brine-bearing formations, respectively. Previously undertaken borehole measurements support our findings. A prominent low-Vp/Vs anomaly underlies these zones at rock depths greater than 1.5 km, where a super-heated zone within felsic overlies rhyolitic within the geothermal melt. Calculations systems show that of the most earthquake focal events are mechanisms consistent double-couple source models with only a few clear non-shear source models.

  7. Multiple ways of producing intermediate and silicic rocks within Thingmúli and other Icelandic volcanoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charreteur, Gilles; Tegner, Christian; Haase, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    of the LFe trend do not reach iron-rich end members. The HFe trend is interpreted as a result of fractional crystallization; numerical modelling using the MELTS algorithm suggests that crystallization took place under redox conditions constrained to one-log unit below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz oxygen....... A high-iron trend (HFe) contains 6-14 wt% total FeO in silicic rocks with c. 1 wt% MgO, as well as sodic plagioclase and hedenbergite phenocrysts. A low-iron trend (LFe) contains 3-5 wt% FeO at c. 1 wt% MgO, which is typical of Iceland but higher than MORB compositions. The most evolved phenocrysts...

  8. Timescales of storage and recycling of crystal mush at Krafla Volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kari M.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Eiler, John M.; Banerjee, Neil

    2016-06-01

    Processes in upper-crustal magma reservoirs such as recharge, magma mixing, recycling of previously crystallized material, and eruption affect both the physical state and the chemical composition of magmas. A growing body of evidence shows that crystals in intermediate or silicic volcanic rocks preserve records of these processes that may be obscured due to mixing in the liquid fraction of magmas. Fewer studies have focused on crystals in basaltic lavas, but these show evidence for a more subtle, but still rich record of magmatic processes. We present new 238U-230Th-226Ra data for plagioclase, combined with δ18O and trace-element measurements of the same crystal populations, from basalts erupted at Krafla Volcanic Center, Iceland. These data document the presence of multiple crystal populations within each sample, with chemical and oxygen isotope heterogeneity at a variety of scales: within individual crystals, between crystals in a given population, between crystal populations within the same sample, and between crystals in lavas erupted from different vents during the same eruption. Comparison to whole-rock or groundmass data shows that the majority of macroscopic crystals are not in trace-element or oxygen isotope equilibrium with their host liquids. The most likely explanation for these data is that the macroscopic crystals originated within a highly heterogeneous crystal mush in the shallow magma reservoir system. U-series and diffusion data indicate that the crystals (and therefore the mush) formed recently (likely within a few thousand years of eruption, and with a maximum age of 8-9 ka), and that the crystals resided in their host magma prior to eruption for decades to a few centuries at most. These data, in conjunction with other recent studies, suggest a model where erupted Icelandic magmas are the result of diverse magmas entering the crust, followed by complex interactions between melts and previously crystallized material at all crustal levels.

  9. The resistivity structures around and beneath the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Southern Iceland: first insides from electromagnetic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miensopust, M. P.; Jones, A. G.; Hersir, G. P.; Vilhjálmsson, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the recent eruptive and highly disruptive volcanic events in 2010 in Iceland, scientific and societal interest is overwhelming in gaining as much information as possible about the volcanic structures and processes to enhance the understanding of the partially glacier-covered Eyjafjallajökull and Katla volcanic systems. Due to their ice-caps the eruptions of these volcanoes are phreato-magmatic in type and are capable of producing jökulhlaups (or glacier bursts), i.e., sudden glacial outburst floods. Numerous petrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of these systems have already been published. However, to date no electrical or electromagnetic data have been aquired on these two volcanoes to attempt to image the resistivity structure beneath and around them, although electromagnetic methods are far more sensitive to fluid distribution (in this case partial melt) than any other geophysical method. In July 2011, broadband magnetotelluric (MT) data were collected at 26 sites around the Eyjafjallajökull and the southern part of Mýrdalsjökull (i.e., the glacier covering Katla). Both horizontal electric field components were recorded using 100 m dipoles, and the vertical and both horizontal magnetic field components were measured using induction coils. At most sites the recording time was approximately 40 hours, and a distant remote reference site (about 150 km away) was recording during the whole survey. The obtained period range of good quality data is about 300 Hz to 1,000 - 2,000 s. In addition, at each MT site central loop transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were obtained using a transmitter loop of 200 m x 200 m and a 1 m2 receiver loop with 100 windings (effective area 100 m2). The TEM data are used to correct the MT data for static shift effects. State of the art data processing and analysis methods have been applied to the data and dimensionality and distortion analyses have been conducted. Induction arrow and phase tensor maps as

  10. Relative relocation of earthquakes without a predefined velocity model: an example from a peculiar seismic cluster on Katla volcano's south-flank (Iceland)

    CERN Document Server

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Einarsson, Páll; Lucchi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Relative relocation methods are commonly used to precisely relocate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-relocation process. With a synthetic test w...

  11. An overview of the Icelandic Volcano Observatory response to the on-going rifting event at Bárðarbunga (Iceland) and the SO2 emergency associated with the gas-rich eruption in Holuhraun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Sara; Jonsdottir, Kristin; Roberts, Matthew J.; Pfeffer, Melissa A.; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.; Vögfjord, Kristin; Stefánsdóttir, Gerður; Jónasdóttir, Elin B.

    2015-04-01

    On 16 August, 2014, Bárðarbunga volcano entered a new phase of unrest. Elevated seismicity in the area with up to thousands of earthquakes detected per day and significant deformation was observed around the Bárðarbunga caldera. A dike intrusion was monitored for almost two weeks until a small, short-lived effusive eruption began on 29 August in Holuhraun. Two days later a second, more intense, tremendously gas-rich eruption started that is still (as of writing) ongoing. The Icelandic Volcano Observatory (IVO), within the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO), monitors all the volcanoes in Iceland. Responsibilities include evaluating their related hazards, issuing warnings to the public and Civil Protection, and providing information regarding risks to aviation, including a weekly summary of volcanic activity provided to the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center in London. IVO has monitored the Bárðarbunga unrest phase since its beginning with the support of international colleagues and, in collaboration with the University of Iceland and the Environment Agency of Iceland, provides scientific support and interpretation of the ongoing phenomena to the local Civil Protection. The Aviation Color Code, for preventing hazards to aviation due to ash-cloud encounter, has been widely used and changed as soon as new observations and geophysical data from the monitoring network have suggested a potential evolution in the volcanic crisis. Since the onset of the eruption, IVO is monitoring the gas emission by using different and complementary instrumentations aimed at analyzing the plume composition as well as estimating the gaseous fluxes. SO2 rates have been measured with both real-time scanning DOASes and occasional mobile DOAS traveses, near the eruption site and in the far field. During the first month-and-a-half of the eruption, an average flux equal to 400 kg/s was registered, with peaks exceeding 1,000 kg/s. Along with these measurements the dispersal model CALPUFF has

  12. A multi-scale risk assessment for tephra fallout and airborne concentration from multiple Icelandic volcanoes - Part 2: Vulnerability and impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaini, C.; Biass, S.; Galderisi, A.; Bonadonna, C.; Folch, A.; Smith, K.; Höskuldsson, A.

    2014-08-01

    We perform a multi-scale impact assessment of tephra fallout and dispersal from explosive volcanic activity in Iceland. A companion paper (Biass et al., 2014; "A multi-scale risk assessment of tephra fallout and airborne concentration from multiple Icelandic volcanoes - Part I: hazard assessment") introduces a multi-scale probabilistic assessment of tephra hazard based on selected eruptive scenarios at four Icelandic volcanoes (Hekla, Askja, Eyjafjallajökull and Katla) and presents probabilistic hazard maps for tephra accumulation in Iceland and tephra dispersal across Europe. Here, we present the associated vulnerability and impact assessment that describes the importance of single features at national and European levels and considers several vulnerability indicators for tephra dispersal and deposition. At the national scale, we focus on physical, systemic and economic vulnerability of Iceland to tephra fallout, whereas at the European scale we focus on the systemic vulnerability of the air traffic system to tephra dispersal. This is the first vulnerability and impact assessment analysis of this type and, although it does not include all the aspects of physical and systemic vulnerability, it allows for identifying areas on which further specific analysis should be performed. Results include vulnerability maps for Iceland and European airspace and allow for the qualitative identification of the impacts at both scales in the case of an eruption occurring. Maps produced at the national scale show that tephra accumulation associated with all eruptive scenarios considered can disrupt the main electricity network, in particular in relation to an eruption of Askja. Results also show that several power plants would be affected if an eruption occurred at Hekla, Askja or Katla, causing a substantial systemic impact due to their importance for the Icelandic economy. Moreover, the Askja and Katla eruptive scenarios considered could have substantial impacts on agricultural

  13. Facies analysis of Hlodufell basaltic subglacial to emergent volcano, SW Iceland: insights into sub-ice growth mechanisms and meltwater drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilling, I. P.

    2003-12-01

    Hlodufell is a subglacial to emergent basaltic volcano located 9km south of the Langjokull ice-cap in SW Iceland. This study is the first detailed facies analysis of this well-known volcano. The vertical facies architecture of the basal half of the volcano is typical of many basaltic subaqueous (including submarine) to emergent volcanoes, comprising basal pillow mounds overlain by Surtseyan eruption-fed subaqueously-deposited sediment gravity flows. However, facies in the upper part of the edifice demonstrate the influence of variable water levels more typical of englacial lakes. The Surtseyan sequence is overlain by two subaerial lava flow and cogenetic lava-fed delta sequences, separated by a second Surtseyan sequence. In addition, the uppermost lava flows are also draped by a thin veneer of Surtseyan tephra. Both lava-fed delta sequences are unusually dominated by subaerial lava breccias. This may be due to a number of factors that influence steep slope stability but the possibility of retreating ice walls should be considered. Detailed facies analysis also revealed evidence of the influence of ice on eruptive and depositional products throughout the history of the edifice. Some of the basal pillow mounds preserve metre-sized cavities with partial hyaloclastite fills, interpreted as meltout structures formed during sub-ice growth by ice-block stoping. Some mounds also have steep chill surfaces where pillows have been compressed against a rigid wall (now absent) interpreted as ice. The peripheral pillow mounds, particularly those to the immediate south of Hlodufell (Rani area) are draped by Surtseyan eruption-fed tephra deposited by erosive meltwater streamflows. The draping tephra was derived from both the first and second Surtseyan sequences. These observations illustrate that direct ice-contact and ice-block stoping was important during initial construction of the volcano and that meltwater drainage (particularly to the south) was important throughout its

  14. Coupling of Activity at Neighbouring Volcanoes in Iceland: Ground Deformation and Activity at the Bárðarbunga-Tungnafellsjökull and Eyjafjallajökull-Katla Volcano Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, M.; Heimisson, E. R.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Ofeigsson, B.; Vogfjord, K. S.; Arnadottir, T.; Dumont, S.; Drouin, V.; Bagnardi, M.; Spaans, K.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Friðriksdóttir, H. M.; Jonsdottir, K.; Guðmundsson, G.; Hensch, M.; Hjaltadottir, S.; Hjartardottir, A. R.; Einarsson, P.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Hognadottir, T.; Lafemina, P.; Geirsson, H.; Sturkell, E.; Magnússon, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques are used to generate a time series of high-resolution deformation measurements, in the vicinity of two pairs of closely spaced volcanoes in Iceland: Bárðarbunga and Tungnafellsjökull, as well as Eyjafjallajökull and Katla. Following the declaration of Icelandic Volcanoes as a Permanent Geohazard Supersite in 2013, a considerable amount of SAR data was made available for both past and future satellite acquisitions, including new X-band images and historic C-band images. InSAR time series have been formed using these data and compared to other geodetic and microseismic measurements to determine the most likely processes responsible for recently observed deformation and/or seismicity. A comprehensive network of seismometers and continuous GPS stations are already deployed at these volcanoes and a series of campaign GPS measurements have been undertaken since 2010. We present an overview of the temporal variation in InSAR observations and these complementary field based measurements at Bárðarbunga and Tungnafellsjökull from 2014-2015 (covering the recent eruption at Holuhraun and contemporaneous slow collapse of the Bárðarbunga caldera), and Eyjafjallajökull and Katla volcanoes from 2010 onwards, after the 2010 explosive eruption of Eyjafjallajökull. We undertake a joint InSAR-GPS inversion using a Markov-chain Monte Carlo approach. The best-fit source geometries responsible for both the inflation of a 50 km long dyke and simultaneous deflation of the Bárðarbunga central volcano during the 2014-2015 unrest and eruption are found. Using these we calculate the stress changes associated with the Bárðarbunga deformation events and compare our results to the location of earthquake swarms in the vicinity of neighbouring Tungnafellsjökull, where seismic activity increased significantly following the onset of unrest at Bárðarbunga in August 2014. We also determine the optimal source parameters for

  15. H2O-rich melt inclusions in fayalitic olivine from Hekla volcano: Implications for phase relationships in silicic systems and driving forces of explosive volcanism on Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnyagin, Maxim; Hoernle, Kaj; Storm, Sonja; Mironov, Nikita; van den Bogaard, Christel; Botcharnikov, Roman

    2012-12-01

    Silicic Icelandic magmas are widely believed to contain low to moderate H2O content prior to degassing, and that their high explosivity mostly results from the interaction of the magmas with ice or meteoric water. Here we report the compositions of glass inclusions (SiO2=57-72 wt%, K2O=1.3-2.6 wt%) in Fe-rich olivines (Fo2-42) from the largest Holocene eruptions of Hekla volcano (H3 and H4) on Iceland, which preserved quenched melts with very high primary H2O contents (3.3-6.2 wt%). The silicic Hekla melts originate primarily by extensive (˜90%) crystal fractionation of H2O-poor (˜0.6 wt%) basalts and represent an end member in the systematics of terrestrial magmas because they originate at low fO2 (ΔQFM ˜-0.1 to -0.4) and have as high H2O contents as significantly more oxidized island-arc magmas (ΔQFM≥1). This demonstrates that H2O and ΔQFM do not correlate in silicic magmas from different tectonic settings, and that fO2, not H2O content, shows a major difference between silicic ocean-island (e.g., Icelandic) and island-arc magmas. Analysis of available experimental data suggests that high H2O activity and low fO2 expand the field of olivine stability in silicic melts. Low fO2 and low MgO content could also suppress crystallization of amphibole. On the basis of these results we propose that an anhydrous mineral assemblage bearing Fe-rich olivine in evolved volcanic and Skaergaard-type intrusive rocks does not imply low H2O in magmas prior to degassing but, in contrast to the commonly held view, is an indicator of H2O-rich silicic parental magmas crystallized at low fO2. Finally, the high H2O content in magma was a major driving force of the largest explosive eruptions of Hekla volcano and must be at least as important for driving silicic explosive volcanism on Iceland as magma-ice interaction.

  16. Constraints on deformation of Hekla volcano, Iceland, 2011-2014, from time-series interferometric analysis of COSMO-SkyMed SAR data and Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Parks, Michelle; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Bagnardi, Marco; Hooper, Andy; Einarsson, Páll; Wittmann, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Hekla volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in Iceland with 18 summit eruptions during the last 1100 years. Since 1970, the volcano has erupted approximatively every 10 years: in 1980-1981, 1991 and 2000. A special feature of Hekla volcano is its aseismic behavior except within 2 hours before these eruptions. However, in 2013 and 2014, some seismic swarms were detected within a 5km radius centered on the volcano, which is unusual for any time period between eruptions. No change in the ground deformation (continuous borehole strainmeter and ground-based GPS), was observed during these events. This year, will be the fifteenth year without an eruption at Hekla, the extended period (since the last eruption) raises the following question: Has the magma plumbing system or the rate of melt supply changed since the last eruption? What is the state of the volcano? What does it imply for its eruptive cycle? To address these questions, we study ground deformation around Hekla volcano using time-series analysis. We analyzed COSMO-SkyMed SAR data acquired between 2011 and 2014 using the Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR) approach for both ascending and descending configurations. As highlighted by previous studies of ground deformation around Hekla, the small deformation rate distributed over a large area increases the importance of the noise reduction process. Once the signal to noise ratio is improved, both time-series display a dominant subsidence signal. The subsiding areas correlate with lava flows extruded during the 2000 eruption. A small inflation signal is more difficult to substantiate from the SAR data alone. For this reason further investigation of source characteristics using a Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is required. SSA is an empirical based decomposition of the signal. This decomposition is applied on a trajectory matrix, called a Hankel matrix (similar to a cross-lag correlation matrix). This method enables the

  17. Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or more from a volcano. Before a Volcanic Eruption The following are things you can do to ... in case of an emergency. During a Volcanic Eruption Follow the evacuation order issued by authorities and ...

  18. Geomorphic classification of Icelandic and Martian volcanoes: Limitations of comparative planetology research from LANDSAT and Viking orbiter images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. S., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Some limitations in using orbital images of planetary surfaces for comparative landform analyses are discussed. The principal orbital images used were LANDSAT MSS images of Earth and nominal Viking Orbiter images of Mars. Both are roughly comparable in having a pixel size which corresponds to about 100 m on the planetary surface. A volcanic landform on either planet must have a horizontal dimension of at least 200 m to be discernible on orbital images. A twofold bias is directly introduced into any comparative analysis of volcanic landforms on Mars versus those in Iceland because of this scale limitation. First, the 200-m cutoff of landforms may delete more types of volcanic landforms on Earth than on Mars or vice versa. Second, volcanic landforms in Iceland, too small to be resolved or orbital images, may be represented by larger counterparts on Mars or vice versa.

  19. Volcanoes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the past thousand years,volcanoes have claimed more than 300,000 lives. Volcanology is ayoung and dangerous science that helps us against the power of the Earth itself.We live on a fiery planet. Nearly 2000 miles beneath our feet, the Earth's inner core reachestemperatures of 12,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Molten rock or magma, rises to the earth's surface. Acold, rigid crust fractured into some twenty plates. When magma breaks through crust it becomes

  20. Seismic tremor signals from Bárðarbunga, Grímsvötn and other glacier covered volcanoes in Iceland's Vatnajökull ice cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogfjörd, Kristin S.; Eibl, Eva; Bean, Chris; Roberts, Matthew; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Jóhannesson, Tómas

    2016-04-01

    Many of Iceland's most active volcanoes, like Grímsvötn and Bárðarbunga are located under glaciers giving rise to a range of volcanic hazards having both local and cross-border effects on humans, infrastructures and aviation. Volcanic eruptions under ice can lead to explosive hydromagmatic volcanism and generate small to catastrophic subglacial floods that may take hours to days to emerge from the glacier edge. Unrest in subglacial hydrothermal systems and the draining of subglacial meltwater can also lead to flood hazards. These processes and magma-ice interactions in general, generate seismic tremor signals that are commonly observed on seismic systems during volcanic unrest and/or eruptions. The tremor signals exhibit certain characteristics in frequency content, amplitude and behavior with time, but their characteristics overlap. Ability to discriminate between the different processes in real-time or near-real time can support early eruption and flood warnings and help mitigate their detrimental effects. One of the goals set forth in the FUTUREVOLC volcano supersite project was in fact to understand and discriminate between the different types of seismic tremor recorded at subglacial volcanoes. In that pursuit, the seismic network was expanded into the Vatnajökull glacier with four permanent stations on rock and in the ice, in addition to three seismic arrays installed at the ice margin, to enable location and possible tracking of the tremor sources. To track subglacial floods with better resolution three GPS receivers were also installed on the ice, one in an ice cauldron above the Skaftárkatlar geothermal melting area and two down glacier, above the track of the expected subglacial flood. During FUTUREVOLC this infrastructure has recorded all the types of process expected: Magmatic dyke intrusion and propagation from Bárðarbunga, subaerial fissure eruption of that magma at Holuhraun, two subglacial floods, one small and one large, draining from the

  1. Joint relative location of earthquakes without a predefined velocity model: an example from a peculiar seismic cluster on Katla volcano's south-flank (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, G.; Gudmundsson, Ó.; Einarsson, P.; Lucchi, F.

    2016-09-01

    Relative location methods are commonly used to precisely locate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-location process. With a synthetic test we determine the best parameters for differential-time measurements and estimate their uncertainties, specifically for each waveform. We design a location strategy to work without a predefined velocity model, by formulating and inverting the problem to seek changes in both location and slowness, thus accounting for azimuth, take-off angles and velocity deviations from a 1D model. We solve the inversion explicitly in order to propagate data errors through the calculation. With this approach we are able to resolve a source volume few tens of meters wide in horizontal directions and around 100 meters in depth. There is no suggestion that the hypocentres lie on a single fault plane and the depth distribution indicates that their source is unlikely to be related to glacial processes as the ice thickness is not expected to exceed few tens of meters in the source area. Our method is designed for a very small source region, allowing us to assume a constant slowness for the

  2. Joint relative location of earthquakes without a pre-defined velocity model: an example from a peculiar seismic cluster on Katla volcano's south-flank (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, G.; Gudmundsson, Ó.; Einarsson, P.; Lucchi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Relative location methods are commonly used to precisely locate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1-D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-location process. With a synthetic test we determine the best parameters for differential-time measurements and estimate their uncertainties, specifically for each waveform. We design a location strategy to work without a pre-defined velocity model, by formulating and inverting the problem to seek changes in both location and slowness, thus accounting for azimuth, take-off angles and velocity deviations from a 1-D model. We solve the inversion explicitly in order to propagate data errors through the calculation. With this approach we are able to resolve a source volume few tens of metres wide in horizontal directions and around 100 metres in depth. There is no suggestion that the hypocentres lie on a single fault plane and the depth distribution indicates that their source is unlikely to be related to glacial processes as the ice thickness is not expected to exceed few tens of metres in the source area. Our method is designed for a very small source region, allowing us to assume a constant slowness for the

  3. Rapid crystal recycling at Krafla Volcano, Iceland, inferred from oxygen-isotope and trace- element compositions and U-Th-Ra disequilibria in plagioclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. M.; Sims, K. W.; Eiler, J. M.; Banerjee, N. R.

    2008-12-01

    The Icelandic central volcano of Krafla exhibits increasing assimilation of hydrothermally-altered crust with increasing differentiation of magmas, as evidenced by decreasing δ18O with decreasing MgO (Nicholson et al., 1991, J Pet 32, p.1005). The Krafla Fires eruption (1975-84) produced two different magma compositions simultaneously: quartz tholeiites near the center of the volcano, and olivine tholeiites north of the central volcano (Gronvold et al., 2008, Goldschmidt abstract). Examination of crystals in these magmas has the potential to provide information about the nature and timescales of mixing of distinct magmas and assimilation of crustal material at Krafla. We present oxygen-isotope compositions, trace-element compositions, and 238U-230Th-226Ra disequilibria measured in plagioclase crystals from samples of lavas erupted during two phases of the Krafla Fires eruption (ol tholeiite erupted Jan-Feb 1981, and qz tholeiite erupted Nov 1981). Oxygen-isotope data for multiple size fractions of plagioclase show a decrease in δ18O with increasing crystal size for the ol tholeiite (from ~4.1 permil to 3.5 permil), whereas there is no clear relationship between plagioclase size and oxygen-isotope composition in the qtz tholeiite (all size fractions average 4.1-4.3 permil). Furthermore, all measured plagioclase have δ18O lower than would be in equilibrium with the whole rock measurements (by up to 1.5 permil). These data imply that (1) few or none of the measured crystals precipitated from the host liquids, and (2) the crystals were entrained in the host magmas shortly prior to eruption, allowing them to maintain oxygen isotopic disequilibrium and heterogeneity within the crystal populations. These inferences are corroborated by trace element compositions measured in plagioclase by laser-ablation ICPMS, as the majority of analyzed points have Ba and Sr concentrations inconsistent with equilibrium partitioning between crystals and liquid. Furthermore, in the case

  4. Volcanic unrest primed by ice cap melting: A case study of Snæfellsjökull volcano, Western Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Richard; Lupi, Matteo; Frehner, Marcel; Berger, Julien; Fuchs, Florian

    2014-05-01

    The most dramatic effect of global warming is the water level rise due to rapid melting of ice sheets. In addition, recent studies suggest that accelerated glacial retreat and associated lithospheric relaxation may enhance upwelling of magmatic fluids through the crust. Here, we investigate whether, also at short geological timescales, shallow magmatic systems may be affected by rapid melting of ice caps. As a case study, we chose the Snæfellsjökull volcanic system in western Iceland, whose ice cap is rapidly melting with 1.25 m(w.e.)/year. To investigate the role of deglaciation in promoting volcanic unrest we use a cross-disciplinary approach integrating geophysical field data, laboratory rheological rock tests, and numerical finite-element analysis. Initial results from seismic data acquisition and interpretation in 2011 show seismic activity (occasionally in swarm sequences) at around a depth range of 8-13 km, indicating the presence of a magmatic reservoir in the crust. In addition, a temporary seismic network of 21 broad-band stations has been deployed in spring 2013 and continuously collected data for several months, which will help better constrain the subsurface geometry. During summer 2013 we collected samples of Tertiary basaltic bedrock from the flanks of Snæfellsjökull, which we assume to be representative for the subsurface volcanic system. Cores drilled from these samples were tri-axially deformed in a Paterson-type apparatus at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1, a confining pressure of 50 MPa (i.e. ~2 km depth), and a temperature ranging from 200 °C to 1000 °C (i.e. various proximities to magma chamber). From the obtained stress-strain curves the static Young's modulus is calculated to be around 35 (±2) GPa, which is not significantly influenced by increasing temperatures up to 800 °C. Beyond the elastic domain, cataclastic shear bands develop, accommodating up to 7% strain before brittle failure. The subsurface geometrical constraints from

  5. Multidisciplinary constraints of hydrothermal explosions based on the 2013 Gengissig lake events, Kverkfjöll volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Cristian; Scheu, Bettina; Gudmundsson, Magnus Tumi; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Reynolds, Hannah Iona; Dürig, Tobias; Strehlow, Karen; Rott, Stefanie; Reuschlé, Thierry; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal explosions frequently occur in geothermal areas showing various mechanisms and energies of explosivity. Their deposits, though generally hardly recognised or badly preserved, provide important insights to quantify the dynamics and energy of these poorly understood explosive events. Furthermore the host rock lithology of the geothermal system adds a control on the efficiency in the energy release during an explosion. We present results from a detailed study of recent hydrothermal explosion deposits within an active geothermal area at Kverkfjöll, a central volcano at the northern edge of Vatnajökull. On August 15th 2013, a small jökulhlaup occurred when the Gengissig ice-dammed lake drained at Kverkfjöll. The lake level dropped by approximately 30 m, decreasing pressure on the lake bed and triggering several hydrothermal explosions on the 16th. Here, a multidisciplinary approach combining detailed field work, laboratory studies, and models of the energetics of explosions with information on duration and amplitudes of seismic signals, has been used to analyse the mechanisms and characteristics of these hydrothermal explosions. Field and laboratory studies were also carried out to help constrain the sedimentary sequence involved in the event. The explosions lasted for 40-50 s and involved the surficial part of an unconsolidated and hydrothermally altered glacio-lacustrine deposit composed of pyroclasts, lavas, scoriaceous fragments, and fine-grained welded or loosely consolidated aggregates, interbedded with clay-rich levels. Several small fans of ejecta were formed, reaching a distance of 1 km north of the lake and covering an area of approximately 0.3 km2, with a maximum thickness of 40 cm at the crater walls. The material (volume of approximately 104 m3) has been ejected by the expanding boiling fluid, generated by a pressure failure affecting the surficial geothermal reservoir. The maximum thermal, craterisation and ejection energies, calculated

  6. Physicochemical and toxicological profiling of ash from the 2010 and 2011 eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn volcanoes, Iceland using a rapid respiratory hazard assessment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwell, C J; Baxter, P J; Hillman, S E; Calkins, J A; Damby, D E; Delmelle, P; Donaldson, K; Dunster, C; Fubini, B; Kelly, F J; Le Blond, J S; Livi, K J T; Murphy, F; Nattrass, C; Sweeney, S; Tetley, T D; Thordarson, T; Tomatis, M

    2013-11-01

    The six week eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in 2010 produced heavy ash fall in a sparsely populated area of southern and south eastern Iceland and disrupted European commercial flights for at least 6 days. We adopted a protocol for the rapid analysis of volcanic ash particles, for the purpose of informing respiratory health risk assessments. Ash collected from deposits underwent a multi-laboratory physicochemical and toxicological investigation of their mineralogical parameters associated with bio-reactivity, and selected in vitro toxicology assays related to pulmonary inflammatory responses. Ash from the eruption of Grímsvötn, Iceland, in 2011 was also studied. The results were benchmarked against ash from Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, which has been extensively studied since the onset of eruptive activity in 1995. For Eyjafjallajökull, the grain size distributions were variable: 2-13 vol% of the bulk samples were <4 µm, with the most explosive phases of the eruption generating abundant respirable particulate matter. In contrast, the Grímsvötn ash was almost uniformly coarse (<3.5 vol%<4 µm material). Surface area ranged from 0.3 to 7.7 m2 g(-1) for Eyjafjallajökull but was very low for Grímsvötn (<0.6 m2 g(-1)). There were few fibre-like particles (which were unrelated to asbestos) and the crystalline silica content was negligible in both eruptions, whereas Soufrière Hills ash was cristobalite-rich with a known potential to cause silicosis. All samples displayed a low ability to deplete lung antioxidant defences, showed little haemolysis and low acute cytotoxicity in human alveolar type-1 like epithelial cells (TT1). However, cell-free tests showed substantial hydroxyl radical generation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide for Grímsvötn samples, as expected for basaltic, Fe-rich ash. Cellular mediators MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-8 showed chronic pro-inflammatory responses in Eyjafjallajökull, Grímsvötn and Soufrière Hills samples

  7. Anatomy of a volcano

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull caused major disruption in European airspace last year. According to his co-author, Freysteinn Sigmundsson, the reconstruction published in Nature six months later by aerospace engineering researcher, Dr Andy Hooper, opens up a new direction in volcanology. “W

  8. The onset of an eruption: selective assimilation of hydrothermal minerals during pre-eruptive magma ascent of the 2010 summit eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistolesi, M.; Cioni, R.; Francalanci, L.; Bertagnini, A.; D'Oriano, C.; Braschi, E.; Höskuldsson, A.

    2016-11-01

    The complex processes occurring in the initial phases of an eruption are often recorded in the products of its opening stage, which are usually characterized by small volume and limited dispersal, and thus generally poorly studied. The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland) represents a unique opportunity for these investigations thanks to the good preservation of tephra deposits within the ice/snow pack. A detailed geochemical investigation on the glassy groundmass of single ash clasts disclosed a population of fragments with unusual high 87Sr/86Sr (up to 0.70668) for Icelandic magmatism, and anomalous elemental composition with respect to most of the juvenile material of the eruption. This suggests that during its rise, before intruding into the ice cover, magma at a dyke tip selectively assimilated hydrothermal minerals with seawater-related, high-Sr isotopic ratios (zeolites, silica phases, anhydrite) hosted in altered volcanic/epiclastic rocks. According to the observed precursory seismicity, only restricted to few hours before the onset of the eruption, this process could have accompanied subcritical aseismic fracture opening during the days before the eruption, possibly related to stress corrosion-cracking processes, which enhanced the partial dissolution/melting and subsequent selective assimilation of the host rocks.

  9. A Study On The Final Phase Of The Bardarbunga Volcano Of 2015 Using Vlf Wave Of Nrk Signal Of Iceland Received At Kiel Longwave Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govinda Sharma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismo-ionospheric changes often affect the VLF waves resulting in possible changes in the terminator times and often lead to night time fluctuations. The Bardarbunga volcano which started on 2014 ended on the last days of February of 2015. In this paper we present the results of the VLF analysis of the first three months of 2015 using a signal of 37.50 KHz where an analysis on the sunset terminator time D-layer dissipation time daytime fluctuation and night time fluctuation of the VLF amplitude was done. We contrasted the values of these parameters for the first two months of 2015 where the volcano was active with third month of 2015 when the volcano had completely subsided. The Sunset terminator time and the daytime fluctuations in the VLF amplitude for the first two months showed no major anomalies. The anomaly in the D-layer disappearance time and night time fluctuation count reached its peak values for the volcanically active months.

  10. Magma storage before large and small explosive eruption at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland, constrained by thermobarometry and volatiles in melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Baptiste; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Larsen, Gudrun

    2017-04-01

    Basaltic eruptions at Grímsvötn occur every decade on average. These are normally phreatomagmatic of a low intensity whereas occasionally larger eruptions with an initial plinian phase take place. The last eruption in May 2011 reached into the stratosphere with heavy ash fall over south Iceland. What causes the difference in eruption intensity at Grímsvötn is not understood. In order to discuss this difference, the crystallization conditions of the eruptive magma were determined through thermobarometry and volatile concentration measured on melt inclusion (MI) and groundmass glasses. Tephra of the two largest historical eruptions (2011 and 1873) and two small eruptions (2004 and 1823) were investigated. Pressure and temperature estimates of crystallization are obtained through equilibrium clinopyroxene-glass (cpx-liq) pairs, where both adjacent groundmass glass and that of melt inclusions (MI) were measured. Most cpx-liq equilibria give pressure of 4 ±1 kbar corresponding to approximately 15 km depth. The cpx crystallization occurred over a considerable temperature range, 1065-1175 °C that correlates with the estimated pressure in products of the 19th century eruptions. Sulfur and chlorine concentrations are highest in MI of the larger eruptions (1974-1789 ppm and 339-266 ppm, respectively) together with lowest groundmass glass concentrations (908-766 ppm and 208-180 ppm, respectively). Quenching with glacial water explains higher groundmass values for the smaller phreatomagmatic eruptions. The differences in volatile concentrations between MI and groundmass glass (S) and the average sulfur concentration in the degassed groundmass correlate with known eruptive volume for the 21st century eruptions and that of the Laki eruption. This suggests water/magma ratio control of S degassing efficiency and allows crude estimates of unknown volumes for older eruptions. The higher volatile concentrations of MI in the larger eruptions are likely to reflect recharge of

  11. Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Eruption – A Brief Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OROIAN I.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the main aspects of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption in Iceland. The process ispresented in the context of Iceland location on tectonic plates’ distribution. Aspects concerning Eyjafjallajökull positionon volcanic landscape of Iceland, both eruption phases and ash composition are briefly described. There are alsoemphasized the effects of the event on main common life aspects it affected (aircraft in Europe and farming in Iceland.The influence of the volcano eruption on the climate change is also discussed.

  12. Stretch marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretch marks can appear when there is rapid stretching of the skin. They are often seen when ... often disappear after the cause of the skin stretching is gone. Avoiding rapid weight gain helps reduce ...

  13. Enamel erosion and mechanical tooth wear in medieval Icelanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Svend; Eliasson, Sigfus Thor

    2016-01-01

    The Icelandic Sagas are an important source of information on the way of life and diet habits in Iceland and possibly other Nordic countries 1000 years ago. Archaeological human skull material worldwide has revealed extensive tooth wear, with the main cause believed to be coarse diet. From a graveyard near volcano Hekla, 66 skeletons dated from before 1104 were excavated. The purpose of this study was to determine the main causes of tooth wear in Icelanders 1000 years ago. Forty-nine skulls were available for research. Two methods were used to evaluate tooth wear and seven for age estimation. An attempt was made to determine the main causes of tooth wear in the light of likely diet and beverage consumption according to a computer search on food and drink customs described in the Icelandic Sagas. Tooth wear was extensive in all groups, increasing with age. The highest score was on first molars, with no difference between sexes. It had all the similarities seen in wear from coarse diet. In some instances it had similar characteristics to those seen in erosion in modern Icelanders consuming excessive amounts of soft drinks. According to the Sagas, acidic whey was a daily drink and used for preservation of food in Iceland until recently. Since acidic whey has considerably high dental erosive potential, it is postulated that consumption of acidic drinks and food, in addition to a coarse and rough diet, played a significant role in the dental wear of ancient Icelanders.

  14. Icelandic-type crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, G.R.; Du, Z.; Julian, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous seismic studies, in particular using receiver functions and explosion seismology, have provided a detailed picture of the structure and thickness of the crust beneath the Iceland transverse ridge. We review the results and propose a structural model that is consistent with all the observations. The upper crust is typically 7 ?? 1 km thick, heterogeneous and has high velocity gradients. The lower crust is typically 15-30 ?? 5 km thick and begins where the velocity gradient decreases radically. This generally occurs at the V p ??? 6.5 km s-1 level. A low-velocity zone ??? 10 000 km2 in area and up to ??? 15 km thick occupies the lower crust beneath central Iceland, and may represent a submerged, trapped oceanic microplate. The crust-mantle boundary is a transition zone ???5 ?? 3 km thick throughout which V p increases progressively from ???7.2 to ???8.0 km s-1. It may be gradational or a zone of alternating high- and low-velocity layers. There is no seismic evidence for melt or exceptionally high temperatures in or near this zone. Isostasy indicates that the density contrast between the lower crust and the mantle is only ???90 kg m-3 compared with ???300 kg m-3 for normal oceanic crust, indicating compositional anomalies that are as yet not understood. The seismological crust is ???30 km thick beneath the Greenland-Iceland and Iceland-Faeroe ridges, and eastern Iceland, ???20 km beneath western Iceland, and ???40 km thick beneath central Iceland. This pattern is not what is predicted for an eastward-migrating plume. Low attenuation and normal V p/V s ratios in the lower crust beneath central and southwestern Iceland, and normal uppermost mantle velocities in general, suggest that the crust and uppermost mantle are subsolidus and cooler than at equivalent depths beneath the East Pacific Rise. Seismic data from Iceland have historically been interpreted both in terms of thin-hot and thick-cold crust models, both of which have been cited as supporting the plume

  15. FISHERIES POLICY OF ICELAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Treer

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fisheries has recently been very exploited area in the Croatian media, either regarding the EU accession negotiations or regarding the interrelationships of the involved parties within Croatia. Iceland is one of the strongest fishery nations in the world that passed through some heavy struggles to protect its fishery grounds (so called “fishery or cod wars”. Therefore its experience in fisheries can be useful when creating Croatian fishery policy. So, the aim of this article is to present the Statement on Responsible Fisheries in Iceland signed by all the parties involved in the Icelandic fishery industry.

  16. Cultural Policy in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Gestur

    2003-01-01

    The article examines the history of cultural policy in Iceland from a Nordic comparative perspective. National cultural policy takes form in the 19th and early 20th century as a part of the nation-building, emphasising the Icelandic language as the core of national identity, building cultural...... on the continuing emphasis on central cultural institution and the Icelandic language. Since the 1970s Cold War conflicts have been replaced by a consensus on growing support to artists and an armth's length policy, and furthermore the 1990s have seen a strong move towards NPM and international participation....

  17. The Icelandic ITQ System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne-Sofie; Hegland, Troels Jacob; Oddsson, Geir

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The fisheries sector is tremendously important for Iceland: the export of fish products accounts for a large part of the value of exported goods. Fisheries policy in Iceland is, consequently, of national importance to a degree that is not comparable to any of the EU member states...... volume of landings is constituted by pelagic species. Cod, which is mainly caught in the Icelanders’ own exclusive economic zone, is the economically most important fish. The aim of this chapter is to evaluate the Icelandic individual transferable quota shares system with its management innovations, e......, and social robustness. In order to make this evaluation, a thorough understanding of the past and present situation on Iceland has to be established. The chapter is based on two sources of information: desk studies and a field study trip....

  18. Volcano Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You might feel better to learn that an ‘active’ volcano is one that has erupted in the past ... miles away. If you live near a known volcano, active or dormant, following these tips will help you ...

  19. Stretch Marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to get rid of stretch marks, but the truth is that most don't work and are ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  20. A Judgement on the Characteristics of Future Eruption from Katla Volcano, Iceland%冰岛卡特拉火山未来喷发特征的判定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓雯; 魏海泉; 周兴志; 赵波

    2013-01-01

    卡特拉火山近期活动频繁,其喷发概率、喷发规模、喷发方式及影响都备受瞩目.通过收集整理若干资料和分析计算,采用“将古论今”的研究方法,初步得到了关于卡特拉火山未来可能的行为方式及影响.根据卡特拉火山喷发的历史规律,估算2013年的喷发概率约为30%.卡特拉火山下次喷发规模可能为4级或5级,其喷发方式有3种:其一是岩浆冲破巨厚冰层发生爆破性喷发;其二是正常的岩浆喷发;其三是夭折的喷发.但根据现有资料分析,卡特拉火山最有可能是以见不到喷发的形式结束这次不稳定性活动.%Katla volcano shows an increased level of unrest recently. Therefore people are increasingly more concerned with the probability, scale and pattern of eruption from Katla volcano, and the potential influence as well. We deduce preliminarily the possible behavior pattern and the effect of the Katla volcano for its future eruption according to the speech "the past is a key to the present", based on collecting some published materials from international journals and internet. According to the eruption history of Katla volcano, a probability of volcanic eruption in 2013 is roughly 30%. The magnitude of next eruption of Katla should be VEI 4, but VEI 5 is also possible. Its eruption pattern has 3 possibilities: the first one is an explosive eruption that breaks through the thick ice cover; the second one is magmatic eruption; the third one is a "failed eruption". From the available information, it indicates that this unrest will be most likely to end up with no eruption.

  1. Ridge jump process in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Eastward ridge jumps bring the volcanic zones of Iceland back to the centre of the hotspot in response to the absolute westward drift of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Mantellic pulses triggers these ridge jumps. One of them is occurring in Southern Iceland, whereas the exact conditions of the last ridge jump in Northern Iceland remain controversial. The diachronous evolution of these two parts of Iceland may be related to the asymmetric plume-ridge interaction when comparing Northern and Southern I...

  2. The Language Situation in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmarsson-Dunn, Amanda; Kristinsson, Ari Pall

    2010-01-01

    Purist language policies in Iceland have preserved and modernized Icelandic up until the present time. However, the impact of globalization and global English has led to the perception that the language is less secure than in the past and has prompted efforts by policy makers towards greater protection of Icelandic. This monograph presents the…

  3. Cultural Policy in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Gestur

    2003-01-01

    The article examines the history of cultural policy in Iceland from a Nordic comparative perspective. National cultural policy takes form in the 19th and early 20th century as a part of the nation-building, emphasising the Icelandic language as the core of national identity, building cultural...... on the continuing emphasis on central cultural institution and the Icelandic language. Since the 1970s Cold War conflicts have been replaced by a consensus on growing support to artists and an armth's length policy, and furthermore the 1990s have seen a strong move towards NPM and international participation....... institutions and relying heavily on civic society enterprise. After national independence in 1918 there are growing conflicts in the cultural field and during the Cold War such conflicts take the form of an alliance of nationlism and socialism against NATO-oriented anti-communism. However, there is consensus...

  4. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  5. Importance of nanoparticles and colloids from volcanic ash for riverine transport of trace elements to the ocean: evidence from glacial-fed rivers after the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepe, Nathalie; Bau, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Volcanic ashes are often referenced as examples for natural nanoparticles, yet the particle size distribution glacial-fed rivers, glacial surface runoff, glacial base flow, and pure glacial meltwater from southern Iceland, that had been sampled 25 days after the explosive eruptions at Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. In addition to the dissolved concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), Zr, Hf, Nb, and Th in the 450 nm-filtered waters, we also studied the respective filter residues (river particulates >450 nm) and volcanic ash. In spite of the low solubilities and high particle-reactivities of the elements studied, most water samples show high dissolved concentrations, such as up to 971 ng/kg of Ce and 501 ng/kg of Zr. Except for the pure glacial meltwater and glacial base flow, all waters display the same shale-normalized REE patterns with pronounced light and heavy REE depletion and positive Eu anomalies. While such patterns are unusual for river waters, they are similar to those of the respective river particulates and the volcanic ash, though at different concentration levels. The distribution of dissolved Zr, Hf, Nb, and Th in the waters also matches that of filter residues and ash. This strongly suggests that in all 450 nm-filtered river waters, the elements studied are associated with solid ash particles smaller than 450 nm. This reveals that volcanic ash-derived nanoparticles and colloids are present in these glacial-fed rivers and that such ultrafine particles control the trace element distribution in the surface runoff. Subsequent to explosive volcanic eruptions, these waters provide terrigenous input from landmasses to estuaries, that is characterized by a unique trace element signature and that subsequent to modification by estuarine processes delivers a pulse of nutrients to coastal seawater in regions not affected by plume fall-out.

  6. An Icelandic wind atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Gudrun; Bjornsson, Halldór; Arason, Þórður; Jónasson, Kristján

    2013-04-01

    While Iceland has ample wind, its use for energy production has been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated from renewable hydro- and geothermal source and adding wind energy has not be considered practical or even necessary. However, adding wind into the energy mix is becoming a more viable options as opportunities for new hydro or geothermal power installation become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland a wind atlas has been developed as a part of the Nordic project "Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing" (IceWind). The atlas is based on mesoscale model runs produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and high-resolution regional analyses obtained through the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). The wind atlas shows that the wind energy potential is considerable. The regions with the strongest average wind are nevertheless impractical for wind farms, due to distance from road infrastructure and power grid as well as harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. There is a strong seasonal cycle, with wintertime power densities throughout the island being at least a factor of two higher than during summer. Calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plants making wind energy a viable additional option.

  7. Vanishing Volcano

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨树仁

    1995-01-01

    Mauna Loa, the world’s largest active volcano,is sinking into the Pacific Ocean——and it’s taking the main island of Hawaii with it! The problem:The mighty volcano has gained too much weight, says Peter Lipman of the U. S. Geological Survey.

  8. The Icelandic volcanological data node and data service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogfjord, Kristin; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Futurevolc Team

    2013-04-01

    Through funding from the European FP7 programme, the International Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO), as well as the local Icelandic government and RANNÍS research fund, the establishment of the Icelandic volcano observatory (VO) as a cross-disciplinary, international volcanological data node and data service is starting to materialize. At the core of this entity is the close collaboration between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO), a natural hazard monitoring and research institution, and researchers at the Earth Science Institute of the University of Iceland, ensuring long-term sustainable access to research quality data and products. Existing Icelandic Earth science monitoring and research infrastructures are being prepared for integration with the European EPOS infrastructure. Because the VO is located at a Met Office, this infrastructure also includes meteorological infrastructures relevant to volcanology. Furthermore, the FP7 supersite project, FUTUREVOLC cuts across disciplines to bring together European researchers from Earth science, atmospheric science, remote sensing and space science focussed on combined processing of the different data sources and results to generate a multiparametric volcano monitoring and early warning system. Integration with atmospheric and space science is to meet the need for better estimates of the volcanic eruption source term and dispersion, which depend not only on the magma flow rate and composition, but also on atmosphere-plume interaction and dispersion. This should lead to better estimates of distribution of ash in the atmosphere. FUTUREVOLC will significantly expand the existing Icelandic EPOS infrastructure to an even more multidisciplinary volcanological infrastructure. A central and sustainable part of the project is the establishment of a research-quality data centre at the VO. This data centre will be able to serve as a volcanological data node within EPOS, making multidisciplinary data accessible to

  9. Digital Marketing Practices in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Björgvin Jóhannsson 1979

    2014-01-01

    As consumers are moving towards the digital media at an increasing rate marketers must follow. Past research has indicated that Icelandic marketers are lagging behind regarding their digital marketing practices. The purpose of this thesis was to offer insight into the digital marketing practice in Iceland on the basses of best practice according to the available literature assess the trends and where digital marketing headed. With this information, Icelandic marketers should be able to be...

  10. Dante's volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  11. Stretch Sensor Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for determining stretch values and movement of body parts, e.g. a foot, by analysing stretch data from a stretch sensor. By analysing data from the stretch sensor it is possible to determine stretch samples which are associated with particular motion phases....... Thereby the stretch values determined from the stretch samples have a particular physical meaning since they are associated with particular motion phases....

  12. Iceland: a postcolonial literary landscape?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Liet, H.; Kroonen, G.; Langbroek, E.; Perridon, H.; Roeleveld, A.

    2011-01-01

    How does Iceland appear in postcolonial literary texts by writers from Denmark, the former colonial power? Three texts from modern Danish literature were chosen, with Iceland as their main theme and based on first hand knowledge of the country gathered through sojourns and travels by the authors: Re

  13. What Are Volcano Hazards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sheet 002-97 Revised March 2008 What Are Volcano Hazards? Volcanoes give rise to numerous geologic and ... as far as 15 miles from the volcano. Volcano Landslides A landslide or debris avalanche is a ...

  14. Stretch Sensor Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for determining stretch values and movement of body parts, e.g. a foot, by analysing stretch data from a stretch sensor. By analysing data from the stretch sensor it is possible to determine stretch samples which are associated with particular motion phases...

  15. The Crash Course from Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huginn Freyr Þorsteinsson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The years between 2006 and 2008 are key in understanding the Icelandic economic crisis. One of the main questions one gets when discussing the lessons from Iceland is: Was the quick recovery due to how the country 'burned' the creditors? Myth has it that when things got tough for the banks, the Icelandic government denied to bail them out and the country therefore escaped the difficult long-term consequence felt by, for example, Ireland. But that is a serious distortion of what happened. The Icelandic banks were on Central Bank life support from 2006 to 2008. It was only when the CBI ran out of steam that an alternative approach in crisis management was put in place. For admirers of historical contingencies, this case is of interest. Iceland did not take a calculated decision to let the banks fail, but an attempted bail-out failed. This meant that that its tackling of a banking crisis took an unexpected turn as banks were put into administration; a move only considered in the face of failure. And despite the route taken by Iceland, the total cost of the economic crisis for the State has surpassed Ireland's and is one of the costliest any sovereign has faced in the ongoing crisis. This is interesting, given the ongoing discussion about the Icelandic 'miraculous' escape from an economic crisis and that the possibilities countries face during crisis management may be many more than those that are discussed.

  16. Stretching Safely and Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it safely and effectively. By Mayo Clinic Staff Stretching may take a back seat to your exercise routine. The main concern is exercising, not stretching, right? Not so fast. Stretching may help you: ...

  17. Moral panic in Icelandic society: Arrival of ecstasy to Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jón Orri Jónasson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of illegal drugs has often been shown to ignite fear and insecurity in society. When a new drug appears the media typically reports on this drug and the risk it poses. Soon after ecstasy appeared in Iceland in the 1990s its use created a major public uproar and insecurity in Icelandic society. In the article the theory of moral panic will be used to examine if the arrival of ecstasy to Iceland ignited a moral panic. Media reports on ecstasy, public reactions, interest groups and government institutions will be analysed. Discourse analysis is employed on newspaper reporting on ecstasy between 1985 and 1997 to detect signs of moral panic. The main conclusion is that evidence suggests that a moral panic existed in Iceland as described in well-known theories on the subject.

  18. Labour Market Performance in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Ingi Rúnar Eðvarðsson

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the unique performance of the Icelandic labour market. It demonstrates, by using international statistics, that the activity rates of both sexes are very high in Iceland, the unemployment rate is low, a high proportion of the the labour force work part time, and labour legislation is unrestricted. Contrary to the competitive labour market–, and flexible models of neo– classic economic theory, the author argues for a historical and institutional explan...

  19. Wind Diagrams in Medieval Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kedwards, Dale

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study of the sole wind diagram that survives from medieval Iceland, preserved in the encyclopaedic miscellany in Copenhagen's Arnamagnæan Institute with the shelf mark AM 732b 4to (c. 1300-25). It examines the wind diagram and its accompanying text, an excerpt on the winds...... from Isidore of Seville's Etymologies. It also examines the perimeter of winds on two medieval Icelandic world maps, and the visual traditions from which they draw....

  20. Integrating volcanic gas monitoring with other geophysical networks in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Melissa A.

    2017-04-01

    The Icelandic Meteorological Office/Icelandic Volcano Observatory is rapidly developing and improving the use of gas measurements as a tool for pre- and syn-eruptive monitoring within Iceland. Observations of deformation, seismicity, hydrological properties, and gas emissions, united within an integrated approach, can provide improved understanding of subsurface magma movements. This is critical to evaluate signals prior to and during volcanic eruptions, issue timely eruption warnings, forecast eruption behavior, and assess volcanic hazards. Gas measurements in Iceland need to be processed to account for the high degree of gas composition alteration due to interaction with external water and rocks. Deeply-sourced magmatic gases undergo reactions and modifications as they move to the surface that exercise a strong control on the composition of surface emissions. These modifications are particularly strong at ice-capped volcanoes where most surface gases are dissolved in glacial meltwater. Models are used to project backwards from surface gas measurements to what the magmatic gas composition was prior to upward migration. After the pristine magma gas composition has been determined, it is used together with fluid compositions measured in mineral hosted melt inclusions to calculate magmatic properties to understand magma storage and migration and to discern if there have been changes in the volcanic system. The properties derived from surface gas measurements can be used as input to models interpreting deformation and seismic observations, and can be used as an additional, independent observation when interpreting hydrological and seismic changes. An integrated approach aids with determining whether observed hydro/geological changes can be due to the presence of shallow magma. Constraints on parameters such as magma gas content, viscosity and compressibility can be provided by the approach described above, which can be utilized syn-eruptively to help explain

  1. Santorini Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  2. Iceland's Language Technology: Policy versus Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmarsson-Dunn, Amanda M.; Kristinsson, Ari P.

    2009-01-01

    Iceland's language policies are purist and protectionist, aiming to maintain the grammatical system and basic vocabulary of Icelandic as it has been for a thousand years and to keep the language free of foreign (English) borrowings. In order to use Icelandic in the domain of information technology, there has been a major investment in language…

  3. Iceland:Hot Eyes on Chinese Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng; Jingjing; Sun; Yongjian

    2005-01-01

      The President of Iceland was in China during May 16th to 22nd. Coming along with him was a large trade delegation of 200 people from 106 Icelandic companies. Great interest was shown to China, this big market with much potential.Let's hear how the Ambassador of Iceland to China see this.……

  4. Iceland:Hot Eyes on Chinese Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Jingjing; Sun Yongjian

    2005-01-01

    @@ The President of Iceland was in China during May 16th to 22nd. Coming along with him was a large trade delegation of 200 people from 106 Icelandic companies. Great interest was shown to China, this big market with much potential.Let's hear how the Ambassador of Iceland to China see this.

  5. When the glacier left the volcano: Behaviour and fate of glaciovolcanic glass in different planetary environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vet, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Volcano-ice interactions and associated landforms have been studied in Iceland since 1900 and this research gained a new dimension after similar landforms were observed in 1979 on planet Mars. Our current understanding of a volcano’s response to the overlying ice mass shows that these eruptions are

  6. When the glacier left the volcano: Behaviour and fate of glaciovolcanic glass in different planetary environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vet, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Volcano-ice interactions and associated landforms have been studied in Iceland since 1900 and this research gained a new dimension after similar landforms were observed in 1979 on planet Mars. Our current understanding of a volcano’s response to the overlying ice mass shows that these eruptions are

  7. [Research in pharmacoepidemiology in Iceland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsson, Magnus; Haraldsdottir, Sigridur

    2012-04-01

    Pharmacoepidemiology is a rapidly growing discipline that is useful in studies on effects and adverse effects of drugs. During past years and decades databases have been built in Iceland that are becoming powerful tools for this kind of research. The databases are, however only useful for pharmacoepidemiological research if they include personal identification and can be merged. The personal identification should be without time limits because in many cases we are interested in what happened years or decades ago. The prescriptions database was started in 2002 and has dramatically changed the possibilities for pharmacoepidemiological studies in Iceland. The main aim of this review is to give an overview of the existing databases in Iceland and to encourage research in this important field.

  8. Global Volcano Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

  9. The Stress Pattern of Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Moritz; Rajabi, Mojtaba; Heidbach, Oliver; Páll Hersir, Gylfi; Ágústsson, Kristján; Árnadóttir, Sigurveig; Zang, Arno

    2016-04-01

    Iceland is one of the few places on earth where an active spreading can be observed onshore, yet the contemporary crustal stress state has not been investigated intesively. We compiled the first comprehensive stress map of Iceland from different stress indicators and analysed data from 57 Icelandic geothermal boreholes. In total we interpreted appox. 37 km of acoustic image logs for stress indicators, i.e. borehole breakouts and drilling induced tensile fractures. Furthermore we revised the 38 data records for Iceland from the World Stress Map 2008 and conducted an extensive literature research to compile all available focal mechanism solutions and geological stress indicators. The new stress compilation consists of 495 data records for the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) in and around Iceland with 318 data records of A-D qualities according to the World Stress Map ranking scheme. Most of the data records are derived from focal mechanism solutions (35%) and geological fault inversions (26%). Borehole related indicators (breakouts, drilling induced fractures, hydro-fractures) have a share of 20%. Minor contributions to the dataset are provided by the alignment of volcanic vents and fissures and overcoring measurements. The mean orientation of SHmax is 17° ± 39° for all A-D quality data. A closer look at subregions reveals four different provinces with fairly consistent SHmax orientation. They are in the Capital area and Southern Lowlands (mean SHmax = 38° ± 29°), the eastern Highlands and Eastfjords (mean SHmax = 8° ± 25°), the Tjörnes Fracture Zone and Akureyri (mean SHmax = 151° ± 21°), and the Westfjords (mean SHmax = 137° ± 17°). This distribution of SHmax orientations is in agreement with the prevailing tectonic structure. At the spreading ridges Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey in the South and North respectively an orientation of SHmax parallel to the plate boundary is observed. The same is observed in the Northern and Eastern

  10. Tephra in marine sediment cores offshore southern Iceland: A 68,000 year record of explosive volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanati, Christina; Wehrmann, Heidi; Portnyagin, Maxim; Hoernle, Kaj; Mirzaloo, Maryam; Nürnberg, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions on Iceland, even of intermediate magnitude have far-reaching impacts. Their far-distal deposits have been found up to Northern Continental Europe and Greenland. On Iceland, the harsh environment and strongly erosive conditions limit the preservation of volcanic deposits and their accessibility on land. The area offshore southern Iceland preserves information about the depositional fans at medial distance from the volcanic source. Here we use this sedimentary archive to reconstruct the Icelandic eruption record in greater detail. This high resolution geological record allows us to infer eruption frequencies and explosiveness in great detail and contributes to the assessment of Icelandic volcanic hazards, volcano-climate interaction, stratigraphy and palaeoceanographic reconstructions. Eight gravity cores were obtained during RV Poseidon Cruise 457, at 260 to 1,600 m water depths and distances of 130 to 400 km west to southeast of Iceland. The ˜4 to 10 m long sediment cores reach back to the Late Pleistocene (˜68 ka BP; dated by 14C and sedimentation rates), mostly excluding the Holocene. Potential tephra layers were identified by visual inspection and color scans. Volcanic glass shards were analyzed for their major element composition by electron microprobe and assigned to their eruptive source by geochemical fingerprinting. More than 50 primary tephra layers and nearly as many reworked layers were identified, several of which were correlated across the cores. The mostly basaltic tephra shards are derived from the Katla, Grímsvötn-Lakagígar, Bárðarbunga-Veiðivötn, and Hekla volcanic systems. Primary and mixed layers with particles of unique bimodal composition identical to the ˜12 ka BP Vedde-Tephra from the Katla Volcanic System, including rhyolitic particles, were identified in nearly all cores and used as time marker and for inter-core correlation. Tephra layers of unique unknown composition were also identified and

  11. Mechanical coupling between earthquakes, volcanos and landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, K. L.; Retina Team

    2003-04-01

    "The eruption began as a large earthquake that triggered a massive landslide that culminated in a violent lateral explosion" [Malone et al., USGS 1981]. The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens taught a very powerful lesson -- that one natural hazard can trigger another. For example, earthquakes have triggered landslides in Papua New Guinea. Similarly, eruptions of Vesuvius are mechanically coupled to earthquakes in the Appenines, just as an inflating magma chamber can trigger earthquakes near Hengill volcano in SW Iceland and on the Izu Peninsula in Japan. The Luzon earthquake may have triggered the eruption of Mount Pinatubo. In many of these cases, the second triggered event caused more damage than the initial one. If we can better understand the mechanical coupling underlying the temporal and spatial correlation of such events, we will improve our assessments of the hazards they pose. The RETINA project has been funded by the European Commission's 5th Framework to study couplings between three classes of natural hazards: earthquakes, landslides, and volcanoes. These three phenomena are linked to and by the stress field in the crust. If the stress increases enough, the material will fail catastrophically. For example, magma injection beneath a volcano can trigger an earthquake by increasing stress on a fault. Increasing shear stress on unconsolidated materials on steep slopes can trigger landslides. Such stress change triggers may also be tectonic (from plate driving forces), hydrological (from heavy rain), or volcanic (magmatic injection). Any of these events can perturb the stress field enough to trigger another event. Indeed, stress changes as small as 0.1 bar (0.01 MPa) suffice to trigger an earthquake. If the medium is close to failure, this small change can increase the Coulomb stress beyond the yield threshold, breaking the material. This quantity is the primary means we will use for describing mechanical coupling. In this paper, we will review several case

  12. Microbial diversity on Icelandic glaciers and ice caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Stefanie; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Edwards, Arwyn; Benning, Liane G.

    2015-01-01

    Algae are important primary colonizers of snow and glacial ice, but hitherto little is known about their ecology on Iceland's glaciers and ice caps. Due do the close proximity of active volcanoes delivering large amounts of ash and dust, they are special ecosystems. This study provides the first investigation of the presence and diversity of microbial communities on all major Icelandic glaciers and ice caps over a 3 year period. Using high-throughput sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA genes (16S and 18S), we assessed the snow community structure and complemented these analyses with a comprehensive suite of physical-, geo-, and biochemical characterizations of the aqueous and solid components contained in snow and ice samples. Our data reveal that a limited number of snow algal taxa (Chloromonas polyptera, Raphidonema sempervirens and two uncultured Chlamydomonadaceae) support a rich community comprising of other micro-eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant bacterial phyla. Archaea were also detected in sites where snow algae dominated and they mainly belong to the Nitrososphaerales, which are known as important ammonia oxidizers. Multivariate analyses indicated no relationships between nutrient data and microbial community structure. However, the aqueous geochemical simulations suggest that the microbial communities were not nutrient limited because of the equilibrium of snow with the nutrient-rich and fast dissolving volcanic ash. Increasing algal secondary carotenoid contents in the last stages of the melt seasons have previously been associated with a decrease in surface albedo, which in turn could potentially have an impact on the melt rates of Icelandic glaciers. PMID:25941518

  13. Magma storage under Iceland's Eastern Volcanic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, J.; Neave, D.; Hartley, M. E.; Edmonds, M.; Thordarson, T.; Morgan, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) of Iceland is defined by a number of volcanic systems and large basaltic eruptions occur both through central volcanoes (e.g. Grímsvötn) and on associated fissure rows (e.g. Laki, Eldgjá). We have collected a large quantity of micro-analytical data from a number of EVZ eruptions, with the aim of identifying common processes that occur in the premonitory stages of significant volcanic events. Here, we focus on the AD 1783 Laki event, the early postglacial Saksunarvatn tephra and the sub-glacially erupted Skuggafjöll tindar and for each of these eruptions we have >100 olivine-hosted or plagioclase-hosted melt inclusion analyses for major, trace and volatile elements. These large datasets are vital for understanding the history of melt evolution in the plumbing system of basaltic volcanoes. Diverse trace element compositions in melt inclusions hosted in primitive macrocrysts (i.e. Fo>84, An>84) indicate that the mantle melts supplied to the plumbing system of EVZ eruptions are highly variable in composition. Concurrent mixing and crystallisation of these melts occurs in crustal magma bodies. The levels of the deepest of these magma bodies are not well constrained by EVZ petrology, with only a handful of high-CO2 melt inclusions from Laki providing evidence for magma supply from >5 kbar. In contrast, the volatile contents of melt inclusions in evolved macrocrysts, which are close to equilibrium with the carrier liquids, indicate that final depths of inclusion entrapment are 0.5-2 kbar. The major element composition of the matrix glasses shows that the final pressure of equilibration between the melt and its macrocryst phases also occurred at 0.5-2 kbar. The relationship between these pressures and seismic/geodetic estimates of chamber depths needs to be carefully evaluated. The melt inclusion and macrocryst compositional record indicates that injection of porphyritic, gas-rich primitive melt into evolved/enriched and degassed shallow

  14. Airborne in-situ investigations of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume on Iceland and over north-western Germany with light aircrafts and optical particle counters

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Klaus; Eliasson, J.; Vogel, A.; Fischer, C.; Pohl, T; Haren, G. van; Meier, M.; Grobéty, Bernard; Dahmann, D.

    2012-01-01

    During the time period of the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 the Duesseldorf University of Applied Sciences has performed 14 research flights in situations with and without the volcanic ash plume over Germany. In parallel to the research flights in Germany three measurement flights have been performed by the University of Iceland in May 2010 over the western part of Iceland. During two of these flights the outskirts of the eruption plume were entered dire...

  15. Magma plumbing for the 2014-2015 Holuhraun eruption, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Harri; Mattsson, Tobias; Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Burchardt, Steffi; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Tryggvason, Ari; Krumbholz, Michael; Harris, Chris

    2016-08-01

    The 2014-2015 Holuhraun eruption on Iceland was located within the Askja fissure swarm but was accompanied by caldera subsidence in the Bárðarbunga central volcano 45 km to the southwest. Geophysical monitoring of the eruption identified a seismic swarm that migrated from Bárðarbunga to the Holuhraun eruption site over the course of two weeks. In order to better understand this lateral connection between Bárðarbunga and Holuhraun, we present mineral textures and compositions, mineral-melt-equilibrium calculations, whole rock and trace element data, and oxygen isotope ratios for selected Holuhraun samples. The Holuhraun lavas are compositionally similar to recorded historical eruptions from the Bárðarbunga volcanic system but are distinct from the historical eruption products of the nearby Askja system. Thermobarometry calculations indicate a polybaric magma plumbing system for the Holuhraun eruption, wherein clinopyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at average depths of ˜17 km and ˜5 km, respectively. Crystal resorption textures and oxygen isotope variations imply that this multilevel plumbing system facilitated magma mixing and assimilation of low-δ18O Icelandic crust prior to eruption. In conjunction with the existing geophysical evidence for lateral migration, our results support a model of initial vertical magma ascent within the Bárðarbunga plumbing system followed by lateral transport of aggregated magma batches within the upper crust to the Holuhraun eruption site.

  16. Iceland's Economic Eruption and Meltdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsson, Ulf; Torfason, Bjarni K.

    2012-01-01

    background that lead to an initially flourishing banking sector. In doing so, the paper elaborates on the economic oversights that were made during the financial build-up of the country and how such mistakes contributed to the crash. The focus is thus on identifying the main factors that contributed......The Icelandic financial collapse, which occurred in the fall of 2008, is without precedent. Never before in modern history has an entire financial system of a developed country collapsed so dramatically. This paper describes the country's path towards financial liberalisation and the economic...... that any fast growing market may be exposed to. It concludes that the economic collapse was primarily home-brewed and a consequence of an unbound, risk-seeking banking sector and ineffective (or non-existent) actions of the Icelandic authorities....

  17. Salmonella in Sheep in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnarsson E

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1995 several outbreaks of food poisoning in humans occurred in Iceland, that were traced to salmonella contamination of singed sheep heads. This prompted us to study the prevalence of salmonella infection in sheep and to trace where and how infection might have occurred. Faecal, intestinal contents and tonsillar samples were collected in the spring and autumn from sheep on 50 farms in the southwestern part of the country, where salmonellosis had been detected and from 5 farms in the northwestern part of the country. All faecal samples from the southwest were negative, whereas samples from 3 farms obtained in the autumn in the northwest were positive. Tonsillae taken in the autumn were positive in sheep from 3 farms in the southwest and 2 in the northwest. Our results show that salmonella infection is rare in Icelandic sheep but healthy carriers may harbour the bacteria in tonsillae. Salmonella was not detected in drainage from slaughterhouses nor in singed sheep heads.

  18. Global Volcano Locations Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC maintains a database of over 1,500 volcano locations obtained from the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program, Volcanoes of the World publication. The...

  19. Stretching: Does It Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  20. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  1. Stretching: Does It Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  2. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  3. Origin and population structure of the Icelanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J T

    1993-04-01

    The Norse and Celtic contributions to the founding population of Iceland have been estimated previously on a pan-Icelandic basis using gene frequency data for the entire island. Accounts of the settlement of Iceland, however, suggest that different regions received different proportions of Norse and Celtic settlers, indicating the need to incorporate geographic variation into Icelandic admixture studies. A formal likelihood ratio test rejects the null hypothesis of regional homogeneity in admixture proportions. Here, regional admixture estimates for Iceland are reported; they are in agreement with the settlement pattern inferred from historical accounts. The western, northern, and southern regions of Iceland exhibit a moderate Celtic component, consistent with historical indications that these regions were settled by Norse Vikings from the British Isles, accompanied by Celtic wives and slaves. Eastern Iceland, believed to have been settled chiefly by Vikings from Scandinavia, is characterized by a large Norse component of admixture. The northwestern peninsula is also found to be predominantly Norse. Regional genetic data are used to elucidate the contemporary population structure of Iceland. The observed structure correlates well with patterns of Icelandic geography, history, economy, marriage, urbanization, and internal migration. The northeastern region is strongly isolated, the urbanized areas of the north and southwest are representative of the overall population, and the remaining regions exhibit small-scale variation about the genetic central tendency. A high level of genetic homogeneity is indicated (RST = 0.0005), consistent with the high internal migration rate of the Icelanders. A regression of mean per-locus heterozygosity on distance from the gene frequency centroid reveals a greater than average external gene flow into the eastern region, whereas the northwestern peninsula has received less than average external gene flow. Iceland is compared with

  4. Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography of the volcanic systems of eastern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. G.; Priestley, K. F.; White, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Vatnajökull region of central-east Iceland lies above the head of the Iceland mantle plume where the crust is thickest due to enhanced melt supply. As a result the region contains a high density of volcanic rift systems, with six large subglacial central volcanoes. Due to the ice cover, the geological structure of the area and the location of past eruptions are poorly known. Imaging of the crustal velocity heterogeneities beneath the ice sheet aims to reveal much in terms of the structure of these volcanic plumbing systems. Mapping of significant velocity changes through time may also be indicative of movement of melt around the central volcanoes; one of which (Bárðarbunga) experienced a major rifting event in August 2014 (Sigmundsson et al. Nature 2015, Green et al. Nature Geosci. 2015). We present results from tomographic imaging of the volcanic systems in the region, using continuous data from a local broadband seismic network in central-east Iceland which provides excellent ray path coverage of the volcanic systems. This is supplemented by data from the HOTSPOT and ICEMELT experiments and the permanent monitoring stations of the Icelandic Meteorological Office. We process the continuous data following Benson et al. 2007 and automatic frequency-time analysis (FTAN) routines are used to extract more than 9000 dispersion measurements. We then generate Rayleigh wave group velocity maps which we present here. We find low velocity regions beneath the Vatnajökull icecap which are bounded by the surface expression of the volcanic rift systems. The lower velocities also extend north-west to the volcanic system under the Hofsjökull ice cap, and northwards towards Askja and the volcanic systems of the northern volcanic zone. We also produce locations and focal mechanisms of earthquakes caused by magmatic and hydrothermal activity to correlate structure with the activity of the volcanic systems.

  5. Volcano seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic

  6. Life Interpretation and Religion among Icelandic Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Gunnar J.

    2009-01-01

    Does religion play any specific part in Icelandic teenagers' life interpretation? This paper examines Icelandic teenagers' talk about religion and presents some of the findings in interviews with teenagers in a qualitative research project. The focus is especially on how three individuals express themselves about the influence of religion on their…

  7. Life Interpretation and Religion among Icelandic Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Gunnar J.

    2009-01-01

    Does religion play any specific part in Icelandic teenagers' life interpretation? This paper examines Icelandic teenagers' talk about religion and presents some of the findings in interviews with teenagers in a qualitative research project. The focus is especially on how three individuals express themselves about the influence of religion on their…

  8. Holocene marine tephrochronology on the Iceland shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guomundsdottir, Esther Ruth; Eiriksson, Jón; Larsen, Guorun

    2012-01-01

    Currently the Late-glacial and Holocene marine tephrochronology on the shelf around Iceland comprises 130 tephra layers from 30 sediment cores ranging in age from 15,000 years cal. BP to AD 1947. A vast majority of the cores and tephra layers are from the North Iceland shelf Much fewer tephra...... layers have been found on the South and West Iceland shell The early Holocene Saksunarvatn ash and Vedde Ash are the only tephra layers identified on all investigated shelf areas. For the last 15,000 years correlated tephra layers from the shelf sediments around Iceland to their terrestrial counterparts...... both in Iceland and overseas are 40 of which 26 are terrestrially dated tephra markers. Thirty correlations are within the last 7050 years. The terrestrially dated tephra markers found on the shelf have been used to constrain past environmental variability in the region, as well as marine reservoir age...

  9. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  10. Polymer Stretching by Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, M

    2000-01-01

    The stretching of a polymer chain by a large scale chaotic flow is considered. The steady state which emerges as a balance of the turbulent stretching and anharmonic resistance of the chain is quantitatively described, i.e. the dependency on the flow parameters (Lyapunov exponent statistics) and the chain characteristics (the number of beads and the inter-bead elastic potential) is made explicit. Implications for the drag reduction theory are discussed.

  11. Antarctic volcanoes: A remote but significant hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Alex; Folch, Arnau; Giralt, Santiago

    2017-04-01

    Ash emitted during explosive volcanic eruptions can be dispersed over massive areas of the globe, posing a threat to both human health and infrastructures, such as the air traffic. Some of the last eruptions occurred during this decade (e.g. 14/04/2010 - Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland; 24/05/2011-Grímsvötn, Iceland; 05/06/2011-Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, Chile) have strongly affected the air traffic in different areas of the world, leading to economic losses of billions of euros. From the tens of volcanoes located in Antarctica, at least nine are known to be active and five of them have reported volcanic activity in historical times. However, until now, no attention has been paid to the possible social, economical and environmental consequences of an eruption that would occur on high southern latitudes, perhaps because it is considered that its impacts would be minor or local, and mainly restricted to the practically inhabited Antarctic continent. We show here, as a case study and using climate models, how volcanic ash emitted during a regular eruption of one of the most active volcanoes in Antarctica, Deception Island (South Shetland Islands), could reach the African continent as well as Australia and South America. The volcanic cloud could strongly affect the air traffic not only in the region and at high southern latitudes, but also the flights connecting Africa, South America and Oceania. Results obtained are crucial to understand the patterns of volcanic ash distribution at high southern latitudes with obvious implications for tephrostratigraphical and chronological studies that provide valuable isochrones with which to synchronize palaeoclimate records. This research was partially funded by the MINECO grants VOLCLIMA (CGL2015-72629-EXP)and POSVOLDEC(CTM2016-79617-P)(AEI/FEDER, UE), the Ramón y Cajal research program (RYC-2012-11024) and the NEMOH European project (REA grant 34 agreement n° 289976).

  12. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  13. Deep Drilling into a Mantle Plume Volcano: The Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald M. Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic volcanoes formed by mantle plumes, such as those of Hawaii and Iceland, strongly influence our views about the deep Earth (Morgan, 1971; Sleep, 2006. These volcanoes are the principal geochemical probe into the deep mantle, a testing ground for understanding mantle convection, plate tectonics and volcanism, and an archive of information on Earth’s magnetic field and lithospheredynamics. Study of the petrology, geochemistry, and structure of oceanic volcanoes has contributed immensely to our present understanding of deep Earth processes, but virtually all of this study has been concentrated on rocks available at the surface. In favorable circumstances, surface exposures penetrate to a depth of a few hundred meters, which is a small fraction of the 10- to 15-kilometer height of Hawaiian volcanoes above the depressed seafloor (Moore, 1987; Watts, 2001.

  14. Self Censorship among Icelandic Journalists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgir Guðmundsson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The discussion on media self-censorship has flourished in Iceland after the attacks on the Charlie Hebdo editorial offices in January 2015 and after some dramatic changes in the top management and owner-groups of some of the media firms. But what is this experience that journalists describe as self censorship? This paper attempts to answer two main research questions. On the one hand the question how journalists understand the concept of selfcensorship. On the other hand the question: what is the experience of Icelandic journalist of self-censorship? The approach is the one of a qualitative research and is based on interviews with six experienced journalists. The main findings suggest important influence of the social discourse on news and news values of journalists and their tendency for self-censorship. This discourse is partly directed by politicians and influential bloggers and also by a massive discussion by active social media users. Furthermore the findings suggest, that ownership and the location of the particular medium where a journalist works in the lineup of different commercial-political blocks in the media market, is important for self-censorship. Finally it seems that journalists understand the concept selfcensorship in a different manner and that it is important to define the term carefully if it is to be used as an analytical tool.

  15. Research on aging in Iceland: future potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Adalsteinn

    2004-02-01

    Iceland is a small but prototypic western society strategically located between mainland Europe and North America. Through private and public funding, Iceland is a model in the making for opportunities in research on aging. Its ethnically and socioeconomically homogenous population served by an advanced health care system has historically been exceptionally supportive and willing to participate in both trans-sectional and cohort studies. Interdisciplinary geriatric care is well established and Iceland was on of the first countries to adapt from the US, the resident assessment instrument (RAI), which makes comparison of long-term care between countries very feasible. Among a number of biotech companies recently established in Iceland is Deocode, a leading company in the field of linking genetic variation to diseases. A major population study on interactions between age, genes and environment (AGES) was launched by the Icelandic Heart Association in 2002 through support from the NIA and the Icelandic government. Ultimately, one may expect that a cutting edge aging research in Iceland will contribute to our understanding of how to maintain a better health, independence and active participation in later life.

  16. Volcano hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Matías, O.; Rose, William I.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fuego-Acatenango massif comprises a string of five or more volcanic vents along a north-south trend that is perpendicular to that of the Central American arc in Guatemala. From north to south known centers of volcanism are Ancient Acatenango, Yepocapa, Pico Mayor de Acatenango, Meseta, and Fuego. Volcanism along the trend stretches back more than 200,000 years. Although many of the centers have been active contemporaneously, there is a general sequence of younger volcanism, from north to south along the trend. This massive volcano complex towers more than 3500 meters (m) above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan Highlands to the north. The volcano complex comprises remnants of multiple eruptive centers, which periodically have collapsed to form huge debris avalanches. The largest of these avalanches extended more than 50 kilometers (km) from its source and covered more than 300 square km. The volcano has potential to produce huge debris avalanches that could inundate large areas of the Pacific coastal plain. In areas around the volcanoes and downslope toward the coastal plain, more than 100,000 people are potentially at risk from these and other flowage phenomena.

  17. Foci of Volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, I.

    1974-01-01

    One may assume a center of volcanic activities beneath the edifice of an active volcano, which is here called the focus of the volcano. Sometimes it may be a ''magma reservoir''. Its depth may differ with types of magma and change with time. In this paper, foci of volcanoes are discussed from the viewpoints of four items: (1) Geomagnetic changes related with volcanic activities; (2) Crustal deformations related with volcanic activities; (3) Magma transfer through volcanoes; and (4) Subsurface structure of calderas.

  18. Volcanoes and carcinoma of the thyroid: a possible association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, T M; Ng, W L; Gibson, J B

    1981-01-01

    Environmental factors contributing to incidences of thyroid carcinoma are re-evaluated and emphasized in this study. Thyroid cancers appear to occur independent of endemic goiter, based on epidemiologic and histologic evidence. While environmental factors appear to be important, the specific etiologic agent has not yet been identified or suggested. The number of thyroid cancer incidences available from cancer registries are analyzed in an attempt to identify a specific environmental carcinogenic agent. The presence of active volcanoes that produce abundant lava is found to be the common denominator of Iceland and Hawaii, where the incidence of thyroid cancer is outstandingly high. Comparison with other areas with active volcanoes is made. The presence of a carcinogenic agent in the lava is postulated and its possible mode of action on humans through fish products is hypothesized.

  19. Metal scavenging by calcium carbonate at the Eyjafjallajökull volcano

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, J.; Stipp, S. L S; Makovicky, E.

    2014-01-01

    in the Icelandic river, Hvanná, in the vicinity of the volcano. The river water emerged from under the lava flow and was heavily charged with cations and dissolved CO2. The concentration of the major dissolved constituents was: dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), 33.08mM; calcium, 6.17mM; magnesium, 4.27mM; sodium...

  20. Metal scavenging by calcium carbonate at the Eyjafjallajökull volcano

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, J.; Stipp, S. L S; Makovicky, E.

    2014-01-01

    in the Icelandic river, Hvanná, in the vicinity of the volcano. The river water emerged from under the lava flow and was heavily charged with cations and dissolved CO2. The concentration of the major dissolved constituents was: dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), 33.08mM; calcium, 6.17mM; magnesium, 4.27mM; sodium...

  1. Microbial diversity on Icelandic glaciers and ice caps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eLutz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Algae are important primary colonizers of snow and glacial ice, but hitherto little is known about their ecology on Iceland’s glaciers and ice caps. Due do the close proximity of active volcanoes delivering large amounts of ash and dust, they are special ecosystems. This study provides the first investigation of the presence and diversity of microbial communities on all major Icelandic glaciers and ice caps over a three year period. Using high-throughput sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA genes (16S and 18S, we assessed the snow community structure and complemented these analyses with a comprehensive suite of physical-, geo- and biochemical characterizations of the aqueous and solid components contained in snow and ice samples. Our data reveal that a limited number of snow algal taxa (Chloromonas polyptera, Raphidonema sempervirens and two uncultured Chlamydomonadaceae support a rich community comprising of other micro-eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant bacterial phyla. Archaea were also detected in sites where snow algae dominated and they mainly belong to the Nitrososphaerales, which are known as important ammonia oxidizers. Multivariate analyses indicated no relationships between nutrient data and microbial community structure. However, the aqueous geochemical simulations suggest that the microbial communities were not nutrient limited because of the equilibrium of snow with the nutrient-rich and fast dissolving volcanic ash. Increasing algal secondary carotenoid contents in the last stages of the melt seasons have previously been associated with a decrease in surface albedo, which in turn could potentially have an impact on the melt rates of Icelandic glaciers.

  2. The Wind Energy Potential of Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Petersen, Guðrún Nína; Björnsson, Halldór

    2014-01-01

    Downscaling simulations performed with theWeather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to determine the large-scale wind energy potential of Iceland. Local wind speed distributions are represented by Weibull statistics. The shape parameter across Iceland varies between 1.2 and 3.......6, with the lowest values indicative of near-exponential distributions at sheltered locations, and the highest values indicative of normal distributions at exposed locations in winter. Compared with summer, average power density in winter is increased throughout Iceland by a factor of 2.0e5.5. In any season......, there are also considerable spatial differences in average wind power density. Relative to the average value within 10 km of the coast, power density across Iceland varies between 50 and 250%, excluding glaciers, or between 300 and 1500 W m_2 at 50 m above ground level in winter. At intermediate elevations...

  3. Volcano-ice interactions on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    Central volcanic eruptions beneath terrestrial glaciers have built steep-sided, flat-topped mountains composed of pillow lava, glassy tuff, capping flows, and cones of basalt. Subglacial fissure eruptions produced ridges of similar composition. In some places the products from a number of subglacial vents have combined to form widespread deposits. The morphologies of these subglacial volcanoes are distinctive enough to allow their recognition at the resolutions characteristic of Viking orbiter imagery. Analogs to terrestrial subglacial volcanoes have been identified on the northern plains and near the south polar cap of Mars. The polar feature provides probable evidence of volcanic eruptions beneath polar ice. A mixed unit of rock and ice is postulated to have overlain portions of the northern plains, with eruptions into this ground ice having produced mountains and ridges analogous to those in Iceland. Subsequent breakdown of this unit due to ice melting revealed the volcanic features. Estimated heights of these landforms indicate that the ice-rich unit once ranged from approximately 100 to 1200 m thick.

  4. Investigations of Very High Enthalpy Geothermal Resources in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Fridleifsson, G. O.

    2012-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) is investigating the economic feasibility of producing electricity from supercritical geothermal reservoirs. Earlier modeling indicates that the power output of a geothermal well producing from a supercritical reservoir could potentially be an order of magnitude greater than that from a conventional hot geothermal reservoir, at the same volumetric flow rate. However, even in areas with an unusually high geothermal gradient, for normal hydrostatic pressure gradients reaching supercritical temperatures and pressures will require drilling to depths >4 km. In 2009 the IDDP attempted to drill the first deep supercritical well, IDDP-01, in the caldera of the Krafla volcano, in NE Iceland. However drilling had to be terminated at only 2.1 km depth when ~900°C rhyolite magma flowed into the well. Our studies indicate that this magma formed by partial melting of hydrothermally altered basalts within the Krafla caldera. Although this well was too shallow to reach supercritical pressures, it is highly productive, and is estimated to be capable of generating up to 36 MWe from the high-pressure, superheated steam produced from the upper contact zone of the intrusion. With a well-head temperature of ~440°C, it is at present apparently the hottest producing geothermal well in the world. A pilot plant is investigating the optimal utilization of this magmatically heated resource. A special issue of the journal Geothermics with 16 papers reporting on the IDDP-01 is in preparation. However, in order to continue the search for supercritical geothermal resources, planning is underway to drill a 4.5 km deep well at Reykjanes in SW Iceland in 2013-14. Although drilling deeper towards the heat source of this already developed high-temperature geothermal field will be more expensive, if a supercritical resource is found, this cost increase should be offset by the considerable increase in the power output and lifetime of the Reykjanes geothermal

  5. FAST TRACK PAPER: Older crust underlies Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, G. R.

    2006-05-01

    The oldest rocks outcropping in northwest Iceland are ~16 Myr old and in east Iceland ~13 Myr. The full plate spreading rate in this region during the Cenozoic has been ~2 cm a-1, and thus these rocks are expected to be separated by ~290 km. They are, however, ~500 km apart. The conclusion is inescapable that an expanse of older crust ~210 km wide underlies Iceland, submerged beneath younger lavas. This conclusion is independent of any considerations regarding spreading ridge migrations, jumps, the simultaneous existence of multiple active ridges, three-dimensionality, or subsidence of the lava pile. Such complexities bear on the distribution and age of the older crust, but not on its existence or its width. If it is entirely oceanic its maximum age is most likely 26-37 Ma. It is at least 150 km in north-south extent, but may taper and extend beneath south Iceland. Part of it might be continental-a southerly extension of the Jan Mayen microcontinent. This older crust contributes significantly to crustal thickness beneath Iceland and the ~40 km local thickness measured seismically is thus probably an overestimate of present-day steady-state crustal production at Iceland.

  6. Free carboxylate stretching modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, J.; Steill, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first IR spectroscopic observation of carboxylate stretching modes in free space, i.e., in the complete absence of solvent or counterions. Gas-phase spectra of a series of benzoate anions have been recorded and compared to condensed-phase spectra, revealing the profound influence of th

  7. Climate effects on volcanism: influence on magmatic systems of loading and unloading from ice mass variations, with examples from Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Pinel, Virginie; Lund, Björn; Albino, Fabien; Pagli, Carolina; Geirsson, Halldór; Sturkell, Erik

    2010-05-28

    Pressure influences both magma production and the failure of magma chambers. Changes in pressure interact with the local tectonic settings and can affect magmatic activity. Present-day reduction in ice load on subglacial volcanoes due to global warming is modifying pressure conditions in magmatic systems. The large pulse in volcanic production at the end of the last glaciation in Iceland suggests a link between unloading and volcanism, and models of that process can help to evaluate future scenarios. A viscoelastic model of glacio-isostatic adjustment that considers melt generation demonstrates how surface unloading may lead to a pulse in magmatic activity. Iceland's ice caps have been thinning since 1890 and glacial rebound at rates exceeding 20 mm yr(-1) is ongoing. Modelling predicts a significant amount of 'additional' magma generation under Iceland due to ice retreat. The unloading also influences stress conditions in shallow magma chambers, modifying their failure conditions in a manner that depends critically on ice retreat, the shape and depth of magma chambers as well as the compressibility of the magma. An annual cycle of land elevation in Iceland, due to seasonal variation of ice mass, indicates an annual modulation of failure conditions in subglacial magma chambers.

  8. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  9. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  10. Precise Hypocenter Relocation of Microearthquakes in the Torfajökull Volcanic System, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, R.; White, R. S.; Soosalu, H.

    2003-12-01

    The Torfajökull volcanic system is one of about 30 active volcanoes comprising the neovolcanic zones of Iceland. It is located at the rift-transform junction between the Eastern Volcanic Zone and the South Iceland Seismic Zone. The central volcanic part of the system is the largest silicic centre in Iceland with a caldera of about 12 km diameter. It's high-temperature geothermal system is one of the most powerful in Iceland. Torfajökull is the source of persistent seismicity, where both high- and low-frequency earthquakes occur. To study the microseismicity of the volcanic area in detail a temporary array of 20 broad-band seismic stations was deployed between May and November 2002. These temporary stations were embedded in the permanent South Iceland Lowland (SIL) network, and data from nine adjacent SIL-stations were included in the study. A 'minimum one-dimensional velocity model' with station corrections was computed for earthquake relocation by inverting manually picked P- and S- wave arrival times from events occurring in the Torfajökull volcanic centre, beneath Myrdalsjökull glacier south of the temporary array, and in the South Iceland Seismic Zone in the west. High-frequency earthquakes from the Torfajökull volcanic centre were then relocated using the program NonLinLoc, which calculates a non-linear, probabilistic solution to the earthquake location problem. From several hundred earthquakes in the Torfajökull area, 122 were well locatable (gap < 180 degrees, more than 10 observations). Subsequently, we correlated the waveforms of this sub-dataset (around 2000 obseravtions) to define linked events, calculated the relative travel time difference between event pairs, and solved for the hypocentral separation between these events with HypoDD. The resulting high-resolution pattern shows a tighter clustering in epicenter and focal depth when compared to original locations. All earthquakes are located beneath the caldera with hypocenters between 1 and 6 km

  11. Strength and deformation properties of volcanic rocks in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    2016-01-01

    rock from Iceland has been the topic for rock mechanical studies carried out by Ice-landic guest students at the Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Den-mark over a number of years in cooperation with University of Iceland, Vegagerðin (The Icelandic Road Directorate......) and Landsvirkjun (The National Power Company of Iceland). These projects involve engineering geological properties of volcanic rock in Iceland, rock mechanical testing and parameter evaluation. Upscaling to rock mass properties and modelling using Q- or GSI-methods have been studied by the students......Tunnelling work and preinvestigations for road traces require knowledge of the strength and de-formation properties of the rock material involved. This paper presents results related to tunnel-ling for Icelandic water power plants and road tunnels from a number of regions in Iceland. The volcanic...

  12. Iceland as a Model for Chemical Alteration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.; Schiffman, P.; Murad, E.; Southard, R.

    2001-03-01

    Subglacial volcanic activity on Iceland has led to the formation of a variety of silicate and iron oxide-rich alteration products that may ressemble chemical alteration on Mars. The spectral and chemical properties of Icelandic samples are presented.

  13. Difficulties and solutions of learning Icelandic for foreigners

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Soffía Yujing, 1989-

    2012-01-01

    This thesis mainly focuses on difficulties in learning Icelandic, as well as analyzing and suggesting measures for improvements of these difficulties. Icelandic is a hard language to learn and many foreigners have encountered great difficulties in the learning process. The syntax of Icelandic is unique and complex, take the nouns for example, this part of speech can be divided into three genders, each with very complex transformations. Icelandic pronunciation of some letters is unusual, an...

  14. Individualistic Vikings: Culture, Economics and Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Már Wolfgang Mixa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Icelandic culture has generally been considered to share many similarities to the Nordic cultures. However, the financial crisis in 2008 painted a completely different picture, with the Nordic nations faring much less worse than Iceland, which saw its banking system becoming almost entirely worthless. Looking at traditional cultural yardsticks in the vein of the most commonly used research in the field of business and organizational management, generally linked to Hofstede´s dimensional studies, one would at first glance conclude that Icelanders would have behaved in a similar manner as people in the Nordic nations. By focusing on savings ratio, it is shown that Icelanders were much more risk-seeking during the prelude of the crisis. Many nations badly hit during the 2008 financial crisis have a high level of individualism inherent in their culture. Iceland fits this scenario. Thus while general cultural characteristics may lack explanatory power regarding economic behavior of people between cultures, the individual/collective cultural dimension may provide clues of what dangers (and possible strengths lurk within societies from a financial point of view. Such developments may affect the financial stability of nations, especially those with a high level of individualism where financial liberalization with possible abuses is occurring.

  15. Hydrothermal activity in Tertiary Icelandic crust: Implication for cooling processes along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałgan, D.; Devey, C. W.; Yeo, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Known hydrothermal activity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is mostly high-temperature venting, controlled by volcano-tectonic processes confined to ridge axes and neotectonic zones ~15km wide on each side of the axis (e.g. TAG or Snake Pit). However, extensive exploration and discoveries of new hydrothermal fields in off-axis regions (e.g. Lost City, MAR) show that hydrothermalism may, in some areas, be dominated by off-axis venting. Little is known about nature of such systems, including whether low-temperature "diffuse" venting dominates rather than high-temperature black-smokers. This is particularly interesting since such systems may transport up to 90% of the hydrothermal heat to the oceans. In this study we use Icelandic hot springs as onshore analogues for off-shore hydrothermal activity along the MAR to better understand volcano-tectonic controls on their occurrence, along with processes supporting fluid circulation. Iceland is a unique laboratory to study how new oceanic crust cools and suggests that old crust may not be as inactive as previously thought. Our results show that Tertiary (>3.3 Myr) crust of Iceland (Westfjords) has widespread low-temperature hydrothermal activity. Lack of tectonism (indicated by lack of seismicity), along with field research suggest that faults in Westfjords are no longer active and that once sealed, can no longer support hydrothermal circulation, i.e. none of the hot springs in the area occur along faults. Instead, dyke margins provide open and permeable fluid migration pathways. Furthermore, we suggest that the Reykjanes Ridge (south of Iceland) may be similar to Westfjords with hydrothermalism dominated by off-axis venting. Using bathymetric data we infer dyke positions and suggest potential sites for future exploration located away from neotectonic zone. We also emphasise the importance of biological observations in seeking for low-temperature hydrothermal activity, since chemical or optical methods are not sufficient.

  16. CPAFFC President Chen Haosu Leads Delegation to Iceland and Denmark

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Icelandic-Chinese Cultural So-ciety (ICCS) and the Friendship Association Denmark-China, the CPAFFC delegation headed by President Chen Haosu visited Iceland, Denmark and the Faroe Islands from November 18 to 29, 2003.On November 22, in collaboration with the ICCS and the Chinese Association of Iceland, the delegation held a kite show

  17. Volcanoes - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes Holocene volcanoes, which are those thought to be active in the last 10,000 years, that are within an extended area of the northern...

  18. Italian active volcanoes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RobertoSantacroce; RenawCristofolini; LuigiLaVolpe; GiovanniOrsi; MauroRosi

    2003-01-01

    The eruptive histories, styles of activity and general modes of operation of the main active Italian volcanoes,Etna, Vulcano, Stromboli, Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei and Ischia, are described in a short summary.

  19. Building Information Modelling in Denmark and Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Jóhannesson, Elvar Ingi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the implementation of building information modelling (BIM) in the Nordic countries of Europe with particular focus on the Danish building industry with the aim of making use of its experience for the Icelandic building industry. Design....../methodology/aptroach – The research is based on two separate analyses. In the first part, the deployment of information and communication technology (ICT) in the Icelandic building industry is investigated and compared with the other Nordic countries. In the second part the experience in Denmark from implementing and working...... for making standards and guidelines related to BIM. Public building clients are also encouraged to consider initiating projects based on making simple building models of existing buildings in order to introduce the BIM technology to the industry. Icelandic companies are recommended to start implementing BIM...

  20. Psychotropic drug use among Icelandic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoëga, Helga; Baldursson, Gísli; Hrafnkelsson, Birgir

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate psychotropic drug use among children in Iceland between 2003 and 2007. METHODS: A nationwide population-based drug use study covering the total pediatric population (ages 0-17) in Iceland. Information was obtained from the National Medicines...... Registry to calculate prevalence of use by year and psychotropic drug group; incidence by year, psychotropic drug group, child's age and sex, and medical specialty of prescriber; the most commonly used psychotropic chemical substances, off-label and unlicensed use and concomitant psychotropic drug use....... RESULTS: The overall prevalence of psychotropic drug use was 48.7 per 1000 Icelandic children in 2007. Stimulants and antidepressants increased in prevalence from 2003 to 2007 and were the two most prevalent psychotropic drug groups, respectively, 28.4 and 23.4 per 1000 children in 2007. A statistically...

  1. Joekulhlaups in Iceland: Characteristics and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsson, H.

    2000-08-01

    Glacier outburst floods, joekulhlaups, are frequent in Iceland. They can be traced to three types of sources: (1) to subglacial lakes at geothermal areas, (2) to melt water drained during volcanic eruptions, and (3) to marginal ice dammed lakes. Joekulhlaups are major events; they may profoundly affect landscape and they threaten human life and property. In Iceland, joekulhlaups have caused loss of lives, ruined farms and cultivated land, and devastated large vegetated areas. They threaten roads, bridges, and hydroelectric power plants on glacier-fed rivers. Their effects on landscape are seen in the erosion of large canyons and in the transport and deposition of sediments over sandur deltas. The present lecture gives an overview of joekulhlaups in Iceland, their sources, triggering, and drainage. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  2. Plague and landscape resilience in premodern Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Richard; Dugmore, Andrew J; Vésteinsson, Orri

    2012-03-01

    In debates on societal collapse, Iceland occupies a position of precarious survival, defined by not becoming extinct, like Norse Greenland, but having endured, sometimes by the narrowest of margins. Classic decline narratives for late medieval to early modern Iceland stress compounding adversities, where climate, trade, political domination, unsustainable practices, and environmental degradation conspire with epidemics and volcanism to depress the Icelanders and turn the once-proud Vikings and Saga writers into one of Europe's poorest nations. A mainstay of this narrative is the impact of incidental setbacks such as plague and volcanism, which are seen to have compounded and exacerbated underlying structural problems. This research shows that this view is not correct. We present a study of landscape change that uses 15 precisely dated tephra layers spanning the whole 1,200-y period of human settlement in Iceland. These tephras have provided 2,625 horizons of known age within 200 stratigraphic sections to form a high-resolution spatial and temporal record of change. This finding shows short-term (50 y) declines in geomorphological activity after two major plagues in A.D. 15th century, variations that probably mirrored variations in the population. In the longer term, the geomorphological impact of climate changes from the 14th century on is delayed, and landscapes (as well as Icelandic society) exhibit resilience over decade to century timescales. This finding is not a simple consequence of depopulation but a reflection of how Icelandic society responded with a scaling back of their economy, conservation of core functionality, and entrenchment of the established order.

  3. Voluminous Icelandic Basaltic Eruptions Appear To Cause Abrupt Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Beginning on June 21, 1783, Laki volcano in southern Iceland erupted 14.7 km3 basalt, ejecting 24 Mt SO_{2} into the stratosphere where it was blown eastward and northward and 98 Mt into the troposphere where the jet stream transported it southeastward to Europe. The "dry fog" observed in Europe with an estimated mean concentration of 60 ppbv SO2, raised daytime temperatures as much as 3.3^{o}C, causing the warmest July in England from 1659 when measurements began until 1983. SO2, tropospheric O_{3}, NO2, and fine ash absorb ultraviolet energy from the sun that causes the bonds between and within their atoms to oscillate at 47 times higher frequency than the bonds in CO_{2} absorbing infrared radiation. Temperature is proportional to the kinetic energy of these oscillations, i.e. the frequency squared. Thus these gases are raised to much higher temperatures than greenhouse gases. The Stefan-Boltzmann law says that radiation from these molecules is a constant times temperature raised to the fourth power. As a result, SO2 and ash radiate far more energy back to earth than CO_{2}, causing warming. Another way to look at the energy involved shows that 15 ppbv SO2 in the 0.3-0.42 μm wavelength band absorbs as much solar energy per unit volume as 388,000 ppbv CO_{2} absorbs infrared energy in the 12.7-17.5 μm band. Basaltic volcanoes such as Laki emit 10 to 100 times more SO2 than more evolved magmas and are less explosive, leaving most of the SO_{2} in the troposphere. All 14 Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) sudden warmings between 46 and 11 ka are contemporaneous with the highest levels of sulfate in the GISP2 drill hole near Summit Greenland. These DO events typically warmed the northern hemisphere out of the ice age within decades, but as volcanism waned, ocean temperatures cooled the world back into an ice age within centuries. The world finally exited the ice age when voluminous volcanism continued from 11.6 to 9.6 ka. Basaltic table mountains or tuyas in Iceland document

  4. Cost containment of pharmaceutical use in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, A B; Morgall, J M; Grímsson, A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Iceland was the first Nordic country to liberalise its drug distribution system, in March 1996. Subsequent regulation in January 1997 increased patients' share of drug costs. The objectives of this study were to test the assumptions that liberalizing community pharmacy ownership would...... in March 1996 or from the regulatory intervention in January 1997. CONCLUSIONS: The main argument used for liberalizing community pharmacy ownership in Iceland was built on false assumptions regarding the effect on drug reimbursement costs to the state. It will be necessary to find more promising...

  5. Strategy for larch breeding in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eysteinsson, T. [Iceland Forest Service, Egilsstadir (Iceland)

    1995-12-31

    An accelerated breeding program for Siberian larch was initiated in Iceland in 1992. Siberian larch is an important exotic species, but not fully adapted to Icelandic conditions. Selections are made based on adaptive traits such as growth rhythm and resistance to damage as well as form and growth rate. Seed will be produced in containerised, greenhouse orchards, necessitating selection for fecundity to best use expensive greenhouse space. Research will concentrate on developing flower induction treatments for Siberian larch and ways to maximize seed production and viability. 19 refs

  6. The Wind Energy Potential of Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Bjornsson, Halldór; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Jónasson, Kristján; Bay Hasager, Charlotte; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2014-05-01

    While Iceland has an abundant wind energy resource, its use for electrical power production has so far been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated primarily from hydro- and geothermal sources, and adding wind energy has so far not been considered practical or even necessary. However, wind energy is becoming a more viable option, as opportunities for new hydro- or geothermal power installations become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland, a wind atlas has been developed as part of the joint Nordic project 'Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing' (IceWind). Downscaling simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to determine the large-scale wind energy potential of Iceland. Local wind speed distributions are represented by Weibull statistics. The shape parameter across Iceland varies between 1.2 and 3.6, with the lowest values indicative of near-exponential distributions at sheltered locations, and the highest values indicative of normal distributions at exposed locations in winter. Compared with summer, average power density in winter is increased throughout Iceland by a factor of 2.0 - 5.5. In any season, there are also considerable spatial differences in average wind power density. Relative to the average value within 10 km of the coast, power density across Iceland varies between 50 - 250%, excluding glaciers, or between 300 - 1500 W m-2 at 50 m above ground level in winter. At intermediate elevations of 500 - 1000 m above mean sea level, power density is independent of the distance to the coast. In addition to seasonal and spatial variability, differences in average wind speed and power density also exist for different wind directions. Along the coast in winter, power density of onshore winds is higher by 100 - 700 W m-2 than that of offshore winds. The regions with the highest average wind speeds are impractical for wind farms, due to the distances from road

  7. Characterization of Genetic Variation in Icelandic Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars-Erik; Das, Ashutosh; Momeni, Jamal

    Identification of genetic variation in cattle breeds using next-generation sequencing technology has focused on the modern production cattle breeds. We focused on one of the oldest indigenous breeds, the Icelandic cattle breed. Sequencing of two individuals enabled identification of more than 8...... million SNPs and more than one million short indels. Annotation of the genetic variants identified a substantial number of functional SNPs and variants. The number of genetic variants identified in the Icelandic cattle breed is on the same level as previously seen in other studies on Holstein cattle...

  8. Iceland as a Landscape Investigation Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campanini, Manuela Silvia

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays Icelanders continue an ancient dialogue. Nature is part of their soul and they take with them bits of their terrestrial landscape when they move to the elsewhere. When they move out in the sea they often name their ships or boats after natural spots (waterfalls, mountains, etc., Moving to the town, architects build monuments inspired by wild nature like Hallgrimskirkja (inspired by Hraundrangar and the columnar basalt or Perlan (inspired by the Geysir and the geothermal water. This is the way Icelanders compensate and take care of their perennial landscape nostalgia.

  9. Gendering in one Icelandic preschool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Alda Hardardottir

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to shed light on gendering in preschool. It analyzes the opinions and beliefs of preschool teachers with regard to boys and girls in one Icelandic preschool, and how gender performative acts are manifested in the preschool’s children. The preschool, which was observed for one school year, comprised 60 children, aged 18 months to five years, and 20 employees, of which eight were qualified teachers. The research material is analyzed in terms of Judith Butler’s gender constructivism. Butler contends that gender is constituted by, and is a product of, society, and that the individual’s empowerment is therefore limited in relation to society, with individuals typically seeking to identify themselves with the dominant norms concerning gender. The main conclusions suggest that “gendering” is prominent within the preschool. There is a strong tendency among the preschool teachers to classify the children into categories of boys/masculine and girls/feminine, and specific norms direct the children into the dominant feminine and masculine categories, thus maintaining and reinforcing their gender stereotypes. The children used symbols such as colors, locations and types of play as means to instantiate the “girling” and the “boying”. These findings are consistent with previous Nordic research and indicate a prevailing essentialist perspective towards both girls and boys. The originality of the research, however, lies in focusing on children’s gender from the individual’s perspective and how the individual child generally enacts gender performatively within the confines of society’s norms.

  10. Volcano morphometry and volume scaling on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J. B.; Williams, R. S., Jr.

    1994-03-01

    A broad variety of volcanic edifices have been observed on Venus. They ranged in size from the limits of resolution of the Magellan SAR (i.e., hundreds of meters) to landforms over 500 km in basal diameter. One of the key questions pertaining to volcanism on Venus concerns the volume eruption rate or VER, which is linked to crustal productivity over time. While less than 3 percent of the surface area of Venus is manifested as discrete edifices larger than 50 km in diameter, a substantial component of the total crustal volume of the planet over the past 0.5 Ga is related to isolated volcanoes, which are certainly more easily studied than the relatively diffusely defined plains volcanic flow units. Thus, we have focused our efforts on constraining the volume productivity of major volcanic edifices larger than 100 km in basal diameter. Our approach takes advantage of the topographic data returned by Magellan, as well as our database of morphometric statistics for the 20 best known lava shields of Iceland, plus Mauna Loa of Hawaii. As part of this investigation, we have quantified the detailed morphometry of nearly 50 intermediate to large scale edifices, with particular attention to their shape systematics. We found that a set of venusian edifices which include Maat, Sapas, Tepev, Sif, Gula, a feature at 46 deg S, 215 deg E, as well as the shield-like structure at 10 deg N, 275 deg E are broadly representative of the approx. 400 volcanic landforms larger than 50 km. The cross-sectional shapes of these 7 representative edifices range from flattened cones (i.e., Sif) similar to classic terrestrial lava shields such as Mauna Loa and Skjaldbreidur, to rather dome-like structures which include Maat and Sapas. The majority of these larger volcanoes surveyed as part of our study displayed cross-sectional topographies with paraboloidal shaped, in sharp contrast with the cone-like appearance of most simple terrestrial lava shields. In order to more fully explore the

  11. Volcano plumbing system geometry: The result of multi-parametric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Magma is transported from magma chambers towards the surface through networks of planar structures (intrusive sheets) spanning from vertical dikes to inclined sheets and horizontal sills. This study presents an overview of intrusive sheets at several volcanoes located in different settings in order to contribute to assess the factors controlling the geometry of magma plumbing systems. Data have been mainly acquired in the field and secondarily through a collection and analysis of geophysical publications; data include local lithology and tectonics of the substratum surrounding the volcano with special reference to local fault kinematics and related stress tensor, regional tectonics (general kinematics and far-field stress tensors), crustal thickness, geology and shape of the volcano, topographic setting, and characteristics of the plumbing system. Data from active volcanoes and eroded extinct volcanoes are discussed; the shallow plumbing system of active volcanoes has been reconstructed by combining available geophysical data with field information derived from outcropping sheets, morphometric analyses of pyroclastic cones, and the orientation and location of eruptive fissures. The study of eroded volcanoes enabled to assess the plumbing system geometry at lower levels in the core of the edifice or under the volcano-substratum interface. Key sites are presented in extensional, transcurrent and contractional tectonic settings, and different geodynamic areas have been investigated in North and South-America, Iceland, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea and Africa. The types of sheet arrangements that are illustrated include swarms of parallel dikes, diverging rift patterns, centrally-inclined sheets, radial dikes, bi-modal dike strikes, circum-lateral collapse sheets, and mixed members. This review shows that intrusive sheet emplacement at a volcano depends upon the combination of several local and regional factors, some of which are difficult to be constrained. While much

  12. Brand, Brand Stretching, and Brand Stretching Plan for JAC

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lei

    2012-01-01

    With the consistent crisis of world economic, companies are encountering problems with their expansion. Introducing all new brands for expanding is hard to be accepted due to the high level of costs and risks. Using brand stretching as companies’ expansion strategy efficiently reduces the costs and risks today. Therefore, getting clear about brand stretching seems quite important for most companies nowadays. The objectives of this thesis is introducing brand stretching theory and making a...

  13. Brand, Brand Stretching, and Brand Stretching Plan for JAC

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lei

    2012-01-01

    With the consistent crisis of world economic, companies are encountering problems with their expansion. Introducing all new brands for expanding is hard to be accepted due to the high level of costs and risks. Using brand stretching as companies’ expansion strategy efficiently reduces the costs and risks today. Therefore, getting clear about brand stretching seems quite important for most companies nowadays. The objectives of this thesis is introducing brand stretching theory and making a...

  14. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: VOLCANOS (Volcano Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the locations of volcanos in Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Vector points in the data set represent the location of the volcanos....

  15. Stretching cells with DEAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, S.; Rosset, S.; Shea, H. R.

    2012-04-01

    Biological cells regulate their biochemical behavior in response to mechanical stress present in their organism. Most of the available cell cultures designed to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on cells are cm2 area, far too large to monitor single cell response or have a very low throughput. We have developed two sets of high throughput single cell stretcher devices based on dielectric elastomer microactuators to stretch groups of individual cells with various strain levels in a single experiment. The first device consists of an array of 100 μm x 200 μm actuators on a non-stretched PDMS membrane bonded to a Pyrex chip, showing up to 4.7% strain at the electric field of 96 V/μm. The second device contains an array of 100 μm x 100 μm actuators on a 160% uniaxially prestretched PDMS membrane suspended over a frame. 37% strain is recorded at the nominal electric field of 114 V/μm. The performance of these devices as a cell stretcher is assessed by comparing their static and dynamic behavior.

  16. Cost containment of pharmaceutical use in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Morgall, Janine Marie; Grímsson, A

    2000-01-01

    Iceland was the first Nordic country to liberalise its drug distribution system, in March 1996. Subsequent regulation in January 1997 increased patients' share of drug costs. The objectives of this study were to test the assumptions that liberalizing community pharmacy ownership would lower...

  17. Iceland's renewable power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverrisdottir, V.

    2000-07-01

    The base of Iceland's natural resource consists of the fish stocks in the sea surrounding the country, the land with its soil and vegetation, enormous quantity of hot and cold spring water and renewable energy resources - both geothermal and hydro. The clean environment of the country, on which food-processing and tourism are based, may also be regarded as one of our most important natural resources. At last but not least the utilization of these resources are based on the highly educated and civilized people living in the country. In terms of the population size, Iceland has considerable untapped reserves of renewable energy. Further harnessing of these reserves for economic and sustainable development is an important task for the future and will probably play a large role in maintaining a high standards of living in Iceland in the near future. In this address I would like to say a few words about Iceland's energy resources, how we have utilized them, the main environmental aspects of the future utilisation and the governmental energy policy. (orig.)

  18. Broiler Contamination and Human campylobacteriosis in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    To examine whether there is a relationship between the degree of Campylobacter contamination observed in product lots of retail Icelandic briler chicken carcasses and human disease, 1617 isolates from 327 individual product lots were genetically matched (using flaA Short Variable Region) to 289 isol...

  19. Polish Complementary Schools in Iceland and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, Malgorzata; Kowzan, Piotr; Ragnarsdóttir, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the opening of labour markets has spurred a considerable number of Poles to emigrate e.g. to Iceland and England. Families with school age children have had the challenge of adapting to foreign environments and school systems. Polish complementary schools have played an important, albeit ambivalent, role in this process. Through focus…

  20. Historic magmatism on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peate, David W.; Baker, Joel A.; Jakobssen, Sveinn P.

    2009-01-01

    We present new compositional data on a suite of historic lava flows from the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland. They were erupted over a short time period between c. 940 and c. 1340 AD and provide a snap-shot view of melt generation and evolution processes beneath this onshore, 65 km long, ridge segment...

  1. Professional Learning outside the Classroom: Expedition Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Julie; Bull, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A bunch of intrepid teachers spent a week in Iceland in a quest to learn more about the country's challenging landscape, by engaging in a unique and inspiring professional development opportunity to learn about innovative ways to teach science and mathematics outside of a classroom setting. A 2008 Ofsted report highlighted the benefits of learning…

  2. Geothermal Cogeneration: Iceland's Nesjavellir Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Energy use in Iceland (population 283,000) is higher per capita than in any other country in the world. Some 53.2% of the energy is geothermal, which supplies electricity as well as heated water to swimming pools, fish farms, snow melting, greenhouses, and space heating. The Nesjavellir Power Plant is a major geothermal facility, supplying both…

  3. Privatization of Early Childhood Education in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dýrfjörð, Kristín; Magnúsdóttir, Berglind Rós

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to give a comprehensive picture of the marketization of early childhood education in Iceland. Our theoretical framework is based on Hursh's (2007) analysis of how the governance of schools is reshaped to serve a neoliberal agenda with the help of internal and external privatization (Ball and Youdell, 2007). In this…

  4. Multicultural Education in Iceland: Vision or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Elsa Sigriour; Ragnarsdottir, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the development of educational policy and curricula in relation to the development of a multicultural society in Iceland are critically discussed. Neither policy nor national curriculum guides refer particularly to multicultural society, multicultural or intercultural education. Implementations of equity principles are not clear in…

  5. Reporting from the Iceland Deep Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Karl

    2017-04-01

    Geoscience-related topics are in many cases difficult to communicate to the public: Often they include dead soil which not easily tells lively stories. And it is hard to sell those topics to editors of public media. In addition the topics might also be politically supercharged if they are resource-related with a visible environmental impact. Therefore any researcher involved might be overcautious while talking to journalists. With a grant from the EGU Science Journalist Fellowship I travelled to Iceland in autumn 2016 to report about the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP). The project which started just weeks prior to my arrival aimed to drill the deepest borehole in a volcanically active region. During earlier trials the borehole collapsed or the drill string unintentionally hit magma. If successful the IDDP promises a much higher level of geothermal energy harvested. The IDDP was therefore ideally suited to be sold to public media outlets since Iceland's volcanic legacy easily tells a lively story. But the drilling's potential environmental impact makes it a political topic in Iceland - even though geothermal energy has a positive public perception. Therefore the IDDP included some pitfalls I observed several times before while reporting about geoscience research. Those could be circumvented if researchers and journalists knew better about their expectations before any interview takes place.

  6. Doing Business Economy Profile 2015 : Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This economy profile for Doing Business 2015 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Iceland. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2015 is the 12th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. E...

  7. Martian hillside gullies and icelandic analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.; Thorsteinsson, Thorsteinn; Sigurdsson, Freysteinn

    2003-04-01

    We report observations of Icelandic hillside gully systems that are near duplicates of gullies observed on high-latitude martian hillsides. The best Icelandic analogs involve basaltic talus slopes at the angle of repose, with gully formation by debris flows initiated by ground water saturation, and/or by drainage of water from upslope cliffs. We report not only the existence of Mars analog gullies, but also an erosional sequence of morphologic forms, found both on Mars and in Iceland. The observations support hypotheses calling for creation of martian gullies by aqueous processes. Issues remain whether the water in each case comes only from surficial sources, such as melting of ground ice or snow, or from underground sources such as aquifers that gain surface access in hillsides. Iceland has many examples of the former, but the latter mechanism is not ruled out. Our observations are consistent with the martian debris flow mechanism of F. Costard et al. (2001c, Science295, 110-113), except that classic debris flows begin at midslope more frequently than on Mars. From morphologic observations, we suggest that some martian hillside gully systems not only involve significant evolution by extended erosive activity, but gully formation may occur in episodes, and the time interval since the last episode is considerably less than the time interval needed to erase the gully through normal martian obliteration processes.

  8. Geothermal Cogeneration: Iceland's Nesjavellir Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Energy use in Iceland (population 283,000) is higher per capita than in any other country in the world. Some 53.2% of the energy is geothermal, which supplies electricity as well as heated water to swimming pools, fish farms, snow melting, greenhouses, and space heating. The Nesjavellir Power Plant is a major geothermal facility, supplying both…

  9. Three-dimensional glacier surface motion maps at the Gjalp eruption site, Iceland, inferred from combining InSAR and other ice-displacement data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, S.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Bjornsson, H.

    2002-01-01

    We use topographically corrected interferograms, repeated global positioning system observations of locations of stakes and time series of elevation data to produce time series of high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) ice surface motion maps for the infilling of the ice depression created...... by the 1996 subglacial eruption at the Gjalp volcano in Vatnajokull, Iceland. The ice inflow generated uplift in the central parts of the depression. During the first months, the uplift was much reduced by basal melting as the subglacial volcano cooled. For those motions surface-parallel ice flow cannot....... They provide a consistent picture of the 3-D motion field, both spatially and with time, which cannot be seen by separate interpretation of the complementary observations. The 3-D motion maps were used to calculate the cooling rate of the subglacial volcano for the first year after the eruption. First...

  10. Three-dimensional glacier surface motion maps at the Gjalp eruption site, Iceland, inferred from combining InSAR and other ice-displacement data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, S.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Bjornsson, H.

    2002-01-01

    . They provide a consistent picture of the 3-D motion field, both spatially and with time, which cannot be seen by separate interpretation of the complementary observations. The 3-D motion maps were used to calculate the cooling rate of the subglacial volcano for the first year after the eruption. First......We use topographically corrected interferograms, repeated global positioning system observations of locations of stakes and time series of elevation data to produce time series of high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) ice surface motion maps for the infilling of the ice depression created...... by the 1996 subglacial eruption at the Gjalp volcano in Vatnajokull, Iceland. The ice inflow generated uplift in the central parts of the depression. During the first months, the uplift was much reduced by basal melting as the subglacial volcano cooled. For those motions surface-parallel ice flow cannot...

  11. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  12. Trondhjemitic melts produced by in-situ differentiation of a tholeiitic lava flow, Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E.; Sigmarsson, O.

    2006-12-01

    How the continental crust began to form early in Earth's history is unconstrained. However, it is reasonable to presume that higher heat flow in the past, resulted in more frequent interaction of mantle plumes and mid- oceanic ridges. If true, then Iceland could be a good analogue for processes occurring on Earth at its youth stage. This is supported by the relatively high abundance of silicic rocks in Iceland but their rarity on other oceanic hot spots. The origin of Icelandic silicic rocks has been a subject of a lively debate but has been shown to be principally formed by partial melting of hydrothermally altered basaltic crust. However, in rare cases, their origin by fractional crystallization from mantle derived basalts is suggested. Segregation veins in lava flows frequently contain interstitial glasses of silicic compositions. Moreover, they allow an exceptional overview of the fractional crystallization mechanism. These veins form by gas filter pressing during cooling and degassing of solidifying lava flows, after approximately 50% fractional crystallization of anhydrous minerals. Pairs of samples, host lava and associated segregation veins, from Reykjanes Peninsula (Iceland), Lanzarote (Canary Island) and Masaya's volcano (Nicaragua), allow the assessment of a near-complete fractional crystallization of olivine tholeiitic basalt at pressure close to one atmosphere. Interstitial glass patches in segregation veins represent the final product of this process (80 97 % of fractional crystallization). These ultimate liquids are of granitic composition in the case of Lanzarote and Masaya but overwhelmingly trondhjemitic at Reykjanes. It appears that the initial K2O/Na2O of the basaltic liquid controls the evolution path of the residual liquid composition produced at pressure close to 0.1 MPa (1 bar). Granitic liquids are generated from basalts of high initial K2O/Na2O whereas low initial K2O/Na2O leads to trondhjemitic compositions. The trondhjemitic composition

  13. The geo-scientific basis for the geothermal evolution in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flovenz, O. G.

    2007-12-01

    More than half of the primary energy use in Iceland is economically produced from geothermal resources. The main reasons for this unique success in Iceland are favourable geological conditions and highly developed technology in geosciences and engineering. Iceland is a sub-aerial part of the ocean floor, located where the central axis of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge intersect the Iceland hot-spot, resulting in abnormal crustal thickness and complicated tectonic patterns. The ridge axis crosses the island from South-West to North East forming a volcanic rift zones that is characterized by many active central volcanoes and associated high temperature geothermal fields (T more than 200°C at 1 km depth). The rift zone is highly faulted and the uppermost 1 km is composed of permeable young basaltic material. Outside the volcanic zone the crust is normally made of altered basaltic lavas of low primary permeability due to secondary mineralization. However, recent tectonic activity, probably due to glacial rebound and relative movement of the ridge axis and the hot spot, has formed permeable fractures that are pathways for geothermal fluid and result in numerous low temperature geothermal fields ( T less than 150°C at 1km depth). The background heat flow in Iceland varies with age from 70 to 250 mW/m2 and the crustal thickness varies from 20 to nearly 40 km. Geothermal exploration is done with a multidisciplinary approach where geological mapping, geochemistry and geophysics interact. The geological mapping with emphasis on tectonic structure, stratigraphy, hydrothermal alteration and eruption history is usually the first step. If hot springs or fumaroles exist, chemical methods are used to predict the reservoir temperature and the fluid properties prior to drilling. Geophysical surveys are the most widely used methods to detect subsurface high temperature fields and to estimate their size and properties. Resistivity soundings, mainly based on TEM and MT measurements, play the

  14. Stretching the Border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horstmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I hope to add a complementary perspective to James Scott’s recent work on avoidance strategies of subaltern mountain people by focusing on what I call the refugee public. The educated Karen elite uses the space of exile in the Thai borderland to reconstitute resources and to re......-enter Karen state in Eastern Burma as humanitarians, providing medical, educational resources and help to document human rights violations and do advocacy work. In addition, local missionaries and faith-based groups also use the corridor to spread the word of God. I argue that Karen humanitarian community......-based organizations succeed to stretch the border by establishing a firm presence that is supported by the international humanitarian economy in the refugee camps in Northwestern Thailand....

  15. Organizational changes at Earthquakes & Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Primary responsibility for the preparation of Earthquakes & Volcanoes within the Geological Survey has shifted from the Office of Scientific Publications to the Office of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering (OEVE). As a consequence of this reorganization, Henry Spall has stepepd down as Science Editor for Earthquakes & Volcanoes(E&V).

  16. Magma types and mantle sources of the Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldórsson, Sæmundur; Rubin, Ken; Sverrisdóttir, Guðrún; Sigurðsson, Gylfi

    2015-04-01

    The Bárðarbunga volcanic system (BVS) represents one of the largest volcanic systems in Iceland, extending ~190 km from the northern boundary of Torfajökull in the south to Dyngjufjöll Ytri in the north, and intersecting the largely ice-covered Bárðarbunga volcano. The extensive length of the BVS thus allows sampling of an unusually large section of the mantle underlying Iceland's Eastern rift zone. Perhaps surprisingly, the degree of mantle source heterogeneity beneath the BVS remains poorly known. We have recently undertaken a detailed study of the BVS because such data are fundamental for understanding the magmatic history and magma delivery system beneath of the BVS, including those that led to recent volcanism north of Dyngjujökull. Here, we present major and trace element analyses, as well as high-precision Pb isotope analyses, of several Holocene lava flows from the Dyngjuháls area and from rocks representing the basement, flanks and nunataks of the ice-free part of the Bárðarbunga volcano. We compare these data to those on a suite of recently collected fissure basalts from the Veiðivötn fissure swarm in the south and the new lava north of Dyngjujökull in order to study the geochemical characteristics of the BVS as a whole. The BVS has generated fairly primitive tholeiites (MgO ~6-9 wt.%) throughout the Holocene. Evolved basaltic compositions (MgO ≤6 wt.%) that are often associated with large and mature caldera systems in Iceland (e.g., Krafla and Askja), appear to be notably absent in the BVS within our current sample set (although might still exist in the largely ice-covered Bárðarbunga volcano). Significantly, no highly evolved rocks (dacite, rhyolite) have been associated with the BVS. It is therefore unlikely that a long-lived and relatively shallow (18.40. In contrast, subglacial formations in the Dyngjuháls region, form a single trend with 206Pb/204Pb always melts to the BVS, in different proportions in space and time. However

  17. Hawaii's volcanoes revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Naka, Jiro; Smith, John R.; Takahashi, Eiichi; Clague, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes typically evolve in four stages as volcanism waxes and wanes: (1) early alkalic, when volcanism originates on the deep sea floor; (2) shield, when roughly 95 percent of a volcano's volume is emplaced; (3) post-shield alkalic, when small-volume eruptions build scattered cones that thinly cap the shield-stage lavas; and (4) rejuvenated, when lavas of distinct chemistry erupt following a lengthy period of erosion and volcanic quiescence. During the early alkalic and shield stages, two or more elongate rift zones may develop as flanks of the volcano separate. Mantle-derived magma rises through a vertical conduit and is temporarily stored in a shallow summit reservoir from which magma may erupt within the summit region or be injected laterally into the rift zones. The ongoing activity at Kilauea's Pu?u ?O?o cone that began in January 1983 is one such rift-zone eruption. The rift zones commonly extend deep underwater, producing submarine eruptions of bulbous pillow lava. Once a volcano has grown above sea level, subaerial eruptions produce lava flows of jagged, clinkery ?a?a or smooth, ropy pahoehoe. If the flows reach the ocean they are rapidly quenched by seawater and shatter, producing a steep blanket of unstable volcanic sediment that mantles the upper submarine slopes. Above sea level then, the volcanoes develop the classic shield profile of gentle lava-flow slopes, whereas below sea level slopes are substantially steeper. While the volcanoes grow rapidly during the shield stage, they may also collapse catastrophically, generating giant landslides and tsunami, or fail more gradually, forming slumps. Deformation and seismicity along Kilauea's south flank indicate that slumping is occurring there today. Loading of the underlying Pacific Plate by the growing volcanic edifices causes subsidence, forming deep basins at the base of the volcanoes. Once volcanism wanes and lava flows no longer reach the ocean, the volcano continues to submerge, while

  18. The May 29 2008 earthquake aftershock sequence within the South Iceland Seismic Zone: Fault locations and source parameters of aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Parsons, M.; White, R. S.; Gudmundsson, O.; Drew, J.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Atlantic plate boundary breaks up into a series of segments across Iceland. The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is a complex transform zone where left-lateral E-W shear between the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone and the Eastern Volcanic Zone is accommodated by bookshelf faulting along N-S lateral strike-slip faults. The SISZ is also a transient feature, migrating sideways in response to the southward propagation of the Eastern Volcanic Zone. Sequences of large earthquakes (M > 6) lasting from days to years and affecting most of the seismic zone have occurred repeatedly in historical time (last 1100 years), separated by intervals of relative quiescence lasting decades to more than a century. On May 29 2008, a Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the western part of the South Iceland Seismic Zone, followed within seconds by a slightly smaller event on a second fault ~5 km further west. Aftershocks, detected by a temporal array of 11 seismometers and three permanent Icelandic Meteorological Office stations were located using an automated Coalescence Microseismic Mapping technique. The epicenters delineate two major and several smaller N-S faults as well as an E-W zone of activity stretching further west into the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone. Fault plane solutions show both right lateral and oblique strike slip mechanisms along the two major N-S faults. The aftershocks deepen from 3-5 km in the north to 8-9 km in the south, suggesting that the main faults dip southwards. The faulting is interpreted to be driven by the local stress due to transform motion between two parallel segments of the divergent plate boundary crossing Iceland.

  19. Structure of volcano plumbing systems: A review of multi-parametric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Magma is transported and stored in the crust mostly through networks of planar structures (intrusive sheets), ranging from vertical dykes to inclined sheets and horizontal sills, and magma chambers, which make up the plumbing system of volcanoes. This study presents an overview of plumbing systems imaged at different depths and geodynamic settings, in order to contribute to assessing the factors that control their geometry. Data were derived from personal field surveys and through the analysis of publications; observations include local lithology and tectonics of the host rock with special reference to local fault kinematics and related stress tensor, regional tectonics (general kinematics and far-field stress tensors), geology and shape of the volcano, topographic settings, and structural and petrochemical characteristics of the plumbing system. Information from active volcanoes and eroded extinct volcanoes is discussed; the shallow plumbing system of active volcanoes has been reconstructed by combining available geophysical data with field information derived from outcropping sheets, morphometric analyses of pyroclastic cones, and the orientation and location of eruptive fissures. The study of eroded volcanoes enabled to assess the plumbing system geometry at deeper levels in the core of the edifice or underneath the volcano-substratum interface. Key sites are presented in extensional, transcurrent and contractional tectonic settings from North and South-America, Iceland, the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea and Africa. The types of sheet arrangements illustrated include swarms of parallel dykes, diverging rift patterns, centrally-inclined sheets, ring and radial dykes, circum-lateral collapse sheets, sills, and mixed members. This review shows that intrusive sheet emplacement at a volcano depends upon the combination of several local and regional factors, some of which are difficult to be constrained. While much progress has been made, it is still very challenging to

  20. Mr. Arnthor Helgason, Friendship Ambassador Between the People of China and Iceland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Icelandic Chinese Cul- tural Society (ICCS), a CPAFFC delegation led by Vice President Li Jianping visited Iceland from April 21 to 24. The Icelandic friends were waiting long to welcome the

  1. Tachylyte in Cenozoic basaltic lavas from the Czech Republic and Iceland: contrasting compositional trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrych, Jaromír; Krmíček, Lukáš; Teschner, Claudia; Řanda, Zdeněk; Skála, Roman; Jonášová, Šárka; Fediuk, Ferry; Adamovič, Jiří; Pokorný, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Tachylytes from rift-related volcanic rocks were recognized as: (i) irregular veinlets in host alkaline lava flows of the Kozákov volcano, Czech Republic, (ii) (sub)angular xenoliths in alkaline lava of the feeding channel of the Bukovec volcano, Czech Republic, and (iii) paleosurface of a tholeiitic lava flow from Hafrafell, Iceland. The tachylyte from Kozákov is phonotephrite to tephriphonolite in composition while that from Bukovec corresponds to trachyandesite to tephriphonolite. Both glass and host rock from Hafrafell are of tholeiitic basalt composition. The tachylyte from Kozákov, compared with the host rock, revealed a substantial enrichment in major elements such as Si, Al and alkalis along with Rb, Sr, Ba, Nb, Zr, REE, Th and U. The tachylyte from Bukovec displays contrasting trends in the incompatible element contents. The similarity in composition of the Hafrafell tachylyte paleosurface layer and parental tholeiitic basalt is characteristic for lavas. The host/parent rocks and tachylytes have similar initial Sr-Nd characteristics testifying for their co-magmatic sources. The initial ɛNd values of host/parent rocks and tachylytes from the Bohemian Massif (+3.4 to +3.9) and those from Iceland (+6.3) are interpreted as primary magma values. Only the tachylyte from Bukovec shows a different ɛNd value of -2.1, corresponding to a xenolith of primarily sedimentary/metamorphic origin. The tachylyte from Kozákov is a product of an additional late magmatic portion of fluids penetrating through an irregular fissure system of basaltic lava. The Bukovec tachylyte is represented by xenoliths originated during the interaction of ascending basaltic melt with granitoids or orthogneisses, whereas the Hafrafell tachylyte is a product of a rapid cooling on the surface of a basalt flow.

  2. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  3. Dimmuborgir: a rootless shield complex in northern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Alasdair; Sturkell, Erik; Jakobsson, Martin; Einarsson, Draupnir; Tollefsen, Elin; Orr, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The origin of Dimmuborgir, a shield-like volcanic structure within the Younger Laxá lava flow field near Lake Mývatn, in northern Iceland, has long been questioned. New airborne laser mapping (light detection and ranging (LiDAR)), combined with ground-penetrating radar results and a detailed field study, suggests that Dimmuborgir is a complex of at least two overlapping rootless shields fed by lava erupting from the nearby Lúdentarborgir crater row. This model builds upon previous explanations for the formation of Dimmuborgir and is consistent with observations of rootless shield development at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii. The larger rootless shields at Dimmuborgir, 1–1.5 km in diameter, elliptical in plan view, ∼30 m in height, and each with a 500-m-wide summit depression, were capable of storing as much as 2–3 × 106 m3 of lava. They were fed by lava which descended 30–60 m in lava tubes along a distance of 3 km from the crater row. The height difference generated pressure sufficient to build rootless shields at Dimmuborgir in a timescale of weeks. The main summit depressions, inferred to be drained lava ponds, could have emptied via a 30-m-wide × 5-m-deep channel, with estimated effusion rates of 0.7–7 m3 s−1 and minimum flow durations of 5–50 days. We argue that the pillars for which Dimmuborgir is famed are remnants of lava pond rims, at various stages of disintegration that formed during pond drainage.

  4. To stretch or not to stretch: the role of stretching in injury prevention and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, M P; Cosgrave, C H

    2010-04-01

    Stretching is commonly practiced before sports participation; however, effects on subsequent performance and injury prevention are not well understood. There is an abundance of literature demonstrating that a single bout of stretching acutely impairs muscle strength, with a lesser effect on power. The extent to which these effects are apparent when stretching is combined with other aspects of a pre-participation warm-up, such as practice drills and low intensity dynamic exercises, is not known. With respect to the effect of pre-participation stretching on injury prevention a limited number of studies of varying quality have shown mixed results. A general consensus is that stretching in addition to warm-up does not affect the incidence of overuse injuries. There is evidence that pre-participation stretching reduces the incidence of muscle strains but there is clearly a need for further work. Future prospective randomized studies should use stretching interventions that are effective at decreasing passive resistance to stretch and assess effects on subsequent injury incidence in sports with a high prevalence of muscle strains.

  5. Determining dyke-propagation paths at Santorini volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drymoni, Kyriaki; Browning, John; Lecoeur, Nora; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    The volcanic Island of Santorini constitutes a complex of collapse calderas which has experienced a range of explosive and effusive volcanic eruptions and is still active. Numerous stratigraphic horizons which constitute the upper part of the volcano have widely different mechanical properties, resulting in local stresses that may act as dyke-traps, preventing the dykes from reaching the surface to erupt. Several caldera collapses (<3.6 ka) have exposed part of the stratigraphy and a dyke swarm (composed of at least 63 dykes, many arrested and some feeders) within a section of the northern caldera wall, allowing detailed examination. This ongoing study will (1) document the petrological and structural characteristics of feeder and non-feeder (arrested) dykes and estimate their frequency; (2) determine the physiochemical and mechanical conditions that control dyke arrest/dyke penetration at contacts between layers; (3) explore the fluid and mechanical conditions of the associated magma chamber(s) that must be satisfied for chamber rupture and dyke injection to occur; (4) make numerical and probabilistic models as to the likely dyke paths in heterogeneous and anisotropic crustal segments/volcanoes (such as Santorini), including the likelihood of injected dykes reaching the surface during an unrest period in a volcano of a given type; (5) compare the data collected from Santorini with existing data on dykes worldwide, particularly those on dykes in Tenerife and Iceland. The principal aim of the study is to provide models that, during an unrest period in Santorini and other similar volcanoes, allow us to forecast (a) the condition for magma-chamber rupture and dyke injection, and (b) the likely path of the resulting dyke. The latter includes assessment of the likelihood as to dyke arrest versus dyke propagation to the surface, the latter resulting in an eruption. For dyke-fed eruptions, the study will also provide methods for forecasting the likely volumetric flow

  6. Validity of Type D personality in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svansdottir, Erla; Karlsson, Hrobjartur D; Gudnason, Thorarinn

    2012-01-01

    Type D personality has been associated with poor prognosis in cardiac patients. This study investigated the validity of the Type D construct in Iceland and its association with disease severity and health-related risk markers in cardiac patients. A sample of 1,452 cardiac patients completed...... the Type D scale (DS14), and a subgroup of 161 patients completed measurements for the five-factor model of personality, emotional control, anxiety, depression, stress and lifestyle factors. The Icelandic DS14 had good psychometric properties and its construct validity was confirmed. Prevalence of Type D...... was 26-29%, and assessment of Type D personality was not confounded by severity of underlying coronary artery disease. Regarding risk markers, Type D patients reported more psychopharmacological medication use and smoking, but frequency of previous mental problems was similar across groups. Type D...

  7. Deep structure of the Iceland plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.R.; Sacks, I.S.

    1979-11-10

    The topography of the sea floor between Iceland and Jan Mayen Island is flat and elevated in relation to most ocean basins. Marine geophysical observations in the area have shown that it was formed by sea floor spreading but have not revealed details of structures more than a few hundred meters beneath the sea floor. We have examined the dispersion of seismic surface waves across the Iceland Plateau and have modeled structures to depths of up to 100 km. We find that the thickness of the crustal component of the lithosphere is much greater than that of normal oceanic structures, perhaps exceeding 20 km. We suggest that the elevation of the region is due to isostatic compensation for this excess of low-density crustal material. The total lithospheric thickness is about 50 km throughout the region, indicating that the lithosphere thickens with age at a rate similar to that found in other young oceans.

  8. Icelandic: A Lesser-Used Language in the Global Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmarsdottir, Halla B.

    2001-07-01

    A small nation in the middle of the North Atlantic, Iceland currently has a population of 265,000 (1996). The Iceland language has changed very little since the island was settled some 11 centuries ago. Despite the relatively small number of people who speak the language and irrespective of the globalisation efforts by the international community, which includes the ever-increasing influence of English worldwide, the Icelandic language and culture are stronger than ever. The current volume and variety of publications of Icelandic works in all areas have never been as great. Icelandic is a living and growing language. Growth in vocabulary, in response to recent phenomena like the introduction of new technology, has primarily come about with the development of new words from the language's roots. The near absence of Latin, Greek and, more recently, English or Danish words in Icelandic, is striking. Iceland's language policy is not only a governmental policy. It is a policy that comes from the grassroots with the government and official institutions viewing their job as one of service to the people of Iceland. Icelanders are very proud of their language and are extremely determined to continually develop and preserve it for future generations.

  9. Corporate taxation in Iceland and the international challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnarsdóttir Fjóla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe the development in the field of corporate tax law in Iceland, from both legal and economic point of view, with a focus on measures taken to protect the tax base and in order to try to make Iceland an attractive place for investment and establishment companies. First, there will be a brief general description of the development of the corporate tax rate in Iceland since 2004 and an overview of new taxes that have been introduced for companies over the past ten years. Second, there will be an analysis of how the Icelandic legal framework provides for incentives for investment and establishment of companies in Iceland. Third, this discussion is to be followed by a section on the steps Iceland has taken in order to combat tax avoidance. Fourth, there is a general description of the economic development for the corporate taxation in Iceland since 1990 and fifth, there is brief discussion of the development of revenues from the corporate tax. Sixth, a short overview of the real investment in the Icelandic economy is given, and finally, the main conclusions of this article will be summed up with a short discussion on the main challenges Iceland is currently facing in the field of corporate taxation in today’s globalised economy.

  10. Food 
Security
 in
 Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson J.K. Bailes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of food security applies in both poor and rich societies and concerns the steady availability of food in the right quantity and quality, at the right price. Globally, policies to assure it remain confused and world food prices are rising. Despite large exports of fish, Iceland produces only around half of its inhabitants’ nutritional needs and relies significantly on imports, also for food production inputs like fodder and seeds. Icelandic supplies are affected by oligopoly in the retail market, and could be put at risk by events in other security dimensions ranging from natural disasters and infrastructure failures to terrorism, neighbouring conflicts and other people’s shortages. Icelandic farmers have used the terminology of ‘food security’ to press their claims for more home-grown production, and more recently also in their campaign against EU membership. The general public however shows little sign of security-awareness in this field. The government possesses suitable non-military security frameworks to address food-related risks and has initiated useful, general and specific, studies. Yet it has not developed a strategy or contingency plan for food security, even following the lessons of the 2008 economic crash and 2010-2011 eruptions. Suitable remedies would include larger emergency stocks and a range of measures to reduce vulnerability and improve resilience in crises. Above all, Iceland needs a balanced and open policy-making process to decide what its general future strategy should be as a food-producing and -importing nation. Food security could then be more precisely defined and pursued with the aim of minimizing threats and risks to that agreed vision.

  11. Stretch-minimising stream surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Barton, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We study the problem of finding stretch-minimising stream surfaces in a divergence-free vector field. These surfaces are generated by motions of seed curves that propagate through the field in a stretch minimising manner, i.e., they move without stretching or shrinking, preserving the length of their arbitrary arc. In general fields, such curves may not exist. How-ever, the divergence-free constraint gives rise to these \\'stretch-free\\' curves that are locally arc-length preserving when infinitesimally propagated. Several families of stretch-free curves are identified and used as initial guesses for stream surface generation. These surfaces are subsequently globally optimised to obtain the best stretch-minimising stream surfaces in a given divergence-free vector field. Our algorithm was tested on benchmark datasets, proving its applicability to incompressible fluid flow simulations, where our stretch-minimising stream surfaces realistically reflect the flow of a flexible univariate object. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The passive of reflexive verbs in Icelandic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlíf Árnadóttir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Reflexive Passive in Icelandic is reminiscent of the so-called New Passive (or New Impersonal in that the oblique case of a passivized object NP is preserved. As is shown by recent surveys, however, speakers who accept the Reflexive Passive do not necessarily accept the New Passive, whereas conversely, speakers who accept the New Passive do also accept the Reflexive Passive. Based on these results we suggest that there is a hierarchy in the acceptance of passive sentences in Icelandic, termed the Passive Acceptability Hierarchy. The validity of this hierarchy is confirmed by our diachronic corpus study of open access digital library texts from Icelandic journals and newspapers dating from the 19th and 20th centuries (tímarit.is. Finally, we sketch an analysis of the Reflexive Passive, proposing that the different acceptability rates of the Reflexive and New Passives lie in the argument status of the object. Simplex reflexive pronouns are semantically dependent on the verbs which select them, and should therefore be analyzed as syntactic arguments only, and not as semantic arguments of these verbs.

  13. Party cohesion in the Icelandic Althingi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Helgi Kristinsson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Institutional theories of party cohesion may be divided into "nomination theories" and "structure of the executive theories". The former seek explanations of cohesion in the way nominations are conducted, predicting that de-centralized and inclusive nominations will reduce party cohesion. The latter attempt to explain cohesion by reference to the structure of the executive, and predict that parliamentary government will increase cohesion. Party cohesion in the Icelandic Althingi has, hitherto, not been extensively studied. In this article, large amounts of data are explored to test hypotheses derived from the two theoretical approaches. The analysis is based on roll-call data dating back to 1961 and electronic voting records from 1991 onwards. The main conclusion is that party cohesion is at a high level in Iceland, despite decentralized and inclusive nominations, and hypotheses derived from nomination theories therefore find no support in our data. Hypotheses derived from "structure of the executive theories" fare much better and the main reason for high party cohesion in Iceland seems to be parliamentary government. Various features of our data, however, encourage us not to ignore other contextual features affecting party cohesion, which neither of the two institutional theories can account for satisfactorily.

  14. Geological and geophysical remote sensing of Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. S., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A binational, multidisciplinary research effort in Iceland is directed at an analysis of MSS imagery from ERTS-1 to study a variety of geologic, hydrologic, oceanographic, and agricultural phenomena. Initial findings are: (1) recent lava flows can be delineated from older ones; (2) ERTS-1 and NOAA-2 recorded volcanic eruptions on Heimaey, Vestmann Islands; (3) coastline changes are mappable; (4) areas covered with new or residual snow can be mapped, and dark appearance of newly fallen snow on band 7 appears to be related to melting; (5) sediment plumes from discharge of glacial rivers can be delineated; (6) the area encompassed by glacial ice can be mapped, including the new position of a surging glacier, Eyjabakkajokull, and related phenomena of nunataks and moraines; (7) changes in position of rivers, lake sizes, and new lakes can be mapped; (8) low sun angle imagery enhances the morphologic expression of constructional glacial and volcanic landforms; (9) MSS color composites permit regional mapping of distribution of vegetation; and (10) at least at 1:250, 000 map scale and smaller, ERTS-1 imagery provides a means of updating various types of maps of Iceland and will permit the compilation of maps specifically aimed at those dynamic environmental phenomena which impact on the Icelandic economy.

  15. Iceland spar and its legacy in science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kristjánsson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the late 17th century, Rasmus Bartholin and Christiaan Huygens investigated a curious optical property of crystals found at Helgustaðir in Eastern Iceland. This property which has been called double refraction, revealed in the 19th century a new aspect of light which turned out to be very useful as a probe of the internal structure of matter. Clear specimens of these crystals, an unusually pure variety of calcite, have since around 1780 been known as ''Iceland spar''. Few if any other localities yielding calcite crystals of comparable size and quality were discovered before 1900, and no alternatives for use in precision optical instrumentation were developed until the 1930s. Hundreds of tons of calcite were exported from Helgustaðir, mostly between 1850 and 1925. However, little information has been found on trading routes for the material of optical quality, so that some enigmas remain regarding its supply-demand situation. A study of the scientific literature in the period up to 1930 has revealed that results obtained with the aid of Iceland spar accelerated progress within the earth sciences (in mineralogy and petrology, physics, chemistry, and biology, even by decades. This has also influenced the development of technology and of medicine in various direct and indirect ways.

  16. Acute Muscle Stretching and Shoulder Position Sense

    OpenAIRE

    Björklund, Martin; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Crenshaw, Albert G.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Stretching is common among athletes as a potential method for injury prevention. Stretching-induced changes in the muscle spindle properties are a suggested mechanism, which may imply reduced proprioception after stretching; however, little is known of this association.

  17. Pressure sources versus surface loads: Analyzing volcano deformation signal composition with an application to Hekla volcano, Iceland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grapenthin, R.; Ófeigsson, B.G.; Sigmundsson, F.; Sturkell, E.; Hooper, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The load of lava emplaced over periods of decades to centuries induces a gradual viscous response of the Earth resulting in measurable deformation. This effect should be considered in source model inversions for volcanic areas with large lava production and flow emplacement in small centralized regi

  18. Volcano-hazard zonation for San Vicente volcano, El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Vicente volcano, also known as Chichontepec, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. This composite volcano, located about 50 kilometers east of the capital city San Salvador, has a volume of about 130 cubic kilometers, rises to an altitude of about 2180 meters, and towers above major communities such as San Vicente, Tepetitan, Guadalupe, Zacatecoluca, and Tecoluca. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and major transportation routes are located near the lowermost southern and eastern flanks of the volcano. The population density and proximity around San Vicente volcano, as well as the proximity of major transportation routes, increase the risk that even small landslides or eruptions, likely to occur again, can have serious societal consequences. The eruptive history of San Vicente volcano is not well known, and there is no definitive record of historical eruptive activity. The last significant eruption occurred more than 1700 years ago, and perhaps long before permanent human habitation of the area. Nevertheless, this volcano has a very long history of repeated, and sometimes violent, eruptions, and at least once a large section of the volcano collapsed in a massive landslide. The oldest rocks associated with a volcanic center at San Vicente are more than 2 million years old. The volcano is composed of remnants of multiple eruptive centers that have migrated roughly eastward with time. Future eruptions of this volcano will pose substantial risk to surrounding communities.

  19. Combination of SAR remote sensing and GIS for monitoring subglacial volcanic activity – recent results from Vatnajökull ice cap (Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Münzer

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents latest results from the combined use of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar remote sensing and GIS providing detailed insights into recent volcanic activity under Vatnajökull ice cap (Iceland. Glaciers atop active volcanoes pose a constant potential danger to adjacent inhabited regions and infrastructure. Besides the usual volcanic hazards (lava flows, pyroclastic clouds, tephra falls, etc., the volcano-ice interaction leads to enormous meltwater torrents (icelandic: jökulhlaup, devastating large areas in the surroundings of the affected glacier. The presented monitoring strategy addresses the three crucial questions: When will an eruption occur, where is the eruption site and which area is endangered by the accompanying jökulhlaup. Therefore, sufficient early-warning and hazard zonation for future subglacial volcanic eruptions becomes possible, as demonstrated for the Bardárbunga volcano under the northern parts of Vatnajökull. Seismic activity revealed unrest at the northern flanks of Bardárbunga caldera at the end of September 2006. The exact location of the corresponding active vent and therefore a potentially eruptive area could be detected by continuous ENVISAT-ASAR monitoring. With this knowledge a precise prediction of peri-glacial regions prone to a devastating outburst flood accompanying a possible future eruption is possible.

  20. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  1. Geology of Kilauea volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.B. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Federal Center); Trusdell, F.A. (Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory)

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. 71 refs., 2 figs.

  2. 4D volcano gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the

  3. Pairing the Volcano

    CERN Document Server

    Ionica, Sorina

    2011-01-01

    Isogeny volcanoes are graphs whose vertices are elliptic curves and whose edges are $\\ell$-isogenies. Algorithms allowing to travel on these graphs were developed by Kohel in his thesis (1996) and later on, by Fouquet and Morain (2001). However, up to now, no method was known, to predict, before taking a step on the volcano, the direction of this step. Hence, in Kohel's and Fouquet-Morain algorithms, many steps are taken before choosing the right direction. In particular, ascending or horizontal isogenies are usually found using a trial-and-error approach. In this paper, we propose an alternative method that efficiently finds all points $P$ of order $\\ell$ such that the subgroup generated by $P$ is the kernel of an horizontal or an ascending isogeny. In many cases, our method is faster than previous methods. This is an extended version of a paper published in the proceedings of ANTS 2010. In addition, we treat the case of 2-isogeny volcanoes and we derive from the group structure of the curve and the pairing ...

  4. Seismic Tremor Generated by Multiple Processes, Vatnajökull Glacier, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, E. P. S.; Bean, C. J.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Vatnajökull glacier in eastern Iceland covers five volcanic systems in which Bárdarbunga and Grimsvötn are the most active volcanoes. Whilst fluctuating ice cover mitigates against year-round near-field monitoring of the volcanoes, important information can be gleaned from stations deployed at the glacier's edge. Glacial cover significantly increases the complexity of and the solution space for observed seismic signals. For example tremor can be caused by magmatic activity, intra-glacier interactions, melt water flow or hydrothermal boiling. A better understanding of hazard requires a more indepth understanding of the signals generated by these processes at Vatnajökull. We augmented the sparse network in the region with two seven-element broad band seismometer arrays west of Vatnajökull, in Jökulheimar and near Laki respectively. Observed seismic tremor-like transients (< 2 Hz) originating from two cauldrons west of Grimsvötn are directly associated with small flooding events (jökulhaups), as subsequently confirmed by radar and hydrological observations. For larger longer duration floods dominant harmonic tremor frequencies of 2 to 4 Hz are observed, but they change in amplitude and frequency with time, likely reflecting variable feed and flow rates, associated with a moving source. Our aim is to 'fingerprint' these events such that they can be distinguished from seismic tremor signals associated with magmatic activity.

  5. Galactic Super-volcano in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A galactic "super-volcano" in the massive galaxy M87 is erupting and blasting gas outwards, as witnessed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and NSF's Very Large Array. The cosmic volcano is being driven by a giant black hole in the galaxy's center and preventing hundreds of millions of new stars from forming. Astronomers studying this black hole and its effects have been struck by the remarkable similarities between it and a volcano in Iceland that made headlines earlier this year. At a distance of about 50 million light years, M87 is relatively close to Earth and lies at the center of the Virgo cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies. M87's location, coupled with long observations over Chandra's lifetime, has made it an excellent subject for investigations of how a massive black hole impacts its environment. "Our results show in great detail that supermassive black holes have a surprisingly good control over the evolution of the galaxies in which they live," said Norbert Werner of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, who led one of two papers describing the study. "And it doesn't stop there. The black hole's reach extends ever farther into the entire cluster, similar to how one small volcano can affect practically an entire hemisphere on Earth." The cluster surrounding M87 is filled with hot gas glowing in X-ray light, which is detected by Chandra. As this gas cools, it can fall toward the galaxy's center where it should continue to cool even faster and form new stars. However, radio observations with the Very Large Array suggest that in M87 jets of very energetic particles produced by the black hole interrupt this process. These jets lift up the relatively cool gas near the center of the galaxy and produce shock waves in the galaxy's atmosphere because of their supersonic speed. The scientists involved in this research have found the interaction of this cosmic

  6. Geographic Names of Iceland's Glaciers: Historic and Modern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Oddur; Williams, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Climatic changes and resulting glacier fluctuations alter landscapes. In the past, such changes were noted by local residents who often documented them in historic annals; eventually, glacier variations were recorded on maps and scientific reports. In Iceland, 10 glacier place-names are to be found in Icelandic sagas, and one of Iceland's ice caps, Snaefellsjokull, appeared on maps of Iceland published in the 16th century. In the late 17th century, the first description of eight of Iceland's glaciers was written. Therefore, Iceland distinguishes itself in having a more than 300-year history of observations by Icelanders on its glaciers. A long-term collaboration between Oddur Sigurdsson and Richard S. Williams, Jr., led to the authorship of three books on the glaciers of Iceland. Much effort has been devoted to documenting historical glacier research and related nomenclature and to physical descriptions of Icelandic glaciers by Icelanders and other scientists from as far back as the Saga Age to recent (2008) times. The first book, Icelandic Ice Mountains, was published by the Icelandic Literary Society in 2004 in cooperation with the Icelandic Glaciological Society and the International Glaciological Society. Icelandic Ice Mountains was a glacier treatise written by Sveinn Palsson in 1795 and is the first English translation of this important scientific document. Icelandic Ice Mountains includes a Preface, including a summary of the history and facsimiles of page(s) from the original manuscript, a handwritten copy, and an 1815 manuscript (without maps and drawings) by Sveinn Palsson on the same subject which he wrote for Rev. Ebenezer Henderson; an Editor's Introduction; 82 figures, including facsimiles of Sveinn Palsson's original maps and perspective drawings, maps, and photographs to illustrate the text; a comprehensive Index of Geographic Place-Names and Other Names in the treatise; References, and 415 Endnotes. Professional Paper 1746 (this book) is the second

  7. The Acquisition of Reflexives and Pronouns by Icelandic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurjonsdottir, Sigridur; And Others

    An experimental study of the interpretation of lexical anaphors and pronouns by Icelandic-speaking children is reported. The standard binding theory of English is reviewed, and problems in the application of the theory to Icelandic, which has long-distance antecedents, are discussed. A parameterized binding theory constructed to account for the…

  8. Explaining Gender Inequality in Iceland: What Makes the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijstra, Thamar M.; O'Connor, Pat; Rafnsdóttir, Gudbjörg Linda

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the explanations offered by men and women, at different academic ranks, for the scarcity of women in full professorial positions in Icelandic universities. Data derive from interviews and a survey involving the total Icelandic academic population. We test three hypotheses: Firstly, academics will not see family…

  9. Plastic ingestion by the northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis) in Iceland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuehn, S.; Franeker, van J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) from Iceland were used to test the hypothesis that plastic debris decreases at northern latitudes in the Atlantic when moving away from major human centres of coastal and marine activities. Stomach analyses of Icelandic fulmars confirm that plastic poll

  10. The Mathematical Content Knowledge of Prospective Teachers in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsdottir, Bjorg

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the mathematical content knowledge of prospective teachers in Iceland. The sample was 38 students in the School of Education at the University of Iceland, both graduate and undergraduate students. All of the participants in the study completed a questionnaire survey and 10 were interviewed. The choice of ways to measure the…

  11. Upper mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness under Iceland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, A.; Wal, W. van der; Drury, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Deglaciation during the Holocene on Iceland caused uplift due to glacial isostatic adjustment. Relatively low estimates for the upper mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness result in rapid uplift responses to the deglaciation cycles on Iceland. The relatively high temperatures of the upper mant

  12. Icelandic for Adult Foreigners: Effects of Imposing an Icelandic Language Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Pamela; Skaptadóttir, Unnur Dís

    2017-01-01

    Legislation linking language course attendance and passage of a language test for residence visas and citizenship, respectively, was enacted in Iceland in the early 2000s. Curricular guidelines and the language test were developed as a result. Research in other countries suggests such structures cause teachers to create "de facto"…

  13. Work and Family Balance Among Icelandic Employees with Young Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnardottir, Audur Arna; Hreinsson, Sturla; Sigurjonsson, Olaf

    the standpoint of Icelandic working fathers and mothers, who had taken parental leave in previous 6 years. Total of 1300 participants, 53% male, mean age 35 years (4.9 SD), 98% were married/cohabiting, and 79% worked full time. Multiple hierarchical regression showed that Icelandic fathers experience more...... conflict and less enrichment than Icelandic mothers (controlled for age, number of children, and number of weekly work hours. Cohen’s d from.52 to.72). T-test for independent samples showed that Icelandic fathers experienced significantly more time and behavior related conflicts than Icelandic mothers......Work-family balance is one of the major organizational challenges of the 21st century. Extensive research has been conducted that assesses wf-balance from the conflict standpoint, but in recent years, benefits, resulting from simultaneous participation in the work and family role, have gained...

  14. The psychometric testing of the Nursing Teamwork Survey in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragadóttir, Helga; Kalisch, Beatrice J; Smáradóttir, Sigríður Bríet; Jónsdóttir, Heiður Hrund

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Nursing Teamwork Survey-Icelandic (NTS-Icelandic), which was translated from US English to Icelandic. The Nursing Teamwork Survey, with 33 items, measures overall teamwork and five factors of teamwork: trust, team orientation, backup, shared mental models, and team leadership. The psychometric testing of the NTS-Icelandic was carried out on data from a pilot study and a national study. The sample for a pilot study included 123 nursing staff from five units, and the sample for a national study included 925 nursing staff from 27 inpatient units. The overall test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient in the pilot study was 0.693 (lower bound = 0.498, upper bound = 0.821) (p teamwork. The NTS-Icelandic tested valid and reliable in this study. Study findings support further use of the Nursing Teamwork Survey internationally.

  15. Should Iceland engage in policy dialogue with developing countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Þór Hilmarsson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief overview of the current status of Icelandic development cooperation, bilaterally and multilaterally, and argues that it is time for Iceland to become more engaged in policy dialogue with developing countries on issues related to public sector reform and economic policy. Iceland should also in the authors view take more advantages of the extensive knowledge that Icelandic experts possess, and the experience they have gained, both in Iceland and internationally. Iceland should be more active in offering exerts in the public service, in the academia, as well as in the private sector to provide policy advise and technical assistance to developing countries that are implementing complex economic and public sector reforms. A number of those exerts have also gained considerable international experience in implementing policy reform programs. The article then discusses two cases: (i the case of Latvia where Iceland rushed to recognize its independence, but did little to assist the country in the post independence period, and (ii, the case of Vietnam where a country like Iceland could provide valuable assistance to a country that is achieving remarkable progress in poverty reduction, implementing important public sector reforms and creating a better business environment for foreign investors. This article is based on the authors experience as chairman of the Board of the Icelandic International Development Agency (ICEIDA and as Special Advisor to the Minister for Foreign Affairs in Iceland from 1995 to 1999, and as World Bank specialist at the Bank’s Head Quarters in Washington DC from 1990 to 1995, in Latvia from 1999 to 2003 and in Vietnam from 2003 to 2006.

  16. Os-He Isotope Systematics of Iceland Picrites: Evidence for a Deep Origin of the Iceland Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Alan D.; Graham, David W.; Waight, Tod; Gautason, Bjarni

    2007-01-01

    Recent work on the origin of the Iceland hotspot suggests that it may result from upwelling upper mantle material rather than a deep plume. To constrain the depths of origins of Iceland mantle sources, Os and He isotope systematics were obtained on a suite picrites that span the compositional range observed within the neovolcanic zones.

  17. The Relevance of English Language Instruction in a Changing Linguistic Environment in Iceland: The L2 Self of Young Icelanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeves, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In this study perceptions of post-compulsory school studies in Iceland were investigated through semi-structured interviews. While colloquial English suffices for entertainment, hobbies and Internet use in Iceland, a high level of proficiency is required for employment and tertiary study. School learners and young people in tertiary study and…

  18. Eating Disorders in College Students in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudlaug Thorsteinsdottir

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The prevalence of eating disorders in Iceland is unknown. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of eating disorders in a large sample of college students in Iceland. Methods: A sample of 3.052 students from around the country aged 15-20 years was used to determine prevalence of eating disorders. The Eating Disorders Diagnostic Scale (EDDS and Eating disorder Screen for Primary care (ESP were employed. Results: On the ESP, 51.3% of females and 22.9% of males report discontent with their eating patterns and 63% of the females and 30.9% of the males report that they are emotionally affected by their weight. The ESP returned 10.5% prevalence when cut off level of 3 responses in the direction of an eating disorder was used, and 20.3% when cut off level of 2 was applied. A total of 9.8% of participants received diagnosis with EDDS, 15.2 % of females and 1.9% of males. For anorexia nervosa 1.1% of females received a diagnosis but no male. For bulimia nervosa 5.6% of females and 0.8% of males received a diagnosis and for binge eating disorder 0.6% of females and 0.2% of males. Prevalence of all subthreshold diagnoses combined was 5%. Conclusions: The prevalence of eating disorders is high in college students in Iceland, bulimia nervosa being the most common diagnosis for both males and females.

  19. Physical properties of suspended dust in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Skrabalova, Lenka; Sigurdardottir, Gudmunda; Branis, Martin; Hladil, Jindrich; Chadimova, Leona; Skala, Roman; Navratil, Tomas; Menar, Sibylle von Lowis of; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric Dust Measurements (ADMI 2013) of one of the most active dust sources in Iceland (Mælifellsandur) were conducted during season with high precipitation on August 8th-18th, 2013. We measured mass concentrations (PM2.5 and PM10), particle size distributions in size range 0.3-10μm and number concentrations during rather small dust event. Dust samples of the event were analyzed (morpho-textural observations, optical and scanning-electron microscopy). Two TSI 8520 DustTrak Aerosol Monitors (light-scattering laser photometers that measure aerosol mass concentrations in range 0.001 to 100 mg/m3) and one TSI Optical Particle Sizer (OPS) 3330 (optical scattering from single particle up to 16 different channels - 0.3 to 10 μm - measuring particle size distribution) were used. We measured a dust event which occurred during wet and low wind/windless conditions as result of surface heating in August 2013. Maximum particle number concentration (PM~0.3-10 µm) reached 149954 particles cm-3 min-1 while mass concentration (PM1.5-5 µm in diameter. Close-to-ultrafine particle size distributions showed a significant increase in number with the severity of the dust event. Number concentrations were well correlated with mass concentrations. The mineralogy and geochemical compositions showed that glaciogenic dust contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles and 80 % of the particulate matter is volcanic glass rich in heavy metals. Wet dust particles were mobilized within < 4 hours. Here we introduced a comprehensive study on physical properties of the Icelandic dust aerosol and the first scientific study of particle size distributions in an Icelandic dust event including findings on initiation of dust suspension.

  20. Albedo changes on Vatnajökull associated with dust events, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragosics, Monika; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Pálsson, Finnur

    2015-04-01

    Deposition of aerosols on the glacier surface changes the albedo, thus enhances melt rates and affects the glacier mass balance. There are extensive sources for particles in Iceland; volcanic sandy deserts and glacial outwash plains cover more than 22% of the country. (Arnalds et al., 2001) Particles from these sources get airborne and transported on to the ice caps in several dust storms in most years, causing changes in albedo and surface energy balance. Long-term observations of atmospheric dust over the last 60 years show a high frequency of dust events in Iceland, with more than 34 dust days per year (Dagsson-Waldhauserova et al., 2013). Volcanoes are sources of large quantities of particles during an eruption, and for some years (even decades or centuries) after, due to re-suspension. Volcanic eruptions are frequent in Iceland, often with subsequent deposition of volcanic tephra on glaciers. The most recent are the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn in 2010 and 2011. The evolution of surface albedo is measured with in-situ automatic weather stations (AWS), during summer, on a few locations on icelandic ice-caps. To detect dust events on Brúarjökull outlet (NE Vatnajökull ice-cap), drops in albedo are compared with energy balance results from the measured values of the AWSs, temperature, dust storm occurrence (recorded at manned weather stations in the lowlands), and visible changes on satellite observations (MODIS images) as in-situ samples. A dust deposition event is detected by comparing the MODIS images of 20 May and 28 May 2012 and explains a drop in albedo on 21 May, lasting to June 4 from 0.86 to 0.51. The in-situ samples are: snow surface samples from Vatnajökull with impurities collected in October 2013, representing the deposition of one summer over the ice cap; and two firn cores of about 8 meters depth from Brúarjökull, taken in June 2014. The firn cores were analysed to detect dust layers and to measure mass, volume, density of

  1. Atomic Stretch: Optimally bounded real-time stretching and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Nielsen, Jannik Boll

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Stretch is a plugin for your preferred Adobe video editing tool, allowing real-time smooth and optimally bounded retarget-ting from and to any aspect ratio. The plugin allows preserving of high interest pixels through a protected region, attention redirection through color-modification, co......Atomic Stretch is a plugin for your preferred Adobe video editing tool, allowing real-time smooth and optimally bounded retarget-ting from and to any aspect ratio. The plugin allows preserving of high interest pixels through a protected region, attention redirection through color...

  2. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  3. Italian Volcano Supersites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, G.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the geohazards that may have a substantial economic and social impact, even at worldwide scale. Large populated regions are prone to volcanic hazards worldwide. Even local phenomena may affect largely populated areas and in some cases even megacities, producing severe economic losses. On a regional or global perspective, large volcanic eruptions may affect the climate for years with potentially huge economic impacts, but even relatively small eruptions may inject large amounts of volcanic ash in the atmosphere and severely affect air traffic over entire continents. One of main challenges of the volcanological community is to continuously monitor and understand the internal processes leading to an eruption, in order to give substantial contributions to the risk reduction. Italian active volcanoes constitute natural laboratories and ideal sites where to apply the cutting-edge volcano observation systems, implement new monitoring systems and to test and improve the most advanced models and methods for investigate the volcanic processes. That's because of the long tradition of volcanological studies resulting into long-term data sets, both in-situ and from satellite systems, among the most complete and accurate worldwide, and the large spectrum of the threatening volcanic phenomena producing high local/regional/continental risks. This contribution aims at presenting the compound monitoring systems operating on the Italian active volcanoes, the main improvements achieved during the recent studies direct toward volcanic hazard forecast and risk reductions and the guidelines for a wide coordinated project aimed at applying the ideas of the GEO Supersites Initiative at Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei / Vesuvius areas.

  4. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  5. Shallow conduit processes during the ad 1158 explosive eruption of Hekla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janebo, Maria H.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Larsen, Gudrun

    2016-10-01

    Hekla is one of the most frequently active felsic volcanic systems in the world, with several known pre-historic large Plinian eruptions and 18 historical subplinian to small Plinian eruptions. A common view is that Plinian eruptions of Hekla are relatively short lived and purely explosive events. In detail, these events exhibit subtle differences in terms of deposit characteristics, reflecting significant differences in eruption behaviour. Of the 18 historical eruptions, two had bulk magma compositions with >66 wt% SiO2: a Plinian eruption in ad 1104 and a smaller, less well characterised, but atypical subplinian eruption in ad 1158. The ad 1158 eruption was a relatively sustained, dry (magmatic) eruption with a more powerful opening phase followed by a lower intensity, waning phase accompanied by minor destabilisation and collapse of the conduit walls. We examine here the dynamics of the ad 1158 eruption, focussing on the role of shallow conduit processes in modulating eruption dynamics. Vesicularity data constrain the relative influence of bubble nucleation, growth, and coalescence. The juvenile pyroclasts are composed of two types of microvesicular pumice (white and grey) with contrasting vesicle number density, vesicle-size distribution, and phenocryst and microlite contents. Textural analysis shows that these pumices reflect heterogeneity developed pre- to syn-eruptively in the conduit and that entrainment of longer resident magma by faster ascending magma permitted magma of contrasting maturity to be fragmented simultaneously. In this regard, the mixed melt of the ad 1158 eruption contrasts with the compositionally homogeneous melt phase of the more powerful ad 1104 Plinian event, which was typified by more uniform conduit and eruption dynamics accompanying higher average ascent rates.

  6. Shallow conduit processes during the 1158 AD explosive eruption of Hekla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janebo, Maria; Houghton, Bruce; Thordarson, Thor; Larsen, Gudrun

    2015-04-01

    Hekla is one of the most frequently active silicic volcanic systems in the world, with multiple pre-historic large Plinian eruptions and 18 historical subplinian-Plinian eruptions. The common view is that the Plinian phases of the largest Hekla eruptions are all relatively homogeneous in style. Of the historical eruptions, only two were silicic: a Plinian eruption in 1104 and a smaller, less well characterized, eruption in 1158. We examine the dynamics of the 1158 eruption in detail with focus on the modulating role of shallow conduit processes. Grain size analysis, componentry, and density were used to characterize gradual and abrupt changes during the course of the eruption and quantitative vesicularity analysis was used to constrain the influence of bubble nucleation and coalescence. The 1158 eruption was a relatively steady, dry eruption with a more powerful opening phase followed by a lower intensity, waning phase accompanied by destabilization and collapse of the conduit walls. The juvenile pyroclasts are comprised of three types of microvesicular ragged pumice: white, grey, and banded. The abundance of grey pumice decreases as the eruption reaches maximum intensity, and then increases again during the waning phase of the eruption. The white pumices are more vesicular than the grey pumice, and the banded pumices have vesicularities that span predictably the range of the two end-members. The macroscopic differences between the white and grey pumice are accompanied by differences on a microscopic scale, most notably in a decrease in vesicle number density (VND) and a broadening of the vesicle size distribution, as well as increased crystal content. VND values of 0.5 to 1 E+6 mm-3 are similar to those recorded for the more powerful and sustained Plinian phases of the Novarupta 1912 and Taupo 181 eruptions in our laboratory. The 1158 pumice clasts display complex textures with adjacent domains of contrasting texture, alluding to complex nucleation, growth and collapse histories for melt in the shallow portions of the conduit and the development of textural heterogeneity, leading to simultaneous fragmentation of melt of contrasting conduit residence time and hence maturity. We infer that the grey pumice reflects those pockets of magma that had slowed or stalled in the shallow conduit permitting some of the small-to-moderate-sized bubbles to undergo enhanced coalescence and limited development of vesicle pathways and open-system degassing. In this regard, the 1158 eruption contrasts with the relative homogeneity of the melt phase involved in the more powerful earlier Plinian silicic eruptions of Hekla, for which we can infer a more simple conduit history accompanying higher average ascent rates.

  7. Gradual caldera collapse at Bárdarbunga volcano, Iceland, regulated by lateral magma outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hooper, Andrew; Holohan, Eoghan P; Halldórsson, Sæmundur A; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G; Cesca, Simone; Vogfjörd, Kristín S; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Einarsson, Páll; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Jarosch, Alexander H; Jónasson, Kristján; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Bagnardi, Marco; Parks, Michelle M; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Pálsson, Finnur; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Heimann, Sebastian; Reynolds, Hannah I; Dumont, Stéphanie; Bali, Eniko; Gudfinnsson, Gudmundur H; Dahm, Torsten; Roberts, Matthew J; Hensch, Martin; Belart, Joaquín M C; Spaans, Karsten; Jakobsson, Sigurdur; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B; Fridriksdóttir, Hildur M; Drouin, Vincent; Dürig, Tobias; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Riishuus, Morten S; Pedersen, Gro B M; van Boeckel, Tayo; Oddsson, Björn; Pfeffer, Melissa A; Barsotti, Sara; Bergsson, Baldur; Donovan, Amy; Burton, Mike R; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2016-07-15

    Large volcanic eruptions on Earth commonly occur with a collapse of the roof of a crustal magma reservoir, forming a caldera. Only a few such collapses occur per century, and the lack of detailed observations has obscured insight into the mechanical interplay between collapse and eruption. We use multiparameter geophysical and geochemical data to show that the 110-square-kilometer and 65-meter-deep collapse of Bárdarbunga caldera in 2014-2015 was initiated through withdrawal of magma, and lateral migration through a 48-kilometers-long dike, from a 12-kilometers deep reservoir. Interaction between the pressure exerted by the subsiding reservoir roof and the physical properties of the subsurface flow path explain the gradual, near-exponential decline of both collapse rate and the intensity of the 180-day-long eruption.

  8. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    Iliamna Volcano is a 3,053-meter-high, ice- and snow-covered stratovolcano in the southwestern Cook Inlet region about 225 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and about 100 kilometers northwest of Homer. Historical eruptions of Iliamna Volcano have not been positively documented; however, the volcano regularly emits steam and gas, and small, shallow earthquakes are often detected beneath the summit area. The most recent eruptions of the volcano occurred about 300 years ago, and possibly as recently as 90-140 years ago. Prehistoric eruptions have generated plumes of volcanic ash, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that extended to the volcano flanks and beyond. Rock avalanches from the summit area have occurred numerous times in the past. These avalanches flowed several kilometers down the flanks and at least two large avalanches transformed to cohesive lahars. The number and distribution of known volcanic ash deposits from Iliamna Volcano indicate that volcanic ash clouds from prehistoric eruptions were significantly less voluminous and probably less common relative to ash clouds generated by eruptions of other Cook Inlet volcanoes. Plumes of volcanic ash from Iliamna Volcano would be a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International Airport and other local airports, and depending on wind direction, could drift at least as far as the Kenai Peninsula and beyond. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Because Iliamna Volcano has not erupted for several hundred years, a future eruption could involve significant amounts of ice and snow that could lead to the formation of large lahars and downstream flooding. The greatest hazards in order of importance are described below and shown on plate 1.

  9. Time-lapse characterization of hydrothermal seawater and microbial interactions with basaltic tephra at Surtsey Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M. D.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Bach, W.; Cappelletti, P.; Coleman, N. J.; Ivarsson, M.; Jónasson, K.; Jørgensen, S. L.; Marteinsson, V.; McPhie, J.; Moore, J. G.; Nielson, D.; Rhodes, J. M.; Rispoli, C.; Schiffman, P.; Stefánsson, A.; Türke, A.; Vanorio, T.; Weisenberger, T. B.; White, J. D. L.; Zierenberg, R.; Zimanowski, B.

    2015-12-01

    A new International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) project will drill through the 50-year-old edifice of Surtsey Volcano, the youngest of the Vestmannaeyjar Islands along the south coast of Iceland, to perform interdisciplinary time-lapse investigations of hydrothermal and microbial interactions with basaltic tephra. The volcano, created in 1963-1967 by submarine and subaerial basaltic eruptions, was first drilled in 1979. In October 2014, a workshop funded by the ICDP convened 24 scientists from 10 countries for 3 and a half days on Heimaey Island to develop scientific objectives, site the drill holes, and organize logistical support. Representatives of the Surtsey Research Society and Environment Agency of Iceland also participated. Scientific themes focus on further determinations of the structure and eruptive processes of the type locality of Surtseyan volcanism, descriptions of changes in fluid geochemistry and microbial colonization of the subterrestrial deposits since drilling 35 years ago, and monitoring the evolution of hydrothermal and biological processes within the tephra deposits far into the future through the installation of a Surtsey subsurface observatory. The tephra deposits provide a geologic analog for developing specialty concretes with pyroclastic rock and evaluating their long-term performance under diverse hydrothermal conditions. Abstracts of research projects are posted at http://surtsey.icdp-online.org.

  10. Elementary analysis of data from Tianchi Volcano

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guo-ming; ZHANG Heng-rong; KONG Qing-jun; WU Cheng-zhi; GUO Feng; ZHANG Chao-fan

    2004-01-01

    Tianchi Volcano is the largest potential erupticve volcano in China. Analyzing these data on seismic monitoring, deformation observation and water chemistry investigation gained from the Tianchi Volcano Observatory (TVO), the authors consider that the Tianchi Volcano is in going into a new flourishing time.

  11. The development of the suffix –erni in Icelandic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jóhannsson, Ellert Þór

    stages to establish a clear derivational pattern that is productively used in the language to form new words. Having access to continuous written material in Icelandic from ca. 1200 to 2011 gives us the possibility to track this process through time and follow each step in the development.......This paper investigates the suffix –erni in Icelandic, its origin, and development from the period of Old Norse to Modern Icelandic. This suffix is most often used to derive a neuter noun from nouns and adjectives with the meaning ‘belonging to’ e.g. faðir ‘father’ => faðerni ‘fatherhood...

  12. Isotope heterogeneity of Pre-Holocene groundwater in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Á.E.; Arnorsson, S.; Heinemeier, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that groundwater with a Pre-Holocene component is more common in the Icelandic bedrock than previously thought. Some of the Pre-Holocene water samples are more depleted in delta H-2 and delta O-18 than any mean annual precipitation in Iceland today due to the cold......-Holocene component in the groundwater. The deuterium excess value may also help to identify water from a different climate regime, if no oxygen shift has occurred. The relative abundance of a Pre-Holocene water component of the Icelandic groundwater has led to the understanding that combined interpretation of water...

  13. Design of Warped Stretch Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire Lifan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-11-01

    Time stretch dispersive Fourier transform enables real-time spectroscopy at the repetition rate of million scans per second. High-speed real-time instruments ranging from analog-to-digital converters to cameras and single-shot rare-phenomena capture equipment with record performance have been empowered by it. Its warped stretch variant, realized with nonlinear group delay dispersion, offers variable-rate spectral domain sampling, as well as the ability to engineer the time-bandwidth product of the signal’s envelope to match that of the data acquisition systems. To be able to reconstruct the signal with low loss, the spectrotemporal distribution of the signal spectrum needs to be sparse. Here, for the first time, we show how to design the kernel of the transform and specifically, the nonlinear group delay profile dictated by the signal sparsity. Such a kernel leads to smart stretching with nonuniform spectral resolution, having direct utility in improvement of data acquisition rate, real-time data compression, and enhancement of ultrafast data capture accuracy. We also discuss the application of warped stretch transform in spectrotemporal analysis of continuous-time signals.

  14. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Pierce, C. W.; Milner, T. E.

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions durin...

  15. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  16. Transient filament stretching rheometer II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The Lagrangian sspecification is used to simulate the transient stretching filament rheometer. Simulations are performed for dilute PIB-solutions modeled as a four mode Oldroyd-B fluid and a semidilute PIB-solution modeled as a non-linear single integral equation. The simulations are compared...

  17. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  18. Should Athletes Stretch before Exercise?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KarlB.Fields,MD; CraigM.Burnworth,MD; Martha Delaney·MA

    2007-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS Traditional stretching routines performed during warm-up procedures before exercise can increase flexibility for a short time, but there is little scientific evidence that such routines can improve exercise performance, reduce delayed-onset muscular soreness, or prevent injuries.

  19. Iterated Stretching of Viscoelastic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Kalaidin, Evgeny

    1999-01-01

    We examine, with asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation, the iterated stretching dynamics of FENE and Oldroyd-B jets of initial radius r(sub 0), shear viscosity nu, Weissenberg number We, retardation number S, and capillary number Ca. The usual Rayleigh instability stretches the local uniaxial extensional flow region near a minimum in jet radius into a primary filament of radius [Ca(1 - S)/ We](sup 1/2)r(sub 0) between two beads. The strain-rate within the filament remains constant while its radius (elastic stress) decreases (increases) exponentially in time with a long elastic relaxation time 3We(r(sup 2, sub 0)/nu). Instabilities convected from the bead relieve the tension at the necks during this slow elastic drainage and trigger a filament recoil. Secondary filaments then form at the necks from the resulting stretching. This iterated stretching is predicted to occur successively to generate high-generation filaments of radius r(sub n), (r(sub n)/r(sub 0)) = square root of 2[r(sub n-1)/r(sub 0)](sup 3/2) until finite-extensibility effects set in.

  20. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  1. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  2. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  3. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA

  4. Multiple congenital ocular anomalies in Icelandic horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindgren Gabriella

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple congenital ocular anomalies (MCOA syndrome is a hereditary congenital eye defect that was first described in Silver colored Rocky Mountain horses. The mutation causing this disease is located within a defined chromosomal interval, which also contains the gene and mutation that is associated with the Silver coat color (PMEL17, exon 11. Horses that are homozygous for the disease-causing allele have multiple defects (MCOA-phenotype, whilst the heterozygous horses predominantly have cysts of the iris, ciliary body or retina (Cyst-phenotype. It has been argued that these ocular defects are caused by a recent mutation that is restricted to horses that are related to the Rocky Mountain Horse breed. For that reason we have examined another horse breed, the Icelandic horse, which is historically quite divergent from Rocky Mountain horses. Results We examined 24 Icelandic horses and established that the MCOA syndrome is present in this breed. Four of these horses were categorised as having the MCOA-phenotype and were genotyped as being homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation. The most common clinical signs included megaloglobus, iris stromal hypoplasia, abnormal pectinate ligaments, iridociliary cysts occasionally extending into the peripheral retina and cataracts. The cysts and pectinate ligament abnormalities were observed in the temporal quadrant of the eyes. Fourteen horses were heterozygous for the PMEL17 mutation and were characterized as having the Cyst-phenotype with cysts and occasionally curvilinear streaks in the peripheral retina. Three additional horses were genotyped as PMEL17 heterozygotes, but in these horses we were unable to detect cysts or other forms of anomalies. One eye of a severely vision-impaired 18 month-old stallion, homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation was examined by light microscopy. Redundant duplication of non-pigmented ciliary body epithelium, sometimes forming cysts bulging into the posterior chamber

  5. Geochemistry and mineralogy of mafic Icelandic hyaloclastites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; Eyer, C.; Bindeman, I. N.; Sigmarsson, O.

    2016-12-01

    Hyaloclastite in the crust may be a cryptic contaminant contributing to some volatile-rich Icelandic basalts and in some places reach 2.5 km1. Hyaloclastites are highly fragmented composites of lithics, glass, and crystals in a palagonite matrix that form as a result of magma-ice or magma-water interactions. These rocks have high water content and porosity and a high initial glass content, which makes them susceptible to rapid alteration by ambient or hydrothermal waters and potentially fast digestion by magmas. Due to low density and ductility, they have the potential to stall ascending mantle-derived magmas to form sills, and in the process may contribute exotic volatile or fluid-mobile components. We have characterized the geochemistry and mineralogy of 18 hyaloclastite samples from the Reykjanes Peninsula (RP), Vestmannajyar, and the southern coast of Iceland. Major and trace elements were obtained using ICP-AES and ICP-MS, respectively, and mineralogy was determined by XRD. Loss on ignition is highly variable (0.44 - 15.7 wt.%) and positively correlated with alkali loss reflected in the Chemical Index of Alteration [34.8 - 51.3; CIA = Al2O3/(Al2O3+CaO+Na2O+K2O)]. Primitive mantle normalized multi-element plots for RP hyaloclastites are broadly similar to those for unaltered RP Holocene basalts. Two samples have trace element profiles resembling those of picrites in the region. The samples from the south coast and Vestmannaeyjar have OIB-like enrichments similar to local Holocene basalts. Five well-sorted hyaloclastite samples have broad humps in their XRD patterns from 20-50° 2q. These samples contain only primary magmatic mineral phases (plagioclase, olivine, and pyroxene), if any, while other hyaloclastites contain both primary phases and secondary alteration phases including halite, calcite, clays, chlorite, and zeolites. Preliminary O and H isotope investigation demonstrates large ranges in both parameters. Future work will include oxygen isotope analyses

  6. Assessing the long-term probabilistic volcanic hazard for tephra fallout in Reykjavik, Iceland: a preliminary multi-source analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Roberto; Barsotti, Sara; Sandri, Laura; Tumi Guðmundsson, Magnús

    2015-04-01

    Icelandic volcanism is largely dominated by basaltic magma. Nevertheless the presence of glaciers over many Icelandic volcanic systems results in frequent phreatomagmatic eruptions and associated tephra production, making explosive eruptions the most common type of volcanic activity. Jökulhlaups are commonly considered as major volcanic hazard in Iceland for their high frequency and potentially very devastating local impact. Tephra fallout is also frequent and can impact larger areas. It is driven by the wind direction that can change with both altitude and season, making impossible to predict a priori where the tephra will be deposited during the next eruptions. Most of the volcanic activity in Iceland occurs in the central eastern part, over 100 km to the east of the main population centre around the capital Reykjavík. Therefore, the hazard from tephra fallout in Reykjavík is expected to be smaller than for communities settled near the main volcanic systems. However, within the framework of quantitative hazard and risk analyses, less frequent and/or less intense phenomena should not be neglected, since their risk evaluation depends on the effects suffered by the selected target. This is particularly true if the target is highly vulnerable, as large urban areas or important infrastructures. In this work we present the preliminary analysis aiming to perform a Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Assessment (PVHA) for tephra fallout focused on the target area which includes the municipality of Reykjavík and the Keflavík international airport. This approach reverts the more common perspective where the hazard analysis is focused on the source (the volcanic system) and it follows a multi-source approach: indeed, the idea is to quantify, homogeneously, the hazard due to the main hazardous volcanoes that could pose a tephra fallout threat for the municipality of Reykjavík and the Keflavík airport. PVHA for each volcanic system is calculated independently and the results

  7. Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Founded in 1912 at the edge of the caldera of Kīlauea Volcano, HVO was the vision of Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., a geologist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, whose studies of natural disasters around the world had convinced him that systematic, continuous observations of seismic and volcanic activity were needed to better understand—and potentially predict—earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Jaggar summarized the aim of HVO by stating that “the work should be humanitarian” and have the goals of developing “prediction and methods of protecting life and property on the basis of sound scientific achievement.” These goals align well with those of the USGS, whose mission is to serve the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage natural resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life.

  8. Referential Subject and Object Gaps in Modern Icelandic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Pouplier

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the nature of subject and object gaps in coordinate structures in Modern Icelandic. Modern Icelandic is considered to be a semi-pro-drop language, since it generally licenses only generic null subjects; object gaps only occur in the form of topic drop. Nevertheless it has been argued that MI licenses referential subject pro as well as referential object pro in certain (tightly restricted contexts. This assumption is based on the existence of coordinating constructions that exhibit referential subject and object gaps at the same time. While this paper follows previous proposals in assuming subject pro to be licit in coordinate structures, object argument gaps are assumed to be object-topic drop, which is independetly needed in the grammar of Icelandic. Under the analysis presented here, the previously reported null subject condition on null objects falls out from Icelandic word order facts.

  9. Multigenerational information: the example of the Icelandic Genealogy Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulinius, Hrafn

    2011-01-01

    The first part of the chapter describes the Icelandic Genealogical Database, how it was created, what it contains, and how it operates. In the second part, an overview of research accomplished with material from the database is given.

  10. Over-the-counter codeine use in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Grimsson, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the assumption that liberalizing community pharmacy ownership in Iceland would lead to increased irrational use of over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine....

  11. Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Seas Regional Climatology (NODC Accession 0112824)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To provide an improved oceanographic foundation and reference for multi-disciplinary studies of the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Seas (GINS), NODC developed a new set...

  12. Mite allergy and mite exposure in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, Thorkil E; Gislason, Thorarinn; Gislason, David

    2011-01-01

    In this overview of investigations into mite allergy in Iceland and of the current understanding of the sources of exposure, 2 major categories of mite-induced allergies were encountered. The first was house dust mite allergy due to house dust mites from unknown sources, and the second was barn allergy caused by mites connected with the degradation of stored hay. Characteristics of these diseases have been obtained from surveys where skin prick tests were made with commercially available extracts of mites and from zoological investigations where mites had been found in different kinds of dusts relevant for the tested persons. The investigations uncovered a discrepancy between the capital Reykjavik and countryside farms. While the frequencies of sensitization to house dust mites and barn mites are rather similar in the capital area and in the rural area, the exposure to these mites is unexpectedly low in the capital area. Thus, sensitization appears to take place preferably in the rural area.

  13. Archaeal diversity in Icelandic hot springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Thomas; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Westermann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Whole-cell density gradient extractions from three solfataras (pH 2.5) ranging in temperature from 81 to 90 degrees C and one neutral hot spring (81 degrees C, pH 7) from the thermal active area of Hveragerethi (Iceland) were analysed for genetic diversity and local geographical variation...... of Archaea by analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes. In addition to the three solfataras and the neutral hot spring, 10 soil samples in transects of the soil adjacent to the solfataras were analysed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP). The sequence data from the clone libraries...... enzymes AluI and BsuRI. The sequenced clones from this solfatara belonged to Sulfolobales, Thermoproteales or were most closest related to sequences from uncultured Archaea. Sequences related to group I.1b were not found in the neutral hot spring or the hyperthermophilic solfatara (90 degrees C)....

  14. The circulation of Icelandic waters – a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Logemann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional flow, temperature and salinity fields of the North Atlantic including the Arctic Ocean covering the time period 1992 to 2006 are simulated with the numerical ocean model CODE. The model reveals several new insights and previously unknown structures which help us to clarify open questions on the regional oceanography of Icelandic waters. These relate to the structure and geographical distribution of the coastal current, the primary forcing of the North Icelandic Irminger Current (NIIC, the path of the Atlantic Water south-east of Iceland and the structure of the North Icelandic Jet (NIJ. The model's adaptively refined computational mesh has a maximum resolution of 1 km horizontal and 2.5 m vertical in Icelandic waters. CTD profiles from this region and the river discharge of 46 Icelandic watersheds, computed by the hydrological model WaSiM, are assimilated into the simulation. The model realistically reproduces the established elements of the circulation around Iceland. However, analysis of the simulated mean flow field also provides further insights. It suggests a distinct freshwater-induced coastal current that only exists along the south-west and west coasts which is accompanied by a counter-directed undercurrent. The simulated transport of Atlantic Water over the Icelandic shelf takes place in a symmetrical system of two currents, with the established NIIC over the north-western and northern shelf, and a current over the southern and south-eastern shelf herein called the South Icelandic Current (SIC. Both currents are driven by topographically induced distortions of the Arctic Front's barotropic pressure field. The SIC is simulated to be an upstream precursor of the Faroe Current (FC. The recently discovered North Icelandic Jet (NIJ also features in the model predictions and is found to be forced by the baroclinic pressure field of the Arctic Front, to originate east of the Kolbeinsey Ridge and to have a volume transport

  15. Making Earth's earliest continental crust - an analogue from voluminous Neogene silicic volcanism in NE-Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Sylvia E.; Troll, Valentin R.; Burchardt, Steffi; Riishuus, Morten S.; Deegan, Frances M.; Harris, Chris; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Gústafsson, Ludvik E.

    2014-05-01

    Borgarfjörður Eystri in NE-Iceland represents the second-most voluminous exposure of silicic eruptive rocks in Iceland and is a superb example of bimodal volcanism (Bunsen-Daly gap), which represents a long-standing controversy that touches on the problem of crustal growth in early Earth. The silicic rocks in NE-Iceland approach 25 % of the exposed rock mass in the region (Gústafsson et al., 1989), thus they significantly exceed the usual ≤ 12 % in Iceland as a whole (e.g. Walker, 1966; Jonasson, 2007). The origin, significance, and duration of the voluminous (> 300 km3) and dominantly explosive silicic activity in Borgarfjörður Eystri is not yet constrained (c.f. Gústafsson, 1992), leaving us unclear as to what causes silicic volcanism in otherwise basaltic provinces. Here we report SIMS zircon U-Pb ages and δ18O values from the region, which record the commencement of silicic igneous activity with rhyolite lavas at 13.5 to 12.8 Ma, closely followed by large caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions from the Breiðavik and Dyrfjöll central volcanoes (12.4 Ma). Silicic activity ended abruptly with dacite lava at 12.1 Ma, defining a ≤ 1 Myr long window of silicic volcanism. Magma δ18O values estimated from zircon range from 3.1 to 5.5 (± 0.3; n = 170) and indicate up to 45 % assimilation of a low-δ18O component (e.g. typically δ18O = 0 ‰, Bindeman et al., 2012). A Neogene rift relocation (Martin et al., 2011) or the birth of an off-rift zone to the east of the mature rift associated with a thermal/chemical pulse in the Iceland plume (Óskarsson & Riishuus, 2013), likely brought mantle-derived magma into contact with fertile hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. The resulting interaction triggered large-scale crustal melting and generated mixed-origin silicic melts. Such rapid formation of silicic magmas from sustained basaltic volcanism may serve as an analogue for generating continental crust in a subduction-free early Earth (e.g. ≥ 3 Ga, Kamber et

  16. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP): (I) Drilling for Supercritical Hydrothermal Fluids is Underway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Fridleifsson, G. O.; Bird, D. K.; Reed, M. H.; Schiffman, P.; Zierenberg, R.

    2008-12-01

    The IDDP is being carried out by an international industry-government consortium in Iceland (consisting of three leading Icelandic power companies, together with the National Energy Authority), Alcoa Inc. and StatoilHydro) with the objective of investigating the economic feasibility of producing electricity from supercritical geothermal fluids. This will require drilling to temperatures of 400-600°C and depths of 4 to 5 km. Modeling suggests that supercritical water could yield an order of magnitude greater power output than that produced by conventional geothermal wells. The consortium plans to test this concept in three different geothermal fields in Iceland. If successful, major improvements in the development of high-temperature geothermal resources could result worldwide. In June 2008 preparation of the first deep IDDP well commenced in the Krafla volcanic caldera in the active rift zone of NE Iceland. Selection of the first drill site for this well was based on geological, geophysical and geochemical data, and on the results of extensive geothermal drilling since 1971. During 1975-1984, a rifting episode occurred in the caldera, involving 9 volcanic eruptions. In parts of the geothermal field acid volcanic gases made steam from some of the existing wells unsuitable for power generation for the following decade. A large magma chamber at 3-7 km depth was detected by S-wave attenuation beneath the center of the caldera, believed to be the heat source of the geothermal system. A recent MT-survey has confirmed the existence of low resistivity bodies at shallow depths within the volcano. The IDDP well will be drilled and cased to 800m depth in September, before the winter snows, and in spring 2009 it will be drilled and cased to 3.5km depth and then deepened to 4.5 km in July. Several spot cores for scientific studies will be collected between 2400m and the total depth. After the well heats, it will be flow tested and, if successful, a pilot plant for power

  17. Icelandic Journalists & the Question of Professionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgir Guðmundsson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The question whether journalism constitutes a profession or not has been widely discussed in the literature in recent decades without a definite conclusion. Indeed some suggest that much of the contradictory views on professionalism and the professionalization of journalism may be traced to the unclear meaning of the very term “professionalism” or “professionalization” (Nolan 2008. Thus it is possible to put simultaneously forth plausible arguments suggesting de-professionalization of journalism on the one hand, and further professionalization of journalism on the other, based on different interpretations of the term “professionalism”. The terms “professional” and “professionalism” can refer to different social phenomena in different contexts. Thus an ongoing professionalization of journalism can be taking place in one sense at the same time as de-professionalization in a different sense, and of course, these different trends can also be taking place simultaneously in different parts of the media environment (Nolan, 2008; Hallin&Mancini, 2004; Witschge&Nygren, 2009; Schudson, 2001. In determining an approach to the concept of a profession it is helpful to establish some general criteria, against which journalistic practice may be measured. In finding these criteria, guidelines are given by the discussion of traditional professions - doctors, lawyers – and on that basis some characteristics can been said to signify a profession. To what extent is the work of Icelandic journalists characterised by professionalism, and to what extent do they, as an occupational group, exhibit the features normally associated with professions? The following analysis suggests that Icelandic journalists fulfil many of the key conditions associated with professions and their development in recent decades has been one of increased professionalism.

  18. Over-the-counter codeine use in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Grimsson, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the assumption that liberalizing community pharmacy ownership in Iceland would lead to increased irrational use of over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine.......The objective of this study was to test the assumption that liberalizing community pharmacy ownership in Iceland would lead to increased irrational use of over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine....

  19. Planned Home Births in Iceland: Premise, Outcome, and Influential Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Berglind Hálfdánsdóttir 1973

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hospitalization of childbirth in Iceland in the 20th century reduced home birth rates to less than 0.1% in 1990. Icelandic home birth rates have risen rapidly in the new millennium and were 2.2% in 2014. Recent studies in other Western countries have consistently shown lower rates of interventions and maternal morbidity in planned home births than in planned hospital births, while neonatal outcomes are dissimilar in different countries. These study results have been met with scept...

  20. Learning from Bjartur About Today's Icelandic Economic Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pia Paganelli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Economies are complex systems resulting from human action but not from human design. The economic success of Iceland in recent decades was the result of the development of good institutions combined with a positive global economic climate. The recent economic downturn, not just in Iceland but around the world, should be a reminder that good institutions matter and should serve as an exhortation to continue building good institutions rather than dismissing them in favor of institutions that generate poverty.

  1. Icelandic Inland Wetlands: Characteristics and Extent of Draining

    OpenAIRE

    Gudmundsson, Jon; Brink, Sigmundur H.; Arnalds, Olafur; Gisladottir, Fanney O.; Oskarsson, Hlynur

    2016-01-01

    Iceland has inland wetland areas with soils exhibiting both Andosol and Histosol properties which are uncommon elsewhere on Earth. They are generally fertile, with higher bird-nest densities than in similar wetlands in the neighboring countries, with nutrients released by rapid weathering of aeolian materials of basaltic nature. Icelandic inland wetlands cover about 9000 km2 constituting 19.4 % of the vegetated surfaces of the island. The wetland soils are often 1–3 m thick and store 33 to >1...

  2. Perception of ethics in the Icelandic Aviation Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This Master’s thesis deals with perception of ethics in the Icelandic aviation sector. It offers a qualitative study to answer the following central research questions: what is the perception of the ethical environment in the aviation sector of Iceland by its top-managers? To introduce the study, a literature review presents an overview of the concepts of ethics, corruption and bribery as well as culture and corporate social responsibility. A special focus is proposed on the different school ...

  3. Volcanoes in Eruption - Set 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The word volcano is used to refer to the opening from which molten rock and gas issue from Earth's interior onto the surface, and also to the cone, hill, or mountain...

  4. Volcanoes in Eruption - Set 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The word volcano is used to refer to the opening from which molten rock and gas issue from Earth's interior onto the surface, and also to the cone, hill, or mountain...

  5. USGS Volcano Notification Service (VNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Website provides a subscription service to receive an email when changes occur in the activity levels for monitored U.S. volcanoes and/or when information releases...

  6. Does Acute Static Stretching Reduce Muscle Power?

    OpenAIRE

    Francis M. Kozub; Sameer A. Gohir; Alan Donnelly

    2012-01-01

    Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the training and clinical setting. Recently, stretching in the warm-up has been shown to decrease several muscular performance variables, but the dose-response of this effect is unknown and moreover these stretching bouts are not representative of athletes during warm up procedures, as they are usually time consuming. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help spo...

  7. Analysis of a filament stretching rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1996-01-01

    A finite element analysis of the stretching filament rheometer of Tirtaadmadja and Sridhar (1993) is presenetd. Simulations of the stretching of a filament of the polymet test solution, fluid A, between two plates are shown.......A finite element analysis of the stretching filament rheometer of Tirtaadmadja and Sridhar (1993) is presenetd. Simulations of the stretching of a filament of the polymet test solution, fluid A, between two plates are shown....

  8. [Infection risks associated with importation of fresh food in Iceland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristinsson, Karl G; Georgsson, Franklín

    2015-06-01

    Access to safe food is a privilege for people living in Iceland. Rapid increase in antimicrobial resistance, related to factory farming and antimicrobial use in agriculture, is a major threat to public health. Increasing food trade between countries and continents facilitates global spread of pathogens and resistance. Icelandic agriculture has benefitted from its isolation and small size. After interventions to reduce the prevalence of Campylobacter and Salmonella at poultry farms, the incidence of human campylobacteriolsis is 17-43/100.000, of which about half is domestically acquired and Salmonella infections 10-15/100.000 mainly acquired abroad. Since Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) has not been detected in domestic cattle, the low incidence of infections is not surprising (0-0.6/100.000/year). A recent outbreak due to a multiresistant EHEC strain was traced to imported lettuce. Antimicrobial use in Icelandic agriculture is among the lowest in Europe and domestic infections caused by Salmonella and Campylobacter are rarely caused by resistant strains. Carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae have not been found in Iceland. Low use of antimicrobials in Icelandic agriculture and actions to limit the spread of Campylobacter and Salmonella have been successful. The public should be informed of the importance of the origin of food and that Icelandic food products are among the safest.

  9. Estimating Cs-137 fallout inventories in Iceland from precipitation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E.; Sigurgeirsson, M.A.; Gudnason, K. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst., Reykjavik (Iceland); Arnalds, O. [Agricultural Research Inst., Reykjavik (Iceland); Howard, B.J.; Wright, S.M. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Merlewood, Cumbria, (United Kingdom); Palsdottir, I. [Iceland Meteorological Office, Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2002-12-01

    Iceland was identified in the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) as one of the Arctic areas which received the most global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, due to relatively high precipitation rates compared with much of the Arctic and sub arctic. Cs-137 in the Icelandic terrestrial ecosystem almost entirely originates from the nuclear weapons tests carried out in the atmosphere until the early sixties. Fallout was greatest in mid nineteen sixties. Additional fallout from the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant was relatively small. The study gave preliminary information on the spatial variation in {sup 137} Cs deposition in Iceland, especially in areas used for agriculture. The objectives of the study were (1) to measure the spatial variation of radiocaesium inventories in soils in Iceland and (2) to compare the results with different approaches to predicting {sup 137} Cs contents in soil. This quantification is a necessary first step in an evaluation of vulnerability to radiocaesium deposition in Iceland. It is anticipated that Icelandic soils could be highly vulnerable to radiocaesium due to their volcanic nature and consequent lack of illitic minerals, as has been suggested by initial chemical studies on the properties of soils in the Nordic countries. (ln)

  10. GLACIERS OF THE KORYAK VOLCANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Manevich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents main glaciological characteristics of present-day glaciers located on the Koryaksky volcano. The results of fieldwork (2008–2009 and high-resolution satellite image analysis let us to specify and complete information on modern glacial complex of Koryaksky volcano. Now there are seven glaciers with total area 8.36 km2. Three of them advance, two are in stationary state and one degrades. Moreover, the paper describes the new crater glacier.

  11. Polymer network stretching during electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Israel; Arinstein, Arkadii; Fezzaa, Kamel; Rafailovich, Miriam; Zussman, Eyal

    2011-03-01

    Fast X-ray phase contrast imaging is used to observe the flow of a semi-dilute polyethylene oxide solution during electrospinning. Micron-size glass particles mixed in the polymer solution allow viewing of the jet flow field, and reveal a high-gradient flow that has both longitudinal and radial components that grow rapidly along the jet. The resulting hydrodynamic forces cause substantial longitudinal stretching and transversal contraction of the polymer network within the jet, as confirmed by random walk simulation and theoretical modeling. The polymer network therefore concentrates towards the jet center, and its conformation may transform from a free state to a fully-stretched state within a short distance from the jet start. We acknowledge the financial support of the United States - Israel Bi-National Science Foundation (grant 2006061).

  12. Prophylactic stretching does not reduce cramp susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C; Harsen, James D; Long, Blaine C

    2017-08-10

    Some clinicians advocate stretching to prevent muscle cramps. It is unknown whether static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching increases cramp threshold frequency (TFc ), a quantitative measure of cramp susceptibility. Fifteen individuals completed this randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study. We measured passive hallux range of motion (ROM) and then performed 3 minutes of either static stretching, PNF stretching (hold-relax-with agonist contraction), or no stretching. ROM was reassessed and TFc was measured. PNF stretching increased hallux extension (pre-PNF 81 ± 11°, post-PNF 90 ± 10°; P 0.05). Static stretching increased hallux extension (pre-static 80 ± 11°, post-static 88 ± 9°; P 0.05). No ROM changes occurred with no stretching (P > 0.05). TFc was unaffected by stretching (no stretching 18 ± 7 Hz, PNF 16 ± 4 Hz, static 16 ± 5 Hz; P = 0.37). Static and PNF stretching increased hallux extension, but neither increased TFc . Acute stretching may not prevent muscle cramping. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Modified "DMC" technique for stretching DNA molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A modified "dynamic molecular combing"(DMC)technique used for stretching double-strandedDNA is reported. DNA molecules were stretched on the silanized mica surface by thistechnique, its speed being precisely controlled with a computer. This approachcombinedthe precise DNA stretching method with high resolution AFM imaging at nanometer scale,thusmaking it useful for DNA alignment manipulation and subsequent gene research.

  14. WorldFengur - the studbook of origin for the Icelandic horse

    OpenAIRE

    Lorange, Jón Baldur

    2011-01-01

    WorldFengur is the database that contains and functions as the studbook of origin of the Icelandic horse. Only pure-bred Icelandic horses, whose ancestry can be traced back to Iceland entirely, may be registered into WorldFengur. The WorldFengur project is a joint effort by the FAIC (Farmers Association of Iceland) and FEIF (International Federation of Icelandic Horse Associations) to construct an official and central database on horses of Icelandic origin located all over the world. It is us...

  15. Mahukona: The missing Hawaiian volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.O.; Muenow, D.W. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA)); Kurz, M.D. (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    New bathymetric and geochemical data indicate that a seamount west of the island of Hawaii, Mahukona, is a Hawaiian shield volcano. Mahukona has weakly alkalic lavas that are geochemically distinct. They have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios (12-21 times atmosphere), and high H{sub 2}O and Cl contents, which are indicative of the early state of development of Hawaiian volcanoes. The He and Sr isotopic values for Mahukona lavas are intermediate between those for lavas from Loihi and Manuna Loa volcanoes and may be indicative of a temporal evolution of Hawaiian magmas. Mahukona volcano became extinct at about 500 ka, perhaps before reaching sea level. It fills the previously assumed gap in the parallel chains of volcanoes forming the southern segment of the Hawaiian hotspot chain. The paired sequence of volcanoes was probably caused by the bifurcation of the Hawaiian mantle plume during its ascent, creating two primary areas of melting 30 to 40 km apart that have persisted for at least the past 4 m.y.

  16. Local stretch zeroing NMO correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, N.; Siahkoohi, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method of normal move-out (NMO) correction called local stretch zeroing (LSZ) method that avoids NMO stretch. The method eliminates the theoretical curves that generate interpolated data samples responsible for NMO stretch. Pre-correction time sampling interval is preserved by reassigning and zero padding of true data samples. The optimum mute zone selection feature of the LSZ method eliminates all interfering reflection events at far offsets. The resulted stacked section from the LSZ method contains generally higher frequency components than a normal stack, and preserves most of the shallow reflectors. The LSZ method requires that zero-offset width of the time gate, i.e. zero-offset time difference between two adjacent reflections, be larger than the dominant period. The major shortcoming of the method occurs when CMP data are over- or under-NMO corrected. Both synthetic and real world examples show the efficiency of the LSZ method over the conventional NMO (CNMO) correction. The method loses its superiority when CMP data are over- or under-NMO corrected.

  17. Iceland ,Small Country Witnessing Diversified Cooperation with China Interview with Ambassador of Iceland H. E. Mr. Gunnar Snorri Gunnarsson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Located in the North Europe, Iceland is a very beautiful country. Although very small with an area of 103,000 sq. km and a population of 308,000,and quite different in most respects such as geographical location, size, history, climate and political structures, it has developed very good relations with China. For instance, Iceland was the first European country to recognize China as a market economy.

  18. Effects of static stretching for 30 seconds and dynamic stretching on leg extension power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Taichi; Ishii, Kojiro

    2005-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to clarify the effects of static stretching for 30 seconds and dynamic stretching on leg extension power. Eleven healthy male students took part in this study. Each subject performed static stretching and dynamic stretching on the 5 muscle groups in the lower limbs and nonstretching on separate days. Leg extension power was measured before and after the static stretching, dynamic stretching, and nonstretching. No significant difference was found between leg extension power after static stretching (1788.5 +/- 85.7 W) and that after nonstretching (1784.8 +/- 108.4 W). On the other hand, leg extension power after dynamic stretching (2022.3 +/- 121.0 W) was significantly (p < 0.01) greater than that after nonstretching. These results suggest that static stretching for 30 seconds neither improves nor reduces muscular performance and that dynamic stretching enhances muscular performance.

  19. The stretch zone of automotive steel sheets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ľ Ambriško; L Pešek

    2014-04-01

    The paper deals with an experimental determination of the stretch zone dimensions in the notch tip in thin steel sheets. The stretch zone dimensions depend on steel grade, on the rolling direction as well as on the loading rate. Stretch zones were observed and measured on three steel grades. Fracture area and stretch zones were analysed by SEM. Stable crack growth was monitored by videoextensometry techniques on CT (Compact Tension) specimens. Specimens were loaded under two loading rates by eccentric tension, whereby the deformation in the notch surrounding area was recorded using a non-contact measurement–videoextensometry technique. Linear relation between the stretch zone dimensions was determined.

  20. Subglacial and Subaqueous Monogenetic Volcanoes, Thermal and Morphological Contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, M. T.; Jarosch, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Tuyas, tindars (hyaloclastite ridges), sheets and various types of smaller mounds are the main types of monogenetic volcanic edifices formed in eruptions within glaciers. Similar landforms can be created in subaqueous to emergent eruptions. Differences in confinement by ice on the one hand and water on the other may provide a diagnostic tool to differentiate between the two environments. In marine or lake environments a stable water level can be assumed in most cases. Within glaciers the level of englacial lakes may wary considerably, depending on drainage mechanisms and possible shifts during eruption between subglacial and supraglacial drainage. A combined study of (1) the morphology of predominantly basaltic tuyas in Iceland, (2) thermal constraints on ice melting and size of depression in glacier surface around a growing volcano, (3) ice flow patterns of Pleistocene ice sheets as recorded by striations, and (4) ice flow modeling, provides insight into some of the characteristics unique to subglacially formed volcanoes. In the modeling it is assumed that the ice sheet in which the tuyas formed was warm-based, although it may well have been polythermal. The results show that the tuyas tend to be elongated in the direction of ice flow at the time of eruption. A progression towards lowering of the passage zone away from vent area in the down-flow direction is also indicated. These patterns are also predicted by the ice flow modeling, since inflow of ice on the up-slope side is much greater than from the sides or from the down-slope side, effectively preventing significant extension of a growing lava delta in the up-flow direction of the glacier. Another aspect of the large scale edifice morphology that may be a useful diagnostic is the level of erosion. Islands formed in monogenetic eruptions in the ocean or large lakes are eroded by wave action. Surtsey off the south coast of Iceland has a lava cap but has lost more than half of its area since formation in 1963

  1. "Mediterranean volcanoes vs. chain volcanoes in the Carpathians"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivarean, Radu

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes have always represent an attractive subject for students. Europe has a small number of volcanoes and Romania has none active ones. The curricula is poor in the study of volcanoes. We want to make a parallel between the Mediterranean active volcanoes and the old extinct ones in the Oriental Carpathians. We made an comparison of the two regions in what concerns their genesis, space and time distribution, the specific relief and the impact in the landscape, consequences of their activities, etc… The most of the Mediterranean volcanoes are in Italy, in the peninsula in Napoli's area - Vezuviu, Campi Flegrei, Puzzoli, volcanic islands in Tirenian Sea - Ischia, Aeolian Islands, Sicily - Etna and Pantelleria Island. Santorini is located in Aegean Sea - Greece. Between Sicily and Tunisia there are 13 underwater volcanoes. The island called Vulcano, it has an active volcano, and it is the origin of the word. Every volcano in the world is named after this island, just north of Sicily. Vulcano is the southernmost of the 7 main Aeolian Islands, all volcanic in origin, which together form a small island arc. The cause of the volcanoes appears to be a combination of an old subduction event and tectonic fault lines. They can be considered as the origin of the science of volcanology. The volcanism of the Carpathian region is part of the extensive volcanic activity in the Mediterranean and surrounding regions. The Carpathian Neogene/Quaternary volcanic arc is naturally subdivided into six geographically distinct segments: Oas, Gutai, Tibles, Calimani, Gurghiu and Harghita. It is located roughly between the Carpathian thrust-and-fold arc to the east and the Transylvanian Basin to the west. It formed as a result of the convergence between two plate fragments, the Transylvanian micro-plate and the Eurasian plate. Volcanic edifices are typical medium-sized andesitic composite volcanoes, some of them attaining the caldera stage, complicated by submittal or peripheral domes

  2. Mud Volcanoes Formation And Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliyev, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are natural phenomena, which occur throughout the globe. They are found at a greater or lesser scale in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, on the Kerch and Taman peninsulas, on Sakhalin Island, in West Kuban, Italy, Romania, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Ecuador. Mud volcanoes are most well-developed in Eastern Azerbaijan, where more than 30% of all the volcanoes in the world are concentrated. More than 300 mud volcanoes have already been recognized here onshore or offshore, 220 of which lie within an area of 16,000 km2. Many of these mud volcanoes are particularly large (up to 400 m high). The volcanoes of the South Caspian form permanent or temporary islands, and numerous submarine banks. Many hypotheses have been developed regarding the origin of mud volcanoes. Some of those hypotheses will be examined in the present paper. Model of spontaneous excitation-decompaction (proposed by Ivanov and Guliev, 1988, 2002). It is supposed that one of major factors of the movement of sedimentary masses and formation of hydrocarbon deposits are phase transitions in sedimentary basin. At phase transitions there are abnormal changes of physical and chemical parameters of rocks. Abnormal (high and negative) pressure takes place. This process is called as excitation of the underground environment with periodicity from several tens to several hundreds, or thousand years. The relationship between mud volcanism and the generation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, is considered to be a critical factor in mud volcano formation. At high flow rates the gas and sediment develops into a pseudo-liquid state and as flow increases the mass reaches the "so-called hover velocity" where mass transport begins. The mass of fluid moves as a quasi-uniform viscous mass through the sediment pile in a piston like manner until expelled from the surface as a "catastrophic eruption

  3. Butterflies on the Stretched Horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I return to the question of what kind of perturbations on Alice's side of an Einstein-Rosen bridge can send messages to Bob as he enters the horizon at the other end. By definition "easy" operators do not activate messages and "hard" operators do, but there are no clear criteria to identify the difference between easy and hard. In this paper I argue that the difference is related to the time evolution of a certain measure of computational complexity, associated with the stretched horizon of Alice's black hole. The arguments suggest that the AMPSS commutator argument is more connected with butterflies than with firewalls.

  4. Bending and stretching of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, E H; Hemp, W S

    1964-01-01

    The Bending and Stretching of Plates deals with elastic plate theory, particularly on small- and large-deflexion theory. Small-deflexion theory concerns derivation of basic equations, rectangular plates, plates of various shapes, plates whose boundaries are amenable to conformal transformation, plates with variable rigidity, and approximate methods. Large-deflexion theory includes general equations and some exact solutions, approximate methods in large-deflexion theory, asymptotic large-deflexion theories for very thin plates. Asymptotic theories covers membrane theory, tension field theory, a

  5. Laser therapy of stretch marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, David H

    2002-01-01

    Striae distensae, better known as stretch marks, are a common disfiguring skin disorder of significant cosmetic concern. Many sources have reported the use of lasers to diminish the appearance of striae. Controlled clinical studies of the various treatment modalities available for striae are relatively uncommon, and much of the clinical data are anecdotal. The use of lasers alone or in combination with other therapeutic modalities can provide a safe and effective reduction in the appearance of both red and white striae distensae. Many of these therapies require special measures for darker skin phototypes. This article reviews the historical use of laser therapy for this disorder and discusses current therapeutic options.

  6. Cultural factors behind the different business cultures of Iceland and Norway, a comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Rostrup, Hanne Ragnhild Hjemlestad, 1976-

    2010-01-01

    Even though Iceland and Norway are both Nordic countries originating from the same culture, the countries’ business cultures have developed different characteristics over the years. In light of the increasing emigration from Iceland to Norway following the financial crisis in 2008, this study will establish the difference between Norwegian and Icelandic business cultures so that Icelanders can prepare themselves for the different national culture and business culture in Norway. Moreover th...

  7. Re-Thinking Sustainable Education Systems in Iceland: The Net-University Project

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Rennie; Sigurbjörg Jóhannesdóttir; Stefania Kristinsdottir

    2011-01-01

    The recent economic crisis in Iceland has raised issues of the sustainability of Icelandic higher education to new levels of importance. A key strategy in relation to this economic crisis is to consider the merger of the four public universities in Iceland and to introduce a much higher enegagement with online and open delivery methods of higher education. The Net-University Project was an EU Leonardo-funded initiative to compare approaches to open and distance education in Iceland, Sweden, a...

  8. The circulation of Icelandic waters – a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Logemann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional flow, temperature and salinity fields of the North Atlantic, including the Arctic Ocean, covering the time period 1992 to 2006 are simulated with the numerical ocean model CODE. The simulation reveals several new insights and previously unknown structures which help us to clarify open questions on the regional oceanography of Icelandic waters. These relate to the structure and geographical distribution of the coastal current, the primary forcing of the North Icelandic Irminger Current (NIIC and the path of the Atlantic Water south-east of Iceland. The model's adaptively refined computational mesh has a maximum resolution of 1 km horizontal and 2.5 m vertical in Icelandic waters. CTD profiles from this region and the river discharge of 46 Icelandic watersheds, computed by the hydrological model WaSiM, are assimilated into the simulation. The model realistically reproduces the established elements of the circulation around Iceland. However, analysis of the simulated mean flow field also provides further insights. It suggests a distinct freshwater-induced coastal current that only exists along the south-west and west coasts, which is accompanied by a counter-directed undercurrent. The simulated transport of Atlantic Water over the Icelandic shelf takes place in a symmetrical system of two currents, with the established NIIC over the north-western and northern shelf, and a hitherto unnamed current over the southern and south-eastern shelf, which is simulated to be an upstream precursor of the Faroe Current (FC. Both currents are driven by barotropic pressure gradients induced by a sea level slope across the Greenland–Scotland Ridge. The recently discovered North Icelandic Jet (NIJ also features in the model predictions and is found to be forced by the baroclinic pressure field of the Arctic Front, to originate east of the Kolbeinsey Ridge and to have a volume transport of around 1.5 Sv within northern Denmark Strait. The

  9. Laboratory spectroscopy of Mars Analogue materials and latest field results from Iceland and Eifel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offringa, Marloes; Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    We have established a collection of samples, and measured them in the laboratory towards a spectrometric database that could be used as a reference for future orbital or in situ measurements. We are using systematically for all samples UV-VIS and NIR reflectance spectrometers, and sporadically a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and a Raman laser spectrometer on control samples. We also used a documented set of Moon-Mars relevant minerals curated at VU Amsterdam, as well as samples retrieved from Mars analogue campaigns in Utah (Foing et al., 2011, 2016), Iceland (Mid-Atlantic ridge spreading and magma-ice interaction), La Réunion hot spot volcano and Eifel volcanic region (mixed hotspot and melt-ascent through crust fractures) from recent campaigns in 2015 and 2016.. We discuss samples spectral diagnostics of volcanic processes and hydrous alterations that can inform recent or upcoming measurements from Mars orbit or in situ rovers. Acknowledgements: we thank Dominic Doyle for ESTEC optical lab support, Euan Monaghan (Leiden U) for FTIR measurement support, Wim van Westrenen for access to VU samples, Oscar Kamps (Utrecht U), Aidan Cowley (EAC) and Matthias Sperl (DLR) for support discussions

  10. Distribution of dust during two dust storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 ?g?m?3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 ?g?m?3). The mean PM1 concentrations were 97-241 ?g?m?3 with a maximum of 261 ?g?m?3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  11. Cs-137 fallout in Iceland, model predictions and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E.; Sigurgeirsson, M.A.; Gudnason, K. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst. (Iceland); Arnalds, O.; Karlsdottir, I.A. [Agricultural Research Inst. (Iceland); Palsdottir, P. [Icelandic Meteorological Office (Iceland)

    2002-04-01

    Basically all the fallout Cs-137 in Iceland came from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests in the late fifties and early sixties, the addition from the accident in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant was relatively very small. Measurements of fallout from nuclear weapons tests started in Iceland over 40 years ago and samples of soil, vegetation and agricultural products have been collected from various places and measured during this period. Considerable variability has been seen in the results, even between places close to each other. This is understandable due to the mountainous terrain, changing strong winds and high levels of precipitation. This variability has been especially noticeable in the case of soil samples. The important role of uncultivated rangelands in Icelandic agriculture (e.g. for sheep farming) makes it necessary to estimate deposition for many remote areas. It has thus proven difficult to get a good overview of the distribution of the deposition and its subsequent transfer into agricultural products. Over a year ago an attempt was made to assess the distribution of Cs-137 fallout in Iceland. The approach is based on a model predicting deposition using precipitation data, in a similar manner as that used previously within the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP). 1999). One station close to Reykjavik has a time series of Cs-137 deposition data and precipitation data from 1960 onwards. The AMAP deposition model was calibrated for Iceland by using deposition and precipitation data from this station. (au)

  12. Additional Workload or a Part of the Job? Icelandic Teachers' Discourse on Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnþórsdóttir, Hermína; Jóhannesson, Ingólfur Ásgeir

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the discourse of Icelandic compulsory school teachers on inclusive education. From 1974 and onwards, the education policy in Iceland has been towards inclusion, and Iceland is considered to be an example of a highly inclusive education system with few segregated resources for students with special educational…

  13. Re-Thinking Sustainable Education Systems in Iceland: The Net-University Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Frank; Johannesdottir, Sigurbjorg

    2011-01-01

    The recent economic crisis in Iceland has raised issues of the sustainability of Icelandic higher education to new levels of importance. A key strategy in relation to this economic crisis is to consider the merger of the four public universities in Iceland and to introduce a much higher engagement with online and open delivery methods of higher…

  14. Remote Sensing of Active Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter; Rothery, David

    The synoptic coverage offered by satellites provides unparalleled opportunities for monitoring active volcanoes, and opens new avenues of scientific inquiry. Thermal infrared radiation can be used to monitor levels of activity, which is useful for automated eruption detection and for studying the emplacement of lava flows. Satellite radars can observe volcanoes through clouds or at night, and provide high-resolution topographic data. In favorable conditions, radar inteferometery can be used to measure ground deformation associated with eruptive activity on a centimetric scale. Clouds from explosive eruptions present a pressing hazard to aviation; therefore, techniques are being developed to assess eruption cloud height and to discriminate between ash and meterological clouds. The multitude of sensors to be launched on future generations of space platforms promises to greatly enhance volcanological studies, but a satellite dedicated to volcanology is needed to meet requirements of aviation safety and volcano monitoring.

  15. Mount Rainier: A decade volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Donald A.; Malone, Stephen D.; Samora, Barbara A.

    Mount Rainier, the highest (4392 m) volcano in the Cascade Range, towers over a population of more than 2.5 million in the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, and its drainage system via the Columbia River potentially affects another 500,000 residents of southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon (Figure 1). Mount Rainier is the most hazardous volcano in the Cascades in terms of its potential for magma-water interaction and sector collapse. Major eruptions, or debris flows even without eruption, pose significant dangers and economic threats to the region. Despite such hazard and risk, Mount Rainier has received little study; such important topics as its petrologic and geochemical character, its proximal eruptive history, its susceptibility to major edifice failure, and its development over time have been barely investigated. This situation may soon change because of Mount Rainier's recent designation as a “Decade Volcano.”

  16. Systematic radon survey over active volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M.; Garcia Vindas, J.R. [Centre National de la Recherche Cientifique, Montpellier (France). Lab. GBE; Ricard, L.P.; Staudacher, T. [Observatoire Volcanologique Du Pitou de la Fournaise, La Plaine des Cafres (France)

    1999-08-01

    Data obtained since 1993 on Costa Rica volcanos are presented and radon anomalies recorded before the eruption of the Irazu volcano (December 8, 1994) are discussed. The Piton de la Fournaise volcano is inactive since mid 1992. The influence of the external parameters on the radon behaviour is studied and the type of perturbations induced on short-term measurements are individuate.

  17. An Assessment of the Volcanic Hazards on the Island of Heimaey, Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Vestmannaeyjar Islands, off the southern coast of Iceland, mark the most recent area of activity in the southward propagation of the East Volcanic Zone. The eruptions of the islands of Surtsey in 1963 to 1967 and of Heimaey in 1973 indicate a phase of increased activity. The Vestmannaeyjar Islands are thought to be developing into the central (composite) volcano within the volcanic system of the same name. The magma of the 1973 Heimaey eruption is of the same general composition, although slightly more evolved, as that of the 1963 Surtsey eruption. Increased volcanic activity in the area automatically creates increased risk to the island of Heimaey with a population of 5300. Thus a study of the evolution of the island up to and including the 1973 eruption was carried out and a hazard map compiled for the island. The hazard map encapsulates the areas of highest risk, as well as alternative evacuation routes from the island. The logistics of an evacuation of the island are an issue that needs to be addressed; following the favorable evacuation during the 1973 eruption, a false sense of security could be said to be in place. The study also looked at the awareness of the population and their education as regards the volcanic hazards in the area. The hazard map for the island recognizes that a future eruption could be further away from the populated areas of the island, though this does alter the risk involved. A future eruption could occur to the northeast of the island, in which case it would block the natural harbor. Aside from evacuation in an emergency, further questions arise from this study in relation to the future of the island and its predominant fishing industry. The main conclusions of the study are, first, that the people of the island feel that an imminent eruption of the Katla Volcano on the mainland poses perhaps the only future volcanic hazard. Katla Volcano being on the mainland, its future eruption will not much affect them. A second main

  18. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  19. Fluid Stretching as a Levy Process

    CERN Document Server

    Dentz, Marco; Borgne, Tanguy Le; de Barros, Felipe P J

    2016-01-01

    We uncover deformation dynamics that lead to power-law stretching of material lines in heterogeneous flow. This evidences the existence of a broad spectrum of algebraic stretching behaviors in fluids from sub- to superlinear beyond the linear (shear flow) and exponential (chaotic flow) elongation paradigms. Formulating fluid deformation in two-dimensional steady flow in stream-line coordinates, we show that stretching results from the non-linear coupling between Lagrangian shear deformation and velocity fluctuations. Casting the stretching process in the frame of a continuous time random walk, this coupling links the magnitude of elongation events to their persistence through the transit times of material strips. As a consequence, for broad transit time distributions stretching obeys Levy dynamics. We derive explicit expressions for the mean elongation which predict a broad range of power-law stretching behaviors depending on the velocity distribution and the relation between shear rate and velocity along str...

  20. Isotope heterogeneity of Pre-Holocene groundwater in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Á.E.; Arnorsson, S.; Heinemeier, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that groundwater with a Pre-Holocene component is more common in the Icelandic bedrock than previously thought. Some of the Pre-Holocene water samples are more depleted in delta H-2 and delta O-18 than any mean annual precipitation in Iceland today due to the cold......-Holocene component in the groundwater. The deuterium excess value may also help to identify water from a different climate regime, if no oxygen shift has occurred. The relative abundance of a Pre-Holocene water component of the Icelandic groundwater has led to the understanding that combined interpretation of water......-isotopes, water chemistry and hydrogeology is essential to delineate flow direction and trace the origin of thermal and non-thermal groundwaters....

  1. Distribution patterns in the native vascular flora of Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasowicz, Pawel; Pasierbiński, Andrzej; Przedpelska-Wasowicz, Ewa Maria; Kristinsson, Hörður

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to reveal biogeographical patterns in the native vascular flora of Iceland and to define ecological factors responsible for these patterns. We analysed dataset of more than 500,000 records containing information on the occurrence of vascular plants. Analysis of ecological factors included climatic (derived from WORLDCLIM data), topographic (calculated from digital elevation model) and geological (bedrock characteristics) variables. Spherical k-means clustering and principal component analysis were used to detect biogeographical patterns and to study the factors responsible for them. We defined 10 biotic elements exhibiting different biogeographical patterns. We showed that climatic (temperature-related) and topographic variables were the most important factors contributing to the spatial patterns within the Icelandic vascular flora and that these patterns are almost completely independent of edaphic factors (bedrock type). Our study is the first one to analyse the biogeographical differentiation of the native vascular flora of Iceland.

  2. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Waitt, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Augustine Volcano is a 1250-meter high stratovolcano in southwestern Cook Inlet about 280 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and within about 300 kilometers of more than half of the population of Alaska. Explosive eruptions have occurred six times since the early 1800s (1812, 1883, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, and 1986). The 1976 and 1986 eruptions began with an initial series of vent-clearing explosions and high vertical plumes of volcanic ash followed by pyroclastic flows, surges, and lahars on the volcano flanks. Unlike some prehistoric eruptions, a summit edifice collapse and debris avalanche did not occur in 1812, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, or 1986. However, early in the 1883 eruption, a portion of the volcano summit broke loose forming a debris avalanche that flowed to the sea. The avalanche initiated a small tsunami reported on the Kenai Peninsula at English Bay, 90 kilometers east of the volcano. Plumes of volcanic ash are a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International and other local airports. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Eruptions similar to the historical and prehistoric eruptions are likely in Augustine's future.

  3. Monitoring of jökulhlaups and element fluxes in proglacial Icelandic rivers using osmotic samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Gałeczka, Iwona M.; Gkritzalis-Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Palmer, Martin R.; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Vogfjörð, Kristín; Jónsson, Þorsteinn; Gislason, Sigurður R.

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of volatile emissions from volcanoes is an integral part of understanding magmatic systems, with the exsolution and extent of volcanic degassing having a large impact on the nature of an eruption. Measurements of volatiles have traditionally focused on gas emissions into the atmosphere, but volatiles can also become dissolved in proximal water bodies en route to the surface. Thus the monitoring of rivers draining active volcanic areas can provide insights to identifying changes in activity. This process is particularly important for sub-glacial volcanoes in Iceland, where much of the volatile release is transported within glacial outbreak floods, termed jökulhlaups. Monitoring and characterising these phenomena is hampered by the dependence on spot sampling of stochastic events under challenging field conditions, which often leads to bias in the collected data. A recent technological advance is the osmotic sampler, an electricity-free pump that continuously collects water that can subsequently be divided into time-averaged samples. This technique allows for continued and unsupervised deployment of a sampler for weeks to months, representing a cost-efficient form of chemical monitoring. In this study we deployed osmotic samplers in two rivers in southern Iceland. Skálm is a proglacial river from Mýrdalsjökull glacier and Katla volcano, while Skaftá is a larger drainage system from the western part of Vatnajökull glacier. Both rivers are prone to jökulhlaups from geothermal and volcanic sources, and a small jökulhlaup of geothermal origin occurred during the second deployment in Skaftá in January 2014. The two deployments show that osmotic samplers are capable of delivering accurate chemical data in turbulent conditions for several key elements. Total dissolved fluxes for the deployment at Skaftá are calculated to be Na = 9.9 tonnes/day, Mg = 10.5 t/d, Si = 34.7 t/d, Cl = 11.0 t/d, Ca = 31.6 t/d, DIC = 50.8 t/d, and SO4 = 28.3 t/d, with

  4. High resolution modelling of the North Icelandic Irminger Current (NIIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Logemann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The northward inflow of Atlantic Water through Denmark Strait – the North Icelandic Irminger Current (NIIC – is simulated with a numerical model of the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean. The model uses the technique of adaptive grid refinement which allows a high spatial resolution (1 km horizontal, 10 m vertical around Iceland. The model is used to assess time and space variability of volume and heat fluxes for the years 1997–2003. Passive tracers are applied to study origin and composition of NIIC water masses. The NIIC originates from two sources: the Irminger Current, flowing as part of the sub-polar gyre in 100–500 m depth along the Reykjanes Ridge and the shallow Icelandic coastal current, flowing north-westward on the south-west Icelandic shelf. The ratio of volume flux between the deep and shallow branch is around 2:1. The NIIC continues as a warm and saline branch northward through Denmark Strait where it entrains large amounts of polar water due to the collision with the southward flowing East Greenland Current. After passing Denmark Strait, the NIIC follows the coast line eastward being an important heat source for north Icelandic waters. At least 60% of the temporal temperature variability of north Icelandic waters is caused by the NIIC. The NIIC volume and heat transport is highly variable and depends strongly on the wind field north-east of Denmark Strait. Daily means can change from 1 Sv eastward to 2 Sv westward within a few days. Highest monthly mean transport rates occur in summer when winds from north are weak, whereas the volume flux is reduced by around 50% in winter. Summer heat flux rates can be even three times higher than in winter. The simulation also shows variability on the interannual scale. In particular weak winds from north during winter 2002/2003 combined with mild weather conditions south of Iceland led to anomalous high NIIC volume (+40% and heat flux (+60% rates. In this period, simulated north Icelandic

  5. Growth and reproduction in the Icelandic grey seal

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Growth and reproduction in grey seals (Halichoerus grypus Fabricius, 1791) from Iceland were examined. The oldest Icelandic grey seals obtained were a 36 year old female and a 23 year old male. The longest animals were a 255 cm 13 year old male, and a 230 cm 20 year old female. The heaviest grey seal was an 11 year old male weighing 310 kg. The heaviest female was a 20 year old female that weighed 240 kg. Females reached an asymptotic standard length and weight of 200 (95% CI 196 - 204) cm an...

  6. Research on human genetics in Iceland. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-31

    Records of the Icelandic Population are being used to investigate the possible inheritance of disabilities and diseases as well as other characters and the effect of environment on man. The progress report of research covers the period 1977 to 1980. The investigation was begun in 1965 by the Genetical Committee of the University of Iceland and the materials used are demographic records from the year 1840 to present and various medical information. The records are being computerized and linked together to make them effective for use in hereditary studies.

  7. Progress report on research on human genetics in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-31

    Records of the Icelandic population are being used to investigate the possible inheritance of disabilities and diseases as well as other characteristics and the effect of environment on man. The progress report of research covers the period from 1977 to 1980. The investigation was begun in 1965 by the Genetical Committee of the University of Iceland and the materials used are demographic records from the year 1840 to present and various medical information. The records are being computerized and linked together to make them effective for use in hereditary studies.

  8. Sustainable energy resources and economics in Iceland and Greenland

    CERN Document Server

    Kristjánsdóttir, Helga

    2015-01-01

    This book provides fascinating examples of the ways renewable and sustainable energy can support economic growth, which will be illuminating for academic researchers and students, as well as those interested in green investment opportunities. The distinctive glacial, volcanic and oceanic environments of Iceland and Greenland supply abundant renewable energy resources in the form of hydropower and geothermal energy. As one of the few nations in the world with 100% renewable electricity production, Iceland is a compelling case study of a sustainable energy driven economy. Consideration of Green

  9. Antibiotic susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Anna Ingibjorg; Gudjonsson, Hallgrimur; Hardardottir, Hjordis; Jonsdottir, Karen Drofn; Bjornsson, Einar Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Increasing resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to antibiotics calls for constant re-evaluation of multidrug regimens that have been used to eradicate the infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current antibiotic susceptibility of H. pylori in an Icelandic cohort. Patients referred for gastroscopy were recruited prospectively. Those found to have a positive rapid urease test were included in the study. Susceptibility testing was conducted by the Epsilometer test (E-test) method for ampicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole and tetracycline. Results were obtained after three days of incubation in microaerophilic conditions at 37 °C, except for the metronidazole were the first 24 hours were anaerobic. Of the 613 patients who underwent gastroscopy, 138 (23%) had a positive rapid urease test. H. pylori was successfully cultured from 105 (76%) of the urease test positive patients and the isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility. Five patients had prior H. pylori eradication. Antibiotic resistance for ampicillin, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole and tetracycline was 0%, 9%, 4%, 1% and 0%, respectively. If those who had previously undergone eradication treatment were excluded, the resistance was 0%, 6%, 3%, 1% and 0%, respectively. Clarithromycin resistance was higher amongst women than men, 13% vs. 5%, however, not significantly. Clarithromycin resistance was 60% amongst those who had previously received eradication treatment compared to 6% of those who had not (p pylori isolates can be considered relatively low. Therefore, in the current cohort, standard triple-drug clarithromycin-containing regimen should remain the first-line treatment against H. pylori.

  10. Porosity evolution in Icelandic hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thien, B.; Kosakowski, G.; Kulik, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineralogical alteration of reservoir rocks, driven by fluid circulation in natural or enhanced hydrothermal systems, is likely to influence the long-term performance of geothermal power generation. A key factor is the change of porosity due to dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary phases. Porosity changes will affect fluid circulation and solute transport, which, in turn, influence mineralogical alteration. This study is part of the Sinergia COTHERM project (COmbined hydrological, geochemical and geophysical modeling of geotTHERMal systems, grant number CRSII2_141843/1) that is an integrative research project aimed at improving our understanding of the sub-surface processes in magmatically-driven natural geothermal systems. These are typically high enthalphy systems where a magmatic pluton is located at a few kilometers depth. These shallow plutons increase the geothermal gradient and trigger the circulation of hydrothermal waters with a steam cap forming at shallow depth. Field observations suggest that active and fossil Icelandic hydrothermal systems are built from a superposition of completely altered and completely unaltered layers. With help of 1D and 2D reactive transport models (OpenGeoSys-GEM code), we investigate the reasons for this finding, by studying the mineralogical evolution of protoliths with different initial porosities at different temperatures and pressures, different leaching water composition and gas content, and different porosity geometries (i.e. porous medium versus fractured medium). From this study, we believe that the initial porosity of protoliths and volume changes due to their transformation into secondary minerals are key factors to explain the different alteration extents observed in field studies. We also discuss how precipitation and dissolution kinetics can influence the alteration time scales.

  11. Sediment Distribution on Skeidararsandur, Southeast Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, B.; Russell, A. J.; Finnegan, D. C.; Smith, L. C.; Knudsen, O.

    2001-12-01

    The zone of outwash accumulation is perhaps the most distinctive feature of the proglacial environment. Its gross morphology is determined by the topography of the proglacial zone, the volume of the sediment input, and the processes responsible for sediment distribution. The largest unconfined, active outwash plain on Earth, Skeidararsandur, extends seawards across the coastal plain of southeastern Iceland. Investigations of the proximal surface of Skeidararsandur using a variety of data sources, including Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery, Synthetic Aperture Radar data, Airborne Topographic Mapper laser altimeter data and high-resolution aerial photography, have provided a synoptic perspective of the proglacial drainage system. Over the past 50 yr Skeidararjokull has become decoupled from the sandur and the original, highly diffuse, multipoint distubutary system, inactive remnants of which are preserved on the sandur's proximal surface, has been transformed into an integrated drainage network, with only three primary outlets. These entrenched channels constrain jokulhlaups and ablation dominated flows alike, and permit most meltwater to bypass the proximal surface. The shift from a diffuse to a channelized (point source) distributary system has had a significant impact on the magnitude and style of sedimentation throughout the proximal zone, and also on the size of sediment supplied to the sandur. Stratigraphic evidence suggests both jokulhlaups and glacier surges have a significant influence on the development of the fluvial succession in the proximal zone, but a diffuse, multipoint distributary system is required to sustain active accretion across the sandur as a whole. The contemporary meltwater distributary system on Skeidararsandur, which is a product of glacier retreat, may thus represent one end of the spectrum of channel configurations that facilitate sediment distribution on sandar.

  12. Stretching Folding Instability and Nanoemulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chon U

    2009-01-01

    Here we show a folding-stretching instability in a microfluidic flow focusing device using silicon oil (100cSt) and water. The fluid dynamics video demonstrates an oscillating thread of oil focused by two co-flowing streams of water. We show several high-speed sequences of these oscillations with 30,000 frames/s. Once the thread is decelerated in a slower moving pool downstream an instability sets in and water-in-oil droplets are formed. We reveal the details of the pinch-off with 500,000 frames/s. The pinch-off is so repeatable that complex droplet patterns emerge. Some of droplets are below the resolution limit, thus smaller than 1 micrometer in diameter.

  13. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    CERN Document Server

    Livne, Ariel; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations -- cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell's passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measu...

  14. Mount Rainier, a decade volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, S.C.; Hooper, P.R. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Geology); Eggers, A.E. (Univ. of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Mount Rainier, recently designated as a decade volcano, is a 14,410 foot landmark which towers over the heavily populated southern Puget Sound Lowland of Washington State. It last erupted in the mid-1800's and is an obvious threat to this area, yet Rainier has received little detailed study. Previous work has divided Rainier into two distinct pre-glacial eruptive episodes and one post-glacial eruptive episode. In a pilot project, the authors analyzed 253 well-located samples from the volcano for 27 major and trace elements. Their objective is to test the value of chemical compositions as a tool in mapping the stratigraphy and understanding the eruptive history of the volcano which they regard as prerequisite to determining the petrogenesis and potential hazard of the volcano. The preliminary data demonstrates that variation between flows is significantly greater than intra-flow variation -- a necessary condition for stratigraphic use. Numerous flows or groups of flows can be distinguished chemically. It is also apparent from the small variation in Zr abundances and considerable variation in such ratios as Ba/Nb that fractional crystallization plays a subordinate role to some form of mixing process in the origin of the Mount Rainier lavas.

  15. Development and field-testing of the BENTO box: A new satellite-linked data collection system for volcano monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, D. C.; Behar, A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Fouch, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    'i; Etna Volcano, Italy, and Hengill Volcano, Iceland. Together, the data from these BENTO boxes and previously established volcano monitoring instruments are allowing us to test and refine the system design and deployment strategy. 'BENTO 2' boxes, equipped with broadband seismic sensors, are currently undergoing bench testing, and will be deployed on active volcanoes for field-testing beginning in early 2014.

  16. Did the Laki volcano eruption cause the cold winter of 1783-1784?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-05-01

    In June 1783 the Laki volcano in Iceland began to erupt and continued erupting for months, causing a major environmental disaster. The eruption spewed out toxic sulfuric acid aerosols, which spread over northern latitudes and caused thousands of deaths. That summer, there were heat waves, widespread famines, crop failures, and livestock losses. During the following winter, temperatures in Europe were about 2°C below average for the late 1700s; the winter was also one of the most severe of the past 500 years in eastern North America. The Laki eruption has been blamed for the anomalously cold winter of 1783-1784. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL046696, 2011)

  17. The BENTO Box: Development and field-testing of a new satellite-linked data collection system for multiparameter volcano monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, D. C.; Behar, A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2014-12-01

    Predicting volcanic activity requires continuous monitoring for signals of magmatic unrest in harsh, often remote environments. BENTO is a next-generation monitoring system, currently in prototype testing, that is highly portable, low-cost, rapidly deployable, and entirely autonomous. Such a system could be used to provide critical monitoring and data collection capabilities during rapid-onset eruptions, or to provide a crude baseline monitor at large numbers of remote volcanoes to 'flag' the onset of unrest so that costlier resources such as specialized instrumentation can be deployed in the appropriate place at the appropriate time. The BENTO 1 (low-rate data) prototype currently comprises off-the-shelf volcanic gas sensors (SO2, CO2, Fl, Cl, and Br), a weather station (temperature, wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, humidity, pressure), and telemetry via Iridium modem. In baseline mode, BENTO 1 takes a measurement from all of its sensors every two hours and automatically sends the measurements through Iridium to a server that posts them to a dedicated and customizable web page. The measurement interval and other sensor parameters (pumping time, sensor constants) can be adjusted directly or remotely (through the Iridium network) as needed. Currently, BENTO 1 is deployed at Mt. Etna, Italy; Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, Hengill Volcano, Iceland; and Hekla Volcano, Iceland. The BENTO 2 (high-rate) system is motivated by a need to avoid having to telemeter raw seismic data, which at 20-100 Hz/channel is far too voluminous for cost- and power-effective transmission through satellite networks such as Iridium. Our solution is to regularly transmit only state-of-health information and descriptions of the seismic data (e.g., 'triggered' seismic event rates and amplitudes), rather than the data itself. The latter can be accomplished through on-board data analysis and reduction at the installation site. Currently, it is possible to request specific time segments of raw

  18. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue.

  19. Anharmonic Bend-Stretch Coupling in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindner, Jörg; Vöhringer, Peter; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Cringus, Dan; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Corkum, Paul; Jonas, David M.; Miller, R.J. Dwayne.; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2006-01-01

    Following excitation of the H-O-H bending mode of water molecules in solution the stretching mode region is monitored over its entire width. The anharmonic coupling between the two modes results in a substantial change of the transient stretch absorption that decays with the bend depopulation time.

  20. STRETCHING IMPACTS INFLAMMATION RESOLUTION IN CONNECTIVE TISSUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J.; Colas, Romain A.; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N.; Langevin, Helene M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 minutes twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, two weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch vs. no stretch for 48 hours, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue. PMID:26588184

  1. Reflexivation and Logophoricity: Evidence from the Acquisition of Icelandic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurjonsdottir, Sigriour; Hyams, Nina

    1992-01-01

    Studied interpretation of local anaphor "sjalfan sig," the long-distance anaphor "sig," and pronouns in 55 Icelandic-speaking children and 10 adult controls. Results support an approach to binding that distinguishes the syntactic use of sig from its logophoric use and treats sig as a pronominal both in its internal structure…

  2. Observations of seasonal subduction at the Iceland-Faroe Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaird, N. L.; Rhines, P. B.; Eriksen, C. C.

    2016-06-01

    The polar front in the North Atlantic is bound to the ridge between Iceland and the Faroe Islands, where about one-half of the northward transport of warm Atlantic Water into the Nordic Seas occurs, as well as about one sixth of the equatorward dense overflow. We find a low salinity water mass at the surface of the Iceland-Faroe Front (IFF), which in wintertime subducts along outcropping isopycnals and is found in much modified form on the Atlantic side of the Iceland-Faroe Ridge (IFR) crest. The features found on the Atlantic side of the crest at depth have temperature and salinity characteristics which are clearly traceable to the surface outcrop of the IFF. The presence of coherent low salinity layers on the Atlantic side of the IFR crest has not been previously reported. Warm waters above the IFR primarily feed the Faroe Current, and injection of a low salinity water mass may play an early role in the water mass transformation taking place in the Nordic Seas. The seasonality of the intrusive features suggests a link between winter convection, mixed layer instability and deep frontal subduction. These low salinity anomalies (as well as a low oxygen water mass from the Iceland Basin) can be used as tracers of the intermediate circulation over the IFR.

  3. Curriculum Analysis and Education for Sustainable Development in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Ingolfur Asgeir; Norodahl, Kristin; Oskarsdottir, Gunnhildur; Palsdottir, Auour; Petursdottir, Bjorg

    2011-01-01

    The article explores how the Icelandic public school curriculum for early childhood, compulsory and upper secondary school deals with education for sustainable development. As the curriculum does not often mention the term sustainability, a key with which to investigate signs of education for sustainable development in the three curricula was…

  4. The Case of Iceland in PISA: Girls' Educational Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsson, Almar M.; Olafsson, Ragnar F.

    2009-01-01

    Among 41 participating countries in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003, the gender difference in favour of females was greatest in Iceland in the three subjects tested: mathematics, science and reading. The aims of this article are to put these findings in national and international context, and report on a number of…

  5. Transition to School Practices: Comparisons from Iceland and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Johanna; Perry, Bob; Dockett, Sue

    2008-01-01

    This paper is the result of collaboration among early childhood education researchers from different cultures on opposite sides of the globe. The project sought to identify what practitioners in both preschool and primary school settings in Iceland and Australia regarded as successful transition to school practices. Independently developed surveys…

  6. Students' Attitudes towards Craft and Technology in Iceland and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Gísli; Ólafsson, Brynjar; Autio, Ossi

    2012-01-01

    Craft education in both Finland and Iceland originated over 140 years ago and was influenced by the Scandinavian Sloyd pedagogy. Since then, the subject has moved away from craft and towards technology, with the aim being to increase students' technological abilities. In the beginning, the subject largely focused on the students copying artefacts,…

  7. Curriculum Analysis and Education for Sustainable Development in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Ingolfur Asgeir; Norodahl, Kristin; Oskarsdottir, Gunnhildur; Palsdottir, Auour; Petursdottir, Bjorg

    2011-01-01

    The article explores how the Icelandic public school curriculum for early childhood, compulsory and upper secondary school deals with education for sustainable development. As the curriculum does not often mention the term sustainability, a key with which to investigate signs of education for sustainable development in the three curricula was…

  8. Pressure Algometry in Icelandic Horses : Interexaminer and Intraexaminer Reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menke, Eveline S.; Blom, Guy; van Loon, Johannes P A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834610; Back, Willem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125023707

    2016-01-01

    Reliability of pressure algometry as an outcome measure in equine research and therapy needs to be studied. The aim of the present study was to establish interexaminer and intraexaminer reliability of pressure algometry in Icelandic horses and to determine reference mechanical nociceptive threshold

  9. Over-the-counter codeine use in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, A B; Grimsson, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to test the assumption that liberalizing community pharmacy ownership in Iceland would lead to increased irrational use of over-the-counter pain relievers containing codeine. METHODS: Based on this assumption we built and tested a model using an interru...

  10. Cartography and Culture in Medieval Iceland (Theses in Progress)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kedwards, Dale

    2015-01-01

    This abstract summarises my research, undertaken as a doctoral thesis at the University of York, into the surviving corpus of world maps from medieval Iceland. It briefly describes the maps, which collectively provide examples of the major European cartographic genres, and their manuscript contexts....

  11. Assessing hazards to aviation from sulfur dioxide emitted by explosive Icelandic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anja; Witham, Claire S.; Theys, Nicolas; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Szpek, Kate; Feng, Wuhu; Hort, Matthew C.; Woolley, Alan M.; Jones, Andrew R.; Redington, Alison L.; Johnson, Ben T.; Hayward, Chris L.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions take place in Iceland about once every 3 to 5 years. Ash emissions from these eruptions can cause significant disruption to air traffic over Europe and the North Atlantic as is evident from the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is also emitted by volcanoes, but there are no criteria to define when airspace is considered hazardous or nonhazardous. However, SO2 is a well-known ground-level pollutant that can have detrimental effects on human health. We have used the United Kingdom Met Office's NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment) model to simulate SO2 mass concentrations that could occur in European and North Atlantic airspace for a range of hypothetical explosive eruptions in Iceland with a probability to occur about once every 3 to 5 years. Model performance was evaluated for the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull summit eruption against SO2 vertical column density retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument and in situ measurements from the United Kingdom Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements research aircraft. We show that at no time during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption did SO2 mass concentrations at flight altitudes violate European air quality standards. In contrast, during a hypothetical short-duration explosive eruption similar to Hekla in 2000 (emitting 0.2 Tg of SO2 within 2 h, or an average SO2 release rate 250 times that of Eyjafjallajökull 2010), simulated SO2 concentrations are greater than 1063 µg/m3 for about 48 h in a small area of European and North Atlantic airspace. By calculating the occurrence of aircraft encounters with the volcanic plume of a short-duration eruption, we show that a 15 min or longer exposure of aircraft and passengers to concentrations ≥500 µg/m3 has a probability of about 0.1%. Although exposure of humans to such concentrations may lead to irritations to the eyes, nose and, throat and cause increased airway resistance even in healthy individuals

  12. Was the 12.1 ka Icelandic Vedde Ash one of a kind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, C. S.; Blockley, S. P. E.; Mangerud, J.; Smith, V. C.; Lohne, Ø. S.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Matthews, I. P.; Lotter, A. F.

    2012-02-01

    The Vedde Ash is the most important volcanic event marker layer for the correlation of Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental archives in Europe and the North Atlantic. First defined from its type site localities near Ålesund, Western Norway, the Vedde Ash has now been traced across much of northern and central Europe, into northwest Russia, within North Atlantic marine sediments and into the Greenland ice cores. The Vedde Ash is thought to derive from an eruption of the Katla volcano in Iceland that occurred midway through the Younger Dryas/Greenland Stadial 1 (GS-1), ˜12.1 ka BP. Visible and cryptotephra deposits of the Vedde Ash have been found in numerous stratified sites with robust chronologies, which allow its age to be constrained and its dispersal to be mapped. The eruption must have been highly explosive, however few proximal outcrops have been confirmed and this crucial ash layer remains almost exclusively distally-described and characterised using major element glass compositions. The widespread distribution, stratigraphic associations and consistent major element glass chemistry have led the Quaternary tephrochronological community to see the Vedde Ash as a robust and unique chronological marker layer for the Last Glacial to Interglacial Transition (˜10-18 ka BP). Here we present new glass analyses of the Vedde Ash from multiple sites around the dispersal area, using a full suite of compositional analysis, including for the first time, single-grain trace element data. These data demonstrate the strong compositional coherence of Vedde Ash deposits. However, comparison with major, minor, and trace element compositional data from several other distally-described Icelandic tephras reveals that both before and after the Younger Dryas chronozone, there were eruptions that generated widespread tephra layers that have comparable glass shard compositions to the Vedde Ash. This implies that these numerous events not only hail from the same volcanic system, but

  13. Inter-rifting Deformation in an Extensional Rift Segment; the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, R.; Masterlark, T.; Sigmundsson, F.; Arnadottir, T.; Feigl, K. L.

    2006-12-01

    The Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) in Iceland is an extensional rift segment, forming a sub-aerial exposure of a part of the Mid-Atlantic ridge. The NVZ is bounded to the south by the Icelandic mantle plume, currently beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap, and to the north by the Tjörnes Fracture zone, a transform zone connecting the offset on- and offshore rift segments of the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Based on geologic and tectonic mapping, the NVZ has been divided into five partly overlapping en-echelon fissure swarms, each with a central main volcanic production area. The two fissure swarms with known activity in historic time are, based on geodetic and seismic data, interpreted to have associated shallow crustal magma chambers. These central volcanoes are furthermore the only with caldera collapses associated, reflecting on the maturity of the systems. A series of newly formed InSAR images of the NVZ, spanning the interval from 1993-2006, have been formed, revealing a complex interplay of several tectonic and magmatic processes. Deformation from two subsiding shallow sources appear at the sites of the known crustal magma chambers. Furthermore, subsidence is occurring at varying degrees within the associated relatively narrow fissure swarms (15-20 km). However, the horizontal plate spreading signal is not confined to the fissure systems, and appears to be distributed over a much wider zone (about 100 km). This wide zone of horizontal spreading has previously been measured with campaign GPS surveys. A broad area of uplift situated about 18 km to the north of one of the subsidence centres (Krafla) suggests a deep seated pressurization source near the crust mantle boundary. Movements on previously unrecognized faults are apparent in the data, correlating well with the location of earthquake epicentres from minor seismic activity. Finally, utilization of geothermal resources in the Krafla area affects the deformation fields created by magmatic and tectonic processes, further

  14. Vertical profile and aerosol size distribution measurements in Iceland (LOAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Vignelles, Damien; Verdier, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Cold climate and high latitudes regions contain important dust sources where dust is frequently emitted, foremost from glacially-derived sediments of riverbeds or ice-proximal areas (Arnalds, 2010; Bullard, 2013). Iceland is probably the most active dust source in the arctic/sub-arctic region (Dagsson-Waldhauserova, 2013). The frequency of days with suspended dust exceeds 34 dust days annually. Icelandic dust is of volcanic origin; it is very dark in colour and contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles. Such properties allow even large particles to be easily transported long distances. Thus, there is a need to better understand the spatial and temporal variability of these dusts. Two launch campaigns of the Light Optical Aerosols Counter (LOAC) were conducted in Iceland with meteorological balloons. LOAC use a new optical design that allows to retrieve the size concentrations in 19 size classes between 0.2 and 100 microm, and to provide an estimate of the main nature of aerosols. Vertical stratification and aerosol composition of the subarctic atmosphere was studied in detail. The July 2011 launch represented clean non-dusty season with low winds while the November 2013 launch was conducted during the high winds after dusty period. For the winter flight (performed from Reykjavik), the nature of aerosols strongly changed with altitude. In particular, a thin layer of volcanic dust was observed at an altitude of 1 km. Further LOAC measurements are needed to understand the implication of Icelandic dust to the Arctic warming and climate change. A new campaign of LAOC launches is planned for May 2014. Reference: Arnalds, O., 2010. Dust sources and deposition of aeolian materials in Iceland. Icelandic Agricultural Sciences 23, 3-21. Bullard, J.E., 2013. Contemporary glacigenic inputs to the dust cycle. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 38, 71-89. Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P., Arnalds O., Olafsson H. 2013. Long-term frequency and characteristics of dust storm events in

  15. Capillary stretching of elastic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protiere, Suzie; Stone, Howard A.; Duprat, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Fibrous media consisting of constrained flexible fibers can be found in many engineered systems (membranes in filters, woven textile, matted paper). When such materials interact with a liquid, the presence of liquid/air interfaces induces capillary forces that deform the fibers. To model this interaction we study the behaviour of a finite volume of liquid deposited on two parallel flexible fibers clamped at both ends. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We show that the system undergoes various morphological changes as the interfiber distance, the elasticity and the tension of the fibers are varied. For a certain range of parameters, the liquid spreads along the fibers and pulls them together, leading to the ``zipping'' of the fibers. This capillary adhesion can then be enhanced or reduced by changing the tension within the fibers. We will show that balancing stretching and capillary forces allows the prediction of this transition as well as the conditions for which detachment of the fibers occurs. These results may be used to prevent the clogging of fibrous membranes or to optimize the capture of liquids.

  16. Does Acute Static Stretching Reduce Muscle Power?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis M. Kozub

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the training and clinical setting. Recently, stretching in the warm-up has been shown to decrease several muscular performance variables, but the dose-response of this effect is unknown and moreover these stretching bouts are not representative of athletes during warm up procedures, as they are usually time consuming. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help sportsmen, coaches, physiotherapist and clinicians make decisions for integrating stretching as a part of warm up or rehabilitation treatment plan.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to examine whether acute static stretching is responsible for losses in isokinetic peak torque production and if it does, than which time of stretching effect muscle peak torque?Design: Randomized, counterbalanced, within-subjects experimental design.Setting: A university human project laboratory.Methods: Twenty (n=20 light to moderate young exercisers, male and female, from University of Limerick community, with an average age of 22.1±3.6 years, height of 175.6±5 cm, and weight of 73.1±9.9 kg, were randomly selected to take part in the study. Prior to the main study, volunteers attended the lab on two occasions to be familiarized with the knee extension protocol on the Con - trex isokinetic system and with the static stretching protocol. All participants than performed five additional static stretching protocols randomly, in non-consecutive training session. The stretching protocols were 0, 60,120, 180 and 180 with alternative pattern.Results: The results of the statistical analysis (P > 0.05 indicated that peak torque remained unchanged following the static stretching for 0-180 sec at 60 & 180° s−1 angular velocities.Conclusion: The findings suggest that an athletic stretching (shorter duration ranging from 0-180 sec does not produce decreases in peak torque. Athletes

  17. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: VOLCANOS (Volcano Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains point locations of active volcanoes as compiled by Motyka et al., 1993. Eighty-nine volcanoes with eruptive phases in the Quaternary are...

  18. Stretching micropatterned cells on a PDMS membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-22

    Mechanical forces exerted on cells and/or tissues play a major role in numerous processes. We have developed a device to stretch cells plated on a PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) membrane, compatible with imaging. This technique is reproducible and versatile. The PDMS membrane can be micropatterned in order to confine cells or tissues to a specific geometry. The first step is to print micropatterns onto the PDMS membrane with a deep UV technique. The PDMS membrane is then mounted on a mechanical stretcher. A chamber is bound on top of the membrane with biocompatible grease to allow gliding during the stretch. The cells are seeded and allowed to spread for several hours on the micropatterns. The sample can be stretched and unstretched multiple times with the use of a micrometric screw. It takes less than a minute to apply the stretch to its full extent (around 30%). The technique presented here does not include a motorized device, which is necessary for applying repeated stretch cycles quickly and/or computer controlled stretching, but this can be implemented. Stretching of cells or tissue can be of interest for questions related to cell forces, cell response to mechanical stress or tissue morphogenesis. This video presentation will show how to avoid typical problems that might arise when doing this type of seemingly simple experiment.

  19. Ground based measurements of the gas emission from the Holuhraun volcanic fissure eruption on Iceland 2014/2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Bo; Arellano, Santiago; Conde, Vladimir; Pfeffer, Melissa; Barsotti, Sara; Stefansdottir, Gerður; Bergsson, Baldur; Bergsson, Bergur; Ingvarsson, Thorgils; Weber, Konradin

    2015-04-01

    The since 31 August 2014 ongoing volcanic eruption at Holuhraun on Iceland is by far the strongest source of sulfur dioxide in Europe over the last 230 years with sustained emission rates exceeding 100 000 ton/day. This gas emission severely affects local population and has become a concern also for air traffic. The eruption has in December continued at constant pace for 3.5 months. Three scenarios are envisaged for the future; (1) the eruption stops, (2) the fissure extends under the Vattnajökul glacier and (3) Bardarbunga volcano erupts. The two later scenarios will cause increased gas emission, severe ash emissions and extended flooding. Under the scope of the EU-project FUTUREVOLC, a project with 3.5 years duration, aiming at making Iceland a supersite for volcanological research as a European contribution to GEO, we are developing a version of the Scanning DOAS instrument that is adapted to high latitudes with low UV radiation and severe meteorological conditions. Since the first day of the eruption several of these novel instruments has been monitoring the SO2 emission from the eruption. Data from our instruments are still after 3.5 months the only sustained ground-based monitoring of this gas emission. A lot of work is however needed to sustain this operation at a very remote site and under severe field conditions. At the same time the very high concentrations in the gas plume, in combination with bad meteorological conditions require the development of novel methods to derive reliable flux estimates. In this presentation we will discuss the instrumental issues and present the latest version of the emission estimates made from our measurements.

  20. Long-term dust aerosol production from natural sources in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur

    2017-02-01

    Iceland is a volcanic island in the North Atlantic Ocean with maritime climate. In spite of moist climate, large areas are with limited vegetation cover where >40% of Iceland is classified with considerable to very severe erosion and 21% of Iceland is volcanic sandy deserts. Not only do natural emissions from these sources influenced by strong winds affect regional air quality in Iceland ("Reykjavik haze"), but dust particles are transported over the Atlantic ocean and Arctic Ocean >1000 km at times. The aim of this paper is to place Icelandic dust production area into international perspective, present long-term frequency of dust storm events in northeast Iceland, and estimate dust aerosol concentrations during reported dust events. Meteorological observations with dust presence codes and related visibility were used to identify the frequency and the long-term changes in dust production in northeast Iceland. There were annually 16.4 days on average with reported dust observations on weather stations within the northeastern erosion area, indicating extreme dust plume activity and erosion within the northeastern deserts, even though the area is covered with snow during the major part of winter. During the 2000s the highest occurrence of dust events in six decades was reported. We have measured saltation and Aeolian transport during dust/volcanic ash storms in Iceland, which give some of the most intense wind erosion events ever measured. Icelandic dust affects the ecosystems over much of Iceland and causes regional haze. It is likely to affect the ecosystems of the oceans around Iceland, and it brings dust that lowers the albedo of the Icelandic glaciers, increasing melt-off due to global warming. The study indicates that Icelandic dust may contribute to the Arctic air pollution.

  1. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P.; Skoog, R.

    2006-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Google Earth is being used as a visualization tool for operational satellite monitoring of the region's volcanoes. Through the abilities of the Keyhole Markup Language (KML) utilized by Google Earth, different datasets have been integrated into this virtual globe browser. Examples include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays with dynamic control, to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through the Google Earth interface to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits; and animated models of ash plumes within Google Earth, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages. The globe also provides an ideal interface for displaying near real-time information on detected thermal anomalies or "hotspot"; pixels in satellite images with elevated brightness temperatures relative to the background temperature. The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska collects AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) through its own receiving station. The automated processing that follows includes application of algorithms that search for hotspots close to volcano location, flagging those that meet certain criteria. Further automated routines generate folders of KML placemarkers, which are linked to Google Earth through the network link function. Downloadable KML files have been created to provide links to various data products for different volcanoes and past eruptions, and to demonstrate examples of the monitoring tools developed. These KML files will be made accessible through a new website that will become publicly available in December 2006.

  2. Modeling eruptions of Karymsky volcano

    OpenAIRE

    Ozerov, A.; Ispolatov, I.; Lees, J.

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed to explain temporal patterns of activity in a class of periodically exploding Strombolian-type volcanos. These patterns include major events (explosions) which follow each other every 10-30 minutes and subsequent tremor with a typical period of 1 second. This two-periodic activity is thought to be caused by two distinct mechanisms of accumulation of the elastic energy in the moving magma column: compressibility of the magma in the lower conduit and viscoelastic response of...

  3. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes and Forecast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiapas, E.

    2009-04-01

    EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (CAUSES AND FORECAST) ELIAS TSIAPAS RESEARCHER NEA STYRA, EVIA,GREECE TEL.0302224041057 tsiapas@hol.gr The earthquakes are caused by large quantities of liquids (e.g. H2O, H2S, SO2, ect.) moving through lithosphere and pyrosphere (MOHO discontinuity) till they meet projections (mountains negative projections or projections coming from sinking lithosphere). The liquids are moved from West Eastward carried away by the pyrosphere because of differential speed of rotation of the pyrosphere by the lithosphere. With starting point an earthquake which was noticed at an area and from statistical studies, we know when, where and what rate an earthquake may be, which earthquake is caused by the same quantity of liquids, at the next east region. The forecast of an earthquake ceases to be valid if these components meet a crack in the lithosphere (e.g. limits of lithosphere plates) or a volcano crater. In this case the liquids come out into the atmosphere by the form of gasses carrying small quantities of lava with them (volcano explosion).

  4. Abundant SO2 release from the 2014 Holuhraun eruption (Bárðarbunga, Iceland) and its impact on human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Sara; Jóhannsson, Thorsteinn; Hellsing, Vanda Ú.; Pfeffer, Melissa A.; Guðnason, Thórólfur; Stefánsdottir, Gerdur

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing eruption in Holuhraun is significantly rich in gases and its prolonged duration probably makes it one of the largest natural source of SO2 in Iceland since the Laki eruption in 1783-84. Since its beginning, on the 31st of August 2014, the eruption has been releasing into the atmosphere an amount of SO2 at a rate of 400 kg/s with peaks larger than 1,000 kg/s. This quantity already exceeds the SO2 fluxes coming from some well-known degassing volcanoes, such as Masaya (Nicaragua) and Etna (Italy); and it is comparable with the prolonged degassing event at Miyjakejima volcano (Japan) in 2000-2004. Low injection velocities and a predominant buoyant style at the source imply quite low plume heights which have been in average between 2-3 km and never exceeded 5 km above sea level. This fact, together with the high SO2 fluxes, is the reason for the high SO2 concentrations measured at ground level all over Iceland in the last months. The air quality monitoring network, operated by the Environment Agency of Iceland (EAI), has been improved and extended since the beginning of the eruption to allow for a near-real time coverage of SO2 measurements across most of the country. Since then, high values have been recorded in many inhabited locations more than 100 km far from the eruption site. For example on October 26th values up to 21,000 µg/m3 were measured in Höfn in the South-East of Iceland, while in the North the town of Akureyri experienced concentrations higher than 2,000 µg/m3 for about 10 hours on October 31st. Due to the large variability in wind direction and wind speed, typical for the Icelandic meterology, almost every town has been affected by the gas cloud and many locations have exceeded the health safety limit of 350 µg/m3 per hour more than 20 times. Such prolonged exposure and acute short-lived concentrations of SO2 can have adverse effects on human health especially in individuals with underlying pulmonary diseases. In Iceland the Chief

  5. Stretching and injury prevention: an obscure relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witvrouw, Erik; Mahieu, Nele; Danneels, Lieven; McNair, Peter

    2004-01-01

    It is generally accepted that increasing the flexibility of a muscle-tendon unit promotes better performances and decreases the number of injuries. Stretching exercises are regularly included in warm-up and cooling-down exercises; however, contradictory findings have been reported in the literature. Several authors have suggested that stretching has a beneficial effect on injury prevention. In contrast, clinical evidence suggesting that stretching before exercise does not prevent injuries has also been reported. Apparently, no scientifically based prescription for stretching exercises exists and no conclusive statements can be made about the relationship of stretching and athletic injuries. Stretching recommendations are clouded by misconceptions and conflicting research reports. We believe that part of these contradictions can be explained by considering the type of sports activity in which an individual is participating. Sports involving bouncing and jumping activities with a high intensity of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) [e.g. soccer and football] require a muscle-tendon unit that is compliant enough to store and release the high amount of elastic energy that benefits performance in such sports. If the participants of these sports have an insufficient compliant muscle-tendon unit, the demands in energy absorption and release may rapidly exceed the capacity of the muscle-tendon unit. This may lead to an increased risk for injury of this structure. Consequently, the rationale for injury prevention in these sports is to increase the compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Recent studies have shown that stretching programmes can significantly influence the viscosity of the tendon and make it significantly more compliant, and when a sport demands SSCs of high intensity, stretching may be important for injury prevention. This conjecture is in agreement with the available scientific clinical evidence from these types of sports activities. In contrast, when the type

  6. Stretch due to Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baten

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year old patient presented to the emergency department with stretch, due to impossible deflation of the penile prosthesis, 4 years after successful implant. A CT-scan showed migration of the reservoir to the left rectus abdominis muscle. Refilling of the reservoir was inhibited by muscular compression, causing stretch. Removal and replacement of the reservoir was performed, after which the prosthesis was well-functioning again. Migration of the penile prosthesis reservoir is extremely rare but can cause several complications, such as stretch.

  7. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  8. Springback Prediction and Optimization of Variable Stretch Force Trajectory in Three-dimensional Stretch Bending Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Fei; ZHANG Wanxi; LIANG Jicai; GAO Song

    2015-01-01

    Most of the existing studies use constant force to reduce springback while researching stretch force. However, variable stretch force can reduce springback more efficiently. The current research on springback prediction in stretch bending forming mainly focuses on artificial neural networks combined with the finite element simulation. There is a lack of springback prediction by support vector regression (SVR). In this paper, SVR is applied to predict springback inthe three-dimensional stretch bending forming process,and variable stretch force trajectory is optimized. Six parameters of variable stretch force trajectory are chosen as the input parameters of the SVR model. Sixty experiments generated by design of experiments (DOE) are carried out to train and test the SVR model. The experimental results confirm that the accuracy of the SVR model is higher than that of artificial neural networks. Based on this model, an optimization algorithm of variable stretch force trajectory using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is proposed. The springback amount is used as the objective function. Changes of local thickness are applied as the criterion of forming constraints. The objection and constraints are formulated by response surface models. The precision of response surface models is examined. Six different stretch force trajectories are employed to certify springback reduction in the optimum stretch force trajectory, which can efficiently reduce springback. This research proposes a new method of springback prediction using SVR and optimizes variable stretch force trajectory to reduce springback.

  9. Static Versus Dynamic Stretching Effect on Agility Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Troumbley, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare effects of static and dynamic stretching on explosive agility movements, and to examine the effect of the interaction of dynamic and static stretching prior to explosive agility movements. Fourteen men and 10 women performed the different warm-up protocols, including no warm-up (NWU), static stretching (SS), dynamic stretching (DS), and dynamic stretching with static stretching (DS+SS). The T-Drill was used to assess agility. The results indicated n...

  10. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups.

  11. Campgrounds in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset provides campground locations in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Information about facilities, water availability, permit requirements and type of...

  12. The 2014-2015 slow collapse of the Bárðarbunga caldera, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Roberts, Matthew; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Jarosch, Alexander H.; Pálsson, Finnur; Einarsson, Páll; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Drouin, Vincent; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Reynolds, Hannah I.; Dürig, Tobias; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Munoz-Cobo Belart, Joaquin; Oddsson, Björn

    2015-04-01

    The Bárðarbunga caldera is located in central Iceland, under in NW corner of Vatnajökull ice cap. The caldera is about 65 km2 in area, with 500-600 m high topographic rims and is fully covered with up to 800 m thick ice. On 16 August 2014 an intense earthquake swarm started in Bárðarbunga, the beginning of a major volcano-tectonic rifting event forming a 45 km long dyke extending from the caldera to Holuhraun lava field outside the northern margin of Vatnajökull (Sigmundsson et al., 2014). A large basaltic, effusive fissure eruption began in Holuhraun on 31 August that by January had formed a lava field of volume in excess of one cubic kilometre. The collapse of the caldera is expected to have begun a few days after the onset of the earthquake swarm, probably coinciding with the first M5 earthquake. This slow caldera collapse has been monitored through repeated mapping of the gradually increasing subsidence bowl (~80 km2 in December) with airborne profiling of the ice surface, satellite mapping, an online GPS station set up in September on the glacier surface in the centre of the caldera with a strong motion sensor added in November, and indirectly through recording of seismic activity. Satellite interferograms constrain both ice movements and the rate of collapse. The rate of collapse was greatest in the first two weeks or 0.5-1 m/day in the centre, but has since gradually declined with time. The daily rate was 0.1-0.2 m/day in January, when the maximum lowering had reached about 60 m. A gradual widening of the subsidence bowl has been observed since early September. It is asymmetric, deepest in the NE part of the caldera. Downwards displacement extends outside the pre-existing topographic caldera rims, particularly on the south side where the rims have subsided by over 10 meters. Ice-flow modelling indicates that the ice is mostly passively subsiding with the caldera floor. Thus, horizontal ice flow has had little effect on the shape of the subsidence bowl

  13. Restoring ecosystem functions and services by overcoming soil threats - The case of Mt. Hekla area in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsson, Johann; Petursdottir, Thorunn

    2015-04-01

    Soils are one of the main fundamental bodies of terrestrial ecosystems. Soil functions contribute substantially to the ecosystem services humans and all other living beings depend on. Current soil threats are in most cases related to anthropogenic impacts and derived environmental pressures. For instance, overexploitation has in many cases damaged ecosystem resilience, affected current equilibrium and caused severe soil degradation. The resulting dysfunctional ecosystems are incapable of providing necessary ecosystem services. In such cases ecosystem restoration is necessary to restore ecosystem functions and ecological succession. The Mt. Hekla area in Iceland is an example of land suffering from accelerated erosion amplified by anthropogenic impacts. The area is 900 km2 located in South Iceland in the vicinity of the volcano Mt. Hekla. Today over 40% of the area is classified as eroded but historical documents indicate that vast part of the area were fertile and vegetated at the time of settlement, 1100 years ago; hence was able to withstand the geological disturbances occurring prior to the arrival of man as is obvious from the pristine woody patches still remaining. Severe soil degradation followed the large-scale deforestation and overgrazing that took place within the area. The initial land degradation event is considered to have occurred in the 11th century, but has been ongoing since then in several episodes. The Þjórsá glacial river flows through the area and carries enormous amounts of sediments every year. After the deforestation, the ecosystem resilience was damaged and the land left exposed to the elements. Eventually large scale wind erosion started, followed with water erosion and increased impact of freeze-thaw processes. The Soil Conservation Service of Iceland started working in the area in the early 20th century and land reclamation operations have been ongoing until this day. Considerable successes have been made as is manifested in the fact

  14. Thermal surveillance of Cascade Range volcanoes using ERTS-1 multispectral scanner, aircraft imaging systems, and ground-based data communication platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, J. D.; Frank, D. G.; Preble, D.; Painter, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A combination of infrared images depicting areas of thermal emission and ground calibration points have proved to be particularly useful in plotting time-dependent changes in surface temperatures and radiance and in delimiting areas of predominantly convective heat flow to the earth's surface in the Cascade Range and on Surtsey Volcano, Iceland. In an integrated experiment group using ERTS-1 multispectral scanner (MSS) and aircraft infrared imaging systems in conjunction with multiple thermistor arrays, volcano surface temperatures are relayed daily to Washington via data communication platform (DCP) transmitters and ERTS-1. ERTS-1 MSS imagery has revealed curvilinear structures at Lassen, the full extent of which have not been previously mapped. Interestingly, the major surface thermal manifestations at Lassen are aligned along these structures, particularly in the Warner Valley.

  15. People living under threat of volcanic hazard in southern Iceland: vulnerability and risk perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jóhannesdóttir

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Residents in the village of Vík and in the farming community of Álftaver in southern Iceland are living with the threat of volcanic hazards. The highly active subglacial volcano Katla has erupted approximately twice per century since the beginning of settlement around 874 AD. The last major eruption was in 1918 and Katla has recently entered an agitated stage. The purpose of this research was to (1 review residents' responses in relation to vulnerability, (2 examine their risk perception, preparedness and mitigation in relation to an eruption of Katla, and (3 investigate the public and the representative of the local authorities and emergency manager's knowledge of the official evacuation plan. In 2004, we conducted in-depth, face-to-face interviews with local residents using a snowball sample technique. All participants were permanent residents of the two communities, between the ages of 25–95 and most had lived in the area their entire lives. Regardless of the residents' knowledge about past volcanic activity of Katla and the associated future risk, many residents were doubtful about the imminent eruption forecast by scientists and they believed that the volcano is no longer active. In both communities, different social, cultural and economic factors played a central role in how people perceived natural hazards and how they dealt with the fact that their lives and livelihoods could be at risk. The participants had good knowledge about the existing evacuation plan and had participated in evacuation exercises. However, they had not made personal mitigation or preparedness plans in the event of a future eruption. In contrast to the residents of Vík, the inhabitants in Álftaver are concerned about the evacuation process and found it very confusing; they neither found the emergency plan nor the proposed methods for risk communication relevant for their farming community. The perception of the inhabitants, especially in Álftaver, does not

  16. Bias of purine stretches in sequenced chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Soumpasis, Dikeos Mario; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We examined more than 700 DNA sequences (full length chromosomes and plasmids) for stretches of purines (R) or pyrimidines (Y) and alternating YR stretches; such regions will likely adopt structures which are different from the canonical B-form. Since one turn of the DNA helix is roughly 10 bp, we...... measured the fraction of each genome which contains purine (or pyrimidine) tracts of lengths of 10 by or longer (hereafter referred to as 'purine tracts'), as well as stretches of alternating pyrimidines/purine ('pyr/pur tracts') of the same length. Using this criteria, a random sequence would be expected......, in eukaryotes there is an abundance of long stretches of purines or alternating purine/pyrimidine tracts, which cannot be explained in this way; these sequences are likely to play an important role in eukaryotic chromosome organisation....

  17. Secondary mineralization and hydrothermal alteration in the Reydarfjordur drill core, eastern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehegan, James M.; Robinson, Paul T.; Delaney, John R.

    1982-08-01

    Deep crustal drilling in eastern Iceland has allowed study of a fossil hydrothermal system at a constructive plate margin. The drilled sequence consists of partly to completely altered subaerial lava flows, basaltic dikes, and minor clastic material. Alteration and secondary mineralization are most intense in the flow top breccias where water/rock ratios are presumed to have been the highest. In the upper portion of the cored sequence (to a depth of about 1200 m) alteration is characterized by the deposition of clay minerals ± calcite ± quartz ± laumontite into open spaces such as vugs and vesicles. Low-temperature zeolites, such as stilbite, epistilbite, mordenite, and heulandite, are also present but are restricted to the upper 500 m of the drill core. Below 1200 m, alteration is characterized by the dissolution and replacement of both primary minerals and earlier authigenic minerals, followed by partial filling of dissolution cavities. Early mineral assemblages consist of epidote ± quartz ± prehnite ± chlorite ± albite, and a later superimposed assemblage consists of calcite + laumontite ± anhydrite. Authigenic sphene, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pumpellyite, actinolite, and wairakite also occur sporadically in the cored sequence. Secondary mineral assemblages and temperature measurements of fluid inclusions suggest a maximum temperature of alteration of about 300°C. Fluid inclusion compositions indicate that the geothermal fluid was meteoric water with very low salinities and high calcium activities. Iron activities and oxygen fugacities were highest in the deeper portions of the systems. The mineral paragenesis suggests that the fluid composition, temperature, and PCO2 varied significantly with time. The thermal energy for the geothermal system was probably derived from a high-level magma chamber associated with nearby Thingmuli volcano. Local contact metamorphism, indicated by the formation of garnet, occurred during late stage emplacement of dikes into

  18. Graben-structure complexities at Mt. Laki, Iceland, investiged by camera drones and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Bastian; Walter, Thomas R.; Mueller, Daniel; Witt, Tanja; Schoepa, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Fissure eruptions are often associated with formations of structural lineaments and a tectonic graben. Asymmetrical surface structures, formed by the fissure eruption of Laki volcano (Iceland) in 1783/84, are investigated for genesis and development in relation to loading and geometrical effects. The Laki craters, which form a NE-SW oriented row of about 140 vents over a distance of 25 km, are accompanied by asymmetrical ruptures close to the fissure. The graben forming ruptures show local complexities that are especially large at Mt. Laki. The dependence of the ruptures' form and orientation on dyke-geometry, loading effects and topography shall be studied here by using camera drones as central working method and stress modeling. Therefore, over 5000 photos, taken in several overflights with two camera drones over the top of Mt. Laki and on the northeastern/southwestern sides, were collected and converted into 3D-models using Structure from Motion (SfM). Afterwards, offset and orientation of the graben structures have been measured by profiles along and across the ruptures. The calculated trends of offset and distance to the vents provide a geometric constrain on the orientation and geometry of the underlying dyke. We compared this geometry of surface fractures to simulated fractures. In order to do so, the finite element method (FEM) was used to model stress and strain parameters close to a simulated dyke. Depth and dip of the dyke were systematically changed. The results of FEM are then compared to the photo results and provide an overall picture of the formation of the surface structures' local complexities at Mt. Laki and at other sites of the fissure eruption.

  19. Research on Methods for Building Volcano Disaster Information System--taking Changbai Mountain as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuexia; BO Liqun; LU Xingchang

    2001-01-01

    Volcano eruption is one of the most serious geological disasters in the world. There are volcanoes in every territory on the earth, about a thousand in China, among which Changbai Mountain Volcano, Wudalianchi Volcano and Tengchong Volcano are the most latent catastrophic eruptive active volcanoes. The paper, following an instance of Changbai Mountain Volcano, expounds that monitoring, forecasting and estimating volcano disaster by building Volcano Disaster Information System (VDIS) is feasible to alleviate volcano disaster.

  20. Volcanic hazards at Atitlan volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, J.M.; Escobar Wolf, R.; Vallance, James W.; Rose, William I.; Griswold, J.P.; Schilling, S.P.; Ewert, J.W.; Mota, M.

    2006-01-01

    Atitlan Volcano is in the Guatemalan Highlands, along a west-northwest trending chain of volcanoes parallel to the mid-American trench. The volcano perches on the southern rim of the Atitlan caldera, which contains Lake Atitlan. Since the major caldera-forming eruption 85 thousand years ago (ka), three stratovolcanoes--San Pedro, Toliman, and Atitlan--have formed in and around the caldera. Atitlan is the youngest and most active of the three volcanoes. Atitlan Volcano is a composite volcano, with a steep-sided, symmetrical cone comprising alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs. Eruptions of Atitlan began more than 10 ka [1] and, since the arrival of the Spanish in the mid-1400's, eruptions have occurred in six eruptive clusters (1469, 1505, 1579, 1663, 1717, 1826-1856). Owing to its distance from population centers and the limited written record from 200 to 500 years ago, only an incomplete sample of the volcano's behavior is documented prior to the 1800's. The geologic record provides a more complete sample of the volcano's behavior since the 19th century. Geologic and historical data suggest that the intensity and pattern of activity at Atitlan Volcano is similar to that of Fuego Volcano, 44 km to the east, where active eruptions have been observed throughout the historical period. Because of Atitlan's moderately explosive nature and frequency of eruptions, there is a need for local and regional hazard planning and mitigation efforts. Tourism has flourished in the area; economic pressure has pushed agricultural activity higher up the slopes of Atitlan and closer to the source of possible future volcanic activity. This report summarizes the hazards posed by Atitlan Volcano in the event of renewed activity but does not imply that an eruption is imminent. However, the recognition of potential activity will facilitate hazard and emergency preparedness.

  1. Comparison of two stretching methods and optimization of stretching protocol for the piriformis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Brett M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Levine, David; Tillman, Larry; Harrysson, Ola L A; Osborne, Jason A; Baxter, Blaise

    2014-02-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis for a non-discogenic form of sciatica whose treatment has traditionally focused on stretching the piriformis muscle (PiM). Conventional stretches include hip flexion, adduction, and external rotation. Using three-dimensional modeling, we quantified the amount of (PiM) elongation resulting from two conventional stretches and we investigated by use of a computational model alternate stretching protocols that would optimize PiM stretching. Seven subjects underwent three CT scans: one supine, one with hip flexion, adduction, then external rotation (ADD stretch), and one with hip flexion, external rotation, then adduction (ExR stretch). Three-dimensional bone models were constructed from the CT scans. PiM elongation during these stretches, femoral neck inclination, femoral head anteversion, and trochanteric anteversion were measured. A computer program was developed to map PiM length over a range of hip joint positions and was validated against the measured scans. ExR and ADD stretches elongated the PiM similarly by approximately 12%. Femoral head and greater trochanter anteversion influenced PiM elongation. Placing the hip joints in 115° of hip flexion, 40° of external rotation and 25° of adduction or 120° of hip flexion, 50° of external rotation and 30° of adduction increased PiM elongation by 30-40% compared to conventional stretches (15.1 and 15.3% increases in PiM muscle length, respectively). ExR and ADD stretches elongate the PiM similarly and therefore may have similar clinical effectiveness. The optimized stretches led to larger increases in PiM length and may be more easily performed by some patients due to increased hip flexion.

  2. The 2011 unrest at Katla volcano: characterization and interpretation of the tremor sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Einarsson, Páll; Lucchi, Federico; Li, Ka Lok; Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Roberts, Roland; Tryggvason, Ari

    2016-01-01

    A 23 hour tremor burst was recorded on July 8-9th 2011 at the Katla subglacial volcano, one of the most active and hazardous volcanoes in Iceland. This was associated with deepening of cauldrons on the ice cap and a glacial flood that caused damage to infrastructure. Increased earthquake activity within the caldera started a few days before and lasted for months afterwards and new seismic activity started on the south flank. No visible eruption broke the ice and the question arose as to whether this episode relates to a minor subglacial eruption with the tremor being generated by volcanic processes, or by the flood. The tremor signal consisted of bursts with varying amplitude and duration. We have identified and described three different tremor phases, based on amplitude and frequency features. A tremor phase associated with the flood was recorded only at stations closest to the river that flooded, correlating in time with rising water level observed at gauging stations. Using back-projection of double cross-...

  3. Restoring Eroded Lands in Southern Iceland: Efficacy of Domestic, Organic Fertilizers in Sandy Gravel Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Julia Miriam, 1989-

    2016-01-01

    Since settlement Iceland has faced severe soil degradation due to a combination of natural stressors – glacial flooding, volcanic eruption, and heavy wind – and anthropogenic stressors – grazing livestock, wood harvesting, and land use change. Declining soil stability under these conditions resulted in extensive soil erosion: 40% of Iceland now has considerable, severe, or extremely severe erosion. Fertilizers have been utilized for land reclamation in Iceland for many years, but they have mo...

  4. Social Media Used by Government Institutions in Iceland: Application, Role and Aims

    OpenAIRE

    Már Einarsson; Jóhanna Gunnlaugsdóttir

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the use and role of social media hosted by government institutions in Iceland. The research was conducted using quantitative and qualitative research methods. A survey was sent electronically to all government institutions in Iceland and semi-structured interviews were conducted with specialists working for institutions. No research has been conducted on this subject in Iceland before. It was therefore considered timely that a research was conducted o...

  5. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yutetsu; Naito, Hisashi; Ogura, Yuji; Katamoto, Shizuo; Aoki, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate and compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Thirteen male university students (age, 20 ± 1 years; height, 172.2 ± 4.6 cm; weight, 68.4 ± 6.7 kg; mean ± SD) completed 3 different conditions on 3 nonconsecutive days in randomized order: static stretching (SS), PNF stretching (PNF), and no stretching (control, CON). Each condition consisted of a 5-minute rest accompanied by one of the following activities: (a) control, (b) SS, or (c) PNF stretching. The hip flexion range of motion (ROM) was evaluated immediately before and after the activity. The MVC of knee flexion was then measured. Surface electromyography was recorded from the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles during MVC tests and stretching. Although increases in ROM were significantly greater after PNF than after SS (p stretching increases ROM more than SS, PNF stretching and SS is detrimental to isometric maximal strength.

  6. Promoting Bank Stability through Compensation Reform: Lessons from Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Cullen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the program of compensation reform at financial institutions – despite recent wide-ranging changes – remains incomplete. A considerable body of theoretical and empirical research has been developed which, for the most part, suggests that compensation incentives embedded in compensation contracts at banks encouraged risk-taking behaviour which contributed to the Global Financial Crisis. Extensive reforms to compensation rules at financial institutions have been implemented across the globe, including increased use of deferral, mandatory capping of bonuses and the introduction of claw-back powers. Relying on observations on the failures of Icelandic and UK banks, and legal and economic analyses of compensation reforms in each jurisdiction, this paper argues that some elements of the Icelandic and UK reform programs ought to be transposed to the EU level. Arguably, these recommendations will help improve the resilience of the European banking system and contribute to greater financial stability.

  7. Progress Report on the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred A. Elders

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP is a project of “Deep Vision”, a consortium of the government and the three leading energy companies in Iceland. It aims to improve the economics of geothermal energy production by exploring for supercritical hydrothermal fluids as a possible energy source. This will require drilling to depths of 4 to 5 km in order to reach temperatures of 400°C–600°C. From the outset, Deep Vision, recognizing that a broad scale of studies would be necessary in order to explore the little understood supercritical environment, welcomed the inclusion of basic scientific studies in the IDDP and invited participation from the international scientific community, to the mutual advantage of both industrial and scientific participants (Fridleifsson and Albertsson, 2000.

  8. Magma chamber processes in central volcanic systems of Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Þórarinsson, Sigurjón Böðvar; Tegner, Christian

    2009-01-01

    New field work and petrological investigations of the largest gabbro outcrop in Iceland, the Hvalnesfjall gabbro of the 6-7 Ma Austurhorn intrusive complex, have established a stratigraphic sequence exceeding 800 m composed of at least 8 macrorhythmic units. The bases of the macrorhythmic units......3 of clinopyroxene and magnetite indicative of magma replenishment. Some macrorhythmic units show mineral trends indicative of up-section fractional crystallisation over up to 100 m, whereas others show little variation. Two populations of plagioclase crystals (large, An-rich and small, less An...... olivine basalts from Iceland that had undergone about 20% crystallisation of olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene and that the macrorhythmic units formed from thin magma layers not exceeding 200-300 m. Such a "mushy" magma chamber is akin to volcanic plumbing systems in settings of high magma supply...

  9. Linkages between Icelandic Low position and SE Greenland winter precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, M.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Hammann, A. C.; Mioduszewski, J.; Hameed, S.; Tedesco, M.; Stroeve, J. C.; Mote, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Greenland's largest flux of precipitation occurs in its Southeast (SE) region. An understanding of the mechanisms controlling precipitation in this region is lacking despite its disproportionate importance in the mass balance of Greenland and the consequent contributions to sea level rise. We use weather station data from the Danish Meteorological Institute to reveal the governing influences on precipitation in SE Greenland during the winter and fall. We find that precipitation in the fall is significantly correlated to the longitude of the Icelandic Low and the NAO. Winter precipitation is correlated with the strength and longitude of the Icelandic Low, as well as the NAO. We show that in years of extreme high precipitation, onshore winds dominate, thereby advecting more moisture inland. In low precipitation years, winds are more westerly, approaching the stations from land. Understanding the controls of SE Greenland precipitation will help us predict how future precipitation in this key region may change in a warming climate.

  10. Icelandic Public Pensions: Why time is running out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ólafur Ísleifsson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the Icelandic public sector pension system enjoying a third party guarantee. Defined benefit funds fundamentally differ from defined contribution pension funds without a third party guarantee as is the case with the Icelandic general labour market pension funds. We probe the special nature of the public sector pension funds and make a comparison to the defined contribution pension funds of the general labour market. We explore the financial and economic effects of the third party guarantee of the funds, their investment performance and other relevant factors. We seek an answer to the question why time is running out for the country’s largest pension fund that currently faces the prospect of becoming empty by the year 2022.

  11. The most unusual dust event cases from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur; Meinander, Outi; Gritsevich, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has the largest area of volcaniclastic sandy desert on Earth where dust is originating from volcanic, but also glaciogenic sediments. Total Icelandic desert areas cover over 44,000 km2 suggesting Iceland being the largest Arctic as well as European desert. Satelite MODIS pictures have revealed dust plumes traveling over 1000 km at times. The mean frequency of days with dust suspension was to 135 dust days annually in 1949-2011. The annual dust deposition was calculated as 31 - 40.1 million tons yr-1 affecting the area of > 500,000 km2, which places Iceland among the most active dust sources on Earth. Volcanic dust is distributed over local glaciers (about 4.5 million t annually) and surrounding oceans (6 - 14 million t annually). Mean dust emissions were calculated for minor, medium and major dust events as 0.1, 0.3 and 1 million tons per event, respectively. Three unusual dust events were observed and measured: The first, an extreme wind erosion event of the fresh Eyjafjallajokull 2010 volcanic ash, the second, a Snow-Dust Storm in 2013, and the third, a suspended dust during moist and low wind conditions. Frequent volcanic eruptions in Iceland (new eruption each 3-4 years on average) represent important inputs to dust variability. Freshly deposited ash prolongs impacts of volcanic eruptions as we observed after the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption. In September 2010, an extreme storm was recorded with the maximum wind speed of 38.7 ms-1. The maximum saltation was 6825 pulses per minute while the aeolian transport over one m wide transect and 150 cm height reached 11,800 kg m-1. The largest previously measured amount in Iceland in one storm was about 4,200 kg m-1. This storm is among the most extreme wind erosion events recorded on Earth. Dust events in South Iceland often take place in winter or at sub-zero temperatures. The Snow-Dust Storm occurred in March 6-7th 2013 when snow was nearly black with several mm thick dark layer of dust deposited on snow

  12. Servant leadership and job satisfaction in the University of Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guðjón Ingi Guðjónsson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Servant leadership is a philosophy of communication and leadership whith focus on decentralization, autonomy, mutual respect and commitment to society. In light of universities’ important societal role and importance of equality of academic staff it is presumed that servant leadership suits a university. Prior research indicates the value of servant leadership for universities’ performance. The purpose of the study was to assess servant leadership in the University of Iceland and its correlation with staff job satisfaction using a new Dutch instrument (SLS measuring participants’ attitudes to their next superior. A single item job satisfaction question was included. Results showed considerable practice of servant leadership or 4,19 (scale: 1-6 and the strongest servant leadership characteristic was stewardship, followed by forgiveness and empowerment. 82,6% of participants reported job satisfaction with significant positive correlation with servant leadership. The relatively high degree of servant leadership supports previous study of the uiniversity’s working environment but not recent American studies indicating universities’ a low degree of servant leadership. The degree of servant leadership in the University of Iceland was lower compared to grammar schools (6,46 and general hospital wards (4,33 but identical to hospital emergency care units (4,19. Significant positive correlation of servant leadership with job satisfaction, confirms similar relationships in US universities and in various institutions in Iceland. Results indicate the importance of servant leadership for employees’ job satisfaction, not least empowerment and courage, and this has the potential to support peer management, employee independence and social responsibility of the University of Iceland.

  13. Surveillance of influenza in Iceland during the 2009 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsdottir, G; Gudnason, T; Ólafsson, Ö; Baldvinsdottir, G E; Atladottir, A; Löve, A; Danon, L; Briem, H

    2010-12-09

    In a pandemic setting, surveillance is essential to monitor the spread of the disease and assess its impact. Appropriate mitigation and healthcare preparedness strategies depend on fast and accurate epidemic surveillance data. During the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic, rapid improvements in influenza surveillance were made in Iceland. Here, we describe the improvements made in influenza surveillance during the pandemic , which could also be of great value in outbreaks caused by other pathogens. Following the raised level of pandemic influenza alert in April 2009, influenza surveillance was intensified. A comprehensive automatic surveillance system for influenza-like illness was developed, surveillance of influenza-related deaths was established and laboratory surveillance for influenza was strengthened. School absenteeism reports were also collected and compared with results from the automatic surveillance system. The first case of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) was diagnosed in Iceland in May 2009, but sustained community transmission was not confirmed until mid-August. The pandemic virus circulated during the summer and early autumn before an abrupt increase in the number of cases was observed in October. There were large outbreaks in elementary schools for children aged 6–15 years throughout the country that peaked in late October. School absenteeism reports from all elementary schools in Iceland gave a similar epidemiological curve as that from data from the healthcare system. Estimates of the proportion of the population infected with the pandemic virus ranged from 10% to 22%. This study shows how the sudden need for improved surveillance in the pandemic led to rapid improvements in data collection in Iceland. This reporting system will be improved upon and expanded to include other notifiable diseases, to ensure accurate and timely collection of epidemiological data.

  14. The Icelandic volcanic aeolian environment: Processes and impacts - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnalds, Olafur; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur

    2016-03-01

    Iceland has the largest area of volcaniclastic sandy desert on Earth or 22,000 km2. The sand has been mostly produced by glacio-fluvial processes, leaving behind fine-grained unstable sediments which are later re-distributed by repeated aeolian events. Volcanic eruptions add to this pool of unstable sediments, often from subglacial eruptions. Icelandic desert surfaces are divided into sand fields, sandy lavas and sandy lag gravel, each with separate aeolian surface characteristics such as threshold velocities. Storms are frequent due to Iceland's location on the North Atlantic Storm track. Dry winds occur on the leeward sides of mountains and glaciers, in spite of the high moisture content of the Atlantic cyclones. Surface winds often move hundreds to more than 1000 kg m-1 per annum, and more than 10,000 kg m-1 have been measured in a single storm. Desertification occurs when aeolian processes push sand fronts and have thus destroyed many previously fully vegetated ecosystems since the time of the settlement of Iceland in the late ninth century. There are about 135 dust events per annum, ranging from minor storms to >300,000 t of dust emitted in single storms. Dust production is on the order of 30-40 million tons annually, some traveling over 1000 km and deposited on land and sea. Dust deposited on deserts tends to be re-suspended during subsequent storms. High PM10 concentrations occur during major dust storms. They are more frequent in the wake of volcanic eruptions, such as after the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption. Airborne dust affects human health, with negative effects enhanced by the tubular morphology of the grains, and the basaltic composition with its high metal content. Dust deposition on snow and glaciers intensifies melting. Moreover, the dust production probably also influences atmospheric conditions and parameters that affect climate change.

  15. Servant leadership and job satisfaction in the University of Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Guðjón Ingi Guðjónsson 1976; Sigrún Gunnarsdóttir 1960

    2014-01-01

    Servant leadership is a philosophy of communication and leadership whith focus on decentralization, autonomy, mutual respect and commitment to society. In light of universities’ important societal role and importance of equality of academic staff it is presumed that servant leadership suits a university. Prior research indicates the value of servant leadership for universities’ performance. The purpose of the study was to assess servant leadership in the University of Iceland and its correlat...

  16. Airborne in-situ investigations of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume on Iceland and over north-western Germany with light aircrafts and optical particle counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K.; Eliasson, J.; Vogel, A.; Fischer, C.; Pohl, T.; van Haren, G.; Meier, M.; Grobéty, B.; Dahmann, D.

    2012-03-01

    During the time period of the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 the Duesseldorf University of Applied Sciences has performed 14 research flights in situations with and without the volcanic ash plume over Germany. In parallel to the research flights in Germany three measurement flights have been performed by the University of Iceland in May 2010 over the western part of Iceland. During two of these flights the outskirts of the eruption plume were entered directly, delivering most direct measurements within the eruption plume during this eruptive event. For all the measurement flights reported here, light durable piston-motor driven aircrafts were used, which were equipped with optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. Real-time monitoring of the particle concentrations was possible during the flights. As different types of optical particle counters have been used in Iceland and Germany, the optical particle counters have been re-calibrated after the flights to the same standard using gravimetric reference methods and original Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash samples. In-situ measurement results with high spatial resolution, directly from the eruption plume in Iceland as well as from the dispersed and several days old plume over Germany, are therefore presented here for the first time. They are normalized to the same ash concentration calibration standard. Moreover, airborne particles could be sampled directly out of the eruption plume in Iceland as well as during the flights over Germany. During the research flights over Iceland from 9 May 2011 to 11 May 2011 the ash emitted from the vent of the volcano turned out to be concentrated in a narrow well-defined plume of about 10 km width at a distance of 45-60 km away from the vent. Outside this plume the airborne ash concentrations could be proved to be below 50 μg m -3 over western Iceland. However, by entering the outskirts of the plume directly the research aircraft could

  17. Volcanic Hazard Education through Virtual Field studies of Vesuvius and Laki Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose significant hazards to human populations and have the potential to cause significant economic impacts as shown by the recent ash-producing eruptions in Iceland. Demonstrating both the local and global impact of eruptions is important for developing an appreciation of the scale of hazards associated with volcanic activity. In order to address this need, Web-based virtual field exercises at Vesuvius volcano in Italy and Laki volcano in Iceland have been developed as curriculum enhancements for undergraduate geology classes. The exercises are built upon previous research by the authors dealing with the 79 AD explosive eruption of Vesuvius and the 1783 lava flow eruption of Laki. Quicktime virtual reality images (QTVR), video clips, user-controlled Flash animations and interactive measurement tools are used to allow students to explore archeological and geological sites, collect field data in an electronic field notebook, and construct hypotheses about the impacts of the eruptions on the local and global environment. The QTVR images provide 360o views of key sites where students can observe volcanic deposits and formations in the context of a defined field area. Video sequences from recent explosive and effusive eruptions of Carribean and Hawaiian volcanoes are used to illustrate specific styles of eruptive activity, such as ash fallout, pyroclastic flows and surges, lava flows and their effects on the surrounding environment. The exercises use an inquiry-based approach to build critical relationships between volcanic processes and the deposits that they produce in the geologic record. A primary objective of the exercises is to simulate the role of a field volcanologist who collects information from the field and reconstructs the sequence of eruptive processes based on specific features of the deposits. Testing of the Vesuvius and Laki exercises in undergraduate classes from a broad spectrum of educational institutions shows a preference for the

  18. Studies on four hereditary blood disorders in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensson, O.

    1978-01-01

    An Icelandic family with fifty elliptocytic individuals is reviewed. Pedigree studies indicate strongly that affected members of the family are descendants of a common ancestor. The hereditary pattern is typical of a dominant autosomal gene with full penetrance. Thirty members with typical hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and over 70 apparently unaffected members belonging to 12 families have been studied. Pedigree studies on one of the families indicate that the HS gene or genes have been transmitted through six generations over the past 200 years. Much reduced penetrance of the HS gene or the presence of the so-called mild form is upheld as the main explanation for the unevenness in the genetic ratio. An Icelandic family containing fourteen members with Pelger anomaly is reviewed. It is possible that this family is the only one with this type of mutation in Icelanders. Genealogical information indicates that the Pelger anomaly gene has been present in this family over 200 years. Three families with Von Willebrand's disease (VW) are reviewed. Severe symptoms of bleeding predominate in the males, two of whom have died from hemorrhage. There is a reduced expressivity of the mutant gene, amounting to nonpenetrance, mainly in the female members of the families. It is thought probable that the mutant gene present in the three families has originated from a common ancestor in a district which is common to the three families. (KRM)

  19. Gudmundur Finnbogason, "sympathetic understanding," and early Icelandic psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pind, Jörgen L

    2008-05-01

    Gudmundur Finnbogason (1873-1944) was a pioneer of Icelandic psychology. He was educated at the University of Copenhagen where he finished his M.A. in 1901 in philosophy, specializing in psychology. During the years 1901-1905, Finnbogason played a major role in establishing and shaping the future of primary education in Iceland. He defended his doctoral thesis on "sympathetic understanding" at the University of Copenhagen in 1911. This work deals with the psychology of imitation. In it Finnbogason defends the view that imitation is basically perception so that there is a direct link from perception to motor behavior. Through imitation people tend to assume the countenance and demeanor of other people, thus showing, in Finnbogason's terminology, "sympathetic understanding." Finnbogason's theory of imitation in many respects anticipates contemporary approaches to the psychology of imitation. In 1918 Finnbogason became professor of applied psychology at the recently founded University of Iceland. Here he attempted to establish psychology as an independent discipline. In this he was unsuccessful; his chair was abolished in 1924.

  20. The involvement of family in child protection cases in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anni Haugen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the involvement of families in child protection cases in Iceland, as well as to shed light on the attitudes of child protection workers on the importance of including families while working on child protection cases. The study is part of an international comparative analysis called: Social Work with Families: Social Workers’ Constructions of Family in Professional Practice. This article only addresses the Icelandic segment of the research. In the study, qualitative methods were used and three focus groups were conducted, in which the same three-step vignette about a child protection case was presented. The findings highlighted how difficult child protection workers found it to define the family. The main element is that family are those individuals closest to the child and connected to them through emotional ties, as Icelandic child protection workers seem to strive to involve family in child protection cases. However, there are signs which show that when working with more complicated cases the definition of a family becomes narrower, and involvement is restricted mostly to parents and grandparents. The findings also show that attitudes toward fathers differ from those toward mothers. The mother is expected to support and create security for the child, while the father is judged mostly on his violent behaviour and is not automatically regarded as providing support or actively taking responsibility for his child.

  1. Cereal production, high status and climate in Medieval Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlendsson, Egill; Riddell, Scott

    2017-04-01

    At Hrísbrú (formerly the medieval Mosfell estate) in the Mosfell Valley, southwest Iceland, archaeologists have excavated a medieval skáli (hall) proposed to be the high status residence of a chieftain. This is indicated by the size of the skáli, artefacts (foreign goods), archaeofaunal (cattle/sheep bone) ratios and macrobotanical remains (cereal grain). The analysis of pollen from nearby natural contexts suggests that cereals were grown locally. Using multiple profile palynological approach, this paper examines if the apparent cereal production is representative of high status in the Icelandic context. First as a correlate by confirming that cereals were grown in association with the archaeological features characteristic of high status; secondly, as an indicator in its own right through comparison with other palynological datasets from inferred lower status farms. The presence or absence of cereal-type pollen (cf. barley) and other arable correlates was examined for each site. The results suggest that medieval cereal cultivation in the Mosfell Valley was confined to the landholding of the medieval Mosfell estate. This feature is seen as an attribute of the locale's greater status in relation to the other farms in Mosfell Valley. The abandonment of cereal cultivation at the Mosfell estate around AD 1200 is probably associated with interactions between changes in the nation's social power structure and how marginal cereal production in Iceland was (and is) in terms of climate.

  2. Influence of volcanic tephra on photovoltaic (PV)-modules: An experimental study with application to the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Edgar; Walter, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions may lead to significant tephra dispersion, crossing borders and affecting distant and industrial societies in various ways. While the effects of volcanic ash clouds on the aviation industry have been recognized, damaging effects on the photovoltaic energy sector are poorly investigated. Here we describe the influence of volcanic tephra deposition on photovoltaic (PV) modules that we experimentally analyzed and evaluated. A systematic set of experiments was conducted under controlled conditions using an artificial light source and measuring the electrical power generated from the PV-modules with the aim to determine the dependency of the amount of tephra covering a module and its subsequent loss in power production (measured in voltage and current) as well as the influence of the tephra grain size. We find that a mass of fine tephra has a stronger influence on the PV-modules power generation than the same mass of coarser particles. An application to the fine-grained 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland and the resulting ash-cloud reveals that the power produced by PV-modules in continental Europe might have been affected significantly. Deposits were thick enough to cause complete failures of PV-modules up to a distance of about 300 km downwind. Although this distance is largely over the ocean in this particular case, our results imply that similar and larger eruptions of other volcanoes elsewhere might harm commercial or private energy production at distances of hundreds to thousands of kilometers from the volcano. Given that volcanic eruptions are frequent and the fact that the PV-industry is growing rapidly, negative impacts are expected in the future, requiring close tephra dispersion monitoring and PV-maintenance strategies.

  3. Predictability of Volcano Eruption: lessons from a basaltic effusive volcano

    CERN Document Server

    Grasso, J R

    2003-01-01

    Volcano eruption forecast remains a challenging and controversial problem despite the fact that data from volcano monitoring significantly increased in quantity and quality during the last decades.This study uses pattern recognition techniques to quantify the predictability of the 15 Piton de la Fournaise (PdlF) eruptions in the 1988-2001 period using increase of the daily seismicity rate as a precursor. Lead time of this prediction is a few days to weeks. Using the daily seismicity rate, we formulate a simple prediction rule, use it for retrospective prediction of the 15 eruptions,and test the prediction quality with error diagrams. The best prediction performance corresponds to averaging the daily seismicity rate over 5 days and issuing a prediction alarm for 5 days. 65% of the eruptions are predicted for an alarm duration less than 20% of the time considered. Even though this result is concomitant of a large number of false alarms, it is obtained with a crude counting of daily events that are available fro...

  4. Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joel E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows are found within the Newberry National Volcanic Monument in central Oregon. Established November 5, 1990, the monument is managed by the U.S. Forest Service as part of the Deschutes National Forest. Since 2011, a series of aerial surveys over the monument collected elevation data using lidar (light detection and ranging) technology, which uses lasers to directly measure the ground surface. These data record previously unseen detail in the volcano’s numerous lava flows and vents. On average, a laser return was collected from the ground’s surface every 2.17 feet (ft) with ±1.3 inches vertical precision.

  5. What is a Volcano? How planetary volcanism has changed our definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R. M.; Mitchell, K. L.; Williams, D. A.; Mitri, G.; Gregg, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    The discovery of numerous extra-terrestrial volcanoes, including active ones, has stretched our traditional definition of what is a volcano. We now know that the nature of volcanism is highly variable over the Solar System, and the traditional definition of a volcano as defined for Earth needs to be modified and expanded to include processes such as cryovolcanism, in which aqueous mixtures are erupted from the interior to the surface. Plate tectonics, which largely controls the location and types of volcanoes on Earth, has not been identified on any other planetary body. Volcanic and tectonic structures on other bodies may have different origins from their terrestrial morphological counterparts. For example, calderas on Io are associated with effusive rather than explosive eruptions. Lava lakes on Io may be more similar to the Earth’s East Pacific Rise eruptions that give rise to temporary lava lakes rather than to terrestrial lava lakes where there is a shallow magma chamber. Volcanic features on Io, and also Titan, appear to be randomly distributed on the surface and not associated with a global tectonic control or with the locations of mountains. Cryovolcanism on Titan, which may still be active, is likely made possible by bottom crevasses opening in the icy crust and formation of ammonia-water pockets in the ice shell. Large scale tectonic stress (tides, global volume changes and/or topography) may promote resurfacing. Mountains on Titan may be the result of long-term cooling of the interior causing global volume contraction (Mitri et al. 2009, JGR submitted). This paper will focus on active volcanic features on Io, cryovolcanism on Titan, and how these phenomena have led us to suggest the following definition that encompasses the different forms of volcanic activity seen in other worlds: A volcano is an opening on a planet or moon’s surface from which magma, as defined for that body, and/or magmatic gas is erupted.

  6. An Analysis of Individual Stretching Programs of Intercollegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael; And Others

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate individual stretching programs of intercollegiate athletes, 238 athletes (164 male, 74 female) in ten sports were surveyed about their stretching practices. Almost all of the athletes stretched, but to varying degrees. Muscle groups stretched by the fewest athletes were the adductors, plantar flexors, hips, and neck. (Author/MT)

  7. The 2011 unrest at Katla volcano: Characterization and interpretation of the tremor sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Einarsson, Páll; Lucchi, Federico; Li, Ka Lok; Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Roberts, Roland; Tryggvason, Ari

    2017-05-01

    A 23-hour tremor burst was recorded on July 8-9th 2011 at the Katla subglacial volcano, one of the most active and hazardous volcanoes in Iceland. This was associated with deepening of cauldrons on the ice cap and a glacial flood that caused damage to infrastructure. Increased earthquake activity within the caldera started a few days before and lasted for months afterwards and new seismic activity started on the southern flank. No visible eruption broke the ice and the question arose as to whether this episode relates to a minor subglacial eruption with the tremor being generated by volcanic processes, or by the flood. The tremor signal consisted of bursts with varying amplitude and duration. We have identified and described three different tremor phases, based on amplitude and frequency features. A tremor phase associated with the flood was recorded only at stations closest to the river that flooded, correlating in time with rising water level observed at gauging stations. Using back-projection of double cross-correlations, two other phases have been located near the active ice cauldrons and are interpreted to be caused by volcanic or hydrothermal processes. The greatly increased seismicity and evidence of rapid melting of the glacier may be explained by a minor sub-glacial eruption. A less plausible interpretation is that the tremor was generated by hydrothermal boiling and/or explosions with no magma involved. This may have been induced by pressure drop triggered by the release of water when the glacial flood started. All interpretations require an increase of heat released by the volcano.

  8. An Icelander and The East Is Red The story of Arnthor Helgason, Chairman of Icelandic Chinese Cultural Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun; Chi

    2014-01-01

    <正>The winter breeze blew through Beijing at the start of November,while inside the tranquil compound of the Chinese People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries(CPAFFC),Arnthor Helgasion smiled at the camera,a gleam of warmth shone on his face."The East Is Red is my wedding song,and I hope it would be also played in my funeral,"he said.Helgason,Chairman of the Icelandic Chines

  9. Stretch-activated channels in stretch-induced muscle damage: role in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ella W; Allen, David G

    2004-08-01

    1. Stretch-induced muscle injury results in the damage that causes reduced force and increased membrane permeability. This muscle damage is caused, in part, by ionic entry through stretch-activated channels and blocking these channels with Gd3+ or streptomycin reduces the force deficit associated with damage. 2. Dystrophin-deficient muscles are more susceptible to stretch-induced muscle injury and the recovery from injury can be incomplete. We have found that Na+ entry associated with stretch-induced injury is enhanced in dystrophin-deficient muscles and that blockers of stretch-activated channels are capable of preventing ionic entry and reducing muscle damage. 3. A model is presented that proposes links between stretch-induced injury, opening of stretch-activated channels, increased levels of intracellular ions and various forms of muscle damage. Although changes in Na+ accompany stretch-induced muscle injury, we believe that changes in Ca2+ probably have a more central role in the damage process.

  10. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  11. Movement and stretching imagery during flexibility training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergeer, Ineke; Roberts, Jenny

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of movement and stretching imagery on increases in flexibility. Thirty volunteers took part in a 4 week flexibility training programme. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) movement imagery, where participants imagined moving the limb they were stretching; (2) stretching imagery, where participants imagined the physiological processes involved in stretching the muscle; and (3) control, where participants did not engage in mental imagery. Active and passive range of motion around the hip was assessed before and after the programme. Participants provided specific ratings of vividness and comfort throughout the programme. Results showed significant increases in flexibility over time, but no differences between the three groups. A significant relationship was found, however, between improved flexibility and vividness ratings in the movement imagery group. Furthermore, both imagery groups scored significantly higher than the control group on levels of comfort, with the movement imagery group also scoring significantly higher than the stretching imagery group. We conclude that the imagery had stronger psychological than physiological effects, but that there is potential for enhancing physiological effects by maximizing imagery vividness, particularly for movement imagery.

  12. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation. PMID:22319684

  13. Gambling and football: Epidemiological research on gambling participation and problem gambling among adult football players in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    There is not much known about the gambling behaviour of Icelandic football players. Aims of the current study were to examine the prevalence of total gambling participation and problem gambling among Icelandic football players, to examine if Icelandic football players have been involved in behaviour that could possibly be related to game fixing and to examine players attitudes towards banning coaches and players to gamble on games the Icelandic championship. Participants were 725, of which 75...

  14. Full Wavefield Numerical Simulations of Sub-glacial Seismic Tremor at Vatnajökull Glacier, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yingzi; Eibl, Eva P. S.; Bean, Christopher J.; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Pálsson, Finnur

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic systems, including the central volcanoes Bárðarbunga and Grimsvötn in South-East Iceland lie beneath the Vatnajökull glacier and are covered by up to 700 m of ice. This ice layer inhibits the recording of the seismic signal close to the source and acts as a wave guide, significantly modifying the seismic wavefield. Recordings of local earthquakes or tremor will therefore be modified by a potentially strong and unknown path effect. We tackle this problem with full wavefield numerical simulations, (2D and 3D) using the Spectral Element method. This allows for the introduction of viscoelasticity in the sub-surface geology and captures all wave conversions and scattering. We employ a 3D model of the glacier thickness and subglacial topography and insert a source wavelet at different depths and locations in order to simulate the wavefield recorded at the location of the field seismometers, in the region of Vatnajökull. Furthermore we calculate sensitivity kernels which show us which part of the model creates a specific part of the simulated seismogram, yielding a deeper understanding of tremor seismogram composition. Our findings show that path effects play a very significant role in determining the overall character of the tremor wavefield and must be removed or suppressed in order to gain a better understanding of the tremor source process itself.

  15. Two weather radar time series of the altitude of the volcanic plume during the May 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn, Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Petersen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The eruption of Grímsvötn volcano in Iceland in 2011 lasted for a week, 21–28 May. The eruption was explosive and peaked during the first hours, with the eruption plume reaching 20–25 km altitude. The height of the plume was monitored every 5 min with a C-band weather radar located at Keflavík International Airport and a mobile X-band radar, 257 km and 75 km distance from the volcano respectively. In addition, photographs taken during the first half-hour of the eruption give information regarding the initial rise. Time series of the plume-top altitude were constructed from the radar observations. This paper presents the two independent radar time series. The series have been cross validated and there is a good agreement between them. The echo top radar series of the altitude of the volcanic plume are publicly available from the Pangaea Data Publisher (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.778390.

  16. Homologous pairing in stretched supercoiled DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, T. R.; Croquette, V.; Bensimon, D.

    1998-01-01

    By using elastic measurements on single DNA molecules, we show that stretching a negatively supercoiled DNA activates homologous pairing in physiological conditions. These experiments indicate that a stretched unwound DNA locally denatures to alleviate the force-driven increase in torsional stress. This is detected by hybridization with 1 kb of homologous single-stranded DNA probes. The stretching force involved (≈2 pN) is small compared with those typically developed by molecular motors, suggesting that this process may be relevant to DNA processing in vivo. We used this technique to monitor the progressive denaturation of DNA as it is unwound and found that distinct, stable denaturation bubbles formed, beginning in A+T-rich regions. PMID:9724746

  17. Binary-phase compression of stretched pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Nairat, Muath; Dantus, Marcos

    2017-10-01

    Pulse stretching and compression are essential for the energy scale-up of ultrafast lasers. Here, we consider a radical approach using spectral binary phases, containing only two values (0 and π) for stretching and compressing laser pulses. We numerically explore different strategies and present results for pulse compression of factors up to a million back to the transform limit and experimentally obtain results for pulse compression of a factor of one hundred, in close agreement with numerical calculations. Imperfections resulting from binary-phase compression are addressed by considering cross-polarized wave generation filtering, and show that this approach leads to compressed pulses with contrast ratios greater than ten orders of magnitude. This new concept of binary-phase stretching and compression, if implemented in a multi-layer optic, could eliminate the need for traditional pulse stretchers and more importantly expensive compressors.

  18. Lattice stretching bistability and dynamic heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Savin, A. V.; Zolotaryuk, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional lattice model is suggested to describe the experimentally observed plateau in force-stretching diagrams for some macromolecules. This chain model involves the nearest-neighbor interaction of a Morse-like potential (required to have a saturation branch) and a harmonic second......-neighbor coupling. Under an external stretching applied to the chain ends, the intersite Morse-like potential results in the appearance of a double-well potential within each chain monomer, whereas the interaction between the second neighbors provides a homogeneous bistable (degenerate) ground state, at least...... stretched bonds with a double-well potential. This case allows us to explain the existence of a plateau in the force-extension diagram for DNA and α-helix protein. Finally, the soliton dynamics are studied in detail....

  19. COMPUTER SIMULATION SYSTEM OF STRETCH REDUCING MILL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Y. Sun; S.J. Yuan

    2007-01-01

    The principle of the stretch reducing process is analyzed and three models of pass design areestablished. The simulations are done about variables, such as, stress, strain, the stretches betweenthe stands, the size parameters of the steel tube, and the roll force parameters. According to itsproduct catalogs the system can automatically divide the pass series, formulate the rolling table,and simulate the basic technological parameters in the stretch reducing process. All modules areintegrated based on the developing environment of VB6. The system can draw simulation curvesand pass pictures. Three kinds of database including the material database, pass design database,and product database are devised using Microsoft Access, which can be directly edited, corrected,and searched.

  20. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at

  1. Filament stretching rheometer: inertia compensation revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-01-01

    The necessary inertia compensation used in the force balance for the filament stretching rheometer is derived for an arbitrary frame of reference. This enables the force balance to be used to extract correctly the extensional viscosity from measurements of the tensile force at either end of the e......The necessary inertia compensation used in the force balance for the filament stretching rheometer is derived for an arbitrary frame of reference. This enables the force balance to be used to extract correctly the extensional viscosity from measurements of the tensile force at either end...

  2. Stretching and folding mechanism in foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, Alberto [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Pedrosa Biscaia Tufaile, Adriana [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-10-13

    We have described the stretching and folding of foams in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing air and a surfactant solution, from a sequence of upside-down flips. Besides the fractal dimension of the foam, we have observed the logistic growth for the soap film length. The stretching and folding mechanism is present during the foam formation, and this mechanism is observed even after the foam has reached its respective maximum fractal dimension. Observing the motion of bubbles inside the foam, large bubbles present power spectrum associated with random walk motion in both directions, while the small bubbles are scattered like balls in a Galton board.

  3. Depicting Vortex Stretching and Vortex Relaxing Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符松; 李启兵; 王明皓

    2003-01-01

    Different from many existing studies on the paranetrization of vortices, we investigate the effectiveness of two new parameters for identifying the vortex stretching and vortex relaxing mechanisms. These parameters are invariants and identify three-dimensional flow structures only, i.e. they diminish in two-dimensional flows. This is also unlike the existing vortex identification approaches which deliver information in two-dimensional flows. The present proposals have been successfully applied to identify the stretching and relaxing vortices in compressible mixing layers and natural convection flows.

  4. Viscous Swirling Flow over a Stretching Cylinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiegang FANG; ShanshanYAO

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a viscous How over a cylinder with stretching and torsional motion. There is an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and there exists a unique solution for all the given values of the flow Reynolds number. The results show that velocity decays faster for a higher Reynolds number and the How penetrates shallower into the ambient Huid. All the velocity proHles decay algebraically to the ambient zero velocity.%We investigate a viscous flow over a cylinder with stretching and torsional motion.There is an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and there exists a unique solution for all the given values of the flow Reynolds number.The results show that velocity decays faster for a higher Reynolds number and the flow penetrates shallower into the ambient fluid.All the velocity profiles decay algebraically to the ambient zero velocity.Exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations play important roles in the development of fluid mechanics.In the review articles,[1,2] Wang summarized the available exact solutions of the unsteady state and of the steady-state NS equations.Swirl flows have important engineering applications in many fields such as the cyclone for separation of solid,liquid and gas,swirl atomizers,swirl combustion devices,heat transfer enhancement and others.[3,4] A famous example of flows involving rotation or swirl is the rotating disk problem studied by von Karman.[5-8] The flow induced by a stretching boundary is also important in the extrusion processes in plastic and metal industries.[9-11] Crane[12] presented an exact solution of the two-dimensional NS equations for a stretching sheet problem with a closed analytical form.The stretching wall problem was extended by Wang[13]to a three-dimensional setting.The flow between two stretching disks was studied by Fang and Zhang recently.[14] The combined effects of disk stretching and rotation on the von Karman flow was investigated by Fang.[15] The flow inside a channel or a

  5. Holland in Iceland Revisited: An Emic Approach to Evaluating U.S. Vocational Interest Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Sif; Rounds, James; Su, Rong

    2010-01-01

    An emic approach was used to test the structural validity and applicability of Holland's (1997) RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) model in Iceland. Archival data from the development of the Icelandic Interest Inventory (Einarsdottir & Rounds, 2007) were used in the present investigation. The data…

  6. Teamwork in Establishing a Professional Learning Community in a New Icelandic School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanbjörnsdóttir, Birna María; Macdonald, Allyson; Frímannsson, Gudmundur Heidar

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the action research reported here is on how leaders and teachers used teamwork in developing a professional learning community in a new compulsory school in Iceland. Collaboration is a critical issue in schools as it can improve practice that supports student achievement. Results from the TALIS 2008 study show that Icelandic teachers…

  7. The Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ) in Icelandic: Psychometric Properties and Factor Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Halldorsson, Jonas G.; Steinberg, Stacy; Hansdottir, Ingunn; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari

    2014-01-01

    This article describes psychometric testing of an Icelandic adaptation of the "Adult Reading History Questionnaire" (ARHQ), designed to detect a history of reading difficulties indicative of dyslexia. Tested in a large and diverse sample of 2,187 adults, the Icelandic adaptation demonstrated internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's…

  8. Low-Ti basalts from the Faroe Islands constrain the early Iceland depleted plume component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin

    -Toft, J, Kingsley, R., Schilling, J.G., 2000: Depleted Iceland mantle plume geochemical signature: Artifact of multicomponent mixing? Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems vol.1. Thirlwall, M.F., Gee, M.A.M., Taylor, R.N., Murton, B.J., 2004: Mantle components in Iceland and adjecent ridges investigated...

  9. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Icelandic Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhjalmsdottir, Guobjorg; Kjartansdottir, Guorun Birna; Smaradottir, Sigriour Briet; Einarsdottir, Sif

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric characteristics and construct validity of the Icelandic form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS-Iceland). The CAAS consists of four scales that measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. The…

  10. Iceland, the Land of Fire and Ice, an ideal place to teach and study earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, David C.; Pétursdóttir, Þórunn

    2016-04-01

    Iceland, the arctic Island on the mid Atlantic ridge, is in many ways a unique place. While the earth crust is usually over 10 km thick, the mid Atlantic ridge on which Iceland is situated is less than 1 km thick. Accordingly, the country is characterized by frequent volcanic eruptions, seismic activity and numerous geothermal sites. Due to its Nordic location all elevated mountain peaks are covered by glaciers, accounting for about 11% of the area of the island. Only in Iceland earth sciences processes are occurring continuously and can be observed almost in real time. The frequent collision of cold Arctic winds with humid Atlantic air masses lead frequently to extreme weather constellations. Consequently, the weather in Iceland is characterized by high precipitation rates and extreme hydrological phenomena, ranging from rainfall flood peaks, to diurnal snow and ice melt and the all famous Jökulhaups. The frequent volcanic eruptions lead to a continuous renewal of the lithosphere, generating locations of distinct morphologic formations. Finally, 40% of Iceland's vegetation and soil has been lost due to anthropogenic impact since the first settlement 1100 years ago. These extreme conditions reveal also advantages, e.g. in the energy sector. Today Iceland electrical energy production is almost entirely renewable, 70% coming from hydropower and 30% from geothermal power plants. In this presentation we will present an outline why Iceland is an ideal place to teach and study earth science processes. The presentation will conclude by presenting educative itineraries for field excursions in Iceland.

  11. Icelandic National Culture compared to National Cultures of 25 OECD member states using VSM94

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svala Guðmundsdóttir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Researchers such as Hofstede (2002 and House, Hanges, Javidan, Dorfman and Gupta, (2004 have defined well-known cultural clusters such as, Anglo, Germanic, and Nordic cultural clusters. However, Iceland was not incorporated in these studies and therefore the research question of this paper is: In relation to Hofstede´s five cultural dimensions where does Iceland differ in relation to 25 of the OECD member states using VSM94? A questionnaire was sent to students at the University of Iceland, School of Social Sciences by e-mail in October 2013. The five dimensions of national culture were measured using scales developed by Hofstede called VSM 94. The results indicated that Iceland differs considerably from nations such as Slovakia, Japan, India, Thailand and China, which were found high in PDI and the MAS dimension while Iceland was found to be high in IDV and low in PDI. When considering the 25 OECD countries, Iceland is more similar to the Anglo cluster, C3, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdon, Australia and United States than the Nordic cluster, C1 i.e. Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Iceland is similar to those countries in relation to high IDV, low PDI but differs in the dimensions MAS and UAI where Iceland scores higher.

  12. U.S. and Icelandic College Student Attitudes toward Relationships/Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freysteinsdóttir, Freydís Jóna; Skúlason, Sigurgrímur; Halligan, Caitlin; Knox, David

    2014-01-01

    Seven hundred and twenty-two undergraduates from a large southeastern university in the U.S. and 368 undergraduates from The University of Iceland in the Reykjavik, Iceland completed a 100 item Internet questionnaire revealing their (mostly white and 20-24 years old) attitudes on various relationship and sexual issues. Significant differences…

  13. Educational Leadership and Market Values: A Study of School Principals in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lárusdóttir, Steinunn Helga

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a larger case study about the impact of values on educational leaders in Iceland. The environment of Icelandic schools has changed considerably in recent years. These changes have affected schools and changed the nature and scope of principals' work. Scholars have argued that these changes are primarily…

  14. Holland in Iceland Revisited: An Emic Approach to Evaluating U.S. Vocational Interest Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Sif; Rounds, James; Su, Rong

    2010-01-01

    An emic approach was used to test the structural validity and applicability of Holland's (1997) RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) model in Iceland. Archival data from the development of the Icelandic Interest Inventory (Einarsdottir & Rounds, 2007) were used in the present investigation. The data…

  15. Internationally Educated Teachers and Student Teachers in Iceland: Two Qualitative Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragnarsdottir, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    This article draws upon two qualitative studies with internationally educated teachers and teacher assistants in preschools in Iceland as well as ethnic minority student teachers at the Iceland University of Education. The common research question in both studies is whether the experiences of these teachers reveal barriers to integration within…

  16. The Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ) in Icelandic: Psychometric Properties and Factor Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Halldorsson, Jonas G.; Steinberg, Stacy; Hansdottir, Ingunn; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari

    2014-01-01

    This article describes psychometric testing of an Icelandic adaptation of the "Adult Reading History Questionnaire" (ARHQ), designed to detect a history of reading difficulties indicative of dyslexia. Tested in a large and diverse sample of 2,187 adults, the Icelandic adaptation demonstrated internal consistency reliability…

  17. Mapping Offshore Winds Around Iceland Using Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar and Mesoscale Model Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete; Nawri, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    The offshore wind climate in Iceland is examined based on satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR), coastal meteorological station measurements, and results from two atmospheric model data sets, HARMONIE and NORA10. The offshore winds in Iceland are highly influenced by the rugged coastline. Lee...

  18. Reconstruction of the mean specific balance of Vatnajokull (Iceland) with a seasonal sensitivity characteristic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter de Wildt, Martijn Sybren de; Klok, E.J.; Oerlemans, J.

    We present a Seasonal Sensitivity Characteristic (SSC) of Vatnajökull (Iceland), which consists of the sensitivity of the mean specific mass balance to monthly perturbations in temperature and precipitation. The climate in Iceland is predominantly maritime (high precipitation) although often the

  19. Cold water corals and carbonate crusts in the El Arraiche mud volcano field, Gulf of Cadiz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensbergen, P.; Henriet, J. P.; Swennen, R.; Cunha, M.; Ivanov, M.

    2003-04-01

    The El Arraiche mud volcano field is situated on the Atlantic Moroccan margin. About 8 small to giant mud volcanoes are clustered around two sub-parallel thrust ridges, the Vernadsky and Renard ridges, with steep fault escarpments. The ridges rise up in water depths of about 700 m and stretch to the shelf edge. Most mud volcanoes occur on top of the Renard ridge (Lazarillo de Tormes mv, Gemini mv, Don Quichote mv and Fiúza mv). Isolated mud volcanoes occur between the ridges (Adamastor mv, Mercator mv, Al Idrissi mv). The largest mud volcano, Al Idrissi, is situated at the shelf edge and is almost 250 m high, 5.3 km wide at the base and 1.4 km at the top. The mud volcano cluster was discovered during a R/V Belgica cruise in May 2002 and surveyed again with the R/V Logachev in July 2002. The surveys yielded detailed swath bathymetry over the entire area, dense grids of high-resolution seismic data, a few very high-resolution deep-tow sub bottom profiles, side scan sonar mosaics over the major structures, selected TV-lines, TV-grabs, dredge samples and gravity cores. Integration of the data set allows to reconstruct the structure of active mud volcanoes in detail, and moreover, it allows to zoom at selected places from the regional structures gradually down to microscopic scale. In the study area small coral banks and carbonate crusts were found at the Pen Duick escarpment at the southern flank of the Renard Ridge.The Pen Duick escarpment is a fault scarp about 4.5 km long, 100 m high, and the waterdepth at the top is 525 m. The eastern part of the platform is characterized by a hummocky topography, to the west the pattern changes to parallel elongated ridges. On basis of the TV lines, TV guided grab samples were taken from dead coral banks and from a fault zone with carbonate slabs. The coral bank consisted of a dead coral framework with terrigeneous mud matrix and few living corals at the top. It is indicative of a more favourable coral habitat in the past

  20. Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  1. Redoubt Volcano: 2009 Eruption Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, K. F.

    2009-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a 3110-m glaciated stratovolcano located 170 km SW of Anchorage, Alaska, on the W side of Cook Inlet. The edifice comprises a oil production in Cook Inlet was halted for nearly five months. Unrest began in August, 2008 with reports of H2S odor. In late September, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)’s seismic network recorded periods of volcanic tremor. Throughout the fall, AVO noted increased fumarolic emissions and accompanying ice- and snow-melt on and around the 1990 dome, and gas measurements showed elevated H2S and CO2 emissions. On January 23, seismometers recorded 48 hrs of intermittent tremor and discrete, low-frequency to hybrid events. Over the next 6 weeks, seismicity waxed and waned, an estimated 5-6 million m3 of ice were lost due to melting, volcanic gas emissions increased, and debris flows emerged repeatedly from recently formed ice holes near the 1990 dome, located on the crater’s N (“Drift”) side. On March 15, a phreatic explosion deposited non-juvenile ash from a new vent in the summit ice cap just S of the 1990 dome. Ash from the explosion rose to ~4500 m above sea level (asl). The plume was accompanied by weak seismicity. The first magmatic explosion occurred on March 22. Over the next two weeks, more than 19 explosions destroyed at least two lava domes and produced ash plumes that reached 6-18 km asl. Tephra was deposited along variable azimuths including trace to minor amounts on Anchorage and Kenai Peninsula communities, and reached Fairbanks, ~800 km to the N. Several lahars were produced by explosive disruption and melting of the “Drift” glacier. The largest lahars followed explosions on March 23 and April 4 and inundated the Drift River valley to the coast, causing temporary evacuation of the Drift River Oil Terminal, ~40 km from the vent. Time-lapse images captured pyroclastic flows and lahars in the “Drift” glacier valley during several of the explosions. Ballistics and pyroclastic flow deposits were

  2. Linking space observations to volcano observatories in Latin America: Results from the CEOS DRM Volcano Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F.; Pritchard, M. E.; Biggs, J.; Arnold, D. W. D.; Poland, M. P.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Wauthier, C.; Wnuk, K.; Parker, A. L.; Amelug, F.; Sansosti, E.; Mothes, P. A.; Macedo, O.; Lara, L.; Zoffoli, S.; Aguilar, V.

    2015-12-01

    Within Latin American, about 315 volcanoes that have been active in the Holocene, but according to the United Nations Global Assessment of Risk 2015 report (GAR15) 202 of these volcanoes have no seismic, deformation or gas monitoring. Following the 2012 Santorini Report on satellite Earth Observation and Geohazards, the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) has developed a 3-year pilot project to demonstrate how satellite observations can be used to monitor large numbers of volcanoes cost-effectively, particularly in areas with scarce instrumentation and/or difficult access. The pilot aims to improve disaster risk management (DRM) by working directly with the volcano observatories that are governmentally responsible for volcano monitoring, and the project is possible thanks to data provided at no cost by international space agencies (ESA, CSA, ASI, DLR, JAXA, NASA, CNES). Here we highlight several examples of how satellite observations have been used by volcano observatories during the last 18 months to monitor volcanoes and respond to crises -- for example the 2013-2014 unrest episode at Cerro Negro/Chiles (Ecuador-Colombia border); the 2015 eruptions of Villarrica and Calbuco volcanoes, Chile; the 2013-present unrest and eruptions at Sabancaya and Ubinas volcanoes, Peru; the 2015 unrest at Guallatiri volcano, Chile; and the 2012-present rapid uplift at Cordon Caulle, Chile. Our primary tool is measurements of ground deformation made by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) but thermal and outgassing data have been used in a few cases. InSAR data have helped to determine the alert level at these volcanoes, served as an independent check on ground sensors, guided the deployment of ground instruments, and aided situational awareness. We will describe several lessons learned about the type of data products and information that are most needed by the volcano observatories in different countries.

  3. Iceland as a demonstrator for a transition to low carbon economy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbjornsson, Einar Jon; Stefansson, Hlynur; Finger, David Christian

    2017-04-01

    The energy supply in Iceland is quite unique, about 85% of the total primary energy is coming from renewable resources. Nevertheless, the ecological footprint of an average Icelander is with 6.5 worlds, one of the highest worldwide and the energy consumption per capita is about 7 times higher than the European average. Recent developments have shown that there is a great potential to reduce the footprint and develop towards low carbon economy. With its small population, well educated and governed society and clear system boundaries to the outside world, Iceland is a good research laboratory and an ideal demonstrator for a transition towards a low carbon economy. This presentation will outline how several innovative research projects at Reykjavik University could lead Iceland towards a sustainable and low carbon economy. The presentations will conclude with a visionary outlook how Iceland can become a demonstration nation towards a prosperous, low carbon and sustainable economy, helping stabilize global warming at an acceptable level.

  4. Leonardsenite, MgAlF5(H2O)(2), a new mineral species from Eldfell Volcano, Heimaey Island, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitolo, Donatella; Garavelli, Anna; Zunic, Tonci Balic

    2013-01-01

    is white and the luster is earthy. The calculated density is 2.31 g cm(-3). Leonardsenite is orthorhombic, space group Imma; the lattice parameters, obtained from Rietveld refinement of the XRPD data, are: a 7.055(1) A, b 10.117(2) angstrom, c 6.813(1) angstrom, V 486.3(1) angstrom(3), and Z = 4. The eight...... microscope produced a mean elemental composition as follows (wt.: Mg 14.66, Al 16.16, F 52.98, 0 15.88, H 1.78, total 101.46. The corresponding empirical formula, calculated on the basis of 2 cations pfu, is Mgi.00Ali 004.64(011)0.361E5.00(1420)1 29. On the basis of chemical analyses and X-ray diffraction...

  5. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, W.; Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2009-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), remote sensing is an important component of its daily monitoring of volcanoes. AVO’s remote sensing group (AVORS) primarily utilizes three satellite datasets; Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Satellites (POES), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Terra and Aqua satellites, and NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) data. AVHRR and MODIS data are collected by receiving stations operated by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska’s Geophysical Institute. An additional AVHRR data feed is supplied by NOAA’s Gilmore Creek satellite tracking station. GOES data are provided by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Monterey Bay. The ability to visualize these images and their derived products is critical for the timely analysis of the data. To this end, AVORS has developed javascript web interfaces that allow the user to view images and metadata. These work well for internal analysts to quickly access a given dataset, but they do not provide an integrated view of all the data. To do this AVORS has integrated its datasets with Keyhole Markup Language (KML) allowing them to be viewed by a number of virtual globes or other geobrowsers that support this code. Examples of AVORS’ use of KML include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through KML to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits using polygons; and animated models of ash plumes, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages.

  6. Quantifying the Impact of Icelandic Dust Storms on High-Latitude Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browse, Jo; Dorsi, Kelly; Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Murray, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Using a combination of observations, meteorological climatologies and modelling we have developed an Icelandic dust storm emission inventory. Here we present results from a global modelling study quantifying the contribution of Icelandic dust to high-latitude: ice nucleating particles (INP), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and PM2.5. Our results suggest that Icelandic dust cannot explain the formation and persistence of summertime mixed-phase Arctic marine clouds, as summertime marine clouds are too warm for Icelandic dust to serve as INP. However, in colder regions (such as Greenland) Icelandic dust may sporadically contribute to INP. The contribution of Icelandic dust to high-latitude CCN was shown to be complex. Indeed, our results indicate a decrease in high-latitude CCN in the aftermath of Icelandic dust storms. This decrease is due to the short-term increase of the Arctic atmospheric condensation sink and the resulting suppression of nucleation processes (a significant source of Arctic summertime CCN). Finally, Icelandic dust storms are shown to significantly contribute to high-latitude summertime PM2.5 (and PM10) both during (˜100 {μ}gm-3) and in the aftermath (˜10 {μ}gm-3) of dust events. Our results suggest that Icelandic dust storms (neglected in most global climate models) may in the short term increase aerosol optical depth (strongly correlated to PM2.5) at high latitudes. Additionally, Icelandic dust storms are likely to contribute to poor air quality as well as reduced visibility in the Arctic boundary layer. Thus, we argue for the adoption of high-latitude dust emissions in climate and NWP models.

  7. Mapping of magnetic chrons: paleomagnetic polarity map of East Iceland, 0-13 Myr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgason, Johann

    2016-04-01

    Through data on palaeomagnetism, stratigraphy and radiometric age dating an immense database on magnetic chrons has been established for the lava succession in Iceland (e.g. Kristjánsson, 2008). Correlation of magnetic chrons with the geomagnetic time scale provides a reasonable age estimate for vast stratigraphic sequences. The basalt lava succession in Iceland has a thickness of tens of kilometers. The magnetostratigraphic data offer, through the help of paleomagnetism and radiometric dating, a detailed timing of events in the evolution of the Iceland mantle plume region. Yet a magnetic polarity map for Iceland has been lacking but during the last 50 years, comprehensive stratigraphic mapping has paved the way for a magnetic polarity map in various parts of Iceland. Here, such a map is presented for a segment of East Iceland, i.e. for lavas ranging in age from 0 to 13 M yr. The map is a compilation based on various studies into the cliff section and stratigraphic work performed by numerous research initiatives, both in relation to hydroelectric research as well as academic projects. References: Kristjánsson, L., 2008. Paleomagnetic research on Icelandic lava flows. Jökull, 58, 101-116. Helgason, J., Duncan, R.A., Franzson, H., Guðmundsson, Á., and M. Riishuus., 2015. Magnetic polarity map of Akrafjall and Skarðsheiði and new 40Ar-39Ar age dating from West Iceland., Presentation at the spring conference of the Icelandic Geological Society, held on March 13th 2015 at the University of Iceland.

  8. Chemical quality and regulatory compliance of drinking water in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Maria J; Gardarsson, Sigurdur M; Jonsson, Gunnar St; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-11-01

    Assuring sufficient quality of drinking water is of great importance for public wellbeing and prosperity. Nations have developed regulatory system with the aim of providing drinking water of sufficient quality and to minimize the risk of contamination of the water supply in the first place. In this study the chemical quality of Icelandic drinking water was evaluated by systematically analyzing results from audit monitoring where 53 parameters were assessed for 345 samples from 79 aquifers, serving 74 water supply systems. Compliance to the Icelandic Drinking Water Regulation (IDWR) was evaluated with regard to parametric values, minimum requirement of sampling, and limit of detection. Water quality compliance was divided according to health-related chemicals and indicators, and analyzed according to size. Samples from few individual locations were benchmarked against natural background levels (NBLs) in order to identify potential pollution sources. The results show that drinking compliance was 99.97% in health-related chemicals and 99.44% in indicator parameters indicating that Icelandic groundwater abstracted for drinking water supply is generally of high quality with no expected health risks. In 10 water supply systems, of the 74 tested, there was an indication of anthropogenic chemical pollution, either at the source or in the network, and in another 6 water supplies there was a need to improve the water intake to prevent surface water intrusion. Benchmarking against the NBLs proved to be useful in tracing potential pollution sources, providing a useful tool for identifying pollution at an early stage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Family dynamics in the United States, Finland and Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marjorie A; Elder, Jennifer H; Paavilainen, Eija; Joronen, Katja; Helgadóttir, Helga L; Seidl, Ann

    2010-03-01

    Understanding the dynamics of contemporary, postmodern families and how these relate to health is critically important to nurses and other health care providers throughout the world. Much can be learned by studying not only one's own culture but also other countries. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare family dynamics of families in the United States, Finland and Iceland. To date relatively little has been published related to families in these Nordic countries. Six family dimensions in Barnhill's Family Health Cycle served as the theoretical framework. Adult respondents (n = 567) purposively selected from varied community groups, completed the Family Dynamics Measure II (FDM II) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Main findings from the three countries were positive family dynamics, with mutuality contributing the strongest factor to partially confirm the theoretical propositions in Barnhill's Family Health Cycle. Respondents from all countries reported (1) clear communication and flexibility that contribute to mutuality; (2) younger age of respondents and increased education that were associated with more positive family dynamics; and (3) larger families associated with more negative dynamics. Mixed reports occurred according to gender, with Nordic men tending to perceive some negative dimensions. Marriage was important for more positive family dynamics only in the United States. Families in the United States and in Iceland had in common more negative family dynamics during illnesses. Problems and changes affected mostly families in the United States. In general, families in Finland and Iceland had greater strengths than in the United States. This benchmark study offers information for health practitioners to assist families, as well as contribute to the improvement of family social policies, especially in the United States.

  10. Neutron Compton scattering studies of stretched polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrys, B J; Mayers, J; Kalhoro, M S

    2002-01-01

    The mean kinetic energy of hydrogen and carbon atoms in unstretched and stretched polyethylene samples has been measured by neutron Compton scattering. The vibrational frequencies of the ground state and torsional energies have been calculated and compared with the existing data and calculations. The results obtained on deuterated and non-deuterated samples are compared. (orig.)

  11. Linear viscoelastic characterization from filament stretching rheometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    viscoelasticity well into the nonlinear regime. Therefore at present, complete rheological characterization of a material requires two apparatuses: a shear and an extensional rheometer. This work is focused on developing a linear viscoelastic protocol for the filament stretching rheometer (FSR) in order...

  12. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  13. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  14. Cloud Network Helps Stretch IT Dollars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    No matter how many car washes or bake sales schools host to raise money, adding funds to their coffers is a recurring problem. This perpetual financial difficulty makes expansive technology purchases or changes seem like a pipe dream for school CIOs and has education technologists searching for ways to stretch money. In 2005, state K-12 school…

  15. 231Pa systematics in postglacial volcanic rocks from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon; Kokfelt, Thomas; Hoernle, Kaj; Lundstrom, Craig; Hauff, Folkmar

    2016-07-01

    Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of combined 238U-230Th and 235U-231Pa systematics to constrain upwelling rates and the role of recycled mafic lithologies in mantle plume-derived basalts. Accordingly, we present measurements of the 231Pa concentrations from 26 mafic volcanic rocks from Iceland, including off-axis basalts from the Snaefellsnes Peninsula, to complement previously published 238U-230Th-226Ra data. 231Pa concentrations vary from 27 to 624 fg/g and (231Pa/235U) ratios from 1.12 to 2.11 with the exception of one anomalous sample from the Southeast Rift which has a 231Pa deficit with (231Pa/235U) = 0.86. An important new result is that basalts from the Southeast Rift and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula define a trend at relatively low (231Pa/235U) for a given (230Th/238U) ratio. Many of the remaining samples fall in or around the global field for ocean island basalts but those from the Mid-Iceland Belt and the Southwest Rift/Reykjanes Peninsula extend to higher (231Pa/235U) ratios at a given (230Th/238U), similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts. In principle, these lavas could result from melting of peridotite at lower pressures. However, there is no reason to suspect that the Mid-Iceland Belt and the Southwest Rift lavas reflect shallower melting than elsewhere in Iceland. In our preferred model, these lavas reflect melting of garnet peridotite whereas those from the Southeast Rift and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula contain a significant contribution (up to 20%) of melt from garnet pyroxenite. This is consistent with incompatible trace element and radiogenic isotope evidence for recycled oceanic crust in these lavas. There is increasing agreement that the displacement of ocean island basalts to lower (231Pa/235U) ratios at a given (230Th/238U), compared to mid-ocean ridge basalts, reflects the role of recycled mafic lithologies such as garnet pyroxenite as well as higher average pressures of melting. It now seems likely that this interpretation may

  16. Life cycle assessment of Icelandic Atlantic salmon Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This study analysed the environmental impacts of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farmed in sea cages in Tálknafjörður, North West of Iceland. Methodologically the study was based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and the functional unit was 1 metric tonne of the whole Atlantic salmon produced in sea cage system and delivered to a processing plant in Patreksfjörður. The life cycle model included the feed production (including feed raw materials production), hatchery, sea-cage farm, faming equipmen...

  17. [Surgical removing of an ectopic tooth in an Iceland mare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicht, S; Del Chicca, F; Fürst, A

    2011-12-01

    Ectopic teeth occur because of failure of the first branchial cleft to close during development and are found mostly in young horses. Such dentigerous cysts are often located at the base of the ear, forming a notable swelling with a fistula, as it was the case with the two year old Iceland mare «Runa». In order to confirm the diagnosis, x-ray images were taken, which is also necessary to locate the ectopic tooth correctly. While operating, the whole cystic membrane should be removed and it is important to prevent adjacent nerves and blood vessels from damage. Prognosis for complete healing after removing an ectopic tooth is excellent.

  18. Populism in Iceland: Has the Progressive Party turned populist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiríkur Bergmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Though nationalism has always been strong in Iceland, populist political parties did not emerge as a viable force until after the financial crisis of 2008. On wave of the crisis a completely renewed leadership took over the country’s old agrarian party, the Progressive Party (PP, which was rapidly transformed in a more populist direction. Still the PP is perhaps more firmly nationalist than populist. However, when analyzing communicational changes of the new postcrisis leadership it is unavoidable to categorize the party amongst at least the softer version of European populist parties, perhaps closest to the Norwegian Progress Party.

  19. Lahar hazards at Agua volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, S.P.; Vallance, J.W.; Matías, O.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    At 3760 m, Agua volcano towers more than 3500 m above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan highlands to the north. The volcano is within 5 to 10 kilometers (km) of Antigua, Guatemala and several other large towns situated on its northern apron. These towns have a combined population of nearly 100,000. It is within about 20 km of Escuintla (population, ca. 100,000) to the south. Though the volcano has not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris—also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas.

  20. Volcanoes muon imaging using Cherenkov telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Catalano, Osvaldo; Mineo, Teresa; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Pareschi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    A detailed understanding of a volcano inner structure is one of the key-points for the volcanic hazards evaluation. To this aim, in the last decade, geophysical radiography techniques using cosmic muon particles have been proposed. By measuring the differential attenuation of the muon flux as a function of the amount of rock crossed along different directions, it is possible to determine the density distribution of the interior of a volcano. Up to now, a number of experiments have been based on the detection of the muon tracks crossing hodoscopes, made up of scintillators or nuclear emulsion planes. Using telescopes based on the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique, we propose a new approach to study the interior of volcanoes detecting the Cherenkov light produced by relativistic cosmic-ray muons that survive after crossing the volcano. The Cherenkov light produced along the muon path is imaged as a typical annular pattern containing all the essential information to reconstruct particle direction and energ...

  1. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  2. A field guide to Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; McKay, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon at the intersection of the Cascade Range and the High Lava Plains. Its lavas range in age from ca. 0.5 Ma to late Holocene. Erupted products range in composition from basalt through rhyolite and cover ~3000 km2. The most recent caldera-forming eruption occurred ~80,000 years ago. This trip will highlight a revised understanding of the volcano's history based on new detailed geologic work. Stops will also focus on evidence for ice and flooding on the volcano, as well as new studies of Holocene mafic eruptions. Newberry is one of the most accessible U.S. volcanoes, and this trip will visit a range of lava types and compositions including tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalt flows, cinder cones, and rhyolitic domes and tuffs. Stops will include early distal basalts as well as the youngest intracaldera obsidian flow.

  3. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a mega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies.

  4. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in amega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead......, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA......-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies....

  5. Lahar-hazard zonation for San Miguel volcano, El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Chesner, C.A.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Miguel volcano, also known as Chaparrastique, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. The volcano, located in the eastern part of the country, rises to an altitude of about 2130 meters and towers above the communities of San Miguel, El Transito, San Rafael Oriente, and San Jorge. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and the PanAmerican and coastal highways cross the lowermost northern and southern flanks of the volcano. The population density around San Miguel volcano coupled with the proximity of major transportation routes increases the risk that even small volcano-related events, like landslides or eruptions, may have significant impact on people and infrastructure. San Miguel volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in El Salvador; it has erupted at least 29 times since 1699. Historical eruptions of the volcano consisted mainly of relatively quiescent emplacement of lava flows or minor explosions that generated modest tephra falls (erupted fragments of microscopic ash to meter sized blocks that are dispersed into the atmosphere and fall to the ground). Little is known, however, about prehistoric eruptions of the volcano. Chemical analyses of prehistoric lava flows and thin tephra falls from San Miguel volcano indicate that the volcano is composed dominantly of basalt (rock having silica content

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF PNF STRETCHING AND CYCLIC STRETCHING OF CALF TIGHTNESS ON COLLEGE GOING GIRLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlesha Sirari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flexibility helps with injury prevention, the reduction of soreness following a workout, and a general sense of well-being. There are different stretching techniques and protocols for improvements in calf extensibility and flexibility. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of two techniques i.e. CYCLIC and PNF stretching which improves calf flexibility. This study was done to find the effectiveness of calf Cyclic and PNF stretching technique to improve calf flexibility. Methods: 30 subjects with age group 21-22 years were randomly allocated to 2 groups equally. Group 1(n=15 were given CYCLIC and group 2(n=15 were given PNF stretching technique. Plantar flexion was used to measure the calf tightness which was done before and after the treatment. Treatment was given for 7 days and on the 7th day the calf tightness was again measured. Results: The mean difference of the CYCLIC is 4.6 and mean difference of PNF is 4.7 which indicate that CYCLIC and PNF both are effective to improve calf flexibility but PNF is more effective than CYCLIC to improve calf flexibility. Conclusion: The neurophysiological basis of PNF, stating that the excitatory efficient of the neuromuscular spindle or the inhibitory afferent of the Golgi tendon organ (GTO or both are responsible for the effects. During PNF stretch and isometric contraction of stretched agonists for extended period may cause activation of its neuromuscular spindle. The increase in tension created during the isometric contraction of the pre – lengthened agonist contracts concentrically. Both the fascia & the spindle of the agonist adjust to the nearly lengthened position. These impulses travel via causing post synaptic inhibition of the motor neuron to agonist increasing the tension from the GTO. These impulses can override the impulses coming from the neuromuscular spindles arousing the muscle to reflexly resist to the change in length, thus helping in lengthening

  7. A new high-resolution Holocene tephra stratigraphy in eastern Iceland: Improving the Icelandic and North Atlantic tephrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsdóttir, Esther Ruth; Larsen, Gudrún; Björck, Svante; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Striberger, Johan

    2016-10-01

    A new and improved Holocene tephra stratigraphy and tephrochronological framework for eastern and northern Iceland is presented. Investigations of a sediment sequence from Lake Lögurinn have revealed a comprehensive tephra record spanning the last 10.200 years. A total of 157 tephra layers have been identified, whereof 149 tephra layers have been correlated to its source volcanic system using geochemistry, stratigraphy and age. Fifteen layers have chemical composition of two affinities that possibly represent two very closely spaced eruptions. Thus, these 157 tephra layers are believed to represent 172 explosive eruptions. Nineteen tephra marker layers have been identified in the Lake Lögurinn record (G1922, A1875, V1477, V1410, H1636, K1625, Ö1362, G1354, K1262, V874, Hrafnkatla, Sn-1, Grákolla, HY, H3, H4, HÖ, LL1755 and Reitsvík-8 tephra markers). New potential tephra markers are the silicic Askja L (∼9400 cal BP), the low titanium basalt layers, LL 1774 (∼10.150 cal BP) and LL 1755 (∼9990 cal BP), assigned to Veidivötn-Bárdarbunga and the tephra layers, LL 1527.8 (∼7850 cal BP), LL 911.2 (∼2370 cal BP), LL 908.4 (∼2350 cal BP), LL 781.9 (∼1930 cal BP), LL 644.4 (∼1480 cal BP), not yet correlated to a source volcanic system. A silicic tephra marker layer, Reitsvík 8, correlated to the Fosen tephra in Norway has been identified in Lake Lögurinn. The Lake Lögurinn tephra record has been connected and integrated with the Icelandic terrestrial tephrochronology and stratigraphy through 102 tephra layers, the marine tephra stratigraphy through 39 layers and overseas through 9 tephra layers. This record is the first high-resolution tephra stratigraphical and chronological framework for the Holocene in eastern Iceland as well as the most detailed and continuous record, and has considerable potential to serve as a key section or a stratotype for the Holocene in eastern Iceland and the North Atlantic.

  8. Food appearances in children's television programmes in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsdottir, Steingerdur; Berg, Christina

    2017-08-29

    Exposure to advertisements cannot fully explain the associations between young children's dietary intake and the time they spend in front of the television. It is therefore of importance to study television content other than advertisements in this aspect. The present study aimed to examine the nature and extent of verbal and visual appearances of foods and beverages in children's television programmes on Icelandic public service television. A total of 27 h of children's programmes (domestic and internationally produced) were watched. All verbal and visual appearances of foods and beverages were coded, as well as the context in which the foods/beverages were discussed or appeared. Children's programmes on Icelandic public service television. Two food groups were of special interest for their importance from a public health perspective: high-calorie and low-nutrient (HCLN) foods and fruits and vegetables (F&V). The χ 2 test and logistic regression were performed to analyse if the occurrence of the two groups was associated with the context where foods/beverages appeared. Of the 125 different programmes, a food or beverage appeared in 86 %. Of the total food appearances (n 599), HCLN foods accounted for 26 % and F&V for 23 %. HCLN foods were presented as desirable by appearing more frequently with child characters (Pservice television has the potential to improve the way food and eating is presented in children's programmes, as young childhood is a critical period for founding healthy habits for later life.

  9. Changes in groundwater chemistry before two consecutive earthquakes in Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Skelton, Alasdair

    2014-09-21

    Groundwater chemistry has been observed to change before earthquakes and is proposed as a precursor signal. Such changes include variations in radon count rates1, 2, concentrations of dissolved elements3, 4, 5 and stable isotope ratios4, 5. Changes in seismic wave velocities6, water levels in boreholes7, micro-seismicity8 and shear wave splitting9 are also thought to precede earthquakes. Precursor activity has been attributed to expansion of rock volume7, 10, 11. However, most studies of precursory phenomena lack sufficient data to rule out other explanations unrelated to earthquakes12. For example, reproducibility of a precursor signal has seldom been shown and few precursors have been evaluated statistically. Here we analyse the stable isotope ratios and dissolved element concentrations of groundwater taken from a borehole in northern Iceland between 2008 and 2013. We find that the chemistry of the groundwater changed four to six months before two greater than magnitude 5 earthquakes that occurred in October 2012 and April 2013. Statistical analyses indicate that the changes in groundwater chemistry were associated with the earthquakes. We suggest that the changes were caused by crustal dilation associated with stress build-up before each earthquake, which caused different groundwater components to mix. Although the changes we detect are specific for the site in Iceland, we infer that similar processes may be active elsewhere, and that groundwater chemistry is a promising target for future studies on the predictability of earthquakes.

  10. The Icelandic media coverage of the constitutional assembly election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guðbjörg Hildur Kolbeins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On November 27, 2010, the people of Iceland elected 25 individuals to the country’s constitutional assembly. As there were 522 candidates for the 25 seats in the assembly, the media were faced with a new dilemma, i.e. how to ensure impartiality and objectivity in their coverage of the candidates and the subject matter. The present study compares the media coverage of the constitutional assembly election to two other national elections; the general election in the spring of 2009 and the municipal election in the spring of 2010. All news stories in the 13 major print, broadcast and online news outlets in Iceland were coded two weeks prior to each election. The results indicate that the national media almost ignored the constitutional assembly election in comparison to the other elections. There were 632 news stories on the general election, 590 stories on the municipal election but only 165 stories on the constitutional assembly election. The lack of coverage of the candidates for the constitutional assembly seems to reveal that the traditional media, i.e. the print and broadcast media, and the online media did not know how to best serve and inform the public in the democratic process.

  11. EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2014-05-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: 1)Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). 2)Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). 3)The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is

  12. Crustal Structure of the Iceland Region from Spectrally Correlated Free-air and Terrain Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftwich, T. E.; vonFrese, R. R. B.; Potts, L. V.; Roman, D. R.; Taylor, P. T.

    2003-01-01

    Seismic refraction studies have provided critical, but spatially restricted constraints on the structure of the Icelandic crust. To obtain a more comprehensive regional view of this tectonically complicated area, we spectrally correlated free-air gravity anomalies against computed gravity effects of the terrain for a crustal thickness model that also conforms to regional seismic and thermal constraints. Our regional crustal thickness estimates suggest thickened crust extends up to 500 km on either side of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge with the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge crust being less extended and on average 3-5 km thinner than the crust of the Greenland-Iceland Ridge. Crustal thickness estimates for Iceland range from 25-35 km in conformity with seismic predictions of a cooler, thicker crust. However, the deepening of our gravity-inferred Moho relative to seismic estimates at the thermal plume and rift zones of Iceland suggests partial melting. The amount of partial melting may range from about 8% beneath the rift zones to perhaps 20% above the plume core where mantle temperatures may be 200-400 C above normal. Beneath Iceland, areally limited regions of partial melting may also be compositionally and mechanically layered and intruded. The mantle plume appears to be centered at (64.6 deg N, 17.4 deg W) near the Vatnajokull Glacier and the central Icelandic neovolcanic zones.

  13. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  14. The seismicity of Marapi volcano, West Sumatra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, L.

    2009-04-01

    Marapi is one of the active volcanoes in West Sumatra. It is a stratovolcano with an edifice that is elongated in the ENE-WSW direction. Its elevation is about 2,900 m a.s.l. The summit area is characterized by a caldera that contains some active craters aligned along the ENE-WSW direction. The Marapi volcano is an attractive region for tourists and hosts many small communities its surrounding areas. The recent history of Mt. Marapi is characterized by explosive activity at the summit craters. No lava flows have passed the rim of the summit caldera in recent times. The last eruption occurred on August 5, 2004, and consisted of moderate explosive activity from the central crater. In 1975 an eruption with magmatic and phreatic explosive phases and mudflows and lahars occurred that caused fatalities in the surrounding areas. Since 1980 other eruptions have occurred at Marapi volcano. Even if the explosive intensities of those eruptions have been small to moderate, in some cases, there were fatalities. A cooperation project started between Italy and Indonesia (COVIN) for the monitoring of volcanoes in West Sumatra. In the context of this project a monitoring centre has been set up at the Bukittinggi Observatory and a seismological monitoring system for Marapi volcano has been realized. This system is based on a broadband seismic network including 4 three-component stations. The data acquired by the broadband network of Marapi volcano are continuous recordings of the seismic signals starting from 19/10/2006. Volcano-Tectonic and Long Period events of Marapi volcano together with regional and teleseismic earthquakes are recorded. Several events of high magnitude located at short distances from the network were also recorded such as on March 6, 2007, when two events of Magnitudes Mw 6.4 and 6.3 were recorded with the epicentres near the Marapi volcano. During the following days, there was a sequence of hundreds of aftershocks. The preliminary analysis of the seismicity of

  15. Volcanic ash from Iceland over Munich: mass concentration retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, J.; Gro{ß}, S.; Freudenthaler, V.; Wiegner, M.

    2011-03-01

    Volcanic ash plumes, emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano (Iceland) in spring 2010, were observed by the lidar systems MULIS and POLIS in Maisach (near Munich, Germany), and by a CIMEL Sun photometer and a JenOptik ceilometer in Munich. We retrieve mass concentrations of volcanic ash from the lidar measurements; spectral optical properties, i.e.~extinction coefficients, backscatter coefficients, and linear depolarization ratios, are used as input for an inversion. The inversion algorithm searches for model aerosol ensembles with optical properties that agree with the measured values within their uncertainty ranges. The non-sphericity of ash particles is considered by assuming spheroids. Optical particle properties are calculated using the T-matrix method supplemented by the geometric optics approach. The lidar inversion is applied to observations of the pure volcanic ash plume in the morning of 17 April 2010. We find 1.45 g m-2 for the ratio between the mass concentration and the extinction coefficient at λ = 532 nm, assuming an ash density of 2.6 g cm-3. The uncertainty range for this ratio is from 0.87 g m-2 to 2.32 g m-2. At the peak of the ash concentration over Maisach the extinction coefficient at λ = 532 nm was 0.75 km-1 (1-h-average), which corresponds to a maximum mass concentration of 1.1 mg m-3 (0.65 to 1.8 mg m-3). Model calculations show that particle backscatter at our lidar wavelengths (λ ≤ 1064 nm), and thus the lidar retrieval, is hardly sensitive to large particles (r ≳ 3 μm); large particles, however, may contain significant amounts of mass. Therefore, as an independent cross check of the lidar retrieval and to investigate the presence of large particles in more detail, we model ratios of sky radiances in the aureole of the Sun and compare them to measurements of the CIMEL. These ratios are sensitive to particles up to r ≈ 10 μm. This approach confirms the mass concentrations from the lidar retrieval. We conclude that synergistic

  16. Intercomparison of Metop-A SO2 measure- ments during the 2010- 2011 Icelandic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elissavet Koukouli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The European Space Agency project Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Avi­ ation Hazards, was introduced after the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in the spring of 2010 to facilitate the development of an optimal End­to­End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Predic­ tion. The Eyjafjallajökull plume drifted towards Europe and caused major disruptions of European air traffic for several weeks affecting the everyday life of millions of people. The limitations in volcanic plume monitoring and prediction capabilities gave birth to this observational system which is based on comprehensive satellite­derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide [SO2] level estimates, as well as a widespread validation using supplementary satellite, aircraft and ground­based measurements. Inter­comparison of the volcanic total SO2 column and plume height observed by GOME­2/Metop­A and IASI/Metop­A are shown before, during and after the Eyjaf­ jallajökull 2010 eruptions as well as for the 2011 Grímsvötn eruption. Co­located ground­based Brewer Spectro­ photometer data extracted from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre for de Bilt, the Nether­ lands, are also compared to the different satellite estimates. Promising agreement is found for the two different types of instrument for the SO2 columns with linear regression coefficients ranging around from 0.64 when comparing the different instruments and 0.85 when comparing the two different IASI algorithms. The agree­ ment for the plume height is lower, possibly due to the major differences between the height retrieval part of the GOME2 and IASI algorithms. The comparisons with the Brewer ground­based station in de Bilt, The Nether­ lands show good qualitative agreement for the peak of the event however stronger eruptive signals are required for a longer quantitative comparison. 

  17. Gas chemistry, boiling and phase segregation in a geothermal system, Hellisheidi, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Samuel; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Arnórsson, Stefán; Stefánsson, Andri

    2014-01-01

    The geochemistry of aquifer fluids of the Hellisheidi geothermal system, southwest Iceland, was studied. Based on samples of vapor and liquid from well discharge fluids, the aquifer fluid compositions at the depth of the geothermal system were reconstructed taking into account the highly variable degree of excess well discharge enthalpy, where the enthalpy of the discharge is significantly higher than that of vapor-saturated liquid at the measured aquifer temperature. Decreasing concentrations of non-volatile components such as Si in the total well discharge suggest that the main cause of elevated discharge enthalpies is liquid-vapor phase segregation, i.e. the retention of liquid in the aquifer rock due to its adhesion onto mineral surfaces. Moreover, the slightly lower than equilibrium calculated concentrations of H2 and H2S in some of the hottest and highest-enthalpy wells is considered to be caused by conductive heat transfer from the rocks to the fluids. Alternatively, the cause may lie in the selection of the phase segregation conditions. The calculated concentrations of volatile species in the aquifer fluid are very sensitive to the assumed phase segregation conditions while non-volatiles are not greatly affected by this model parameter. In general, the level of uncertainty does not contradict previous findings of a close approach to fluid-mineral equilibrium at aquifer temperatures above 250 °C. The CO2 concentrations were observed to fall below equilibrium with respect to the most likely mineral buffers, suggesting a possible source control. Elevated H2 concentrations indicate a small equilibrium vapor fraction in aquifer fluids (∼0.2% by mass or ∼3% by volume). Previous conceptual models of the Hengill volcanic area (e.g. Bödvarsson et al., 1990) have implied a central magmatic heat source underlying the Hengill central volcano. Instead, a new conceptual model of the Hellisheidi system is proposed that features two main regions of fluid upflow

  18. Present kinematics of the Tjornes Fracture Zone, North Iceland, from campaign and continuous GPS measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Metzger, S.

    2012-11-19

    The Tjörnes Fracture Zone (TFZ), North Iceland, is a 120 km transform offset of the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge that accommodates 18 mm yr−1 plate motion on two parallel transform structures and connects the offshore Kolbeinsey Ridge in the north to the on-shore Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) in the south. This transform zone is offshore except for a part of the right-lateral strike-slip Húsavík-Flatey fault (HFF) system that lies close to the coastal town of Húsavík, inducing a significant seismic risk to its inhabitants. In our previous work we constrained the locking depth and slip-rate of the HFF using 4 yr of continuous GPS measurements and found that the accumulated slip-deficit on the fault is equivalent to a Mw6.8 ± 0.1 earthquake, assuming a complete stress release in the last major earthquakes in 1872 and a steady accumulation since then. In this paper we improve our previous analysis by adding 44 campaign GPS (EGPS) data points, which have been regularly observed since 1997. We extract the steady-state interseismic velocities within the TFZ by correcting the GPS data for volcanic inflation of Theistareykir—the westernmost volcano of the NVZ—using a model with a magma volume increase of 25 × 106 m3, constrained by InSAR time-series analysis results. The improved velocity field based on 58 GPS stations confirms the robustness of our previous model and allows to better constrain the free model parameters. For the HFF we find a slightly shallower locking depth of ∼6.2 km and a slightly higher slip-rate of ∼6.8 mm yr−1 that again result in the same seismic potential equivalent to a Mw6.8 earthquake. The much larger number of GPS velocities improves the statistically estimated model parameter uncertainties by a factor of two, when compared to our previous study, a result that we validate using Bayesian estimation.

  19. Advanced fractional crystallisation and homogenization of large-volume rhyolite before the Oraefajokull 1362 AD plinian eruption, SE Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbekk, R. S.; Tronnes, R. G.

    2007-12-01

    In the 50 km wide Icelandic rift zones rhyolite magma is generated by partial melting of hydrated metabasaltic crust, subsiding under the weight of the growing volcanic pile. This mechanism of silicic melt formation is indicated by the basalt-rhyolite bimodality and rhyolite O-isotope composition. The low 18/16O-isotope ratios of rift zone rhyolites trace the high-latitude meteoric water component of the subsiding hydrated basalts [1]. The rhyolites of the volcanic flank zones (VFZ), however, have generally as heavy oxygen as the associated alkaline to transitional basalts and intermediate volcanics [2,3]. The minor volcanic loading of the older, thicker and stronger VFZ crust is insufficient for significant subsidence, and less pronounced basalt-rhyolite bimodality combined with other geochemical features support silicic melt generation by fractional crystallization. An extreme case in Icelandic, as well as global, perspective is the rhyolite magma of the plinian eruption from the large VFZ-volcano, Oraefajokull, in 1362 AD [4]. Glass, mineral and bulk tephra analyses show no chemical variation exceeding the analytical precision for the entire erupted volume of 2 km3 DRE. This applies even to the glass shards from distant locations in Greenland, Norway and Ireland. The total phenocryst content is 0.5-1 wt percent, with oligoclase (An14 Ab81 Or5.5), fayalite (Fa99.7 Fo0.3) and hedenbergite (Wo44.7 En2.6 Fs52.7) constituting 50- 80, 10-25 and 10-25 percent of the total phenocrysts, respectively. The extreme mineral compositions (especially pure fayalite and hedenbergite) resemble those of the granophyres in the Skaergaard and Bushveld complexes and differ from all other investigated rhyolites. The advanced fractionation and homogenisation to form the erupted 2 km3 DRE rhyolite is petrogenetically challenging, and a parental magma chamber of 20-40 km3 seems like a conservative estimate. The time-scale of the historic magma chamber evolution under Oraefajokull is

  20. The role of stretching in tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witvrouw, E; Mahieu, N; Roosen, P; McNair, P

    2007-04-01

    The function of tendons can be classified into two categories: tensile force transmission, and storage and release of elastic energy during locomotion. The action of tendons in storing and releasing energy is mainly seen in sports activities with stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs). The more intense the SSC movements are (jumping-like activities), the more frequently tendon problems are observed. High SSC movements impose high loads on tendons. Consequently, tendons that frequently deal with high SSC motion require a high energy-absorbing capacity to store and release this large amount of elastic energy. As the elasticity of tendon structures is a leading factor in the amount of stored energy, prevention and rehabilitation programmes for tendon injuries should focus on increasing this tendon elasticity in athletes performing high SSC movements. Recently, it has been shown that ballistic stretching can significantly increase tendon elasticity. These findings have important clinical implications for treatment and prevention of tendon injuries.

  1. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  2. Stretching a Semiflexible Polymer in a Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runhua Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available How the statistical behavior of semiflexible polymer chains may be affected by force stretching and tube confinement is a classical unsolved problem in polymer physics. Based on the Odijk deflection theory and normal mode decomposition in terms of Fourier expansion, we have derived a new compact formula for the extension of a wormlike chain of finite length strongly confined in a tube and simultaneously stretched by an external force. We have also suggested a new deflection length, which together with the force-extension relation is valid for a very extended range of the tube-diameter/persistence-length ratio comparing to the classic Odijk theory. The newly derived formula has no adjustable fitting parameters for the whole deflection regime; in contrast, the classic Odijk length needs different prefactors to fit the free energy and average extension, respectively. Brownian dynamics simulations based on the Generalized Bead-Rod (GBR model were extensively performed, which justified the theoretical predictions.

  3. Depleted basaltic lavas from the proto-Iceland plume, Central East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Baker, Joel A.

    2012-01-01

    ridges considered to be derived from upper mantle sources polluted by the Iceland plume. However, small positive Pb peaks when normalised to MORB, and lower Nb distinguish the CEG low-Ti basalts from depleted Icelandic compositions. The lower ¿Nb (... in crustally uncontaminated parental melts implies a closer affinity to compositions from the oceanic ridges surrounding Iceland (especially Reykjanes), yet they are subtly distinct on the basis of available trace element data. We suggest that this depleted component was an integral part of the plume...

  4. Body condition score, morphometric measurements and estimation of body weight in mature Icelandic horses in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bovbjerg; Danielsen, Signe H.; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity is related to the development of several diseases like insulin resistance and laminitis in horses. The prevalence of obesity among mature Icelandic horses in Denmark has not been investigated previously. This study aimed to find the prevalence of obesity, to compare body condi......, and that owners tend to underestimate the BCS of their Icelandic horses. The GC:HW ratio might indicate overweight or obesity, however, the ratio for Icelandic horses is different than reported for horses and ponies of other breeds....

  5. “The provocation is titillating.” Sven Wernström in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Holownia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the reception and impact of Sven Wernström's views and works in Iceland. In particular, it retraces the controversy which surrounded the 1978 translation of his book Kamrat Jesus (1971 and recounts the heated debate over the book which took place both in the press and in the Icelandic parliament. Wernström's prose and critical voice is also considered within the context of the so-called social realist movement in Icelandic literature for children and young adults.

  6. How the Cloud Stretches the SOA Scope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmanan G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we will describe how the enterprise serviceoriented-architecture (SOA scope is stretched with the advent of cloud computing. With the help of the case study of a fictitious global retailer, we will demonstrate the process for identifying cloud scenarios. Also, we will come across an emerging breed of distributed applications—both on-premise and in the Cloud—and discuss the integration considerations for building them.

  7. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  8. Laser treatment of stretch marks: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Leonardo; Piccinetti, A. L.; Monache, G. D.; Botta, G.; Mancini, S.

    2000-06-01

    The best treatment of these stretch mark is still unknown. Some authors proposed the treatment with flash-lamp-pumped dye laser 585 nm, with fluence over 8 J/cm2. Reviewing our experiences on no-surgical effects of lasers in the various phases of the wound healing, including the re- epithelization, we would like to apply the no-surgical laser therapy treating the stretch marks of breast, abdomen and lumbo-sacral region. The goal is to inhibit the fibrous tissue metabolism, encouraging the destruction of the collagen fibers with inflammatory mechanism, and increasing the reconstitution of the superficial dermis layers. We treated five cases of stretch marks in women 22-35 years old, since May 1999, with a cycle of applications of double lasers, 511 and 577 nm, with energy of 20 Joule for spot, respecting the maximum thermal relaxation times of the skin. We waited two weeks interval between the applications. Results obtained after five applications are very positive, and we are encouraged to continue this experimentation.

  9. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  10. The bioreactivity of the sub-10 μm component of volcanic ash: Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Timothy; Bérubé, Kelly

    2011-10-30

    With the recent eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyafallajökull and resulting ash cloud over much of Europe there was considerable concern about possible respiratory hazards. Volcanic ash can contain minerals that are known human respiratory health hazards such as cristobalite. Short-term ash exposures can cause skin sores, respiratory and ocular irritations and exacerbation of pre-existing lung conditions such as asthma. Long-term occupational level exposures to crystalline silicon dioxide can cause lung inflammation, oedema, fibrosis and cancer. The potential health effects would be dependent on factors including mineralogy, surface chemistry, size, and levels and duration of exposure. Bulk ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano was sourced and inhalable (<2.5 μm) ash samples prepared and physicochemically characterised. The fine ash samples were tested for bioreactivity by SDS-PAGE which determined the strength of binding between mineral grains and lung proteins. Selected proteins bound tightly to cristobalite, and bound loosely to other ash components. A positive correlation was seen between the amount of SiO(2) in the sample and the strength of the binding. The strength of binding is a function of the mineral's bioreactivity, and therefore, a potential geo-biomarker of respiratory risk.

  11. Volcanoes in the Classroom--an Explosive Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Susan A.; Thompson, Keith S.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on volcanoes for third- and fourth-grade students. Includes demonstrations; video presentations; building a volcano model; and inviting a scientist, preferably a vulcanologist, to share his or her expertise with students. (JRH)

  12. Volcanostratigraphic Approach for Evaluation of Geothermal Potential in Galunggung Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Q. S.; Sianipar, J. Y.; Pratopo, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    he geothermal systems in Indonesia are primarily associated with volcanoes. There are over 100 volcanoes located on Sumatra, Java, and in the eastern part of Indonesia. Volcanostratigraphy is one of the methods that is used in the early stage for the exploration of volcanic geothermal system to identify the characteristics of the volcano. The stratigraphy of Galunggung Volcano is identified based on 1:100.000 scale topographic map of Tasikmalaya sheet, 1:50.000 scale topographic map and also geological map. The schematic flowchart for evaluation of geothermal exploration is used to interpret and evaluate geothermal potential in volcanic regions. Volcanostratigraphy study has been done on Galunggung Volcano and Talaga Bodas Volcano, West Java, Indonesia. Based on the interpretation of topographic map and analysis of the dimension, rock composition, age and stress regime, we conclude that both Galunggung Volcano and Talaga Bodas Volcano have a geothermal resource potential that deserve further investigation.

  13. USGS U.S. Volcanoes with Elevated Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Website provides list of elevated status volcanoes with access to activity updates and/or information releases for changes in activity at the volcanoes. activity at...

  14. Experimental Characterization of Stretch-Bending Formability of AHSS Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitting, Daniela; Ofenheimer, Aldo; Pauli, Heinrich; Till, Edwin T.

    2011-05-01

    Deformation conditions of combined stretching and bending are known to enhance material formability compared to forming conditions without bending (e.g. in-plane stretching). These phenomena can be observed for most conventional steel grades but is even more pronounced for Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) sheets. Consequently, there is an urgent need in industry to quantify the phenomena of enhanced material formability due to bending effects. In this work new stretch-bend test setups are presented which can be used in addition to the conventional Angular Stretch Bend Test to systematically investigate the influence of various stretch-bending deformation conditions on the formability of AHSS sheets.

  15. Photosynthesis within Mars' volcanic craters?: Insights from Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K. L.; Hynek, B. M.; McCollom, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    Discrete locales of sulfate-rich bedrocks exist on Mars and in many cases represent the products of acid-sulfate alteration of martian basalt. In some places, the products have been attributed to hydrothermal processes from local volcanism. In order to evaluate the habitability of such an environment, we are investigating the geochemical and biological composition of active fumaroles at Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua, where fresh basaltic cinders similar in composition to martian basalts are altered by acidic, sulfur-bearing gases. Temperatures at active fumaroles can reach as high as 400°C and the pH of the steam ranges from Bacterial diversity. Cloning of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes reveals a diverse community of Bacteria, with eight phyla represented. The most common bacterial sequences belonged to the Cyanobacteria and Ktedonobacteria, however Actinobacteria, alpha-Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were also identified. Many of the cyanobacterial sequences were similar to those of the eukaryotic Cyanidiales, red algae that inhabit acidic, geothermal environments. Many of sequences related to Ktedonobacteria and Actinobacteria have also been found in acid mine drainage environments. The Archaeal community was far less diverse, with sequences matching those of unclassified Desulfurococcales and unclassified Thermoprotei. These sequences were more distant from isolated species than the bacterial sequences. Similar bacterial and archaeal communities have been found in hot spring environments in Yellowstone National Park, Greenland, Iceland, New Zealand and Costa Rica. Some of Mars' volcanoes were active for billions of years and by analogy to Cerro Negro, may have hosted photosynthetic organisms that could have been preserved in alteration mineral assemblages. Even on a generally cold and dry Mars, volcanic craters likely provided long-lived warm and wet conditions and should be a key target for future exploration assessing habitability.

  16. Does residual force enhancement increase with increasing stretch magnitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisey, Brandon; Leonard, Tim R; Herzog, Walter

    2009-07-22

    It is generally accepted that force enhancement in skeletal muscles increases with increasing stretch magnitudes. However, this property has not been tested across supra-physiological stretch magnitudes and different muscle lengths, thus it is not known whether this is a generic property of skeletal muscle, or merely a property that holds for small stretch magnitudes within the physiological range. Six cat soleus muscles were actively stretched with magnitudes varying from 3 to 24 mm at three different parts of the force-length relationship to test the hypothesis that force enhancement increases with increasing stretch magnitude, independent of muscle length. Residual force enhancement increased consistently with stretch amplitudes on the descending limb of the force-length relationship up to a threshold value, after which it reached a plateau. Force enhancement did not increase with stretch amplitude on the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. Passive force enhancement was observed for all test conditions, and paralleled the behavior of the residual force enhancement. Force enhancement increased with stretch magnitude when stretching occurred at lengths where there was natural passive force within the muscle. These results suggest that force enhancement does not increase unconditionally with increasing stretch magnitude, as is generally accepted, and that increasing force enhancement with stretch appears to be tightly linked to that part of the force-length relationship where there is naturally occurring passive force.

  17. The Relevance of Stretch Intensity and Position: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos eApostolopoulos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stretching exercises to increase the range of motion (ROM of joints have been used by sports coaches and medical professionals for improving performance and rehabilitation. The ability of connective and muscular tissues to change their architecture in response to stretching is important for their proper function, repair and performance. Given the dearth of relevant data in the literature, this review examined two key elements of stretching: stretch intensity and stretch position; and their significance to ROM, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, and inflammation in different populations. A search of three databases, Pub-Med, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews, identified 152 articles, which were subsequently categorized into four groups; athletes (n = 24, clinical (n = 29, elderly (n = 12, and general population (n = 87. The use of different populations facilitated a wider examination of the stretching components and their effects. All 152 articles incorporated information regarding duration, frequency and stretch position, whereas only 79 referred to the intensity of stretching and 22 of these 79 studies were deemed high quality. It appears that the intensity of stretching is relatively under-researched, and the importance of body position and its influence on stretch intensity, is largely unknown. In conclusion, this review has highlighted areas for future research, including stretch intensity and position and their effect on musculo-tendinous tissue, in relation to the sensation of pain, delayed onset muscle soreness, inflammation, as well as muscle health and performance

  18. Lava Eruption and Emplacement: Using Clues from Hawaii and Iceland to Probe the Lunar Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, D. H.; Hamilton, C. W.; Bleacher, J. E.; Whelley, P. L.; Young, K. E.; Scheidt, S. P.; Richardson, J. A.; Sutton, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the 2014/15 Holuhraun, Iceland and December 1974 Kilauea, Hawaii eruptions to improve understanding of relationships between eruption dynamics and final lava flow morphology. Insights are used to deduce the origin of Rima Bode on the Moon.

  19. Heat Pumps in Subarctic Areas: Current Status and Benefits of Use in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlason, Reynir Smari; Oddsson, Gudmundur Valur; Unnthorsson, Runar

    2017-01-01

    Geothermal heat pumps use the temperature difference between inside and outside areas to modify a refrigerant, either for heating or cooling. Doing so can lower the need for external heating energy for a household to some extent. The eventual impact depends on various factors, such as the external...... source for heating or cooling and the temperature difference. The use of geothermal heat pumps, and eventual benefits has not been studied in the context of frigid areas, such as in Iceland. In Iceland, only remote areas do not have access to district heating from geothermal energy where households may...... therefor benefit from using geothermal heat pumps. It is the intent of this study to explore the observed benefits of using geothermal heat pumps in Iceland, both financially and energetically. This study further elaborates on incentives provided by the Icelandic government. Real data was gathered from...

  20. Structure dependent antioxidant capacity of phlorotannins from Icelandic Fucus vesiculosus by UHPLC-DAD-ECD-QTOFMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermund, Ditte Baun; Plaza, Merichel; Turner, Charlotta

    2018-01-01

    widely studied, the antioxidant capacity of individual phlorotannins has been rarely explored. The aim of this study was to determine the structure dependant antioxidant capacity of phlorotannins from Icelandic brown algae, Fucus vesiculosus. The antioxidant capacity of individual phlorotannins...