WorldWideScience

Sample records for volcanism normal faulting

  1. Mechanical stratigraphy and normal faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.; Smart, Kevin J.; Wigginton, Sarah S.; Hill, Nicola J.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stratigraphy encompasses the mechanical properties, thicknesses, and interface properties of rock units. Although mechanical stratigraphy often relates directly to lithostratigraphy, lithologic description alone does not adequately describe mechanical behavior. Analyses of normal faults with displacements of millimeters to 10's of kilometers in mechanically layered rocks reveal that mechanical stratigraphy influences nucleation, failure mode, fault geometry, displacement gradient, displacement distribution, fault core and damage zone characteristics, and fault zone deformation processes. The relationship between normal faulting and mechanical stratigraphy can be used either to predict structural style using knowledge of mechanical stratigraphy, or conversely to interpret mechanical stratigraphy based on characterization of the structural style. This review paper explores a range of mechanical stratigraphic controls on normal faulting illustrated by natural and modeled examples.

  2. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Petricca, P.; Riguzzi, F.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors. PMID:26169163

  3. Basement faults and volcanic rock distributions in the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Ordos Basin are of mainly two types: one in the basin and the other along the margin of the basin. Besides those along the margin, the marginal volcanic rocks also include the volcanic rocks in the Yinshanian orogenic belt north of the basin. Based on the latest collection of gravitational and aeromagnetic data, here we interpret basement faults in the Ordos Basin and its peripheral region, compare the faults derived from aeromagnetic data with those from seismic data, and identify the geological ages of the fault development. Two aeromagnetic anomaly zones exist in the NE-trending faults of the southern basin, and they are in the volcanic basement formed in pre-Paleozoic. These NE-trending faults are the channel of volcanic material upwelling in the early age (Archean-Neoproterozoic), where igneous rocks and sedimentary rocks stack successively on both sides of the continental nucleus. In the Cambrian, the basin interior is relatively stable, but in the Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic, the basin margin underwent a number of volcanic activities, accompanied by the formation of nearly north-south and east-west basement faults in the basin periphery and resulting in accumulation of great amount of volcanic materials. Volcanic tuff from the basin periphery is discovered in the central basin and volcanic materials are exposed in the margins of the basin. According to the source-reservoir-cap rock configuration, the basin peripheral igneous traps formed in the Indosinian-Early Yanshanian and Late Hercynian are favorable exploration objectives, and the volcanic rocks in the central basin are the future target of exploration.

  4. Faults and volcanoes: Main volcanic structures in the Acambay Graben, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Suñe-Puchol, I.; Lacan, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) province is best known by the major stratovolcanoes, such as Popocatepetl and Colima, but most of the province is formed by modest size stratovolcanoes and monogenetic cones. Regional fault systems were developed together with the building of the volcanic province; the most notorious one is Chapala-Tula Fault System (CTFS), which runs parallel to the central sector of the MVB, and thus it is also referred to as the Intra-Arc fault system. Acambay graben (AG) is part of this central system. It is a 20 x 70 km depression located 100 km to the NW of Mexico City, at the easternmost end of the E-W trending CTFS, and was formed as the result of NS to NE oriented extension. Seismically active normal faults, such as the Acambay-Tixmadejé fault, with a mB =7 earthquake in 1912, delimit the AG. The graben includes several volcanic structures and associated deposits ranging in age from Miocene to 3 ka. The main structures are two stratovolcanoes, Altamirano (900 m high) and Temascalcingo (800 m high). There are also several Miocene-Pliocene lava domes, and Quaternary small cinder cones and shield volcanoes. Faulting of the Acambay graben affects all these volcanic forms, but depending on their ages, the volcanoes are cut by several faults or by a few. That is the case of Altamirano and Temascalcingo volcanoes, where the former is almost unaffected whereas the latter is highly dissected by faults. Altamirano is younger than Temascalcingo; youngest pyroclastic deposits from Altamirano are dated at 12-3 ka, and those from Temascalcingo at 40-25 ka (radiocarbon ages). The relatively young ages found in volcanic deposits within the Acambay graben raise the volcanic danger level in this area, originally marked as an inactive volcanic zone, but activity could restart at any time. Supported by DGAPA-PAPIIT-UNAM grant IN-104615.

  5. DEM simulation of growth normal fault slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sheng-Shin; Lin, Ming-Lang; Nien, Wie-Tung; Chan, Pei-Chen

    2014-05-01

    Slip of the fault can cause deformation of shallower soil layers and lead to the destruction of infrastructures. Shanchiao fault on the west side of the Taipei basin is categorized. The activities of Shanchiao fault will cause the quaternary sediments underneath the Taipei basin to become deformed. This will cause damage to structures, traffic construction, and utility lines within the area. It is determined from data of geological drilling and dating, Shanchiao fault has growth fault. In experiment, a sand box model was built with non-cohesive sand soil to simulate the existence of growth fault in Shanchiao Fault and forecast the effect on scope of shear band development and ground differential deformation. The results of the experiment showed that when a normal fault containing growth fault, at the offset of base rock the shear band will develop upward along with the weak side of shear band of the original topped soil layer, and this shear band will develop to surface much faster than that of single top layer. The offset ratio (basement slip / lower top soil thickness) required is only about 1/3 of that of single cover soil layer. In this research, it is tried to conduct numerical simulation of sand box experiment with a Discrete Element Method program, PFC2D, to simulate the upper covering sand layer shear band development pace and scope of normal growth fault slip. Results of simulation indicated, it is very close to the outcome of sand box experiment. It can be extended to application in water pipeline project design around fault zone in the future. Keywords: Taipei Basin, Shanchiao fault, growth fault, PFC2D

  6. The 2011-2012 unrest at Santorini rift: Stress interaction between active faulting and volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuillet, Nathalie

    2013-07-01

    Santorini, active normal faulting controls the emission of volcanic products. Such geometry has implication on seismic activity around the plumbing system during unrest. Static Coulomb stress changes induced by the 2011-2012 inflation within a preexisting NW-SE extensional regional stress field, compatible with fault geometry, increased by more than 0.5 MPa in an ellipsoid-shaped zone beneath the Minoan caldera where almost all earthquakes (96%) have occurred since beginning of unrest. Magmatic processes perturb the regional stress in the caldera where strike-slip rather than normal faulting along NE-SW striking planes are expected. The inflation may have also promoted more distant moderate earthquakes on neighboring faults as the M > 5 January 2012, south of Christiania. Santorini belongs to a set of en echelon NE-SW striking rifts (Milos, Nysiros) oblique to the Aegean arc that may have initiated in the Quaternary due to propagation of the North Anatolian fault into the Southern Aegean Sea.

  7. Cenozoic volcanic geology and probable age of inception of basin-range faulting in the southeasternmost Chocolate Mountains, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1978-02-01

    A complex sequence of Oligocene-age volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks form a major volcanic center in the Picacho area of the southeasternmost Chocolate Mountains, Imperial County, California. Basal-volcanic rocks consist of lava flows and flow breccia of trachybasalt, pyroxene rhyodacite, and pyroxene dacite (32 My old). These volcanic rocks locally overlie fanglomerate and rest unconformably on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. South and southeast of a prominent arcuate fault zone in the central part of the area, the rhyolite ignimbrite (26 My old) forms a major ash-flow sheet. In the southwestern part of the Picacho area the rhyolite ignimbrite interfingers with and is overlain by dacite flows and laharic breccia. The rhyolite ignimbrite and the dacite of Picacho Peak are overlapped by lava flows and breccia of pyroxene andesite (25 My old) that locally rest on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. The volcanic rocks of the Picacho area form a slightly bimodal volcanic suite consisting chiefly of silicic volcanic rocks with subordinate andesite. Late Miocene augite-olivine basalt is most similar in major-element abundances to transitional alkali-olivine basalt of the Basin and Range province. Normal separation faults in the Picacho area trend northwest and north parallel to major linear mountain ranges in the region. The areal distribution of the 26-My-old rhyolite ignimbrite and the local presence of megabreccia and fanglomerate flanking probable paleohighs suggest that the ignimbrite was erupted over irregular topography controlled by northwest- and north-trending probable basin-range faults. These relations date the inception of faulting in southeasternmost California at pre-26 and probably pre-32 My ago. A transition of basaltic volcanism in the area is dated at 13 My ago. 9 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Mechanical basis for slip along low-angle normal faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Emmanuel; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Lacombe, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    The existence of active low-angle normal faults is much debated because (1) the classical theory of fault mechanics implies that normal faults are locked when the dip is less than 30° and (2) shallow-dipping extensional fault planes do not produce large earthquakes (M > 5.5). However, a number of field observations suggest that brittle deformation occurs on low-angle normal faults at very shallow dip. To reconcile observations and theory, we use an alternative model of fault reactivation including a thick elasto-plastic frictional fault gouge, and test it at large strain by the mean of 2D mechanical modeling. We show that plastic compaction allows reducing the effective friction of faults sufficiently for low-angle normal faults to be active at dip of 20°. As the model predicts that these faults must be active in a slip-hardening regime, it prevents the occurrence of large earthquakes. However, we also evidence the neoformation of Riedel-type shear bands within thick fault zone, which, we believe, may be responsible for repeated small earthquakes and we apply the model to the Gulf of Corinth (Greece).

  9. Elastic stress interaction between faulting and volcanism in the Olacapato-San Antonio de Los Cobres area (NW Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonali, F. L.; Tibaldi, A.; Corazzato, C.; Lanza, F.; Cavallo, A.; Nardin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the relationships between Plio-Quaternary tectonics, palaeoseismicity and volcanism along the NW-trending Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) lineament that crosses the Andean chain and the Puna Plateau and continues within the eastern Cordillera at about 24° S. Field and satellite data have been collected from the Chile-Argentina border to a few km east of the San Antonio del Los Cobres village. These data revealed the presence of seven Quaternary NW-striking normal left-lateral fault segments in the southeastern part of the studied area and of a Plio-Quaternary N-S-striking graben structure in the northwestern part. The NW-striking Chorrillos fault (CF) segment shows the youngest motions, of late Pleistocene age, being marked by several fault scarps, sag-ponds and offset Quaternary deposits and landforms. Offset lavas of 0.78±0.1 Ma to 0.2±0.08 Ma indicate fault kinematics characterized by a pitch angle of 20° to 27° SE, a total net displacement that ranges from 31 to 63.8 m, and a slip-rate of 0.16 to 0.08 mm/yr. This fault segment is 32 km long and terminates to the northwest near a set of ESE-dipping thrust faults affecting Tertiary strata, while to the southeast it terminates 10 km further from San Antonio. In the westernmost part of the examined area, in Chile at altitudes of 4000 m, recent N-S-striking normal fault scarps depict the 5-km-wide and 10-km-long graben structure. Locally, fault pitches indicate left-lateral normal kinematics. These faults affect deposits up to ignimbrites of Plio-Quaternary age. Scarp heights are from a few metres to 24 m. Despite this area is located along the trace of the COT strike-slip fault system, which is reported as a continuous structure from Chile to Argentina in the literature, no evidence of NW-striking Plio-Quaternary strike-slip structures is present here. A series of numerical models were developed in an elastic half-space with uniform isotropic elastic properties using the

  10. Characteristics of Fault Zones in Volcanic Rocks Near Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

    2007-11-27

    During 2005 and 2006, the USGS conducted geological studies of fault zones at surface outcrops at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives of these studies were to characterize fault geometry, identify the presence of fault splays, and understand the width and internal architecture of fault zones. Geologic investigations were conducted at surface exposures in upland areas adjacent to Yucca Flat, a basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site; these data serve as control points for the interpretation of the subsurface data collected at Yucca Flat by other USGS scientists. Fault zones in volcanic rocks near Yucca Flat differ in character and width as a result of differences in the degree of welding and alteration of the protolith, and amount of fault offset. Fault-related damage zones tend to scale with fault offset; damage zones associated with large-offset faults (>100 m) are many tens of meters wide, whereas damage zones associated with smaller-offset faults are generally a only a meter or two wide. Zeolitically-altered tuff develops moderate-sized damage zones whereas vitric nonwelded, bedded and airfall tuff have very minor damage zones, often consisting of the fault zone itself as a deformation band, with minor fault effect to the surrounding rock mass. These differences in fault geometry and fault zone architecture in surface analog sites can serve as a guide toward interpretation of high-resolution subsurface geophysical results from Yucca Flat.

  11. Characteristics of Fault Zones in Volcanic Rocks Near Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

    2007-11-27

    During 2005 and 2006, the USGS conducted geological studies of fault zones at surface outcrops at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives of these studies were to characterize fault geometry, identify the presence of fault splays, and understand the width and internal architecture of fault zones. Geologic investigations were conducted at surface exposures in upland areas adjacent to Yucca Flat, a basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site; these data serve as control points for the interpretation of the subsurface data collected at Yucca Flat by other USGS scientists. Fault zones in volcanic rocks near Yucca Flat differ in character and width as a result of differences in the degree of welding and alteration of the protolith, and amount of fault offset. Fault-related damage zones tend to scale with fault offset; damage zones associated with large-offset faults (>100 m) are many tens of meters wide, whereas damage zones associated with smaller-offset faults are generally a only a meter or two wide. Zeolitically-altered tuff develops moderate-sized damage zones whereas vitric nonwelded, bedded and airfall tuff have very minor damage zones, often consisting of the fault zone itself as a deformation band, with minor fault effect to the surrounding rock mass. These differences in fault geometry and fault zone architecture in surface analog sites can serve as a guide toward interpretation of high-resolution subsurface geophysical results from Yucca Flat.

  12. Characteristics of Fault Zones in Volcanic Rocks Near Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Drake II, Ronald M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2005 and 2006, the USGS conducted geological studies of fault zones at surface outcrops at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives of these studies were to characterize fault geometry, identify the presence of fault splays, and understand the width and internal architecture of fault zones. Geologic investigations were conducted at surface exposures in upland areas adjacent to Yucca Flat, a basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site; these data serve as control points for the interpretation of the subsurface data collected at Yucca Flat by other USGS scientists. Fault zones in volcanic rocks near Yucca Flat differ in character and width as a result of differences in the degree of welding and alteration of the protolith, and amount of fault offset. Fault-related damage zones tend to scale with fault offset; damage zones associated with large-offset faults (>100 m) are many tens of meters wide, whereas damage zones associated with smaller-offset faults are generally a only a meter or two wide. Zeolitically-altered tuff develops moderate-sized damage zones whereas vitric nonwelded, bedded and airfall tuff have very minor damage zones, often consisting of the fault zone itself as a deformation band, with minor fault effect to the surrounding rock mass. These differences in fault geometry and fault zone architecture in surface analog sites can serve as a guide toward interpretation of high-resolution subsurface geophysical results from Yucca Flat.

  13. The Temporal and Spatial Association of Faulting and Volcanism in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field - Rio Grande Rift, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. A.; Hudson, M. R.; Minor, S. A.; McIntosh, W. C.; Miggins, D. P.; Grauch, V.

    2008-12-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene Cerros del Rio volcanic field (CdRVF) in northern New Mexico is one of the largest ( greater than 700 square kilometers) predominantly basaltic and andesitic volcanic centers of the Rio Grande rift; it records the late-stage, volcano-tectonic evolution of the SW part of the Espanola Basin. The CdRVF reflects both regional proclivity toward Pliocene basaltic volcanism following protracted Neogene extensional tectonism and localized eruptive response to migration of basin- bounding faults. Approximately 180 cubic kilometers of flat lying to gently dipping basalt, andesite, and minor dacite lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of the CdRVF were erupted from more than 50 exposed vents between 2.8 Ma and 1.14 Ma. Subsurface interpretations of drill hole data and incised canyon exposures of the Rio Grande show that volcanic deposits are interbedded with Santa Fe Group sediments deposited in actively subsiding sub-basins of the southernmost Espanola Basin. Major basin-bounding faults in this area strike north to northwest, dip basinward, and have mostly dip-slip and subordinate strike-slip displacement. Although major basin-bounding faults were active prior to the onset of volcanism in the CdRVF, protracted extension resulted in a westward migration of graben-bounding faults. Phases of coeval volcanism at 2.8-2.6 Ma, 2.5-2.2 Ma, and 1.5-1.1 Ma, decreased in eruptive volume through time and are delineated on the basis of mapped stratigraphy, argon geochronology, paleomagnetic and aeromagnetic properties, and record a syntectonic westward migration of eruptive centers. The alignment of vent areas with mapped faults strongly suggests deep magmatic sources utilized local structures as conduits (i.e. faults and fractures developed in response to regional stress). However, some near-surface feeder dikes associated with eroded cinder cones record orientations that are not typically correlative with regional fault patterns suggesting near-surface conduits are

  14. Elastic stress interaction between faulting and volcanism in the Olacapato-San Antonio de Los Cobres area (Puna plateau, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonali, F. L.; Corazzato, C.; Tibaldi, A.

    2012-06-01

    We describe the relationships between Plio-Quaternary tectonics, palaeoseismicity and volcanism along the NW-trending Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) lineament that crosses the Andean chain and the Puna Plateau and continues within the eastern Cordillera at about 24° S. We studied in detail the area from the Chile-Argentina border to a few km east of the San Antonio del Los Cobres village. Satellite and field data revealed the presence of seven Quaternary NW-striking normal left-lateral fault segments in the southeastern part of the studied area and of a Plio-Quaternary N-S-striking graben structure in the northwestern part. The NW-striking Chorrillos fault (CF) segment shows the youngest motions, of late Pleistocene age, being marked by several fault scarps, sag ponds and offset Quaternary deposits and landforms. Offset lavas of 0.78 ± 0.1 Ma to 0.2 ± 0.08 Ma indicate fault kinematics characterised by a pitch angle of 20° to 27° SE, a total net displacement of 31 to 63.8 m, and a slip-rate of 0.16 to 0.08 mm/yr. This fault segment is 32 km long and terminates to the northwest near a set of ESE-dipping thrust faults affecting Tertiary strata, while to the southeast it terminates 10 km further from San Antonio. In the westernmost part of the examined area, in Chile at altitudes > 4000 m, recent N-S-striking normal fault scarps depict the 5-km-wide and 10-km-long graben structure. Locally, fault pitches indicate left-lateral normal kinematics. These faults affect deposits up to ignimbrites of Plio-Quaternary age. Scarp heights are from a few metres to 24 m. Despite that this area is located along the trace of the COT strike-slip fault system, which is reported as a continuous structure from Chile to Argentina in the literature, no evidence of NW-striking Plio-Quaternary strike-slip structures is present here. A series of numerical models were also developed in an elastic half-space with uniform isotropic elastic properties using the Coulomb 3.1 code. We studied

  15. Power-law Distribution of Normal Fault Displacement and Length and Estimation of Extensional Strain due to Normal Faults:A Case Study of the Sierra de San Miguelito,Mexico

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shunshan; A. F. NIETO-SAMANIEGO; S. A. ALANIZ-(A)LVAREZ

    2005-01-01

    The Sierra de San Miguelito is a relatively uplifted area and is constituted by a large amount of silicic volcanic rocks with ages from middle to late Cenozoic. The normal faults of the Sierra de San Miguelito are Domino-style and nearly parallel. The cumulative length and displacement of the faults obey power-law distribution. The fractal dimension of the fault traces is -1.49. Using the multi-line one-dimensional sampling, the calculated exponent of cumulative fault displacements is -0.66. A cumulative curve combining measurements of all four sections yielded a slope of -0.63. The displacement-length plot shows a non-linear relationship and large dispersion of data. The large dispersion in the plot is mainly due to the fault linkage during faulting. An estimation of extensional strain due to the normal faults is ca. 0.1830.The bed extension strain is always less than or equal to the horizontal extension strain. The deformation in the Sierra de San Miguelito occurred near the surface, producing pervasive faults and many faults are too small to appear in maps and sections at common scales. The stretching produced by small faults reach ca. 33% of the total horizontal elongation.

  16. Can cosmic ray exposure dating reveal the normal faulting activity of the Cordillera Blanca Fault, Peru?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Siame

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The build-up of in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be within bedrock scarps and escarpments associated to the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault, Peru, was measured to evaluate, through Cosmic Ray Exposure dating, its normal faulting activity. The highest mountain peaks in Peru belong to the 210 km-long, NW- striking, Cordillera Blanca. Along its western border, the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault is responsible for a vertical relief over 4.4 km, whose prominent 2 km high escarpment is characterized by ~1 km-high triangular facets corresponding to vertical displacements cumulated during the last 1-2 million years. At a more detailed scale, this fault system exhibits continuous geomorphic evidence of repeated displacements, underlined by 2 to 70 m-high scarps, corresponding to vertical displacements cumulated since Late Pleistocene and Holocene periods. Although microseismicity occurs along the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault, no major historical or instrumental earthquake has been recorded since the beginning of the Spanish settlement in the 16th century. To evaluate the vertical slip rate along the major 90 km-long central segment of the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault, the Quaternary fault escarpment (i.e., triangular facet, as well as the bedrock fault scarp, have been sampled for 10Be Cosmic Ray Exposure dating. Even if the uppermost part of the triangular facets have been resurfaced by the Last Glacial Maximum glaciers, our results allow to estimate a vertical slip-rate of 3±1 mm/yr, and suggest at least 2 seismic events during the last 3000 years.

  17. The 2011 Hawthorne, Nevada, Earthquake Sequence; Shallow Normal Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. D.; Johnson, C.; Davies, J. A.; Agbaje, T.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kent, G.

    2011-12-01

    An energetic sequence of shallow earthquakes that began in early March 2011 in western Nevada, near the community of Hawthorne, has slowly decreased in intensity through mid-2011. To date about 1300 reviewed earthquake locations have been compiled; we have computed moment tensors for the larger earthquakes and have developed a set of high-precision locations for all reviewed events. The sequence to date has included over 50 earthquakes ML 3 and larger with the largest at Mw 4.6. Three 6-channel portable stations configured with broadband sensors and accelerometers were installed by April 20. Data from the portable instruments is telemetered through NSL's microwave backbone to Reno where it is integrated with regional network data for real-time notifications, ShakeMaps, and routine event analysis. The data is provided in real-time to NEIC, CISN and the IRIS DMC. The sequence is located in a remote area about 15-20 km southwest of Hawthorne in the footwall block of the Wassuk Range fault system. An initial concern was that the sequence might be associated with volcanic processes due to the proximity of late Quaternary volcanic flows; there have been no volcanic signatures observed in near source seismograms. An additional concern, as the sequence has proceeded, was a clear progression eastward toward the Wassuk Range front fault. The east dipping range bounding fault is capable of M 7+ events, and poses a significant hazard to the community of Hawthorne and local military facilities. The Hawthorne Army Depot is an ordinance storage facility and the nation's storage site for surplus mercury. The sequence is within what has been termed the 'Mina Deflection' of the Central Walker Lane Belt. Faulting along the Whiskey Flat section of the Wassuk front fault would be primarily down-to-the-east, with an E-W extension direction; moment tensors for the 2011 earthquake show a range of extension directions from E-W to NW-SE, suggesting a possible dextral component to the Wassuk

  18. Spatial distribution of damage around faults in the Joe Lott Tuff Member of the Mount Belknap Volcanics, Utah: A mechanical analog for faulting in pyroclastic deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Chris H.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic ash is thought to comprise a large fraction of the Martian equatorial layered deposits and much new insight into the process of faulting and related fluid flow in these deposits can be gained through the study of analogous terrestrial tuffs. This study identifies a set of fault-related processes that are pertinent to understanding the evolution of fault systems in fine-grained, poorly indurated volcanic ash by investigating exposures of faults in the Miocene-aged Joe Lott Tuff Member of the Mount Belknap Volcanics, Utah. The porosity and granularity of the host rock are found to control the style of localized strain that occurs prior to and contemporaneous with faulting. Deformation bands occur in tuff that was porous and granular at the time of deformation, while fractures formed where the tuff lost its porous and granular nature due to silicic alteration. Non-localized deformation of the host rock is also prominent and occurs through compaction of void space, including crushing of pumice clasts. Significant off-fault damage of the host rock, resembling fault pulverization, is recognized adjacent to one analog fault and may reflect the strain rate dependence of the resulting fault zone architecture. These findings provide important new guidelines for future structural analyses and numerical modeling of faulting and subsurface fluid flow through volcanic ash deposits on Mars.

  19. GPS-derived coupling estimates for the Central America subduction zone and volcanic arc faults: El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Mora, F.; DeMets, C.; Alvarado, D.; Turner, H. L.; Mattioli, G.; Hernandez, D.; Pullinger, C.; Rodriguez, M.; Tenorio, C.

    2009-12-01

    We invert GPS velocities from 32 sites in El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua to estimate the rate of long-term forearc motion and distributions of interseismic coupling across the Middle America subduction zone offshore from these countries and faults in the Salvadoran and Nicaraguan volcanic arcs. A 3-D finite element model is used to approximate the geometries of the subduction interface and strike-slip faults in the volcanic arc and determine the elastic response to coupling across these faults. The GPS velocities are best fit by a model in which the forearc moves 14-16 mmyr-1 and has coupling of 85-100 per cent across faults in the volcanic arc, in agreement with the high level of historic and recent earthquake activity in the volcanic arc. Our velocity inversion indicates that coupling across the potentially seismogenic areas of the subduction interface is remarkably weak, averaging no more than 3 per cent of the plate convergence rate and with only two poorly resolved patches where coupling might be higher along the 550-km-long segment we modelled. Our geodetic evidence for weak subduction coupling disagrees with a seismically derived coupling estimate of 60 +/- 10 per cent from a published analysis of earthquake damage back to 1690, but agrees with three other seismologic studies that infer weak subduction coupling from 20th century earthquakes. Most large historical earthquakes offshore from El Salvador and western Nicaragua may therefore have been intraslab normal faulting events similar to the Mw 7.3 1982 and Mw 7.7 2001 earthquakes offshore from El Salvador. Alternatively, the degree of coupling might vary with time. The evidence for weak coupling indirectly supports a recently published hypothesis that much of the Middle American forearc is escaping to the west or northwest away from the Cocos Ridge collision zone in Costa Rica. Such a hypothesis is particularly attractive for El Salvador, where there is little or no convergence obliquity to drive the

  20. Paleoseismological analysis on the basis of precise sea bottom topography and sonic prospecting along the normal fault in the Beppu-Haneyama Fault Zone in Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, K.; Haraguchi, T.; Yamada, K.; Yoshinaga, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The subaqueous topography of bays or lakes along the large active faults are influenced by displacement on fault and strong motion related sediments such as land slide, turbidite etc. We carried out precise topographic survey using multi-beam sonic survey, and seismic reflection survey to about 40m deep sediments in Beppu Bay, which is a pull apart basin with normal faults related to right lateral movements of Median Tectonic Line in southwest Japan. In west central Kyushu, long active fault zone named as Beppu - Haneyama Fault zone runs with E-W direction normal fault zone. The southwest boundary of Beppu Bay is a part of Beppu-Haneyama Fault zone and normal fault of pull apart basin. The multi beam sonic data show the characteristic altitude distribution (topography) of steep inclining slope from shore side to the deepest part with 70m below sea level along the coast, and also submarine slidings occurred at off Beppu and off Oita. Within those areas, several blocks of more than 100m has preserved shape and developed to sliding direction. From the viewpoint of sliding topography, sliding movements are thought sector collapse during short interval, and main cause is thought the movement of directly below active fault and related strong seismic motion. The sonic prospecting data show several reflection horizons indicating volcanic ashes and sand seams. Around two submarine sliding deposit areas, continuation of clear reflections are sparse influenced by event sedimentation and thick coarse sediments. 88 m sediment cores from 7 sites (core length: 8m to 20m long per site) from deepest part and submarine sliding area in late July this year (2015) will make clear that construction age of these topography and construction mechanism from lithological characteristics, and comparison to historical record including large earthquake occurred in 1596.

  1. Apparent stress, fault maturity and seismic hazard for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, G.L.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of apparent stress for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones is derived by examining the apparent stress (?? a = ??Es/Mo, where E s is radiated energy and Mo is seismic moment) of all globally distributed shallow (depth, ?? 1 MPa) are also generally intraslab, but occur where the lithosphere has just begun subduction beneath the overriding plate. They usually occur in cold slabs near trenches where the direction of plate motion across the trench is oblique to the trench axis, or where there are local contortions or geometrical complexities of the plate boundary. Lower ??a (tectonic regime suggests that the level of ?? a is related to fault maturity. Lower stress drops are needed to rupture mature faults such as those found at plate interfaces that have been smoothed by large cumulative displacements (from hundreds to thousands of kilometres). In contrast, immature faults, such as those on which intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes generally occur, are found in cold and intact lithosphere in which total fault displacement has been much less (from hundreds of metres to a few kilometres). Also, faults on which high ??a oceanic strike-slip earthquakes occur are predominantly intraplate or at evolving ends of transforms. At subduction zones, earthquakes occurring on immature faults are likely to be more hazardous as they tend to generate higher amounts of radiated energy per unit of moment than earthquakes occurring on mature faults. We have identified earthquake pairs in which an interplate-thrust and an intraslab-normal earthquake occurred remarkably close in space and time. The intraslab-normal member of each pair radiated anomalously high amounts of energy compared to its thrust-fault counterpart. These intraslab earthquakes probably ruptured intact slab mantle and are dramatic examples in which Mc (an energy magnitude) is shown to be a far better estimate of the potential for earthquake damage than Mw. This discovery may help explain why loss of

  2. Seismic evidence of conjugate normal faulting: The 1994 Devil Canyon earthquake sequence near Challis, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Suzette M. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Aftershock hypocenters of the 1984 Devil Canyon, Idaho earthquake indicate the sequence was associated with conjugate normal faulting on two northwest-striking normal faults that bound the Warm Spring Creek graben.

  3. Using faults for PSHA in a volcanic context: the Etna case (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaro, Raffaele; D'Amico, Salvatore; Gee, Robin; Pace, Bruno; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    At Mt. Etna volcano (Southern Italy), recurrent volcano-tectonic earthquakes affect the urbanised areas, with an overall population of about 400,000 and with important infrastructures and lifelines. For this reason, seismic hazard analyses have been undertaken in the last decade focusing on the capability of local faults to generate damaging earthquakes especially in the short-term (30-5 yrs); these results have to be intended as complementary to the regulatory seismic hazard maps, and devoted to establish priority in the seismic retrofitting of the exposed municipalities. Starting from past experience, in the framework of the V3 Project funded by the Italian Department of Civil Defense we performed a fully probabilistic seismic hazard assessment by using an original definition of seismic sources and ground-motion prediction equations specifically derived for this volcanic area; calculations are referred to a new brand topographic surface (Mt. Etna reaches more than 3,000 m in elevation, in less than 20 km from the coast), and to both Poissonian and time-dependent occurrence models. We present at first the process of defining seismic sources that includes individual faults, seismic zones and gridded seismicity; they are obtained by integrating geological field data with long-term (the historical macroseismic catalogue) and short-term earthquake data (the instrumental catalogue). The analysis of the Frequency Magnitude Distribution identifies areas in the volcanic complex, with a- and b-values of the Gutenberg-Richter relationship representative of different dynamic processes. Then, we discuss the variability of the mean occurrence times of major earthquakes along the main Etnean faults estimated by using a purely geologic approach. This analysis has been carried out through the software code FISH, a Matlab® tool developed to turn fault data representative of the seismogenic process into hazard models. The utilization of a magnitude-size scaling relationship

  4. Late Cenozoic tectonics and volcanism along the North Anatolian Fault: new structural and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiyaman, Özlem; Chorowicz, Jean; Arnaud, O. Nicolas; Gündogdu, M. Niyazi; Gourgaud, Alain

    2001-08-01

    Different types of volcanic activity have developed along the North Anatolian Fault zone (NAF) in Turkey. Detailed analysis of satellite images and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), and field observations have been made in order to understand the tectonics and the distribution of volcanic vents. In the Anatolian block, some faults are oblique to the NAF, and delimit extensional escape wedges. Vents rooted on open tension fractures show that emplacement of the volcanism is related to tensional fracturing of the Anatolian continental block, which we attribute to the onset of free borders in the south and west. Along the NAF, earliest extension ( ϑ1) is directed S to SSW and the latest ( ϑ2) towards W to WSW, parallel to the sinistral slip along the NAF. Major and trace element geochemical data indicate that the dominant calc-alkaline rocks are associated with various alkaline lavas. K-Ar ages of the volcanics range from 22 to 8.5 Ma in Galatia Massif, 900 to 100 ka in Niksar and 3 to 12 ka in Erzincan. Isotopic and trace element data are interpreted as reflecting a dominantly lithospheric mantle source, slightly mixed with asthenospheric liquids. Most magmas were fractionated and contaminated by continental crust during their ascent. ϑ1 and ϑ2 tectono-volcanic events have propagated through time and space from west to east. The ϑ1 extension is late Oligocene in the Galatia Massif, late Miocene in Niksar and late Pliocene in Erzincan. The ϑ2 extension and strike-slip event along the NAF began in the late Miocene in the Galatia Massif, early Pliocene in Niksar and Quaternary in Erzincan. Signature from an asthenospheric source in the second event in the three regions suggests that an ancient suture zone (Galatia Massif) and/or the lithospheric NAF transform (Niksar and Erzincan) have served to channel small quantities of asthenospheric melts existing at the base of the lithosphere.

  5. Foreland normal fault control on northwest Himalayan thrust front development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blisniuk, Peter M.; Sonder, Leslie J.; Lillie, Robert J.

    1998-10-01

    In the Trans-Indus Ranges along the western part of the northwest Himalayan thrust front, unconformities, changes in paleocurrent directions, and locally derived conglomerates in synorogenic foreland basin deposits provide evidence for major local deformation at ≥3.5 Ma. The tectonic history of the Trans-Indus Ranges has previously been described in terms of a single episode of major thrusting at ≤1 Ma, thus our work implies that there were two distinct phases of deformation. In conjunction with published evidence in the Salt Range to the east for two phases of deformation (˜6 to 5 Ma, and ˜2.5 Ma to present), this study demonstrates that these two phases of deformation are regionally significant and probably correlative along the entire present-day NW Himalayan thrust front. Reconstruction of possible source areas for the locally derived conglomerates shows that the earlier deformation is probably related to normal faulting. These results suggest that the tectonic evolution of the area along the present-day thrust front is characterized by (1) latest Miocene to early Pliocene formation of north dipping normal fault zones (total throw ≥ 600 m) within the foreland basin, related to syn-orogenic flexure of the Indian plate, and (2) late Pliocene to early Pleistocene initiation of south directed thrusting along the present-day thrust front, related to outward growth of the NW Himalayan thrust wedge. The location of the present-day thrust front appears to be controlled by north dipping normal faults and monoclines that formed during the earlier deformation and subsequently localized structural ramps during later thrusting.

  6. Normal faulting in the northern Shanxi Grabens, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Tim; Walker, Richard; Parsons, Barry; Wang, Weitao; Schwenninger, Jean-Luc; Sherlock, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    The Ordos Plateau forms a piece of non-deforming continental lithosphere in northeastern China. Despite being thousands of kilometres from the nearest plate boundary, numerous devastating earthquakes have been recorded around the margins of the plateau over the past 2000 years. Continental deformation in this part of Asia is believed to be caused by the ongoing collision of India with Eurasia; India is currently moving northwards at 40 mm/a. The rate of deformation around the Ordos Plateau, however, is significantly less; typical slip rates for faults bordering the plateau are of the order of 1 mm/a. This deformation is nonetheless important because the adjacent North China Plain is one of the most densely populated regions on Earth. The combined population of Beijing, Hebei and Shanxi Provinces is in excess of 125 million people-all potentially at risk from future earthquakes. Assessing the seismic hazard is clearly of vital societal importance. The plateau is surrounded by extensional rift systems on all sides, except for the Liupanshan in the southwestern corner, where thrust faulting is dominant. The Hetao Graben lies to the north of the plateau, the Yinchuan Graben to the west, the Weihe Graben to the south and the Shanxi Grabens to the east, where they form an S-shaped series of en-echelon basins some 1200 km long. The northern portion of the Shanxi Grabens is characterised by east-northeast striking normal faults and asymmetric half-grabens with footwall blocks tilted to the south-southeast. GPS measurements in this region are sparse, but the existing data suggests a rate of extension across the northern Shanxi grabens of anywhere between 0 mm/a and 4 mm/a. We have used optically stimulated luminescence dating of sedimentary quartz grains and Ar-Ar dating of basaltic lavas to determine ages for features which have been offset by the faulting. Combined with scarp heights and field measurements of fault dip, this data suggest a total extension rate across the

  7. Peripheral Faulting of Eden Patera: Potential Evidence in Support of a New Volcanic Construct on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, J.

    2016-12-01

    Arabia Terra's (AT) pock-marked topography in the expansive upland region of Mars Northern Hemisphere has been assumed to be the result of impact crater bombardment. However, examination of several craters by researchers revealed morphologies inconsistent with neighboring craters of similar size and age. These 'craters' share features with terrestrial super-eruption calderas, and are considered a new volcanic construct on Mars called `plains-style' caldera complexes. Eden Patera (EP), located on the northern boundary of AT is a reference type for these calderas. EP lacks well-preserved impact crater morphologies, including a decreasing depth to diameter ratio. Conversely, Eden shares geomorphological attributes with terrestrial caldera complexes such as Valles Caldera (New Mexico): arcuate caldera walls, concentric fracturing/faulting, flat-topped benches, irregular geometric circumferences, etc. This study focuses on peripheral fractures surrounding EP to provide further evidence of calderas within the AT region. Scaled balloon experiments mimicking terrestrial caldera analogs have showcased fracturing/faulting patterns and relationships of caldera systems. These experiments show: 1) radial fracturing (perpendicular to caldera rim) upon inflation, 2) concentric faulting (parallel to sub-parallel to caldera rim) during evacuation, and 3) intersecting radial and concentric peripheral faulting from resurgence. Utilizing Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Context Camera (CTX) imagery, peripheral fracturing is analyzed using GIS to study variations in peripheral fracture geometries relative to the caldera rim. Visually, concentric fractures dominate within 20 km, radial fractures prevail between 20 and 50 km, followed by gradation into randomly oriented and highly angular intersections in the fretted terrain region. Rose diagrams of orientation relative to north expose uniformly oriented mean regional stresses, but do not illuminate localized caldera stresses. Further

  8. Tectonic geomorphology of a large normal fault: Akşehir fault, SW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Savaş; Keller, Edward; Bufe, Aaron; Koçyiğit, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In order to better understand the activity of the Akşehir normal fault in SW Turkey and the associated seismic hazard, we investigated the tectonic geomorphology of a 60-km stretch of the 100-km-long Akşehir fault block. The fault can be separated into seven geomorphic segments (1 to 7 from NW to SE) along the mountain front. Segment length varies from about 9 to 14 km, and relief of the horst block varies from about 0.6 km in the SE to 1.0 km in the NW. Analysis of the tectonic geomorphology of 32 drainage basins and mountain front facets using a combination of geomorphic indices reveals a general pattern of high slip rates in the northern and central segments and low slip rates in the southern, probably older, segments. We show that mountain front sinuosity varies from about 1.1 to 1.4 on segments S1-S6 to 2.4 on segment S7, suggesting that the six northern segments are more active than the southernmost segment. Similarly, χ analysis and slope-area analysis of streams reveal a pattern of steepest channels draining the central and northern segments of the horst. The ratio of valley floor width to valley height varies from 0.2 to 0.6, which are typical values for tectonically active mountain fronts; and alluvial fans along segments S1, S2, and S4 are back-tilted. Finally, we show that (1) shapes of the ~ 100-900m high mountain front facets are mostly triangular (~ 80%) and partly trapezoidal (~ 20%); (2) facet slopes range from 6 to 22°; (3) facets at the NW and SE segment ends are larger than the intervening facets; and (4) steepest facets occur along the central segments. Uplift rates estimated from the slope of mountain front facets range from about 0.06 m/ky on the southernmost fault segment (S7) to 0.23 m/ky on the more central S5 and 0.16 m/ky on the northern segment (S1). The estimated pattern of uplift is consistent with the pattern of geomorphic indices. The vertical relief of the facets suggests that uplift of the mountain front initiated in the late

  9. Structure of a normal seismogenic fault zone in carbonates: The Vado di Corno Fault, Campo Imperatore, Central Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demurtas, Matteo; Fondriest, Michele; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    The Vado di Corno Fault Zone (VCFZ) is an active extensional fault cutting through carbonates in the Italian Central Apennines. The fault zone was exhumed from ∼2 km depth and accommodated a normal throw of ∼2 km since Early-Pleistocene. In the studied area, the master fault of the VCFZ dips N210/54° and juxtaposes Quaternary colluvial deposits in the hangingwall with cataclastic dolostones in the footwall. Detailed mapping of the fault zone rocks within the ∼300 m thick footwall-block evidenced the presence of five main structural units (Low Strain Damage Zone, High Strain Damage Zone, Breccia Unit, Cataclastic Unit 1 and Cataclastic Unit 2). The Breccia Unit results from the Pleistocene extensional reactivation of a pre-existing Pliocene thrust. The Cataclastic Unit 1 forms a ∼40 m thick band lining the master fault and recording in-situ shattering due to the propagation of multiple seismic ruptures. Seismic faulting is suggested also by the occurrence of mirror-like slip surfaces, highly localized sheared calcite-bearing veins and fluidized cataclasites. The VCFZ architecture compares well with seismological studies of the L'Aquila 2009 seismic sequence (mainshock MW 6.1), which imaged the reactivation of shallow-seated low-angle normal faults (Breccia Unit) cut by major high-angle normal faults (Cataclastic Units).

  10. Generic along-strike segmentation of Afar normal faults, East Africa: Implications on fault growth and stress heterogeneity on seismogenic fault planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manighetti, I.; Caulet, C.; Barros, L.; Perrin, C.; Cappa, F.; Gaudemer, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how natural faults are segmented along their length can provide useful insights into fault growth processes, stress distribution on fault planes, and earthquake dynamics. We use cumulative displacement profiles to analyze the two largest scales of segmentation of ˜900 normal faults in Afar, East Africa. We build upon a prior study by Manighetti et al. (2009) and develop a new signal processing method aimed at recovering the number, position, displacement, and length of both the major (i.e., longest) and the subordinate, secondary segments within the faults. Regardless of their length, age, geographic location, total displacement, and slip rate, 90% of the faults contain two to five major segments, whereas more than 70% of these major segments are divided into two to four secondary segments. In each hierarchical rank of fault segmentation, most segments have a similar proportional length, whereas the number of segments slightly decreases with fault structural maturity. The along-strike segmentation of the Afar faults is thus generic at its two largest scales. We summarize published fault segment data on 42 normal, reverse, and strike-slip faults worldwide, and find a similar number (two to five) of major and secondary segments across the population. We suggest a fault growth scenario that might account for the generic large-scale segmentation of faults. The observation of a generic segmentation suggests that seismogenic fault planes are punctuated with a deterministic number of large stress concentrations, which are likely to control the initiation, arrest and hence extent and magnitude of earthquake ruptures.

  11. Lateral propagation of active normal faults throughout pre-existing fault zones: an example from the Southern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; Prosser, Giacomo; Ivo Giano, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    The main active structures in the Southern Apennines are represented by a set of NW-trending normal faults, which are mainly located in the axial sector of the chain. Evidences arising from neotectonics and seismology show activity of a composite seismic source, the Irpinia - Agri Valley, located across the Campania-Basilicata border. This seismic source is made up of two right-stepping, individual seismic sources forming a relay ramp. Each individual seismic source consists of a series of nearly parallel normal fault segments. The relay ramp area, located around the Vietri di Potenza town, is bounded by two seismic segments, the San Gregorio Magno Fault, to the NW, and the Pergola-Melandro Fault, to the SE. The possible interaction between the two right-stepping fault segments has not been proven yet, since the fault system of the area has never been analyzed in detail. This work is aimed at assessing the geometry of such fault system, inferring the relative age of the different fault sets by studying the crosscutting relationships, characterizing the micromechanics of fault rocks associated to the various fault sets, and understanding the modalities of lateral propagation of the two bounding fault segments. Crosscutting relationships are recognized by combining classical geological mapping with morphotectonic methods. This latter approach, which include the analysis of aerial photographs and field inspection of quaternary slope deposits, is used to identify the most recent structures among those cropping out in the field area. In the relay ramp area, normal faults crosscut different tectonic units of the Apennine chain piled up, essentially, during the Middle to Late Miocene. The topmost unit (only few tens of meter-thick) consists of a mélange containing blocks of different lithologies in a clayish matrix. The intermediate thrust sheet consists of 1-1.5 km-thick platform carbonates of late Triassic-Jurassic age, with dolomites at the base and limestones at the

  12. Tectonic origin for polygonal normal faults in pelagic limestones of the Cingoli anticline hinge (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracchini, Lorenzo; Antonellini, Marco; Billi, Andrea; Scrocca, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Polygonal faults are a relatively-recent new class of normal faults which are thought to be formed during early burial and diagenesis as a consequence of heterogeneous lateral volume changes. Polygonal faults are non-systematically oriented and, in map view, they form rhombus-, pentagon-, or hexagon-like pattern, suggesting a non-tectonic origin. Furthermore, polygonal faults are layer bound and they are restricted to particular stratigraphic level. Predicting the pattern of polygonal normal fault results crucial for geofluid exploration and exploitation, but, despite the large number of studies, the origin of these faults remains still largely controversial. One of the main reason for this uncertainty is that they are poorly known in outcrops. Polygonal faults have been identified in few localities within Mesozoic chalk (United Kingdom, France, and Egypt), in Paleogene claystone (Belgium), and in the Cretaceous Khoman Formation (Egypt) where polygonal faults have been observed in an extensive exposure of chalk. In this study, we describe an outcrop in the Cingoli anticline hinge, which is located at external front of the northern Apennines fold-thrust belt (Italy), showing normal faults that we interpreted as syn-tectonically (syn-thrusting) polygonal faults. The outcrop shows three vertical exposures of sub-horizontal fine-grained marly limestones with chert interlayers of Albian-Turonian age. Intraformational short normal faults affect the carbonate and chert beds. These faults are poorly-systematic and they cut through the carbonate beds whereas usually stop against the chert layers. The fault surfaces are often characterized by slickolites, clayey residue, and micro-breccias including clasts of chert and carbonate. Fault displacement is partly or largely accommodated by pressure solution. At the fault tips, the displacement is generally transferred, via a lateral step, to an adjacent similar fault segment. The aim of our study is to understand the nucleation

  13. Low-angle normal faults-low differential stress at mid crustal levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    A simple model for frictional slip on pre-existing faults that considers the local stress state near the fault and the effect of non-hydrostatic fluid pressures predicts that low-angle normal faulting is restricted to areas of the crust characterized by low differential stress and nearly lithostatic fluid pressures. The model considers frictional slip on a cohesionless low-angle normal fault governed by the failure criterion tau = mu sub f (sigma (*) sub n) =mu sub f (sigma sub n - P sub f) where tau and sigma sub n are the shear and normal stresses across the fault plane, mu sub f is the static coefficient of friction, and P sub f is the pore fluid pressure. As a first approximation, the model considers a vertical greatest principal compressive stress, sigma sub 1. It is apparent that if slip on low-angle normal faults is governed by the avove frictional failure criterion, slip on the low-angle normal fault occurs only if the least effective principal stress, sigma (*) sub 3 = sigma sub 3 - P sub f, is tensile, whenever tan superscrip -1(mu sub f d, where d is the dip of the fault. If detachment faulting occurs at any significant depth in the crust, P sub f sigma sub 3 is required. In light of this conclusion I allow P sub f to vary as necessary to allow slip on the low-angle normal fault.

  14. Simulation of growth normal fault sandbox tests using the 2D discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sheng-Shin; Lin, Ming-Lang; Huang, Wen-Chao; Nien, Wei-Tung; Liu, Huan-Chi; Chan, Pei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    A fault slip can cause the deformation of shallow soil layers and destroy infrastructures. The Shanchiao Fault on the west side of the Taipei Basin is one such fault. The activities of the Shanchiao Fault have caused the quaternary sediment beneath the Taipei Basin to become deformed, damaging structures, traffic construction, and utility lines in the area. Data on geological drilling and dating have been used to determine that a growth fault exists in the Shanchiao Fault. In an experiment, a sandbox model was built using noncohesive sandy soil to simulate the existence of a growth fault in the Shanchiao Fault and forecast the effect of the growth fault on shear-band development and ground differential deformation. The experimental results indicated that when a normal fault contains a growth fault at the offset of the base rock, the shear band develops upward beside the weak side of the shear band of the original-topped soil layer, and surfaces considerably faster than that of the single-topped layer. The offset ratio required is approximately one-third that of the single-cover soil layer. In this study, a numerical simulation of the sandbox experiment was conducted using a discrete element method program, PFC2D, to simulate the upper-covering sand layer shear-band development pace and the scope of a growth normal fault slip. The simulation results indicated an outcome similar to that of the sandbox experiment, which can be applied to the design of construction projects near fault zones.

  15. Landscape response to normal fault growth and linkage in the Southern Apennines, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda-Boluda, Duna; Whittaker, Alex

    2016-04-01

    It is now well-established that landscape can record spatial and temporal variations in tectonic rates. However, decoding this information to extract detailed histories of fault growth is often a complex problem that requires careful integration of tectonic and geomorphic data sets. Here, we present new data addressing both normal fault evolution and coupled landscape response for two normal faults in the Southern Apennines: the Vallo di Diano and East Agri faults. By integrating published constraints with new data, we show that these faults have total throws of up to 2100 m, and Holocene throw rates of up to 1 mm/yr at their maximum. We demonstrate that geomorphology is effectively recording tectonics, with relief, channel and catchment slopes varying along fault strike as normal fault activity does. Therefore, valuable information about fault growth and interaction can be extracted from their geomorphic expression. We use the spatial distribution of knickpoints on the footwall channels to infer two episodes of base level change, which can be associated with distinct fault interaction events. From our detailed fault throw profiles, we reconstruct the amount of throw accumulated after each of these events, and the segments involved in each, and we use slip rate enhancement factors derived from fault interaction theory to estimate the magnitude of the tectonic perturbation in each case. From this approach, we are able to reconstruct pre-linkage throw rates, and we estimate that fault linkage events likely took place 0.7 ± 0.2 Ma and 1.9 ± 0.6 Ma in the Vallo di Diano fault, and 1.1 ± 0.1 and 2.3 ± 0.9 Ma in the East Agri fault. Our study suggests that both faults started their activity at 3.6 ± 0.5 Ma. These fault linkage scenarios are consistent with the knickpoint heights, and may relate to soft-linkage interaction with the Southern Apennines normal fault array, the existence of which has been the subject of considerable debate. Our combined geomorphic and

  16. Miocene extension in the East Range, Nevada: A two-stage history of normal faulting in the northern basin and range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosdick, J.C.; Colgan, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The East Range in northwestern Nevada is a large, east-tilted crustal block bounded by west-dipping normal faults. Detailed mapping of Tertiary stratigraphic units demonstrates a two-phase history of faulting and extension. The oldest sedimentary and volcanic rocks in the area record cumulative tilting of -30??-45??E, whereas younger olivine basalt flows indicate only a 15??-20??E tilt since ca. 17-13 Ma. Cumulative fault slip during these two episodes caused a minimum of 40% extensional strain across the East Range, and Quaternary fault scarps and seismic activity indicate that fault motion has continued to the present day. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He data presented here show that faulting began in the East Range ca. 17-15 Ma, coeval with middle Miocene extension that occurred across much of the Basin and Range. This phase of extension occurred contemporaneously with middle Miocene volcanism related to the nearby northern Nevada rifts, suggesting a link between magmatism and extensional stresses in the crust that facilitated normal faulting in the East Range. Younger fault slip, although less well constrained, began after 10 Ma and is synchronous with the onset of low-magnitude extension in many parts of northwestern Nevada and eastern California. These findings imply that, rather than migrating west across a discrete boundary, late Miocene extension in western Nevada is a distinct, younger period of faulting that is superimposed on the older, middle Miocene distribution of extended and unextended domains. The partitioning of such middle Miocene deformation may reflect the influence of localized heterogeneities in crustal structure, whereas the more broadly distributed late Miocene extension may reflect a stronger influence from regional plate boundary processes that began in the late Miocene. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  17. Possible Non-volcanic Tremor Discovered in the Reelfoot Fault Zone, Northern Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, C. A.; Williams, R. A.; Magnani, M.; Rieger, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    A swarm of ~80 microearthquakes was fortuitously detected in 20, 14 second-duration long-offset vibroseis shotgathers collected for a seismic reflection experiment near Mooring, TN, directly over the Reelfoot fault zone on the afternoon of 16 November 2006. These natural events show up in the shotgathers as near-vertically incident P waves with a dominant frequency of 10-15 Hz. The reflection line was 715m in length consisting of 144 channels with a sensor spacing of 5m, 8Hz vertical geophones, and recording using a Geometrics 24bit Geode seismograph. Small variations in event moveout across the linear array indicate that the seismicity was not confined to the same hypocenter and probably occurred at depths of approximately 10 km. The largest events in the series are estimated to have local magnitudes of ~-1 if at 10 km distance from the array. This is about 2.5 magnitude units lower than the threshold for local events detected and located by the CERI cooperative network in the area. The seismicity rate was ~1000 events per hour based on the total time duration of the shotgathers. The expected number of earthquakes of ML greater than or equal to -1 for the entire central United States is only 1 per hour. This detection of microseismic swarms in the Reelfoot fault zone indicates active physical processes that may be similar to non-volcanic tremor seen in the Cascadia and San Andreas fault zones and merits long-term monitoring to understand its source.

  18. Origin and accumulation mechanisms of petroleum in the Carboniferous volcanic rocks of the Kebai Fault zone, Western Junggar Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhonghong; Zha, Ming; Liu, Keyu; Zhang, Yueqian; Yang, Disheng; Tang, Yong; Wu, Kongyou; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    The Kebai Fault zone of the West Junggar Basin in northwestern China is a unique region to gain insights on the formation of large-scale petroleum reservoirs in volcanic rocks of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Carboniferous volcanic rocks are widespread in the Kebai Fault zone and consist of basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, tuff, volcanic breccia, sandy conglomerate and metamorphic rocks. The volcanic oil reservoirs are characterized by multiple sources and multi-stage charge and filling history, characteristic of a complex petroleum system. Geochemical analysis of the reservoir oil, hydrocarbon inclusions and source rocks associated with these volcanic rocks was conducted to better constrain the oil source, the petroleum filling history, and the dominant mechanisms controlling the petroleum accumulation. Reservoir oil geochemistry indicates that the oil contained in the Carboniferous volcanic rocks of the Kebai Fault zone is a mixture. The oil is primarily derived from the source rock of the Permian Fengcheng Formation (P1f), and secondarily from the Permian Lower Wuerhe Formation (P2w). Compared with the P2w source rock, P1f exhibits lower values of C19 TT/C23 TT, C19+20TT/ΣTT, Ts/(Ts + Tm) and ααα-20R sterane C27/C28 ratios but higher values of TT C23/C21, HHI, gammacerane/αβ C30 hopane, hopane (20S) C34/C33, C29ββ/(ββ + αα), and C29 20S/(20S + 20R) ratios. Three major stages of oil charge occurred in the Carboniferous, in the Middle Triassic, Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, and in the Middle Jurassic to Late Jurassic periods, respectively. Most of the oil charged during the first stage was lost, while moderately and highly mature oils were generated and accumulated during the second and third stages. Oil migration and accumulation in the large-scale stratigraphic reservoir was primarily controlled by the top Carboniferous unconformity with better porosity and high oil enrichment developed near the unconformity. Secondary dissolution

  19. Seismic imaging of deformation zones associated with normal fault-related folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapadat, Alexandru; Imber, Jonathan; Iacopini, David; Hobbs, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Folds associated with normal faulting, which are mainly the result of fault propagation and linkage of normal fault segments, can exhibit complex deformation patterns, with multiple synthetic splay faults, reverse faults and small antithetic Riedel structures accommodating flexure of the beds. Their identification is critical in evaluating connectivity of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and sealing capacity of faults. Previous research showed that seismic attributes can be successfully used to image complex structures and deformation distribution in submarine thrust folds. We use seismic trace and coherency attributes, a combination of instantaneous phase, tensor discontinuity and semblance attributes to identify deformation structures at the limit of seismic resolution, which accommodate seismic scale folding associated with normal faulting from Inner Moray Firth Basin, offshore Scotland. We identify synthetic splay faults and reverse faults adjacent to the master normal faults, which are localized in areas with highest fold amplitudes. This zone of small scale faulting is the widest in areas with highest fault throw / fold amplitude, or where a bend is present in the main fault surface. We also explore the possibility that changes in elastic properties of the rocks due to deformation can contribute to amplitude reductions in the fault damage zones. We analyse a pre-stack time-migrated 3D seismic data-set, where seismic reflections corresponding to a regionally-continuous and homogeneous carbonate layer display a positive correlation between strain distribution and amplitude variations adjacent to the faults. Seismic amplitude values are homogeneously distributed within the undeformed area of the footwall, with a minimum deviation from a mean amplitude value calculated for each seismic line. Meanwhile, the amplitude dimming zone is more pronounced (negative deviation increases) and widens within the relay zone, where sub-seismic scale faults, which accommodate

  20. The Ajo Mining District, Pima County, Arizona--Evidence for Middle Cenozoic Detachment Faulting, Plutonism, Volcanism, and Hydrothermal Alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Dennis P.; Force, Eric R.; Wilkinson, William H.; More, Syver W.; Rivera, John S.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The Ajo porphyry copper deposit and surrounding Upper Cretaceous rocks have been separated from their plutonic source and rotated by detachment faulting. Overlying middle Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks have been tilted and show evidence for two periods of rotation. Following these rotations, a granitic stock (23.7?0.2 Ma) intruded basement rocks west of the Ajo deposit. This stock was uplifted 2.5 km to expose deep-seated Na-Ca alteration.

  1. Laboratory observations of fault strength in response to changes in normal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Brian D.; Lozos, Julian; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Oglesby, David

    2012-01-01

    Changes in fault normal stress can either inhibit or promote rupture propagation, depending on the fault geometry and on how fault shear strength varies in response to the normal stress change. A better understanding of this dependence will lead to improved earthquake simulation techniques, and ultimately, improved earthquake hazard mitigation efforts. We present the results of new laboratory experiments investigating the effects of step changes in fault normal stress on the fault shear strength during sliding, using bare Westerly granite samples, with roughened sliding surfaces, in a double direct shear apparatus. Previous experimental studies examining the shear strength following a step change in the normal stress produce contradictory results: a set of double direct shear experiments indicates that the shear strength of a fault responds immediately, and then is followed by a prolonged slip-dependent response, while a set of shock loading experiments indicates that there is no immediate component, and the response is purely gradual and slip-dependent. In our new, high-resolution experiments, we observe that the acoustic transmissivity and dilatancy of simulated faults in our tests respond immediately to changes in the normal stress, consistent with the interpretations of previous investigations, and verify an immediate increase in the area of contact between the roughened sliding surfaces as normal stress increases. However, the shear strength of the fault does not immediately increase, indicating that the new area of contact between the rough fault surfaces does not appear preloaded with any shear resistance or strength. Additional slip is required for the fault to achieve a new shear strength appropriate for its new loading conditions, consistent with previous observations made during shock loading.

  2. Characteristics of volcanic reservoirs and distribution rules of effective reservoirs in the Changling fault depression, Songliao Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujun Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the Songliao Basin, volcanic oil and gas reservoirs are important exploration domains. Based on drilling, logging, and 3D seismic (1495 km2 data, 546 sets of measured physical properties and gas testing productivity of 66 wells in the Changling fault depression, Songliao Basin, eruptive cycles and sub-lithofacies were distinguished after lithologic correction of the 19,384 m volcanic well intervals, so that a quantitative analysis was conducted on the relation between the eruptive cycles, lithologies and lithofacies and the distribution of effective reservoirs. After the relationship was established between lithologies, lithofacies & cycles and reservoir physical properties & oil and gas bearing situations, an analysis was conducted on the characteristics of volcanic reservoirs and the distribution rules of effective reservoirs. It is indicated that 10 eruptive cycles of 3 sections are totally developed in this area, and the effective reservoirs are mainly distributed at the top cycles of eruptive sequences, with those of the 1st and 3rd Members of Yingcheng Formation presenting the best reservoir properties. In this area, there are mainly 11 types of volcanic rocks, among which rhyolite, rhyolitic tuff, rhyolitic tuffo lava and rhyolitic volcanic breccia are the dominant lithologies of effective reservoirs. In the target area are mainly developed 4 volcanic lithofacies (11 sub-lithofacies, among which upper sub-lithofacies of effusive facies and thermal clastic sub-lithofacies of explosion lithofacies are predominant in effective reservoirs. There is an obvious corresponding relationship between the physical properties of volcanic reservoirs and the development degree of effective reservoirs. The distribution of effective reservoirs is controlled by reservoir physical properties, and the formation of effective reservoirs is influenced more by porosity than by permeability. It is concluded that deep volcanic gas exploration presents a good

  3. Dating upper plate normal fault slip events in Late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments of northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. A.; Binnie, S.; Gonzalez, G.; Cortés, J.

    2011-12-01

    In order to understand how subduction earthquakes along the Nazca-South America plate boundary affect upper plate faults in the coastal forearc of northern Chile, we are developing the first detailed paleoseismological study to characterize the Late Quaternary activity of the Mejillones and Salar del Carmen faults, located around 40 km north and 15 km east of Antofagasta, respectively. There is currently a lack of basic palaeo-seismological data on these and other upper plate faults, such as long term slip rates, amount of slip per event, palaeo-earthquake magnitude and recurrence intervals. This lack of knowledge impedes understanding of how large subduction earthquakes, occurring at depths of around 50 km in this region, relate to upper plate seismicity and deformation. We have used OSL dating of fault-related sediments, and cosmogenic-ray nuclide dating of terrace surfaces, to constrain slips rates over the last 45 ka. Several trenches were excavated across both faults in order to expose and log the most recent fault-related sediments. In the hanging wall of these normal faults, vertically stacked colluvial wedges and hillslope deposits are the product of discrete slip events and post-slip fault scarp degradation. Multiple trenches along each fault permit the spatial variability in slip amount and fault-related sedimentation to be investigated. Long-term slip rates have been measured using cosmogenic-ray nuclide exposure dating of the alluvial terraces offset by the Mejillones Fault. OSL dating of the fault-related sediments in the trenches has been used to compare the ages of individual slip events on both faults, and the age of events recorded along the trace of each fault. The application of both cosmogenic-ray nuclide and OSL methods in this type of setting (hyper-arid with low erosion rates, yet tectonically active) is non-trivial, due to cosmogenic inheritance accumulated in cobbles on the terrace surfaces, low sensitivity of the quartz for OSL dating, and

  4. The Deformation of Overburden Soil and Interaction with Pile Foundations of Bridges Induced by Normal Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang-Chun; Li, Chien-Hung; Chan, Pei-Chen; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2017-04-01

    According to the investigations of well-known disastrous earthquakes in recent years, ground deformation induced by faulting is one of the causes for engineering structure damages in addition to strong ground motion. Most of structures located on faulting zone has been destroyed by fault offset. Take the Norcia Earthquake in Italy (2016, Mw=6.2) as an example, the highway bridge in Arquata crossing the rupture area of the active normal fault suffered a quantity of displacement which causing abutment settlement, the piers of bridge fractured and so on. However, The Seismic Design Provisions and Commentary for Highway Bridges in Taiwan, the stating of it in the general rule of first chapter, the design in bridges crossing active fault: "This specification is not applicable of making design in bridges crossing or near active fault, that design ought to the other particular considerations ".This indicates that the safty of bridges crossing active fault are not only consider the seismic performance, the most ground deformation should be attended. In this research, to understand the failure mechanism and the deformation characteristics, we will organize the case which the bridges subjected faulting at home and abroad. The processes of research are through physical sandbox experiment and numerical simulation by discrete element models (PFC3-D). The normal fault case in Taiwan is Shanchiao Fault. As above, the research can explore the deformation in overburden soil and the influences in the foundations of bridges by normal faulting. While we can understand the behavior of foundations, we will make the bridge superstructures into two separations, simple beam and continuous beam and make a further research on the main control variables in bridges by faulting. Through the above mentioned, we can then give appropriate suggestions about planning considerations and design approaches. This research presents results from sandbox experiment and 3-D numerical analysis to simulate

  5. Continental Dynamics in High Tibetan Plateau: Normal Faulting Type Earthquake Activities and Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jiren; Zhao Zhixin

    2009-01-01

    Various earthquake fault types were analyzed for this study on the crust movement in the high region of the Tibetan plateau by analyzing mechanism solutions and stress fields. The results show that a lot of normal faulting type earthquakes are concentrated in the central High Tibetan plateau. Many of them are nearly perfect normal fault events. The strikes of the fault planes of normal faulting earthquakes are almost in an N-S direction based on the analyses of the Wulff stereonet diagrams of fault plane solutions. It implies that the dislocation slip vectors of the normal faulting type events have quite great components in the E-W direction. The extensions probably are an eastward extensional motion, being mainly a tectonic active regime in the plateau altitudes. The tensional stress in the E-W or NWW-SEE direction predominates earthquake occurrences in the normal event region of the central plateau. The eastward extensional motion in the high Tibetan plateau is attributable to the gravitational collapse of the high plateau and the eastward extrusion of hotter mantle materials beneath the east boundary of the plateau. Extensional motions from the relaxation of the topography and/or gravitational collapse in the high plateau hardly occurred along the N-S direction. The obstruction for the plateau to move eastward is rather weak.

  6. On the mechanical behaviour of a low-angle normal fault: the Alto Tiberina fault (Northern Apennines, Italy) system case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadacca, Luigi; Casarotti, Emanuele; Chiaraluce, Lauro; Cocco, Massimo

    2016-11-01

    Geological and seismological observations have been used to parameterize 2-D numerical elastic models to simulate the interseismic deformation of a complex extensional fault system located in the Northern Apennines (Italy). The geological system is dominated by the presence of the Alto Tiberina fault (ATF), a large (60 km along strike) low-angle normal fault dipping 20° in the brittle crust (0-15 km). The ATF is currently characterized by a high and constant rate of microseismic activity, and no moderate-to-large magnitude earthquakes have been associated with this fault in the past 1000 years. Modelling results have been compared with GPS data in order to understand the mechanical behaviour of this fault and a suite of minor syn- and antithetic normal fault segments located in the main fault hanging wall. The results of the simulations demonstrate the active role played by the Alto Tiberina fault in accommodating the ongoing tectonic extension in this sector of the chain. The GPS velocity profile constructed through the fault system cannot be explained without including the ATF's contribution to deformation, indicating that this fault, although misoriented, has to be considered tectonically active and with a creeping behaviour below 5 km depth. The low-angle normal fault also shows a high degree of tectonic coupling with its main antithetic fault (the Gubbio fault), suggesting that creeping along the ATF may control the observed strain localization and the pattern of microseismic activity.

  7. Selective reverse-reactivation of normal faults, and deformation around reverse-reactivated faults in the Mesozoic of the Somerset coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P. G.; Peacock, D. C. P.; Sanderson, D. J.; McGurk, A. C.

    1999-05-01

    Normal faults exposed in the Triassic-Jurassic limestones and shales of the Somerset coast were formed during the Mesozoic development of the Bristol Channel Basin. Reverse-reactivation of some of these normal faults occurred during Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary north-south contraction. The contraction is also evident from thrusts and conjugate strike-slip faults. Preferential reactivation of the normal faults is attributed to: (1) decreased fault-plane friction, (2) domino block rotation, (3) displacement magnitude, and (4) fault connectivity. The geometries of overlapping and underlapping zones in reactivated fault zones are dependent on the existing structural geometry. Two distinctive styles of displacement accommodation occur between reverse-reactivated normal faults: (1) formation of a network of strike-slip faults, conjugate about NNE-SSW, and (2) oblique steeply-dipping reverse faults. Interaction between strike-slip and an existing fault is dependent on whether the normal fault was reactivated. The range of structures related to the north-south contraction has been incorporated into a single deformation model, controlled by the northwards movement of the hanging wall of the Quantock's Head Fault. Pure dip-slip movement occurred in the centre of its curved fault trace, with a sinistral component at the western tip, and a dextral component of displacement and strike-slip block rotations occurred at the eastern tip. Shortening of these blocks was achieved through development of a strike-slip fault network and NW-striking thrusts. In an underlap zone, loading of the footwall by the hanging wall block modified the local stress system to allow formation of oblique, steeply-dipping reverse faults.

  8. Soufrière Hills eruption, Montserrat, 1995 - 1997: volcanic earthquake locations and fault plane solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinall, W.P.; Miller, A.D.; Lynch, L.L.; Latchman, J.L.; Stewart, R.C.; White, R.A.; Power, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A total of 9242 seismic events, recorded since the start of the eruption on Montserrat in July 1995, have been uniformly relocated with station travel-time corrections. Early seismicity was generally diffuse under southern Montserrat, and mostly restricted to depths less than 7 km. However, a NE-SW alignment of epicentres beneath the NE flank of the volcano emerged in one swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes (VTs) and later nests of VT hypocentres developed beneath the volcano and at a separated location, under St. George's Hill. The overall spatial distribution of hypocentres suggests a minimum depth of about 5 km for any substantial magma body. Activity associated with the opening of a conduit to the surface became increasingly shallow, with foci concentrated below the crater and, after dome building started in Fall 1995, VTs diminished and repetitive swarms of ‘hybrid’ seismic events became predominant. By late-1996, as magma effusion rates escalated, most seismic events were originating within a volume about 2 km diameter which extended up to the surface from only about 3 km depth - the diminution of shear failure earthquakes suggests the pathway for magma discharge had become effectively unconstricted. Individual and composite fault plane solutions have been determined for a few larger earthquakes. We postulate that localised extensional stress conditions near the linear VT activity, due to interaction with stresses in the overriding lithospheric plate, may encourage normal fault growth and promote sector weaknesses in the volcano.

  9. Syn-thrusting polygonal normal faults exposed in the hinge of the Cingoli anticline, northern Apennines, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo ePetracchini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cingoli arcuate anticline is part of the Apennines fold-thrust belt in Italy. The anticline involves sedimentary carbonate strata generally affected by syn-thrusting contractional structures such as bed-normal pressure solution seams, folds, and reverse faults. An exception is constituted by an outcrop in the anticline hinge, where sub-horizontal carbonate and chert beds are affected by joints and intraformational short normal faults. These faults are poorly-systematic and conceivably polygonal in map view. They cut through the carbonate beds while usually stop against the chert layers that are bent and extended along the faults themselves. At the fault tips, the displacement is generally transferred, via a lateral step, to an adjacent similar fault segment. The fault surfaces are often characterized by slickolites, greenish clayey residue, and micro-breccias including chert and carbonate clasts. Fault displacement is partly or largely accommodated by pressure solution. The faults, in effect, are usually accompanied by bed-parallel pressure solution seams in the two contractional quadrants located at the present or past fault tips. The pressure solution features fade away departing from the faults. This evidence and others are analytically explained with fault tip stress distributions. The faults are interpreted as polygonal normal faults syn-tectonically (syn-thrusting nucleated in response to multi-directional stretching processes occurred at the Cingoli triple-folded anticline extrados. The faults then grew through a four-stage process: (1. stop the faults stopped at the competent chert beds; (2. shrink faulting produced shrinkage (pressure solution of carbonate beds at the fault compressive tips; (3. shrink and step the faults stepped laterally at the competent chert beds; (4. shatter the chert beds were shattered along the fault surfaces. The case presented constitutes the first reported one of syn-thrusting non-diagenetic polygonal

  10. Recent, slow normal and strike-slip faulting in the Pasto Ventura region of the southern Puna Plateau, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Cosca, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recent normal and strike-slip faulting on the Puna Plateau of NW Argentina has been linked to lithospheric foundering, gravitational spreading, plate boundary forces and a decrease in crustal shortening from north to south. However, the timing, kinematics and rate of extension remain poorly constrained. We focus on the Pasto Ventura region (NW Argentina) located on the southern Puna Plateau and recent deformation (cinder cones show that the overall extension direction is subhorizontal, is oriented NE-SW to NNE-SSW, and occurs at a slow, time-integrated rate of 0.02 to 0.08 mm/yr since at least 0.8–0.5 Ma. A regional compilation from this study and existing data shows that recent extension across the Puna Plateau is subhorizontal but varies in azimuthal orientation dramatically. Data from the Pasto Ventura region are consistent with a number of models to explain normal and strike-slip faulting on the Puna Plateau, all of which likely influence the region. Some role for lower lithospheric foundering through dripping appears to be seen based on the regional extension directions and ages of mafic volcanism in the southern Puna Plateau.

  11. Normal faulting in a back arc basin: Seismological characteristics of the March 2, 1987, Edgecumbe, New Zealand, Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Helen; Smith, Euan; Robinson, Russell

    1990-04-01

    The Edgecumbe earthquake (March 2, 1987, 0142 UT, 37.92°S, 176.76°E) occurred beneath a coastal river plain a the southeastern margin of the Central Volcanic Region (CVR) of the North Island of New Zealand, a back arc basin that is widening at a geodetically determined rate of about 12 mm/yr. Its situation enabled a wide range of geological and geophysical measurements to be made of the preseismic, coseismic and postseismic processes. The estimated hypocenter and fault plane solution are consistent with the observed surface faulting. Various estimates of the seismic moment of the mainshock range from 4.3×1018 N m (from long-period P wave modelling of the first 5 s) to 10×1018 N m (from dislocation modelling of geodetic data). The variation in the values can be reasonably explained in terms of the methods used to determine them. Focal mechanisms of both mainshock and aftershocks were similar to focal mechanisms previously determined for events in the CVR and its offshore extension. Normal faulting mechanisms make up 75% of the events with the remainder strike slip (dextral assuming a northeast striking fault). The distribution of mechanisms is consistent with the regional strain field as previously determined from geodetic observations. The mainshock has been modelled as a complex event with a second subevent about 3 s after the first, with both episodes of moment release initiating at a depth of about 8 km. The Edgecumbe earthquake was preceded by a large number of foreshocks, some near the mainshock, but most in a tight cluster 35 km away to the northwest (i.e., off-strike). After the first half hour following the mainshock, swarms of aftershocks began occurring up to 50 km from the mainshock rupture, mostly along the strike of the faulting. Main rupture aftershocks were mostly located in the footwall of the main fault. A notable gap in the aftershock distribution is coincident with a geothermal field along strike of the main rupture. Swarms are common in the

  12. Normal Faulting at the Western Margin of the Altiplano Plateau, Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildgen, T. F.; Hodges, K. V.; Whipple, K. X.; Perignon, M.; Smith, T. M.

    2004-12-01

    Although the western margin of the Altiplano Plateau is commonly used to illustrate the marked differences in the evolution of a mountain range with strong latitudinal and longitudinal precipitation gradients, the nature of tectonism in this semi-arid region is poorly understood and much debated. The western margin of the Altiplano in southern Peru and northern Chile marks an abrupt transition from the forearc region of the Andes to the high topography of the Cordillera Occidental. This transition has been interpreted by most workers as a monocline, with modifications due to thrust faulting, normal faulting, and gravity slides. Based on recent fieldwork and satellite image analysis, we suggest that, at least in the semi-arid climate of southern Peru, this transition has been the locus of significant high-angle normal faulting related to the block uplift of the Cordillera Occidental. We have focused our initial work in the vicinity of 15\\deg S latitude, 71\\deg W longitude, where the range front crosses Colca Canyon, a major antecedent drainage northwest of Arequipa. In that area, Oligocene to Miocene sediments of the Moquegua Formation, which were eroded from uplifted terrain to the northeast, presently dip to the northeast at angles between 2 and 10º. Field observations of a normal fault contact between the Moquegua sedimentary rocks and Jurassic basement rocks, as well as 15-m resolution 3-D images generated from ASTER satellite imagery, show that the Moquegua units are down-dropped to the west across a steeply SW-dipping normal fault of regional significance. Morphology of the range front throughout southern Peru suggests that normal faulting along the range front has characterized the recent tectonic history of the region. We present geochronological data to constrain the timing of movement both directly from the fault zone as well as indirectly from canyon incision that likely responded to fault movement.

  13. Seismic slip on an upper-plate normal fault during a large subduction megathrust rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Stephen P.; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of stress accumulation and release during subduction zone seismic cycles requires an understanding of the distribution of fault slip during earthquakes. Reconstructions of slip are typically constrained to a single, known fault plane. Yet, slip has been shown to occur on multiple faults within the subducting plate owing to stress triggering, resulting in phenomena such as earthquake doublets. However, rapid stress triggering from the plate interface to faults in the overriding plate has not been documented before. We have analysed seismic data from the magnitude 7.1 Araucania earthquake that occurred in the Chilean subduction zone in January 2011. We find that the earthquake, which was reported as a single event in global moment tensor solutions, was instead composed of two ruptures on two separate faults. We use 3-D full waveform simulations to better constrain the centroid of the second rupture. Within 12 s, a thrust earthquake (Mw 6.8) on the plate interface triggered a second large rupture on a normal fault 30 km away in the overriding plate (Mw 6.7). We define this set of events as a 'closely spaced doublet' (CSD). This configuration of partitioned rupture is consistent with normal-faulting mechanisms in the ensuing aftershock sequence. We conclude that plate interface rupture can trigger almost instantaneous slip in the overriding plate of a subduction zone. This shallow upper-plate rupture may be masked from teleseismic data, posing a challenge for real-time tsunami warning systems.

  14. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  15. Ductile deformation, boudinage and low angle normal faults. An overview of the structural variability at present-day rifted margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Camille; Jolivet, Laurent; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Ballard, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    High quality industrial seismic profiles acquired along most of the world's passive margins present stunningly increased resolution that leads to unravel an unexpected variety of structures. An important benefit of the increased resolution of recent seismic profiles is that they provide an unprecedented access to the processes occurring in the middle and lower continental crust. We present a series of so far unreleased profiles that allow the identification of various rift-related geological processes such as crustal boudinage, ductile shear and low angle detachment faulting. The lower crust in passive margins appears much more intensely deformed than usually represented. At the foot of both magma-rich and magma-poor margins, we observe clear indications of ductile deformation of the deep continental crust along large-scale shallow dipping shear zones. These shear zones generally show a top-to-the-continent sense of shear consistent with the activity of overlying continentward dipping normal faults observed in the upper crust. This pattern is responsible for a migration of the deformation and associated sedimentation and/or volcanic activity toward the ocean. In some cases, low angle shear zones define an anastomosed pattern that delineates boudin-like structures. The interboudins areas seem to localize the maximum of deformation. The lower crust is intensely boudinaged and the geometry of those boudins seems to control the position and dip of upper crustal normal faults. We present some of the most striking examples (Uruguay, West Africa, Barents sea…) and discuss their implications for the time-temperature-subsidence history of the margins.

  16. Architectural and microstructural characterization of a seismogenic normal fault in dolostones (Central Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demurtas, Matteo; Fondriest, Michele; Clemenzi, Luca; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Storti, Fabrizio; Di Toro, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    Fault zones cutting carbonate sequences represent significant seismogenic sources worldwide (e.g. L'Aquila 2009, MW 6.1). Though seismological and geophysical techniques (double differences method, trapped waves, etc.) allow us to investigate down to the decametric scale the structure of active fault zones, further geological field surveys and microstructural studies of exhumed seismogenic fault zones are required to support interpretation of geophysical data, quantify the geometry of fault zones and identify the fault processes active during the seismic cycle. Here we describe the architecture (i.e. fault geometry and fault rock distribution) of the well-exposed footwall-block of the Campo Imperatore Fault Zone (CIFZ) by means of remote sensed analyses, field surveys, mineralogical (XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy) and microstructural (FE-SEM, optical microscope cathodoluminescence) investigations. The CIFZ dips 58° towards N210 and its strike mimics that of the arcuate Gran Sasso Thrust Belt (Central Apennines). The CIFZ was exhumed from 2-3 km depth and accommodated a normal throw of ~2 km starting from the Early-Pleistocene. In the studied area, the CIFZ puts in contact the Holocene deposits at the hangingwall with dolomitized Jurassic carbonate platform successions (Calcare Massiccio) at the footwall. From remote sensed analyses, structural lineaments both inside and outside the CIFZ have a typical NW-SE Apenninic strike, which is parallel to the local trend of the Gran Sasso Thrust. Based on the density of the fracture/fault network and the type of fault zone rocks, we distinguished four main structural domains within the ~300 m thick CIFZ footwall-block, which include (i) a well-cemented (white in color) cataclastic zone (up to ~40 m thick) at the contact with the Holocene deposits, (ii) a well-cemented (brown to grey in color) breccia zone (up to ~15 m thick), (iii) an high strain damage zone (fracture spacing 10 cm). Other than by the main boundary normal

  17. Mechanical Effects of Normal Faulting Along the Eastern Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, S. J.; Logan, J. M.; Stock, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Here we test whether the regional near-surface stress field in the Sierra Nevada, California, and the near-surface fracturing that heavily influences the Sierran landscape are a mechanical response to normal faulting along its eastern escarpment. A compilation of existing near-surface stress measurements for the central Sierra Nevada, together with three new measurements, shows the most compressive horizontal stresses are 3-21 MPa, consistent with the widespread distribution of sheeting joints (near-surface fractures subparallel to the ground surface). In contrast, a new stress measurement at Aeolian Buttes in the Mono Basin, east of the range front fault system, reveals a horizontal principal tension of 0.014 MPa, consistent with the abundant vertical joints there. To evaluate mechanical effects of normal faulting, we modeled both normal faults and grabens in three ways: (1) dislocations of specified slip in an elastic half-space, (2) frictionless sliding surfaces in an elastic half-space; and (3) faults in thin elastic beams resting on an inviscid fluid. The different mechanical models predict concave upward flexure and widespread near-surface compressive stresses in the Sierra Nevada that surpass the measurements even for as little as 1 km of normal slip along the eastern escarpment, which exhibits 1-3 km of structural and topographic relief. The models also predict concave downward flexure of the bedrock floors and horizontal near-surface tensile stresses east of the escarpment. The thin-beam models account best for the topographic relief of the eastern escarpment and the measured stresses given current best estimates for the rheology of the Sierran lithosphere. Our findings collectively indicate that the regional near-surface stress field and the widespread near-surface fracturing directly reflect the mechanical response to normal faulting along the eastern escarpment. These results have broad scientific and engineering implications for slope stability

  18. The Geothermal Systems along the Watukosek fault system (East Java, Indonesia):The Arjuno-Welirang Volcanic Complex and the Lusi Mud-Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Mazzini, Adriano; Vita, Fabio; Sciarra, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    The Java Island is characterized by an intense volcanic activity with more then 100 active volcanoes. Moreover, this island is also known by the presence of many mud volcanoes and hydrothermal springs. In particular, in the 2006 several sudden hot mud eruptions, with fluids around 100° C, occurred in the NE side of the island resulting in a prominent eruption named Lusi (contraction of Lumpur Sidoarjo) located along the major Watukosek strike-slip fault zone. The Watukosek fault system, strikes from the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex, intersects Lusi and extends towards the NE of the Java island. Conversely of the normal mud eruptions (cold fluids emitted in a short time period of few days), the Lusi eruption was characterized by a persistent effusive hot fluids emissions for a long-time period of, so far, nearly a decade. Moreover, the isotopic composition of emitted gases like Helium showed a clear magmatic origin. For this reasons we decided to investigate the near Arjuno-Welirang complex located on the same strike-slip fault. Arjuno-Welirang is a twin strato-volcano system located in the East of Java along the Watukosek fault, at about 25 km SW respect to the Lusi volcano system. It features two main peaks: Arjuno (3339 masl) and Welirang (3156 masl). The last recorded eruptive activity took place in August 1950 from the flanks of Kawah Plupuh and in October 1950 from the NW part of the Gunung Welirang. This strato-volcano is characterized by a S-rich area, with high T-vent fumarole at least up to 220° C (and likely higher), located mainly in the Welirang crater. In addition, several hot springs vent from the flanks of the volcano, indicate the presence of a large hydrothermal system. During July 2015, in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126), we carried out a geochemical field campaign on the Arjuno-Welirang volcano hydrothermal system area, sampling water and dissolved gases from the thermal and cold springs located on the flanks of

  19. Unusual low-angle normal fault earthquakes after the 2011 Tohoku-oki megathrust earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Yuji; Okuwaki, Ryo; Enescu, Bogdan; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2015-06-01

    A few low-angle normal fault earthquakes at approximately the depth of the plate interface, with a strike nearly parallel to the trench axis, were detected immediately after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. After that, however, no such normal fault events have been observed until the occurrence of the 2014 M W 6.6 Fukushima-oki earthquake. Here we analyze the teleseismic body waveforms of the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake. We first compare the observed teleseismic body waves of the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake with those of the largest previous low-angle normal fault aftershock ( M W 6.6), which occurred on 12 March 2011, and then estimate the centroid depth and moment tensor solution of the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake. The teleseismic body waves and moment tensor solution of the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake are similar to those of the 2011 normal fault aftershock, which suggests that the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake occurred at a similar depth and had a similar mechanism to that of the 2011 aftershock. We detected five low-angle normal fault aftershocks at approximately the depth of the plate interface, with a strike nearly parallel to the trench axis, and confirmed that all of them except for the 2014 Fukushima-oki earthquake occurred within 17 days after the mainshock. The occurrence of these low-angle normal fault events is likely to reflect the reversal of shear stress due to overshooting of slip during the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. We speculate that a fast but heterogeneous recovery of stress state at the plate interface may explain why these events preferentially occurred immediately after the megathrust event, while one of them occurred with a significant delay. In order to better understand the characteristics of stress state in the crust, we have to carefully observe the ongoing seismic activity around this region.

  20. Risk assessment of the impact of future volcanic eruptions on direct normal irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Blanc, Philippe; Vignola, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosols from Plinian volcanic eruptions affect the solar surface irradiance forcing by scattering the solar radiation as it passes through the Earth atmosphere. Since these aerosols have high single scattering albedos they mostly affect direct normal irradiances (DNI). The effect on global horizontal irradiance (GHI) is less because some of the scattered irradiance reaches the surface as diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI) and adds to the GHI. DNI is the essential input to concentrating solar thermal electric power (CSP/STE) and concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) plants. Therefore, an assessment of the future potential variability in the DNI resource caused by Plinian volcanic eruptions is desirable. Based on investigations of the El Chichón and Pinatubo eruptions, the microphysical, and thereby optical, properties of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols are well known. Given these, radiative transfer computations of the DNI resource can be made. The DNI resource includes forward scattered irradiance within the acceptance angle of a given CSP/STE or CPV plant. The rarity of Plinian eruptions poses a challenge for assessing the statistical risk of future eruptions and its potential of risk in the electricity production. Here we present and discuss methods to account for these potential volcanic eruptions for technical and economical studies including scenarios with very high probability of exceedance (e.g. P99 scenarios) for risk assessment of DNI-based solar power projects.

  1. The influence of normal fault on initial state of stress in rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajduś Antoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of original state of stress in rock mass is a very difficult task for rock mechanics. Yet, original state of stress in rock mass has fundamental influence on secondary state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of mining headings. This, in turn, is the cause of the occurrence of a number of mining hazards, i.e., seismic events, rock bursts, gas and rock outbursts, falls of roof. From experience, it is known that original state of stress depends a lot on tectonic disturbances, i.e., faults and folds. In the area of faults, a great number of seismic events occur, often of high energies. These seismic events, in many cases, are the cause of rock bursts and damage to the constructions located inside the rock mass and on the surface of the ground. To estimate the influence of fault existence on the disturbance of original state of stress in rock mass, numerical calculations were done by means of Finite Element Method. In the calculations, it was tried to determine the influence of different factors on state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of a normal fault, i.e., the influence of normal fault inclination, deformability of rock mass, values of friction coefficient on the fault contact. Critical value of friction coefficient was also determined, when mutual dislocation of rock mass part separated by a fault is impossible. The obtained results enabled formulation of a number of conclusions, which are important in the context of seismic events and rock bursts in the area of faults.

  2. Is lithostatic loading important for the slip behavior and evolution of normal faults in the Earth's crust?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattenhorn, Simon A. [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Pollard, David D. [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    1999-12-10

    Normal faults growing in the Earth's crust are subject to the effects of an increasing frictional resistance to slip caused by the increasing lithostatic load with depth. We use three-dimensional (3-D) boundary element method numerical models to evaluate these effects on planar normal faults with variable elliptical tip line shapes in an elastic solid. As a result of increasing friction with depth, normal fault slip maxima for a single slip event are skewed away from the fault center toward the upper fault tip. There is a correspondingly greater propagation tendency at the upper tip. However, the tall faults that would result from such a propagation tendency are generally not observed in nature. We show how mechanical interaction between laterally stepping fault segments significantly competes with the lithostatic loading effect in the evolution of a normal fault system, promoting lateral propagation and possibly segment linkage. Resultant composite faults are wider than they are tall, resembling both 3-D seismic data interpretations and previously documented characteristics of normal fault systems. However, this effect may be greatly complemented by the influence of a heterogeneous stratigraphy, which can control fault nucleation depth and inhibit fault propagation across the mechanical layering. Our models demonstrate that although lithostatic loading may be an important control on fault evolution in relatively homogeneous rocks, the contribution of lithologic influences and mechanical interaction between closely spaced, laterally stepping faults may predominate in determining the slip behavior and propagation tendency of normal faults in the Earth's crust. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  3. Normal-fault stress and displacement through finite-element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Megna, A; Santini, S; Barba, Salvatore; Megna, Antonietta; Santini, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    We compute displacement and stress due to a normal fault by means of two-dimensional plane-strain finite-element analysis. To do so, we apply a system of forces to the fault nodes and develop an iterative algorithm serving to determine the force magnitudes for any slip distribution. As a sample case, we compute the force magnitudes assuming uniform slip on a 10-km two-dimensional normal fault. The numerical model generates displacement and stress fields that compare well to the analytical solution. In fact, we find little difference in displacements (<5%), displacement orientation (<15 DEG), and stress components (<35%, half of which due to slip tolerance). We analyze such misfit, and discuss how the error propagates from displacement to stress. Our scheme provides a convenient way to use the finite-elements direct method in a trial-and-error procedure to reproduce any smooth slip distribution.

  4. Late Quaternary normal faulting and its kinematic mechanism of eastern piedmont fault of the Haba-Yulong Snow Mountains in northwestern Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The regional geologic and geomorphic observations show that an active arcuate normal fault constitutes the main boundary fault of the Haba-Yulong Snow Mountains (HYSM). This fault is called eastern piedmont fault of Haba-Yulong Snow Mountains (HYPF). The fault consists of two segments with differential trend; the northern segment is NW-trending and NE-dipping and the southern section is S-N trending and E-dipping. Three sets of fault scarps cutting late Quaternary landforms and their dating results indicate that the fault is a prominent Holocene active fault and its throw rates are 0.3―1.4 mm/a during late Quaternary. The geometry and kinematics of the fault suggest that the arcuate normal faulting or rifting are typical surface deformation pattern at the two tips of the Z-shaped rift zone of northwestern Yunnan, which is related to regional east-west extension accompanying clockwise rota- tion of micro-block.

  5. Late Quaternary normal faulting and its kinematic mechanism of eastern piedmont fault of the Haba-Yulong Snow Mountains in northwestern Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU ZhongHai; ZHANG YongShuang; HU DaoGong; ZHAO XiTao; YE PeiSheng

    2009-01-01

    The regional geologic and geomorphic observations show that an active arcuate normal fault consti-tutes the main boundary fault of the Haba-Yulong Snow Mountains (HYSM). This fault is called eastern piedmont fault of Haba-Yulong Snow Mountains (HYPF). The fault consists of two segments with dif-ferential trend; the northern segment is NW-trending and NE-dipping and the southern section is S-N trending and E-dipping. Three sets of fault scarps cutting late Quaternary landforms and their dating results indicate that the fault is a prominent Holocene active fault and its throw rates are 0.3-1.4 mm/a during late Quaternary. The geometry and kinematics of the fault suggest that the arcuate normal faulting or rifting are typical surface deformation pattern at the two tips of the Z-shaped rift zone of northwestern Yunnan, which is related to regional east-west extension accompanying clockwise rota-tion of micro-block.

  6. On the mechanics of low-angle normal faults: interdisciplinary observations and open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, C.

    2016-12-01

    "Standard" frictional fault reactivation predicts that in an extending crust normal faults should cease to slip at dips of 30°. This mechanical prediction is consistent with the absence on continental low-angle normal faults, LANF, of moderate-to-large earthquakes where the rupture plane is unambiguously discriminated. In marked contrast, widespread geological data and seismic reflection profiles show that LANF have played a key-role in crustal extension. In the last 15 years we have tried to address this LANF paradox focusing on the Northern Apennines of Italy by comparing active with ancient-exhumed LANFs of the same fault system. In the active (3 mm/yr) extending area geophysical data define a regional LANF characterized by locked and creeping (1.7 mm/yr) portions with interspersed microseismicity (about 3 events per day, ML seismological records. Although the above conditions can be invoked to explain some aspects of LANF mechanics, they do not represent the solution of the LANF paradox. First, a widespread development of phyllosilicates does not seem to be a common feature in plenty of exhumed LANF. Second, a significant number of LANF formed as gently dipping structures within a brittle crust characterized by a vertical S1 and a well-constrained mechanical explanation for LANF initiation is still lacking. These two points highlight an important gap of knowledge in fault mechanics.

  7. Normal faulting in the Simav graben of western Turkey reassessed with calibrated earthquake relocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasözen, Ezgi; Nissen, Edwin; Bergman, Eric A.; Johnson, Kendra L.; Walters, Richard J.

    2016-06-01

    Western Turkey has a long history of large earthquakes, but the responsible faults are poorly characterized. Here we reassess the past half century of instrumental earthquakes in the Simav-Gediz region, starting with the 19 May 2011 Simav earthquake (Mw 5.9), which we image using interferometric synthetic aperture radar and regional and teleseismic waveforms. This event ruptured a steep, planar normal fault centered at 7-9 km depth but failed to break the surface. However, relocated main shock and aftershock hypocenters occurred beneath the main slip plane at 10-22 km depth, implying rupture initiation in areas of low coseismic slip. These calibrated modern earthquakes provide the impetus to relocate and reassess older instrumental events in the region. Aftershocks of the 1970 Gediz earthquake (Mw 7.1) form a narrow band, inconsistent with source models that invoke low-angle detachment faulting, and may include events triggered dynamically by the unilateral main shock rupture. Epicenters of the 1969 Demirci earthquakes (Mw 5.9, 6.0) are more consistent with slip on the south dipping Akdağ fault than the larger, north dipping Simav fault. A counterintuitive aspect of recent seismicity across our study area is that the largest event (Mw 7.1) occurred in an area of slower extension and indistinct surface faulting, yet ruptured the surface, while recent earthquakes in the well-defined and more rapidly extending Simav graben are smaller (Mw <6.0) and failed to produce surface breaks. Though our study area bounds a major metamorphic core complex, there is no evidence for involvement of low-angle normal faulting in any of the recent large earthquakes.

  8. Constraints on 3D fault and fracture distribution in layered volcanic- volcaniclastic sequences from terrestrial LIDAR datasets: Faroe Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithatha, Bansri; McCaffrey, Kenneth; Walker, Richard; Brown, Richard; Pickering, Giles

    2013-04-01

    the upper lava unit and therefore fracture concentration is higher, while in the lower lava unit, the fault zone is narrower and thus fracture concentration is also low. Both field observations and the DFN model indicate that the faults and fractures are steeper in the basalts, and shallower in the volcaniclastic sequences, giving a 'stepped' geometry. To assess the nature of sub-seismic fracturing, fracture attributes (connectivity, spacing, length, and orientation) within the model were analysed quantitatively. Continuing work will integrate the detailed field analysis fully, including 1D and 2D fracture transects, structural logging and mapping as well as microstructural characterisation from collected field samples, to understand the complex nature of fracture networks in inter-layered basalt-volcaniclastic sequences. Fracture attributes, such as the shape, length, aspect ratio, curvature and aperture, will be quantified to provide key parameters for fluid flow simulation. Once these attributes have been assessed, experimental data (porosity and permeability) will be incorporated into the DFN model to constrain the fluid flow potential within these inter-layered volcanic sequences.

  9. The role of antecedent drainage networks and isolated normal fault propagation on basin stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, E.; Brocklehurst, S. H.; Gawthorpe, R.

    2010-12-01

    The stratigraphy of an extensional basin reflects a history of fault activity, erosion, drainage network evolution, and sediment transport and deposition. Here a three-dimensional numerical model of erosion and clastic sedimentation is applied to investigate the effect of displacement on a normal fault to the distribution of deposition in an extensional basin. Material is eroded from the hinterland through a stream-power incision law and deposited in the basin using a modified diffusion algorithm. Experiments are implemented for 3Ma, in which the initial 1Ma are used to permit a drainage network to evolve to a topographic steady state. This system is then perturbed by the introduction of a propagating isolated normal fault at varying displacement rates (1.0m/kyr - 2.0m/kyr) to demonstrate the influence of fault propagation on drainage capture, network re-organisation, sediment routing and deposition. Faster displacement rates and smaller antecedent drainage networks cause footwall-derived deltas to be cut-off more rapidly from the hinterland source area. Drainage networks are re-organised such that sediment is then transported around the fault tips into axially sourced deltas. Sediments may continue to be deposited in the hanging wall at the fault centre, but this material has not been sourced directly from the adjacent footwall, even though the stratigraphic architecture might suggest that this is the case. Drainage networks are modified by drainage reversals in the antecedent channels, and the development of areas of abandoned/trapped drainage. These changes in sediment supply due to network re-organisation are also reflected in the basin stratigraphy, with rapid back-stepping of deltas when the source is removed in the adjacent footwall. Later incision and headward erosion of the footwall channels may cause re-capture of earlier channels, while network re-organisation may also cause depositional in-filling of earlier channels. The drainage divide shifts

  10. Uniform pattern of normal faulting at the temporally distributed centers of eruption along the path of the Yellowstone hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah, Armita; Babaie, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    The northeasterly migration of the Yellowstone hotspot (YHS) has led both to the successive eruption of lava from a temporally ordered set of calderas, and related thermally-induced normal faulting along the Snake River Plain (SRP) over the past 16.6 Ma. We have applied a series of structural and statistical methods to analyze the spatial distribution and orientation of the normal faults to understand the kinematics of the mid-Tertiary-Quaternary faulting event along the SRP in the northern Rockies. The azimuths of the linear directional mean (LDM) and the directional (autocorrelation) anisotropy ellipses in the semivariograms, applying Ordinary Kriging, for different sets of normal fault traces give an estimate for the horizontal component of extension for normal faulting. The sub-parabolic spatial pattern of the normal fault LDMs, and their sub-parallel alignment with the minor axes of the Standard Deviation Ellipses (SDEs) in and around different caldera, suggest uniform normal faulting during thermally-induced extensions along the SRP. The asymmetric, sub-parabolic distribution of the spatial trajectories (form lines) of the LDMs and the major axes of the directional (anisotropy) ellipses of the traces of normal faults in the youngest three calderas are similar to the reported parabolic distribution of earthquake epicenters along active normal faults around the YHS. The parallelism of the axis of the sub-parabolic pattern with the trajectories of the LDMs, the major axes of the directional anisotropy ellipses, and the deduced extension directions for each caldera, suggest systematic and progressive normal faulting due to the thermal regime of the hotspot as it migrated to the northeast. This implies that the age of normal faulting progressively decreases to the northeast.

  11. Quaternary fault-controlled volcanic vents and crustal thinning: new insights from the magma-rich Tyrrhenian passive margin (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardello, Giovanni Luca; Conti, Alessia; Consorti, Lorenzo; Do Couto, Damien

    2017-04-01

    The discover of monogenic Quaternary volcanic vents, that were recently mapped along major fault zones both inland and offshore the Tyrrhenian magma-rich passive margin, poses questions about: timing and role they had into Plio-Pleistocene crustal thinning with relevant consequences for the hazard assessment of an area inhabited by some 0.5 million people. The present-day margin is stretched over 100 km between the Volsci Range (VR) and the Pontian escarpment, being defined by moderate shallow seismicity (Mw≤4.6), relative high geothermal gradient and ongoing hydrothermal activity. Although major central volcanoes (e.g., Colli Albani), occurring at major fault intersections are well studied, smaller volcanic fields were so far unconstrained. Both field survey in the VR and offshore high-resolution geophysical data, allow us to: 1) better define the anatomy of the poorly known VR volcanic field; 2) furnish new insights on the regional Quaternary dynamics; 3) propose modes and reason of magma emplacement. The VR is composed of about 40 punctual and linear monogenic and mostly phreatomagmatic vents occurring at the edges of the Apennine carbonate fold-and-thrust belt and within the VR backbone. Volcanites are characterized by zeolitized to incoherent tuffs and surge deposits locally covered by lavas and slope deposits. Most explosive units host carbonate-rich lithics with different degrees of rounding and decarbonation, which frequently belong to Albian-Cenomanian aquifers. By comparing cross-section with lithic analyses we demonstrate that fragmentation, transport, progressive disintegration and decarbonation occur at multiple depths, depending on the fold-and-thrust belt setting. Thus, along the same vent zone, juvenile lithic composition proves repeated fragmentation within pressured-aquifers, testifying for fissural activity with implications for local seismic and volcanic assessment. Pyroclastic deposits occur as well in the Pontina and Fondi coastal plains at

  12. Rare normal faulting earthquake induced by subduction megaquake: example from 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, T.; Sugito, N.; Echigo, T.; Sato, H.; Suzuki, T.

    2012-04-01

    A month after March 11 gigantic M9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake, M7.0 intraplate earthquake occurred at a depth of 5 km on April 11 beneath coastal area of near Iwaki city, Fukushima prefecture. Focal mechanism of the mainshock indicates that this earthquake is a normal faulting event. Based on field reconnaissance and LIDAR mapping by Geospatial Information Authority of Japan, we recognized coseismic surface ruptures, presumably associated with the main shock. Coseismic surface ruptures extend NNW for about 11 km in a right-stepping en echelon manner. Geomorphic expressions of these ruptures commonly include WWS-facing normal fault scarps and/or drape fold scarp with open cracks on their crests, on the hanging wall sides of steeply west-dipping normal fault planes subparallel to Cretaceous metamorphic rocks. Highest topographic scarp height is about 2.3 m. In this study we introduce preliminary results of a trenching survey across the coseismic surface ruptures at Shionohira site, to resolve timing of paleoseismic events along the Shionohira fault. Trench excavations were carried out at two sites (Ichinokura and Shionohira sites) in Iwaki, Fukushima. At Shionohira site a 2-m-deep trench was excavated across the coseismic fault scarp emerged on the alluvial plain on the eastern flank of the Abukuma Mountains. On the trench walls we observed pairs of steeply dipping normal faults that deform Neogene to Paleogene conglomerates and unconformably overlying, late Quaternary to Holocene fluvial units. Sense of fault slip observed on the trench walls (large dip-slip with small sinistral component) is consistent with that estimated from coseismic surface ruptures. Fault throw estimated from separation of piercing points on lower Unit I and vertical structural relief on folded upper Unit I is consistent with topographic height of the coseismic fault scarp at the trench site. In contrast, vertical separation of Unit II, unconformably overlain by Unit I, is measured as about 1.5 m

  13. Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  14. Mapping of normal fault scarps in airborne laser swath mapping data using wavelet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sare, R.; Hilley, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Wavelet analysis of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) successfully identifies degraded fault scarps where earthquakes produce topographic steps and provides an estimate of their morphologic age. However, these methods may fail to detect relatively young, sloping scarps created by more gently-dipping normal faults, misidentifying them as mature, highly-degraded vertical scarps if they are detected at all. We present new wavelet templates incorporating initial scarp slope and above- and below-scarp surface angles to better describe the curvature of observed fault scarps. These templates are based on an analytic solution for scarp curvature, allowing for more accurate estimation of the relative age of the scarp. Synthetic tests show that scarp-like landforms that went largely undetected by a vertical-scarp template are more clearly detected using profile geometries that reflect subtle changes in curvature due to scarp and far-field slope angles. Analysis of DEMs from sites in Surprise Valley in the northwestern Basin and Range and near Jenny Lake on the Teton rangefront illustrates the effects of along-strike variability in scarp morphology on best-fit template parameters. Where normal fault scarps have high slopes, they are identified by filters designed to detect topographic step functions. Scarps with finite initial slopes, as well as those that cut surfaces with different angles above and below the scarp, can be resolved with higher signal-to-noise ratios using more sophisticated template functions. Adaptive use of different wavelet templates could reduce the number of false negatives in wavelet analysis of data from complex faulting regimes, improving the robustness of these methods and enabling automated fault mapping of large areas.

  15. Geologic context of geodetic data across a Basin and Range normal fault, Crescent Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, A. M.; Lee, J.; Wernicke, B. P.; Sieh, K.

    2004-04-01

    Geodetic strain and late Quaternary faulting in the Basin and Range province is distributed over a region much wider than historic seismicity, which is localized near the margins of the province. In the relatively aseismic interior, both the magnitude and direction of geodetic strain may be inconsistent with the Holocene faulting record. We document the best example of such a disagreement across the NE striking, ˜55° NW dipping Crescent normal fault, where a NW oriented, 70 km geodetic baseline records contemporary shortening of ˜2 mm/yr orthogonal to the fault trace. In contrast, our geomorphic, paleoseismic, and geochronologic analyses of the Crescent fault suggest that a large extensional rupture occurred during the late Holocene epoch. An excavation across the fault at Fourmile Canyon reveals that the most recent event occurred at 2.8 ± 0.1 ka, with net vertical tectonic displacement of 4.6 ± 0.4 m at this location, corresponding to the release of ˜3 m of accumulated NW-SE extension. Measured alluvial scarp profiles suggest a minimum rupture length of 30 km along the range front for the event, implying a moment magnitude Mw of at least 6.6. No prior event occurred between ˜2.8 ka and ˜6.4 ± 0.1 ka, the 14C calender age of strata near the base of the exposed section. Assuming typical slip rates for Basin and Range faults (˜0.3 mm/yr), these results imply that up to one third, or ˜1 m, of the extensional strain released in the previous earthquake could have reaccumulated across the fault since ˜2.8 ka. However, the contemporary shortening implies that the fault is unloading due to a transient process, whose duration is limited to between 6 years (geodetic recording time) and 2.8 ka (the age of the most recent event). These results emphasize the importance of providing accurate geologic data on the timescale of the earthquake cycle in order to evaluate geodetic measurements.

  16. 3D seismic analysis of gravity-driven and basement influenced normal fault growth in the deepwater Otway Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, A. G.; King, R. C.; Holford, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    We use three-dimensional (3D) seismic reflection data to analyse the structural style and growth of a normal fault array located at the present-day shelf-edge break and into the deepwater province of the Otway Basin, southern Australia. The Otway Basin is a Late Jurassic to Cenozoic, rift-to-passive margin basin. The seismic reflection data images a NW-SE (128-308) striking, normal fault array, located within Upper Cretaceous clastic sediments and which consists of ten fault segments. The fault array contains two hard-linked fault assemblages, separated by only 2 km in the dip direction. The gravity-driven, down-dip fault assemblage is entirely contained within the 3D seismic survey, is located over a basement plateau and displays growth commencing and terminating during the Campanian-Maastrichtian, with up to 1.45 km of accumulated throw (vertical displacement). The up-dip normal fault assemblage penetrates deeper than the base of the seismic survey, but is interpreted to be partially linked along strike at depth to major basement-involved normal faults that can be observed on regional 2D seismic lines. This fault assemblage displays growth initiating in the Turonian-Santonian and has accumulated up to 1.74 km of throw. Our detailed analysis of the 3D seismic data constraints post-Cenomanian fault growth of both fault assemblages into four evolutionary stages: [1] Turonian-Santonian basement reactivation during crustal extension between Australia and Antarctica. This either caused the upward propagation of basement-involved normal faults or the nucleation of a vertically isolated normal fault array in shallow cover sediments directly above the reactivated basement-involved faults; [2] continued Campanian-Maastrichtian crustal extension and sediment loading eventually created gravitational instability on the basement plateau, nucleating a second, vertically isolated normal fault array in the cover sediments; [3] eventual hard-linkage of fault segments in both fault

  17. Geochemistry, geochronology, and tectonic setting of Early Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the northern segment of the Tan-Lu Fault region, northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yi-Yun; Zhang, Jin-Jiang; Liu, Kai; Ge, Mao-Hui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jia-Min

    2017-08-01

    We present new geochemical and geochronological data for volcanic and related rocks in the regions of the Jia-Yi and Dun-Mi faults, in order to constrain the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the northern segment of the Tan-Lu Fault. Zircon U-Pb dating shows that rhyolite and intermediate-mafic rocks along the southern part of the Jia-Yi Fault formed at 124 and 113 Ma, respectively, whereas the volcanic rocks along the northern parts of the Jia-Yi and Dun-Mi faults formed at 100 Ma. The rhyolite has an A-type granitoid affinity, with high alkalis, low MgO, Ti, and P contents, high rare earth element (REE) contents and Ga/Al ratios, enrichments in large-ion lithophile (LILEs; e.g., Rb, Th, and U) and high-field-strength element (HFSEs; e.g., Nb, Ta, Zr, and Y), and marked negative Eu anomalies. These features indicate that the rhyolites were derived from partial melting of crustal material in an extensional environment. The basaltic rocks are enriched in light REEs and LILEs (e.g., Rb, K, Th, and U), and depleted in heavy REEs, HFSEs (e.g., Nb, Ta, Ti, and P), and Sr. These geochemical characteristics indicate that these rocks are calc-alkaline basalts that formed in an intraplate extensional tectonic setting. The dacite is a medium- to high-K, calc-alkaline, I-type granite that was derived from a mixed source involving both crustal and mantle components in a magmatic arc. Therefore, the volcanic rocks along the Jia-Yi and Dun-Mi faults were formed in an extensional regime at 124-100 Ma (Early Cretaceous), and these faults were extensional strike-slip faults at this time.

  18. Analysis of a conjugate normal fault system caused by subsidence and bulge development within the alpine foreland basin in Bavaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hartmann, Hartwig; Schumacher, Sandra; Tanner, David C.

    2014-05-01

    The Upper Jurassic carbonate platform of the Bavarian Molasse Basin is one of the main targets for the exploration of hydrogeothermal reservoirs in Germany. A 120 sq km large seismic survey was interpreted to map the fault system that is fundamental for the characterization and evaluation of the reservoir. The carbonate platform shows a complex pattern of faults that strike southwest - northeast and west - east, the latter approximately parallel to the Alps front. Faults within the Tertiary infill are more sparsely distributed and form a series of conjugate normal faults with alternating polarity that run across the whole survey. Within the western part of this fault system the main basement fault and the conjugate faults meet near the top of the carbonate platform, thus forming rotated blocks above the crossing. The analysis of fault juxtapostion diagrams show that throw diminishes up- and downwards on the fault planes of the conjugate normal fault. The basal fault tips are offset by more than hundred meters from the corresponding faults within the carbonate platform. Two tectonic phases can be distinguished: The breakup of the platform due to basement subsidence and the formation of the large conjugate normal faults afterwards. The latter maybe the result of intracontinental plate bending that formed a foreland bulge during the collision of the European and the African plate. Such bulge formation is also known i.e. from the collision of the Indian and the Asian plate. The fault pattern of the Upper Jurassic carbonate platform probably triggered the formation of later faults, but their geometry was caused by a different stress field and different rheologies of the Molasse Basin (compared to the carbonate platform). Consequently the fault members of both systems are offset to each other. The interpretation shows a detailed insight into the formation of a fault system within a foreland molasse basin. The decoupling of the covering Molasse sediments and the basement

  19. Was Himalayan normal faulting triggered by initiation of the Ramgarh-Munsiari Thrust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Delores M.; Pearson, Ofori N.

    2013-01-01

    The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is a major orogen-scale fault that extends for more than 1,500 km along strike in the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. The fault can be traced along the Himalayan arc from Himachal Pradesh, India, in the west to eastern Bhutan. The fault is located within the Lesser Himalayan tectonostratigraphic zone, and it translated Paleoproterozoic Lesser Himalayan rocks more than 100 km toward the foreland. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is always located in the proximal footwall of the Main Central thrust. Northern exposures (toward the hinterland) of the thrust sheet occur in the footwall of the Main Central thrust at the base of the high Himalaya, and southern exposures (toward the foreland) occur between the Main Boundary thrust and Greater Himalayan klippen. Although the metamorphic grade of rocks within the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust sheet is not significantly different from that of Greater Himalayan rock in the hanging wall of the overlying Main Central thrust sheet, the tectonostratigraphic origin of the two different thrust sheets is markedly different. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust became active in early Miocene time and acted as the roof thrust for a duplex system within Lesser Himalayan rocks. The process of slip transfer from the Main Central thrust to the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust in early Miocene time and subsequent development of the Lesser Himalayan duplex may have played a role in triggering normal faulting along the South Tibetan Detachment system.

  20. Seismicity in northeast edge of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), activation of an undocumented fault: the Peñamiller earthquake sequence of 2011, Queretaro, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Chavez, A.; Figueroa-Soto, A.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Arroyo, M.; Montiel, M.; Chavez, O.

    2013-02-01

    The Peñamiller town, in the Queretaro state, Mexico is located at the northeast border of the seismogenic zone known as the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), which covers a central fringe of Mexico with east-west orientation. In this town, a sequence of small earthquakes occurred during the end of 2010 and beginning of 2011. Seismicity frequent in of the continental regimen of central Mexico are not common, however, it is known that there are precedents of large earthquakes (Mw magnitude greater than 6.0) occurring in this zone. In order to enrich seismic information, which has not been analyzed nor documented until this moment, is presented this work. This will contribute to gain more insight into the tectonic situation of the central Mexico region. Twenty-four shallow earthquakes records of the Peñamiller, Queretaro seismic sequence of 2011 were recorded by a provisional accelerograph network from the Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro (UAQ). The data were analysed in order to determine the source locations and for the estimation of the source parameters. The study was carried out through an inversion process and by spectral analysis. The results show that the largest earthquake, occurred on 8 February 2011 at 19:53:48.6 UTC, had a moment magnitude Mw = 3.5, and was located at latitude 21.039° and longitude -99.752°, at a depth of 5.6 km. This zone is located less than 7 km away in south-east direction from downtown Peñamiller. The focal mechanisms are mostly normal faults with a small lateral component. This feature is consistent with the extensional regimen of the southern extension of the Basin and Range (BR) province. The source area of the largest event was estimated to have a radius of 0.5 km, which corresponds to a normal fault with azimuth of 174° and an almost pure dip slip; this caused Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) of up to 100 cm s-2 in the horizontal direction. It is evident that the shallow earthquakes induced by crustal faulting can present a

  1. Hypothesis for the mechanics and seismic behaviour of low-angle normal faults: the example of the Altotiberina fault Northern Apennines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Collettini

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Widespread mapping of low-angle normal faults in areas of former continental extension continues to prompt debate as to whether such structures may be seismically active at very low dips (? <30 °in the upper continental crust.The Northern Apennines provide an example where an active low-angle normal fault (Altotiberina fault, ATFcan be studied.A set of commercial seismic reflection profiles plus deep boreholes have been used to constrain the geometry of the fault at depth.These data have been integrated with a microseismic survey showing that part of the microseismicity (M <3.0is consistent with the geometry of the ATF as imaged by depth converted seismic reflection profiles.Frictional fault mechanics under Byerlee ?s friction coefficient and vertical ? 1 (constrained from the inversion of the focal mechanismsdefines the peculiar condition for reactivation of the ATF:small values of differential stress,? 1 ?? 3 <28 MPa,relatively high value of tensile strength of the fault surrounding rocks (T ~10 MPaand tensile fluid overpressure P f >? 3 (i.e.? v >0.93.The short-lived attainment of P f >? 3 along small fault portions,in an area characterised by large amounts of CO2,account for the microseismic activity located along the ATF,which occurs on rupture surfaces in the range of 10 ??10 ? 3 km 2..

  2. Syn-Extensional Constrictional Folding of the Gwoira Rider Block, a Large Fault-Bounded Slice Atop the Mai'iu Low-Angle Normal Fault, Woodlark Rift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, T. A.; Webber, S. M.; Norton, K. P.; Mizera, M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Mai'iu Fault is an active and corrugated low-angle normal fault (LANF) in Woodlark Rift, Eastern Papua New Guinea, which dips 21° NNE, accommodating rapid N-S extension. The Gwoira rider block is a large fault-bounded sedimentary slice comprising the Gwoira Conglomerate, located within a large synformal megamullion in the Mai'iu Fault surface. The Gwoira Conglomerate was originally deposited on the Mai'iu Fault hanging wall concurrent with extension, and has since been buried to a maximum depth of 1600-2100 m (evidenced by vitrinite reflectance data), back-tilted, and synformally folded. Both the Gwoira Conglomerate (former hanging wall) and mylonitic foliation (footwall) of the Mai'iu Fault have been shortened E-W, perpendicular to the extension direction. We show that E-W synformal folding of the Gwoira Conglomerate was concurrent with ongoing sedimentation and extension on the Mai'iu Fault. Structurally shallower Gwoira Conglomerate strata are folded less than deeper strata, indicating that folding was progressively accrued concurrent with N-S extension. We also show that abandonment of the inactive strand of the Mai'iu Fault in favor of the Gwoira Fault, which resulted in formation of the Gwoira rider block, occurred in response to progressive megamullion amplification and resultant misorientation of the inactive strand of the Mai'iu Fault. We attribute E-W folding to extension-perpendicular constriction. This is consistent with observations of outcrop-scale conjugate strike-slip faults that deform the footwall and hanging wall of the Mai'iu Fault, and accommodate E-W shortening. Constrictional folding remains active in the near-surface as evidenced by synformal tilting of inferred Late Quaternary fluvial terraces atop the Gwoira rider block. This sequence of progressive constrictional folding is dated using 26Al/10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of the Gwoira Conglomerate. Finally, because rider block formation records abandonment of the

  3. The Padul normal fault activity constrained by GPS data: Brittle extension orthogonal to folding in the central Betic Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Antonio J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; Borque, Maria Jesús; Sánchez-Alzola, Alberto; Martinez-Martos, Manuel; Alfaro, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    The Padul Fault is located in the Central Betic Cordillera, formed in the framework of the NW-SE Eurasian-African plate convergence. In the Internal Zone, large E-W to NE-SW folds of western Sierra Nevada accommodated the greatest NW-SE shortening and uplift of the cordillera. However, GPS networks reveal a present-day dominant E-W to NE-SW extensional setting at surface. The Padul Fault is the most relevant and best exposed active normal fault that accommodates most of the NE-SW extension of the Central Betics. This WSW-wards dipping fault, formed by several segments of up to 7 km maximum length, favored the uplift of the Sierra Nevada footwall away from the Padul graben hanging wall. A non-permanent GPS network installed in 1999 constrains an average horizontal extensional rate of 0.5 mm/yr in N66°E direction. The fault length suggests that a (maximum) 6 magnitude earthquake may be expected, but the absence of instrumental or historical seismic events would indicate that fault activity occurs at least partially by creep. Striae on fault surfaces evidence normal-sinistral kinematics, suggesting that the Padul Fault may have been a main transfer fault of the westernmost end of the Sierra Nevada antiform. Nevertheless, GPS results evidence: (1) shortening in the Sierra Nevada antiform is in its latest stages, and (2) the present-day fault shows normal with minor oblique dextral displacements. The recent change in Padul fault kinematics will be related to the present-day dominance of the ENE-WSW regional extension versus NNW-SSE shortening that produced the uplift and northwestwards displacement of Sierra Nevada antiform. This region illustrates the importance of heterogeneous brittle extensional tectonics in the latest uplift stages of compressional orogens, as well as the interaction of folding during the development of faults at shallow crustal levels.

  4. The January 25th, 2014 Kebumen earthquake: A normal faulting in subduction zone of Southern Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serhalawan, Yopi Ruben; Sianipar, Dimas; Suardi, Iman

    2017-07-01

    Normal faulting mechanism of earthquake in subduction zone is quite interested to study further. We investigated the Kebumen, January 25, 2014 earthquake sequences by retrieving focal mechanisms using full moment tensor inversion. We used BMKG seismic data from stations in the vicinity of Central Java region for these inversions. Then we correlated the static coulomb stress change by the mainshock to the aftershocks. We found that mainshock is a normal faulting earthquake with nodal plane 1; strike 283, dip 22 and rake -100; nodal plane 2 with strike 113, dip 68 and rake -86. Using distribution analysis of high precision aftershocks after relocated; we considered that the reliable fault plane was nodal plane 1 with strike trending SE-NW. The focal mechanisms provide an estimate of the local stress field in the Wadati-Beniof Zone of Southern Java subduction zone. There is also conclution stating that the mainshock may trigger the aftershocks mainly in three zones, i.e. in continental crustal, upper mantle and on the oceanic slab. This is visually showed that the high quality aftershocks located in positive zones of static coulomb stress change.

  5. Spatio-temporal trends in normal-fault segmentation recorded by low-temperature thermochronology: Livingstone fault scarp, Malawi Rift, East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Estelle; Kirstein, Linda A.; Stuart, Finlay M.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of through-going normal-fault arrays from initial nucleation to growth and subsequent interaction and mechanical linkage is well documented in many extensional provinces. Over time, these processes lead to predictable spatial and temporal variations in the amount and rate of displacement accumulated along strike of individual fault segments, which should be manifested in the patterns of footwall exhumation. Here, we investigate the along-strike and vertical distribution of low-temperature apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) cooling ages along the bounding fault system, the Livingstone fault, of the Karonga Basin of the northern Malawi Rift. The fault evolution and linkage from rift initiation to the present day has been previously constrained through investigations of the hanging wall basin fill. The new cooling ages from the footwall of the Livingstone fault can be related to the adjacent depocentre evolution and across a relay zone between two palaeo-fault segments. Our data are complimented by published apatite fission-track (AFT) data and reveal significant variation in rock cooling history along-strike: the centre of the footwall yields younger cooling ages than the former tips of earlier fault segments that are now linked. This suggests that low-temperature thermochronology can detect fault interactions along strike. That these former segment boundaries are preserved within exhumed footwall rocks is a function of the relatively recent linkage of the system. Our study highlights that changes in AHe (and potentially AFT) ages associated with the along-strike displacement profile can occur over relatively short horizontal distances (of a few kilometres). This is fundamentally important in the assessment of the vertical cooling history of footwalls in extensional systems: temporal differences in the rate of tectonically driven exhumation at a given location along fault strike may be of greater importance in controlling changes in rates of vertical exhumation

  6. Tectonic role of margin-parallel and margin-transverse faults during oblique subduction in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes: Insights from Boundary Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Yonge, A.; Griffith, W. A.; Cembrano, J.; St. Julien, R.; Iturrieta, P.

    2016-09-01

    Obliquely convergent subduction margins develop trench-parallel faults shaping the regional architecture of orogenic belts and partitioning intraplate deformation. However, transverse faults also are common along most orogenic belts and have been largely neglected in slip partitioning analysis. Here we constrain the sense of slip and slip rates of differently oriented faults to assess whether and how transverse faults accommodate plate-margin slip arising from oblique subduction. We implement a forward 3-D boundary element method model of subduction at the Chilean margin evaluating the elastic response of intra-arc faults during different stages of the Andean subduction seismic cycle (SSC). Our model results show that the margin-parallel, NNE striking Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System accommodates dextral-reverse slip during the interseismic period of the SSC, with oblique slip rates ranging between 1 and 7 mm/yr. NW striking faults exhibit sinistral-reverse slip during the interseismic phase of the SSC, displaying a maximum oblique slip of 1.4 mm/yr. ENE striking faults display dextral strike slip, with a slip rate of 0.85 mm/yr. During the SSC coseismic phase, all modeled faults switch their kinematics: NE striking fault become sinistral, whereas NW striking faults are normal dextral. Because coseismic tensile stress changes on NW faults reach 0.6 MPa at 10-15 km depth, it is likely that they can serve as transient magma pathways during this phase of the SSC. Our model challenges the existing paradigm wherein only margin-parallel faults account for slip partitioning: transverse faults are also capable of accommodating a significant amount of plate-boundary slip arising from oblique convergence.

  7. Locating non-volcanic tremor along the San Andreas Fault using a multiple array source imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, C.H.; Fuis, G.S.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Shelly, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Non-volcanic tremor (NVT) has been observed at several subduction zones and at the San Andreas Fault (SAF). Tremor locations are commonly derived by cross-correlating envelope-transformed seismic traces in combination with source-scanning techniques. Recently, they have also been located by using relative relocations with master events, that is low-frequency earthquakes that are part of the tremor; locations are derived by conventional traveltime-based methods. Here we present a method to locate the sources of NVT using an imaging approach for multiple array data. The performance of the method is checked with synthetic tests and the relocation of earthquakes. We also applied the method to tremor occurring near Cholame, California. A set of small-aperture arrays (i.e. an array consisting of arrays) installed around Cholame provided the data set for this study. We observed several tremor episodes and located tremor sources in the vicinity of SAF. During individual tremor episodes, we observed a systematic change of source location, indicating rapid migration of the tremor source along SAF. ?? 2010 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2010 RAS.

  8. Digital Computer Transient Models of Three-Phase Inverter Systems Under Normal and Fault Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawish, Said Abdelhamid Atiya

    In many industrial applications, variable speed drives of electrical machines are needed. This speed control can be met either by dc or ac machines. The ac machines have several distinct advantages compared to dc machines due to the absence of commutators, therefore, a variable -voltage, variable-frequency power supply is normally required for speed control of ac machines. This power supply can be obtained by a dc link converter system that consists of a rectifier and inverter. In this dissertation the waveforms and transient response of a three-phase forced-commutated inverters are simulated on a digital computer from basic circuit theory. Both the voltage source inverter (VSI) and the current source inverter (CSI) are simulated using thyristors with real characteristics. The simulation is further modified to give three-phase currents with adjustable frequency to be used in adjustable speed induction motor drives or the starting of synchronous motors from rest. The digital simulation of Gate Turn-Off (GTO) thyristor inverters feeding an induction motor is presented and can allow for step frequency change for the study of adjustable speed induction motor drives. A naturally-commutated three-phase inverter using thyristors with real characteristics was also simulated to study VSIs and CSIs. The interactions between the load parameters and the inverter circuit parameters are investigated. The parameters studied include ratio of dc voltage to amplitude of ac voltage, ratio of smoothing inductance to load inductance and triggering angle (alpha). Since the naturally-commutated CSI system is widely used in power applications, it was investigated under different types of fault s occurring both on the line and in the inverter circuit. These faults include three-phase short circuits, thyristor failures, line-to-line faults, false triggering and open circuits. A digital computer was used to simulate these faults and the system response because it is difficult to obtain the

  9. Neotectonic development of the El Salvador Fault Zone and implications for deformation in the Central America Volcanic Arc: Insights from 4-D analog modeling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Henar, Jorge; Schreurs, Guido; Martinez-Díaz, José Jesús; Álvarez-Gómez, José Antonio; Villamor, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) is an active, approximately 150 km long and 20 km wide, segmented, dextral strike-slip fault zone within the Central American Volcanic Arc striking N100°E. Although several studies have investigated the surface expression of the ESFZ, little is known about its structure at depth and its kinematic evolution. Structural field data and mapping suggest a phase of extension, at some stage during the evolution of the ESFZ. This phase would explain dip-slip movements on structures that are currently associated with the active, dominantly strike slip and that do not fit with the current tectonic regime. Field observations suggest trenchward migration of the arc. Such an extension and trenchward migration of the volcanic arc could be related to slab rollback of the Cocos plate beneath the Chortis Block during the Miocene/Pliocene. We carried out 4-D analog model experiments to test whether an early phase of extension is required to form the present-day fault pattern in the ESFZ. Our experiments suggest that a two-phase tectonic evolution best explains the ESFZ: an early pure extensional phase linked to a segmented volcanic arc is necessary to form the main structures. This extensional phase is followed by a strike-slip dominated regime, which results in intersegment areas with local transtension and segments with almost pure strike-slip motion. The results of our experiments combined with field data along the Central American Volcanic Arc indicate that the slab rollback intensity beneath the Chortis Block is greater in Nicaragua and decreases westward to Guatemala.

  10. 3D Geometry of Salt Controlled Normal Faults on Friesland Platform - NW Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Kivanc; Kaymakci, Nuretdin; Arda Ozacar, A.

    2010-05-01

    A detailed 3D structural modeling was carried out using the available 3D seismic reflection and borehole data, in order to reveal the structures and deformation history, associated with the dynamic evolution of the Middle-Late Permian age Zechstein salt layer in Northern Friesland - Netherlands. The model includes major structures and seismostratigraphic units of Permian to recent, revealing salt and salt induced structures, formed during the periods of active salt movement in the study area. The model indicates a thick salt layer formed on N-S oriented grabens and half grabens of South Permian Basin that acted as the primary control for the location of salt diapirs and reflected the basement deformation pattern to the cover. A major salt movement was initiated in Triassic, during E-W Mesozoic rifting i.e breaking up of Pangea, evidenced by rim-synclines on Triassic mini-basins. Structurally conformable layers of Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic units overlie Triassic units unconformably by base Cretaceous unconformity, deposited during a tectonic quiescence when salt movement was ceased. A second phase of salt movement took place during the Early Cenozoic that was triggered possily due to the compressional tectonism related to Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary Alpine Orogeny. A final and still ongoing phase is observed in the slightly deformed Neogene and Quaternary units. The model represents a N-S oriented salt cored anticline and a convergent transfer zone between a pair of segmented normal growth faults, controlled by the salt movement. Major faults associated with the transfer zone have assymetrical half graben geometry away from the transfer zone and symmetrical graben structure with small scale synthetic and antithetic faults at the center of the transfer zone. Detailed study of the structural model in 3D with the aid of cross sections, allows the establishment of the architecture of the transfer zone and its relation with the salt deformation process.

  11. Numerical reconstruction of Late-Cenosoic evolution of normal-fault scarps in Baikal Rift Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byzov, Leonid; San'kov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Numerical landscape development modeling has recently become a popular tool in geo-logic and geomorphic investigations. We employed this technique to reconstruct Late-Cenosoic evolution of Baikal Rift Zone mountains. The objects of research were Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland. These structures are formed under conditions of crustal extension and bounded by active normal faults. In our experiments we used instruments, engineered by Greg Tucker (University of Colo-rado) - CHILD (Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development) and 'Bedrock Fault Scarp'. First program allowed constructing the complex landscape model considering tectonic uplift, fluvial and hillslope processes; second program is used for more accurate simulating of triangular facet evolution. In general, our experiments consisted in testing of tectonic parameters, and climatic char-acteristic, erosion and diffusion properties, hydraulic geometry were practically constant except for some special runs. Numerous experiments, with various scenarios of development, showed that Barguzin range and Svyatoy Nos Upland has many common features. These structures characterized by internal differentiation, which appear in height and shape of slopes. At the same time, individual segments of these objects are very similar - this conclusion refers to most developing parts, with pronounced facets and V-shaped valleys. Accordingly modelling, these landscapes are in a steady state and are undergoing a uplift with rate 0,4 mm/yr since Early Pliocene (this solution accords with AFT-dating). Lower segments of Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland also have some general fea-tures, but the reasons of such similarity probably are different. In particular, southern segment of Svyatoy Nos Upland, which characterized by relative high slope with very weak incision, may be formed as result very rapid fault movement or catastrophic landslide. On the other hand, a lower segment of Barguzin Range (Ulun segment, for example

  12. Discrete element modeling of Martian pit crater formation in response to extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Kevin J.; Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Ferrill, David A.

    2011-04-01

    Pit craters, circular to elliptical depressions that lack a raised rim or ejecta deposits, are common on the surface of Mars. Similar structures are also found on Earth, Venus, the Moon, and smaller planetary bodies, including some asteroids. While it is generally accepted that these pits form in response to material drainage into a subsurface void space, the primary mechanism(s) responsible for creating the void is a subject of debate. Previously proposed mechanisms include collapse into lave tubes, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. In this study, we employ two-dimensional discrete element models to assess both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting as mechanisms for forming pit craters. We also examine the effect of mechanical stratigraphy (alternating strong and weak layers) and variation in regolith thickness on pit morphology. Our simulations indicate that both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting are viable mechanisms. Both mechanisms lead to generally convex (steepening downward) slope profiles; extensional fracturing results in generally symmetric pits, whereas dilational normal faulting produces strongly asymmetric geometries. Pit width is established early, whereas pit depth increases later in the deformation history. Inclusion of mechanical stratigraphy results in wider and deeper pits, particularly for the dilational normal faulting, and the presence of strong near-surface layers leads to pits with distinct edges as observed on Mars. The modeling results suggest that a thicker regolith leads to wider but shallower pits that are less distinct and may be more difficult to detect in areas of thick regolith.

  13. Seismic Source Parameters of Normal-Faulting Inslab Earthquakes in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Quetzalcoatl; Singh, Shri Krishna

    2016-08-01

    We studied 62 normal-faulting inslab earthquakes in the Mexican subduction zone with magnitudes in the range of 3.6 ≤ M w ≤ 7.3 and hypocentral depths of 30 ≤ Z ≤ 108 km. We used different methods to estimate source parameters to observe differences in stress drop, corner frequencies, source dimensions, source duration, energy-to-moment ratio, radiated efficiency, and radiated seismic energy. The behavior of these parameters is derived. We found that normal-faulting inslab events have higher radiated seismic energy, energy-to-moment ratio, and stress drop than interplate earthquakes as expected. This may be explained by the mechanism dependence of radiated seismic energy and apparent stress reported in previous source parameter studies. The energy-to-moment ratio data showed large scatter and no trend with seismic moment. The stress drop showed no trend with seismic moment, but an increment with depth. The radiated seismic efficiencies showed similar values to those obtained from interplate events, but higher than near-trench events. We found that the source duration is independent of the depth. We also derived source scaling relationships for the mentioned parameters. The low level of uncertainties for the seismic source parameters and scaling relationships showed that the obtained parameters are robust. Therefore, reliable source parameter estimation can be carried out using the obtained scaling relationships. We also studied regional stress field of normal-faulting inslab events. Heterogeneity exists in the regional stress field, as indicated by individual stress tensor inversions conducted for two different depth intervals ( Z 40 km, respectively). While the maximum stress axis ( σ 1) appears to be consistent and stable, the orientations of the intermediate and minimum stresses ( σ 2 and σ 3) vary over the depth intervals. The stress inversion results showed that the tensional axes are parallel to the dip direction of the subducted plate. At depths

  14. The Sanfandila earthquake sequence of 1998, Queretaro, Mexico: activation of an undocumented fault in the northern edge of central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, F. R.; Pacheco, J. F.; Guzmán-Speziale, M.; Aguirre-Díaz, G. J.; Espíndola, V. H.; Nava, E.

    2003-01-01

    A sequence of small earthquakes occurred in Central Mexico, at the northern edge of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) in the State of Queretaro, during the first 3 months of 1998. Medium to large events in the continental regime of central Mexico are not common, but the seismic history of the region demonstrates that faults there are capable of generating destructive events. The sequence was analyzed using data from a temporary network with the goals of identifying the causative fault and its relation to regional tectonics. Employing a waveform inversion scheme adapted from a method used for regional studies, we found that the source mechanisms conform to the style of faulting (i.e. extension in the E-W direction) representative of the Taxco-San Miguel Allende Fault system. This system has been proposed as the southernmost extension of the Basin and Range (BR) Province. The spatial distribution of hypocenters and source mechanisms indicate that the seismogenic segment was a fault with an azimuth of approximately 334° with almost pure dip slip. Since events which occurred just south from this region show features which are consistent with TMVB tectonics (i.e. extension in an N-S direction), the sequence may mark the boundary between the TMVB and BR stress domains.

  15. Normal fault populations across the Costa Rica margin, NW of the Osa Penninsula, and implications for upper plate stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangs, N. L.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    The upper plate of the Costa Rica subduction zone is dissected by hundreds of normal faults that cut through the uppermost 500 - 1000m of slope sediment cover sequences within the upper slope and outer shelf of the Costa Rica margin. These faults are typically spaced 10s to 100s of m apart and have only small offsets of Cocos Ridge (~75 km to the SE) and the Costa Rica margin (La Femina, et al., 2009). The second set of normal faults strikes east with an azimuth of 85°. This set of faults has a consistent orientation across the shelf and upper slope. This orientation is roughly parallel to the orientation of the subducting basement ridges (78°), which form horst and graben structures on the down going plate. These faults may be a result of uplift and extension as subducting ridges pass underneath. However, beneath the upper slope additional fault populations emerge with dominant azimuths primarily oriented at 5° and 65°. These faults appear to mark the localized extension caused by growth and uplift in the underlying margin wedge. Further, recent movement on shallow thrust faults indicates active shortening of the upper plate. We speculate that the contrast in the variability of fault populations beneath the upper slope and shelf is a result of a change in the competence of upper plate that allows more stress localization within the margin wedge beneath the slope than beneath the shelf. LaFemina, et al. (2009), Fore-arc motion and Cocos Ridge collision in Central America, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 10, Q05S14.

  16. The role of elasticity in normal faulting and the development of axial topography in the oceanic lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J. L.; Behn, M. D.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Ito, G.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we compare 2D numerical simulations of lithospheric extension with and without elasticity in order to investigate its role on the development of normal faults and axial topography at oceanic spreading centers. Specifically, we use a finite difference / marker-in-cell technique to model visco-elasto-plastic (VEP) and visco-plastic (VP) deformation of the lithosphere under extension. Simulated fault zones form spontaneously as the system evolves and the associated strain localization is achieved by reducing the cohesion in proportion to the accumulated plastic strain in regions undergoing yielding. We investigate the development of different fault modes (e.g. growth of multiple faults vs. a single large-offset fault) both in a VP and a VEP lithosphere for a range of lithospheric thicknesses, spreading rates, and rates of cohesion loss. In our simulations, fault-induced bending of a VP lithosphere occurs on a larger wavelength and with less overall vertical deflection than in a VEP lithosphere. Flexural rotation of long-lived, initially steep faults does not require elasticity, but appears to have a strain-rate-dependent wavelength in a VP lithosphere. We find that thinner lithosphere and rapid weakening promote the growth of large-offset faults in both a VEP and a VP lithosphere. The effect of neglecting elasticity appears greater in thicker lithosphere, where a VP rheology favors the growth of multiple steep faults instead of a few large-offset faults. We also note that a VP lithosphere requires more total extension to achieve the same faulting pattern as a VEP lithosphere. This may be due to distributed viscous deformation taking up a portion of the extension in the VP case. To further quantify our numerical results, we develop scaling relations describing the build-up of topographic and bending stresses in a faulted VP lithosphere and compare them to those previously derived for a VEP lithosphere. These relations are then implemented in a force

  17. Continental Rupture Controlled by Low-Angle Normal Faults in the Northern Gulf of California: Analysis of Seismic Reflection Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Barajas, A.; González-Escobar, M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Pacheco, M.; Mar-Hernández, E.

    2010-12-01

    The transition from focused continental extension to the rupture of continental lithosphere is imaged in the northern Gulf of California rift system across the obliquely conjugated Tiburon-Delfin basins. Structural mapping on a 5-20 km grid of seismic reflection lines (48 channels, 6s TWTT) of Petroleos Mexicanos indicates that a large amount of extension and subsidence in the Tiburon basin was accommodated on a NNE-striking pattern of normal faults merging at depth into a detachment fault (here named Angel de la Guarda Detachment or AGD). The main AGD break-away fault is a ~70 km-long, listric fault concave to the southeast, which flattens below 3 seconds (TWTT). This detachment fault juxtaposes the late-Neogene marine sequence over thinned, mostly Mesozoic continental crust. The AGD is bounded at both ends by two major NW-striking, dextral-oblique faults, the Tiburon and De Mar faults that shear the continental crust parallel to the tectonic transport on both margins of the Tiburon basin. Additional, yet undetermined, amount of dextral shear was accommodated in a ~30 to 50 km wide belt adjacent to mainland Sonora along the now inactive eastern margin of the rift. The AGD break-away fault is cut by an array of NE-striking, northwest dipping active normal faults that accommodate oblique extension to the northwest into the Lower and Upper Delfin basins. Both Delfin basins form a broad, tectonically active rombochasm that also contains a ˜7 km-thick late Neogene sedimentary fill largely derived from the Colorado river delta. Intermediate to felsic magmatic intrusions with MORB-type geochemical and isotopic signatures along the western margin of the rift strongly indicate the rupture of the continental lithosphere and formation of an hybrid crust formed by thick sedimentary sequences and magmatic intrusions. We speculate that thermal anomaly caused by the rupture of continental lithosphere in Delfin basins caused footwall uplift of the detachment fault and the intra

  18. Comparison of {gamma}-ray profile across active normal and reverse faults; Seidansogata to gyakudansogata katsudanso ni okeru hoshano tansa kekka no hikaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, A.; Wada, N.; Sumi, H. [Shimada Technical Consultants, Ltd., Shimane (Japan); Yamauchi, S.; Iga, T. [Shimane Univ., Shimane (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Active faults confirmed at trench and outcrop were surveyed by the {gamma}-ray spectrometry. The active fault found at trench is a normal fault, and that found at outcrop is a reverse fault. The {gamma}-ray spectral characteristics of these two types of faults were compared to each other. The normal fault is named as Asagane fault located in Aimi-machi, Saihaku-gun, Tottori prefecture. The reverse fault is named as Yokota reverse fault located in Yokota-cho, Nita-gun, Shimane prefecture. Rises of radon gas indicating the existence of opening cracks were confirmed above the fault for the normal fault, and at the side of thrust block for the reverse fault. It was considered that such characteristics were caused by the difference of fault formation in the tensile stress field and in the compressive stress field. It was also reconfirmed that much more information as to faults can be obtained by the combined exploration method using the total counting method and the spectral method. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Growth Normal Faulting at the Western Edge of the Metropolitan Taipei Basin since the Last Glacial Maximum, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Tung Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth strata analysis is an useful tool in understanding kinematics and the evolution of active faults as well as the close relationship between sedimentation and tectonics. Here we present the Shanchiao Fault as a case study which is an active normal fault responsible for the formation of the 700-m-thick late Quaternary deposits in Taipei Basin at the northern tip of the Taiwan mountain belt. We compiled a sedimentary record, particularly the depositional facies and their dated ages, at three boreholes (SCF-1, SCF-2 and WK-1, from west to east along the Wuku Profile that traverses the Shanchiao Fault at its central segment. By incorporating the global sea level change curve, we find that thickness changes of sediments and changes of depositional environments in the Wuku area are in a good agreement with a rapid sea level rise since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM of about 23 ka. Combining depositional facies changes and their ages with their thickness, we are able to introduce a simple back-stripping method to reconstruct the evolution of growing strata across the Shanchiao Fault since the LGM. We then estimate the vertical tectonic slip rate since 23 ka, which exhibits 2.2 mm yr-1 between SCF-2 and WK-1 and 1.1 mm yr-1 between SCF-1 and SCF-2. We also obtain the Holocene tectonic subsidence rate of 2.3 mm yr-1 at WK-1 and 0.9 mm yr-1 at SCF-2 since 8.4 ka. We thus conclude that the fault zone consists of a high-angle main fault to the east between SCF-2 and WK-1 and a western lower-angle branch fault between SCF-1 and SCF-2, resembling a tulip structure developed under sinistral transtensional tectonism. We find that a short period of 600-yr time span in 9 - 8.4 ka shows important tectonic subsidence of 7.4 and 3.3 m for the main and branch fault, respectively, consistent with possible earthquake events proposed by previous studies during that time. A correlation between geomorphology and subsurface geology in the Shanchiao Fault zone shows

  20. Geology of the Ivanhoe Hg-Au district, northern Nevada: Influence of Miocene volcanism, lakes, and active faulting on epithermal mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The mercury-gold deposits of the Ivanhoe mining district in northern Nevada formed when middle Miocene rhyolitic volcanism and high-angle faulting disrupted a shallow lacustrine environment. Sinter and replacement mercury deposits formed at and near the paleosurface, and disseminated gold deposits and high-grade gold-silver veins formed beneath the hot spring deposits. The lacustrine environment provided abundant meteoric water; the rhyolites heated the water; and the faults, flow units, and lakebeds provided fluid pathways for the hydrothermal fluids. A shallow lake began to develop in the Ivanhoe area about 16.5 Ma. The lake progressively expanded and covered the entire area with fine-grained lacustrine sediments. Lacustrine sedimentation continued to at least 14.4 Ma, and periodic fluctuations in the size and extent of the lake may have been responses to both climate and nearby volcanism. The eruption of rhyolite and andesite flows and domes periodically disrupted the lacustrine environment and produced interfingered flows and lake sediments. The major pulse of rhyolitic volcanism took place between 15.16 ± 0.05 and 14.92 ± 0.05 Ma. High-angle faulting began in the basement about 15.2 Ma, penetrated to and disrupted the paleosurface after 15.10 ± 0.06 Ma, and largely ceased by 14.92 ± 0.05 Ma. Ground motion related to both faulting and volcanism created debris flows and soft-sediment deformation in the lakebeds. Mercury-gold mineralization was coeval with rhyolite volcanism and high-angle faulting, and it took place about 15.2 to 14.9 Ma. At and near the paleosurface, hydrothermal fluids migrated through tuffaceous sediments above relatively impermeable volcanic and Paleozoic units, creating chalcedonic, cinnabar-bearing replacement bodies and sinters. Disseminated gold was deposited in sedimentary and volcanic rocks beneath the mercury deposits, although the hydrologic path between the two ore types is unclear. Higher-grade gold-silver deposits formed in

  1. Evaluation of fault-normal/fault-parallel directions rotated ground motions for response history analysis of an instrumented six-story building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    According to regulatory building codes in United States (for example, 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground-motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of buildings. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak responses of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were obtained for rotation angles ranging from 0° through 180° for evaluating the FN/FP directions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  2. A UNESCO World Heritage nomination for a tectono-volcanic site: advances in the Chaîne des Puy - Limagne Fault project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive-Garcia, Cecile; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The Chaîne des Puys - Limagne fault property is an ensemble of tectonic, volcanic and geomporphic features that described the geological system a rift as the first stages of continental drift. The nomination to UNESCO World Heritage of this site was first reviewed by the World Heritage Committee in 2014. It was referred, requiring complementary information, in light of a very strong disagreement between the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) reporting body and the geological community, as to the real nature of the property (purely volcanic, or a tectono-volcanic ensemble). As part of the WH committee decision, a mission of independent geological experts was invited to review the nomination jointly by France and the IUCN. This is the first time in Geological World Heritage that such an open mission has been organised. The mission took place in October 2015, and an open report was submitted in November 2015. This report confirmed that the original IUCN review of the project lacked the integrated geological nature of the nomination, and concentrated only on limited aspects of the volcanism. The report suggested that the proponents make a restatement of the integrated geological system, that emphasised the inseparable interrelationship of tectonics, volcanism and geomorphological evolution, and to extend the comparative analysis of the property to provide a broader foundation for the nomination. I will describe the upstream process with the IUCN up to the 2015 independent experts' visit, and detail the current process of creating this complementary information for the nomination that will be presented again to UNESCO in July 2016 at the World Heritage Committee meeting in Istanbul.

  3. A numerical modelling approach to investigate the surface processes response to normal fault growth in multi-rift settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlivanidou, Sofia; Cowie, Patience; Finch, Emma; Gawthorpe, Robert; Attal, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    This study uses a numerical modelling approach to explore structural controls on erosional/depositional systems within rifts that are characterized by complex multiphase extensional histories. Multiphase-rift related topography is generated by a 3D discrete element model (Finch et al., Basin Res., 2004) of normal fault growth and is used to drive the landscape evolution model CHILD (Tucker et al., Comput. Geosci., 2001). Fault populations develop spontaneously in the discrete element model and grow by both tip propagation and segment linkage. We conduct a series of experiments to simulate the evolution of the landscape (55x40 km) produced by two extensional phases that differ in the direction and in the amount of extension. In order to isolate the effects of fault propagation on the drainage network development, we conduct experiments where uplift/subsidence rates vary both in space and time as the fault array evolves and compare these results with experiments using a fixed fault array geometry with uplift rate/subsidence rates that vary only spatially. In many cases, areas of sediment deposition become uplifted and vise-versa due to complex elevation changes with respect to sea level as the fault array develops. These changes from subaerial (erosional) to submarine (depositional) processes have implications for sediment volumes and sediment caliber as well as for the sediment routing systems across the rift. We also explore the consequences of changing the angle between the two phases of extension on the depositional systems and we make a comparison with single-phase rift systems. Finally, we discuss the controls of different erodibilities on sediment supply and detachment-limited versus transport-limited end-member models for river erosion. Our results provide insights into the nature and distribution of sediment source areas and the sediment routing in rift systems where pre-existing rift topography and normal fault growth exert a fundamental control on

  4. Weakening mechanisms along Low-Angle Normal Faults in pelagic limestones (Southern Apennine, Italy): insights from microstructural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novellino, R.; Prosser, G.; Viti, C.; Spiess, R.; Agosta, F.; Tavarnelli, E.; Bucci, F.

    2013-12-01

    Low-Angle Normal Faults (LANFs) consist of shallowly-dipping extensional tectonic structures, whose origin relates to a mechanical paradox currently debated by a number of researches. The easy slip along these faults suggests a strain-weakening process active during fault nucleation and growth. Weakening mechanisms may include: i) presence of weak minerals; ii) high fluid pressure which, causing a drastic reduction of the effective stress, and iii) dynamic fault weakening during coseismic rupture. In the Basilicata portion of Southern Apennines, LANFs have been extensively studied by geological mapping and field structural analysis. Differently, a detailed microstructural observations are not hitherto available in the geological literature. For this reason, in this note, we summarize the results of microstructural analysis carried out on fault rock samples collected from a well-exposed mesoscopic LANFs. The present work is aimed at analyzing the weakening mechanisms that took place along the study faults. The incipient study LANFs are characterized by a narrow and discontinuous damage zone surrounding a very thin fault core that include a discrete slip-surface. The offset is in the range of tens of centimeters to few meters. At the microscope scale, the sampled rocks reveal the coexistence of different structural features such as: i) pervasive shape preferred orientation defined by elongated grains of calcite, producing a distinct foliation; ii) Crush Microbreccia (CM), formed of angular clasts locally in contact with each other; iii) several Ultracataclastic Veins (UV), departing from the slip-surfaces and cutting across the slip-zone. TEM investigation reveal the presence of ultrafine to calcite-nanoparticles (dynamic recrystallization. At least, two generation of calcite veins, approximately orthogonal to the slip-surface, show systematic cross-cutting relationships with the above illustrated structural features. Overall, the investigated features form a complex

  5. Stratigraphy of amethyst geode-bearing lavas and fault-block structures of the Entre Rios mining district, Paraná volcanic province, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LÉO A. HARTMANN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Entre Rios mining district produces a large volume of amethyst geodes in underground mines and is part of the world class deposits in the Paraná volcanic province of South America. Two producing basalt flows are numbered 4 and 5 in the lava stratigraphy. A total of seven basalt flows and one rhyodacite flow are present in the district. At the base of the stratigraphy, beginning at the Chapecó river bed, two basalt flows are Esmeralda, low-Ti type. The third flow in the sequence is a rhyodacite, Chapecó type, Guarapuava subtype. Above the rhyodacite flow, four basalt flows are Pitanga, high-Ti type including the two mineralized flows; only the topmost basalt in the stratigraphy is a Paranapanema, intermediate-Ti type. Each individual flow is uniquely identified from its geochemical and gamma-spectrometric properties. The study of several sections in the district allowed for the identification of a fault-block structure. Blocks are elongated NW and the block on the west side of the fault was downthrown. This important structural characterization of the mining district will have significant consequences in the search for new amethyst geode deposits and in the understanding of the evolution of the Paraná volcanic province.

  6. Nucleation, linkage and active propagation of a segmented Quaternary normal-dextral fault: the Loma del Viento fault (Campo de Dalías, Eastern Betic Cordillera, SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrera, Antonio; Marín-Lechado, Carlos; Stich, Daniel; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Rey-Moral, Carmen; de Lis Mancilla, Flor

    2012-02-01

    Active faults from the Campo de Dalías (SE Betic Cordillera) allow us to constrain the deformation styles involved in the development of segmented oblique-slip faults. This sector constitutes the widest outcrop of Plio-Quaternary sediments in the northern boundary of the Alboran Sea. It has emerged since the Late Pliocene, and therefore provides recent deformation markers that are not disturbed by erosive processes. The faults started to grow during the Pleistocene, reactivating previous hybrid joints, with a normal-dextral slip. We present a detailed map of the largest fault in the area, the Loma del Viento fault, comprising six onshore segments. Based on field work and aerial photography, the distributions of the contiguous joints have been mapped, and the joints reactivated as faults are identified. Some of these fault segments are hard-linked, and fault slip enhances toward the linkage sectors between them with associated sedimentary depocenters. An electrical tomography profile reveals the wedge geometry of a unit of Pleistocene conglomerates and red silts that were coevally deposited during the fault movement. Long-term slip rate in the central part of the fault is estimated at 0.07 ± 0.03 mm/y. In addition, a seismic crisis nucleated close to the Loma del Viento fault during November 2010 was recorded. Moment tensor analysis of the two mainshocks (Mw 3.5 and 4.2) provides a focal solution indicating a N120°E striking right-lateral strike-slip fault. The corrugated morphology of the Loma del Viento fault may have influenced its seismic behavior. Some of the fault segments are oblique to the general motion of the fault. These oblique segments would provide higher resistance against the general fault motion and could lock the fault, leading to accumulate elastic energy.

  7. Deep reaching versus vertically restricted Quaternary normal faults: Implications on seismic potential assessment in tectonically active regions: Lessons from the middle Aterno valley fault system, central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcucci, E.; Gori, S.; Moro, M.; Fubelli, G.; Saroli, M.; Chiarabba, C.; Galadini, F.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the Middle Aterno Valley fault system (MAVF), a poorly investigated seismic gap in the central Apennines, adjacent to the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake epicentral area. Geological and paleoseismological analyses revealed that the MAVF evolved through hanging wall splay nucleation, its main segment moving at 0.23-0.34 mm/year since the Middle Pleistocene; the penultimate activation event occurred between 5388-5310 B.C. and 1934-1744 B.C., the last event after 2036-1768 B.C. and just before 1st-2nd century AD. These data define hard linkage (sensu Walsh and Watterson, 1991; Peacock et al., 2000; Walsh et al., 2003, and references therein) with the contiguous Subequana Valley fault segment, able to rupture in large magnitude earthquakes (up to 6.8), that did not rupture since about two millennia. By the joint analysis of geological observations and seismological data acquired during to the 2009 seismic sequence, we derive a picture of the complex structural framework of the area comprised between the MAVF, the Paganica fault (the 2009 earthquake causative fault) and the Gran Sasso Range. This sector is affected by a dense array of few-km long, closely and regularly spaced Quaternary normal fault strands, that are considered as branches of the MAVF northern segment. Our analysis reveals that these structures are downdip confined by a decollement represented by to the presently inactive thrust sheet above the Gran Sasso front limiting their seismogenic potential. Our study highlights the advantage of combining Quaternary geological field analysis with high resolution seismological data to fully unravel the structural setting of regions where subsequent tectonic phases took place and where structural interference plays a key role in influencing the seismotectonic context; this has also inevitably implications for accurately assessing seismic hazard of such structurally complex regions.

  8. Thermal mapping: the hydrothermal system of a volcano used to map faults and palaeostructures within stratified ground. The Yasur-Yenkahe volcanic complex (Vanuatu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin Douillet, Guilhem; Peltier, Aline; Finizola, Anthony; Brothelande, Elodie; Garaebiti, Esline

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface thermal measurements provide a valuable tool to map hydrothermal-fluid release zones in activevolcanic areas. On explosive volcanoes, where ash fall layers deposit parallel to the ground surface, hydrothermal fluids are trapped in the stratification due to the variations in permeability in deposits of the different explosive phases. Thermal fluids thus travel parallel to the surface close to the ground. This horizontal flux can only escape when faults break the seals of stratification. On the Yasur-Yenkahe volcanic complex (Tanna Island, Vanuatu archipelago), fumaroles andhot springs abound, signs of upraising heat fluxes associated to a well-developed hydrothermal activity. Combinationof high resolution mapping of ground thermal anomalies with geomorphological analysis allows thecharacterization of the structural relationships between the active Yasur volcano and the Yenkahe resurgent dome. A complex system of heat release and hydrothermal fluid circulation below the Yasur-Yenkahe complex isevidenced. Circulation, though propagating vertically as a whole, is funneled by stratification. Thus, the main thermal fluid release is almost exclusively concentrated along structural limits that break the seals inducedby the stratified nature of the ground. Three types of medium/high temperature anomalies have beenevidenced: (1) broad hydrothermalized areas linked with planar stratification that favor lateral spreading,(2) linear segments that represent active faults, and (3) arcuate segments related to paleo-crater rims. Thelimit between the Yasur volcano and the Yenkahe resurgent dome is characterized by an active fault systemaccommodating both the rapid uplift of the Yenkahe block and the overloading induced by the volcanoweight. In such a setting, faults converge below the cone of Yasur, which acts as a focus for the faults. Evidenceof such structures, sometimes hidden in the landscape but detected by thermal measurements, iscritical for risk assessment of

  9. Deep postseismic viscoelastic relaxation excited by an intraslab normal fault earthquake in the Chile subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Lidong; Ryder, Isabelle; Métois, Marianne

    2017-08-01

    The 2005 Mw 7.8 Tarapaca earthquake was the result of normal faulting on a west-dipping plane at a depth of 90 km within the subducting slab down-dip of the North Chilean gap that partially ruptured in the 2014 M 8.2 Iquique earthquake. We use Envisat observations of nearly four years of postseismic deformation following the earthquake, together with some survey GPS measurements, to investigate the viscoelastic relaxation response of the surrounding upper mantle to the coseismic stress. We constrain the rheological structure by testing various 3D models, taking into account the vertical and lateral heterogeneities in viscosity that one would expect in a subduction zone environment. A viscosity of 4-8 × 1018 Pa s for the continental mantle asthenosphere fits both InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) and GPS horizontal displacements reasonably well. In order to test whether the Tarapaca earthquake and associated postseismic relaxation could have triggered the 2014 Iquique sequence, we computed the Coulomb stress change induced by the co- and postseismic deformation following the Tarapaca earthquake on the megathrust interface and nodal planes of its M 6.7 foreshock. These static stress calculations show that the Tarapaca earthquake may have an indirect influence on the Iquique earthquake, via loading of the M 6.7 preshock positively. We demonstrate the feasibility of using deep intraslab earthquakes to constrain subduction zone rheology. Continuing geodetic observation following the 2014 Iquique earthquake may further validate the rheological parameters obtained here.

  10. COMPARISON OF COSEISMIC IONOSPHERIC DISTURBANCE WAVEFORMS REVISITED: STRIKE-SLIP, NORMAL, AND REVERSE FAULT EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Nur Cahyadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Using Total Electron Content (TEC measurements with Global Positioning System we studied ionospheric responses to three large earthquakes with difference focal mechanism that occurred in the Sumatra Andaman 26 December 2004, North off Sumatra 11 April 2012, and North Japan 7 December 2012. These earthquakes have different focal mechanisms, i.e. high-angle reverse, strike-slip, and normal faulting, respectively. TEC responses to the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and north Japan 2012 events initiated with positive changes. On the other hand, the initial TEC changes in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake showed both positive and negative polarities depending on the azimuth around the focal area. Such a variety may reflect differences in coseismic vertical crustal displacements, which are dominated by uplift and subsidence in the Sumatra 2012 event. This phenomena has same characteristic with 1994 Kuril Arch earthquake. There are three different propagation velocity in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake, within the first 300 km until 430 km, the CID propagation velocity was ~3 km/s, which is equal to the secod sound speed at the height of the ionospheric F-layer. Starting from 380 km until 750 km out from the epicenter, the disturbance seems to divide into two separate perturbations, with each propagating at a different velocity, about 1 km/s for the one and about 0.4 m/s for the other. The apparent velocity in the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and Japan 2012 propagated ~ 1 km/s and ~ 0.3 km/s, consistent with the sound speed at the ionospheric F layer height and internal gravity wave respectively. Resonant oscillation of TEC with a frequency of ~ 3.7 mHZ and ~4.4 mHz have been found in the Sumatra 2012 and Sumatra Andaman 2004 events. Those earthquakes, which occurred during a period of quiet geomagnetic activity, also showed clear preseismic TEC anomalies similar to those before the 2011 Tohoku-Oki and 2007 Bengkulu earthquake.   The positive anomalies started 30-60 minutes

  11. Global Correlation between the Size of Subduction Earthquakes and the Magnitude of Crustal Normal Fault Aftershocks in the Forearc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, F.; Allmendinger, R. W.; Jensen Siles, E.

    2013-12-01

    Large, shallow reactivations of forearc normal faults, reaching Mw up to 7.0, were some of the notable effects of the 2010, Mw 8.8 Maule and 2011, Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquakes. But how likely are large, upper-plate normal fault aftershocks after a great megathrust event? We use data from the Global CMT catalog to analyze globally the seismicity in forearc regions following all the great subduction ruptures > Mw 7.7, since 1976 (44 events). The intraplate aftershocks selected have hypocentral locations inside the 3D wedge defined by the seismogenic zone of the slab, the rupture extension and the forearc topography. Our search spans the 3 years following the main rupture, to include both the coseismic and post-seismic deformation periods. Within the detection limits of the catalog and with just a few exceptions, most of the megathrust events (~77%) triggered upper-plate normal faulting. More importantly, for any given megathrust the summation of the Mw accounted by the all the forearc events has a positive correlation with the Mw of the subduction earthquake; the larger the megathrust the larger the energy released by forearc earthquakes. Great megathrust events, such as the Maule and Tohoku earthquakes, not only shake the ground and deform elastically the crust; they also leave a permanent deformation mark in the geological record of the upper plate, especially on the forearc above the seismogenic zone. Because the continent is mostly stretched in the direction of the coseismic rebound, this permanent signature is expressed as extensional features, including surface tension cracks and shallow, intraplate normal fault reactivations. Those reactivations tend to occur in structures which strike sub-perpendicular to the maximum coseismic stretching orientation, but the observations show that only some particular faults produced significant aftershocks - not all the properly oriented forearc structures above the megathrust rupture slipped seismically after a single

  12. Diverse, discrete, mantle-derived batches of basalt erupted along a short normal fault zone: The Poison Lake chain, southernmost Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, L.J.P.; Clynne, M.A.; Calvert, A.T.; Champion, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The Poison Lake chain consists of small, monogenetic, calc-alkaline basaltic volcanoes located east of the Cascade arc axis, 30 km ENE of Lassen Peak in northeastern California. This chain consists of 39 distinguishable units in a 14-km-long and 2-kmwide zone trending NNW, parallel to nearby Quaternary normal faults. The 39 units fall into nine coherent groups based on stratigraphy, field characteristics, petrography, and major-element compositions. Petrographic differences among groups are expressed by different amounts and proportions of phenocrysts. MgO-SiO 2, K 2O-SiO 2, and TiO 2-SiO 2 variation diagrams illustrate clear differences in compatible and incompatible elements among the groups. Variation of K 2O/ TiO 2 and K 2O/P 2O 5 with MgO indicates that most of the basalts of the Poison Lake chain cannot be related by crystal fractionation at different pressures and that compositions have not been affected significantly by incorporation of low-degree silicic crustal melt or interaction with sialic crust. Limited traceelement and whole-rock isotopic data also suggest little if any incorporation of uppercrustal material, and that compositional variation among groups primarily reflects source compositional differences. Precise 40Ar/ 39Ar determinations show that the lavas were erupted between 100 and 110 ka. The migration of paleomagnetic remanent directions over 30?? suggests that the entire Poison Lake chain could represent three short-lived episodes of volcanism within a period as brief as 500 yr. The diverse geologic, petrographic, chemical, paleomagnetic, and age data indicate that each of the nine groups represents a small, discrete magma batch generated in the mantle and stored briefly in the lower crust. A NNW normal fault zone provided episodic conduits that allowed rapid ascent of these batches to the surface, where they erupted as distinct volcanic groups, each aligned along a segment of the Poison Lake chain. Compositional diversity of these primitive

  13. A grid side converter current controller for accurate current injection under normal and fault ride through operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadjidemetriou, Lenos; Kyriakides, Elias; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    requirements. In addition, the renewable energy systems require fault ride through capability in order to support the power grid under balanced or unbalanced low voltage grid faults. Therefore, the development of advanced current controller techniques is essential for the grid side power electronic converters...... in order to increase the renewable energy systems penetration and satisfy the grid codes. This paper proposes a current controller technique, which enables the appropriate operation of the grid side converter under unbalanced grid faults and harmonic distorted grid conditions. The proposed current......Modern grid codes for interconnection of distributed energy resources have become more restrictive due to the massive integration of renewable energy sources. The interconnected renewable energy sources must operate accurately under normal and abnormal grid conditions in order to meet the grid...

  14. Recent movements along the Main Boundary Thrust of the Himalayas: Normal faulting in an over-critical thrust wedge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnier, Jean-Louis; Huyghe, Pascale; Chalaron, Edouard; Mascle, Georges

    1994-11-01

    The Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) is one of the major Himalayan thrusts occurring during the Cainozoic, and it is presently incorporated within the Himalayan thrust wedge (Lesser and Outer Himalayas) displaced above the Indian lithosphere. Nonetheless the MBT shows recent normal displacement along most of its length. We suggest that the orientation of the major principal stress within the Himalayan thrust wedge deviates significantly from the horizontal and when this deviation exceeds the dip of the vectors normal to back-tilted thrusts, the normal component of displacement may act along these faults. Steep north-dipping segments of the MBT therefore show a normal component of displacement if a geometrical definition is used, but they are faults in a compressional regime where the major principal stress axis has deviated from the horizontal. Micro-structural data recorded along the Surkhet-Ghorahi segment of the MBT are consistent with a strong deviation of the state of stress. The presence of such peculiar normal faulting along the MBT is used to calibrate the mechanical characteristics of the belt considered as a Coulomb wedge. The following characteristics are suggested: (a) very poor strength contrast between basal decollement and rocks in the wedge body, (b) a high pore fluid pressure ratio (probably close to 0.8-0.9) and a higher fluid pressure ratio (close to 1.0) along the active normal faults if a high internal friction angle (close to the Byerlee value) is considered. The strong deviation in principal stress direction may have recently increased, due to a taper of the Himalayan wedge exceeding the stability boundary and may be controlled by erosion and isostatic uplift rebound of the Himalayan range.

  15. Flow-to-fracture transition in a volcanic mush plug may govern normal eruptions at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, J.; Keller, T.; Cashman, K. V.; Persson, P.-O.

    2016-12-01

    Stromboli is a model volcano for studying eruptions driven by degassing. The current paradigm posits that Strombolian eruptions represent the bursting of gas slugs ascending through melt-filled conduits, but petrological observations show that magma at shallow depth is crystalline enough to form a three-phase plug consisting of crystals, bubbles, and melt. We combine a 1-D model of gas flushing a crystalline mush with a 3-D stress model. Our results suggest that localized gas segregation establishes hot conduits of mobile magma within a stagnant plug. The plug is prone to tensile failure controlled by gas overpressure and tectonic stress, with failure most likely beneath the observed vent locations. We hence argue that Strombolian eruptions are related to plug failure rather than flow. Our proposed three-phase model of the shallow plumbing system may provide a promising framework for integrating geophysical, petrological, and morphological observations at Stromboli and in open-system volcanism more generally.

  16. A reversed hierarchy of active normal faults: the 6 April 2009, Mw 6.3, L'Aquila earthquake (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bonini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between seismogenic slip at depth and surface deformation is fundamental in any seismic hazard analysis because the assessment of the earthquake potential of large continental faults relies largely on field investigations. The well-documented 6 April 2009, Mw 6.3, L'Aquila earthquake affords a unique opportunity to explore the relationships between the activity of the deep source and its surface evidence. We used available high-resolution geologic, geodetic and seismological data aided by analogue modeling to reconstruct the geometry of the seismogenic rupture in relation with surface and sub-surface faults. We contend that the earthquake was caused by a blind fault, controlled at depth by pre-existing discontinuities and expressed at the surface by pseudo-primary breaks resulting from coseismic crustal bending. Finally, we propose a scheme for hierarchizing normal faults that explains all surface occurrences related to blind faulting in the frame of a single, mechanically coherent, interpretative model. Failure to appreciate such complexity may result in severe over– or under-estimation of the local seismogenic potential.

  17. Submarine volcanoes along the Aegean volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Alexandri, Matina; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Rousakis, Grigoris

    2013-06-01

    The Aegean volcanic arc has been investigated along its offshore areas and several submarine volcanic outcrops have been discovered in the last 25 years of research. The basic data including swath bathymetric maps, air-gun profiles, underwater photos and samples analysis have been presented along the four main volcanic groups of the arc. The description concerns: (i) Paphsanias submarine volcano in the Methana group, (ii) three volcanic domes to the east of Antimilos Volcano and hydrothermal activity in southeast Milos in the Milos group, (iii) three volcanic domes east of Christiana and a chain of about twenty volcanic domes and craters in the Kolumbo zone northeast of Santorini in the Santorini group and (iv) several volcanic domes and a volcanic caldera together with very deep slopes of several volcanic islands in the Nisyros group. The tectonic structure of the volcanic centers is described and related to the geometry of the arc and the neotectonic graben structures that usually host them. The NE-SW direction is dominant in the Santorini and Nisyros volcanic groups, located at the eastern part of the arc, where strike-slip is also present, whereas NW-SE direction dominates in Milos and Methana at the western part, where co-existence of E-W disrupting normal faults is observed. The volcanic relief reaches 1100-1200 m in most cases. This is produced from the outcrops of the volcanic centers emerging usually at 400-600 m depth and ending either below sea level or at high altitudes of 600-700 m on the islands. Hydrothermal activity at relatively high temperatures observed in Kolumbo is remarkable whereas low temperature phenomena have been detected in the Santorini caldera around Kameni islands and in the area southeast of Milos. In Methana and Nisyros, hydrothermal activity seems to be limited in the coastal areas without other offshore manifestations.

  18. Structural characteristics of middle and southern Xainza-Dinggye Normal Fault System and its relationship to Southern Tibetan Detachment System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Xainza-Dinggye Normal Fault System (XDNFS) is a large-scale nearly-north-south trending extensional structure across central and southern Tibet. Its middle segment developed in Tethys Himalaya with features of earlier magmatic core complex and later normal faults dipping moderately to northwest-west. The magmatic core complex is made up by mylonitic leucogrante with a low-angle detachment fault on the top of it and overlain by lower-grade meta-sedimentary rocks. The structural pattern of the southern segment of XDNFS take the shape of a detachment fault dipping to southeast-east with the High-Himalayan rock series as the lower plate. The Southern Tibetan Detachment System (STDS) is expressed as a ductile shear zone composed of mylonitic leucogranite in the studied area of this note. STDS was cut by the later XDNFS, which presents that nearly-east-west striking STDS is not the controlling or adjusting structure of the nearly-north-south trending extensional structures. The origin of nearly-north-south trending extensional structures in Tibet may be the result of deformational partition of north-south compression.

  19. Evidence of multi-stage faulting by clay mineral analysis: Example in a normal fault zone affecting arkosic sandstones (Annot sandstones)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buatier, Martine D.; Cavailhes, Thibault; Charpentier, Delphine; Lerat, Jérémy; Sizun, Jean Pierre; Labaume, Pierre; Gout, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Fault affecting silicoclastic sediments are commonly enriched in clay minerals. Clays are sensitive to fluid-rock interactions and deformation mechanisms; in this paper, they are used as proxy for fault activity and behavior. The present study focuses on clay mineral assemblages from the Point Vert normal fault zone located in the Annot sandstones, a Priabonian-Rupelian turbidite succession of the Alpine foredeep in SE France. In this area, the Annot sandstones were buried around 6-8 km below the front of Alpine nappes soon after their deposition and exhumed during the middle-late Miocene. The fault affects arkosic sandstone beds alternating with pelitic layers, and displays throw of about thirty meters. The fault core zone comprises intensely foliated sandstones bounding a corridor of gouge about 20 cm thick. The foliated sandstones display clay concentration along S-C structures characterized by dissolution of K-feldspar and their replacement by mica, associated with quartz pressure solution, intense microfracturation and quartz vein precipitation. The gouge is formed by a clayey matrix containing fragments of foliated sandstones and pelites. However, a detailed petrographical investigation suggests complex polyphase deformation processes. Optical and SEM observations show that the clay minerals fraction of all studied rocks (pelites and sandstones from the damage and core zones of the fault) is dominated by white micas and chlorite. These minerals have two different origins: detrital and newly-formed. Detrital micas are identified by their larger shape and their chemical composition with a lower Fe-Mg content than the newly-formed white micas. In the foliated sandstones, newly-formed white micas are concentrated along S-C structures or replace K-feldspar. Both types of newly formed micas display the same chemical composition confirmed microstructural observations suggesting that they formed in the same conditions. They have the following structural formulas: Na0

  20. Investigating the Spatial Extent of a Barely Prehistoric Earthquake on the Bear River Normal Fault, Wyoming and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, S.; Schwartz, D. P.; Cinti, F. R.; Civico, R.; West, M. W.; Stoller, A. R.; DeLong, S.; Pickering, A.

    2016-12-01

    To better constrain the length of a young prehistoric (significantly post-AD 1630) surface-rupturing earthquake recently discovered near the south end of the Bear River normal fault in Utah (Hecker and Schwartz, 2015), we excavated a trench on a strand of the fault 25 km to the north in Wyoming, where previous work had found clear evidence of two older late Holocene events (West, 1993). These two events, which have been identified to the south as well, were interpreted as comprising the entire history of this very young fault. The new trench across the 5-m-high scarp at the northern site exposed a 6-m-wide zone of faulting and two packages of colluvial-wedge deposits, each tabular and 0.5-1 m thick. The colluvial deposits, which bury Pleistocene alluvial deposits that in turn overlie Eocene bedrock, appear correlative with West's two-event stratigraphy. In the latest trench, however, both wedges are faulted, with strands extending to the ground surface, evidence of a third, younger event. The amount of displacement in the most recent event (MRE) in the trench is small (few 10s of cm at most) and distributed and has resulted in only minor colluviation. The event record is complicated by a shallow slope failure in the soil A-horizon on the scarp that we interpret as possibly occurring during the MRE. The slide formed a head scarp at a location underlain by MRE faulting and built a low bench at least 100 m long on the surface below the scarp. We sampled buried in-place soil below the slide for radiocarbon analysis, which should allow age comparison with the earthquake identified farther south. Ultra-high-resolution topography from balloon photography and terrestrial lidar enable detailed morphologic study of surface processes and deformation at the site.

  1. The effects of pre-existing discontinuities on the surface expression of normal faults: Insights from wet-clay analog modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Burrato, Pierfrancesco; Seno, Silvio; Valensise, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    We use wet-clay analog models to investigate how pre-existing discontinuities (i.e. structures inherited from previous tectonic phases) affect the evolution of a normal fault at the Earth's surface. To this end we first perform a series of three reference experiments driven by a 45° dipping master fault unaffected by pre-existing discontinuities to generate a mechanically isotropic learning set of models. We then replicate the experiment six times introducing a 60°-dipping precut in the clay cake, each time with a different attitude and orientation with respect to an initially-blind, 45°-dipping, master normal fault. In all experiments the precut intersects the vertical projection of the master fault halfway between the center and the right-hand lateral tip. All other conditions are identical for all seven models. By comparing the results obtained from the mechanically isotropic experiments with results from experiments with precuts we find that the surface evolution of the normal fault varies depending on the precut orientation. In most cases the parameters of newly-forming faults are strongly influenced. The largest influence is exerted by synthetic and antithetic discontinuities trending respectively at 30° and 45° from the strike of the master fault, whereas a synthetic discontinuity at 60° and an antithetic discontinuity at 30° show moderate influence. Little influence is exerted by a synthetic discontinuity at 45° and an antithetic discontinuity at 60° from the strike of the master fault. We provide a ranking chart to assess fault-to-discontinuity interactions with respect to essential surface fault descriptors, such as segmentation, vertical-displacement profile, maximum displacement, and length, often used as proxies to infer fault properties at depth. Considering a single descriptor, the amount of deviation induced by different precuts varies from case to case in a rather unpredictable fashion. Multiple observables should be taken into

  2. Magma influence on propagation of normal faults: Evidence from cumulative slip profiles along Dabbahu-Manda-Hararo rift segment (Afar, Ethiopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Klinger, Yann; Socquet, Anne; Doubre, Cécile; Jacques, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Measuring displacement-length profiles along normal faults provides crucial information on fault growth processes. Here, based on satellite imagery and topography we analyze 357 normal faults distributed along the active rift of Dabbahu-Manda-Hararo (DMH), Afar, which offers a unique opportunity to investigate the influence of magmatism on fault growth processes. Our measurements reveal a large variety of slip profiles that are not consistent with elastic deformation. Their analysis contributes towards a better understanding of the lateral propagation of faults, especially when nucleation points and existence of barriers are included. Using the fault growth model of Manighetti et al. (2001), we determine the preferred direction of lateral propagation for each fault. Our results suggest that lateral propagation of faults is easier away from areas where magma has been stored for long time at crustal depth, and has thus modified the thermo-mechanical properties of the host-rock. However, these areas correspond also to areas where the initiation of fault growth appears as easiest along the rift. In combining these results with the analysis of rift width and the position of magma reservoirs along DMH rift, we show that fault growth keeps track of the magma presence and/or movement in the crust.

  3. Deformation mechanisms, architecture, and petrophysical properties of large normal faults in platform carbonates and their role in the release of carbon dioxide from earth's interior in central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Fabrizio

    2006-04-01

    A challenging theme of research in structural geology is the process of faulting in carbonate rocks: how do the resulting internal architecture and petrophysical properties of faults affect subsurface fluid flow. A better understanding of this process is important to evaluate the potential oil and gas recovery from carbonate reservoirs, and to plan CO 2 containment in the depleted reservoirs. Carbonate rocks may deform with different mechanisms depending primarily on their original sedimentary fabric, diagenetic history, fluid content, and tectonic environment. In this dissertation I investigate the deformation mechanisms, petrophysics, and internal fluid composition of large, seismic, basin-bounding normal faults in low porosity platform carbonates. Based on the nature, orientation, and abutting relationships of the structural elements preserved within the faults and in the surrounding carbonate host rocks, I was able to characterize the mechanisms of fault growth and the fault architecture. Incipient faulting occurred at shallow depths by sequential formation and shearing of pressure solution seams and joints/veins; with ongoing deformation and exhumation, the joint-based mechanism became predominant. The end result is a mature normal fault that juxtaposes basin sedimentary rocks of the hanging wall against deformed carbonates of the footwall. The deformed carbonates of the fault footwalls are composed of rocks with low porosity and permeability and major slip surfaces in the fault core, and fragmented carbonate matrices with high porosity and permeability, and small faults in the damage zone. The degree of fragmentation in the damage zone generally increases towards the fault hanging wall, forming structural domains characterized by different deformation intensity. The rocks of the fault core have sub-spherical pores, those of the damage zone have elongated, crack-like, pores. The permeability structure of the normal fault zones is therefore made up of a fault

  4. Induced seismicity of a normal blind undetected reservoir-bounding fault influenced by dissymmetric fractured damage zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, J.

    2014-04-01

    Fluid injection in deep sedimentary porous formations might induce shear reactivation of reservoir bounding faults. Here, we focus on `blind' 1000-m-long normal faults (with shear displacement ≤10 m), which can hardly be detected using conventional seismic surveys, but might potentially induce seismicity felt on surface. The influence of the dissymmetry in the internal structure of the fractured damage zone DZ is numerically investigated by using 2-D plane-strain finite-element simulations of a 1500-m-deep fluid injection into a porous reservoir. The problem is solved within the framework of fully saturated isothermal elasto-plastic porous media by both accounting for fault slip weakening and shear-induced degradation of fault core permeability. The numerical results show that the presence of a thick fractured hanging wall's DZ (with Young's modulus decreasing with the distance to the fault core due to the presence of fractures) strongly controls the magnitude M of the seismic event induced by the rupture. In the case modelled, M changed by more than 1.0 unit when the DZ thickness is varied from 5 to 50 m (M ranges from ˜0.1 to ˜1.5, i.e. from a `low' to a `low-to-moderate' seismicity activity). However, further extending DZ up to 90 m has little effect and the relationship reaches a quasi-horizontal plateau. This tendency is confirmed considering other initial conditions and injection scenarios. Finally, the presence of a thicker footwall DZ appears to lower the influence of hanging wall's DZ, but with lesser impact than the degree of fracturing.

  5. The Chaîne des Puys and Limagne Fault World Heritage project: a global partnership for raising the profile of monogenetic volcanism and rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive-Garcia, C.

    2013-12-01

    The present Chaîne des Puys and Limagne Fault World Heritage project represents a global partnership for raising the profile of monogenetic volcanism and rifting. From the 19th Century the Chaîne des Puys and Limagne Fault have been at the centre of discussion about the nature of volcanoes, and the origin of rifts. Part of this interest was due to the action of landowners and government agents such as Montlosier and Desmarest (who first realised that the chain were volcanoes), and national leaders such as Napoleon I, who was instrumental in the visit of Humphrey Davey and Michael Farady in 1805. The chain features largely in Scrope's 'Considerations on v olcanoes' 1825, and of Bonney's 'Volcanoes their structure and significance' of 1899. The fault escarpment is discussed at length by Lyell in Principles of Geology (1830), although they did not recognise it yet as a rift. The area has seen the development of a modern scientific-government-private partnership in geoscience research and education that has developed in parallel with the growth of a earth science centre of excellence, now the Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans. In addition, local owners and users have taken an important part in the development of this partnership to help create a sustainable management of the area. Partnerships have been developed with other sites around the world to share best practice, especially in managing inhabited natural sites. For over 30 years the area has been part of the evolving Auvergne Region Natural Volcano Park, for five years the central Puy de Dôme is a 'Grande site de France', equivalent to a national monument. Educational attractions grew up first as private - scientific partnerships (e.g. Lemptégy, Volvic, Maison de la Pierre) and then with greater public input like Vulcania and the Puy de Dome. The channelling of visitors has been accomplished by improved access by bus, and a new cog-railway up the Puy de Dôme. I present an overview of the UNESCO project, and show

  6. Initiation of a Low-Angle Normal Fault Active Across the Upper Brittle-Plastic Transition, Chemehuevi Mountains, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaForge, J.; John, B. E.; Grimes, C. B.; Stunitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Chemehuevi detachment fault system, part of the regionally developed Colorado River extensional corridor, hosts exceptional exposures of a denuded fault system related to Miocene extension. Here, we characterize the early history of extension associated with a small slip (1-2 km) low-angle normal fault, the Mohave Wash fault (MWF), initially active across the brittle-plastic transition. Strain localized in three principal ways across the 23-km down-dip exposure (T 400°C): a brittle fault zone, localized, disseminated quartz mylonites, and syntectonic dikes hosting mylonitic fabrics. Brittle deformation in these crystalline rocks was concentrated into a 10-62-m thick brittle fault zone hosting localized, unmineralized to chlorite-epidote-quartz mineralized zones of cataclasite series fault rocks ≤3 m thick and rare pseudotachylite. Mylonitic deformation played an increased role in deformation down dip (NE), with mylonites increasing in quantity and average thickness. At shallow structural levels, footwall mylonites are absent; at 9-18 km down dip, cm-scale quartz mylonites are common; ≥18 km down dip, meter-scale syntectonic intermediate-felsic dikes are mylonitic, are attenuated into parallelism with the MWF, and host well-developed L-S fabric; 23 km down dip, the footwall hosts meter-thick zones of disseminated mylonitic quartz of varying intensities. These mylonites host microstructures that record progressively higher deformation temperature down dip, with dislocation-creep in quartz indicative of T of 280-400°C to ≥500°C, and diffusion creep with grain boundary sliding in dikes suggestive of even higher T deformation. Dike emplacement in the system is syntectonic with MWF slip; mafic-intermediate composition dikes intruded damage zone fractures and cataclasites, and were in turn fractured; Pb/U zircon ages of intermediate-felsic dikes range from ca. 1.5 ± 1 Ma to 3.8 ± 1 Ma after the onset of regional extension, but predate rapid slip. Cross

  7. Coseismic Pit Crater, Normal Fault, and Extensional Fissure Formation in Unconsolidated Sediment and Basalt in Northern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrill, D. A.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Smart, K. J.

    2008-12-01

    Two rifting-related seismic events in 1975 and 1978 along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the northern coast of Iceland produced an array of surface deformation features in Holocene basalt flows and overlying unconsolidated sediments. New field mapping and aerial photograph interpretation is coupled with analysis of maps of seismic activity and level-line survey results to constrain the timing, style, and magnitude of this deformation. Fault scarps and fissures in basalts can be traced laterally down a gentle northward dip projecting into unconsolidated braided stream deposits, providing an impressive view of the deformation style in the two contrasting mechanical layers. We report on detailed field mapping of two of these laterally traceable structures conducted in the summer of 2008 and analysis of a suite of aerial photographs from 1958 to 1998. Map-scale structures in the basalts with little or no sedimentary cover include (i) fault scarps, (ii) fissures, and (iii) locally-developed gentle dip away from the related normal fault. Dilation of faults and extension fractures in the basalt has led to rock toppling and rock fall causing widening of fissures. Wedging of toppled rock blocks at the tops of fissures has locally produced keystone arches and bridges across the tops of open fissures. Different stages in the progression of fissure formation and collapse, including (i) fissure, (ii) widened fissure with cavern, (iii) localized collapse pit, and (iv) elongate collapsed fissure, can be observed over along-strike distances of 10's of meters. Where unconsolidated sand and gravel deposits >3 m thick cover the basalts (200 m to the north along strike) structural geomorphologic features are dominated by (i) grabens, (ii) pit craters, and (iii) elongate troughs. Graben-bounding normal faults cutting the sedimentary cover in many cases have displacements >1 m. Pit craters have cone to bowl shapes, commonly occur within grabens, and have depths up to 2.8 m. The mapped

  8. Bimodal volcanism in a tectonic transfer zone: Evidence for tectonically controlled magmatism in the southern Central Andes, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinovic, I. A.; Riller, U.; Brod, J. A.; Alvarado, G.; Arnosio, M.

    2006-04-01

    This field-based and analytical laboratory study focuses on the genetic relationship between bimodal volcanic centres and fault types of an important tectonic transfer zone in the southern Central Andes, the NW-SE striking Calama-Olacapato-Toro (COT) volcanic belt. More specifically, tectono-magmatic relationships are examined for the 0.55 Ma Tocomar, the 0.78 Ma San Jerónimo and the 0.45 Ma Negro de Chorrillos volcanic centres in the Tocomar area (66°30 W-24°15 S). Structures of the COT volcanic belt, notably NW-SE striking strike-slip faults and NE-SW trending normal faults, accommodated differential shortening between major N-S striking thrust faults on the Puna Plateau. We present evidence that bimodal volcanism was contemporaneous with activity of these fault types in the COT volcanic belt, whereby eruption and composition of the volcanic rocks in the Tocomar and San Jerónimo-Negro de Chorrillos areas appear to have been controlled by the kinematics of individual faults. More specifically, rhyolitic centres such as the Tocomar are associated with normal faults, whereas shoshonitic-andesitic monogenetic volcanoes, e.g., the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos centres, formed at strike-slip dominated faults. Thus, the eruption of higher viscous rhyolite magmas appears to have been facilitated in tectonic settings characterized by horizontal dilation whereas ascent and effusive volcanic activity of less viscous and hot basaltic andesites to shoshonites were controlled by subvertical strike-slip faults. While the Tocomar rhyolites are interpreted to be derived from an anatectic crustal source, geochemical characteristics of the San Jerónimo and Negro de Chorrillos shoshonitic andesites are in agreement with a deeper source. This suggests that the composition of erupted volcanic rocks as well as their spatial distribution in the Tocomar area is controlled by the activity of specific fault types. Such volcano-tectonic relationships are also evident from older

  9. Probable slow slips in the mid-crust of Hsinchu, northwestern Taiwan: Temporal correlation between normal faulting earthquakes and relative uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, H. C.; Lin, C. H.

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the seismic behavior of crustal deformation, we deployed a dense seismic network at the Hsinchu area of northwestern Taiwan during the period between 2004 and 2006. Based on abundant local micro-earthquakes recorded at this seismic network, we have successfully determined 274 focal mechanisms among ∼1300 seismic events. It is very interesting to see that the dominant energy of both seismic strike-slip and normal faulting mechanisms repeatedly alternated with each other within two years. Also, the strike-slip and normal faulting earthquakes were largely accompanied with the surface slipping along N60°E and uplifting obtained from the continuous GPS data, individually. Those phenomena were probably resulted by the slow uplifts at the mid-crust beneath the northwestern Taiwan area. As the deep slow uplift was active below 10 km in depth along either the boundary fault or blind fault, the push of the uplifting material would simultaneously produce both of the normal faulting earthquakes in the shallow depths (0-10 km) and the slight surface uplifting. As the deep slow uplift was stop, instead, the strike-slip faulting earthquakes would be dominated as usual due to strongly horizontal plate convergence in the Taiwan. Since the normal faulting earthquakes repeatedly dominated in every 6 or 7 months between 2004 and 2006, it may conclude that slow slip events in the mid crust were frequent to release accumulated tectonic stress in the Hsinchu area.

  10. Submarine earthquake rupture, active faulting and volcanism along the major Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone and implications for seismic hazard assessment in the Patagonian Andes Ruptura sísmica submarina, tectónica y volcanismo activo a lo largo de la Falla Liquiñe-Ofqui e implicancias para el peligro sísmico en los Andes patagónicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vargas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Liquiñe-Ofqui fault zone (LOFZ in the Patagonian Andes is an active major transpressional intra-arc fault system along which Quaternary faulting and volcanism develop. Subaerial and submarine geomorphologic and structural characterization of latest Pleistocene-Holocene faults and monogenetic volcanoes allows us to assess geological cartography of active faults and the kinematic model for recent tectonics during postglacial times, since 12,000 cal. years BP. This allows increasing the basic geological knowledge necessary for determining the seismic hazard associated with cortical structures in the Aysén region in southern Chile. Fault cartography and field observations suggest dominant dextral-reverse strike slip along north-south and locally NNW-striking faults, dextral-normal strike slip along NE to NNE- striking faults, and sinistral strike slip along east-west faults. This kinematics is consistent with regional SW-NE shortening in the context of a major transpressional fault zone. Holocene and even historic monogenetic and sub-aquatic volcanism occurred in this tectonic setting in a close spatial relationship and probably favored by the activity and local architecture of faults. Submarine fault scarps and deformed sediments observed at the bottom of the Aysén Fjord were associated with the destructive April 2007 Mw6.2 earthquake located along the LOFZ. Our observations show that this earthquake occurred along dextral 15-20 km long N-S structure named Punta Cola Fault (PCF. This fault system is located some kilometres to the east of the main N-S Río Cuervo Fault (RCF. Most of the epicentres of the seismic swarm during 2007 were located along or in between both structures. The study area is a transference zone between N-S regional branches of the LOFZ. The cartography of fault segments proposed here together with geophysical and geologic data suggest that large earthquakes Mw6.2-6.5 can be typically expected along most of the active

  11. 徐家围子断陷火山机构类型及其地质指示意义%Volcanic Edifice Types of Xujiaweizi Fault and Their Geological Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王翔飞; 周鑫; 孟德福; 李刚

    2012-01-01

    Qingshen gas field exploration and development shows that isolated volcanic edifice control volcanic gas reservoir. Horizontal distribution of volcanic bodies and their projections become difficulties of volcanic exploration and development. Fine comparative study of volcanic formation of Yingcheng group of XJWZ fault is carried out, find that volcanic eruption control by the deep fault and have the feature of horizontal migration and vertical polycyclic superimposed. Volcanic edifice into the layer-shaped volcano, flat-shaped volcano, skew volcano, lava dome, caldera volcano five categories based on the geophysical response characteristics and their implications. Layer-shaped volcano and skew volcano shows that large-scale volcanic eruption along the tectonic fault zone and the eruption and extensive development of large areas of volcanic lava and pyroclastic rocks interbedded strata, these formation constitute main volcanic body of Yingcheng group. Volcanic edifice misfolding contiguous and volcanic reservoir developed. Flat-shaped volcano shows the strong weathering and erosion, weathering crust reservoir development and can form high volcanic gas reservoirs. Caldera and lava dome indicate the locality of volcanic activity. Caldera volcano is fast instant release of energy and formed large pyroclastic deposits, and mainly developed in tight reservoir. Volcanic lava dome is a product of late, relatively good reservoir, but small.%庆深气田的勘探开发实践表明,火山岩气藏呈现出以孤立火山机构控藏的特征.火山机构的横向分布规律及其预测成为火山岩勘探开发的难点.在徐家围子断陷营城组开展了精细的火山岩地层结构对比研究,发现火山喷发受深大断裂控制,具有横向迁移和纵向多旋回叠置的特征.根据火山机构的地球物理响应特征及其地质指示意义,将火山机构分为层状火山、平状火山、歪斜火山、熔岩穹窿、破火山五大类.层状火山和

  12. A fractal theory approach to the initial examination of normal faulting in Central Corinthian Gulf, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. KONDYLAKIS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An application of fractal theory in geological formations in the central Corinthian Gulf, Greece, is presented in an attempt to study the nature of presently active deformation. Fault patterns are approximated under the perspective of fractal theory concept, leading to the conclusion that fractal approach can be considered valid for the region of study. Nevertheless, homogeneity may be expected with the reservation that there are no considerable changes in the viscosities of the ductile layers in the region, so that the characteristic exponent b+1-a is less than zero.

  13. The 2014 Mw6.2 Eketahuna earthquake, Hikurangi subduction zone - normal faulting in the subducted Pacific Plate crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, R. E.; Bannister, S. C.; Francois-Holden, C.; Hamling, I. J.; Ristau, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 January 20th M6.2 Eketahuna earthquake occurred in the subducted crust of the Pacific plate at the Hikurangi subduction zone, beneath North Island, New Zealand. Moment tensor analysis together with aftershock relocations show that this event was an oblique-normal faulting intraplate event, with hypocentre depth ca.30 km, and with rupture on a northwest-dipping fault extending through the subducted crust up to the subduction megathrust at ca.18-20 km depth. More than 3500 aftershocks were subsequently recorded by the New Zealand GeoNet network, with only minor migration of the aftershocks away from the inferred mainshock rupture, and with very few aftershocks within +/- 1 km of the subduction megathrust. The megathrust in this particular region is inferred to be interseismically locked with no seismic or aseismic slip, although slow slip is occurring ca.15-30 km down-dip (Wallace et al, 2013). Similar oblique-normal faulting events have previously occurred along the Hikurangi subduction margin, including in 1985 (ML5.7) and 1990 (Mw6.2). Earlier earthquakes in 1942 (Mw6.8) and 1921 (Mw6.8) are also inferred to have occurred at a similar depth within the subducted crust. The 1990 earthquake sequence occurred ~40 km along-strike from the 2014 Eketahuna event, and involved a Mw6.2 oblique-normal faulting event in the subducted crust, which was quickly followed by a Mw6.4 event in the overlying crust, with both thrust and dextral strike-slip components, possibly responding to deeper aseismic slip. Deeper earthquakes of similar type at other subduction margins are thought to be high stress drop. We calculate the stress drops of the mainshock and larger aftershocks, using a direct wave, empirical Green's function (EGF) approach that includes measurement uncertainties and objective criteria for assessing the quality of each spectral ratio (Abercrombie, 2013). We compare the results to those for earthquakes in other tectonic regions of New Zealand, calculated using

  14. Supra-salt normal fault growth during the rise and fall of a diapir: Perspectives from 3D seismic reflection data, Norwegian North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvedt, Anette B. M.; Rotevatn, Atle; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.

    2016-10-01

    Normal faulting and the deep subsurface flow of salt are key processes controlling the structural development of many salt-bearing sedimentary basins. However, our detailed understanding of the spatial and temporal relationship between normal faulting and salt movement is poor due to a lack of natural examples constraining their geometric and kinematic relationship in three-dimensions. To improve our understanding of these processes, we here use 3D seismic reflection and borehole data from the Egersund Basin, offshore Norway, to determine the structure and growth of a normal fault array formed during the birth, growth and decay of an array of salt structures. We show that the fault array and salt structures developed in response to: (i) Late Triassic-to-Middle Jurassic extension, which involved thick-skinned, sub-salt and thin-skinned supra-salt faulting with the latter driving reactive diapirism; (ii) Early Cretaceous extensional collapse of the walls; and (iii) Jurassic-to-Neogene, active and passive diapirism, which was at least partly coeval with and occurred along-strike from areas of reactive diapirism and wall collapse. Our study supports physical model predictions, showcasing a three-dimensional example of how protracted, multiphase salt diapirism can influence the structure and growth of normal fault arrays.

  15. Gently dipping normal faults identified with Space Shuttle radar topography data in central Sulawesi, Indonesia, and some implications for fault mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Space-shuttle radar topography data from central Sulawesi, Indonesia, reveal two corrugated, domal landforms, covering hundreds to thousands of square kilometers, that are bounded to the north by an abrupt transition to typical hilly to mountainous topography. These domal landforms are readily interpreted as metamorphic core complexes, an interpretation consistent with a single previous field study, and the abrupt northward transition in topographic style is interpreted as marking the trace of two extensional detachment faults that are active or were recently active. Fault dip, as determined by the slope of exhumed fault footwalls, ranges from 4?? to 18??. Application of critical-taper theory to fault dip and hanging-wall surface slope, and to similar data from several other active or recently active core complexes, suggests a theoretical limit of three degrees for detachment-fault dip. This result appears to conflict with the dearth of seismological evidence for slip on faults dipping less than ~. 30??. The convex-upward form of the gently dipping fault footwalls, however, allows for greater fault dip at depths of earthquake initiation and dominant energy release. Thus, there may be no conflict between seismological and mapping studies for this class of faults. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Backarc tectonism, volcanism, and mass wasting shape seafloor morphology in the Santorini-Christiana-Amorgos region of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Toomey, Douglas R.; Lampridou, Danai; Getz, Claire; Christopoulou, Maria-Eleni; O'Hara, Daniel; Arnoux, Gillean M.; Bodmer, Miles; Gray, Melissa; Heath, Benjamin A.; VanderBeek, Brandon P.

    2017-08-01

    In subduction zone backarcs, extensional deformation and arc volcanism interact and these processes, together with mass wasting, shape the seafloor morphology. We present a new bathymetric map of the Santorini-Christiana-Amorgos backarc region of the Hellenic subduction zone by merging high-resolution multibeam swath data from the R/V Langseth PROTEUS seismic experiment with existing maps. The map together with Knudsen subbottom echosounding profiles reveal that recent tectonism, volcanism, and mass wasting are more prevalent in the Santorini-Amorgos region on the east side of Santorini than in the Christiana Basin on the west side. In the Santorini-Amorgos region, large normal faults form the Anydros and Anafi Basins. Where normal fault segments overlap, two nearby accommodation zones generate a relay ramp and the adjoining Anydros synclinal horst with associated complex faulting and elevated seismicity. The ongoing normal faulting in the Santorini-Amorgos region is accompanied by potentially tsunamigenic submarine landsliding; we identified a large submarine landslide along the Santorini-Amorgos Fault and a smaller landslide with an overlying debris chute along the Amorgos Fault. Volcanic activity is also focused in this eastern region along the Kolumbo lineament within the Anydros Basin. Within the Christiana Basin we discovered the Proteus Knoll and adjacent buried edifice. We suggest that this is an older volcanic edifice formed along the Hellenic Volcanic Arc between Santorini and Milos. Around Santorini itself, features formed during, and immediately after, the Late Bronze Age eruption dominate the seafloor morphology such as the northern strait and wrinkled seafloor pyroclastic flow deposits. This topography is continually reshaped at a smaller scale by ongoing mass wasting. We infer that the earthquake, volcanic, and tsunami activity of the Santorini-Amorgos region is a consequence of focused northwest-southeast extension as the southeastern Aegean moves

  17. 3-D palinspastic restoration of normal faults in the Inner Moray Firth: implications for extensional basin development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, David

    1985-10-01

    Balanced cross-section techniques, and the construction of a restored section, permit 2-dimensional palinspastic restorations to be made in both compressional and extensional terraines. In 3 dimensions, an equivalent restoration can be made by assuming conservation of bedding-plane area and considering the volume of a stratigraphic interval rather than its cross-sectional area. Extensional basins displaying upper crustal listric normal faulting are particularly amenable to this approach. Computerised 3-D restorations have been made of the Inner Moray Firth basin, offshore Scotland. This basin is not isostatically compensated, and was produced by 7-8% post-Triassic extension, of which 2.5-3% is post-Jurassic, above a detachment surface at 20-25 km depth, close to the base of the crust. Limited lower crustal thinning (and lithospheric stretching) has affected the eastern part of the basin, but this can account for no more than half of the measured upper crustal extension. Some of this shallow extension is probably coupled by low-angle faults or shear zones into major zones of lithospheric stretching such as the North Sea grabens, where it may help account for discrepancies between estimates of lithospheric thinning and upper crustal extension.

  18. Preliminary Results on the Mechanics of the Active Mai'iu Low Angle Normal Fault (Dayman Dome), Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, T. A.; Boulton, C. J.; Mizera, M.; Webber, S. M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.; Norton, K. P.; Wallace, L. M.; Biemiller, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid slip on the Mai'iu low-angle normal fault (LANF) has exhumed a smooth, corrugated fault surface contiguous for >24 km up-dip, rising from near sea level to ~2900 m. The fault emerges from the ground dipping ~21° N and flattens over the crest of the dome to dip south. Geomorphic analysis reveals a progressive back-tilting of the surface during exhumation accompanied by cross-cutting antithetic-sense high-angle faults—features that we attribute to "rolling-hinge" deformation of a once more steeply-dipping fault. Near the scarp base, the footwall exposes mafic mylonites that deformed at ~400-450°C. The younger Mai'iu fault cross-cuts this ductile mylonite zone, with most brittle slip being localized into a ~20 cm-thick, gouge-filled core. Near the range front, active faults bite across both the hangingwall and footwall of the Mai'iu fault and record overprinting across a dying, shallow (<~1 km deep) part of the fault by more optimally oriented, steeper faults. Such depth-dependent locking up of the fault suggests it weakens primarily by friction reduction rather than cohesion loss. Outcrop-scale fractures in the exhumed footwall reflect formation in an Andersonian stress regime. Previous campaign GPS data suggest the fault slips at up to ~1 cm/yr. To improve resolution and test for aseismic creep, we installed 12 GPS sites across the fault trace in 2015. Quantitative XRD indicates the gouges were derived primarily from mafic footwall, containing up to 65% corrensite and saponite. Hydrothermal friction experiments on two gouges from a relict LANF strand were done at varying normal stresses (30-120 MPa), temperatures (50-200oC), and sliding velocities (0.3-100 μm/s). Results reveal very weak frictional strength (μ=0.13-0.15 and 0.20-0.28) and velocity-strengthening behavior conducive to fault creep. At the highest temperatures (T≥150oC) and lowest sliding velocities (<3 μm/s), a transition to velocity-weakening behavior indicates the potential for

  19. Structural significance of the south Tyrrhenian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiosi, G.; Musacchio, G.; Ventura, G.; de Astis, G.

    2003-04-01

    The southern part of the Tyrrhenian Sea represents a transition from ocenic- (the Tyrrhenian Sea) to continental-domain (the Calabrian Arc) and is affected by active calkalkaline to potassic volcanism (the Eolian Islands). Active extensional tectonics, coupled with the general upwelling of northern Sicily and Calabria continental crust, coexists with active subduction of the Ionian Plate beneath the Calabrian Arc. This has been interpreted as the result of the detachment of the slab beneath the Calbrian Arc. Present-day tectonics is characterized by NE-SW normal faults and NNW- SSE dextral oblique-slip faults. The normal faults form the major peri- Tyrrhenian basins. Refraction and high resolution onshore-offshore wide-angle-reflection profiles, as well as potential field modeling, provide a 3D image of the Moho. Short wave-length undulations characterize the Moho beneath the Aeolian Arch. The major upraise is about 6 km, beneath the Aeolian active volcanic area, and affects all the crustal boundaries. Another sharp crustal thinning is observed beneath the gulf of Patti at the south-eastern edge of the Tyrrhenian basin. We suggest that the graben-like structure, occurring along the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano islands and oriented at high angles to the trench, is lithospheric and can be followed down to Moho depths. NNW-SSE dextral oblique-slip faults, like the Tindari Letojanni fault system, control the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano portion of the Aeolian volcanism and connect the oceanic crust of the Marsili Basin to the Malta Escarpment, through the Etna volcano. Across this lineament seismicity changes from mostly shallow to the west, to deep intra- slab to the east.

  20. Diatreme-forming volcanism in a deep-water faulted basin margin: Lower Cretaceous outcrops from the Basque-Cantabrian Basin, western Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, L. M.; Sarrionandia, F.; Carracedo-Sánchez, M.

    2017-05-01

    Deep-water diatremes and related eruption products are rare and they have been mainly interpreted from seismic-based data. We present lithofacies and geochemistry analysis of two Lower Cretaceous (Albian) deep-water diatremes and associated extra-diatreme volcaniclastic deposits at a well-exposed outcrop of the northern margin of the Basque-Cantabrian Basin (north Iberia). The studied diatremes are located along a N-S trending Albian fault and present sub-circular to elongate sections, inward-dipping steep walls and smooth to very irregular contacts with the host rocks. They are filled by un-bedded mixed breccias constituted by juvenile and lithic (sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic) clasts. Their textural and structural characteristics indicate that they represent lower diatreme and root zones of the volcanic system. Mapping, geochemical and petrologic data from diatreme-fills support their genetic relationship with the extra-diatreme volcaniclastic beds, which would be generated by the eruption of an incipiently vesicular trachytic magma. Studied diatremes result from multiple explosions that lasted over an estimated period of 65 k.y. during the Late Albian (H. varicosum ammonite Zone, pro parte), and reached up to a maximum subsurface depth of ca. 370 m, whereas extra-diatreme volcaniclastic beds were formed by eruption-fed gravity-driven flows on the deep-water (200-500 m) paleoseabed. Petrological features suggest that these diatremes and related extra-diatreme deposits resulted mainly from phreatomagmatic explosions. In addition, organic geochemistry data indicate that the thermal effect of the trachytic melts on the sedimentary host caused the conversion of the abundant organic matter to methane and CO2 gases, which could also contribute significantly to the overpressure necessary for the explosive fragmentation of the magma and the host rocks. Considering the inferred confining pressures (ca. 8-11 MPa) and the possible participation of unvesiculated (or

  1. Low Angle Normal Fault System Controls the Structure Evolution of Baiyun Deepwater Basin and Its Lithosphere Thinning, Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Ren, J.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the transition area from ~30 km to weakly thinned continental crust (<12 km) in Baiyun deepwater basin, Northern South China Sea leads to two questions: What controls extreme crustal thinning and what is the nature of Baiyun basin. The 3D seismic data newly acquired show that Baiyun basin is an asymmetric half graben mainly controlled by a set of north-dipping normal faults converging in deep. By employing the principle of back-stripping, we estimate the fault dips and slip amount would be in the absence of post-rift sediments and seawater loading. Results show these Middle Eocene faults were extremely active, with a high accumulation horizontal displacement (> 10 km) and an initial very low angle (<7°), followed by a rotated into sub-horizontal. A general scenario for extension of the uppermost continental crust probably includes simultaneous operation of low angle normal fault (F1) as well as parallel arrays of step-faults (domino-faults, f2-f9). Under such a scenario, it shows no obvious extension discrepancy in Baiyun basin. Our results indicate that Baiyun sag preserves information recording the continent thinning before the seafloor spreading, and it could be an abandoned inner rifted basin.

  2. Software for determining the direction of movement, shear and normal stresses of a fault under a determined stress state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez del Castillo, Alejandra; Alaniz-Álvarez, Susana Alicia; Nieto-Samaniego, Angel Francisco; Xu, Shunshan; Ochoa-González, Gil Humberto; Velasquillo-Martínez, Luis Germán

    2017-07-01

    In the oil, gas and geothermal industry, the extraction or the input of fluids induces changes in the stress field of the reservoir, if the in-situ stress state of a fault plane is sufficiently disturbed, a fault may slip and can trigger fluid leakage or the reservoir might fracture and become damaged. The goal of the SSLIPO 1.0 software is to obtain data that can reduce the risk of affecting the stability of wellbores. The input data are the magnitudes of the three principal stresses and their orientation in geographic coordinates. The output data are the slip direction of a fracture in geographic coordinates, and its normal (σn) and shear (τ) stresses resolved on a single or multiple fracture planes. With this information, it is possible to calculate the slip tendency (τ/σn) and the propensity to open a fracture that is inversely proportional to σn. This software could analyze any compressional stress system, even non-Andersonian. An example is given from an oilfield in southern Mexico, in a region that contains fractures formed in three events of deformation. In the example SSLIPO 1.0 was used to determine in which deformation event the oil migrated. SSLIPO 1.0 is an open code application developed in MATLAB. The URL to obtain the source code and to download SSLIPO 1.0 are: http://www.geociencias.unam.mx/ alaniz/main_code.txt, http://www.geociencias.unam.mx/ alaniz/ SSLIPO_pkg.exe.

  3. Modeling the Effects of a Normal-Stress-Dependent State Variable, Within the Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Framework, at Stepovers and Dip-Slip Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kenny J.; Oglesby, David D.

    2017-03-01

    The development of the rate- and state-dependent friction framework (Dieterich Appl Geophys 116:790-806, 1978; J Geophys Res 84, 2161-2168, 1979; Ruina Friction laws and instabilities: a quasistatic analysis of some dry friction behavior, Ph.D. Thesis, Brown Univ., Providence, R.I., 1980; J Geophys Res 88:10359-10370, 1983) includes the dependence of friction coefficient on normal stress (Linker and Dieterich J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992); however, a direct dependence of the friction law on time-varying normal stress in dynamic stepover and dip-slip fault models has not yet been extensively explored. Using rate- and state-dependent friction laws and a 2-D dynamic finite element code (Barall J Int 178, 845-859, 2009), we investigate the effect of the Linker-Dieterich dependence of state variable on normal stress at stepovers and dip-slip faults, where normal stress should not be constant with time (e.g., Harris and Day J Geophys Res 98:4461-4472, 1993; Nielsen Geophys Res Lett 25:125-128, 1998). Specifically, we use the relation d ψ/d t = -( α/ σ)(d σ/d t) from Linker and Dieterich (J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992), in which a change in normal stress leads to a change in state variable of the opposite sign. We investigate a range of values for alpha, which scales the impact of the normal stress change on state, from 0 to 0.5 (laboratory values range from 0.2 to 0.56). For stepovers, we find that adding normal-stress dependence to the state variable delays or stops re-nucleation on the secondary fault segment when compared to normal-stress-independent state evolution. This inhibition of jumping rupture is due to the fact that re-nucleation along the secondary segment occurs in areas of decreased normal stress in both compressional and dilational stepovers. However, the magnitude of such an effect differs between dilational and compressional systems. Additionally, it is well known that the asymmetric geometry of reverse and normal faults can lead to greater

  4. Seismicity at the northeast edge of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB and activation of an undocumented fault: the Peñamiller earthquake sequence of 2010–2011, Querétaro, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Clemente-Chavez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The town of Peñamiller in the state of Querétaro, Mexico, is located at the northeast border of the seismogenic zone known as the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB, which transects the central part of Mexico with an east–west orientation. In the vicinity of this town, a sequence of small earthquakes occurred during the end of 2010 and beginning of 2011. Seismicity in the continental regimen of central Mexico is not too frequent; however, it is known that there are precedents of large earthquakes (Mw magnitude greater than 6.0 occurring in this zone. Three large earthquakes have occurred in the past 100 yr: the 19 November 1912 (MS = 7.0, the 3 January 1920 (MS = 6.4, and the 29 June 1935 (MS = 6.9 earthquakes. Prior to the instrumental period, the earthquake of 11 February 1875, which took place near the city of Guadalajara, caused widespread damage. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the available seismic information of this region. This will help advance our understanding of the tectonic situation of the central Mexico MVB region. Twenty-four shallow earthquakes of the Peñamiller seismic sequence of 2011 were recorded by a temporary accelerograph network installed by the Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro (UAQ. The data were analyzed in order to determine the source locations and to estimate the source parameters. The study was carried out through an inversion process and by spectral analysis. The results show that the largest earthquake occurred on 8 February 2011 at 19:53:48.6 UTC, had a moment magnitude Mw = 3.5, and was located at latitude 21.039° and longitude −99.752°, at a depth of 5.6 km. This location is less than 7 km away in a south-east direction from downtown Peñamiller. The focal mechanisms are mostly normal faults with small lateral components. These focal mechanisms are consistent with the extensional regimen of the southern extension of the Basin and Range (BR province. The source area of the largest event was

  5. Seismicity at the northeast edge of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) and activation of an undocumented fault: the Peñamiller earthquake sequence of 2010-2011, Querétaro, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Chavez, A.; Figueroa-Soto, A.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Arroyo, M.; Montiel, M.; Chavez, O.

    2013-10-01

    The town of Peñamiller in the state of Querétaro, Mexico, is located at the northeast border of the seismogenic zone known as the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), which transects the central part of Mexico with an east-west orientation. In the vicinity of this town, a sequence of small earthquakes occurred during the end of 2010 and beginning of 2011. Seismicity in the continental regimen of central Mexico is not too frequent; however, it is known that there are precedents of large earthquakes (Mw magnitude greater than 6.0) occurring in this zone. Three large earthquakes have occurred in the past 100 yr: the 19 November 1912 (MS = 7.0), the 3 January 1920 (MS = 6.4), and the 29 June 1935 (MS = 6.9) earthquakes. Prior to the instrumental period, the earthquake of 11 February 1875, which took place near the city of Guadalajara, caused widespread damage. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the available seismic information of this region. This will help advance our understanding of the tectonic situation of the central Mexico MVB region. Twenty-four shallow earthquakes of the Peñamiller seismic sequence of 2011 were recorded by a temporary accelerograph network installed by the Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro (UAQ). The data were analyzed in order to determine the source locations and to estimate the source parameters. The study was carried out through an inversion process and by spectral analysis. The results show that the largest earthquake occurred on 8 February 2011 at 19:53:48.6 UTC, had a moment magnitude Mw = 3.5, and was located at latitude 21.039° and longitude -99.752°, at a depth of 5.6 km. This location is less than 7 km away in a south-east direction from downtown Peñamiller. The focal mechanisms are mostly normal faults with small lateral components. These focal mechanisms are consistent with the extensional regimen of the southern extension of the Basin and Range (BR) province. The source area of the largest event was estimated to

  6. Role of low angle normal faulting and basement thrusting on the structural architecture of the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molli, Giancarlo; Carlini, Mirko; Vescovi, Paolo; Artoni, Andrea; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Camurri, Francesca; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Torelli, Luigi

    2017-04-01

    The Northern Apennines of Italy are a classical site for studying fundamental issues in thrust wedges, such as ophiolite formation and emplacement, interplay between tectonics and sedimentation, role of out-of-sequence thrusting, syn-orogenic versus post-orogenic extension, along strike segmentation, etc. Accordingly, the Northern Apennines have been extensively studied since more than two centuries ago. Despite the huge amount of available data with different resolution, a 3D comprehensive regional view combining in a modern framework all available surface and subsurface information for contiguous sectors of the chain is still lacking. We performed such an attempt in the area framed between the Taro valley to the north and the northern termination of the Alpi Apuane to the south. The region includes the main morphostructural zones of the North-West Apennines from the Tyrrhenian coast West-Northwest of La Spezia, through the main topographic divide of the Apennines, to the external frontal part of the chain. The area has been investigated through a multidisciplinary approach that integrated: 1) surface geological data collected during the last two decades of structural and stratigraphic field works in the internal as well as external sectors of the chain; 2) subsurface geological data including: a) interpretation of 1200 Km of seismic reflection profiles tied to surface geology and b) analysis of 39 boreholes stratigraphies. The construction of two regional NE-SW trending cross-sections (the Levanto-Pontremoli-Parma to the North and the La Spezia-Sarzana-North Apuane-Cerreto to the South), connected by the NW-SE trending Taro River-Lunigiana Area-Alpi Apuane composite section, allowed us to illustrate (i) the role of out-of-sequence blind thrusting in the basement, (ii) the presence of low angle normal faulting and its relationships with recent to active high angle normal faulting. Both extensional and contractional systems have relevant implications for the

  7. Intersection patterns of normal faults in the Lufeng Sag of Pearl River Mouth Basin, China: Insights from 4D physical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fusheng; Koyi, Hemin; Zhang, Xiangtao

    2016-12-01

    Interpretation of seismic data from the Lufeng Sag of the Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB) in the northern part of South China Sea shows that different intersection patterns developed in the cover units above basement normal faults. A series of analogue models are used to investigate the intersection patterns and deformation in the sedimentary cover sequences above a basement horst bounded by two non-parallel faults. Modelling results show that during their upward propagation, the basement faults may intersect within the cover sequences and form a graben above the basement horst. Length and width of the graben increase with cover thickness. The strike and dip intersection points are controlled directly by the thickness of the cover sequences, dip and strike of the basement faults, and width of the basement horst. The intersection point migrates along the axis of the graben toward the wide end of the basement horst, when the cover sequence thickens. In contrast, it migrates toward the narrow end of the basement horst, where both fault dip and angle of strike difference increase. The intersection point moves upward with increasing width of the basement horst crest. Model profiles also indicate that in the presence of a ductile layer between the cover and basement such intersection patterns do not form. Interpretation of seismic data and model results show that the intersection pattern developed in the Lufeng Sag is a result of propagation of basement faults into cover units during different extension stages of the basin. Results of this study can be applied to many other sedimentary basins where such fault intersection patterns are likely to form when non-parallel conjugate basement faults are active during sedimentation.

  8. Armenia-To Trans-Boundary Fault: AN Example of International Cooperation in the Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakhanyan, A.; Avagyan, A.; Avanesyan, M.; Elashvili, M.; Godoladze, T.; Javakishvili, Z.; Korzhenkov, A.; Philip, S.; Vergino, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of a trans-boundary active fault that cuts through the border of Armenia to Georgia in the area of the Javakheti volcanic highland have been conducted since 2007. The studies have been implemented based on the ISTC 1418 and NATO SfP 983284 Projects. The Javakheti Fault is oriented to the north-northwest and consists of individual segments displaying clear left-stepping trend. Fault mechanism is represented by right-lateral strike-slip with normal-fault component. The fault formed distinct scarps, deforming young volcanic and glacial sediments. The maximum-size displacements are recorded in the central part of the fault and range up to 150-200 m by normal fault and 700-900 m by right-lateral strike-slip fault. On both flanks, fault scarps have younger appearance, and displacement size there decreases to tens of meters. Fault length is 80 km, suggesting that maximum fault magnitude is estimated at 7.3 according to the Wells and Coppersmith (1994) relation. Many minor earthquakes and a few stronger events (1088, Mw=6.4, 1899 Mw=6.4, 1912, Mw=6.4 and 1925, Mw=5.6) are associated with the fault. In 2011/2012, we conducted paleoseismological and archeoseismological studies of the fault. By two paleoseismological trenches were excavated in the central part of the fault, and on its northern and southern flanks. The trenches enabled recording at least three strong ancient earthquakes. Presently, results of radiocarbon age estimations of those events are expected. The Javakheti Fault may pose considerable seismic hazard for trans-boundary areas of Armenia and Georgia as its northern flank is located at the distance of 15 km from the Baku-Ceyhan pipeline.

  9. Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Daniel [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Geothermal plays in extensional and transtensional tectonic environments have long been a major target in the exploration of geothermal resources and the Dixie Valley area has served as a classic natural laboratory for this type of geothermal plays. In recent years, the interactions between normal faults and strike-slip faults, acting either as strain relay zones have attracted significant interest in geothermal exploration as they commonly result in fault-controlled dilational corners with enhanced fracture permeability and thus have the potential to host blind geothermal prospects. Structural ambiguity, complications in fault linkage, etc. often make the selection for geothermal exploration drilling targets complicated and risky. Though simplistic, the three main ingredients of a viable utility-grade geothermal resource are heat, fluids, and permeability. Our new geological mapping and fault kinematic analysis derived a structural model suggest a two-stage structural evolution with (a) middle Miocene N -S trending normal faults (faults cutting across the modern range), - and tiling Olio-Miocene volcanic and sedimentary sequences (similar in style to East Range and S Stillwater Range). NE-trending range-front normal faulting initiated during the Pliocene and are both truncating N-S trending normal faults and reactivating some former normal faults in a right-lateral fashion. Thus the two main fundamental differences to previous structural models are (1) N-S trending faults are pre-existing middle Miocene normal faults and (2) these faults are reactivated in a right-later fashion (NOT left-lateral) and kinematically linked to the younger NE-trending range-bounding normal faults (Pliocene in age). More importantly, this study provides the first constraints on transient fluid flow through the novel application of apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and 4He/3He thermochronometry in the geothermally active Dixie Valley area in Nevada.

  10. Geomorphological evidence of the influence of pre-volcanic basement structure on emplacement and deformation of volcanic edifices at the Cofre de Perote Pico de Orizaba chain and implications for avalanche generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Dimas, Aline; Cerca, Mariano; Rodríguez, Sergio R.; Watters, Robert J.

    2005-12-01

    Pre-volcanic structure of the basement influences volcanism distribution and avalanche generation in volcanic edifices. Therefore, systematic studies of basement structure below volcanic chains are necessary to understand the deformation effects observed in the surface and vice versa. Based on a compilation of pre-existing data, interpretation of aerial photographs and satellite images, and a collection of structural data we analyzed morphological and structural features of the Cofre de Perote-Pico de Orizaba (CP-PO) volcanic chain and its basement. We have identified three sets of regional lineaments that are related to basement trends. (1) NW 55° SE fractures are parallel to anticline folds observed in Cretaceous rocks that originated during Laramide shortening. These folds present an abrupt morphology observed only in the eastern flank but that is likely to continue below the volcanic chain. (2) NE 55° SW fractures are parallel to normal faults at the basement. We infer that these basement faults confine the CP-PO chain within a stepped graben with a total normal displacement of about 400 m. These faults have been active through time since they have affected volcanic deposits and induced the emplacement of monogenetic vents. Notably, lineaments of monogenetic vents concentrate where the basement is relatively shallow. (3) Another set of faults, oriented N-S, has been observed affecting the scarce basement outcrops at the western flank of the chain covered by lacustrine deposits. Lineaments measured in the volcanic edifice of Pico de Orizaba correlate with the regional trends. In particular, the NE 55° SW alignment of monogenetic vents and fractures at Pico de Orizaba suggest that the same dike trend exists within the volcanic edifice. A normal fault with similar orientation was documented at the NE continuation of an alignment crossing the volcanic edifice along the Jamapa canyon. In the absence of magmatic activity related to collapses, the displacement of

  11. Exotic lamproites or normal ultrapotassic rocks? The Late Miocene volcanic rocks from Kef Hahouner, NE Algeria, in the frame of the circum-Mediterranean lamproites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustrino, Michele; Agostini, Samuele; Chalal, Youcef; Fedele, Lorenzo; Stagno, Vincenzo; Colombi, Francesco; Bouguerra, Abdellah

    2016-11-01

    The late Miocene (11-9 Ma) volcanic rocks of Kef Hahouner, 40 km NE of Constantine (NE Algeria), are commonly classified as lamproites in literature. However, these rocks are characterized by an anhydrous paragenesis with plagioclase and Mg-rich olivine phenocrysts, set in a groundmass made up of feldspars, pyroxenes and opaque minerals. Thus, we classify the Kef Hahouner rocks as ultrapotassic shoshonites and latites, having K2O > 3 wt.%, K2O/Na2O > 2.5, MgO > 3-4 wt.%, SiO2 < 55-57 wt.% and SiO2/K2O < 15. All the investigated samples show primitive mantle-normalized multi-element patterns typical of orogenic (arc-type) magmas, i.e. enriched in LILE (e.g. Cs, Rb and Ba) and LREE (e.g. La/Yb = 37-59) with respect to the HFSE, peaks at Pb and troughs at Nb and Ta. Initial isotopic ratios are in the range of 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70874-0.70961, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51222-0.51223, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.54-18.60, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.62-15.70 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.88-39.16. The Kef Hahouner volcanic rocks show multi-element patterns similar to the other circum-Mediterranean lamproites and extreme Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions. Nevertheless, the abundant plagioclase, the presence of Al-rich augite coupled with high Al2O3 whole rock compositions (9.6-21.4 wt.%), and the absence of phlogopite are all at inconsistent with the definition of lamproite. We reviewed the rocks classified as lamproites worldwide, and found that many of these rocks, as for the Kef Hahouner samples, should be actually defined as "normal" potassic to ultrapotassic volcanic rocks. Even the grouping of lamproites into "orogenic" and "anorogenic" types appears questionable.

  12. Imaging normal faults in alluvial fans using geophysical techniques: Field example from the coast of Gulf of Aqaba, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-08-05

    In this work we use geophysical methods to locate and characterize active faults in alluvial sediments. Since only subtle material and velocity contrasts are expected across the faults, we used seismic refraction tomography and 2D resistivity imaging to locate the fault. One seismic profile and one 2D resistivity profile are collected at an alluvial fan on the Gulf of Aqaba coast in Saudi Arabia. The collected data are inverted to generate the traveltime tomogram and the electric resistivity tomogram (ERT). A low velocity anomaly is shown on the traveltime tomogram indicates the colluvial wedge associated with the fault. The location of the fault is shown on the ERT as a vertical high resistivity anomaly.

  13. 3D modelling of the active normal fault network in the Apulian Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean Sea): Integration of seismic and bathymetric data with implicit surface methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Pellegrini, Caludio; Savini, Alessandra; Marchese, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Apulian ridge (North-eastern Ionian Sea, Mediterranean), interposed between the facing Apennines and Hellenides subduction zones (to the west and east respectively), is characterized by thick cretaceous carbonatic sequences and discontinuous tertiary deposits crosscut by a penetrative network of NNW-SSE normal faults. These are exposed onshore in Puglia, and are well represented offshore in a dataset composed of 2D seismics and wells collected by oil companies from the '60s to the '80s, more recent seismics collected during research projects in the '90s, recent very high resolution seismics (VHRS - Sparker and Chirp-sonar data), multibeam echosounder bathymetry, and sedimentological and geo-chronological analyses of sediment samples collected on the seabed. Faults are evident in 2D seismics at all scales, and their along-strike geometry and continuity can be characterized with multibeam bathymetric data, which show continuous fault scarps on the seabed (only partly reworked by currents and covered by landslides). Fault scarps also reveal the finite displacement accumulated in the Holocene-Pleistocene. We reconstructed a 3D model of the fault network and suitable geological boundaries (mainly unconformities due to the discontinuous distribution of quaternary and tertiary sediments) with implicit surface methods implemented in SKUA/GOCAD. This approach can be considered very effective and allowed reconstructing in details complex structures, like the frequent relay zones that are particularly well imaged by seafloor geomorphology. Mutual cross-cutting relationships have been recognized between fault scarps and submarine mass-wasting deposits (Holocene-Pleistocene), indicating that, at least in places, these features are coeval, hence the fault network should be considered active. At the regional scale, the 3D model allowed measuring the horizontal WSW-ENE stretching, which can be associated to the bending moment applied to the Apulian Plate by the combined effect

  14. 松辽盆地北部徐家围子断陷火山岩储层成因机制%Volcanic rock reservoirs mechanism in North Songliao Basin Xujiaweizi Fault Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩刚; 张文婧; 任延广; 黄清华; 梁江平; 包丽

    2011-01-01

    松辽盆地北部徐家围子断陷徐深气田是我国迄今为止发现的最大的火山岩气田.营城组火山岩具有分布广、厚度大、岩性复杂等特点,既有酸性的流纹岩、流纹质熔结凝灰岩,也有中性的安山岩、安山质集块岩和基性的玄武岩.研究表明,酸性流纹岩、流纹质熔结凝灰岩普遍发育较好的原生气孔,而火山角砾岩、火山集块岩一般发育火山岩原生裂缝,这些为优质火山岩储层形成奠定了物质基础,成岩作用过程中深部流体活动和选择性溶蚀作用,不仅增大了火山岩的有效储集空间,同时也改善了火山岩储集层空间结构,而构造运动所形成的构造裂缝,不仅为深部流体活动和油气运移提供了主要通道,而且有效地增大了火山岩的油气储集空间.%The Xushen gas field locates in Xujiaweizi Fault Depression of North Songliao Basin. It is so far the greatest volcanic rock gas field in China. The Xushen gas field develops typical Yingcheng Formation volcanic rocks. The Yingcheng Formation volcanic rocks have such characteristic as extensive distribution range, great thickness, and complex lithology. By using methods such as core and scanning electron microscope observation, body of casting slice, analysis and assay, we found the lithology of Yingcheng Formation volcanic rocks consist of not only acidic rhyolite, rhyolite-cementing tuff, but also neutral andesite, andesite-agglomerate and basic basalt. We conducted subtly researchs. The purpose is to see into the cause-mechanism of volcanic rocks reservoirs, and then provide reliable evidences in conducting oil-gas exploration, seeking favorable reservoirs and improving the success rate of prospecting well. Researches have made clearly that acidic rhyolite, rhyolite-cementing tuffs develop generally preferable original pore, but volcanic breccias and volcanic agglomerates commonly develop volcanic primary fracture. These establish foundation for

  15. The Diagenesis of Volcanic Rocks and Its Effects on the Reservior Quality in Xujiaweizi Fault Depression, Soliao Basin%徐家围子断陷火山岩成岩作用与储层质量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡文婷; 柳成志; 赵辉; 栾慷; 周振东; 姚洪鹏

    2011-01-01

    The Xjiaweizi fault depression is the largest volcanic reserviors ever discovered in China which is located in the northern Songliao Basin.Study of the petrological characteristics, pore types and the diagenesis of volcanic rocks, shows that volcanic rocks types can be divided into two kinds,including lavas and pyroclastic rocks, the major volcanic reservior rocks are rhyolite and ignimbrite.The reservior spaces include primary pore, primary facture,secondary pore and secondary fracture.While the favorable volcanic rock reserviors in this area are mainly composed of initial bubbles, micropores resulted from devitrification and secondary dissolution pores.The diagenesis of volcanic rocks can be devided into three stages which include syndiagenetic phase, hypergenesis phase and burialdiagenesis phase.There are 12 volcanic diagenesis types, and the reservior guality are greatly effected by the diagenesis events including packing action,devitrify and dissolution.%徐家围子断陷位于松辽盆地北部古中央隆起带东侧,断陷期火山活动强烈,营城组火山岩是本区深层天然气重要的储集空间.对徐家围子断陷营城组火山岩的岩石学特征、储集空间类型以及火山岩的成岩作用研究表明,本区火山岩岩石类型有熔岩和火山碎屑岩两大类,以流纹岩、熔结凝灰岩为主.孔隙类型有4种,不同的岩石类型具有不同的孔隙类型组合,最主要的孔隙类型为原生气孔、脱玻化孔和次生溶孔.火山岩的成岩演化可以分为三个阶段,目前本区火山岩主要出于埋藏成岩阶段II期.本区火山岩一共有12种成岩作用类型,不同成岩阶段的成岩作用类型不相同,对储层质量影响最重要的成岩作用是脱玻化作用、充填作用和溶解作用.

  16. GRAVIMETRIC STUDY OF THE IXTLAN DE LOS HERVORES, GEOTHERMAL AREA, MIDWESTERN MEXICAN VOLCANIC BELT (MVB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, T.; Ortiz, I.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis and interpretation of gravimetric anomalies over the Occidental-Central Mexican Volcanic Belt, sheds new light on the subsurface structure of the Ixtlan de los Hervores, geothermal area. In Mexico, there are several geothermal areas that have been exploited commercially (Cerro Prieto, Los Azufres, Los Humeros, Tres Virgenes fields). However, there are many other known fields that have not been exploited. This is the case in the area of "Ixtlan de los Hervores" in the state of Michoacan. The analyzed region covers a rectangular area, aproximality from 20o N to 20.5° N and 102° W to 102.2°W. In the region there are thick basalt flows. The area is characterized by low and elongated hills formed by volcanic flows and on a smaller scale lacustrian sediments and major normal faults with a NW-SE direction particularly, the Ixtlan-Encinal fault which controls the trace of the Duero River and the Pajacuarán fault. The anomaly map was compared with the surface geology and the anomalies were correlated with major volcanic features, since our main interest was in mapping the subsurface faults and volcanic bodies. Two profiles were selected that cross major anomalies and the geothermal zone of Ixtlan. The Talwani algorithm for 2-D polygonal bodies has been used for calculating the theoretical anomalies. The proposed models adequately explain the main observed geological features. The models are made up of two lithostratigraphic units of volcanic rocks, represented by the Tertiary basalts, which adequately reflect the area's volcanic environment. These basaltic units, corresponding to different volcanic events were cut by the Ixtlan well. Both models reflect the existence of the Ixtlan-Encinal fault, the most important feature in the area which is also responsible for the existence of the geothermal area.

  17. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Fierro, Elisa; Sapia, Vincenzo; Civico, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the north-westernmost segment of the >20 km long Ovindoli-Pezza active normal fault-system (central Italy). Although existing paleoseismic data document high vertical Holocene slip rates (~1 mm/yr) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements the shallow subsurface of a key section of the Piano di Pezza fault. Our surveys cross a ~5 m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing some Late Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images which clearly show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. We can estimate the dip (~50°) and the Holocene vertical displacement of the master fault (~10 m). We also recognize in the hangingwall some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of several paleo-earthquakes older than the Late Holocene events previously recognized by paleoseismic trenching. Conversely, due to the limited investigation depth of seismic and electrical tomography, the estimation of the cumulative amount of Pleistocene throw is hampered. Therefore, to increase the depth of investigation, we performed 7 TDEM measurements along the electrical profile using a 50 m loop size both in central and offset configuration. The recovered 1-D resistivity models show a good match with 2-D resistivity images in the near surface. Moreover, TDEM inversion results indicate that in the hangingwall, ~200 m away from the surface fault trace, the carbonate pre-Quaternary basement may be found at ~90-100 m depth. The combined approach of electrical and

  18. The Morelia-Acambay Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez Bucio, M.; Soria-Caballero, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V.; Mennella, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is one of the most actives and representative zones of Mexico geologically speaking. Research carried out in this area gives stratigraphic, seismologic and historical evidence of its recent activity during the quaternary (Martinez and Nieto, 1990). Specifically the Morelia-Acambay faults system (MAFS) consist in a series of normal faults of dominant direction E - W, ENE - WSW y NE - SW which is cut in center west of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This fault system appeared during the early Miocene although the north-south oriented structures are older and have been related to the activity of the tectonism inherited from the "Basin and Range" system, but that were reactivated by the east- west faults. It is believed that the activity of these faults has contributed to the creation and evolution of the longed lacustrine depressions such as: Chapala, Zacapu, Cuitzeo, Maravatio y Acambay also the location of monogenetic volcanoes that conformed the Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF) and tend to align in the direction of the SFMA dominant effort. In a historical time different segments of the MAFS have been the epicenter of earthquakes from moderated to strong magnitude like the events of 1858 in Patzcuaro, Acambay in 1912, 1979 in Maravatio and 2007 in Morelia, among others. Several detailed analysis and semi-detailed analysis through a GIS platform based in the vectorial archives and thematic charts 1:50 000 scaled from the data base of the INEGI which has allowed to remark the influence of the MAFS segments about the morphology of the landscape and the identification of other structures related to the movement of the existent faults like fractures, alignments, collapses and others from the zone comprehended by the northwest of Morelia in Michoacán to the East of Acambay, Estado de México. Such analysis suggests that the fault segments possess a normal displacement plus a left component. In addition it can be

  19. Volcanic Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  20. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang

    2016-08-22

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  1. Stress Drops of the 1997-1998 Colfiorito, Central Italy Earthquakes: Hints for a Common Behaviour of Normal Faults in the Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Antonio; Calderoni, Giovanna

    2014-10-01

    Stress drop estimates of moderate-magnitude earthquakes in the Umbria-Marche region, in the northern Apennines, exhibit a large scatter. For the two M w 5.7 and 6.0 main shocks of 26 September 1997 near Colfiorito, several papers resulted in stress drop estimates of 20 MPa, but values as low as 2-3 MPa were proposed as well. Also for the largest aftershocks ( M w > 4), estimates spread from earthquakes in a broad magnitude interval (1.7 ≤ M w ≤ 6.0). We have found that the mainshock-aftershock sequences result in stress drops of 2-5 MPa at M w ≥ 5.6, with an average tendency to decrease at smaller magnitudes where stress drop variability increases. These findings confirm the source scaling recently assessed through Empirical Green's Function deconvolution for another well-monitored seismic sequence of normal-faulting earthquakes, which struck the city of L'Aquila in the central Apennines in April 2009. The similar scaling law of the two areas suggests common mechanisms of stress release for the shallow normal faults in the Apennines. The propensity of smaller earthquakes to increase in variability, with a tendency toward smaller stress drops, may reflect an effect of fault strength heterogeneities for smaller size ruptures.

  2. Geometry and evolution of low-angle normal faults (LANF) within a Cenozoic high-angle rift system, Thailand: Implications for sedimentology and the mechanisms of LANF development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Chris K.

    2009-10-01

    At least eight examples of large (5-35 km heave), low-angle normal faults (LANFs, 20°-30° dip) occur in the Cenozoic rift basins of Thailand and laterally pass into high-angle extensional fault systems. Three large-displacement LANFs are found in late Oligocene-Miocene onshore rift basins (Suphan Buri, Phitsanulok, and Chiang Mai basins), they have (1) developed contemporaneous with, or after the onset of, high-angle extension, (2) acted as paths for magma and associated fluids, and (3) impacted sedimentation patterns. Displacement on low-angle faults appears to be episodic, marked by onset of lacustrine conditions followed by axial progradation of deltaic systems that infilled the lakes during periods of low or no displacement. The Chiang Mai LANF is a low-angle (15°-25°), high-displacement (15-35 km heave), ESE dipping LANF immediately east of the late early Miocene Doi Inthanon and Doi Suthep metamorphic core complexes. Early Cenozoic transpressional crustal thickening followed by the northward motion of India coupled with Burma relative to east Burma and Thailand (˜40-30 Ma) caused migmatization and gneiss dome uplift in the late Oligocene of the core complex region, followed by LANF activity. LANF displacement lasted 4-6 Ma during the early Miocene and possibly transported a late Oligocene-early Miocene high-angle rift system 35 km east. Other LANFs in Thailand have lower displacements and no associated metamorphic core complexes. The three LANFs were initiated as low-angle faults, not by isostatic rotation of high-angle faults. The low-angle dips appear to follow preexisting low-angle fabrics (thrusts, shear zones, and other low-angle ductile foliations) predominantly developed during Late Paleozoic and early Paleogene episodes of thrusting and folding.

  3. Comparative study of two tsunamigenic earthquakes in the Solomon Islands: 2015 Mw 7.0 normal-fault and 2013 Santa Cruz Mw 8.0 megathrust earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Harada, Tomoya; Satake, Kenji; Ishibe, Takeo; Gusman, Aditya Riadi

    2016-05-01

    The July 2015 Mw 7.0 Solomon Islands tsunamigenic earthquake occurred ~40 km north of the February 2013 Mw 8.0 Santa Cruz earthquake. The proximity of the two epicenters provided unique opportunities for a comparative study of their source mechanisms and tsunami generation. The 2013 earthquake was an interplate event having a thrust focal mechanism at a depth of 30 km while the 2015 event was a normal-fault earthquake occurring at a shallow depth of 10 km in the overriding Pacific Plate. A combined use of tsunami and teleseismic data from the 2015 event revealed the north dipping fault plane and a rupture velocity of 3.6 km/s. Stress transfer analysis revealed that the 2015 earthquake occurred in a region with increased Coulomb stress following the 2013 earthquake. Spectral deconvolution, assuming the 2015 tsunami as empirical Green's function, indicated the source periods of the 2013 Santa Cruz tsunami as 10 and 22 min.

  4. Long Valley caldera and the UCERF depiction of Sierra Nevada range-front faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    Long Valley caldera lies within a left-stepping offset in the north-northwest-striking Sierra Nevada range-front normal faults with the Hilton Creek fault to the south and Hartley Springs fault to the north. Both Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF) 2 and its update, UCERF3, depict slip on these major range-front normal faults as extending well into the caldera, with significant normal slip on overlapping, subparallel segments separated by ∼10  km. This depiction is countered by (1) geologic evidence that normal faulting within the caldera consists of a series of graben structures associated with postcaldera magmatism (intrusion and tumescence) and not systematic down-to-the-east displacements consistent with distributed range-front faulting and (2) the lack of kinematic evidence for an evolving, postcaldera relay ramp structure between overlapping strands of the two range-front normal faults. The modifications to the UCERF depiction described here reduce the predicted shaking intensity within the caldera, and they are in accord with the tectonic influence that underlapped offset range-front faults have on seismicity patterns within the caldera associated with ongoing volcanic unrest.

  5. Aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Bonin Islands normal-faulting earthquake: Implication for deformation of the Pacific Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; No, T.; Kaiho, Y.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Sato, T.; Noguchi, N.; Nakamura, T.

    2011-12-01

    A Mw 7.4 normal-faulting earthquake occurred 150 km east of Chichi-jima Island, Bonin Islands, Japan on December 21, 2010 (UTC). This is an earthquake occurred within the Pacific plate beneath the outer trench-slope region along the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. According to Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), the associated tsunami was observed over a wide area along the Pacific coast of Japan. Normal faulting earthquakes in outer trench-slope region are a result of the bending of the incoming/subducting oceanic plates. The bending-related normal faults cutting the oceanic plate are likely associated with hydration of the oceanic plate prior to subduction [e.g., Ranero et al., 2003]. The normal faulting earthquakes can be a key to understand deformation and resulting hydration of the oceanic plate. That is also important for consideration of tsunami generation in shallow outer trench-slope region. Aftershock observation of the 2010 Bonin Islands earthquake were conducted by R/V Kairei of Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs). First OBS was deployed in the source area on December 25, 2010 and retrieved on January 7, 2011. Other 4 OBSs were deployed on January 6 and 7 and retrieved on March 11 and 12, 2011. Overall aftershocks distributed in a 130 km long area extended in a NW-SE direction although Izu-Bonin trench extends N-S direction in this area. Most of the aftershocks were located at depths shallower than 30 km, corresponding to the oceanic crust and the uppermost mantle of the Pacific plate. The aftershocks show a complicated distribution. In the central part of the aftershock area, aftershocks formed three subparallel lines with roughly 15 km intervals oriented NW-SE direction. In the southeastern part of the aftershock area away from the trench, the aftershocks distributed along ESE-WNW direction. We estimated aftershock

  6. Volcano instability induced by strike-slip faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagmay, A. M. F.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Kerle, N.; Pyle, D. M.

    2000-09-01

    Analogue sand cone experiments were conducted to study instability generated on volcanic cones by basal strike-slip movement. The results of the analogue models demonstrate that edifice instability may be generated when strike-slip faults underlying a volcano move as a result of tectonic adjustment. This instability occurs on flanks of the volcano above the strike-slip shear. On the surface of the volcano this appears as a pair of sigmoids composed of one reverse and one normal fault. In the interior of the cone the faults form a flower structure. Two destabilised regions are created on the cone flanks between the traces of the sigmoidal faults. Bulging, intense fracturing and landsliding characterise these unstable flanks. Additional analogue experiments conducted to model magmatic intrusion show that fractures and faults developed within the volcanic cone due to basal strike-slip motions strongly control the path of the intruding magma. Intrusion is diverted towards the areas where previous development of reverse and normal faults have occurred, thus causing further instability. We compare our model results to two examples of volcanoes on strike-slip faults: Iriga volcano (Philippines), which underwent non-magmatic collapse, and Mount St. Helens (USA), where a cryptodome was emplaced prior to failure. In the analogue and natural examples, the direction of collapse takes place roughly parallel to the orientation of the underlying shear. The model presented proposes one mechanism for strike-parallel breaching of volcanoes, recently recognised as a common failure direction of volcanoes found in regions with transcurrent and transtensional deformation. The recognition of the effect of basal shearing on volcano stability enables prediction of the likely direction of eventual flank failure in volcanoes overlying strike-slip faults.

  7. Fault zone processes in mechanically layered mudrock and chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrill, David A.; Evans, Mark A.; McGinnis, Ronald N.; Morris, Alan P.; Smart, Kevin J.; Wigginton, Sarah S.; Gulliver, Kirk D. H.; Lehrmann, Daniel; de Zoeten, Erich; Sickmann, Zach

    2017-04-01

    A 1.5 km long natural cliff outcrop of nearly horizontal Eagle Ford Formation in south Texas exposes northwest and southeast dipping normal faults with displacements of 0.01-7 m cutting mudrock, chalk, limestone, and volcanic ash. These faults provide analogs for both natural and hydraulically-induced deformation in the productive Eagle Ford Formation - a major unconventional oil and gas reservoir in south Texas, U.S.A. - and other mechanically layered hydrocarbon reservoirs. Fault dips are steep to vertical through chalk and limestone beds, and moderate through mudrock and clay-rich ash, resulting in refracted fault profiles. Steeply dipping fault segments contain rhombohedral calcite veins that cross the fault zone obliquely, parallel to shear segments in mudrock. The vertical dimensions of the calcite veins correspond to the thickness of offset competent beds with which they are contiguous, and the slip parallel dimension is proportional to fault displacement. Failure surface characteristics, including mixed tensile and shear segments, indicate hybrid failure in chalk and limestone, whereas shear failure predominates in mudrock and ash beds - these changes in failure mode contribute to variation in fault dip. Slip on the shear segments caused dilation of the steeper hybrid segments. Tabular sheets of calcite grew by repeated fault slip, dilation, and cementation. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope geochemistry analyses of fault zone cements indicate episodic reactivation at 1.4-4.2 km depths. The results of these analyses document a dramatic bed-scale lithologic control on fault zone architecture that is directly relevant to the development of porosity and permeability anisotropy along faults.

  8. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Sapia, Vincenzo; Fierro, Elisa; Civico, Riccardo; Pantosti, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the central section of the 35 km long L'Aquila-Celano active normal fault-system in the central Apennines of Italy. Although palaeoseismic data document high Holocene vertical slip rates (˜1 mm yr-1) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time the shallow subsurface of a key section of the main Piano di Pezza fault splay by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic soundings (TDEM). Our surveys cross a ˜5-m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images, which show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. Our data indicate that the upper fault termination has a sub-vertical attitude, in agreement with palaeoseismological trench evidence, whereas it dips ˜50° to the southwest in the deeper part. We recognize some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions in the fault hangingwall that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of some Holocene palaeo-earthquakes. We estimate a ˜13-15 m throw of this fault splay since the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (˜18 ka), leading to a 0.7-0.8 mm yr-1 throw rate that is quite in accordance with previous palaeoseismic estimation of Holocene vertical slip rates. The 1-D resistivity models from TDEM soundings collected along the trace of the electrical profile significantly match with 2-D resistivity images. Moreover, they indicate that in the fault hangingwall, ˜200 m away from the surface fault trace, the pre-Quaternary carbonate basement is at ˜90-100 m depth. We therefore provide a minimal ˜150-160 m estimate of the cumulative throw of the Piano di Pezza

  9. Distribution and migration of aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Ogasawara Islands intraplate normal-faulting earthquake related to a fracture zone in the Pacific plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obana, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; No, Tetsuo; Kaiho, Yuka; Kodaira, Shuichi; Yamashita, Mikiya; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    describe the aftershocks of a Mw 7.4 intraplate normal-faulting earthquake that occurred 150 km east Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, Japan, on 21 December 2010. It occurred beneath the outer trench slope of the Izu-Ogasawara trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Aftershock observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) began soon after the earthquake and multichannel seismic reflection surveys were conducted across the aftershock area. Aftershocks were distributed in a NW-SE belt 140 km long, oblique to the N-S trench axis. They formed three subparallel lineations along a fracture zone in the Pacific plate. The OBS observations combined with data from stations on Chichi-jima and Haha-jima Islands revealed a migration of the aftershock activity. The first hour, which likely outlines the main shock rupture, was limited to an 80 km long area in the central part of the subsequent aftershock area. The first hour activity occurred mainly around, and appears to have been influenced by, nearby large seamounts and oceanic plateau, such as the Ogasawara Plateau and the Uyeda Ridge. Over the following days, the aftershocks expanded beyond or into these seamounts and plateau. The aftershock distribution and migration suggest that crustal heterogeneities related to a fracture zone and large seamounts and oceanic plateau in the incoming Pacific plate affected the rupture of the main shock. Such preexisting structures may influence intraplate normal-faulting earthquakes in other regions of plate flexure prior to subduction.

  10. Growth, destruction and volcanic facies architecture of three volcanic centres in the Miocene Uşak-Güre basin, western Turkey: Subaqueous-subaerial volcanism in a lacustrine setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoğlu, Özgür; Helvacı, Cahit

    2012-11-01

    Early to Mid-Miocene extension in western Anatolia, related to plate tectonic motions, resulted in the development of a number of normal fault-bounded sedimentary basins as well as different styles and compositions of volcanic activity. The Uşak and Güre basins accumulated a thick fluvio-lacustrine fill in which three distinct volcanic edifices (Elmadağ, İtecektepe and Beydağı) and their deposits can overlap with each other and with the sediments produced by the background sedimentation. In addition, complete facies architectures of small-volume (monogenetic) volcanoes have been recognised in association with the three large complex (polygenetic) volcanoes providing a complex mixed siliciclastic and volcaniclastic basin infill in the respective basins where volcanism took place. All three volcanic centres display a complex succession of effusive and explosive volcanisms and their reworked deposits, with abundant evidences of magma-water interaction such as peperites for non-explosive magma-water interaction with the lacustrine water-saturated sediment and standing water body in a large alkaline lake. During the constructive phase, proximal successions of pyroclastic flows, pyroclastic falls, and rarely surge deposits are associated with distally-emplaced debris flow deposits, sometimes of mixed volcanogenic and terrestrial origins, and are interbedded with lacustrine sediments of the Inay Group. All three volcanic centres then experienced a phase of volcano growth and degradation between 17 and 15 Ma ago, most likely related to a combination of tectonic movements on NE-SW-trending basement faults, which triggered multiple flank collapses and volcanic debris avalanches (Elmadağ), and voluminous ignimbrite eruptions that triggered caldera formation (İtecektepe and Beydağı volcanic centres). Lacustrine conditions persisted during the destruction and post-destruction stages of the volcano's evolution, as evidenced by indications of magma-water interactions

  11. The complex architecture of the 2009 MW 6.1 L'Aquila normal fault system (Central Italy) as imaged by 64,000 high-resolution aftershock locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valoroso, L.; Chiaraluce, L.; Di Stefano, R.; Piccinini, D.; Schaff, D. P.; Waldhauser, F.

    2011-12-01

    On April 6th 2009, a MW 6.1 normal faulting earthquake struck the axial area of the Abruzzo region in Central Italy. We present high-precision hypocenter locations of an extraordinary dataset composed by 64,000 earthquakes recorded at a very dense seismic network of 60 stations operating for 9 months after the main event. Events span in magnitude (ML) between -0.9 to 5.9, reaching a completeness magnitude of 0.7. The dataset has been processed by integrating an accurate automatic picking procedure together with cross-correlation and double-difference relative location methods. The combined use of these procedures results in earthquake relative location uncertainties in the range of a few meters to tens of meters, comparable/lower than the spatial dimension of the earthquakes themselves). This data set allows us to image the complex inner geometry of individual faults from the kilometre to meter scale. The aftershock distribution illuminates the anatomy of the en-echelon fault system composed of two major faults. The mainshock breaks the entire upper crust from 10 km depth to the surface along a 14-km long normal fault. A second segment, located north of the normal fault and activated by two Mw>5 events, shows a striking listric geometry completely blind. We focus on the analysis of about 300 clusters of co-located events to characterize the mechanical behavior of the different portions of the fault system. The number of events in each cluster ranges from 4 to 24 events and they exhibit strongly correlated seismograms at common stations. They mostly occur where secondary structures join the main fault planes and along unfavorably oriented segments. Moreover, larger clusters nucleate on secondary faults located in the overlapping area between the two main segments, where the rate of earthquake production is very high with a long-lasting seismic decay.

  12. Imaging the structural style of an active normal fault through multidisciplinary geophysical investigation: a case study from the Mw 6.1, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake region (central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Fabio; Pucci, Stefano; Civico, Riccardo; De Martini, Paolo Marco; Nicolosi, Iacopo; D'Ajello Caracciolo, Francesca; Carluccio, Roberto; Di Giulio, Giuseppe; Vassallo, Maurizio; Smedile, Alessandra; Pantosti, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    The normal fault-system responsible of the 2009 Mw 6.1 L'Aquila earthquake (Paganica-San Demetrio fault-system) comprises several narrow, fault-parallel valleys of controversial origin. We investigated a key section of the southeastern portion of this fault network along the small Verupola Valley. In order to characterize its nature and possible tectonic activity, we applied multiple-geosciences techniques able to image at depth the structure associated to this peculiar landform. We integrated magnetometry, 2-D P wave and resistivity tomography, surface waves and seismic noise analysis coupled with field mapping, shallow boreholes and trenching. According to our results, the Verupola Valley is a ˜30-40-m-deep graben controlled by a SW-dipping master fault and synthetic splays paired with an antithetic NE-dipping fault. The SW-dipping splays are active and cut very shallow (<2 m deep) Late Pleistocene sediments. The small amount of cumulated vertical offset (˜15 m) across the conjugated system may indicate a young fault inception or very low Quaternary slip-rates. Due to its structural continuity with the adjacent mapped strands of the Paganica-San Demetrio fault network, we relate the Verupola Valley to the recent activity of the southeastern segment of this fault system. We also suggest that other fault-parallel valleys can have the same tectonic origin and setting of the Verupola Valley. This latter represents a scale-independent analogue from metric scale (exposed in the palaeoseismological trenches) to the Middle Aterno Basin scale (seen from seismic profiles and fault mapping). Overall, the imaged structural style is coherent with the regional tectonic setting due to Quaternary crustal extension.

  13. Slip distributions on active normal faults measured from LiDAR and field mapping of geomorphic offsets: an example from L'Aquila, Italy, and implications for modelling seismic moment release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Maxwell; Roberts, Gerald P.; McCaffrey, Ken; Cowie, Patience A.; Faure Walker, Joanna P.; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Phillips, Richard J.; Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Vittori, Eutizio; Gregory, Laura; Wedmore, Luke; Watson, Zoë K.

    2015-05-01

    Surface slip distributions for an active normal fault in central Italy have been measured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), in order to assess the impact of changes in fault orientation and kinematics when modelling subsurface slip distributions that control seismic moment release. The southeastern segment of the surface trace of the Campo Felice active normal fault near the city of L'Aquila was mapped and surveyed using techniques from structural geology and using TLS to define the vertical and horizontal offsets of geomorphic slopes since the last glacial maximum (15 ± 3 ka). The fault geometry and kinematics measured from 43 sites and throw/heave measurements from geomorphic offsets seen on 250 scarp profiles were analysed using a modification of the Kostrov equations to calculate the magnitudes and directions of horizontal principal strain-rates. The map trace of the studied fault is linear, except where a prominent bend has formed to link across a former left-stepping relay-zone. The dip of the fault and slip direction are constant across the bend. Throw-rates since 15 ± 3 ka decrease linearly from the fault centre to the tip, except in the location of the prominent bend where higher throw rates are recorded. Vertical coseismic offsets for two palaeo earthquake ruptures seen as fresh strips of rock at the base of the bedrock scarp also increase within the prominent bend. The principal strain-rate, calculated by combining strike, dip, slip-direction and post 15 ± 3 ka throw rate, decreases linearly from the fault centre towards the tip; the strain-rate does not increase across the prominent fault bend. The above shows that changes in fault strike, whilst having no effect on the principal horizontal strain-rate, can produce local maxima in throw-rates during single earthquakes that persist over the timescale of multiple earthquakes (15 ± 3 ka). Detailed geomorphological and structural characterisation of active faults is therefore a critical

  14. Catastrophic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  15. Local stresses, dyke arrest and surface deformation in volcanic edificesand rift zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Brenner

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Field studies indicate that nearly all eruptions in volcanic edifices and rift zones are supplied with magma through fractures (dykes that are opened by magmatic overpressure. While (inferred dyke injections are frequent during unrest periods, volcanic eruptions are, in comparison, infrequent, suggesting that most dykes become arrested at certain depths in the crust, in agreement with field studies. The frequency of dyke arrest can be partly explained by the numerical models presented here which indicate that volcanic edifices and rift zones consisting of rocks of contrasting mechanical properties, such as soft pyroclastic layers and stiff lava flows, commonly develop local stress fields that encourage dyke arrest. During unrest, surface deformation studies are routinely used to infer the geometries of arrested dykes, and some models (using homogeneous, isotropic half-spaces infer large grabens to be induced by such dykes. Our results, however, show that the dyke-tip tensile stresses are normally much greater than the induced surface stresses, making it difficult to explain how a dyke can induce surface stresses in excess of the tensile (or shear strength while the same strength is not exceeded at the (arrested dyke tip. Also, arrested dyke tips in eroded or active rift zones are normally not associated with dyke-induced grabens or normal faults, and some dykes arrested within a few metres of the surface do not generate faults or grabens. The numerical models show that abrupt changes in Young's moduli(stiffnesses, layers with relatively high dyke-normal compressive stresses (stress barriers, and weak horizontal contacts may make the dyke-induced surface tensile stresses too small for significant fault or graben formation to occur in rift zones or volcanic edifices. Also, these small surface stresses may have no simple relation to the dyke geometry or the depth to its tip. Thus, for a layered crust with weak contacts, straightforward

  16. Fault Plane Orientations of Intermediate-Depth Earthquakes in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Extending from Colombia in the north to Chile and Argentina in the south, the South American subduction zone exhibits considerable variation: the subduction angle alternates between flat and steep; the subducting plate has complex structures such as ridges, plateaus, and fracture zones; and late Cenozoic volcanism in the overlying plate has gaps. I investigate the effect of these differences in incoming plate structure and subduction geometry on intermediate-depth earthquakes and use the results to test hypotheses for why intermediate-depth earthquakes occur. For all large (Mw ≥5.7) intermediate-depth earthquakes (60-360 km depth) in South America since 1990, I analyze rupture directivity to try to distinguish which of the two possible fault planes of the focal mechanism slipped in the earthquake. Of the 163 earthquakes that met the selection criteria, half were recorded with a sufficient distribution of stations to determine if there was directivity to the rupture and fault planes were identified for 31 events. Fault plane orientations are spatially coherent. In regions with "normal" subduction angles, such as the Central Volcanic Zone (southern Peru to central Chile), results are consistent with previous studies in Central America and the western Pacific subduction zones: most earthquakes rupture along subhorizontal faults and rupture azimuths are randomly distributed. In the Peruvian Flat Slab, identified fault planes dip eastward. After taking into account the angle of subduction, these faults are perpendicular to the faults that rupture in regions with normal subduction angles. Within sharply curved slab segments, such as the rebending of the plate at the eastern edge of the Peruvian flat slab, both orientations of faults slip. The observed flip in dominant fault plane orientation on either side of sharply curved slab segments suggests that bending and unbending stresses have an important role in controlling fault orientations. Pre-existing weak zones may

  17. Amazonian volcanism inside Valles Marineris on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brož, Petr; Hauber, Ernst; Wray, James J.; Michael, Gregory

    2017-09-01

    The giant trough system of Valles Marineris is one of the most spectacular landforms on Mars, yet its origin is still unclear. Although often referred to as a rift, it also shows some characteristics that are indicative of collapse processes. For decades, one of the major open questions was whether volcanism was active inside the Valles Marineris. Here we present evidence for a volcanic field on the floor of the deepest trough of Valles Marineris, Coprates Chasma. More than 130 individual edifices resemble scoria and tuff cones, and are associated with units that are interpreted as lava flows. Crater counts indicate that the volcanic field was emplaced sometime between ∼0.4 Ga and ∼0.2 Ga. The spatial distribution of the cones displays a control by trough-parallel subsurface structures, suggesting magma ascent in feeder dikes along trough-bounding normal faults. Spectral data reveal an opaline-silica-rich unit associated with at least one of the cones, indicative of hydrothermal processes. Our results point to magma-water interaction, an environment of astrobiological interest, perhaps associated with late-stage activity in the evolution of Valles Marineris, and suggest that the floor of Coprates Chasma is promising target for the in situ exploration of Mars.

  18. Model of deep non-volcanic tremor part II: episodic tremor and slip

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of tremor accompany a moving slip pulse in Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events. The sources of this non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are largely unknown. We have developed a model describing the mechanism of NTV generation. According to this model, NTV is a reflection of resonant-type oscillations excited in a fault at certain depth ranges. From a mathematical viewpoint, tremor (phonons) and slip pulses (solitons) are two different solutions of the sine-Gordon equation describing frictional processes inside a fault. In an ETS event, a moving slip pulse generates tremor due to interaction with structural heterogeneities in a fault and to failures of small asperities. Observed tremor parameters, such as central frequency and frequency attenuation curve, are associated with fault parameters and conditions, such as elastic modulus, effective normal stress, penetration hardness and friction. Model prediction of NTV frequency content is consistent with observations. In the framework of this model it is possible t...

  19. Should ground-motion records be rotated to fault-normal/parallel or maximum direction for response history analysis of buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Juan C.; Kalkan, Erol

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, regulatory seismic codes (for example, California Building Code) require at least two sets of horizontal ground-motion components for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of building structures. For sites within 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal and fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHAs should be performed separately—when FN and then FP direction are aligned with transverse direction of the building axes. This approach is assumed to lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. The validity of this assumption is examined here using 3D computer models of single-story structures having symmetric (torsionally stiff) and asymmetric (torsionally flexible) layouts subjected to an ensemble of near-fault ground motions with and without apparent velocity pulses. In this parametric study, the elastic vibration period is varied from 0.2 to 5 seconds, and yield-strength reduction factors, R, are varied from a value that leads to linear-elastic design to 3 and 5. Further validations are performed using 3D computer models of 9-story structures having symmetric and asymmetric layouts subjected to the same ground-motion set. The influence of the ground-motion rotation angle on several engineering demand parameters (EDPs) is examined in both linear-elastic and nonlinear-inelastic domains to form benchmarks for evaluating the use of the FN/FP directions and also the maximum direction (MD). The MD ground motion is a new definition for horizontal ground motions for use in site-specific ground-motion procedures for seismic design according to provisions of the American Society of Civil Engineers/Seismic Engineering Institute (ASCE/SEI) 7-10. The results of this study have important implications for current practice, suggesting that ground motions rotated to MD or FN/FP directions do not necessarily provide

  20. Configuration and Correlation of Fluvial Terrace Deposits In the Lower Rio Salado Valley: A Record of Magmatic Uplift and Active Normal Faulting in the Rio Grande Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sion, B. D.; Axen, G. J.; Phillips, F. M.; Harrison, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Salado is a western tributary of the Rio Grande whose valley is flanked by six major terrace levels. The Rio crosses several active rift-related normal faults and the active, mid-crustal Socorro Magma Body (SMB; a sill at 19 km depth that is actively doming the land surface), providing an unusual opportunity to explore the effects of deep magma emplacement and active faulting on the terraces. Rio Salado terraces were mapped using a high-resolution DEM and digital color stereophotographs and were projected onto a valley-parallel vertical plane to construct longitudinal profiles. Three new soil pits were described to aid terrace correlation. A net incision rate of 0.41 ± 0.06 m/ka was inferred from the correlation of a major fill-cut terrace to the 122 ± 18 ka Airport surface ~25 km south of the Rio Salado. This incision rate is >1.5 times more rapid than estimated rates nearby or in other parts of New Mexico, but yields age estimates for other terraces that are consistent with soil development. Terrace gradients in the Rio Salado have increased through time, indicating either stream response to Rio Grande incision or footwall tilting from the Quaternary Loma Blanca fault (LBF). Two terraces in the LBF hanging wall are back-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts, suggesting a listric geometry for the LBF. However, two others (Qtf and Qtc) are east-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts. Both Qtf and Qtc merge eastward with the next youngest terrace in the flight, and Qtc is arched, consistent with an earlier episode of surface uplift above the SMB. Future work will involve (a) additional terrace mapping over the SMB, (b) cosmogenic 36Cl depth profile dating of the Rio Salado terraces to determine incision rates, allow regional terrace correlations, and constrain fault-slip slip rates and the record of SMB-related surface uplift, and (c) numerical modeling of SMB inflation constrained by uplift signals.

  1. Dominant fault plane orientations of intermediate-depth earthquakes beneath South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Linda M.

    2014-07-01

    The South American subduction zone exhibits considerable variation: the subduction angle alternates between flat and steep; the subducting plate has complex structures; and arc volcanism in the overlying plate has gaps. I investigate the effect of these differences in incoming plate structure and slab geometry on intermediate-depth earthquakes, specifically their fault orientations and rupture characteristics, and find that slab geometry has the largest impact on fault orientation. I use rupture directivity to estimate rupture direction and rupture velocity and to distinguish the fault plane from the auxiliary plane of the focal mechanism. From analysis of 163 large (Mw≥5.7) intermediate-depth (60-360 km depth) earthquakes from along the length of South America, estimated rupture azimuths and plunges show no trends, appearing to be randomly distributed on the determined population of fault plane orientations, and a majority of earthquakes are made up of multiple subevents. As seen in other subduction zones, subduction segments descending at normal angles have predominantly subhorizontal faults. Flat slab segments also have a dominant fault orientation, but those earthquakes slip along the conjugate nodal plane of the focal mechanism. In strongly curved slab segments, such as at the downdip edge of flat segments where the slab resubducts, earthquakes may slip along either nodal plane orientation. While both fault orientations could be consistent with the reactivation of fossil outer rise faults, the fault orientations are also consistent with expectations for newly created faults in agreement with the ambient stress field. Fault reactivation alone does not explain why different fault orientations are active in segments with different geometries, so the preferred explanation for having regionally consistent fault orientations is that they minimize the total work of the system. The previously observed predominance of subhorizontal faults appears to be a consequence

  2. Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenesis of Volcanic Rocks as Exemplified by Volcanic Rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁庚; 叶霖

    1997-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang,occurring in the collision zone between the Siberia Plate and the Junggar Plate,are distributed along the Eritix River Valley in northern Xinjiang.The volcanic rocks were dated at Late Paleozoic and can be divided into the spilite-keratophyre series and the basalt-andesite series.The spilite-keratophyre series volcanic rocks occur in the Altay orogenic belt at the southwest margin of the Siberia Plate.In addition to sodic volcanic rocks.There are also associated potassic-sodic volcanic rocks and potassic volcanic rocks.The potassic-sodic volcanic rocks occur at the bottom of the eruption cycle and control the distribution of Pb and Zn deposits.The potassic volcanic rocks occur at the top of the eruption cycle and are associated with Au and Cu mineralizations.The sodic volcanic rocks occur in the middle stage of eruption cycle and control the occurrence of Cu(Zn) deposits.The basalt-andesite series volcanic rocks distributed in the North Junggar orogenic belt at the north margin of the Junggar-Kazakstan Plate belong to the potassic sodic volcain rocks.The volcanic rocks distributed along the Ulungur fault are relatively rich in sodium and poor in potassium and are predominated by Cu mineralization and associated with Au mineralization.Those volcanic rocks distributed along the Ertix fault are relatively rich in K and poor in Na,with Au mineralization being dominant.

  3. Quaternary volcanism in the Acambay graben, Mexican Volcanic Belt: Re-evaluation for potential volcanic danger in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Lacan, P.; Roldan-Quintana, J.; Ortuňo, M.; Zuniga, R. R.; Laurence, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) is best known for the major active stratovolcanoes, such as Popocatépetl, Citlaltépetl and Colima. The most common stratovolcanoes in this province are modest-size cones with heights of 800 to 1000 m. Examples are Tequila, Sangangüey, Las Navajas, Culiacán, La Joya, El Zamorano, Temascalcingo and Altamirano; these last two were formed within the Acambay Graben in central MVB. The Acambay graben (20 x 70 km) is 100 km to the NW of Mexico City, with E-W trending seismically active normal faults; in particular the Acambay-Tixmadejé fault related to a mB =7 earthquake in 1912. Within the graben there are many volcanic structures, including calderas, domes, cinder cones and stratovolcanoes; Temascalcingo and Altamirano are the largest, with about 800 and 900 m heights, respectively. Temascalcingo is mostly composed of dacitic lavas and block and ash flow deposits. Includes a 3 x 2.5 km summit caldera and a magmatic sector collapse event with the associated debris avalanche deposit. 14C ages of 37-12 ka correspond to the volcano's latest phases that produced pyroclastic deposits. A major plinian eruption formed the San Mateo Pumice with an age of <20 Ka. Altamirano volcano is poorly studied; it is andesitic-dacitic, composed of lavas, pyroclastic flow deposits, and pumice fallouts. Morphologically is better preserved than Temascalcingo, and it should be younger. 14C ages of 4.0-2.5 ka were performed in charcoal within pyroclastic flow deposits that apparently were erupted from Altamirano. An undated 3 m thick pumice fallout on the flanks of Altamirano volcano could be also Holocene. It represents a major explosive event. The relatively young ages found in volcanic deposits within the Acambay graben raise the volcanic danger level in this area, originally thought as an inactive volcanic zone. The two major volcanoes, Temascalcingo and Altamirano, should be considered as dormant volcanoes that could restart activity at any time. We

  4. Impact of tectonic and volcanism on the Neogene evolution of isolated carbonate platforms (SW Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courgeon, S.; Jorry, S. J.; Jouet, G.; Camoin, G.; BouDagher-Fadel, M. K.; Bachèlery, P.; Caline, B.; Boichard, R.; Révillon, S.; Thomas, Y.; Thereau, E.; Guérin, C.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the impact of tectonic activity and volcanism on long-term (i.e. millions years) evolution of shallow-water carbonate platforms represents a major issue for both industrial and academic perspectives. The southern central Mozambique Channel is characterized by a 100 km-long volcanic ridge hosting two guyots (the Hall and Jaguar banks) and a modern atoll (Bassas da India) fringed by a large terrace. Dredge sampling, geophysical acquisitions and submarines videos carried out during recent oceanographic cruises revealed that submarine flat-top seamounts correspond to karstified and drowned shallow-water carbonate platforms largely covered by volcanic material and structured by a dense network of normal faults. Microfacies and well-constrained stratigraphic data indicate that these carbonate platforms developed in shallow-water tropical environments during Miocene times and were characterized by biological assemblages dominated by corals, larger benthic foraminifera, red and green algae. The drowning of these isolated carbonate platforms is revealed by the deposition of outer shelf sediments during the Early Pliocene and seems closely linked to (1) volcanic activity typified by the establishment of wide lava flow complexes, and (2) to extensional tectonic deformation associated with high-offset normal faults dividing the flat-top seamounts into distinctive structural blocks. Explosive volcanic activity also affected platform carbonates and was responsible for the formation of crater(s) and the deposition of tuff layers including carbonate fragments. Shallow-water carbonate sedimentation resumed during Late Neogene time with the colonization of topographic highs inherited from tectonic deformation and volcanic accretion. Latest carbonate developments ultimately led to the formation of the Bassas da India modern atoll. The geological history of isolated carbonate platforms from the southern Mozambique Channel represents a new case illustrating the major

  5. The 1996 Mw 6.6 Lijiang earthquake: Application of JERS-1 SAR interferometry on a typical normal-faulting event in the northwestern Yunnan rift zone, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lingyun; Wang, Qingliang; Xu, Jing; Feng, Jiangang

    2017-09-01

    The northwestern Yunnan rift zone in the Yunnan Province of China is a seismically active region located along the western boundary of the Sichuan-Yunnan Block on the eastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. An earthquake with a magnitude of 6.6 (Mw) occurred in this region on February 3, 1996. The Lijiang earthquake was the largest normal-faulting event to occur along the western boundary of the Sichuan-Yunnan Block in the last 40 years. In this study, we used L-band JERS-1 (Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1) SAR data sets from two descending orbits to detect surface deformation signals surrounding the epicentral region in order to estimate the source parameters through an inversion of the displacement fields. The results indicated that the earthquake can be explained by slip along two segments of the ∼N-S trending listric normal fault, named the Lijiang-Daju fault. Coseismic deformation patterns and slip distributions revealed that the earthquake consisted of two sub-events, which were also suggested by seismological results. Based on an analysis of the static Coulomb stress change, the second sub-event was likely triggered by the first sub-event. The central segment of the Lijiang-Daju fault, which has an eastward-convex geometry, did not rupture during the earthquake. This phenomenon was probably related to a geometrical discontinuity at the fault-bend area of the Lijiang-Daju fault.

  6. Miocene Tectonics at the Pannonian - Carpathian Transition: The Bogdan Voda - Dragos Voda fault system, northern Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, M.; Gröger, H.; Marin, M.; Schmid, S. M.; Fügenschuh, B.

    2003-04-01

    Tertiary tectonics in the Pannonian-Carpathian transition zone was dominated by opposed rotations of Alcapa and Tisza-Dacia, separated by the Mid-Hungarian lineament (MHL). While in the Pannonian basin the MHL is well known from geophysical and borehole data, its northeastern continuation remains a matter of discussion. Our field based study, located in the Maramures mountains of northern Romania, provides new kinematic data from the Bogdan Voda fault, a first order candidate for the prolongation of the MHL to the northeast. In the Burdigalian, the Pienides (unmetamorphic flysch nappes) were emplaced onto the autochthonous Paleogene flysch units. Kinematic data consistently indicate top to the SE-directed thrusting of the Pienides and selected imbrications in the autochthonous units. Between Langhian and Tortonian these thrust contacts were offset by the E-W trending Bogdan Voda fault and its eastern continuation, the Dragos-Voda fault. These two faults share a common polyphase history, at least since the Burdigalian. Kinematic data derived from mesoscale faults indicate sinistral strike-slip displacement, in good agreement with kinematics inferred from map view. The NE-SW trending Greben fault, another fault of regional importance, was coevally active as a normal fault. From stratigraphic arguments major activity of this fault system is constrained to the time interval between 16.4-10 Ma. While deformation is strongly concentrated in the sedimentary units, the easterly located basement units are affected by abundant minor faults of similar kinematics covering a wide area. These SW-NE trending strike slip faults feature a normal component and resemble an imbricate fan geometry. Since Burdigalian thrusting is consistently SE-directed on either side of the Bogdan-Dragos Voda fault, major post-Burdigalian differential rotations can be excluded for the northern and southern block respectively. Hydrothermal veins within Pannonian volcanic units are aligned along the

  7. Structural character of the northern segment of the Paintbrush Canyon fault, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, R.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States); Spengler, R.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Detailed mapping of exposed features along the northern part of the Paintbrush Canyon fault was initiated to aid in construction of the computer-assisted three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model of Yucca Mountain, to contribute to kinematic reconstruction of the tectonic history of the Paintbrush Canyon fault, and to assist in the interpretation of geophysical data from Midway Valley. Yucca Mountain is segmented into relatively intact blocks of east-dipping Miocene volcanic strata, bounded by north-striking, west-dipping high-angle normal faults. The Paintbrush Canyon fault, representing the easternmost block-bounding normal fault, separates Fran Ridge from Midway Valley and continues northward across Yucca Wash to at least the southern margin of the Timber Mountain Caldera complex. South of Yucca Wash, the Paintbrush Canyon Fault is largely concealed beneath thick Quaternary deposits. Bedrock exposures to the north reveal a complex fault, zone, displaying local north- and west-trending grabens, and rhombic pull-apart features. The fault scarp, discontinuously exposed along a mapped length of 8 km north of Yucca Wash, dips westward by 41{degrees} to 74{degrees}. Maximum vertical offset of the Rhyolite of Comb Peak along the fault measures about 210 m in Paintbrush Canyon and, on the basis of drill hole information, vertical offset of the Topopoah Spring Tuff is about 360 m near the northern part of Fran Ridge. Observed displacement along the fault in Paintbrush Canyon is down to the west with a component of left-lateral oblique slip. Unlike previously proposed tectonic models, strata adjacent to the fault dip to the east. Quaternary deposits do not appear displaced along the fault scarp north of Yucca Wash, but are displaced in trenches south of Yucca Wash.

  8. Late Quaternary Normal Faulting and Hanging Wall Basin Evolution of the Southwestern Rift Margin From Gravity and Geology, B.C.S., MX and Exploring the Influence of Text-Figure Format on Introductory Geology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Melanie M. D.

    2011-12-01

    An array of north-striking, left-stepping, active normal faults is situated along the southwestern margin of the Gulf of California. This normal fault system is the marginal fault system of the oblique-divergent plate boundary within the Gulf of California. To better understand the role of upper-crustal processes during development of an obliquely rifted plate margin, gravity surveys were conducted across the normal-fault-bounded basins within the gulf-margin array and, along with optically stimulated luminescence dating of offset surfaces, fault-slip rates were estimated and fault patterns across basins were assessed, providing insight into sedimentary basin evolution. Additionally, detailed geologic and geomorphic maps were constructed along two faults within the system, leading to a more complete understanding of the role of individual normal faults within a larger array. These faults slip at a low rate (0.1--1 mm/yr) and have relatively shallow hanging wall basins (˜500--3000 m). Overall, the gulf-margin faults accommodate protracted, distributed deformation at a low rate and provide a minor contribution to overall rifting. Integrating figures with text can lead to greater science learning than when either medium is presented alone. Textbooks, composed of text and graphics, are a primary source of content in most geology classes. It is essential to understand how students approach learning from text and figures in textbook-style learning materials and how the arrangement of the text and figures influences their learning approach. Introductory geology students were eye tracked while learning from textbook-style materials composed of text and graphics. Eye fixation data showed that students spent less time examining the figure than the text, but the students who more frequently examined the figure tended to improve more from the pretest to the posttest. In general, students tended to examine the figure at natural breaks in the reading. Textbook-style materials

  9. Can cosmic ray exposure dating reveal the normal faulting activity of the Cordillera Blanca Fault, Peru? ¿Dataciones por exposición de rayos cósmicos revelan fallamiento activo normal en la falla de la Cordillera Blanca, Perú?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Siame

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The build-up of in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be within bedrock scarps and escarpments associated to the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault, Peru, was measured to evaluate, through Cosmic Ray Exposure dating, its normal faulting activity. The highest mountain peaks in Peru belong to the 210 km-long, NW- striking, Cordillera Blanca. Along its western border, the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault is responsible for a vertical relief over 4.4 km, whose prominent 2 km high escarpment is characterized by ~1 km-high triangular facets corresponding to vertical displacements cumulated during the last 1-2 million years. At a more detailed scale, this fault system exhibits continuous geomorphic evidence of repeated displacements, underlined by 2 to 70 m-high scarps, corresponding to vertical displacements cumulated since Late Pleistocene and Holocene periods. Although microseismicity occurs along the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault, no major historical or instrumental earthquake has been recorded since the beginning of the Spanish settlement in the 16th century. To evaluate the vertical slip rate along the major 90 km-long central segment of the Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault, the Quaternary fault escarpment (i.e., triangular facet, as well as the bedrock fault scarp, have been sampled for 10Be Cosmic Ray Exposure dating. Even if the uppermost part of the triangular facets have been resurfaced by the Last Glacial Maximum glaciers, our results allow to estimate a vertical slip-rate of 3±1 mm/yr, and suggest at least 2 seismic events during the last 3000 years.La acumulación in situ de 10Be cosmogénico en las rocas intrusivas de las escarpas de la falla normal de la Cordillera Blanca del Perú han sido medidas para evaluar, su actividad de fallamiento normal., con edades de exposición a los rayos cósmicos. Los más altos picos en el Perú conforman la Cordillera Blanca que se extiende con una longitud de 210 km según una orientación NO. A lo largo de su l

  10. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes.

  11. Volcanic characteristics and rule of hydrocarbon accumulation of Shuanglong area in Lishu faulted depression%梨树断陷双龙地区火山发育特征及油气成藏规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴勇信; 刘长利; 朱建伟; 李烨

    2016-01-01

    Cretaceous Huoshiling Formation of the Shuanglong area in Lishu faulted depression of Songliao Basin developed two types of eruptive volcanos,including the central vent eruption and fissure eruption.They dif-fer in terms of the development scale and hydrocarbon accumulation.The central vent eruption has the characteris-tics of violent activity,long duration,extensive distribution scale of volcanic rocks,large thickness and the lithol-ogy progressively shift from the mafic to the neutral.The fissure eruption has the characteristics of weak activity, short duration,less distribution scale of volcanic rocks,thin thickness and the lithology is mainly neutral.The central vent eruption volcano is adjacent to lake basin,forming the environment of volcanic-lacustrine deposit. With the alternate deposition of volcanic rocks,conglomerate and deep and semi-deep lake mudstone,the Hu-oshiling Formation of central vent eruption area has good association pattern of source rocks,reservoirs and caps rock,and forms self-generation and self-bearing combination of source-reservoir-cap.The fissure eruption volcano is far away from the lake basin and the distribution of volcanic rocks has no directly contact with the deep lacustrine facies mudstone,coupled with poor reservoir properties,the Huoshiling Formation of the fissure eruption volcano area has poor conditions of hydrocarbon accumulation.According to the comprehensive analysis of the data of drill-ing,oil testing and earthquake,it could be considered that the central vent eruption volcano in the western studied area is the favorable exploration area of Huoshiling Formation,in which the source rocks are deep and semi-deep lake mudstones,reservoir including pyroclastic rock,conglomerate and volcanic rocks,the reservoir space are mainly fracture and pore.%松辽盆地梨树断陷双龙地区白垩系火石岭组发育中心式和裂隙式两种喷发型火山,其在发育规模、油气成藏等方面存在不同。中心式喷

  12. Tectonics, magmatism and paleo-fluid distribution in a strike-slip setting: Insights from the northern termination of the Liquiñe-Ofqui fault System, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Flores, Pamela; Cembrano, José; Sánchez-Alfaro, Pablo; Veloso, Eugenio; Arancibia, Gloria; Roquer, Tomás

    2016-06-01

    This study addresses the interplay between strain/stress fields and paleo-fluid migration in the Southern Andean Volcanic Zone (SVZ). The SVZ coexists with the margin-parallel Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and with NW-striking Andean Transverse Faults (ATF). To tackle the role of different fault-fracture systems on deformation distribution and magma/fluid transport, we map the nature, geometry and kinematics of faults, veins and dikes at various scales. Fault-slip data analysis yields stress and strain fields from the full study area data base (regional scale) and fault zones representative of each fault system (local scale). Regional scale strain analysis shows kinematically heterogeneous faulting. Local strain analyses indicate homogeneous deformation with NE-trending shortening and NW-trending extension at NNE-striking Liquiñe-Ofqui master fault zones. Strain axes are clockwise rotated at second order fault zones, with ENE-trending shortening and NNW-trending stretching. The ATF record polyphasic deformation. Conversely, stress field analysis at regional scale indicates a strike-slip dominated transpressional regime with N64°E-trending σ1 and N30°W-trending σ3. Deformation is further partitioned within the arc through NNE-striking dextral-reverse faults, NE-striking dextral-normal faults and NW-striking sinistral-reverse faults with normal slip activation. The regional tectonic regime controls the geometry of NE-striking dikes and volcanic centers. NE-striking faults record local stress axes that are clockwise rotated with respect to the regional stress field. NNE- and NE-striking faults are favorably oriented for reactivation under the regional stress field and show poorly-developed damage zones. Conversely, NW-striking fault systems, misoriented under the regional stress field, show multiple fault cores, wider damage zones and dense vein networks. Deformation driven by oblique subduction is partially partitioned into strike-slip and shortening

  13. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  14. The relationship between normal and strike-slip faults in Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, and its implications for stress rotation and partitioning of deformation in the east-central Basin and Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Atilla; de Joussineau, Ghislain

    2014-06-01

    This study expands on our earlier studies of the evolution of fracturing and faulting in the Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone exposed over a large area in the Valley of Fire State Park, southeastern Nevada. Based on a nearly three-dimensional data set collected from 200-m-high cliff-face exposures with stair-case morphology composed of steep and flat parts, we find that a series of inclined, relatively low-angle normal faults and their splay fractures are precursors of the strike-slip fault network that we previously documented. We discuss the significance of this finding in terms of the tectonics of the broader area, stress rotation, partitioning of deformation, and the development of fracture clusters with compartmentalization of the structures as a function of spatial, depositional and deformational domains.

  15. Volcano-tectonics of the Al Haruj Volcanic Province, Central Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshaafi, Abdelsalam; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-10-01

    The Al Haruj intra-continental Volcanic Province (AHVP), located at the south-western margin of the Sirt Basin, hosts the most extensive and recent volcanic activity in Libya - which is considered typical for plate interiors. From north to south the AHVP is divided into two subprovinces, namely Al Haruj al Aswad and Al Haruj al Abiyad. The total area of the AHVP is around 42,000 km2. Despite the great size of the AHVP, its volcano-tectonic evolution and activity have received very little attention and are poorly documented and understood. Here we present new field data, and analytical and numerical results, on the volcano-tectonics of the AHVP. The length/thickness ratio of 47 dykes and volcanic fissures were measured to estimate magmatic overpressure at the time of eruption. The average dyke (length/thickness) ratio of 421 indicates magmatic overpressures during the associate fissure eruptions of 8-19 MPa (depending on host-rock elastic properties). Spatial distributions of 432 monogenetic eruptions sites/points (lava shields, pyroclastic cones) in the AHVP reveal two main clusters, one in the south and another in the north. Aligned eruptive vents show the dominating strike of volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes as WNW-ESE to NW-SE, coinciding with the orientation of one of main fracture/fault zones. Numerical modelling and field observations suggest that some feeder-dykes may have used steeply dipping normal-fault zones as part of their paths to the surface.

  16. Submarine Volcanic Morphology of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P.; Croff Bell, K.; Carey, S.; Bejelou, K.; Parks, M.; Antoniou, V.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini volcanic group form the central part of the modern Aegean volcanic arc, developed within the Hellenic arc and trench system, because of the ongoing subduction of the African plate beneath the European margin throughout Cenozoic. It comprises three distinct volcanic structures occurring along a NE-SW direction: Christianna form the southwestern part of the group, Santorini occupies the middle part and Koloumbo volcanic rift zone extends towards the northeastern part. The geology of the Santorini volcano has been described by a large number of researchers with petrological as well as geochronological data. The offshore area of the Santorini volcanic field has only recently been investigated with emphasis mainly inside the Santorini caldera and the submarine volcano of Kolumbo. In September 2011, cruise NA-014 on the E/V Nautilus carried out new surveys on the submarine volcanism of the study area, investigating the seafloor morphology with high-definition video imaging. Submarine hydrothermal vents were found on the seafloor of the northern basin of the Santorini caldera with no evidence of high temperature fluid discharges or massive sulphide formations, but only low temperature seeps characterized by meter-high mounds of bacteria-rich sediment. This vent field is located in line with the normal fault system of the Kolumbo rift, and also near the margin of a shallow intrusion that occurs within the sediments of the North Basin. Push cores have been collected and they will provide insights for their geochemical characteristics and their relationship to the active vents of the Kolumbo underwater volcano. Similar vent mounds occur in the South Basin, at shallow depths around the islets of Nea and Palaia Kameni. ROV exploration at the northern slopes of Nea Kameni revealed a fascinating underwater landscape of lava flows, lava spines and fractured lava blocks that have been formed as a result of 1707-1711 and 1925-1928 AD eruptions. A hummocky topography at

  17. Miocene rifting in the Los Angeles basin: Evidence from the Puente Hills half-graben, volcanic rocks, and P-wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Tom; Burke, Kevin; Zhou, Hua-Wei; Yeats, Robert S.

    2002-05-01

    Formation of the Puente Hills half-graben in the northeastern Los Angeles basin and eruption of the Glendora and El Modeno Volcanics (16 14 Ma) help to define the timing of extension in the basin. Normal faulting on the proto-Whittier fault ca. 14 Ma established the Puente Hills half-graben, in which sedimentary strata accumulated between ca. 14 and 10 Ma and into which diabase sills intruded. North-South contraction began to invert the Puente Hills half-graben ca. 7 Ma, leading to formation of the Puente Hills anticline and the Whittier fault. Our high-resolution three-dimensional P-wave velocity model shows two anomalous higher velocity (6.63 km/s) bodies at depths between 9 and 18 km, which we attribute to dioritic plutons named here for Whittier Narrows and El Modeno. The stocklike Whittier Narrows pluton could have been a source for the Glendora Volcanics and the diabase sills in the Puente Hills half-graben. The sill-shaped El Modeno pluton was a likely source for the El Modeno Volcanics. The northwesterly alignment of the plutons may mark the location of the northeastern Los Angeles basin rift boundary, which is associated with the clockwise rotation of the western Transverse Ranges. Three active faults, the Elysian Park blind thrust, the Puente Hills blind thrust, and the Whittier fault, converge on the Whittier Narrows pluton, which may have played a role in their location and segmentation.

  18. The Role of Magmatic and Volcanic Loads in Generating Seaward Dipping Reflector Structures on Volcanic Rifted Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X.; Buck, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    The largest volcanic constructs on Earth are the seismically imaged seaward dipping reflector (SDR) units found offshore of many rifted continental margins, including a large portion that border the Atlantic Ocean. There is considerable controversy over whether their formation requires large offset (i.e. 10s of km) normal faults or not. Although there is some evidence for faulting in association with SDRs, we here show that a wide range of SDRs structures can be produced solely by volcanic loading. To do this we first derive a simple analytic description of a particular type of volcanic construct. We assume that the increase in density when fluid magma in a dike solidifies provides load at the rift center onto the end of a lithospheric plate. Extrusives are assumed to form flat-topped layers that fill in the flexural depression produced by the load of the solidified dike. The thin-plate flexure approximation is used to calculate the deflections due to the vertical load. This simple model produces structures similar to the observed SDRs. Expressions for the maximum thickness of the volcanic pile and the dip of an individual SDR are derived in terms of the flexure parameter and material densities. Asymmetry of SDR units seen across some conjugate margins can be explained with this model if periodic offsets, or jumps of the center of magmatism are included. In addition, we developed a numerical model of lithospheric extension, magma intrusion and volcanism with a temperature dependent elasto-viscous and brittle-plastic rheology. Results of these 2D cross-sectional models with fixed thermal structure confirm the qualitative predictions of the analytic model without the simplified uniform plate assumption. Preliminary results suggest that the rapid subsidence of SDRs, inferred for some rifted margins, can occur if magma is supplied only to the brittle upper layer and the hot weak lower crust is thinned by stretching. This numerical approach may also allow us to test

  19. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  20. CENOZOIC VOLCANISM AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN NORTHEAST CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper is concentrated on Cenozoic volcanism and geothermal resources in Northeast China. There are a lot of Cenozoic volcanoes, a large area of volcanic rocks, a large number of active faults and rich geothermal resources in Northeast China. The time and space characteristics of Cenozoic volcanism and the space distribution characters of hot springs and high geothermal flux regions in Northeast China are described and discussed on the basis of geological, geothermal, drilling and volcanological data. It is revealed that the hot springs and high geothermal flux regions are re lated to the Cenozoic volcanism, rifting and faulting in Northeast China. It is especially emphasized that the hot springs and high geothermal anomaly areas are controlled by active deep faults. It is proposed that the Cenozoic volcanism re gions, rift basins, active fault belts, activated plate suture zones and large earthquake occurrence points are the best areas for prospecting geothermal resources. The geothermal resources in younger volcanic zones are richer than those in older volcanic belts. The hot springs and active or activated faults might be a very good clue for looking for geothermal resources.

  1. 松辽盆地南部长岭断陷火山岩岩性岩相特征及其对储层的控制作用%Lithologic and Lithofacies Characteristics of Volcanic Rock and Their Controlling Effects on Reservoirs of Changling Fault Depression in the South of Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜雪; 邹华耀; 饶勇; 杨元元

    2009-01-01

    长岭断陷是松辽盆地南部最大的断陷,其深层勘探程度低、油气资源丰富、火山岩分布面积大,是很好的油气储集空间.为了明确长岭断陷层火山岩的分布规律以预测有利的储层,本文通过对火山岩的岩心观察、薄片鉴定、测井资料、二维、三维地震资料的综合分析,提出长岭断陷层火山岩主要发育于火石岭组和营城组,以火山熔岩和火山碎屑岩为主;发育出爆发相、溢流相、火山通道相、侵出相和火山沉积相5种火山岩岩相及11种亚相,其中以爆发相和溢流相为主;长岭断陷深层火山岩主要沿深大断裂呈带状分布.裂隙式和中心式喷发兼有,在垂向上表现为多期次喷发序列的叠置:营城组发育三个火山喷发旋回.统计显示溢流相上部和下部亚相的流纹岩和爆发相热碎屑流亚相的凝灰岩的气孔、溶孔和裂缝发育,储集物性最好.%The Changling fault depression is the largest fault depression in the south of Songliao Basin. The deep formation in the depression with a low exploration degree contains abundant hydrocarbon resources, where volcanic rocks are distributedextensively, as a good reservoir of oil and gasses. According to core observation, thin section identification and integration of well log and 2D/3D seismic data, the Yingcheng formation and Huoshiling formation are rich in volcanic rocks, mainly consisting of lava and pyroclastic rocks. 5 types of volcanic lithofacies and 11 types of volcanic subfacies such as explosive facies, overflow facies, volcanic conduit facies, extrusive facies and eruptive-sedimentary facies can be identified, which are mainly overflow facies and explosive facies. The volcanic rocks in the depression are distributed along big deep faults and superimposed by many times of volcanic eruption in the vertical direction in models of eruption of both central type and fissure type. And three volcanic eruption cycles can be identified in

  2. Evaluation of the location and recency of faulting near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2002-01-17

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern

  3. Evaluation of the Location and Recency of Faulting Near Prospective Surface Facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern

  4. Fault Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis prob-lems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem setup introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis pr...... problems can be solved by standard optimization tech-niques. The proposed methods include: (1) fault diagnosis (fault estimation, (FE)) for systems with model uncertainties; (2) FE for systems with parametric faults, and (3) FE for a class of nonlinear systems.......This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis prob-lems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem setup introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis...

  5. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  6. Volcanic spreading forcing and feedback in geothermal reservoir development, Amiata Volcano, Italia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Andrea; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Allocca, Carmine; Delcroix, Carlo; Micheli, Luigi; Vercellino, Alberto; Grieco, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    We made a stratigraphic, structural and morphologic study of the Amiata Volcano in Italy. We find that the edifice is dissected by intersecting grabens that accommodate the collapse of the higher sectors of the volcano. In turn, a number of compressive structures and diapirs exist around the margin of the volcano. These structures create an angular drainage pattern, with stream damming and captures, and a set of lakes within and around the volcano. We interpret these structures as the result of volcanic spreading of Amiata on its weak substratum, formed by the late Triassic evaporites (Burano Anhydrites) and the Middle-Jurassic to Early-Cretaceous clayey chaotic complexes (Ligurian Complex). Regional doming created a slope in the basement facilitating the outward flow and spreading of the ductile layers forced by the volcanic load. We model the dynamics of spreading with a scaled lubrication approximation of the Navier Stokes equations, and numerically study a set of solutions. In the model we include simple functions for volcanic deposition and surface erosion that change the topography over time. Scaling indicates that spreading at Amiata could still be active. The numerical solution shows that, as the central part of the edifice sinks into the weak basement, diapiric structures of the underlying formations form around the base of the volcano. Deposition of volcanic rocks within the volcano and surface erosion away from it both enhance spreading. In addition, a sloping basement may constitute a trigger for spreading and formation of trains of adjacent diapirs. As a feedback, the hot hydrothermal fluids decrease the shear strength of the anhydrites facilitating the spreading process. Finally, we observe that volcanic spreading has created ideal heat traps that constitute todays' exploited geothermal fields at Amiata. Normal faults generated by volcanic spreading, volcanic conduits, and direct contact between volcanic rocks (which host an extensive fresh

  7. The property of fault zone and fault activity of Shionohira Fault, Fukushima, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshimo, K.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Niwa, M.; Kametaka, M.; Sakai, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The April 11, 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake (hereafter the 4.11 earthquake) formed co-seismic surface ruptures trending in the NNW-SSE direction in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, which were newly named as the Shionohira Fault by Ishiyama et al. (2011). This earthquake was characterized by a westward dipping normal slip faulting, with a maximum displacement of about 2 m (e.g., Kurosawa et al., 2012). To the south of the area, the same trending lineaments were recognized to exist even though no surface ruptures occurred by the earthquake. In an attempt to elucidate the differences of active and non-active segments of the fault, this report discusses the results of observation of fault outcrops along the Shionohira Fault as well as the Coulomb stress calculations. Only a few outcrops have basement rocks of both the hanging-wall and foot-wall of the fault plane. Three of these outcrops (Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto) were selected for investigation. In addition, a fault outcrop (Nameishi-minami) located about 300 m south of the southern tip of the surface ruptures was investigated. The authors carried out observations of outcrops, polished slabs and thin sections, and performed X-ray diffraction (XRD) to fault materials. As a result, the fault zones originating from schists were investigated at Kyodo-gawa and Betto. A thick fault gouge was cut by a fault plane of the 4.11 earthquake in each outcrop. The fault materials originating from schists were fault bounded with (possibly Neogene) weakly deformed sandstone at Shionohira. A thin fault gouge was found along the fault plane of 4.11 earthquake. A small-scale fault zone with thin fault gouge was observed in Nameishi-minami. According to XRD analysis, smectite was detected in the gouges from Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto, while not in the gouge from Nameishi-minami.

  8. PALEOSEISMICITY OF QUATERNARY FAULTS NEAR ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO: The Zia Fault

    OpenAIRE

    McCalpin, James P.

    2001-01-01

    This study continues USGS-funded efforts to assess the activity and earthquake hazard potential of Quaternary faults in the Albuquerque metropolitan region. Our target in 2000 was the Zia fault, a 37 km-long normal fault that trends N-S in northern Llano de Albuquerque (LdA). The Zia fault is one of three major east-dipping normal faults that define the western margin of the Rio Grande rift in the northern Albuquerque basin, the other faults being the Calabacillas fault (to the west of the Zi...

  9. Normal Faulting, Fluid Upflow Pathways, and Alteration in the Subsurface of a Seafloor Ultramafic-Hosted Hydrothermal System, northern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, J.; Levine, D.; Crispini, L.; Gaggero, L.; Shanks, W. C., III; Gulbransen, C.

    2016-12-01

    We document the mineralogy and geochemistry of a fault that acted as a hydrothermal upflow zone in the subsurface of a seafloor ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal system in the northern Apennines, Italy. The objectives are to understand fluid flow pathways, and the relative roles of upwelling hydrothermal fluids versus cold seawater and biological effects in such systems on the modern seafloor, which is much more difficult to access and study. Peridotites were exposed on the seafloor by detachment faulting, intruded by MORB gabbros, and are overlain by MORB lavas and pelagic sediments. North of the village of Reppia are two 1-2 m wide fault shear zones in serpentinite, oriented at a high angle to the detachment surface and extending hundreds of meters below the detachment. The host peridotite is 90-100% serpentinized, and serpentinite is highly replaced by talc plus tremolite and sulfide in the shear zones. At the paleo-seafloor, the fault offsets carbonate-cemented serpentinite breccia, talc-altered serpentinite, and serpentinite in the footwall to the west, from pillow basalts of the hanging wall on the east. Here the fault rocks consist of 90% Fe-dolomite with a few percent each of calcite, quartz, serpentine, talc, sulfides, chlorite, and trace relict Cr-spinel. The fault ends upward in massive sulfide overlain by pillow basalts and pelagic sediment. Three main alteration stages are identified. 1. Background serpentinites exhibit slight LREE enrichments and elevated d34S values (+3.9 to +5.2‰) consistent with serpentinization by upwelling hot hydrothermal fluids. 2. Talc alteration of serpentinite leads to strong LREE enrichments, negative Eu anomalies, silica metasomatism, and elevated Cu during the main hydrothermal upflow stage. 3. Carbonate alteration varies from slight veining of serpentinite to near-total replacement in the shallow fault rocks, with variable enrichments of LREE, Ca, Si, and metals. Carbonate oxygen isotope temperatures of 15-150°C and d13C

  10. Soil radon levels across the Amer fault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font, Ll. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)], E-mail: lluis.font@uab.cat; Baixeras, C.; Moreno, V. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Bach, J. [Unitat de Geodinamica externa, Departament de Geologia, Edifici Cs, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    Soil radon levels have been measured across the Amer fault, which is located near the volcanic region of La Garrotxa, Spain. Both passive (LR-115, time-integrating) and active (Clipperton II, time-resolved) detectors have been used in a survey in which 27 measurement points were selected in five lines perpendicular to the Amer fault in the village area of Amer. The averaged results show an influence of the distance to the fault on the mean soil radon values. The dynamic results show a very clear seasonal effect on the soil radon levels. The results obtained support the hypothesis that the fault is still active.

  11. Tectonics control over instability of volcanic edifices in transtensional tectonic regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, G.; Capra, L.; Lagmay, A. M. F.; Manea, M.; Groppelli, G.

    2009-04-01

    We present the results of analogue modeling designed to investigate the interactions between volcanic edifices and transtensional basement faulting. Three sets of experiments were run to account for three examples of stratovolcanoes in active transtensive tectonics regimes, the Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes in Mexico, and the Mayon volcano in the Philippines. All these volcanoes show different behavior and relationship among volcanism, instability of the volcanic edifice, and basement tectonics. Field geological and structural data gave the necessary constrains to the models. The modeling apparatus consisted of a sand cone on a sheared basal layer. Injections of vegetable oil were used to model the rising of magma inside the deformed analogue cones. Set 1: In the case of a volcano directly on top of a basal transtensive shear producing a narrow graben, as observed on the Nevado de Toluca volcano, the analogue models reveal a strong control of the basement faulting on the magma migration path and the volcano instability. Small lateral collapses are directed parallel to the basal shear and affect a limited sector of the cone. Set 2: If the graben generated by transtensive tectonics is bigger in respect to the volcanic edifice and the volcano sits on one boundary fault, as in the case of Mayon volcano, the combined normal and transcurrent movements of the analogue basement fault generate a sigmoidal structure in the sand cone, inducing major sector collapses directed at approx 45° relative to the basement shear toward the downthrown block. Set 3: For volcanoes located near major transtensive faults, as the Jocotitlan volcano, analogue modelling shows an important control of the regional tectonics on the geometry of the fractures and migration paths of magma inside the cone. These structures render unstable the flanks of the volcano and promote sector collapses perpendicular to the basement shear and directed toward the graben formed by the transtensive

  12. Active fault segments as potential earthquake sources: Inferences from integrated geophysical mapping of the Magadi fault system, southern Kenya Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuria, Z. N.; Woldai, T.; van der Meer, F. D.; Barongo, J. O.

    2010-06-01

    Southern Kenya Rift has been known as a region of high geodynamic activity expressed by recent volcanism, geothermal activity and high rate of seismicity. The active faults that host these activities have not been investigated to determine their subsurface geometry, faulting intensity and constituents (fluids, sediments) for proper characterization of tectonic rift extension. Two different models of extension direction (E-W to ESE-WNW and NW-SE) have been proposed. However, they were based on limited field data and lacked subsurface investigations. In this research, we delineated active fault zones from ASTER image draped on ASTER DEM, together with relocated earthquakes. Subsequently, we combined field geologic mapping, electrical resistivity, ground magnetic traverses and aeromagnetic data to investigate the subsurface character of the active faults. Our results from structural studies identified four fault sets of different age and deformational styles, namely: normal N-S; dextral NW-SE; strike slip ENE-WSW; and sinistral NE-SW. The previous studies did not recognize the existence of the sinistral oblique slip NE-SW trending faults which were created under an E-W extension to counterbalance the NW-SE faults. The E-W extension has also been confirmed from focal mechanism solutions of the swarm earthquakes, which are located where all the four fault sets intersect. Our findings therefore, bridge the existing gap in opinion on neo-tectonic extension of the rift suggested by the earlier authors. Our results from resistivity survey show that the southern faults are in filled with fluid (0.05 and 0.2 Ωm), whereas fault zones to the north contain high resistivity (55-75 Ωm) material. The ground magnetic survey results have revealed faulting activity within active fault zones that do not contain fluids. In addition, the 2D inversion of the four aero-magnetic profiles (209 km long) revealed: major vertical to sub vertical faults (dipping 75-85° east or west); an

  13. Detailed Seismic Reflection Images of the Central American Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, K. D.; Fulthorpe, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    New high-resolution seismic reflection profiles across the Central American volcanic arc (CAVA) reveal an asymmetric deformation pattern with large-scale folding and uplift of basinal strata in the forearc contrasted by intrusive bodies, normal faults, and possible strikes-slip faults in the backarc. Since Miocene times the CAVA has migrated seaward, apparently impinging on the Sandino forearc basin and creating or modifying the low-lying Nicaragua depression, which contains the backarc and much of the arc. However the structural nature of the depression and its possible relationship to forearc sliver movement is poorly known. In November-December 2004 we recorded a large, high-resolution, seismic reflection dataset largely on the Pacific shelf (forearc) area of Central America, extending from NW Costa Rica to the SE edge of El Salvador's territorial waters. We seized an opportunity to study the nature of the CAVA by recording data into the Gulf of Fonseca, a large embayment at the intersection of Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador. With 3 GI airguns and a 2100 m streamer we recorded data with typical penetration of 2-3 seconds in the Sandino basin and frequency content of ~10-250 Hz (at shallow levels). Penetration was limited over the arc summit with high velocity volcanic rocks encountered at depths as shallow as a few hundred meters. To the NE the edge of the Nicaragua depression occurs abruptly; our data show a well-developed sedimentary basin 1.5-3 km thick separated by numerous steeply-dipping faults. The broadband signal and good penetration of this dataset will help us determine the chronology of arc development in this position and the styles of deformation in the forearc, arc, and backarc areas. In turn, this will help us understand the regional tectonic and stratigraphic development of this margin due to the profound affects of the arc.

  14. Recognition of Active Faults and Stress Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, T.

    2012-12-01

    Around the plate-boundary region, the directions of maximum and minimum stress related to the plate motion is one of the key for the recognition of active faults. For example, it is typical idea that there are many N-S trading reverse faults, NE-SW and NW-SE trending strike slip faults and less normal faults (only near volcanoes) in Japan, where the compressional stress with E-W direction is dominant caused by the motion of the subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the North American Plate. After the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mj 9.0), however, many earthquakes with the mechanism of the normal fault type occurred in the coastal region of the northern-east Japan. On 11th April 2011, the Fukushima Hamadori Earthquake (Mj 7.0) occurred accompanying surface faults along two faults, the Idosawa fault and the Yunotake fault, that recognized as active faults by the Research Group for Active Fault of Japan (1980, 1991). It impacted on active fault study by the reason of not only the appearance of two traces of significant surface faults with maximum displacement up to 2.1 m, but also the reactivation of the normal faults under the E-W compressional stress field. When we identify the active faults, it is one of the key whether the direction of slip on the fault consists with the stress field in that area or not. And there is a technique to recognized whether the fault is active or not by using the data of the direction of stress in the field and the geometry of the fault plane. Though it is useful for the fault in the rock without overlain Quaternary deposits, we should care that the active faults may react caused by the temporal stress condition after the generation of large earthquakes.

  15. Contributions to Astrogeology: Geology of the lunar crater volcanic field, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D. H.; Trask, N. J.

    1971-01-01

    The Lunar Crater volcanic field in east-central Nevada includes cinder cones, maars, and basalt flows of probably Quaternary age that individually and as a group resemble some features on the moon. Three episodes of volcanism are separated by intervals of relative dormancy and erosion. Changes in morphology of cinder cones, degree of weathering, and superposition of associated basalt flows provide a basis for determining the relative ages of the cones. A method has been devised whereby cone heights, base radii, and angles of slope are used to determine semiquantitatively the age relationships of some cinder cones. Structural studies show that cone and crater chains and their associated lava flows developed along fissures and normal faults produced by tensional stress. The petrography of the basalts and pyroclastics suggests magmatic differentiation at depth which produced interbedded subalkaline basalts, alkali-olivine basalts, and basanitoids. The youngest flows in the field are basanitoids.

  16. ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC FACIES AND APPARATUS OF YINGCHENG FORMATION IN XUJAWEIZI FAULTING DEPRESSION,SONGLIAO BASIN NORTHEAST CHINA%松辽盆地徐家围子断陷营城组 火山岩相和火山机构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    徐家围子断陷营城组火山岩极为发育。文章通过对火山岩的岩芯观察、薄片鉴定、岩芯测试及测井资料、二维、三维地震资料的综合分析,将营城组火山岩盆地分为3大相区,即火山喷发区、过渡区和沉积区。火山喷发区岩性由各种熔岩、火山碎屑岩和少量砂砾岩组成;过渡区岩性以火山碎屑岩与沉积岩互层为特征,夹少量火山熔岩;沉积区岩性包括砂砾岩、砂岩、粉砂岩和泥岩。火山喷发区内可识别出8种类型的火山岩相(空落相、溢流相、基底涌流相、火山碎屑流相、火山泥石流相、火山沉积相、次火山相、隐爆角砾岩相)和3种类型的火山机构(层火山、微型盾火山和渣锥火山)。不同类型的火山机构具有不同火山作用、岩相分布特征和含油气性。因此火山岩相及火山机构分析对火山作用研究和油气勘探均有重要意义。%Yingcheng formation in Xujaweizi faulting depression, Songliao Basin, is rich in volcanic rock. Based on core observation, thin sections identification and integration of well log and 2D/3D seismic data, 3 facies zones are identified in Yingcheng Formation in this basin, which is the eruption zone of volcanic, transitional zone and sedimentary zone. The eruption zone consists of lava, pyroclastic and limited sandy conglomerate. The transitional zone is characterized by interbedding of pyroclastic and sedimentary rocks,and a little volcanic lava rocks was also found in the strata. Sandy conglomerate, sandy stone and siltstone are developed in the sedimentary zone. Moreover, 8 types of volcanic lithofacies such as fallout facies, effusion facies, base surges facies, pyroclastics flow facies, lahar facies, eruption-sedimentary facies, sub-volcanic rock facis and sub-explosive breccia facies, and three kinds of volcanic apparatus such as layered volcano, micro-shield volcano and cone Volcano can be identified in the

  17. Caldera resurgence as a possible cause of slope failure in volcanic areas: the Ischia island case history

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vita, Sandro; Seta Marta, Della; Paola, Fredi; Enrica, Marotta; Giovanni, Orsi; Fabio, Sansivero

    2010-05-01

    bordered by inward-dipping, high-angle reverse faults, cut by late outward-dipping normal faults due to gravitational readjustment of the slopes. The north-eastern and the south-western sides are bordered by vertical faults with right transtensive and left transpressive movements, respectively. The area located to the east of the most uplifted block is displaced by outward-dipping normal faults. Some giant landslides and their relationships with volcano-tectonism have been recognized at Ischia. Their deposits are intercalated with primary volcanics and minor landslide deposits in the eastern sector of the island. Within the northern and western sectors, historical earthquake-triggered landslides are well exposed, also due to lack of recent volcanic rocks. The largest landslide bodies seem to have a submarine counterpart, as evidenced by the hummocky topography of the seafloor in the offshore of the island. The recognized landslides vary from small lahars to large debris-avalanche, whose detachment areas are clearly conditioned by the geometry of the same structures that drove resurgence and fed volcanism. In conclusion, the results of a detailed stratigraphical, sedimentological and structural study carried out at Ischia, emphasize the intimate interplay among slope instability, resurgence dynamics, fault generation, seismicity and volcanism on the island.

  18. Structural evolution of the La Trocha fault zone: Oblique collision and strike-slip basins in the Cuban Orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Orosa, Israel; Sã Bat, Francesc; Ramos, Emilio; Rivero, LluíS.; VáZquez-Taset, Yaniel M.

    2012-10-01

    The La Trocha fault zone acted as a major left-lateral transfer zone and is bounded by the La Trocha (LTF), Zaza-Tuinicú (ZTF), Cristales (CTF) and Taguasco (TGF) faults. These faults were consistent with the clockwise rotation of convergence and shortening in central Cuba. From the Paleocene to the Early Eocene (65-48 Ma), a SSW-NNE shortening produced transtension in the LTF and transpression in the ZTF. Subsequently, during the Middle Eocene (48-37 Ma), shortening shifted to a SW-NE direction, resulting in the normal component of the LTF and transpression in the ZTF and CTF. Since the Late Eocene (37 Ma), central Cuba has been welded to the North American Plate. The post-welding deformation gave rise to transtension of the LTF and TGF. This deformation is consistent with a WSW-ENE shortening and reflects activity in the transform boundary of the Cayman Trough. Both the normal and thrust displacements of these previous faults are corroborated by structural data whereas left-lateral displacement is deduced from the concordance between oblique collision and structural features. Plate-kinematics and the structural evolution of the La Trocha fault zone indicate that the related Central Basin is a strike-slip polygenetic basin and that the formation of this system (i.e., fault zone - strike-slip basin) was a consequence of the Paleogene oblique collision between the Caribbean Volcanic Arc and the Bahamas Borderland (North American plate).

  19. The geochemical variations of the upper cenozoic volcanism along the Calama Olacapato El Toro transversal fault system in central Andes (˜24°S): petrogenetic and geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, M.; Mazzuoli, R.; Omarini, R.; Cas, R.; Maas, R.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, we present new geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data for several Upper Miocene volcanic centres aligned along one of the most extensive transcurrent lineament in the Central Andes, the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT). The transversal volcanic belt along COT is constituted by large composite volcanoes and a caldera structure; they are, from NW to SE, Puntas Negras, Rincon, Tul Tul, Del Medio and Pocitos (TUMEPO), Quevar Aguas Calientes and Tastil. In order to compare chemical data from the different centres along the COT transect, differentiation effects were minimised by using data extrapolated at 60% SiO2 with least-square regression method. In the western sector of the COT, the volcanic products of Puntas Negras and Rincon show relatively high K2O and 87Sr/86Sr and low Rb/Cs, Ta/Th, La/Yb, 143Nd/144Nd. To the east, the TUMEPO products have high Sr and 143Nd/144Nd, La/Yb and Ba/Rb and low Y, 87Sr/86Sr. In the easternmost COT sector, Quevar, Aguas Calientes and Tastil volcanic complexes exhibit low La/Yb, high87Sr/Sr86 and low 143Nd/144Nd. On the basis of these data, we propose a petrogenetic and geodynamical model for Central Andes at 24°S. In correspondence of Miocene-Quaternary volcanic arc (Puntas Negras and Rincon), the magmas inherited a calcalkaline signature partly modified by upper crustal and/or sediment assimilation. In the central eastern sector, melting, assimilation, storage and homogenisation (MASH) processes occurred at the base of a thickened crust. In this COT sector, TUMEPO products show an evident lower crust signature and could be considered representative for MASH derived magmas. In the easternmost sector, Quevar, Aguas Calientes and Tastil products could represent magmas generated by partial melting of underthrusted Brasilian shield and mixed with magmas derived by MASH processes.

  20. Faulting of local earthquakes in the Valley of Mexico Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, D. I.; Quintanar, L.; Jimenez, Z.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we determine focal mechanisms and source parameters of relevant earthquakes (M > 2 occurred in the Valley of Mexico Basin during the past ten years. Data delineates four seismic zones: the first is located north of the Basin, the second in the Chichinautzin mountains range, the third in the Eastern part of Basin and the fourth in the area surrounding the volcano Popocatepetl; here earthquakes are associated with volcanic activity. Source mechanisms were obtained using a method of waveform modeling and joint inversion of polarities and amplitudes of P and S phases. Our results show mechanisms mainly of normal type, consistent with the faulting found across the Trans Mexican volcanic belt. Likewise, from the spectral analysis of signals, we observe an overestimation of the magnitude reported by the Mexican Seismological Service for the earthquakes analyzed. During July 2012, there was an earthquake swarm in the eastern part of Valley of Mexico damaging some constructions in the epicentral area. Our preliminary analysis indicates that most earthquakes of the swarm occurred at shallow depth (<1 km), which could be correlated with the surface cracks observed in the zone. The seismicity, as well the subsidence and faults in the area, is a factor that contributes significantly to increase seismic hazard in the area and should be considered by civil authorities.

  1. Permian magmatism, Permian detachment faulting, and Alpine thrusting in the Orobic Anticline, southern Alps, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Florian; Froitzheim, Niko; Geisler-Wierwille, Thorsten; Schlöder, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    The Grassi Detachment Fault is located in the Orobic Alps east of Lake Como and was described by Froitzheim et al. (2008) as an Early Permian extensional structure. Many issues still remained unclear, like the exact timing of faulting and the extension from the well-exposed part of the detachment towards west. The Grassi Detachment Fault separates the Variscan Basement in its footwall from the volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Early Permian Collio Formation within its hanging wall, marked by a mylonitic and cataclastic layer whose textures indicate top-to-the-southeast displacement. The footwall basement is formed by the Variscan Morbegno Gneiss and two granitic intrusions, the Val Biandino Quarz Diorite (VBQD) and the Valle Biagio Granite (VBG). The former is syntectonic with respect to the detachment, whereas for the latter, the relation to the detachment is unknown. The age of the VBQD is poorly defined as 312 Ma ± 48 Ma (Thöni et al. 1992); the VBG has not been dated. Volcanic rocks of the Collio Formation in the hanging wall may represent the extrusive part of the magmatic system. In our study area west of Val Biandino, several faults and shear zones are exposed: (1) The Grassi Detachment Fault is represented by mylonites and cataclasites with top-SE shear sense, between basement rocks and the Collio Volcanics. Towards NW, it is truncated by the unconformably overlying Late Permian Verrucano Lombardo. This may reflect the eroded culmination of a Permian metamorphic core complex. (2) A steeply NW-dipping, brittle normal fault is found further west in the footwall between VBQD and VBG. It is sealed by the basal unconformity of the Verrucano Lombardo and therefore should also be of Early Permian age (Sciunnach, 2001). It may represent an antithetic fault with respect to the detachment, accommodating the uplift of the magmatically inflated core complex. (3) The Biandino Fault is a steeply SE-dipping reverse fault, affecting also the Late Permian Verrucano

  2. Seismicity at Lusi and the adjacent volcanic complex, Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Anne; Karyono, Karyono; Diehl, Tobias; Lupi, Matteo; Mazzini, Adriano

    2017-04-01

    We study the local seismicity around the spectacular Lusi eruption site, a sedimentary- hosted hydrothermal system in East Java. Lusi is located 10 km NE of the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex and is fed by both mantellic and hydrothermal fluids rising and mixing with those present in the sedimentary formations. During a period of 17 months, we observed 289 micro-seismic earthquakes with local magnitudes ranging from ML0.5 to ML1.7. The events predominantly nucleate at depths of 8-13 km below the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. Despite the geological evidence of active tectonic deformation and faulting observed at the surface, little to no seismicity is observed in the sedimentary basin hosting Lusi. Although we cannot entirely rule out artifacts due to a significantly increased detection threshold in the sedimentary basin, the deficit in seismicity suggests aseismic deformation beneath Lusi due to the large amount of fluids that may lubricate the fault system. An analysis of focal mechanisms of seven selected events around the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex indicate predominantly strike-slip faulting activity in the region SW of Lusi. This type of activity is consistent the orientation and the movements observed for the Watukosek fault system that extends from the volcanic complex towards the NE of Java. Our results suggest that the tectonic deformation of the region is characterized by scattered faulting, rather than localized along a distinct fault plane.

  3. The TR method: A new graphical method that uses the slip preference of the faults to separate heterogeneous fault-slip data in extensional and compressional stress regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranos, Markos

    2013-04-01

    The new graphical TR method uses the slip preference (SP) of the faults to separate heterogeneous fault-slip data. This SP is described in detail and several examples of the application of the TR method are presented. For this purpose, synthetic fault-slip data driven by various extensional and compressional stress regimes whose greatest principal stress axis (σ1) or least principal stress axis (σ3) always remains in vertical or horizontal position respectively as in Andersonian stress states have been considered. Their SP is given through a simple graphical manner and the aid of the Win-Tensor stress inversion software. The extensional stress regimes that have been examined are the radial extension (RE), radial-pure extension (RE-PE), pure extension (PE), pure extension-transtension (PE-TRN) and transtension (TRN), whereas the compressional stress regimes are the radial compression (RC), radial-pure compression (RC-PC), pure compression (PC), pure compression-transpression (PC-TRP) and transpression (TRP). A necessary condition for the TR method that is the faults dipping towards the certain horizontal principal stress axis of the driving stress regime are dip-slip faults, either normal or reverse ones, is satisfied for all extensional and compressional stress regimes respectively. The trend of the horizontal least or greatest principal stress axis of the driving extensional or compressional stress regime respectively can be directly defined by the trend of the T-axes of the normal faults or the P-axes of the reverse faults respectively. Taking into account a coefficient of friction no smaller than 0.6, the reactivated extensional faults in the crust dip at angles higher than about 40°, and the increase of the stress ratio and/or the fault dip angle results in the increase of the slip deviation from the normal activation. In turn, in the compressional stress regimes, the dip angle and SP of the activated faults suggest the distinction of the compressional

  4. 青海东南部应力场特征及正断层小震现象的初步研究%Research on Stress Field Characteristics and Normal Fault Small Earthquakes of Southeastern Qinghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马辉青; 姚家骏; 马建新; 李玮杰; 袁伏全

    2014-01-01

    利用2008-2013年青海东南部数字地震波资料,采用 Pg、Sg 最大振幅比及 CAP 方法反演得到92个 ML 2.5~4.9中小地震震源机制解。统计结果表明该区中小地震震源类型以走滑为主,应力轴接近水平,兼有一定量正断层类型,逆冲类型较少;利用格点尝试法求出研究区平均现代构造应力场是以处于近 NE-SW 方向的水平压应力和近 NW-SE 方向的水平张应力为特征;进一步分析了研究区正断层小震产生的背景,初步认为这些正断层类型小震可能主要源自高海拔地形产生的重力滑塌作用。%Digital seismic waves recorded by Qinghai and Gansu digital networks from January 2008 to August 2013 are used to obtain 92 focal mechanism solutions of 4.9 ≥ M L≥ 2.5 moder-ate and small earthquakes in southeastern Qinghai by using the methods of P-wave and S-wave maximum amplitude ratio and cut and paste (CAP).The focal mechanism solutions of 3.9 ≥ M L≥ 2.5 are retrieved by the former method,and the other larger earthquakes are retrieved by the latter.Moreover,analysis of these focal mechanism solutions by means of statistics and systematic cluster analysis reveals that the predominant distributions of the plunge of T-and P-axes are less than 45°and that a few have a high plunge of P.These results indicate that the moderate and small earthquakes in this region are mostly strike-slip and that a certain number of normal fault earthquakes are present;however,small thrust fault earthquakes are rarely seen.The distributions of all of the azimuths of the P-axis are widely scattered,which may be attributed to the fact that the small earthquakes are more happenstance than tectonic earthquakes;however,the distribu-tions of the P-axis azimuth of M L≥ 3.0 are so regular that it is easy to see the predominant dis-tributions.By using focal mechanism solutions of M L≥ 3.0 by the grid test method,the mean re-gional stress field is obtained

  5. Study on fault induced rock bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-hua; DOU Lin-ming; LU Cai-ping; MU Zong-long; CAO An-ye

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the rules of rock bursts caused by faults by means of mechanical analysis of a roof rock-mass balanced structure and numerical simulation about fault slip destabilization, the effect of coal mining operation on fault plane stresses and slip displacement were studied. The results indicate that the slip displacement sharply increases due to the decrease of normal stress and the increase of shear stress at the fault plane when the working face advances from the footwall to the fault itself, which may induce a fault rock burst. However, this slip displacement will be very small due to the increase of normal stress and the decrease of shear stress when the working face advances from the hanging wall to the fault itself, which results in a very small risk of a fault rock burst.

  6. Volcanic rock properties control sector collapse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes constructed by superimposed layers of varying volcanic materials are inherently unstable structures. The heterogeneity of weak and strong layers consisting of ash, tephra and lavas, each with varying coherencies, porosities, crystallinities, glass content and ultimately, strength, can promote volcanic flank and sector collapses. These volcanoes often exist in areas with complex regional tectonics adding to instability caused by heterogeneity, flank overburden, magma movement and emplacement in addition to hydrothermal alteration and anomalous geothermal gradients. Recent studies conducted on the faulting properties of volcanic rocks at variable slip rates show the rate-weakening dependence of the friction coefficients (up to 90% reduction)[1], caused by a wide range of factors such as the generation of gouge and frictional melt lubrication [2]. Experimental data from experiments conducted on volcanic products suggests that frictional melt occurs at slip rates similar to those of plug flow in volcanic conduits [1] and the bases of mass material movements such as debris avalanches from volcanic flanks [3]. In volcanic rock, the generation of frictional heat may prompt the remobilisation of interstitial glass below melting temperatures due to passing of the glass transition temperature at ˜650-750 ˚C [4]. In addition, the crushing of pores in high porosity samples can lead to increased comminution and strain localisation along slip surfaces. Here we present the results of friction tests on both high density, glass rich samples from Santaguito (Guatemala) and synthetic glass samples with varying porosities (0-25%) to better understand frictional properties underlying volcanic collapse events. 1. Kendrick, J.E., et al., Extreme frictional processes in the volcanic conduit of Mount St. Helens (USA) during the 2004-2008 eruption. J. Structural Geology, 2012. 2. Di Toro, G., et al., Fault lubrication during earthquakes. Nature, 2011. 471(7339): p. 494-498. 3

  7. A Backarc Basin Origin for the Eocene Volcanic Rocks North of Abbas Abad, East of Shahrud, Northeast Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbari Jafari, M.; Mobasher, K.; Davarpanah, A.; Babaie, H.; La Tour, T.

    2008-12-01

    The region in northeastern Iran, bordered by the Miami fault and the Doruneh fault, mainly exposes the Eocene volcanic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks and sporadic outcrops of pre- Jurassic metamorphic rocks such as gneiss and mica-schist. We have divided the volcanic and volcanic-sedimentary rocks into six main units: E1 through the youngest E6. North of Abbas Abad, the Lower Eocene is conglomerate, sandstone, and red shale with lenses of nummulite-bearing limestone at the base, and dacitic lava (E1) at the top. The nummulites give an Early Eocene age for the limestone lenses. The E2 unit includes vesicular basalt, intercalated, intraformational conglomerate, and lenses of nummulite-bearing limestone. E3 is volcanic- sedimentary, and is made of green tuff, tuffite, shale, and nummulite bearing limestone. E4 includes basalt and vesicular trachy-basalt, and E5 is mostly sedimentary, made of tan marl, sandstone, shale, and lenses of Middle Eocene nummulite-bearing limestone. The E6 unit is the most extensive, with at least three levels of nummulite-bearing limestone lenses which give a Middle to Early Eocene age. The volcanic rocks of the E6 unit include few hundred meters of epiclastic to hyaloclastic breccia, with intercalations of lava at the base. These are overlain by four horizons of aphyric olivine basalt and basalt, and phyric trachy-andesite and trachy-basalt. The volume of the aphyric lavas decreases, and that of the phyric lavas increases upsection. The Eocene volcanic sequence is covered by turbidite; the marl washings give an Eocene-Oligocene age range. Chondrite-normalized multi-element plots indicate enrichment of the Eocene Abbas Abad volcanic rocks in the LILE elements, with variable ratios of La/Yb (4.36-19.33) and La/Sm (3.10-7.91). These plots show a gentle slope, and the volcanic rocks in the E1 to E4 units are less enriched than those in the E6 unit, probably reflecting the difference in the original source for the melt. The multi-element plots

  8. Mode-of-Failure Transitions in High Porosity Sedimentary and Ignimbrite Deposits, and Implications for Fault-Zone Structure and Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, L. B.; Rawling, G. C.; Wilson, J. E.; Tobin, H.

    2001-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that fault-zone deformation processes, and thus structures and fault-zone architecture, vary with the petrophysical properties of the protolith. Factors controlling whether or not open fractures form within a given fault zone are of particular importance to understanding fault-zone impacts on fluid flow. We discuss three examples of mode-of-failure transitions from strike-slip and normal faults in sedimentary and volcanic protoliths. Each example illustrates a mechanism by which porosity was reduced over time, resulting in changes in the mechanical behavior of the faulted material. These temporal variations are recorded by overprinting relationships within fault-zone architectural elements. The Sand Hill normal growth fault cuts poorly lithified sediments of the Rio Grande rift, NM. Architectural elements include a fault core bound by tabular mixed zones, which are in turn bracketed by deformation-band damage zones. The mixed zones have been described in poorly lithified sediments only; they consist of material derived from adjacent beds during slip, which has been disaggregated and tectonically mixed. Structures developed during mixing and particulate flow include foliations defined by compositional bands and aligned grains and attenuated and disarticulated beds. These structures are cut by deformation bands in the footwall mixed zone. We interpret these relationships as recording a transition from bulk particulate flow (in normally consolidated sediment) to localized shear within deformation bands (in overconsolidated sediment) as the footwall of the fault was syntectonically exhumed. Mixed zones are also present in the San Gregorio fault zone, a branch of the San Andreas fault system. The San Gregorio fault was active through sedimentation and lithification of rocks currently exposed along the CA coast. Attenuated and boudinaged beds on the SW side of the fault are cut by fractures and veins. We interpret these features as

  9. AN ANALYSIS OF SOUND FOR FAULT ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    Suphattharachai Chomphan; Theerathan Kingrattanaset

    2014-01-01

    Various types of faults of the gasoline engine may result in similar symptoms. Sound analysis of engine has been conducted to diagnose the engine faults. This study presents a study of sound analysis of the normal engine and the engine with three different fault conditions. The gasoline engine was our target of this study. The engine sound has been recorded by using a microphone at the engine room for three directions. Three conditions of engine faults including the engine that is not smooth ...

  10. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  11. Fault kinematics and depocenter evolution of oil-bearing, continental successions of the Mina del Carmen Formation (Albian) in the Golfo San Jorge basin, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, José Matildo; Plazibat, Silvana; Crovetto, Carolina; Stein, Julián; Cayo, Eric; Schiuma, Ariel

    2013-10-01

    Up to 10% of the liquid hydrocarbons of the Golfo San Jorge basin come from the Mina del Carmen Formation (Albian), an ash-dominated fluvial succession preserved in a variably integrated channel network that evolved coeval to an extensional tectonic event, poorly analyzed up to date. Fault orientation, throw distribution and kinematics of fault populations affecting the Mina del Carmen Formation were investigated using a 3D seismic dataset in the Cerro Dragón field (Eastern Sector of the Golfo San Jorge basin). Thickness maps of the seismic sub-units that integrate the Mina del Carmen Formation, named MEC-A-MEC-C in ascending order, and mapping of fluvial channels performed applying geophysical tools of visualization were integrated to the kinematical analysis of 20 main normal faults of the field. The study provides examples of changes in fault throw patterns with time, associated with faults of different orientations. The "main synrift phase" is characterized by NE-SW striking (mean Az = 49°), basement-involved normal faults that attains its maximum throw on top of the volcanic basement; this set of faults was active during deposition of the Las Heras Group and Pozo D-129 formation. A "second synrift phase" is recognized by E-W striking normal faults (mean Az = 91°) that nucleated and propagated from the Albian Mina del Carmen Formation. Fault activity was localized during deposition of the MEC-A sub-unit, but generalized during deposition of MEC-B sub-unit, producing centripetal and partially isolated depocenters. Upward decreasing in fault activity is inferred by more gradual thickness variation of MEC-C and the overlying Lower Member of Bajo Barreal Formation, evidencing passive infilling of relief associated to fault boundaries, and conformation of wider depocenters with well integrated networks of channels of larger dimensions but random orientation. Lately, the Mina del Carmen Formation was affected by the downward propagation of E-W to ESE-WNW striking

  12. Paleomagnetism of the Acambay graben, central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Arechalde, Ana María.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2000-03-01

    Paleomagnetic results for Miocene to Quaternary volcanic units of the Acambay graben are used to investigate the Neogene tectonic activity within the central sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). Characteristic magnetization directions were obtained for 22 sites, with an overall mean direction (Dec=176.7°, Inc=-34.3°, k=28, α95=6°) that is concordant with the expected direction calculated from North American reference data. Examination of site-mean directions shows an apparent geographic pattern related to the intersection of the Queretaro-Taxco fault zone with the E-W border fault system of the graben. This pattern is characterized by easterly and westerly declinations arranged into two broad groups. The mean direction for group A (easterly) is ( n=9): Dec=189.9°, Inc=-28.5°, k=53 and α 95=4.8 . The mean direction for group B (westerly) is ( n=13): Dec=167.6°, Inc=-36.2°, k=38 and α 95=4.3°. Group A sites cover two areas, one inside the graben and the other immediately to the south including the Pastores fault. Group B sites are distributed over broad NW and SE areas across the graben, which include the Amealco caldera and Epitacio Huerta and Acambay-Tixmadeje faults and also the Venta de Bravo fault. Eighteen units show reverse polarities, and four units show normal polarity. Absence of normal polarity Quaternary units suggests a pre-Brunhes age for units sampled. K-Ar dating in the Amealco caldera gives a range between 5.7 and 2.2 Ma. A comparison of group A and B mean directions with reference directions calculated from the North American 10 Ma pole and the geographic pole gives rotation parameters between 9.1±5.3° and 9.9±4.6° and between -12.4±5.4° and -12.4±4.3°, respectively. These may be interpreted in terms of vertical-axis rotations associated with regional left-lateral shear in a normal/strike-slip fault environment, which has characterized the Acambay graben during the Neogene.

  13. Volcanic activity in the Acambay Graben: a < 25 Ka subplinian eruption from the Temascalcingo volcano and implications for volcanic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Aguirre Díaz, Gerardo; Sunyé Puchol, Ivan; Bartolini, Stefania; Geyer, Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) contains a large number of stratovolcanoes, some well-known, as Popocatepetl, Iztaccihuatl, Nevado de Toluca, or Colima and many others of more modest dimensions that are not well known but constitute the majority in the TMVB. Such volcanoes are, for example, Tequila, San Juan, Sangangüey, Cerro Culiacán, Cerro Grande, El Zamorano, La Joya, Palo Huerfano, Jocotitlán, Altamirano and Temascalcingo, among many others. The Temascalcingo volcano (TV) is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) at the eastern part of the Acambay Graben (northwest portion of Estado de México). The TV is composed mainly by dacitic, porphyritic lavas, block and ash deposits and subordinate pumice fall deposits and ignimbrites (Roldán-Quintana et al., 2011). The volcanic structure includes a summit caldera that has a rectangular shape, 2.5×3.5 km, with the largest side oriented E-W, parallel to major normal faults affecting the edifice. The San Mateo Pumice eruption is one of the greatest paroxysmal episodes of this volcano with pumice deposits mainly exposed at the scarp of the Acambay-Tixmadeje fault and at the northern and northeastern flanks of TV. It overlies a paleosol dated at 25 Ka. A NE-trending dispersion was obtained from field data covering an area of at least 80 km2. These deposits overlie older lava flows and mud flows and are discontinuously covered and eroded by younger reworked deposits of Temascalcingo volcano. This event represents a highly explosive phase that generated a relatively thick and widespread pumice fallout deposit that may occur again in future eruptions. A similar eruption today would have a significantly impact in the region, overall due to the fact that there has been no systematic assessment of the volcanic hazard in any of the studies that have been conducted so far in the area. So, this is a pending and urgent subject that must be tackled without delay. Financed by

  14. Fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  15. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    [eng] One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing volcanic crisis. The impact of a natural event, as a volcanic eruption, can s...

  16. Architecture of small-scale fault zones in the context of the Leinetalgraben Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding fault zone properties in different geological settings is important to better assess the development and propagation of faults. In addition this allows better evaluation and permeability estimates of potential fault-related geothermal reservoirs. The Leinetalgraben fault system provides an outcrop analogue for many fault zones in the subsurface of the North German Basin. The Leinetalgraben is a N-S-trending graben structure, initiated in the Jurassic, in the south of Lower Saxony and as such part of the North German Basin. The fault system was reactivated and inverted during Alpine compression in the Tertiary. This complex geological situation was further affected by halotectonics. Therefore we can find different types of fault zones, that is normal, reverse, strike-slip an oblique-slip faults, surrounding the major Leinetalgraben boundary faults. Here we present first results of structural geological field studies on the geometry and architecture of fault zones in the Leinetalgraben Fault System in outcrop-scale. We measured the orientations and displacements of 17 m-scale fault zones in limestone (Muschelkalk) outcrops, the thicknesses of their fault cores and damage zones, as well as the fracture densities and geometric parameters of the fracture systems therein. We also analysed the effects of rock heterogeneities, particularly stiffness variations between layers (mechanical layering) on the propagation of natural fractures and fault zones. The analysed fault zones predominantly show similar orientations as the major fault zones they surround. Other faults are conjugate or perpendicular to the major fault zones. The direction of predominant joint strike corresponds to the orientation of the fault zones in the majority of cases. The mechanical layering of the limestone and marlstone stratification obviously has great effects on fracture propagation. Already thin layers (mm- to cm-scale) of low stiffness - here marl - seem to suffice to change the

  17. Seismological Studies for Tensile Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwo-Bin Ou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A shear slip fault, an equivalence of a double couple source, has often been assumed to be a kinematic source model in ground motion simulation. Estimation of seismic moment based on the shear slip model indicates the size of an earthquake. However, if the dislocation of the hanging wall relative to the footwall includes not only a shear slip tangent to the fault plane but also expansion and compression normal to the fault plane, the radiating seismic waves will feature differences from those out of the shear slip fault. Taking account of the effects resulting from expansion and compression to a fault plane, we can resolve the tension and pressure axes as well as the fault plane solution more exactly from ground motions than previously, and can evaluate how far a fault zone opens or contracts during a developing rupture. In addition to a tensile angle and Poisson¡¦s ratio for the medium, a tensile fault with five degrees of freedom has been extended from the shear slip fault with only three degrees of freedom, strike, dip, and slip.

  18. Sudden aseismic fault slip on the south flank of Kilauea volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervelli, Peter; Segall, Paul; Johnson, Kaj; Lisowski, Michael; Miklius, Asta

    2002-02-28

    One of the greatest hazards associated with oceanic volcanoes is not volcanic in nature, but lies with the potential for catastrophic flank failure. Such flank failure can result in devastating tsunamis and threaten not only the immediate vicinity, but coastal cities along the entire rim of an ocean basin. Kilauea volcano on the island of Hawaii, USA, is a potential source of such flank failures and has therefore been monitored by a network of continuously recording geodetic instruments, including global positioning system (GPS) receivers, tilt meters and strain meters. Here we report that, in early November 2000, this network recorded transient southeastward displacements, which we interpret as an episode of aseismic fault slip. The duration of the event was about 36 hours, it had an equivalent moment magnitude of 5.7 and a maximum slip velocity of about 6[?]cm per day. Inversion of the GPS data reveals a shallow-dipping thrust fault at a depth of 4.5[?]km that we interpret as the down-dip extension of the Hilina Pali--Holei Pali normal fault system. This demonstrates that continuously recording geodetic networks can detect accelerating slip, potentially leading to warnings of volcanic flank collapse.

  19. Identification of recently active faults and folds in Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marliyani, G. I.; Arrowsmith, R.; Helmi, H.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the spatial pattern of active deformation in Java, Indonesia with the aim of characterizing the deformation of the upper plate of the subduction zone in this region. The lack of detailed neotectonic studies in Java is mostly because of its relatively low rate of deformation in spite of significant historical seismic activity. In addition, the abundance of young volcanic materials as well as the region's high precipitation rate and vegetation cover obscure structural relationships and prevent reliable estimates of offset along active faults as well as exhumed intra-arc faults. Detailed maps of active faults derived from satellite and field-based neotectonic mapping, paleoseismic data, as well as new data on the fault kinematics and estimates of orientation of principal stresses from volcano morphology characterize recently active faults and folds. The structures in West Java are dominated by strike-slip faulting, while Central and northern part of East Java are dominated by folds and thrusting with minor normal faulting. The structures vary in length from hundreds meters to tens of kilometers and mainly trend N75°E, N8°E with some minor N45°W. Our preliminary mapping indicates that there are no large scale continuous structures in Java, and that instead deformation is distributed over wide areas along small structures. We established several paleoseismic sites along some of the identified structures. We excavated two shallow trenches along the Pasuruan fault, a normal fault striking NW-SE that forms a straight 13 km scarp cutting Pleistocene deltaic deposits of the north shore of East Java. The trenches exposed faulted and folded fluvial, alluvial and colluvial strata that record at least four ground-rupturing earthquakes since the Pleistocene. The Pasuruan site proves its potential to provide a paleoseismic record rarely found in Java. Abundant Quaternary volcanoes are emplaced throughout Java; most of the volcanoes show elongation in N100°E and N20

  20. Volcanic passive margins: another way to break up continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, L; Burov, E B; Werner, P

    2015-10-07

    Two major types of passive margins are recognized, i.e. volcanic and non-volcanic, without proposing distinctive mechanisms for their formation. Volcanic passive margins are associated with the extrusion and intrusion of large volumes of magma, predominantly mafic, and represent distinctive features of Larges Igneous Provinces, in which regional fissural volcanism predates localized syn-magmatic break-up of the lithosphere. In contrast with non-volcanic margins, continentward-dipping detachment faults accommodate crustal necking at both conjugate volcanic margins. These faults root on a two-layer deformed ductile crust that appears to be partly of igneous nature. This lower crust is exhumed up to the bottom of the syn-extension extrusives at the outer parts of the margin. Our numerical modelling suggests that strengthening of deep continental crust during early magmatic stages provokes a divergent flow of the ductile lithosphere away from a central continental block, which becomes thinner with time due to the flow-induced mechanical erosion acting at its base. Crustal-scale faults dipping continentward are rooted over this flowing material, thus isolating micro-continents within the future oceanic domain. Pure-shear type deformation affects the bulk lithosphere at VPMs until continental breakup, and the geometry of the margin is closely related to the dynamics of an active and melting mantle.

  1. The January 2006 Volcanic-Tectonic Earthquake Swarm at Mount Martin, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Power, John A.

    2009-01-01

    On January 8, 2006, a swarm of volcanic-tectonic earthquakes began beneath Mount Martin at the southern end of the Katmai volcanic cluster. This was the first recorded swarm at Mount Martin since continuous seismic monitoring began in 1996. The number of located earthquakes increased during the next four days, reaching a peak on January 11. For the next two days, the seismic activity decreased, and on January 14, the number of events increased to twice the previous day's total. Following this increase in activity, seismicity declined, returning to background levels by the end of the month. The Alaska Volcano Observatory located 860 earthquakes near Mount Martin during January 2006. No additional signs of volcanic unrest were noted in association with this earthquake swarm. The earthquakes in the Mount Martin swarm, relocated using the double difference technique, formed an elongated cluster dipping to the southwest. Focal mechanisms beneath Mount Martin show a mix of normal, thrust, and strike-slip solutions, with normal focal mechanisms dominating. For earthquakes more than 1 km from Mount Martin, all focal mechanisms showed normal faulting. The calculated b-value for the Mount Martin swarm is 0.98 and showed no significant change before, during, or after the swarm. The triggering mechanism for the Mount Martin swarm is unknown. The time-history of earthquake occurrence is indicative of a volcanic cause; however, there were no low-frequency events or observations, such as increased steaming associated with the swarm. During the swarm, there was no change in the b-value, and the distribution and type of focal mechanisms were similar to those in the period before the anomalous activity. The short duration of the swarm, the similarity in observed focal mechanisms, and the lack of additional signs of unrest suggest this swarm did not result from a large influx of magma within the shallow crust beneath Mount Martin.

  2. Geomorphological characteristics of the onshore/offshore volcanic edifices with respect to their evolutionary stage in the South Aegean Sea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S.; Nomikou, P.; Papanikolaou, D.; Alexandri, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanism in the South Aegean Sea first occurred about 3-4 million years ago, along four different volcanic island groups, including both onshore and recently discovered offshore volcanoes: 1) Starting from the west, the Methana group consists of the Methana stratovolcano, composed exclusively of volcaniclastics and lavas, creating cones and domes onland and the Paphsanias submarine cone in the Epidavros tectonic graben, bordered by E-W normal faults. It has a 2 km basal diameter at 400 m depth and its top rises to 150 m. 2) The Milos-Antimilos group consists of volcanic domes and calderas onland and three submarine domes to the east of Antimilos. A hydrothermal vent field is limited in the SE coastal zone of Milos, 3) The Santorini group consists of: (i) the older volcanic cones of Christianna islets and three submarine domes east of them, (ii) Santorini volcano which during the last 500 ka experienced repeated caldera collapses following Plinian eruptions and edifice rebuilding, represented by the growth of the Kamenes islands after the last catastrophic Late Bronze age eruption. (iii) a chain of about twenty submarine volcanic domes and craters in the Kolumbo zone northeast of Santorini. Kolumbo volcano is a 3 km diameter cone with a 1500 m wide crater, a crater rim as shallow as 18 m depth and a flat crater floor at 505 m depth containing an active hydrothermal vent field degassing 99% of CO2. 4) The Kos-Nisyros group at the eastern edge of the Hellenic Volcanic arc, comprises several domes and craters offshore and Nisyros volcano consists exclusively of alternating lava and pyroclastic deposits following several phases of reconstruction and caldera collapse. The rhyodacitic domes of Profitis Ilias are the latest evolutionary stage of Nisyros volcano which disrupted a pre-existed caldera and may be regarded as an earlier reconstruction phase similar to the Kameni islands at Santorini. The volcanic relief reaches 1100-1200 m in most cases. This is produced from

  3. Active faulting induced by the slip partitioning in the Lesser Antilles arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Frédérique; Feuillet, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    AGUADOMAR marine cruise data acquired 11 years ago allowed us to identified and map two main sets of active faults within the Lesser Antilles arc (Feuillet et al., 2002; 2004). The faults belonging to the first set, such as Morne-Piton in Guadeloupe, bound up to 100km-long and 50km-wide arc-perpendicular graben or half graben that disrupt the fore-arc reef platforms. The faults of the second set form right-stepping en echelon arrays, accommodating left-lateral slip along the inner, volcanic islands. The two fault systems form a sinistral horsetail east of the tip of the left-lateral Puerto Rico fault zone that takes up the trench-parallel component of convergence between the North-American and Caribbean plates west of the Anegada passage. In other words, they together accommodate large-scale slip partitioning along the northeastern arc, consistent with recent GPS measurements (Lopez et al., 2006). These intraplate faults are responsible for a part of the shallow seismicity in the arc and have produce damaging historical earthquakes. Two magnitude 6.3 events occurred in the last 25 years along the inner en echelon faults, the last one on November 21 2004 in Les Saintes in the Guadeloupe archipelago. To better constrain the seismic hazard related to the inner arc faults and image the ruptures and effects on the seafloor of Les Saintes 2004 earthquake, we acquired new marine data between 23 February and 25 March 2009 aboard the French R/V le Suroît during the GWADASEIS cruise. We present here the data (high-resolution 72 channel and very high-resolution chirp 3.5 khz seismic reflection profiles, EM300 multibeam bathymetry, Küllenberg coring and SAR imagery) and the first results. We identified, mapped and characterized in detail several normal to oblique fault systems between Martinique and Saba. They offset the seafloor by several hundred meters and crosscut all active volcanoes, among them Nevis Peak, Soufriere Hills, Soufriere de Guadeloupe and Montagne Pel

  4. Active spreading processes at ultraslow mid-ocean ridges: The 1999-2001 seismo-volcanic episode at 85°E Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten; Korger, Edith; Läderach, Christine

    2010-05-01

    seismicity migration, the swarm activated the rift valley boundary faults in a large area. Along the entire Gakkel ridge, normal fault earthquakes occur predominantly at volcanic centres pointing to strong tectonomagmatic interplay. - unusual change in swarm characteristics: Following 2-3 months of predominantly tectonic faulting, the swarm displays increasing non-double couple character events and an abrupt change in event rate preceded by three conspicuous events of high similarity located in the vicinity of potentially active volcanic structures. Brittle faulting may thus trigger later volcanic discharge or it could be in turn triggered by rising melts. - unusual volcanic discharge: In 2007, Sohn et al. (2008) discovered abundant pyroclastic deposits containing limu o Pele at the 85°E volcanic complex and therefore postulated recent deep submarine explosive volcanism at this site. In order to drive these explosive eruptions at 4 km water depth, high volume fractions of magmatic volatiles must be accumulated locally, for example at the top of a magma chamber under a thick and stable lithospheric roof. Together with the Strombolian eruptions which we inferred from the seismoacoustic explosion signals recorded in 2001, this indicates that an explosive eruption style may be common for volcanic spreading events at ultraslow spreading ridges. Sohn et al. (2008), Explosive volcanism on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean, Nature, 453,doi:10.1038/nature07075.

  5. Geology and stratigraphy of the Challis Volcanic Group and related rocks, Little Wood River area, south-central Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Richard F.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    2005-01-01

    Challis Volcanic Group accumulated was in part structurally controlled by preexisting west and northwest trending normal faults. Paleorelief was probably more than 2,000 ft (600 m). Rocks of the Challis Volcanic Group typically dip about 36? E., probably owing to Eocene extension and (or)basin-and-range faulting and tilting. Some potential forprecious and base metal hydrothermal deposits isassociated with northeast trending lineaments, argillicalteration, and rhyolite dikes.

  6. Identifying fault segments from 3D fault drag analysis (Vienna Basin, Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahić, Darko; Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike

    2013-10-01

    The segmented growth of the Markgrafneusiedl normal fault in the late Miocene clastic sediments of the central Vienna Basin (Austria) was investigated by construction of a detailed three-dimensional (3D) structural model. Using high resolution 3D seismic data, the fault surface and marker horizons in the hanging wall and the footwall of the Markgrafneusiedl Fault were mapped and orientation, displacement and morphology of the fault surface were quantified. Individual, fault segments were identified by direct mapping of the deflection of the marker horizons close to the fault surface. Correlating the size of the identified segments with the magnitude of fault drag and displacement distribution showed that fault evolution progressed in several stages. The proposed method allows the detection of segments that are not recorded by the magnitude of displacement or fault morphology. Most importantly, detailed mapping of marker deflections in the hanging wall could help to constrain equivalent structures in the footwall, which may represent potential hydrocarbon traps.

  7. Recognition and Significance of Volcanic Rocks of the Anda Depression of the Songliao Basin in Jurassic-Cretaceous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuhong Gao; Dongpo Wang; Xinrong Zhang; Guixia Ji; Jian Zhao

    2003-01-01

    A series of volcanic rocks were developed in the deep part of Anda faulting depression. The reflection of therocks are mainly stratiform and hummocky. Three kinds of volcanic facies, e.g. explosion facies, effusion facies andsub-volcanic facies,were recognized by different reflecting characteristics in the seismic profile. The volcanic rocks areformed during three episodes of volcanic activities from Shahezi Formation to Yingcheng Formation. The volcanismshave relation to the formation of Songliao Basin and regional tectonics of northeastern China. Some of the volcanic rocksare good oil and gas reservoirs.

  8. Radon levels in the volcanic region of La Garrotxa, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baixeras, C. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions. Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)]. E-mail: carmen.baixeras@uab.es; Bach, J. [Unitat de Geodinamica Externa. Departament de Geologia. Edifici Cs, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Amgarou, K. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions. Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Moreno, V. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions. Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Font, Ll. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions. Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2005-11-15

    A preliminary survey in the city of Olot, the main town of the volcanic region of La Garrotxa, showed that dwellings built on volcanic formations present higher indoor radon levels than dwellings on non-volcanic materials. The soil of the area is not especially rich in radium. However, some of the volcanic materials present very high permeability and therefore radon entering the houses might have travelled over long distances. In this paper we present indoor radon values measured in a larger survey carried out during April-July 2004. The influence of the volcanic materials found in the preliminary survey has been confirmed. The results obtained suggest the possibility that radon comes from the degassification of mantle through active faults. The values obtained in working places do not constitute a relevant radiological risk for workers.

  9. The Ventotene Volcanic Ridge: a newly explored complex in the central Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, Marco; Martorelli, Eleonora; Bosman, Alessandro; Conti, Alessia; Bigi, Sabina; Muccini, Filippo; Cocchi, Luca; Ligi, Marco; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Scrocca, Davide; Canese, Simonepietro; Chiocci, Francesco L.; Conte, Aida M.; Doglioni, Carlo; Perinelli, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    New high-resolution geophysical data collected along the eastern margin of the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin, in the Pontine Islands area, reveal a ˜NW-SE elongated morphological high, the Ventotene Volcanic Ridge (VR), located on the northern edge of the Ventotene Basin. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry, combined with magnetic data, multi- and single-channel seismic profiles, and ROV dives, suggest that VR results from aggregation of a series of volcanic edifices. The summit of these volcanoes is flat and occurs at about 170 m water depth. Given their depths, we propose that flat morphologies were probably caused by surf erosion during Quaternary glacial sea level lowstands. Seismic stratigraphy together with magnetic data suggest that the volcanic activity in this area is older than 190-130 ka age and may be coeval with that of Ventotene Island (Middle Pleistocene). The submarine volcanoes, located 25 km north of Ventotene, are part of a ˜E-W regional volcanic alignment and extend the Pontine volcanism landward toward the Gaeta bay. Integration of structural data from multichannel seismic profiles in this sector of the eastern Tyrrhenian margin indicates that several normal and/or transtensional faults, striking WNW-ESE, NNW-SSE, and NE-SW, offset the basement and form alternating structural highs and depressions filled by thick, mostly undeformed, sedimentary units. Arc-related magmatism is widespread in the study area, where the VR is placed at the hangingwall of the west-directed Apennines subduction zone, which is undergoing tensional and transtensional tectonics. Bathymetric and topographic evidence shows that VR lies in between a major NE-SW trending escarpment east of Ponza and a NE-SW trending graben southwest of the Roccamonfina volcano, a NE-SW transfer zone that accommodate the extension along this segmented portion of the margin. This suggests that the interaction between NE-SW and NW-SE trending fault systems acts as a structural control on

  10. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  11. Volcanic and Tectonic Activity in the Red Sea Region (2004-2013): Insights from Satellite Radar Interferometry and Optical Imagery

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenbin

    2015-04-01

    Studying recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region is important for improving our knowledge of the Red Sea plate boundary and for regional geohazard assessments. However, limited information has been available about the past activity due to insufficient in-situ data and remoteness of some of the activity. In this dissertation, I have used satellite remote sensing to derive new information about several recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region. I first report on three volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea, the 2007-8 Jebel at Tair eruption and the 2011-12 & 2013 Zubair eruptions, which resulted in formation of two new islands. Series of high- resolution optical images were used to map the extent of lava flows and to observe and analyze the growth and destructive processes of the new islands. I used Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to study the evolution of lava flows, to estimate their volumes, as well as to generate ground displacements maps, which were used to model the dikes that fed the eruptions. I then report on my work of the 2009 Harrat Lunayyir dike intrusion and the 2004 Tabuk earthquake sequence in western Saudi Arabia. I used InSAR observations and stress calculations to study the intruding dike at Harrat Lunayyir, while I combined InSAR data and Bayesian estimation to study the Tabuk earthquake activity. The key findings of the thesis are: 1) The recent volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea indicate that the area is magmatically more active than previously acknowledged and that a rifting episode has been taken place in the southern Red Sea; 2) Stress interactions between an ascending dike intrusion and normal faulting on graben-bounding faults above the dike can inhibit vertical propagation of magma towards the surface; 3) InSAR observations can improve locations of shallow earthquakes and fault model uncertainties are useful to associate earthquake activity with mapped faults; 4). The

  12. Listric growth faults in the Kenya Rift Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. B.

    Many of the major faults in the Kenya Rift Valley are curved in section, were active over considerable periods and form sets which are related in space and time. They can, therefore, be regarded as systems of listric growth faults. The Elgeyo Fault marks the western limit of rift structures at this latitude and displaces the basement surface by up to about 6 km. The Kamasia Hills are a block rotated above this fault plane. Movement on the Elgeyo Fault has been grossly continuous since at least 16 Ma ago but deposition of volcanics and sediments has generally kept pace with the growth of the escarpment. The Kaparaina Arch is a rollover anticline on the downthrown side of the Saimo Fault on the eastern side of the Kamasia Hills. On the eastern side of the rift, the block between the Bogoria and Wasages-Marmanet Faults has shown continued rotation since about 15 Ma. The Pleistocene lavas on the rift floor here show rollover into the Bogoria Fault and have formed a facing near the top of the escarpment. Area balancing calculations suggest depths to décollement of 25 km for the Elgeyo Fault, 6 km for the Saimo Fault and 12 km for the Bogoria Fault. The most direct evidence for the listric nature of the faults is provided by microearthquakes near Lake Manyara which appear to lie on fault planes connected to surface escarpments.

  13. Mazatan metamorphic core complex (Sonora, Mexico): structures along the detachment fault and its exhumation evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granillo, Ricardo Vega; Calmus, Thierry

    2003-08-01

    The Mazatán Sierra is the southernmost metamorphic core complex (MCC) of the Tertiary extensional belt of the western Cordillera. Its structural and lithological features are similar to those found in other MCC in Sonora and Arizona. The lower plate is composed of Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks intruded by Tertiary plutons, both of which are overprinted by mylonitic foliation and N70°E-trending stretching lineation. Ductile and brittle-ductile deformations were produced by Tertiary extension along a normal shear zone or detachment fault. Shear sense is consistent across the Sierra and indicates a top to the WSW motion. The lithology and fabric reflect variations in temperature and pressure conditions during extensional deformation. The upper plate consists mainly of Cambrian-Mississippian limestone and minor quartzite, covered by upper Cretaceous volcanic rocks, and then by Tertiary syntectonic sedimentary deposits with interbedded volcanic flows. Doming caused uplift and denudation of the detachment, as well as successive low-angle and high-angle normal faulting across the western slope of Mazatán Sierra. An 18±3 Ma apatite fission-track age was obtained for a sample of Proterozoic monzogranite from the lower plate. The mean fission-track length indicates rapid cooling and consequent rapid uplift of this sample during the last stage of crustal extension.

  14. Late Cenozoic cooling history of the central Menderes Massif: Timing of the Büyük Menderes detachment and the relative contribution of normal faulting and erosion to rock exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfler, Andreas; Glotzbach, Christoph; Heineke, Caroline; Nilius, Nils-Peter; Hetzel, Ralf; Hampel, Andrea; Akal, Cüneyt; Dunkl, István; Christl, Marcus

    2017-10-01

    Based on new thermochronological data and 10Be-derived erosion rates from the southern part of the central Menderes Massif (Aydın block) in western Turkey, we provide new insights into the tectonic evolution and landscape development of an area that undergoes active continental extension. Fission-track and (U-Th)/He data reveal that the footwall of the Büyük Menderes detachment experienced two episodes of enhanced cooling and exhumation. Assuming an elevated geothermal gradient of 50 °C/km, the first phase occurred with an average rate of 0.90 km/Myr in the middle Miocene and the second one in the latest Miocene and Pliocene with a rate of 0.43 km/Myr. The exhumation rates between these two phases were lower and range from 0.14 to 0.24 km/Myr, depending on the distance to the detachment. Cosmogenic nuclide-based erosion rates for catchments in the Aydın block range from 0.1 to 0.4 km/Myr. The similarity of the erosion rates on both sides of the Aydın block (northern and southern flank) indicate that a rather symmetric erosion pattern has prevailed during the Holocene. If these millennial erosion rates are representative on a million-year timescale they indicate that, apart from normal faulting, erosion in the hanging wall of the Büyük Menderes detachment fault did also contribute to the exhumation of the metamorphic rocks.

  15. Parabolic distribution of circumeastern Snake River Plain seismicity and latest Quaternary faulting: Migratory pattern and association with the Yellowstone hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Mark H.; Geissman, John Wm.; Piety, Lucille A.; Sullivan, J. Timothy

    1989-02-01

    The Intermountain and Idaho seismic belts within Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana form an unusual parabolic pattern about the axis of the aseismic eastern Snake River Plain (SRP). This pattern is also reflected in the distribution of latest Quaternary normal faults. Several late Cenozoic normal faults that trend perpendicular to the axis of the eastern SRP extend from the aseismic region to the region of latest Quaternary faulting and seismicity. A study of the late Miocene to Holocene displacement history of one of these, the Grand Valley fault system in southeastern Idaho and western Wyoming, indicates that a locus of high displacement rates has migrated away from the eastern SRP to its present location in southern Star Valley in western Wyoming. In Swan Valley the studied area closest to the eastern SRP, isotopic ages, and paleomagnetic data for over 300 samples from 47 sites on well-exposed late Cenozoic volcanic rocks (the tuff of Spring Creek, the tuff of Heise, the Huckleberry Ridge tuff, the Pine Creek Basalt, and an older tuff thought to be the tuff of Cosgrove Road) are used to demonstrate differences in the displacement rate on the Grand Valley fault over the last ˜10 m.y. Tectonic tilts for these volcanic rocks are estimated by comparing the results of paleomagnetic analyses in Swan Valley to similar analyses of samples from undeformed volcanic rocks outside of Swan Valley. Basin geometry and tilt axes are established using seismic reflection profiles and field mapping. Combining these data with the tilt data makes it possible to calculate displacement rates during discrete temporal intervals. An average displacement rate of ˜1.8 mm/yr is calculated for the Grand Valley fault in Swan Valley between 4.4 and 2.0 Ma. In the subsequent 2.0-m.y. interval the rate dropped 2 orders of magnitude to ˜0.014 mm/yr; during the preceding 5.5-m.y. interval the displacement rate is ˜0.15 mm/yr, or about 1 order of magnitude less than the rate between 4.4 and 2.0 Ma

  16. Study on shallow structural features in Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Ji-shun; GU Meng-lin; ZHAO Cheng-bin; PAN Su-zhen

    2006-01-01

    A seismic survey by 10 shallow profiles and 6 ultra-shallow profiles was performed in Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic region in 2002. The result shows that there are three (in some areas as many as seven) stable interfaces in the survey region, but no reflection phases are found in depths greater than 500 m. The number of interfaces in the southwestern part is obviously greater than in the northwestern part of Tianchi volcano, which suggests that the faults in the southwest have a stronger controlling power over the flow direction of volcano-spewed lava as compared with those in the northwest. Six shallow faults exist in the survey region. The shallow faults are nearly vertical graben-like faults and are mostly distributed on the southwest of Tianchi crater, indicating that volcanic activities in the southwest are stronger than in the northwest. On this ground, it could be further deduced that the NE-trending major fault of Tianchi volcano ( the Liudaogou-Tianchi-Zengfengshan fault) is more active than the NW-trending Baishanzhen-Tianchi-Jince fault.

  17. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the ‘strength’ of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  18. The Restraining Stepovers And Releasing Bends Along The Active East Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey: Celikhan Region As A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, V.; Seyitoglu, G.; Herece, E.; Saber, R.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Arabia-Eurasia convergence involves intracontinental shortening in SW Turkey. Two active fault zones in Turkey, the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) and the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ), divide the area into the Anatolian micro-plate accommodating SSW-directed movement. The EAFZ is a crustal-scale strike-slip fault, represents a sinistral NE-striking zone, characterized by numerous, complex faults and segmented surface ruptures. The Celikhan region, selected for this study, is located approximately 30 kilometers north of the city of Adiyaman. Although two segments representing the latest seismic activity of the EAFZ have been mapped, named Siro and Erkenek segments, the region contains many segments that become more complex fault pattern. The Celikhan region form part of geology of SE Turkey and is hosted by metamorphic rocks (Poturge metamorphites and Malatya metamorphites), ophiolitic and volcanic units (Kocali complex and Maden complex), limestone with fossils (Midyat formation) and Plio-Quaternary deposits. These rocks are transected by series of steeply dipping to subvertical the EAFZ preserving good indications to sinistral displacement with or/and without normal and reverse component associated with fault rock development. In the northern portion of the study area, the EAFZ is defined by relatively straight, polished recrystallized limestone of the Malatya metamorphites slip surface, which strike N50°-55°E and dip 80°-88° NW. Well-develeoped slickenlines with rakes between 10°-15°, corrugations and some brittle kinematic indicators marks on the slip-surface, indicating strike-slip displacement with minor dip-slip component. This fault create a restraining stepover with the fault near to Celikhan and Akdag can be interpreted as push up structure. At the southwest of Celikhan, the EAFZ create a releasing bend and several strike-slip fault strands with normal component striking N40°-60°E. These subsidiary faults containing centimeter

  19. Geophysical surveys of the Joya Honda maar (México) and surroundings; volcanic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Loera, Héctor; Aranda-Gómez, José Jorge; Arzate, Jorge A.; Molina-Garza, Roberto Stanley

    2008-03-01

    Joya Honda (JH) is a Quaternary maar excavated in Mesozoic limestone. It is located in central Mexico and belongs to the Ventura volcanic field (VVF), which is composed by cinder cones and maars made of intraplate-type mafic alkalic rocks. Volcanoes in the region form ˜ N20W lineaments, roughly parallel to a regional set of normal faults, but there is no obvious relation between these faults and vent distribution in the exposed geology around the maar. The volcanic rock volume is small in the VVF, and most volcanoes and their products are scattered in a region where outcrops are dominated by limestone. The near-vent tephra associated to the JH maar lies north of the crater. This relation suggests that the crater was formed by directed hydromagmatic explosions and may indicate an inclined volcanic conduit near the surface. The tephra stratigraphy suggests that the initial explosions were relatively dry and the amount of water increased during the maar forming eruption. Therefore, the existing model of the maar-diatreme formation may not be applicable to Joya Honda as it requires the formation of a cone of depression in the aquifer and deepening of the focii of the explosions as the crater and underlying diatreme grew. Thus, it is unlikely that there is a diatreme below Joya Honda. Aeromagnetic data shows a boundary between two regional magnetic domains near the elongated volcanic cluster of the VVF. The boundary is straight, with a distinct kink, from NE- to NW-trend, near JH. The limit between the domains is interpreted as fault contacts between mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks and marine Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. Hence, magma ascent in the area may have been facilitated by fractures near the surface. Magnetic and gravimetric ground surveys show that the anomalies associated with the maar are not centered in the crater, which could be consistent with an inclined volcanic conduit. A magnetic profile measured on exposed limestone across the volcanic lineament failed to

  20. Active Faulting and Quaternary Landforms Deformation Related to the Nain Fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Gourabi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Landforms developed across terrain defining boundary the Nain fault have imprints of recent tectonic activity in the west region of Central Iran. Depositional landforms such as alluvial fans bear signatures of later phases of tectonic activity in the form of faulting of alluvial fan deposits and development of fault traces and scarps within 100 km long and a NW-SE-trending zone, 1000-2000 m wide. Approach: We are addressing the neotectonic landforms based on detailed field work carried out in the Nain exposed active fault segments which brought forward some outstanding morphtectonic evidence of quaternary tectonically activities. Tectonic geomorphology applied to the Nain fault suggests recent subsurface activity along the Nain fault and an interconnecting faulting network of roughly NW-SE-trending, right-lateral, strike-slip segments and mostly NW-SE-oriented, transtensional to normal faults. Results: Evidence for recent activity is provided by faulted Pleistocene-Holocene deposits, fresh scarps in Late Quaternary deposits, 8-15 m lateral offsets locally affecting the drainage pattern of the area, ground creeping, aligning of series of spring faults, deflected streams and fault trace over recent alluvial fans. The existences of strike-slip faults system in the Nain area can be implications for seismic hazard. Conclusion: Motion along these structures suggests, in fact, that cumulative displacements include normal, transtensional and strike-slip components. Based on all evidence of active tectonics, earthquake risk and occurrence area is significant.

  1. Recent seismicity detection increase in the Santorini volcanic island complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliaras, G.; Drakatos, G.; Makropoulos, K.; Melis, N. S.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini is the most active volcanic complex in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the seismicity in this region, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) recently installed 4 portable seismological stations supplementary to the 3 permanent stations operating in the region. The addition of these stations has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in the NOA instrumental seismicity catalogue. In this study we analyze quantitatively the seismicity of the Santorini volcanic complex. The results indicate a recent significant reporting increase mainly for events of small magnitude and an increase in the seismicity rate by more than 100%. The mapping of the statistical significance of the rate change with the z-value method reveals that the rate increase exists primarily in the active fault zone perpendicular to the extensional tectonic stress regime that characterizes this region. The spatial distribution of the b-value around the volcanic complex indicates a low b-value distribution parallel to the extensional stress field, while the b-value cross section of the volcanic complex indicates relatively high b-values under the caldera and a significant b-value decrease with depth. These results are found to be in general agreement with the results from other volcanic regions and they encourage further investigations concerning the seismic and volcanic hazard and risk estimates for the Santorini volcanic complex using the NOA earthquake catalogue.

  2. Diagnosing process faults using neural network models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buescher, K.L.; Jones, R.D.; Messina, M.J.

    1993-11-01

    In order to be of use for realistic problems, a fault diagnosis method should have the following three features. First, it should apply to nonlinear processes. Second, it should not rely on extensive amounts of data regarding previous faults. Lastly, it should detect faults promptly. The authors present such a scheme for static (i.e., non-dynamic) systems. It involves using a neural network to create an associative memory whose fixed points represent the normal behavior of the system.

  3. Internal structure of fault zones in geothermal reservoirs: Examples from palaeogeothermal fields and potential host rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea; Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Afşar, Filiz

    2014-05-01

    Fault zones commonly have great effects on fluid transport in geothermal reservoirs. During fault slip all the pores and small fractures that meet with the slip plane become interconnected so that the inner part of the fault, the fault core, consisting of breccia or gouge, may suddenly develop a very high permeability. This is evidenced, for example by networks of mineral veins in deeply eroded fault zones in palaeogeothermal fields. Inactive faults, however, may have low permeabilities and even act as flow barriers. In natural and man-made geothermal reservoirs, the orientation of fault zones in relation to the current stress field and their internal structure needs be known as accurately as possible. One reason is that the activity of the fault zone depends on its angle to the principal stress directions. Another reason is that the outer part of a fault zone, the damage zone, comprises numerous fractures of various sizes. Here we present field examples of faults, and associated joints and mineral veins, in palaeogeothermal fields, and potential host rocks for man-made geothermal reservoirs, respectively. We studied several localities of different stratigraphies, lithologies and tectonic settings: (1) 58 fault zones in 22 outcrops from Upper Carboniferous to Upper Cretaceous in the Northwest German Basin (siliciclastic, carbonate and volcanic rocks); (2) 16 fault zones in 9 outcrops in Lower Permian to Middle Triassic (mainly sandstone, limestone and granite) in the Upper Rhine Graben; and (3) 74 fault zones in two coastal sections of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic age (mudstones and limestone-marl alternations) in the Bristol Channel Basin, UK. (1) and (2) are outcrop analogues of geothermal reservoir horizons, (3) represent palaeogeothermal fields with mineral veins. The field studies in the Northwest German Basin (1) show pronounced differences between normal-fault zones in carbonate and clastic rocks. In carbonate rocks clear damage zones occur that are

  4. Active fault survey on the Tanlu fault zone in Laizhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-cai; YANG Xi-ha; LI Chang-chuan; DENG Qi-dong; DU Xian-song; CHAO Hong-tai; WU Zi-quan; XIAO Lan-xi; SUN Zhao-ming; MIN Wei; LING Hong

    2006-01-01

    Shallow-depth acoustic reflection profiling survey has been conducted on the Tanlu fault zone in Laizhou Bay. It is found that the Tanlu fault zone is obviously active during the late Quaternary and it is still the dominating structure in this region. The Tanlu fault zone consists of two branches. The KL3 fault of the western branch is composed of several high angle normal faults which had been active during the period from the latest Pleistocene to early Holocene, dissected by a series of northeast or approximate east-west trending fault which leaped sediment of the late Pleistocene. The Longkou fault of the eastern branch consists of two right-laterally stepped segments. Late Quaternary offsets and growth strata developed along the Tanlu fault zone verify that the fault zone retained active in the latest Pleistocene to the early Holocene. The Anqiu-Juxian fault that passes through the middle of Shandong and corresponds to the Longkou fault is composed of a series of right-laterally stepped segments. The active faults along the eastern branch of the Tanlu fault zone from the Laizhou bay to the north of Anqiu make up a dextral simple shear deformation zone which is characterized by right-lateral strike-slip movement with dip-slip component during the late Quaternary.

  5. The Comprehensive Study of Electrical Faults in PV Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sabbaghpur Arani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth of the solar industry over the past several years has expanded the significance of photovoltaic (PV systems. Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency, and safety in PV systems and, if not detected, may not only reduce power generation and accelerated system aging but also threaten the availability of the whole system. Due to the current-limiting nature and nonlinear output characteristics of PV arrays, faults in PV arrays may not be detected. In this paper, all possible faults that happen in the PV system have been classified and six common faults (shading condition, open-circuit fault, degradation fault, line-to-line fault, bypass diode fault, and bridging fault have been implemented in 7.5 KW PV farm. Based on the simulation results, both normal operational curves and fault curves have been compared.

  6. AN ANALYSIS OF SOUND FOR FAULT ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphattharachai Chomphan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of faults of the gasoline engine may result in similar symptoms. Sound analysis of engine has been conducted to diagnose the engine faults. This study presents a study of sound analysis of the normal engine and the engine with three different fault conditions. The gasoline engine was our target of this study. The engine sound has been recorded by using a microphone at the engine room for three directions. Three conditions of engine faults including the engine that is not smooth while idling, the engine that goes missing while idling and the engine that has no power are simulated. In the signal processing of the sound, we use five signal features including fundamental frequency, long term spectrum, energy, long term cestrum and zero crossing rate. Thereafter, the important differences between normal engine and the fault engines are concluded. These proposed signal features can be used to discriminate all three conditions and the engine with normal condition effectively.

  7. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-10-13

    Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes average about 1 Ma. Three episodes have occurred in the Quaternary at approximately 1.1 Ma (5 volcanoes), 350 ka (2 volcanoes), and 80 ka (1 volcano). Because Yucca Mountain lies within the Basin and Range Province, a significant portion of the pre-Quaternary volcanic history of the YMR may be buried in alluvial-filled basins. An exceptionally high-resolution aeromagnetic survey and subsequent drilling program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in 2004 and is gathering data that will enhance understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of Pliocene and Miocene volcanism in the region (Figure 1). DOE has convened a ten-member expert panel of earth scientists that will use the information gathered to update probabilistic volcanic hazard estimates originally obtained by expert elicitation in 1996. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-trending ridges of eastward-tilted fault blocks that are bounded by north to northeast-trending normal faults. Topographic basins filled with up to 500 m of alluvium surround it to the east, south and west. In the past several decades, nearly 50 holes have been drilled in these basins, mainly for Yucca Mountain Project Site Characterization and the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Several of these drill holes have penetrated relatively deeply buried (300-400 m) Miocene basalt; a Pliocene basalt dated at 3.8 Ma was encountered at a relatively shallow depth (100 m) in the northern Amargosa Desert (Anomaly B in Figure 1). The current drilling program is the first to specifically target and characterize buried basalt. Based on the new aeromagnetic survey and previous air and ground magnetic surveys (Connor et al. 2000; O'Leary et al. 2002), at least eight

  8. Tectonic localization of multi-plume hydrothermal fluid flow in a segmented rift system, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. V.; Downs, D. T.; Scholz, C.; de P. S. Zuquim, M.

    2013-05-01

    High-temperature (>250°C) multi-plume hydrothermal systems occur in a range of tectonic settings, though most are extensional or transtensional. A key feature of such settings is their tendency to partition into discrete structural elements that scale with the thickness of the seismogenic zone. The late Miocene to present record of arc magmatism and rifting in the North Island of New Zealand illustrates the importance of structural segmentation and reactivation of inherited basement fabrics on the localisation of hydrothermal upflow. The 15 My record of similarly-oriented magmatism, rifting and hydrothermal activity associated with subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the North Island of New Zealand. Lateral migration of the locus of arc magmatism, concomitant with roll-back of the subducting slab, is supported by the SE-directed younging of: 1) volcanism; 2) fault-controlled rift basins; and 3) hydrothermal activity, represented by the distribution of epithermal mineralisation within the ~15-3 Ma Coromandel Volcanic Zone (CVZ), and geothermal activity within the TVZ. Currently the TVZ is extending in a NW-SE direction at a rate that varies from ~3 mm/yr to ~15 mm/yr from SW to NE, respectively. The TVZ is partitioned into discrete rift segments, comprising arrays of NE-striking normal faults of ~20 km in length, as expected on mechanical grounds for the 6-8 km-thick seismogenic zone. Transfer zones between rift segments coincide with N-to-NW-trending alignments of geothermal fields, spaced ~ 30 km apart can be recognized elsewhere within the CVZ. The most productive epithermal deposits to date are localised where these inferred transfer zones intersect arc-parallel fault arrays. A similar tectonic configuration occurs in the Deseado Massif, Argentinian Patagonia, where interplay between transfer and rift faults is inferred to have localized hydrothermal fluids in small pull-apart basins and arrays of extension veins for durations >30 My.

  9. Machine Fault Signature Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratesh Jayaswal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present recent developments in the field of machine fault signature analysis with particular regard to vibration analysis. The different types of faults that can be identified from the vibration signature analysis are, for example, gear fault, rolling contact bearing fault, journal bearing fault, flexible coupling faults, and electrical machine fault. It is not the intention of the authors to attempt to provide a detailed coverage of all the faults while detailed consideration is given to the subject of the rolling element bearing fault signature analysis.

  10. Volcanic Debris Flows of the Latest Paleozoic Arbasay Formation: Geomorphological Characters and Paleoenvironment Reconstruction of Northern Tian Shan, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.; Liu, D.; Guo, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Texturally well-preserved volcanic debris flows (also called lahars) are exposed in the Latest Paleozoic Arbasay Formation, Northern Tian Shan. LA-ICP-MS zircon dating of the intercalated fallout tuff sample provided an age of 314.4±3.4 Ma (MSWD=1.6), suggesting they were deposited at Latest Carboniferous. The lahars consist primarily of two lithofacies: massive, poorly lithified diamictites and stratified, moderately lithified gravelly sandstones. The diamictites can be generally divided into two subfacies, i.e., the matrix-supported and the clast-supported diamictites. Most diamictites are structureless and nongraded. They are thick in beds and contain large clasts up to 3 m in dimension. The gravelly sandstones display much finer particle size and have wedge or lenticular geometries. Large clasts are absent within them and the sorting characters are much better than the diamictites. Despite the different size grading, the matrix and the clasts of the two lithofacies appear to be homogeneous. The matrix is generally sandy mudstone. The clasts comprise rhyolites, dacites, andesites, andesitic basalts and basalts, same to the co-existing volcanic rocks, suggesting they originate from the cognate volcanics. The disorganized diamictites are supposed to deposit from a turbulent flood or pyroclastic surge. The gravelly sandstone lithofacies are interpreted as sand-rich flood flows or hyperconcentrated flood flows during the waning stage of a mass-flow event. The overall characteristics of the deposits suggest a mass-flow dominated alluvial fan environment. It's noteable that several syn- sedimentary normal faults occurred within these lahar deposits, indicating that the Southern Junggar Basin was in an extensional regime during the lahars' deposition. Structure is dominated by normal faulting, allowing the existence of relatively small, highly compartmentalized depocenters. This is also supported by geochemistry and detrital zircon studies.

  11. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O.; Tesfai, T.; Duffield, W.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Smith, James G.; Woldegiorgis, L.; Weldemariam, K.; Kahsai, G.

    1999-01-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression.Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of approx. 10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely

  12. Evolution of the Xiaotian-Mozitan fault and its implications for exhumation of Dabie HP-UHP rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biwei Xiang; Yongsheng Wang; Changcheng Li; Guang Zhu; Yonghong Shi

    2008-01-01

    The Xiaotian-Mozitan fault (XMF) located north of the Dabie orogenic belt separates the North Dabie complex to the south from the Beihuaiyang low-grade metamorphic rocks to the north. It comprises several NW-striking ductile shear zones and brittle faults. The brittie faults obviously overprinted on the ductile shear zones and promoted the development of the volcanic basins in early Cretaceous to the north, which suggests that the brittle faults were normal faults formed in early Cretaceous during doming of the Dabie orogenic belt. The ductile shear zone superposed on the north Dabie gray gneiss. and it is an important channel where the Dabie HP-UHP rocks exhumed. For obtaining new structural constraint on exhumation of the HP-UHP rocks, we present here experimental results on the microstructure, quartz C-axis fabrics and the microprobe analyses of phengite. The ductile shear zone was determined to be formed at a temperature of 600-650℃ and pressure of 1.1GPa by the mineral deformation, microprobe analyses and geobarometry of Siin-phengite of the mylonite, the results suggest that the mylonite now exposed on the surface experienced an upper amphibolite-facies metamorphism in the lower crust. The mineral stretching lineation varies from horizontal in the east segment to sub-dip in the west. Shear sense indicators from outcrop and thin sections of orientated specimen and quartz C-axis fabrics suggest that the XMF is a sinistral normal fault. The kinematics analysis of the ductile shear zone indicates that the exhumation of Dabie HP-UHP rocks is the results of a SE-directed extrusion and an anticlockwise rotation around its eastern pivot simultaneously.

  13. Development of Fault Models for Hybrid Fault Detection and Diagnostics Algorithm: October 1, 2014 -- May 5, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Howard [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Braun, James E. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This report describes models of building faults created for OpenStudio to support the ongoing development of fault detection and diagnostic (FDD) algorithms at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Building faults are operating abnormalities that degrade building performance, such as using more energy than normal operation, failing to maintain building temperatures according to the thermostat set points, etc. Models of building faults in OpenStudio can be used to estimate fault impacts on building performance and to develop and evaluate FDD algorithms. The aim of the project is to develop fault models of typical heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment in the United States, and the fault models in this report are grouped as control faults, sensor faults, packaged and split air conditioner faults, water-cooled chiller faults, and other uncategorized faults. The control fault models simulate impacts of inappropriate thermostat control schemes such as an incorrect thermostat set point in unoccupied hours and manual changes of thermostat set point due to extreme outside temperature. Sensor fault models focus on the modeling of sensor biases including economizer relative humidity sensor bias, supply air temperature sensor bias, and water circuit temperature sensor bias. Packaged and split air conditioner fault models simulate refrigerant undercharging, condenser fouling, condenser fan motor efficiency degradation, non-condensable entrainment in refrigerant, and liquid line restriction. Other fault models that are uncategorized include duct fouling, excessive infiltration into the building, and blower and pump motor degradation.

  14. Development of Fault Models for Hybrid Fault Detection and Diagnostics Algorithm: October 1, 2014 -- May 5, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Howard; Braun, James E.

    2015-12-31

    This report describes models of building faults created for OpenStudio to support the ongoing development of fault detection and diagnostic (FDD) algorithms at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Building faults are operating abnormalities that degrade building performance, such as using more energy than normal operation, failing to maintain building temperatures according to the thermostat set points, etc. Models of building faults in OpenStudio can be used to estimate fault impacts on building performance and to develop and evaluate FDD algorithms. The aim of the project is to develop fault models of typical heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment in the United States, and the fault models in this report are grouped as control faults, sensor faults, packaged and split air conditioner faults, water-cooled chiller faults, and other uncategorized faults. The control fault models simulate impacts of inappropriate thermostat control schemes such as an incorrect thermostat set point in unoccupied hours and manual changes of thermostat set point due to extreme outside temperature. Sensor fault models focus on the modeling of sensor biases including economizer relative humidity sensor bias, supply air temperature sensor bias, and water circuit temperature sensor bias. Packaged and split air conditioner fault models simulate refrigerant undercharging, condenser fouling, condenser fan motor efficiency degradation, non-condensable entrainment in refrigerant, and liquid line restriction. Other fault models that are uncategorized include duct fouling, excessive infiltration into the building, and blower and pump motor degradation.

  15. Volcanism/tectonics working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, L.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Young, S.R. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the impacts of earthquakes, fault rupture, and volcanic eruption on the underground repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. The tectonics and seismic history of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is discussed and geologic analogs to that site are described.

  16. Volcanism-sedimentation interaction in the Campo de Calatrava Volcanic Field (Spain): a magnetostratigraphic and geochronological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Hernández, Antonio; López-Moro, Francisco Javier; Gallardo-Millán, José Luis; Martín-Serrano, Ángel; Gómez-Fernández, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the influence of Cenozoic volcanism of the Campo de Calatrava volcanic field on the sedimentation of two small continental basins in Spain (Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins). The volcanism in this area was mainly monogenetic, according to the small-volume volcanic edifices of scoria cones that were generated and the occurrence of tuff rings and maars. A sedimentological analysis of the volcaniclastic deposits led to the identification of facies close to the vents, low-density (dilute) pyroclastic surges, secondary volcanic deposits and typical maar deposits. Whole-rock K/Ar dating, together with palaeomagnetic constraints, yielded an age of 3.11-3.22 Ma for the onset of maar formation, the deposition finished in the Late Gauss-Early Matuyana. Using both techniques and previous paleontological data allowed it to be inferred that the maar formation and the re-sedimentation stage that occurred in Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins were roughly coeval. The occurrence of syn-eruption volcaniclastic deposits with small thicknesses that were separated by longer inter-eruption periods, where fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation was prevalent, together with the presence of small-volume volcanic edifices indicated that there were short periods of volcanic activity in this area. The volcanic activity was strongly controlled by previous basement faults that favoured magma feeding, and the faults also controlled the location of volcanoes themselves. The occurrence of the volcanoes in the continental basins led to the creation of shallow lakes that were related to the maar formation and the modification of sedimentological intra-basinal features, specifically, valley slope and sediment load.

  17. Fuzzy fault diagnosis system of MCFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhenlei; Qian Feng; Cao Guangyi

    2005-01-01

    A kind of fault diagnosis system of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stack is proposed in this paper. It is composed of a fuzzy neural network (FNN) and a fault diagnosis element. FNN is able to deal with the information of the expert knowledge and the experiment data efficiently. It also has the ability to approximate any smooth system. FNN is used to identify the fault diagnosis model of MCFC stack. The fuzzy fault decision element can diagnose the state of the MCFC generating system, normal or fault, and can decide the type of the fault based on the outputs of FNN model and the MCFC system. Some simulation experiment results are demonstrated in this paper.

  18. InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be

  19. Geology and geochemistry characteristics of the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (Central Area), Chiapas Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, J. C.; Jaimes-Viera, M. C.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Layer, P. W.; Pompa-Mera, V.; Godinez, M. L.

    2007-04-01

    The Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (CVA), located in the central portion of the State of Chiapas, is a 150 km stretch of volcanoes irregularly aligned in the northwest direction between two great volcanic features: the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the northwest and the Central American Volcanic Arc to the southeast. The CVA is located in a complex zone marking the interaction of the North American, Caribbean and Cocos plates, near the Motagua-Polochic fault system, the boundary between North American and Caribbean plates. The central part of the CVA is composed of an irregular northwest alignment of at least 10 volcanic structures generally lying along NNW-SSE-trending faults splayed from the Motagua-Polochic system. Among the structures there are seven volcanic domes (Huitepec, Amahuitz, La Iglesia, Mispía, La Lanza, Venustiano Carranza and Santotón), one explosion crater (Navenchauc), one collapse structure (Apas), and one dome complex (Tzontehuitz). In the majority of the structures there is a clear resurgence with the formation of several domes in the same structure, with the destruction of previous domes (Navenchauc) or with the formation of new explosion craters or collapse structures (Apas). The volcanic activity in the CVA was mainly effusive accompanied by explosive and phreatomagmatic events and is characterized by volcanic domes accompanied by block-and-ash-flows, ash flows with accretionary lapilli, falls, and pumice flows. The volcanic structures and deposits are calcalkaline in composition with a medium to high content of potassium. CVA volcanic rocks vary from andesite to dacite with SiO 2 between 57 and 66 wt.%, show low concentrations of Ti, P, Nb and Ta, are enriched in Light Rare Earths, depleted in Heavy Rare Earths, and show a small Eu anomaly; all indicative of arc-related volcanism associated with subduction of the Cocos plate under the North American plate, but complicated by the geometry of the plate boundary fault system.

  20. Segment-scale variations in seafloor volcanic and tectonic processes in the Rainbow region, Mid-Atlantic Ridge (36º N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, D. E.; Dunn, R. A.; Arai, R.; Canales, J. P.; Sohn, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    Slow spreading ridges exhibit significant along-axis variations in melt supply and thermal structure. We examine variations in seafloor volcanic and tectonic processes at the scale of individual ridge segments in an area of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (35º45'-36º35'N) centered on the Rainbow non-transform discontinuity (NTD). This study brings together results from seafloor geophysical mapping and deeper crustal imaging via 3-D seismic imaging from the MARINER experiment, along with existing lava compositional data, in order to examine magmatic processes. We use a gridded compilation of multifold, multidirectional sonar backscatter amplitude data to examine seafloor properties and identify volcanic flow fields and tectonic features. Regions of low magma supply are associated with thinner crust, more widely spaced faults and larger but less likely frequent volcanic flow fields. The neovolcanic zone is dominated by hummocky volcanic terrain, but a few of the highest backscatter flow fields occur near the ends of ridge segments and exhibit relatively smooth topography. Lava compositions from these flow fields suggest relatively high crystallization pressures, consistent with deep and/or intermittent magma storage. Unlike at faster spreading ridges, the seismic imaging does not show large zones of high temperature and partial melt beneath the axis. However, the regions with the lowest seismic velocities also exhibit the highest backscatter seafloor on average, consistent with recent volcanic activity. The transition to the mantle in the study area is gradual with no clear wide-angle reflections. Seismic velocities rapidly approach mantle-like values beneath Rainbow massif, consistent with the ultramafic and gabbroic material exposed on the surface there. Along the ridge axes, rotated crustal blocks bound by large offset normal faults dominate the abyssal hill topography, and are visible in the seismic images. Large detachment faults have repeatedly formed along the inside

  1. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  2. Slab Detachment, Flat Subduction and Slab Rollback in Central Mexico: Fitting the Neogene Evolution of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt into the History and Dynamics of Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, L.

    2001-12-01

    I present a comparative analysis of the volcanic record of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and the plate tectonic history since 16 Ma in central Mexico that has important implications for the dynamic of the Cocos-Rivera subduction system. The TMVB volcanism has occurred in episodes characterized by across-arc and along strike variation and/or migration. In its first stage (16 to 10 Ma) the TMVB consisted of a broad andesitic arc emplaced between Long. 102° and 97° 30' (central Mexico). During this period volcanism was absent in the western and eastern TMVB. Between 11 and 6 Ma a voluminous mafic volcanism was emplaced to the northof the previous arc with ages progressively younger from west (Tepic-Guadalajara) to east (Queretaro-Hidalgo). Large calderas and silicic dome complexes developed in latest Miocene and early Pliocene (7.5 to 3.5 Ma) west of the Taxco-San Miguel de Allende fault system (TSMA). East of the TSMA a volcanic gap is clearly observed between ~9 and 3.5 Ma. In the western TMVB small amount of lavas with an intra-plate affinity started to be emplaced since 5 Ma. At the same time the volcanic front migrated to the south by about 70 km. East of the TSMA volcanism resumed at about 3.5 Ma in the Mexico City region and at the end of Pliocene in the eastern TMVB (excluding the Palma Sola area). In the Toluca - Mexico City area the volcanic front migrated trenchward in the Quaternary. No southward migration of the volcanic front is observed in the eastern TMVB. The Middle Miocene volcanism represent a "normal" volcanic arc developed after a gap of ~15 Ma following the formation of the Acapulco trench. I propose that the following unusual volcanic evolution was controlled by the detachment of the deeper part of the Cocos slab and the resulting variation in slab inclination. Slab must have detached after 12.5 following the end of subduction off Baja California. This is a kinematic-dynamic requirement, also supported by the fact that the present

  3. Self Fault-Tolerance of Protocols: A Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The prerequisite for the existing protocols' correctness is that protocols can be normally operated under the normal conditions, rather than dealing with abnormal conditions.In other words, protocols with the fault-tolerance can not be provided when some fault occurs. This paper discusses the self fault-tolerance of protocols. It describes some concepts and methods for achieving self fault tolerance of protocols. Meanwhile, it provides a case study, investigates a typical protocol that does not satisfy the self fault-tolerance, and gives a new redesign version of this existing protocol using the proposed approach.

  4. Dead sea transform fault system reviews

    CERN Document Server

    Garfunkel, Zvi; Kagan, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    The Dead Sea transform is an active plate boundary connecting the Red Sea seafloor spreading system to the Arabian-Eurasian continental collision zone. Its geology and geophysics provide a natural laboratory for investigation of the surficial, crustal and mantle processes occurring along transtensional and transpressional transform fault domains on a lithospheric scale and related to continental breakup. There have been many detailed and disciplinary studies of the Dead Sea transform fault zone during the last?20 years and this book brings them together.This book is an updated comprehensive coverage of the knowledge, based on recent studies of the tectonics, structure, geophysics, volcanism, active tectonics, sedimentology and paleo and modern climate of the Dead Sea transform fault zone. It puts together all this new information and knowledge in a coherent fashion.

  5. Model of Deep Non-Volcanic Tremor in Episodic Tremor and Slip Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenzon, N. I.; Bambakidis, G.

    2014-12-01

    Bursts of tremor accompany a moving slip pulse in Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events. The sources of this non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are largely unknown. We have developed a model describing the mechanism of NTV generation. According to this model, NTV is a reflection of resonant-type oscillations excited in a fault at certain depth ranges. From a mathematical viewpoint, tremor (phonons) and slip pulses (solitons) are two different solutions of the sine-Gordon equation describing frictional processes inside a fault. In an ETS event, a moving slip pulse generates tremor due to interaction with structural heterogeneities in a fault and to failures of small asperities (see Figure). Observed tremor parameters, such as central frequency and frequency attenuation curve, are associated with fault parameters and conditions, such as elastic modulus, effective normal stress, penetration hardness and friction. Model prediction of NTV frequency content is consistent with observations. In the framework of this model it is possible to explain the complicated pattern of tremor migration, including rapid tremor propagation and reverse tremor migration. Migration along the strike direction is associated with movement of the slip pulse. Rapid tremor propagation in the slip-parallel direction is associated with movement of kinks along a 2D slip pulse. A slip pulse, pinned in some places, can fragment into several pulses, causing tremor associated with some of these pulse fragments to move opposite to the main propagation direction. The model predicts that the frequency content of tremor during an ETS event is slightly different from the frequency content of ambient tremor and tremor triggered by earthquakes. Figure 1. The slip velocity w of a slip pulse in time-space (x-t) coordinates moving in (a) ideal substrate and (b) substrate with a structural heterogeneity. Pulse is driven by constant external shear stress. Figure 1(b) shows that the pulse oscillates about an obstacle

  6. Fault diagnosis of sensor networked structures with multiple faults using a virtual beam based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Jing, X. J.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a virtual beam based approach suitable for conducting diagnosis of multiple faults in complex structures with limited prior knowledge of the faults involved. The ;virtual beam;, a recently-proposed concept for fault detection in complex structures, is applied, which consists of a chain of sensors representing a vibration energy transmission path embedded in the complex structure. Statistical tests and adaptive threshold are particularly adopted for fault detection due to limited prior knowledge of normal operational conditions and fault conditions. To isolate the multiple faults within a specific structure or substructure of a more complex one, a 'biased running' strategy is developed and embedded within the bacterial-based optimization method to construct effective virtual beams and thus to improve the accuracy of localization. The proposed method is easy and efficient to implement for multiple fault localization with limited prior knowledge of normal conditions and faults. With extensive experimental results, it is validated that the proposed method can localize both single fault and multiple faults more effectively than the classical trust index subtract on negative add on positive (TI-SNAP) method.

  7. Fault Severity Evaluation and Improvement Design for Mechanical Systems Using the Fault Injection Technique and Gini Concordance Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fault injection and Gini concordance based method has been developed for fault severity analysis for multibody mechanical systems concerning their dynamic properties. The fault tree analysis (FTA is employed to roughly identify the faults needed to be considered. According to constitution of the mechanical system, the dynamic properties can be achieved by solving the equations that include many types of faults which are injected by using the fault injection technique. Then, the Gini concordance is used to measure the correspondence between the performance with faults and under normal operation thereby providing useful hints of severity ranking in subsystems for reliability design. One numerical example and a series of experiments are provided to illustrate the application of the new method. The results indicate that the proposed method can accurately model the faults and receive the correct information of fault severity. Some strategies are also proposed for reliability improvement of the spacecraft solar array.

  8. Volcanic Stratigraphy and Potential Hazards of the Chihsingshan Volcano Subgroup in the Tatun Volcano Group, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Tsai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chihsingshan Volcano Subgroup (CVSG is one of the most important landforms located within the Tatun Volcano Group in northern Taiwan. Based on a Digital Terrain Model, contour maps and field investigations, the CVSG can be divided into four types of volcanic landforms: (1 a strato- or composite volcano, Chihsingshan; (2 domes, the Shamaoshan and a hidden unit; (3 lava cones, the Baiyunshan and the Hsiaotsaoshan; and (4 a scoria cone, the Chikushan. Meanwhile, many small craters are distributed linearly along two northeast trending normal-fault systems. The occurrences are predominantly lava flows with subsidiary fall deposits, pyroclastic flows, and lahars in which at least twenty layers of lava flow in the CVSG can be recognized. Among them, 16 layers in the Chihsingshan volcano, named as C1 - C16, two in the Baiyunshan, B1 - B2, and two in the Hsiaotsaoshan, H1 - H2. Our study suggests that the potential volcanic hazards include lava and pyroclastic flows and simultaneous or subsequent lahars, if the Chihsingshan erupts in a similar manner as in the past. A volcanic hazard zonation map can be constructed for the purpose of mitigation assuming the future eruptive center and eruptive volume.

  9. Late Cretaceous volcanic arc system in Southwest Korea: Occurrence, lithological characteristics, SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age, and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hee Jae; Kwon, Chang Woo

    2017-04-01

    In the southwest region of the Korean Peninsula, four large volcanoes, the Buan, Seonunsan, Wido, and Beopseongpo, with a maximum diameter of ca 20 km, form a distinct topographic undulation along the NE-SW-trending Hamyeol Fault. These volcanics comprise various types of pyroclastic, sedimentary, and lava/intrusive rocks, and are interpreted as remnants of calderas resulting from various volcanic eruptions, indicating that Hamyeol Fault, together with crustal extension, played an important role in volcano formation in this region. SHRIMP U-Pb ages of zircon isolated from each volcanics are as follows. For Buan Volcanics, Cheonmasan Tuff 87.23 ±0.92 Ma, Udongje Tuff 86.79 ±0.71 Ma, Seokpo Tuff 87.30 ±0.99 Ma and Yujeongje Tuff 86.66 ±0.93 Ma. For Seonunsan Volcanics, Gyeongsusan Tuff 84.9 ±1.1 Ma and Yeongije Tuff 86.61 ±0.67 Ma. These ages indicate that the four volcanics were formed in the Late Cretaceous. The ages are comparable to those of the volcanic rocks of the Aioi and Arima groups in Southwestern Japan, suggesting that the Late Cretaceous volcanic arc systems developed in a NE-SW direction from the Japanese Islands to the southwestern part of the Korean Peninsula caused by regional magmatism together with crustal deformation as reflected by occurrence of the volcanic rocks along the Hamyeol Fault.

  10. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  11. A possible link between faulting, cryptodomes and lateral collapses at Vesuvius Volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Alfonsa; Torrente, Maurizio Maria; Bellucci, Francesca

    2012-06-01

    Vesuvius is an active volcano that has been affected by late Quaternary lateral collapses and tectonic faults. Cryptodomes and two debris avalanche, 18 ka-old DA1 and 3.5 ka-old DA2, were previously documented off Vesuvius and for the younger avalanche a link between onshore and offshore stratigraphy was reconstructed. The interpretation of seismic reflection profiles off Vesuvius, borehole stratigraphies, onshore and geomorphological data allowed to recognise the relationships among debris avalanches, criptodomes and faulting. Stratigraphic data reveal a remarkable difference between the architecture of the northern and southern volcano sectors that is compatible with the occurrence of the DA1 debris avalanche in the southern volcano sector. A contour map and a three-dimensional model of a surface merging the morphology of the top of the Somma lavas, in the northern volcano sector, with that of the top of the DA1 debris avalanche, in the southern volcano sector, were reconstructed. We present a new lateral collapse model of Vesuvius Volcano and document the relevance of inherited tectonic faults in guiding collapse geometry. It is possible that the SW-directed collapse (DA1) was driven towards the hangingwall blocks of NW-SE normal faults, while the propagation of the W-directed collapse (DA2) can be ascribed to the activity of the E-W strike-slip fault. Because of their distal location a minor role of cryptodome intrusion on collapses of Vesuvius can be postulated. The detailed analysis of substrate and edifice structure presented here establishes clear connexion between substrate tectonics and lateral collapse. This approach broadens the horizons of volcanic hazard assessment of Vesuvius.

  12. Fault reactivation: The Picuris-Pecos fault system of north-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, David Wilson

    The PPFS is a N-trending fault system extending over 80 km in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico. Precambrian basement rocks are offset 37 km in a right-lateral sense; however, this offset includes dextral strike-slip (Precambrian), mostly normal dip-slip (Pennsylvanian), mostly reverse dip-slip (Early Laramide), limited strike-slip (Late Laramide) and mostly normal dip-slip (Cenozoic). The PPFS is broken into at least 3 segments by the NE-trending Embudo fault and by several Laramide age NW-trending tear faults. These segments are (from N to S): the Taos, the Picuris, and the Pecos segments. On the east side of the Picuris segment in the Picuris Mountains, the Oligocene-Miocene age Miranda graben developed and represents a complex extension zone south of the Embudo fault. Regional analysis of remotely sensed data and geologic maps indicate that lineaments subparallel to the trace of the PPFS are longer and less frequent than lineaments that trend orthogonal to the PPFS. Significant cross cutting faults and subtle changes in fault trends in each segment are clear in the lineament data. Detailed mapping in the eastern Picuris Mountains showed that the favorably oriented Picuris segment was not reactivated in the Tertiary development of the Rio Grande rift. Segmentation of the PPFS and post-Laramide annealing of the Picuris segment are interpreted to have resulted in the development of the subparallel La Serna fault. The Picuris segment of the PPFS is offset by several E-ESE trending faults. These faults are Late Cenozoic in age and interpreted to be related to the uplift of the Picuris Mountains and the continuing sinistral motion on the Embudo fault. Differential subsidence within the Miranda graben caused the development of several synthetic and orthogonal faults between the bounding La Serna and Miranda faults. Analysis of over 10,000 outcrop scale brittle structures reveals a strong correlation between faults and fracture systems. The dominant

  13. Imaging the concealed section of the Whakatane fault below Whakatane city, New Zealand, with a shear wave land streamer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, Ulrich; Mueller, Christof; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    The Mw 7.1 Darfield Earthquake in September 2010 ruptured the surface along the Greendale Fault that was not known prior to the earthquake. The subsequent Mw 6.3 Christchurch earthquake in February 2011 demonstrated that concealed active faults have a significant risk potential for urban infrastructure and human life in New Zealand if they are located beneath or close to such areas. Mapping exposures and analysis of active faults incorporated into the National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) suggests that several thousands of these active structures are yet to be identified and have the potential to generate moderate to large magnitude earthquakes (i.e. magnitudes >5). Geological mapping suggests that active faults pass beneath, or within many urban areas in New Zealand, including Auckland, Blenheim, Christchurch, Hastings/Napier, Nelson, Rotorua, Taupo, Wellington, and Whakatane. Since no established methodology for routinely locating and assessing the earthquake hazard posed by concealed active faults is available, the principal objective of the presented study was to evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution shear wave seismic reflection profiling using a land streamer to locate buried faults in urban areas of New Zealand. During the survey carried out in the city of Whakatane in February 2015, the method was first tested over a well known surface outcrop of the Edgecumbe Fault 30 km south-west of Whakatane city. This allowed further to investigate the principle shear wave propagation characteristics in the unknown sediments, consisting mainly of effusive rock material of the Taupo volcanic zone mixed with marine transgression units. Subsequently the survey was continued within Whakatane city using night operation time slots to reduce the urban noise. In total, 11 profiles of 5.7 km length in high data quality were acquired, which clearly show concealed rupture structures of obviously different age in the shallow sediments down to 100 m depth. Subject to depth

  14. California's Vulnerability to Volcanic Hazards: What's at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, M.; Wood, N. J.; Dinitz, L.

    2015-12-01

    California is a leader in comprehensive planning for devastating earthquakes, landslides, floods, and tsunamis. Far less attention, however, has focused on the potentially devastating impact of volcanic eruptions, despite the fact that they occur in the State about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault Zone. At least 10 eruptions have occurred in the past 1,000 years—most recently in northern California (Lassen Peak 1914 to 1917)—and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable. The likelihood of renewed volcanism in California is about one in a few hundred to one in a few thousand annually. Eight young volcanoes, ranked as Moderate to Very High Threat [1] are dispersed throughout the State. Partially molten rock (magma) resides beneath at least seven of these—Medicine Lake Volcano, Mount Shasta, Lassen Volcanic Center, Clear Lake Volcanic Field, Long Valley Volcanic Region, Coso Volcanic Field, and Salton Buttes— causing earthquakes, toxic gas emissions, hydrothermal activity, and (or) ground deformation. Understanding the hazards and identifying what is at risk are the first steps in building community resilience to volcanic disasters. This study, prepared in collaboration with the State of California Governor's Office of Emergency Management and the California Geological Survey, provides a broad perspective on the State's exposure to volcano hazards by integrating mapped volcano hazard zones with geospatial data on at-risk populations, infrastructure, and resources. The study reveals that ~ 16 million acres fall within California's volcano hazard zones, along with ~ 190 thousand permanent and 22 million transitory populations. Additionally, far-field disruption to key water delivery systems, agriculture, utilities, and air traffic is likely. Further site- and sector-specific analyses will lead to improved hazard mitigation efforts and more effective disaster response and recovery. [1] "Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities

  15. Faults strengthening and seismicity induced by geothermal exploitation on a spreading volcano, Mt. Amiata, Italia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoldi, Alberto; Borgia, Andrea; Ripepe, Maurizio; Marchetti, Emanuele; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Schiava, Massimo della; Allocca, Carmine

    2015-08-01

    Seismogenic structures such as faults play a primary role in geothermal system generation, recharge and output. They are also the most susceptible to release seismic energy over fluid injection/extraction operations during anthropic exploitation. We describe the microseismic activity recorded in 2000-2001 in the Piancastagnaio geothermal field, on the SE flank of Mt. Amiata volcano, southern Tuscany, Italy. From our field observations we find that a relatively high percentage (i.e. about 5%) of the recorded events are of hydro-fracturing origin and have a distinct waveform seismic signature when compared to the recorded events of tectonic shear-fracturing origin. While hydrofracturing events are mostly concentrated around the geothermal fields, the spatial distribution of hypocenters shows a deepening and a density increase of the micro-seismic activity from the volcanic axis toward the exploited geothermal reservoir, suggesting that volcanic spreading at Amiata is still active. The study of different data-sets from different time periods together with the knowledge from Terzaghi's law that production of large quantity of pore-fluid with the associated fluid pressure reduction could augment the stress normal to faults' surfaces (and thus their resistance to slip), make us argue that the process of volcanic spreading affecting the edifice of Amiata may allow augmented accumulation of stresses on faults, eventually leading to the release of higher stress drops, once ruptures occur. The Gutenberg-Richter magnitude-frequency distribution shows that the strongest events on record have a local magnitude in the 5-5.5 ML range, for 100-year recurrence time. In conclusions, we infer that geothermal exploitation at Mt. Amiata should be closely monitored in order to understand how fluid injection/production is responsible for the hydrofracturing seismic activity and affects stress accumulation on and rupture of faults within and in the neighborhood of the geothermal fields

  16. The interplay between fault-fracture networks activity, fluid flow and mineralization in the Andes: A case study in the Tolhuaca geothermal system, southern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, P.; Perez-Flores, P.; Reich, M.; Arancibia, G.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    The nature of the interplay between active tectonics and fluid flow is a key feature to better understand the chemical evolution of fluids in geothermal and hydrothermal systems. The prominent hydrothermal, tectonic and volcanic activity of the Southern Andes volcanic zone (SVZ) makes it one of the best natural laboratories to address this issue. In the northern termination of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS), tectonic and volcanic processes interact to define the geothermal field of Tolhuaca. The objective of our current research is to assess the nature of the interplay between brittle deformation and chemical evolution of fluids and mineral paragenesis. Tol-1 is a vertical 1.080 m deep borehole which could yield relevant information regarding the evolution of the Tolhuaca geothermal system. The methodology to achieve our objective includes the structural and geochemical analysis of oriented faults, fault-veins and veins -former pathways- in the core. Structural mapping at the regional scale will help to identify the main structural system, which accommodates the regional stresses, and promotes fluid migration, accumulation and arrest. Fluid inclusions analysis by microthermometry, LA-ICP-MS and Raman spectroscopy will allow a better understanding of the feedback between the fluid flow episodes and the mineralization. More than 120 structural measurements of faults, veins and fault-veins were performed (strike, dip, rake -when available-). Forty seven samples were taken for thin & fluid inclusions sections. Detailed mapping of structures including dip and kinematic indicators from mineral sealing was synthesized in a structural log of Tol-1 core. Our preliminary results show that there is a strong correlation between abundance of structures and rock type. Lava intervals exhibit more intense fracturing and veining than tuff and volcaniclastic intervals. In the upper 300 m of the core, structures are primarily steeply dipping with a dominant normal sense of

  17. Tectonic controls on the Karlıova triple junction (Turkey): Implications for tectonic inversion and the initiation of volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoğlu, Özgür; Selçuk, Azad Sağlam; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2017-01-01

    Few places on Earth are tectonically as active as the Karlıova region of eastern Turkey which comprises a triple junction (KTJ). Triple junctions result in complex kinematic and mechanical interactions within the lithosphere generating tectonic inversions and uplift, extensive seismicity and volcanism. Here we present new data, and summarize existing data, on the tectonic evolution of the KTJ in eastern Turkey over the past 6 Ma. In particular, we present a kinematic model for the KTJ and the surrounding area as well as new structural maps. The deformation or strain rate has varied over this 6 million year period. The maximum strain rate occurred between 6 Ma and 3 Ma, a period that coincides with the initiation of activity in Varto Volcano. We suggest that increased strain rate and the initiation of activity at the Varto Volcano may be tectonically related. Subsequent to its formation, the Varto Volcano was dissected by active faults associated with the Varto Fault Zone, including reverse, normal and strike-slip faults. During the past 3 Ma, however, the KTJ area was deformed dominantly through dextral crustal movements associated to right-lateral faults. This deformation resulted in the development of a NE-SW-trending extensional/transtensional regime, together with a complementary NW-SE-trending contractional regime. In the past 6 Ma the east end of the KTJ has been subjected to incremental deformation. This deformation has resulted in many episodes of faulting during (i) ongoing shortening phases driven by a regional-scale thrust tectonic regime, and (ii) local-scale transtensional phases caused by westward extrusion.

  18. Active Fault Characterization in the Urban Area of Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Kurt; Grupe, Sabine; Hintersberger, Esther

    2016-04-01

    The identification of active faults that lie beneath a city is of key importance for seismic hazard assessment. Fault mapping and characterization in built-up areas with strong anthropogenic overprint is, however, a challenging task. Our study of Quaternary faults in the city of Vienna starts from the re-assessment of a borehole database of the municipality containing several tens of thousands of shallow boreholes. Data provide tight constraints on the geometry of Quaternary deposits and highlight several locations with fault-delimited Middle to Late Pleistocene terrace sediments of the Danube River. Additional information is obtained from geological descriptions of historical outcrops which partly date back to about 1900. The latter were found to be particularly valuable by providing unprejudiced descriptions of Quaternary faults, sometimes with stunning detail. The along-strike continuations of some of the identified faults are further imaged by industrial 2D/3D seismic acquired outside the city limits. The interpretation and the assessment of faults identified within the city benefit from a very well constrained tectonic model of the active Vienna Basin fault system which derived from data obtained outside the city limits. This data suggests that the urban faults are part of a system of normal faults compensating fault-normal extension at a releasing bend of the sinistral Vienna Basin Transfer Fault. Slip rates estimated for the faults in the city are in the range of several hundredths of millimetres per year and match the slip rates of normal faults that were trenched outside the city. The lengths/areas of individual faults estimated from maps and seismic reach up to almost 700 km² suggesting that all of the identified faults are capable of producing earthquakes with magnitudes M>6, some with magnitudes up to M~6.7.

  19. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    employing various filtering techniques. Thus, the reduction-to-the-pole or pseudo-gravity operators have allowed for an improved source positioning, distorted by the inclination of the geomagnetic vector, while high-order derivatives (e.g. horizontal and vertical gradients) have better outlined the contour of the hidden magnetic bodies. Overall, the geomagnetic survey has confirmed the assumptions previously inferred by geological field work. Besides, it helped identify several unrevealed buried volcanic forms and their relation to structural elements (e.g. fault aligned vents, and larger circular structures). In-depth development of the volcanic structures has been studied along several interpretative lines by using inversion and 2D forward modelling of geomagnetic data under rock magnetic properties constraints provided by lab analyses. Acknowledgements. The research was funded through CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0137.

  20. Laboratory Observations of the Spectrum of Fault Slip: Implications for Slow Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, John; Saffer, Demian; Scuderi, Marco; Marone, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Fault zone failure spans a wide range of slip modes, including normal earthquakes, low-frequency earthquakes, episodic tremor and slip, non-volcanic tremor, slow slip events, and steady aseismic creep. Despite widespread observations in a range of tectonic and geologic environments, the physics underlying these events remain poorly understood. Here we present a systematic laboratory study of slow slip and build a mechanical explanation for the spectrum of fault slip modes. We show that complex behaviors can arise from relatively simple models using traditional rate-and-state friction (RSF) concepts. We sheared quartz gouge at constant velocity in a double-direct shear configuration. We controlled the effective stiffness of the system by changing the normal stress and changing the material of the loading blocks from steel to acrylic. There is a critical stiffness value (kc) that represents a bifurcation point separating stable and unstable systems. For systems in which k energy into the system, therefore generating a force imbalance and acceleration to fully dynamic and unstable stick-slip. For systems in which k > kc, the surrounding media unloads energy faster than the fault can weaken and therefore the system is stable. For experiments that exhibited stable behavior, we used velocity step tests and RSF modeling tools to independently determine constitutive frictional parameters and calculate the system critical stiffness. For experiments that exhibited unstable behavior we measured the stiffness of the layer directly from displacement and load measurements during individual stick-slip events, and compared it to the calculated value of kc. We find that the predicted stability boundary (defined by k/kc = 1) delineates stable and unstable slip behavior in our experiments, but rather than a strict bifurcation, slow slip and quasi-dynamic failure occur at and very near k/kc = 1. We also find that the peak slip velocity and duration of stick slip events also vary

  1. Fault system polarity: A matter of chance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpfer, Martin; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Walsh, John; Nicol, Andy; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Many normal fault systems and, on a smaller scale, fracture boudinage exhibit asymmetry so that one fault dip direction dominates. The fraction of throw (or heave) accommodated by faults with the same dip direction in relation to the total fault system throw (or heave) is a quantitative measure of fault system asymmetry and termed 'polarity'. It is a common belief that the formation of domino and shear band boudinage with a monoclinic symmetry requires a component of layer parallel shearing, whereas torn boudins reflect coaxial flow. Moreover, domains of parallel faults are frequently used to infer the presence of a common décollement. Here we show, using Distinct Element Method (DEM) models in which rock is represented by an assemblage of bonded circular particles, that asymmetric fault systems can emerge under symmetric boundary conditions. The pre-requisite for the development of domains of parallel faults is however that the medium surrounding the brittle layer has a very low strength. We demonstrate that, if the 'competence' contrast between the brittle layer and the surrounding material ('jacket', or 'matrix') is high, the fault dip directions and hence fault system polarity can be explained using a random process. The results imply that domains of parallel faults are, for the conditions and properties used in our models, in fact a matter of chance. Our models suggest that domino and shear band boudinage can be an unreliable shear-sense indicator. Moreover, the presence of a décollement should not be inferred on the basis of a domain of parallel faults only.

  2. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowenstern, J.B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (US)] [and others

    1999-04-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of {approx} 10 km{sup 2} on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures > 225{sup o}C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression. (author)

  3. Structure of the Pliocene Camp dels Ninots maar-diatreme (Catalan Volcanic Zone, NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oms, O.; Bolós, X.; Barde-Cabusson, S.; Martí, J.; Casas, A.; Lovera, R.; Himi, M.; Gómez de Soler, B.; Campeny Vall-Llosera, G.; Pedrazzi, D.; Agustí, J.

    2015-11-01

    Maar volcanoes expose shallower or deeper levels of their internal structure as a function of the degree of erosion. In El Camp dels Ninots maar-diatreme (Catalan Volcanic Zone, Spain), the tephra ring has been largely eroded, and the remaining volcanic deposits infilling the diatreme are hidden under a lacustrine sedimentary infill of the crater. The volcano shows hardly any exposure, so its study needs the application of direct (e.g., boreholes) and indirect (shallow geophysics) subsurface exploration techniques. Additionally, this maar-diatreme was built astride two different substrates (i.e., mixed setting) as a result of its location in a normal fault separating Neogene sediments from Paleozoic granites. In order to characterize the internal structure and post-eruption stratigraphy of the maar-diatreme, we did geological studies (mapping, continuous core logging, and description of the tephra ring outcrops) and near-surface geophysics, including nine transects of electric resistivity tomography and a gravity survey. Results show that the deeper part of the diatreme is excavated into granites and is relatively steep and symmetrical. The uppermost diatreme is asymmetrical because of mechanical contrast between granites and Pliocene sands. The maar crater contained a lake permanently isolated from the surrounding relief and was deep enough to host anoxic bottom waters while its margins had shallower waters. These lake conditions preserved the remarkable Pliocene fossil record found in the lacustrine sediments.

  4. Paleomagnetic and geochemical applications to tectonics and Quaternary geology: Studies at Coso Volcanic Field, California and the Channelled Scabland, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhar, Christopher J.

    At the Coso Range, CA we used paleomagnetism to reveal the long-term history and kinematics of deformation resulting from distributed transtension of the Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). Pliocene lavas and sediments deposited in and around the Wild Horse Mesa record and result from the initiation of deformation along the ECSZ in this area. Geochemical analyses, geochronologic, and stratigraphic constraints provide new information about the initiation and evolution of volcanism in this region. Following emplacement of the volcanics, distributed faulting has accommodated dextral shear of the ECSZ by 12°--22° of rotation of fault-bounded blocks in the Wild Horse Mesa and tilting in the Coso geothermal area. This partitioning of block kinematic style probably results from partitioning of slip of the master faults at depth that control block motion of the shallow crust. A calculation based upon some simple assumptions about block geometry indicates that at least 1.5 km of dextral slip is accommodated across the Wild Horse Mesa. Magnetostratigraphic studies of the Cold Creek bar at Hanford, WA constrain the timing of deposition of cataclysmic flood deposits resulting from jokulhlaups like the Missoula floods and similar processes. Abundant evidence for reversed polarity sediments confirm previous studies suggesting onset of cataclysmic floods prior to the last major magnetic polarity reversal (0.78 Ma). A normal polarity zone bracketed by reversed polarity at eastern Cold Creek bar extends the chronology back to before the Jaramillo subchron (0.99--1.07 Ma) suggesting that the climatic and physiographic elements for cataclysmic floods were in place in the Pacific Northwest by about 1.1 Ma.

  5. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  6. Alkali Basalts From the Galatia Volcanic Complex, NW Central Anatolia, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Tankut, Ayla; GÜLEÇ, Nilgün

    2014-01-01

    Alkali basalts occur as small lava flows associated with the andesitic lava flows and pyroclastics of Early to Middle Miocene age which are the main constituents of the Galatia volcanic complex. The northern margin of the complex is bordered by the North Anatolian Fault wher eas the southern margin is surrounded by a continental sedimentary sequence which interfingers with the volcanics. New K-Ar age determinations of the basalts reveal that alkali basalts erupted at two differ ent periods ...

  7. Structural superposition in fault systems bounding Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graymer, Russell W.; Stanley, Richard G.; Ponce, David A.; Jachens, Robert C.; Simpson, Robert W.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2015-01-01

    Santa Clara Valley is bounded on the southwest and northeast by active strike-slip and reverse-oblique faults of the San Andreas fault system. On both sides of the valley, these faults are superposed on older normal and/or right-lateral normal oblique faults. The older faults comprised early components of the San Andreas fault system as it formed in the wake of the northward passage of the Mendocino Triple Junction. On the east side of the valley, the great majority of fault displacement was accommodated by the older faults, which were almost entirely abandoned when the presently active faults became active after ca. 2.5 Ma. On the west side of the valley, the older faults were abandoned earlier, before ca. 8 Ma and probably accumulated only a small amount, if any, of the total right-lateral offset accommodated by the fault zone as a whole. Apparent contradictions in observations of fault offset and the relation of the gravity field to the distribution of dense rocks at the surface are explained by recognition of superposed structures in the Santa Clara Valley region.

  8. East-west faults due to planetary contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Beuthe, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Contraction, expansion and despinning have been common in the past evolution of Solar System bodies. These processes deform the lithosphere until it breaks along faults. The type and orientation of faults are usually determined under the assumption of a constant lithospheric thickness, but lithospheric thinning can occur at the equator or at the poles due either to latitudinal variation in solar insolation or to localized tidal dissipation. Using thin elastic shells with variable thickness, I show that the equatorial thinning of the lithosphere transforms the homogeneous and isotropic fault pattern caused by contraction/expansion into a pattern of faults striking east-west, preferably formed in the equatorial region. By contrast, lithospheric thickness variations only weakly affect the despinning faulting pattern consisting of equatorial strike-slip faults and polar normal faults. If contraction is added to despinning, the despinning pattern first shifts to thrust faults striking north-south and then to thrus...

  9. The structural architecture of the Los Humeros volcanic complex and geothermal field, Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Sulpizio, Roberto; Carrasco Núñez, Gerardo; Davila Harris, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The development of geothermal energy in Mexico is a very important goal, given the presence of a large heat anomaly, associated with the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, the renewability of the resource and the low environmental impact. The Quaternary Los Humeros volcanic complex is an important geothermal target, whose evolution involved at least two caldera events, that alternated with other explosive and effusive activity. The first caldera forming event was the 460 ka eruption that produced the Xaltipan ignimbrite and formed a 15-20 km wide caldera. The second collapse event occurred 100 ka with the formation of the Zaragoza ignimbrite and a nested 8-10 km wide caldera. The whole volcano structure, the style of the collapses and the exact location of the calderas scarps and ring faults are still a matter of debate. The Los Humeros volcano hosts the productive Los Humeros Geothermal Field, with an installed capacity of 40 MW and additional 75 MW power plants under construction. Recent models of the geothermal reservoir predict the existence of at least two reservoirs in the geothermal system, separated by impermeable rock units. Hydraulic connectivity and hydrothermal fluids circulation occurs through faults and fractures, allowing deep steam to ascend while condensate flows descend. As a consequence, the plans for the exploration and exploitation of the geothermal reservoir have been based on the identification of the main channels for the circulation of hydrothermal fluids, constituted by faults, so that the full comprehension of the structural architecture of the caldera is crucial to improve the efficiency and minimize the costs of the geothermal field operation. In this study, we present an analysis of the Los Humeros volcanic complex focused on the Quaternary tectonic and volcanotectonics features, like fault scarps and aligned/elongated monogenetic volcanic centres. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of

  10. Adaptive Modeling for Security Infrastructure Fault Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Zhong-jie; YAO Shu-ping; HU Chang-zhen

    2008-01-01

    Based on the analysis of inherent limitations in existing security response decision-making systems, a dynamic adaptive model of fault response is presented. Several security fault levels were founded, which comprise the basic level, equipment level and mechanism level. Fault damage cost is calculated using the analytic hierarchy process. Meanwhile, the model evaluates the impact of different responses upon fault repair and normal operation. Response operation cost and response negative cost are introduced through quantitative calculation. This model adopts a comprehensive response decision of security fault in three principles-the maximum and minimum principle, timeliness principle, acquiescence principle, which assure optimal response countermeasure is selected for different situations. Experimental results show that the proposed model has good self-adaptation ability, timeliness and cost-sensitiveness.

  11. Crustal structure of norther Oaxaca terrane; The Oaxaca and caltepec faults, and the Tehuacan Valley. A gravity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Alatorre-Zamora, M. A.; Ramón, V. M.; Belmonte, S.

    2014-12-01

    Northern Oaxaca terrane, southern Mexico, is bound by the Caltepec and Oaxaca faults to the west and east, respectively. These faults juxtapose the Oaxaca terrane against the Mixteca and Juarez terranes, respectively. The Oaxaca Fault also forms the eastern boundary of the Cenozoic Tehuacan depression. Several gravity profiles across these faults and the Oaxaca terrane (including the Tehuacan Valley) enables us to establish the upper crustal structure of this region. Accordingly, the Oaxaca terrane is downward displaced to the east in two steps. First the Santa Lucia Fault puts into contact the granulitic basamental rocks with Phanerozoic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Finally, the Gavilan Fault puts into contact the Oaxaca terrane basement (Oaxaca Complex) into contact with the volcano-sedimentary infill of the valley. This gravity study reveals that the Oaxaca Fault system gives rise to a series of east tilted basamental blocks (Oaxaca Complex?). A structural high at the western Tehuacan depression accomadates the east dipping faults (Santa Lucia and Gavilan faults) and the west dipping faults of the Oaxaca Fault System. To the west of this high structural we have the depper depocenters. The Oaxaca Complex, the Caltepec and Santa Lucia faults continue northwestwards beneath Phanerozoic rocks. The faults are regional tectonic structures. They seem to continue northwards below the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. A major E-W to NE-SW discontinuity on the Oaxaca terrane is inferred to exist between profiles 1 and 2. The Tehuacan Valley posses a large groundwater potential.

  12. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption

  13. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption

  14. Neogene seismites and seismic volcanic rocks in the Linqu area, Shandong Province, E China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian H.S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Yishu Fault Zone runs through the centre of Shandong Province (E China; it is a deep-seated large fault system that still is active. Two volcanic faulted basins (the Shanwang and Linqu Basins in the Linqu area, west of the fault zone, are exposed to rifting, which process is accompanied by a series of tectonic and volcanic earthquakes with a magnitude of 5-8. Lacustrine sediments in the basins were affected by these earthquakes so that seismites with a variety of soft-sediment deformation structures originated. The seismites form part of the Shanwang Formation of the Linqu Group. Semi-consolidated fluvial conglomerates became deformed in a brittle way; these seismites are present at the base of the Yaoshan Formation. Intense earthquakes triggered by volcanic activity left their traces in the form of seismic volcanic rocks associated with liquefied-sand veins in the basalt/sand intercalations at the base of the Yaoshan Formation. These palaeo-earthquake records are dated around 14-10 Ma; they are responses to the intense tectonic extension and the basin rifting in this area and even the activity of the Yishu Fault Zone in the Himalayan tectonic cycle.

  15. Acoustic Detection of Faults and Degradation in a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine during VIPR Phase III Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III project was executed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and several industry, academic, and government partners in the summer of 2015. One of the research objectives was to use external radial acoustic microphone arrays to detect changes in the noise characteristics produced by the research engine during volcanic ash ingestion and seeded fault insertion scenarios involving bleed air valves. Preliminary results indicate the successful acoustic detection of suspected degradation as a result of cumulative exposure to volcanic ash. This detection is shown through progressive changes, particularly in the high-frequency content, as a function of exposure to greater cumulative quantities of ash. Additionally, detection of the simulated failure of the 14th stage stability bleed valve and, to a lesser extent, the station 2.5 stability bleed valve, to their fully-open fail-safe positions was achieved by means of spectral comparisons between nominal (normal valve operation) and seeded fault scenarios.

  16. Lunar Pyroclastic Eruptions: Basin Volcanism's Dying Gasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Nahm, A.; McGovern, P. J.; Kring, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    spatially isolated volcanic units, both confined within the central peak ring. One is a thin mare deposit to the north, and to the south is a 8.5 km long pyroclastic vent. The basin also a series of fractures, which exhibit complex cross-cutting relationships with each other and the basin floor materials, thereby offering clues about the timing of their formation. Some of these fractures widen as they cut across the uplifted peak ring, indicating that they are the surface manifestations of deep faulting and are younger. An orthogonal system of fractures in the southern basin floor outside of the peak ring is of particular interest because of its possible relationship to Schrodinger's basin volcanism. We are exploring the hypothesis that an expanding magma chamber once resided in this location, uplifted the basin floor, and formed these orthogonal fractures. Post-inflation, the reservoir was emptied via a propagating dike and sill complex that eventually surfaced at the location of the pyroclastic vent. [1] Saal et al. (2008) Nature; [2] Hauri et al. (2011) Science; [3] Saal et al. (2011) NASA Lunar Sci. Inst. Forum; [4] Delano (1986) JGR; [5] Head (1976) Rev. Geophys. Space Phys.; [6] McGovern & Litherland (2011) LPSC 42;McGovern et al. (2011) AGU Fall Session

  17. Recent seismicity detection increase in the Santorini volcanic island complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chouliaras

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Santorini is the most active volcanic complex in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the seismicity in this region, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA recently installed 4 portable seismological stations supplementary to the 3 permanent stations operating in the region. The addition of these stations has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in the NOA instrumental seismicity catalogue.

    In this study we analyze quantitatively the seismicity of the Santorini volcanic complex. The results indicate a recent significant reporting increase mainly for events of small magnitude and an increase in the seismicity rate by more than 100%. The mapping of the statistical significance of the rate change with the z-value method reveals that the rate increase exists primarily in the active fault zone perpendicular to the extensional tectonic stress regime that characterizes this region.

    The spatial distribution of the b-value around the volcanic complex indicates a low b-value distribution parallel to the extensional stress field, while the b-value cross section of the volcanic complex indicates relatively high b-values under the caldera and a significant b-value decrease with depth.

    These results are found to be in general agreement with the results from other volcanic regions and they encourage further investigations concerning the seismic and volcanic hazard and risk estimates for the Santorini volcanic complex using the NOA earthquake catalogue.

  18. Precambrian Lunar Volcanic Protolife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Green

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated.

  19. Tectonic implications of paleomagnetic poles from Lower Tertiary Volcanic Rocks, south central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, John W.; Grommé, C. Sherman; Csejtey, Bela, Jr.

    1985-12-01

    We have determined the paleolatitude of lower Tertiary volcanic rocks in southern Alaska to measure possible poleward translation of the Wrangellia and the Peninsular terranes after 50 m.y. ago. Previous paleomagnetic studies have shown that in Triassic and Jurassic time these terranes were located near the equator and have moved at least 3000 km poleward relative to the North American craton. Our sample localities are in the northern Talkeetna Mountains in mildly deformed andesite and dacite flows (50.4, 51.3, 53.9, and 56.3 m.y. by K-Ar) that overlap Lower Cretaceous flysch, Lower Permian volcanic rocks of Wrangellia, and Upper Triassic pillow basalt of the Susitna terrane. Results from 26 cooling units (23 of reversed polarity and 3 of normal polarity) give a mean paleomagnetic pole at 69.5°N, 179.6°E, α95 = 12.2°. Stratigraphic sections from opposite limbs of a syncline yield directional paths that pass the fold test, satisfying a necessary condition for primary origin of the magnetization. The corresponding mean paleolatitude (76°N) of the northern Talkeetna Mountains is 8°±10° higher than the latitude predicted from the Eocene reference pole for North America. Therefore, northward drift of the Talkeetna superterrane, which is the amalgamation of the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes during and after Middle Jurassic time, was probably complete by 50 m.y. ago. Our results are consistent with paleomagnetic poles from uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene volcanic sequences in Denali National Park, the Lake Clark region, northern Bristol Bay region, and near McGrath. These poles generally lie south of the cratonic poles, suggesting that the region between the Kaltag, Bruin Bay, and Castle Mountain faults has rotated counterclockwise relative to North America since the early Eocene.

  20. Effects of Hayward fault interactions with the Rodgers Creek and San Andreas faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.; Geist, E.; Jachens, R.; Sliter, R.; Jaffe, B.

    2003-12-01

    Finite-element and crustal-structure models of the Hayward fault emphasize its position within a network of interacting faults, and indicate a number of expected influences from other faults. For example, a new structural cross section across San Pablo Bay in association with potential field maps allows us to map and model detailed interactions between the Hayward and Rodgers Creek faults. The two faults do not appear to connect at depth, and finite-element models indicate growing extensional stress in the stepover between the two faults. A model consequence of extensional stress in the stepover, combined with long-term interaction with the San Andreas fault, is normal-stress reduction (unclamping) of the north Hayward fault. If this occurs in the real Earth, then substantial reduction in frictional resistance on the north Hayward fault is expected, which might in turn be expected to influence the distribution of creep. Interaction effects on a shorter time scale are also evident. The 1906 San Francisco, and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes are calculated to have reduced stress on the Hayward fault at seismogenic depths. Models of the 1906 earthquake show complex interactions; coseismic static stress changes drop stress on the north Hayward fault while upper mantle viscoelastic relaxation slightly raises the stressing rate. Stress recovery is calculated to have occurred by ~1980, though earthquake probability is still affected by the delay induced by stress reduction. We conclude that the model Hayward fault is strongly influenced by its neighbors, and it is worth considering these effects when studying and attempting to understand the real fault.

  1. Characterization of slow slip rate faults in humid areas: Cimandiri fault zone, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marliyani, G. I.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Whipple, K. X.

    2016-12-01

    In areas where regional tectonic strain is accommodated by broad zones of short and low slip rate faults, geomorphic and paleoseismic characterization of faults is difficult because of poor surface expression and long earthquake recurrence intervals. In humid areas, faults can be buried by thick sediments or soils; their geomorphic expression subdued and sometimes undetectable until the next earthquake. In Java, active faults are diffused, and their characterization is challenging. Among them is the ENE striking Cimandiri fault zone. Cumulative displacement produces prominent ENE oriented ranges with the southeast side moving relatively upward and to the northeast. The fault zone is expressed in the bedrock by numerous NE, west, and NW trending thrust- and strike-slip faults and folds. However, it is unclear which of these structures are active. We performed a morphometric analysis of the fault zone using 30 m resolution Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. We constructed longitudinal profiles of 601 bedrock rivers along the upthrown ranges along the fault zone, calculated the normalized channel steepness index, identified knickpoints and use their distribution to infer relative magnitudes of rock uplift and locate boundaries that may indicate active fault traces. We compare the rock uplift distribution to surface displacement predicted by elastic dislocation model to determine the plausible fault kinematics. The active Cimandiri fault zone consists of six segments with predominant sense of reverse motion. Our analysis reveals considerable geometric complexity, strongly suggesting segmentation of the fault, and thus smaller maximum earthquakes, consistent with the limited historical record of upper plate earthquakes in Java.

  2. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out...... that there is a separation be-tween the feedback controller and the fault tolerant part. The closed loop feedback properties are handled by the nominal feedback controller and the fault tolerant part is handled by the design of the Youla parameter. The design of the fault tolerant part will not affect the design...... of the nominal feedback con-troller....

  3. Distribution and nature of fault architecture in a layered sandstone and shale sequence: An example from the Moab fault, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N.C.; Aydin, A.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the distribution of fault rock and damage zone structures in sandstone and shale along the Moab fault, a basin-scale normal fault with nearly 1 km (0.62 mi) of throw, in southeast Utah. We find that fault rock and damage zone structures vary along strike and dip. Variations are related to changes in fault geometry, faulted slip, lithology, and the mechanism of faulting. In sandstone, we differentiated two structural assemblages: (1) deformation bands, zones of deformation bands, and polished slip surfaces and (2) joints, sheared joints, and breccia. These structural assemblages result from the deformation band-based mechanism and the joint-based mechanism, respectively. Along the Moab fault, where both types of structures are present, joint-based deformation is always younger. Where shale is juxtaposed against the fault, a third faulting mechanism, smearing of shale by ductile deformation and associated shale fault rocks, occurs. Based on the knowledge of these three mechanisms, we projected the distribution of their structural products in three dimensions along idealized fault surfaces and evaluated the potential effect on fluid and hydrocarbon flow. We contend that these mechanisms could be used to facilitate predictions of fault and damage zone structures and their permeability from limited data sets. Copyright ?? 2005 by The American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

  4. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make existing lung problems worse. ... deep into the lungs. Breathing in volcanic smog irritates the lungs and mucus membranes. It can affect ...

  5. Active Fault Detection and Isolation for Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Mehdi; Schiøler, Henrik; Bak, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm for active fault detection and isolation is proposed. In order to observe the failure hidden due to the normal operation of the controllers or the systems, an optimization problem based on minimization of test signal is used. The optimization based method imposes the normal and fault...... to the two tank bench mark example in presence of two faults....

  6. Crustal Seismicity and Recent Faults in Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Comte, D.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Herail, G.

    2004-12-01

    Most seismological studies in southern Peru have been focused on the downgoing slab seismicity in order to constrain the Wadati-Benioff zone. This study deals with the intra-continental seismicity of the southern Peru forearc (17,3° S - 18,5° S) in a post-seismic context (Arequipa thrust earthquake, Mw=8.4, 23 June, 2001). It is difficult to identify historical crustal earthquake from available catalogues, however some crustal events teleseismically recorded can be found since 1976; they exhibit normal focal mechanism solutions in the southern Peru volcanic arc and inverse focal mechanism solutions in the Central Depression. Following a notable increase of shallow crustal seismicity located close to the Western Cordillera after the 23 June 2001, a temporary seismic network was deployed between January and March 2003 in order to study the Wadati-Benioff zone and monitoring the crustal seismicity in southern Peru. From the about 1700 events locally recorded by the local network, 300 crustal earthquakes were identified in the Peruvian forearc between Tacna and Moquegua. This crustal seismicity is distributed along a lineament located at depths between 0 and 60 km, dipping at about 45° from the Western Cordillera towards the coast, almost perpendicular to the subducting slab; this behaviour was previously observed in northern Chile and in southern Peru, north of the study zone (16° S). In the Central Depression, seismic activity is not superficial occurring between 25-60 km depth and it is mostly characterized by inverse focal mechanism solutions. Superficial faults situated in the Central Depression and in the Coastal Cordillera can not be associated with the seismic activity observed in this area. However, in the Pre-Cordillera, crustal seismicity occurs at depths between 0-15 km and can be correlated with shallow fault systems recognized by satellite images and on the field. For examples, the Incapuquio fault system which was a transpressive system in Cretaceous

  7. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  8. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    bears witness to the important role of the zonal winds in the Jovian atmosphere (blowing along the same latitude) in transporting the haze material, much stronger than that of the meridional winds (along the same longitude), even at the high latitudes of the auroral region. Jupiter's rapid rotation (about 10 hours per revolution) obviously plays an important role in this. A volcanic eruption on Io ESO PR Photo 21f/01 ESO PR Photo 21f/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 322 pix - 50k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 643 pix - 160k] Caption : ESO PR Photo 21f/01 shows a small area of an image obtained through a narrow-band filter centered at 4.07 µm. The bright object is the Jovian moon Io ; its image is further enlarged to the left. A strong asymmetry is evident, with the Tvashtar hot spot well visible in the upper right quadrant. Io , the innermost major satellite of Jupiter is one of the most remarkable bodies in the solar system. Volcanic activity on its surface was first discovered by the NASA Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft during fly-by's in 1979. This is attributed to internal heating caused by tidal effects between Jupiter, Io and the other Galilean satellites. Apart from the Earth, Io is the only other body in the solar system that is currently volcanically active. The volcanism on this moon is the main source of electrically charged particles (plasma) in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. A bright polar feature is visible on several ISAAC images of Io , obtained through a narrow-band filter at 4.07 µm, cf. PR Photo 21f/01 . In this waveband, the effect of reflected sunlight is negligible and the image resolution is the best. Applying a basic filtering algorithm, the sharpness of this image was further enhanced. The recorded emission is found to correspond to the Tvashtar hot spot that was discovered by NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) in November 1999 and observed simultaneously by the Galileo spacecraft during its I25 flyby. Such outbursts normally have a short lifetime, less than

  9. Evidences for strong directional resonances in intensely deformed zones of the Pernicana fault, Mount Etna, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giulio, G.; Cara, F.; Rovelli, A.; Lombardo, G.; Rigano, R.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we investigate ground motion properties in the western part of the Pernicana fault. This is the major fault of Mount Etna and drives the dynamic evolution of the area. In a previous work, Rigano et al. (2008) showed that a significant horizontal polarization characterizes ground motion in fault zones of Mount Etna, both during earthquakes and ambient vibrations. We have performed denser microtremor measurements in the NE rift segment and in intensely deformed zones of the Pernicana fault at Piano Pernicana. This study includes mapping of azimuth-dependent horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios along and across the fault, frequency-wave number techniques applied to array data to investigate the nature of ambient vibrations, and polarization analysis through the conventional covariance matrix method. Our results indicate that microtremors are likely composed of volcanic tremor. Spectral ratios show strong directional resonances of horizontal components around 1 Hz when measurements enter the most damaged part of the fault zone. Their polarization directions show an abrupt change, by 20° to 40°, at close measurements between the northern and southern part of the fault zone. Recordings of local earthquakes at one site in the fault zone confirm the occurrence of polarization with the same angle found using volcanic tremor. We have also found that the directional effect is not time-dependent, at least at a seasonal scale. This observation and the similar behavior of volcanic tremors and earthquake-induced ground motions suggest that horizontal polarization is the effect of local fault properties. However, the 1-Hz resonant frequency cannot be reproduced using the 1-D vertically varying model inferred from the array data analysis, suggesting a role of lateral variations of the fault zone. Although the actual cause of polarization is unknown, a role of stress-induced anisotropy and microfracture orientation in the near-surface lavas of the Pernicana fault

  10. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  11. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  12. Fault detection and isolation in systems with parametric faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem of fault detection and isolation of parametric faults is considered in this paper. A fault detection problem based on parametric faults are associated with internal parameter variations in the dynamical system. A fault detection and isolation method for parametric faults is formulated...

  13. Iowa Bedrock Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This fault coverage locates and identifies all currently known/interpreted fault zones in Iowa, that demonstrate offset of geologic units in exposure or subsurface...

  14. null Faults, null Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  15. Mountain building on Io driven by deep faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael; McKinnon, William B

    2016-01-01

    Jupiter’s volcanic moon Io possesses some of the highest relief in the Solar System: massive, isolated mountain blocks that tower up to 17 km above the surrounding plains. These mountains are likely to result from pervasive compressive stresses induced by subsidence of the surface beneath the near-continual emplacement of volcanic material. The stress state that results from subsidence and warming of Io’s lithosphere has been investigated in detail1, 2, 3, 4; however, the mechanism of orogenesis itself and its effect on regional tectonism and volcanism has not been firmly established. Here we present viscoelastic–plastic finite element simulations demonstrating that Io’s mountains form along deep-seated thrust faults that initiate at the base of the lithosphere and propagate upward. We show that faulting fundamentally alters the stress state of Io’s lithosphere by relieving the large volcanism-induced subsidence stresses. Notably, in the upper portion of the lithosphere, stresses become tensile (near-zero differential stress). A number of processes are therefore altered post-faulting, including magma transport through the lithosphere, interactions with tidal stresses and potentially the localization of mountain formation by thermoelastic stresses. We conclude that Io’s mountains form by a unique orogenic mechanism, compared with tectonic processes operating elsewhere in the Solar System.

  16. Known and suggested quaternary faulting in the midcontinent United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, R.L.; Crone, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The midcontinent United States between the Appalachian and Rocky Mountains contains 40 known faults or other potentially tectonic features for which published geologic information shows or suggests Quaternary tectonic faulting. We report results of a systematic evaluation of published and other publicly available geologic evidence of Quaternary faulting. These results benefit seismic-hazard assessments by (1) providing some constraints on the recurrence intervals and magnitudes of large, prehistoric earthquakes, and (2) identifying features that warrant additional study. For some features, suggested Quaternary tectonic faulting has been disproved, whereas, for others, the suggested faulting remains questionable. Of the 40 features, nine have clear geologic evidence of Quaternary tectonic faulting associated with prehistoric earthquakes, and another six features have evidence of nontectonic origins. An additional 12 faults, uplifts, or historical seismic zones lack reported paleoseismological evidence of large. Quaternary earthquakes. The remaining 13 features require further paleoseismological study to determine if they have had Quaternary earthquakes that were larger than any known from local historical records; seven of these 13 features are in or near urbanized areas where their study could affect urban hazard estimates. These seven are: (1) the belt of normal faults that rings the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Texas. (2) the Northeast Ohio seismic zone, (3) the Valmont and (4) Goodpasture faults of Colorado. (5) the Champlain lowlands normal faults of New York State and Vermont, and (6) the Lexington and (7) Kentucky River fault systems of eastern Kentucky. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Geology and geochemistry of volcanic centers within the eastern half of the Sonoma volcanic field, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Rytuba, James J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Sonoma volcanic field in the northern California Coast Ranges contain heterogeneous assemblages of a variety of compositionally diverse volcanic rocks. We have used field mapping, new and existing age determinations, and 343 new major and trace element analyses of whole-rock samples from lavas and tuff to define for the first time volcanic source areas for many parts of the Sonoma volcanic field. Geophysical data and models have helped to define the thickness of the volcanic pile and the location of caldera structures. Volcanic rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field show a broad range in eruptive style that is spatially variable and specific to an individual eruptive center. Major, minor, and trace-element geochemical data for intracaldera and outflow tuffs and their distal fall equivalents suggest caldera-related sources for the Pinole and Lawlor Tuffs in southern Napa Valley and for the tuff of Franz Valley in northern Napa Valley. Stratigraphic correlations based on similarity in eruptive sequence and style coupled with geochemical data allow an estimate of 30 km of right-lateral offset across the West Napa-Carneros fault zones since ~5 Ma.

  18. Basement Fault Reactivation by Fluid Injection into Sedimentary Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Eichhubl; Fan, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Many suspected injection-induced earthquakes occur in crystalline basement rather than in the overlying sedimentary injection reservoir. To address why earthquakes nucleate in the basement rather than the injection layer we investigate the relationship between pore pressure diffusion, rock matrix deformation, and induced fault reactivation through 3D fully coupled poroelastic finite element models. These models simulate the temporal and spatial perturbation of pore pressure and solid stresses within a basement fault that extends into overlying sedimentary layers and that is conductive for flow along the fault but a barrier for flow across. We compare the effects of direct pore pressure communication and indirect poroelastic stress transfer from the injection reservoir to the fault on increasing the Coulomb failure stress that could reactivate the basement fault for normal, reverse, and strike-slip faulting stress regimes. Our numerical results demonstrate that volumetric expansion of the reservoir causes a bending of the fault near the injector and induces shear tractions along the downdip direction of the fault in the basement. These induced shear tractions act to increase the Coulomb failure stress for a normal faulting stress regime, and decrease the Coulomb failure stress for a reverse faulting regime. For a strike-slip faulting stress regime, the induced shear tractions increase the Coulomb failure stress both in the reservoir and basement. The induced normal traction on the fault reduces the Coulomb failure stress in all three tectonic regimes, but is larger in the reservoir than in the basement due to the more pronounced poroelastic effect in the reservoir. As a result, strike-slip stress regimes favor fault reactivation in the basement. Whereas the magnitude of the direct pore pressure increase exceeds the magnitude of induced poroelastic stress change, the poroelastic stress change increases the Coulomb failure stress in the basement fault for the normal

  19. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  20. Performance based fault diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Different aspects of fault detection and fault isolation in closed-loop systems are considered. It is shown that using the standard setup known from feedback control, it is possible to formulate fault diagnosis problems based on a performance index in this general standard setup. It is also shown...

  1. Fault tolerant computing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Randell, B

    1981-01-01

    Fault tolerance involves the provision of strategies for error detection, damage assessment, fault treatment and error recovery. A survey is given of the different sorts of strategies used in highly reliable computing systems, together with an outline of recent research on the problems of providing fault tolerance in parallel and distributed computing systems. (15 refs).

  2. Fault Tolerant Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, S. A.

    was to avoid a total close-down in case of the most likely faults. The second was a fault tolerant attitude control system for a micro satellite where the operation of the system is mission critical. The purpose was to avoid hazardous effects from faults and maintain operation if possible. A method...

  3. Coordination Control Strategy for Compound Fault of MMC-HVDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ming Guang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-line to ground fault of DC side and sub-module fault are typical faults of MMC-HVDC. When each of the above faults occurs, the system will give a signal for circuit-breaker releasing, this will result in interruption of power delivery, the stability of the system is greatly reduced. When these two faults occur simultaneously, research on control strategy for compound fault will help to improve the reliability of the system. While single-line to ground fault of DC side happens, only the electric potential auxiliary point of DC side is changed, system’s power transport normally. When sub-module is fault, redundancy fault-tolerated control strategy is presented, which replace the failed sub-modules with equal number of redundant sub-modules, it can restrain the fluctuation of direct current. A double terminals and 21 voltage-level MMC-HVDC system simulation model is set up in PSCAD/EMTDC. From the computation and simulation results, it is concluded that the proposed control strategy is correct for above compound fault, it can achieve rapid recovery after faults, effectively improve fault tolerance of the system, develop the stability and reliability of the system.

  4. Map and Data for Quaternary Faults and Fault Systems on the Island of Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Eric C.; Burgmann, Roland; Crone, Anthony J.; Machette, Michael N.; Dart, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This report and digitally prepared, GIS-based map is one of a series of similar products covering individual states or regions of United States that show the locations, ages, and activity rates of major earthquake-related features such as faults and fault-related folds. It is part of a continuing the effort to compile a comprehensive Quaternary fault and fold map and database for the United States, which is supported by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program. Guidelines for the compilation of the Quaternary fault and fold maps for the United States were published by Haller and others (1993) at the onset of this project. This compilation of Quaternary surface faulting and folding in Hawai`i is one of several similar state and regional compilations that were planned for the United States. Reports published to date include West Texas (Collins and others, 1996), New Mexico (Machette and others, 1998), Arizona (Pearthree, 1998), Colorado (Widmann and others, 1998), Montana (Stickney and others, 2000), Idaho (Haller and others, 2005), and Washington (Lidke and others, 2003). Reports for other states such as California and Alaska are still in preparation. The primary intention of this compilation is to aid in seismic-hazard evaluations. The report contains detailed information on the location and style of faulting, the time of most recent movement, and assigns each feature to a slip-rate category (as a proxy for fault activity). It also contains the name and affiliation of the compiler, date of compilation, geographic and other paleoseismologic parameters, as well as an extensive set of references for each feature. The map (plate 1) shows faults, volcanic rift zones, and lineaments that show evidence of Quaternary surface movement related to faulting, including data on the time of most recent movement, sense of movement, slip rate, and continuity of surface expression. This compilation is presented as a digitally prepared map product

  5. Stress sensitivity of fault seismicity: A comparison between limited-offset oblique and major strike-slip faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom; Stein, Ross S.; Simpson, Robert W.; Reasenberg, Paul A.

    1999-09-01

    We present a new three-dimensional inventory of the southern San Francisco Bay area faults and use it to calculate stress applied principally by the 1989 M = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake and to compare fault seismicity rates before and after 1989. The major high-angle right-lateral faults exhibit a different response to the stress change than do minor oblique (right-lateral/thrust) faults. Seismicity on oblique-slip faults in the southern Santa Clara Valley thrust belt increased where the faults were undamped. The strong dependence of seismicity change on normal stress change implies a high coefficient of static friction. In contrast, we observe that faults with significant offset (>50-100 km) behave differently; microseismicity on the Hayward fault diminished where right-lateral shear stress was reduced and where it was undamped by the Loma Prieta earthquake. We observe a similar response on the San Andreas fault zone in southern California after the Landers earthquake sequence. Additionally, the offshore San Gregorio fault shows a seismicity rate increase where right-lateral/oblique shear stress was increased by the Loma Prieta earthquake despite also being clamped by it. These responses are consistent with either a low coefficient of static friction or high pore fluid pressures within the fault zones. We can explain the different behavior of the two styles of faults if those with large cumulative offset become impermeable through gouge buildup; coseismically pressurized pore fluids could be trapped and negate imposed normal stress changes, whereas in more limited offset faults, fluids could rapidly escape. The difference in behavior between minor and major faults may explain why frictional failure criteria that apply intermediate coefficients of static friction can be effective in describing the broad distributions of aftershocks that follow large earthquakes, since many of these events occur both inside and outside major fault zones.

  6. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East Deccan Volcanic Province, Kinwat, Maharashtra, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R D Kaplay; T Vijay Kumar; Soumyajit Mukherjee; P R Wesanekar; Md Babar; Sumeet Chavan

    2017-07-01

    We study the margin of South East Deccan Volcanic Province around Kinwat lineament, Maharashtra, India, which is NW extension of the Kaddam Fault. Structural field studies document ∼E–W strike-slip mostly brittle faults from the basement granite. We designate this as ‘Western boundary East Dharwar Craton Strike-slip Zone’ (WBEDCSZ). At local level, the deformation regime from Kinwat, Kaddam Fault, micro-seismically active Nanded and seismically active Killari corroborate with the nearby lineaments. Morphometric analyses suggest that the region is moderately tectonically active. The region of intense strike-slip deformation lies between seismically active fault along Tapi in NW and Bhadrachalam in the SE part of the Kaddam Fault/lineament. The WBEDCSZ with the surface evidences of faulting, presence of a major lineaments and intersection of faults could be a zone of intraplate earthquake.

  7. Late Quaternary Faulting along the San Juan de los Planes Fault Zone, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, M. M.; Coyan, J. A.; Arrowsmith, J.; Maloney, S. J.; Gutierrez, G.; Umhoefer, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    As a result of continued distributed deformation in the Gulf Extensional Province along an oblique-divergent plate margin, active normal faulting is well manifest in southeastern Baja California. By characterizing normal-fault related deformation along the San Juan de los Planes fault zone (SJPFZ) southwest of La Paz, Baja California Sur we contribute to understanding the patterns and rates of faulting along the southwest gulf-margin fault system. The geometry, history, and rate of faulting provide constraints on the relative significance of gulf-margin deformation as compared to axial system deformation. The SJPFZ is a major north-trending structure in the southern Baja margin along which we focused our field efforts. These investigations included: a detailed strip map of the active fault zone, including delineation of active scarp traces and geomorphic surfaces on the hanging wall and footwall; fault scarp profiles; analysis of bedrock structures to better understand how the pattern and rate of strain varied during the development of this fault zone; and a gravity survey across the San Juan de los Planes basin to determine basin geometry and fault behavior. The map covers a N-S swath from the Gulf of California in the north to San Antonio in the south, an area ~45km long and ~1-4km wide. Bedrock along the SJPFZ varies from Cretaceous Las Cruces Granite in the north to Cretaceous Buena Mujer Tonalite in the south and is scarred by shear zones and brittle faults. The active scarp-forming fault juxtaposes bedrock in the footwall against Late Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate. This ~20m wide zone is highly fractured bedrock infused with carbonate. The northern ~12km of the SJPFZ, trending 200°, preserves discontinuous scarps 1-2km long and 1-3m high in Quaternary units. The scarps are separated by stretches of bedrock embayed by hundreds of meters-wide tongues of Quaternary sandstone-conglomerate, implying low Quaternary slip rate. Further south, ~2 km north of the

  8. Do faults stay cool under stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, H. M.; Polissar, P. J.; Sheppard, R. E.; Brodsky, E. E.; Rowe, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    Determining the absolute stress on faults during slip is one of the major goals of earthquake physics as this information is necessary for full mechanical modeling of the rupture process. One indicator of absolute stress is the total energy dissipated as heat through frictional resistance. The heat results in a temperature rise on the fault that is potentially measurable and interpretable as an indicator of the absolute stress. We present a new paleothermometer for fault zones that utilizes the thermal maturity of extractable organic material to determine the maximum frictional heating experienced by the fault. Because there are no retrograde reactions in these organic systems, maximum heating is preserved. We investigate four different faults: 1) the Punchbowl Fault, a strike-slip fault that is part of the ancient San Andreas system in southern California, 2) the Muddy Mountain Thrust, a continental thrust sheet in Nevada, 3) large shear zones of Sitkanik Island, AK, part of the proto-megathrust of the Kodiak Accretionary Complex and 4) the Pasagshak Point Megathrust, Kodiak Accretionary Complex, AK. According to a variety of organic thermal maturity indices, the thermal maturity of the rocks falls within the range of heating expected from the bounds on burial depth and time, indicating that the method is robust and in some cases improving our knowledge of burial depth. Only the Pasagshak Point Thrust, which is also pseudotachylyte-bearing, shows differential heating between the fault and off-fault samples. This implies that most of the faults did not get hotter than the surrounding rock during slip. Simple temperature models coupled to the kinetic reactions for organic maturity let us constrain certain aspects of the fault during slip such as fault friction, maximum slip in a single earthquake, the thickness of the active slipping zone and the effective normal stress. Because of the significant length of these faults, we find it unlikely that they never sustained

  9. From tomographic images to fault heterogeneities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Amato

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Local Earthquake Tomography (LET is a useful tool for imaging lateral heterogeneities in the upper crust. The pattern of P- and S-wave velocity anomalies, in relation to the seismicity distribution along active fault zones. can shed light on the existence of discrete seismogenic patches. Recent tomographic studies in well monitored seismic areas have shown that the regions with large seismic moment release generally correspond to high velocity zones (HVZ's. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between the seismogenic behavior of faults and the velocity structure of fault zones as inferred from seismic tomography. First, we review some recent tomographic studies in active strike-slip faults. We show examples from different segments of the San Andreas fault system (Parkfield, Loma Prieta, where detailed studies have been carried out in recent years. We also show two applications of LET to thrust faults (Coalinga, Friuli. Then, we focus on the Irpinia normal fault zone (South-Central Italy, where a Ms = 6.9 earthquake occurred in 1980 and many thousands of attershock travel time data are available. We find that earthquake hypocenters concentrate in HVZ's, whereas low velocity zones (LVZ’ s appear to be relatively aseismic. The main HVZ's along which the mainshock rupture bas propagated may correspond to velocity weakening fault regions, whereas the LVZ's are probably related to weak materials undergoing stable slip (velocity strengthening. A correlation exists between this HVZ and the area with larger coseismic slip along the fault, according to both surface evidence (a fault scarp as high as 1 m and strong ground motion waveform modeling. Smaller wave-length, low-velocity anomalies detected along the fault may be the expression of velocity strengthening sections, where aseismic slip occurs. According to our results, the rupture at the nucleation depth (~ 10-12 km is continuous for the whole fault lenoth (~ 30 km, whereas at shallow depth

  10. Volcanic unrest leading to the July-August 2001 lateral eruption at Mt. Etna: Seismological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicali, Simona; Barberi, Graziella; Cocina, Ornella; Musumeci, Carla; Patanè, Domenico

    2015-10-01

    A close relationship between earthquake swarms, volcanic eruptions, and ground deformation at Mt. Etna was well documented shortly before the beginning of the July-August 2001 eruption. Past experiences at this volcano suggest how magma/dike intrusion in the shallow crust or in the upper part of the volcanic pile normally occurs after several years/months of internal recharging. Since seismic investigations provide a means to study the scale and origin of stress perturbations at active volcanoes, allowing to better investigating the preparation phase of an eruption, in this paper, we performed a close examination of the seismic activity recorded at Mt. Etna in the months preceding the 2001 eruption and in particular between November 2000 and July 2001. After integrating data recorded by the two networks operating during that time and run by the Istituto Internazionale di Vulcanologia and SISTEMA POSEIDON, we relocated 522 earthquakes by using the tomoDD code in a 3D velocity model, and then we computed their fault plane solutions. The application of different selection criteria enabled obtaining a good-quality revised data set consisting of 111 fault plane solutions. The high-precision locations identified well-defined seismic clusters, in different periods, suggesting a link with the magma migration from a depth of 8-13 km b.s.l. towards shallower zones. Moreover, the computed maximum compressive stress axis, as inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms, indicated a roughly W-E-oriented σ1. This findings reflect an overpressure of the mid to shallow crust due to the progressive magma uprising in central portion of the volcano and also highlighted a rotation of the local stress field with respect to the regional one N-S trending. In addition, P-axis distribution pointed out the presence of a center of pressure located to the south of the Central Craters. These results provide particularly compelling evidence for a direct causal link between pressurization of the

  11. Information Based Fault Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2008-01-01

    Fault detection and isolation, (FDI) of parametric faults in dynamic systems will be considered in this paper. An active fault diagnosis (AFD) approach is applied. The fault diagnosis will be investigated with respect to different information levels from the external inputs to the systems....... These inputs are disturbance inputs, reference inputs and auxilary inputs. The diagnosis of the system is derived by an evaluation of the signature from the inputs in the residual outputs. The changes of the signatures form the external inputs are used for detection and isolation of the parametric faults....

  12. Fault-Tree Compiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Fault-Tree Compiler (FTC) program, is software tool used to calculate probability of top event in fault tree. Gates of five different types allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language easy to understand and use. In addition, program supports hierarchical fault-tree definition feature, which simplifies tree-description process and reduces execution time. Set of programs created forming basis for reliability-analysis workstation: SURE, ASSIST, PAWS/STEM, and FTC fault-tree tool (LAR-14586). Written in PASCAL, ANSI-compliant C language, and FORTRAN 77. Other versions available upon request.

  13. Fault zone evolution in a Cenozoic inversion tectonic setting, SE Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Seog; Lee, Minjoo; Han, Seung-Rok

    2010-05-01

    The Korean peninsula has been considered as a tectonically safe region from earthquakes, because it is located in a stable margin of the Eurasian plate. However, more than 30 Quaternary faults have recently been reported from the southeastern part of the Korean peninsula. The studied fault zone is an N-S trending fault located in the northern extent of the Quaternary Eupcheon Fault, which composed of several fault gouges indicating multiple deformations. The fault zone (fault core) is exposed over 1 km long and the thickness is up to 2m. The fault gouge zone is composed of several different colored gouge bands. Well-exposed vertical and horizontal sections are analyzed so as to understand the characteristics of the fault and fault zone evolution. The analyzed kinematic indicators such as cleavages, lineations and slickenlines suggest that the fault underwent early normal slip under SE extension and was later reactivated under NNW compression resulting in inversion tectonics. Major fault zones do not cross-cut each other; instead, the fault gouges within the fault zone split and merge into other fault zones. Fault rocks developed in this fault zone show asymmetrical features including lens-shaped breccias blocks in gouge zones, and asymmetric distributions of grain size and fracture density, indicating mature fault system and asymmetric fault zone evolution. The hanging wall block of the fault shows relatively highly damaged fracture patterns indicating that the hanging wall is weaker than footwall. Therefore, detailed analysis of fault and fracture patterns, and characteristics of fault zones must be very useful in evaluation of fault zone evolution and characteristics of foundation.

  14. Earthquake fault superhighways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. P.; Das, S.; Searle, M. P.

    2010-10-01

    Motivated by the observation that the rare earthquakes which propagated for significant distances at supershear speeds occurred on very long straight segments of faults, we examine every known major active strike-slip fault system on land worldwide and identify those with long (> 100 km) straight portions capable not only of sustained supershear rupture speeds but having the potential to reach compressional wave speeds over significant distances, and call them "fault superhighways". The criteria used for identifying these are discussed. These superhighways include portions of the 1000 km long Red River fault in China and Vietnam passing through Hanoi, the 1050 km long San Andreas fault in California passing close to Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and San Francisco, the 1100 km long Chaman fault system in Pakistan north of Karachi, the 700 km long Sagaing fault connecting the first and second cities of Burma, Rangoon and Mandalay, the 1600 km Great Sumatra fault, and the 1000 km Dead Sea fault. Of the 11 faults so classified, nine are in Asia and two in North America, with seven located near areas of very dense populations. Based on the current population distribution within 50 km of each fault superhighway, we find that more than 60 million people today have increased seismic hazards due to them.

  15. Exploring Hawaiian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-02-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai`i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO's founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists' understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  16. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  17. Post-laramide folds in early- to mid-Tertiary volcanic and/or gravel sequences in eastern Chihuahua, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Gomez, J. J.; Chávez-Cabello, G.; Cerca-Niño, M.; Harald, B.; Iriondo, A.; Kurt, W.; Gildardo, G.

    2009-12-01

    Laramide age deformation in Northern Mexico ended prior to the accumulation of thick sequences of volcanic rocks, which in most places are flat-lying or gently tilted by normal faults related to Basin and Range extension. W of the Plomosas uplift, at Sierra Cuesta del Infierno, volcanic rocks interlayered with thin gravel deposits were locally folded in the period between 45.3 ± 0.1 Ma (Ar/Ar, san) and 33.95 ± 0.4 (U-Pb, zircon), producing a NNW-trending, plunging syncline associated with a monocline and two sets of domino-style normal faults. This group of structures roughly mimics the tectonic western front of the Chihuahua Thrust and Fold Belt at nearby Sierra El Morrión. There are thick sequences of continental gravel deposits in the southeastern portion of Chihuahua. Some sequences are mostly composed by clasts derived from Mesozoic marine sediments, with minor amounts of plutonic and volcanic rock fragments; they were deposited prior to the accumulation of a thick sequence of upper Eocene - middle Oligocene calc-alkaline volcanic rocks. E of Camargo (13 km, 090°), near Cerro El Jabalí, we have documented a NE tilted (40 to 70°), > 1200 m thick, gravel deposit, which was intruded by a 45.82 ± 0.02 Ma (Ar/Ar, hbl) andesitic sill. NW and SE of the Camargo volcanic field are two plunging synclines exposed at the sierras Aguachile (65 km, 066° from Camargo) and La Herradura (115 km, 097° from Camargo). These NNW-trending folds are younger than a rhyolitic ignimbrite at Aguachile (K-Ar, 31.3 Ma) and an andesite (Ar/Ar = 33.5± 0.3 Ma) at La Herradura. Part of La Herradura folded sequence is a gravel deposit formed by limestone clasts, similar to the Cerro El Jabalí sequence. S of Sierra El Diablo there is a striking array of structures, exposed in a large area (60 x 70 km). These structures were developed in sand and gravel deposits. Some of the folds have N-S trending axes and other folds are E-W trending. A few structures are clearly non-coaxial re

  18. Identification of Lembang fault, West-Java Indonesia by using controlled source audio-magnetotelluric (CSAMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanny, Teuku A.

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine boundary and how to know surrounding area between Lembang Fault and Cimandiri fault. For the detailed study we used three methodologies: (1). Surface deformation modeling by using Boundary Element method and (2) Controlled Source Audiomagneto Telluric (CSAMT). Based on the study by using surface deformation by using Boundary Element Methods (BEM), the direction Lembang fault has a dominant displacement in east direction. The eastward displacement at the nothern fault block is smaller than the eastward displacement at the southern fault block which indicates that each fault block move in left direction relative to each other. From this study we know that Lembang fault in this area has left lateral strike slip component. The western part of the Lembang fault move in west direction different from the eastern part that moves in east direction. Stress distribution map of Lembang fault shows difference between the eastern and western segments of Lembang fault. Displacement distribution map along x-direction and y-direction of Lembang fault shows a linement oriented in northeast-southwest direction right on Tangkuban Perahu Mountain. Displacement pattern of Cimandiri fault indicates that the Cimandiri fault is devided into two segment. Eastern segment has left lateral strike slip component while the western segment has right lateral strike slip component. Based on the displacement distribution map along y-direction, a linement oriented in northwest-southeast direction is observed at the western segment of the Cimandiri fault. The displacement along x-direction and y-direction between the Lembang and Cimandiri fault is nearly equal to zero indicating that the Lembang fault and Cimandiri Fault are not connected to each others. Based on refraction seismic tomography that we know the characteristic of Cimandiri fault as normal fault. Based on CSAMT method th e lembang fault is normal fault that different of dip which formed as

  19. Salt movements and faulting of the overburden - can numerical modeling predict the fault patterns above salt structures?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Egholm, D.L.; Wesenberg, Rasmus

    among other things the productivity due to the segmentation of the reservoir (Stewart 2006). 3D seismic data above salt structures can map such fault patterns in great detail and studies have shown that a variety of fault patterns exists. Yet, most patterns fall between two end members: concentric...... and radiating fault patterns. Here we use a modified version of the numerical spring-slider model introduced by Malthe-Sørenssen et al.(1998a) for simulating the emergence of small scale faults and fractures above a rising salt structure. The three-dimensional spring-slider model enables us to control....... The modeling shows that purely vertical movement of the salt introduces a mesh of concentric normal faults in the overburden, and that the frequency of radiating faults increases with the amount of lateral movements across the salt-overburden interface. The two end-member fault patterns (concentric vs...

  20. Spatio-temporal evolution of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobs Nawotniak, S. E.; Espindola, J.; Godinez, L.

    2010-12-01

    Mapping of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF), located in Veracruz, Mexico, through the use of digital elevation models, aerial photography, and field confirmation has found 353 distinct cones, 4 large composite volcanoes, and 42 maars. Eruptive activity in the TVF began in the late Miocene, underwent a quiescent period approximately 2.6-0.8 Ma, and continues into historic times with the most recent eruption occurring at San Martín Tuxtla volcano in 1793. The covariance of the minimum cone separation in the TVF indicates that, despite the influence of clear vent alignments following regional faulting trends, the field as a whole is anticlustered. Dividing the cones by morphometric age shows that while the older cones have an anti-clustered distribution, the younger cones (Catemaco. These areas of concentrated volcanism roughly correspond to the locations of two gravity anomalies previously identified in the area. While the average height/width ratio is equal between the two clusters, the cones in the eastern group are significantly smaller than their counterparts in the western group. The maars of the TVF are mostly located within the younger volcanic series, west of Laguna Catemaco, and have an anticlustered distribution; many of the maars are evenly spaced along curved lines, where they are weakly grouped according to crater diameter. Results indicate volcanism TVF has undergone continued spatial restriction over time, concentrating in the western half of the TVF with the onset of the eruption of the younger volcanic series 0.8 Ma and further contracting along the principle fault system within the last 50 Ka.

  1. Fault kinematics of the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, southern Chile; an example of diffuse strain and sinistral transtension along a continental transform margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betka, Paul; Klepeis, Keith; Mosher, Sharon

    2016-04-01

    A system of left-lateral faults that separates the South American and Scotia plates, known as the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, defines the modern tectonic setting of the southernmost Andes and is superimposed on the Late Cretaceous - Paleogene Patagonian fold-thrust belt. Fault kinematic data and crosscutting relationships from populations of thrust, strike-slip and normal faults from Peninsula Brunswick adjacent to the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, presented herein, show kinematic and temporal relationships between thrust faults and sets of younger strike-slip and normal faults. Thrust fault kinematics are homogeneous in the study area and record subhorizontal northeast-directed shortening. Strike-slip faults record east-northeast-directed horizontal shortening, west-northwest-directed horizontal extension and form Riedel and P-shear geometries compatible with left-lateral slip on the main splay of the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system. Normal faults record north-south trending extension that is compatible with the strike-slip faults. The study area occurs in a releasing step-over between overlapping segments of the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, which localized on antecedent sutures between basement terranes with differing geological origin. Results are consistent with regional tectonic models that suggest sinistral shearing and transtension in the southernmost Andes was contemporaneous with the onset of seafloor spreading in the Western Scotia Sea during the Early Miocene.

  2. DC superconducting fault current limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixador, P.; Villard, C.; Cointe, Y.

    2006-03-01

    There is a lack of satisfying solutions for fault currents using conventional technologies, especially in DC networks, where a superconducting fault current limiter could play a very important part. DC networks bring a lot of advantages when compared to traditional AC ones, in particular within the context of the liberalization of the electric market. Under normal operation in a DC network, the losses in the superconducting element are nearly zero and only a small, i.e. a low cost, refrigeration system is then required. The absence of zero crossing of a DC fault current favourably accelerates the normal zone propagation. The very high current slope at the time of the short circuit in a DC grid is another favourable parameter. The material used for the experiments is YBCO deposited on Al2O3 as well as YBCO coated conductors. The DC limitation experiments are compared to AC ones at different frequencies (50-2000 Hz). Careful attention is paid to the quench homogenization, which is one of the key issues for an SC FCL. The University of Geneva has proposed constrictions. We have investigated an operating temperature higher than 77 K. As for YBCO bulk, an operation closer to the critical temperature brings a highly improved homogeneity in the electric field development. The material can then absorb large energies without degradation. We present tests at various temperatures. These promising results are to be confirmed over long lengths.

  3. The use of outcrop data in fault prediction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, Oeystein

    1997-12-31

    This thesis begins by describing deformation structures formed by gravitational sliding in partially lithified sediments by studying the spatial variation in frequency of deformation structures, as well as their geometries and kinematics, the sequential development of an ancient slide is outlined. This study brings to light a complex deformation history which was associated with block gliding, involving folding, listric faulting, small-scale boudinage and clastic dyke injection. The collapse deformation which is documented in the basal part of a gliding sheet is described for the first time. Further, rift-related normal faults formed in a continental sequence of normal beds are described and there is a focus on the scaling behaviour of faults in variably cemented sandstones. It is shown that the displacement population coefficients of faults are influenced by the local lithology and hence scaling of faults is not uniform on all scales and is variable in different parts of a rock volume. The scaling behaviour of small faults is linked to mechanical heterogeneities in the rock and to the deformation style. It is shown that small faults occur in an aureole around larger faults. Strain and scaling of the small faults were measured in different structural positions relative to the major faults. The local strain field is found to be variable and can be correlated with drag folding along the master faults. A modeling approach is presented for prediction of small faults in a hydrocarbon reservoir. By modeling an outcrop bedding surface on a seismic workstation, outcrop data could be compared with seismic data. Further, well data were used to test the relationships inferred from the analogue outcrops. The study shows that seismic ductile strain can be correlated with the distribution of small faults. Moreover, the use of horizontal structural well data is shown to calibrate the structural interpretation of faulted seismic horizons. 133 refs., 64 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Subdiffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is performed on volcanic seismicities at Mt.Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland and Mt. Etna in Sicily, Italy, from the viewpoint of science of complex systems, and the discovery of remarkable similarities between them regarding their exotic spatio-temporal properties is reported. In both of the volcanic seismicities as point processes, the jump probability distributions of earthquakes are found to obey the exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distributions follow the power law. In particular, a careful analysis is made about the finite size effects on the waiting-time distributions, and accordingly, the previously reported results for Mt. Etna [S. Abe and N. Suzuki, EPL 110, 59001 (2015)] are reinterpreted. It is shown that spreads of the volcanic earthquakes are subdiffusive at both of the volcanoes. The aging phenomenon is observed in the "event-time-averaged" mean-squared displacements of the hypocenters. A comment is also made on presence/absence of long term memories in the context of t...

  5. Seismological study on the crustal structure of Tengchong volcanic-geothermal area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王椿镛; 楼海; 吴建平; 白志明; 皇甫岗; 秦嘉政

    2002-01-01

    Based upon the deep seismic sounding profile conducted in the Tengchong volcanic-geothermal area, a two-dimensional crustal P velocity structure is obtained by use of the finite-difference inversion and the forward travel-time fitting method. The crustal model shows that there is a low velocity zone in upper crust in the Tengchong area, which may be related to the volcanic-geothermal activities, and two intracrustal faults (the Longling-Ruili fault and Tengchong fault) exist on the profile, where the Tengchong fault may extend to the Moho discontinuity. Meanwhile, based on teleseismic data recorded by a temporary seismic network, we obtained the S-wave velocity structures beneath the Rehai-Retian region in the Tengchong area, which show the low S-wave velocity anomaly in upper crust. The authors discuss the causes of Tengchong volcanic eruption based on the deep crustal structure. The crustal structure in the Tengchong volcanic-geothermal area is characterized by low P-wave and S-wave velocity, low resistivity, high heat-flow value and low Q value. The P-wave velocity in the upper mantle is also low. For this information, it can be induced that the magma in the crust is derived from the upper mantle, and the low velocity anomaly in upper crust in the Tengchong area may be related to the differentiation of magma. The Tengchong volcanoes are close to an active plate boundary and belong to "plate boundary" volcanoes.

  6. The northwest trending north Boquerón Bay-Punta Montalva Fault Zone; A through going active fault system in southwestern Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig‐Silva, Coral Marie; Asencio, Eugenio; Joyce, James

    2013-01-01

    The North Boquerón Bay–Punta Montalva fault zone has been mapped crossing the Lajas Valley in southwest Puerto Rico. Identification of the fault was based upon detailed analysis of geophysical data, satellite images, and field mapping. The fault zone consists of a series of Cretaceous bedrock faults that reactivated and deformed Miocene limestone and Quaternary alluvial fan sediments. The fault zone is seismically active (local magnitude greater than 5.0) with numerous locally felt earthquakes. Focal mechanism solutions suggest strain partitioning with predominantly east–west left-lateral displacements with small normal faults striking mostly toward the northeast. Northeast-trending fractures and normal faults can be found in intermittent streams that cut through the Quaternary alluvial fan deposits along the southern margin of the Lajas Valley, an east–west-trending 30-km-long fault-controlled depression. Areas of preferred erosion within the alluvial fan trend toward the west-northwest parallel to the onland projection of the North Boquerón Bay fault. The North Boquerón Bay fault aligns with the Punta Montalva fault southeast of the Lajas Valley. Both faults show strong southward tilting of Miocene strata. On the western end, the Northern Boquerón Bay fault is covered with flat-lying Holocene sediments, whereas at the southern end the Punta Montalva fault shows left-lateral displacement of stream drainage on the order of a few hundred meters.

  7. The volcanic and tectonic history of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J.S.; Pozio, S.

    1996-01-01

    Enceladus has a protracted history of impact cratering, cryo-volcanism, and extensional, compressional, and probable strike-slip faulting. It is unique in having some of the outer Solar System's least and most heavily cratered surfaces. Enceladus' cratering record, tectonic features, and relief elements have been analyzed more comprehensively than done previously. Like few other icy satellites, Enceladus seems to have experienced major lateral lithospheric motions; it may be the only icy satellite with global features indicating probable lithospheric convergence and folding. Ridged plains, 500 km across, consist of a central labyrinthine ridge complex atop a broad dome surrounded by smooth plains and peripheral sinuous ridge belts. The ridged plains have few if any signs of extension, almost no craters, and an average age of just 107 to 108 years. Ridge belts have local relief ranging from 500 to 2000 m and tend to occur near the bottoms of broad regional troughs between swells. Our reanalysis of Peter Thomas' (Dermott, S. F., and P. C. Thomas, 1994, The determination of the mass and mean density of Enceladus from its observed shape, Icarus, 109, 241-257) limb profiles indicates that high peaks, probably ridge belts, also occur in unmapped areas. Sinuous ridges appear foldlike and are similar to terrestrial fold belts such as the Appalachians. If they are indeed folds, it may require that the ridged plains are mechanically (perhaps volcanically) layered. Regional topography suggests that folding may have occurred along zones of convective downwelling. The cratered plains, in contrast to the ridged plains, are heavily cratered and exhibit extensional structures but no obvious signs of compression. Cratered plains contain a possible strike-slip fault (Isbanir Fossa), along which two pairs of fractures seem to have 15 km of right-lateral offset. The oldest cratered plains might date from shortly after the formation of the saturnian system or the impact disruption and

  8. Data-Driven Adaptive Observer for Fault Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shen Yin; Xuebo Yang; Hamid Reza Karimi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for data-driven design of fault diagnosis system. The proposed fault diagnosis scheme consists of an adaptive residual generator and a bank of isolation observers, whose parameters are directly identified from the process data without identification of complete process model. To deal with normal variations in the process, the parameters of residual generator are online updated by standard adaptive technique to achieve reliable fault detection performance. After...

  9. Geometry and kinematics of accretionary wedge faults inherited from the structure and rheology of the incoming sedimentary section; insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Rebecca; Orme, Haydn; Lenette, Kathryn; Jackson, Christopher; Fitch, Peter; Phillips, Thomas; Moore, Gregory

    2017-04-01

    Intra-wedge thrust faults represent important conduits for fluid flow in accretionary prisms, modulating pore fluid pressure, effective stress and, ultimately, the seismic hazard potential of convergent plate boundaries. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust networks in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images. To address this we here present observations from two subduction zones, the Nankai and Lesser Antilles margins, where 3D seismic and borehole data allow us to constrain the geometry and kinematics of intra-wedge fault networks and to thus shed light on the mechanisms responsible for their structural style variability. At the Muroto transect, Nankai margin we find that the style of protothrust zone deformation varies markedly along-strike over distances of only a few km. Using structural restoration and quantitative fault analysis, we reveal that in the northern part of the study area deformation occurred by buckle folding followed by faulting. Further south, intra-wedge faults nucleate above the décollement and propagate radially with no folding, resulting in variable connectivity between faults and the décollement. The seismic facies character of sediments immediately above the décollement varies along strike, with borehole data revealing that, in the north, where buckle folding dominates un-cemented Lower Shikoku Basin sediments overlie the décollement. In contrast, further south, Opal CT-cemented, and thus rigid Upper Shikoku Basin sediments overlie the décollement. We suggest these along-strike variations in diagenesis and thus rheology control the observed structural style variability. Near Barbados, at the Lesser Antilles margin, rough subducting plate relief is blanketed by up to 700 m of sediment. 3D seismic data reveal that basement relief is defined by linear normal fault blocks and volcanic ridges, and sub

  10. Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

  11. Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

  12. Early Neogene unroofing of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta along the Bucaramanga -Santa Marta Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraquive Bermúdez, Alejandro; Pinzón, Edna; Bernet, Matthias; Kammer, Andreas; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Sarmiento, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    Plate interaction between Caribbean and Nazca plates with Southamerica gave rise to an intricate pattern of tectonic blocks in the Northandean realm. Among these microblocks the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (SNSM) represents a fault-bounded triangular massif composed of a representative crustal section of the Northandean margin, in which a Precambrian to Late Paleozoic metamorphic belt is overlain by a Triassic to Jurassic magmatic arc and collateral volcanic suites. Its western border fault belongs to the composite Bucaramanga - Santa Marta fault with a combined left lateral-normal displacement. SE of Santa Marta it exposes remnants of an Oligocene marginal basin, which attests to a first Cenoizoic activation of this crustal-scale lineament. The basin fill consists of a sequence of coarse-grained cobble-pebble conglomerates > 1000 m thick that unconformably overlay the Triassic-Jurassic magmatic arc. Its lower sequence is composed of interbedded siltstones; topwards the sequence becomes dominated by coarser fractions. These sedimentary sequences yields valuable information about exhumation and coeval sedimentation processes that affected the massif's western border since the Upper Eocene. In order to analyse uplifting processes associated with tectonics during early Neogene we performed detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, detrital thermochronology of zircon and apatites coupled with the description of a stratigraphic section and its facies composition. We compared samples from the Aracataca basin with analog sequences found at an equivalent basin at the Oca Fault at the northern margin of the SNSM. Our results show that sediments of both basins were sourced from Precambrian gneisses, along with Mesozoic acid to intermediate plutons; sedimentation started in the Upper Eocene-Oligocene according to palynomorphs, subsequently in the Upper Oligocene a completion of Jurassic to Cretaceous sources was followed by an increase of Precambrian input that became the dominant

  13. Seismicity and Tectonics of the West Kaibab Fault Zone, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgus, J. T.; Brumbaugh, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    The West Kaibab Fault Zone (WKFZ) is the westernmost bounding structure of the Kaibab Plateau of northern Arizona. The WKFZ is a branching complex of high angle, normal faults downthrown to the west. There are three main faults within the WKFZ, the Big Springs fault with a maximum of 165 m offset, the Muav fault with 350 m of displacement, and the North Road fault having a maximum throw of approximately 90 m. Mapping of geologically recent surface deposits at or crossing the fault contacts indicates that the faults are likely Quaternary with the most recent offsets occurring one of the most seismically active areas in Arizona and lies within the Northern Arizona Seismic Belt (NASB), which stretches across northern Arizona trending NW-SE. The data set for this study includes 156 well documented events with the largest being a M5.75 in 1959 and including a swarm of seven earthquakes in 2012. The seismic data set (1934-2014) reveals that seismic activity clusters in two regions within the study area, the Fredonia cluster located in the NW corner of the study area and the Kaibab cluster located in the south central portion of the study area. The fault plane solutions to date indicate NE-SW to EW extension is occurring in the study area. Source relationships between earthquakes and faults within the WKFZ have not previously been studied in detail. The goal of this study is to use the seismic data set, the available data on faults, and the regional physiography to search for source relationships for the seismicity. Analysis includes source parameters of the earthquake data (location, depth, and fault plane solutions), and comparison of this output to the known faults and areal physiographic framework to indicate any active faults of the WKFZ, or suggested active unmapped faults. This research contributes to a better understanding of the present nature of the WKFZ and the NASB as well.

  14. Fault zone roughness controls slip stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbord, Christopher; Nielsen, Stefan; De Paola, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Fault roughness is an important control factor in the mechanical behaviour of fault zones, in particular the frictional slip stability and subsequent earthquake nucleation. Despite this, there is little experimental quantification as to the effects of varying roughness upon rate- and state-dependant friction (RSF). Utilising a triaxial deformation apparatus and a novel adaptation of the direct shear methodology to simulate initially bare faults in Westerly Granite, we performed a series of velocity step frictional sliding experiments. Initial root mean square roughnesses (Sq) was varied in the range 6x10-7 - 2.4x10-5 m. We also investigated the effects upon slip stability of normal stress variation in the range σn = 30 - 200 MPa, and slip velocity between 0.1 - 10 μm s-1. A transition from stable sliding to unstable slip (manifested by stick-slip and slow slip events) was observed, depending on the parameter combination, thus covering the full spectrum of fault slip behaviours. At low normal stress (σn = 30MPa) smooth faults (Sqstress drops on slow slip events upon velocity increase), with strongly velocity weakening friction. When normal stress is increased to intermediate values (σn = 100 - 150 MPa), smooth faults (Sqstress (σn = 200 MPa) a transition from unstable to stable sliding is observed for smooth faults, which is not expected using RSF stability criteria. At all conditions sliding is stable for rough faults (Sq> 1x10-6 m). We find that instability can develop when the ratio of fault to critical stiffness kf kc > 10, or, alternatively, even when a - b > 0 at σn = 150MPa, suggesting that bare surfaces may not strictly obey the R+S stability condition. Additionally we present white light interferometry and SEM analysis of experimentally deformed samples which provide information about the distribution and physical nature of frictional contact. Significantly we suggest that bare fault surfaces may require a different stability criterion (based on

  15. S-wave velocity structure inferred from receiver function inversion in Tengchong volcanic area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺传松; 王椿镛; 吴建平

    2004-01-01

    Tengchong volcanic area is located near the impinging and underthrust margin of India and Eurasia plates. The volcanic activity is closely related to the tectonic environment. The deep structure characteristics are inferred from the receiver function inversion with the teleseismic records in the paper. The results show that the low velocity zone is influenced by the NE-trending Dayingjiang fault. The S-wave low velocity structure occurs obviously in the southern part of the fault, but unobviously in its northern part. There are low velocity zones in the shallow position, which coincides with the seismicity. It also demonstrates that the low velocity zone is directly related to the thermal activity in the volcanic area. Therefore, we consider that the volcano may be alive again.

  16. Multiple Local Reconstruction Model-based Fault Diagnosis for Continuous Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chun-Hui; LI Wen-Qing; SUN You-Xian; GAO Fu-Rong

    2013-01-01

    In the present work,the multiplicity of fault characteristics is proposed and analyzed to improve the fault diagnosis performance.It is based on the following recognition that the underlying fault characteristics in general do not stay constant but will present changes along the time direction.That is,the fault process reveals different variable correlations across different time periods.To analyze the multiplicity of fault characteristics,a fault division algorithm is developed to divide the fault process into multiple local time periods where the fault characteristics are deemed similar within the same local time period.Then a representative fault decomposition model is built in each local time period to reveal the relationships between the fault and normal operation status.In this way,these different fault characteristics can be modeled respectively.The proposed method gives an interesting insight into the fault evolvement behaviors and a more accurate from-fault-to-normal reconstruction result can be expected for fault diagnosis.The feasibility and performance of the proposed fault diagnosis method are illustrated with the Tennessee Eastman process.

  17. Structural evolution of fault zones in sandstone by multiple deformation mechanisms: Moab fault, southeast Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N.C.; Eichhubl, P.; Aydin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Faults in sandstone are frequently composed of two classes of structures: (1) deformation bands and (2) joints and sheared joints. Whereas the former structures are associated with cataclastic deformation, the latter ones represent brittle fracturing, fragmentation, and brecciation. We investigated the distribution of these structures, their formation, and the underlying mechanical controls for their occurrence along the Moab normal fault in southeastern Utah through the use of structural mapping and numerical elastic boundary element modeling. We found that deformation bands occur everywhere along the fault, but with increased density in contractional relays. Joints and sheared joints only occur at intersections and extensional relays. In all locations , joints consistently overprint deformation bands. Localization of joints and sheared joints in extensional relays suggests that their distribution is controlled by local variations in stress state that are due to mechanical interaction between the fault segments. This interpretation is consistent with elastic boundary element models that predict a local reduction in mean stress and least compressive principal stress at intersections and extensional relays. The transition from deformation band to joint formation along these sections of the fault system likely resulted from the combined effects of changes in remote tectonic loading, burial depth, fluid pressure, and rock properties. In the case of the Moab fault, we conclude that the structural heterogeneity in the fault zone is systematically related to the geometric evolution of the fault, the local state of stress associated with fault slip , and the remote loading history. Because the type and distribution of structures affect fault permeability and strength, our results predict systematic variations in these parameters with fault evolution. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  18. Tectonic geomorphology and neotectonics of the Kyaukkyan Fault, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosetto, Silvia; Watkinson, Ian; Gori, Stefano; Falcucci, Emanuela; Min, Soe

    2016-04-01

    The Kyaukkyan Fault is a dextral strike-slip fault, part of a complex zone of active dextral transpression that absorbs most of the northward motion of India relative to Sundaland. While much of the strike-slip displacement is localised in western Myanmar and along the prominent Sagaing Fault, significant dextral shear also occurs across the Kyaukkyan Fault, on the Shan Plateau in the east. The largest recorded earthquake in Myanmar occurred on the Kyaukkyan Fault in 1912, near Maymyo (Mw 7.7), but the fault has generated little significant seismicity since then. Despite its demonstrated seismic potential and remarkable topographic expression, the fault's neotectonic history remains poorly known. Interpretation of ≤30 m Landsat TM/ETM+ images, together with field investigations, reveals deformation features developed along the Kyaukkyan Fault system, mostly indicative of Quaternary dextral strike-slip faulting. Well-marked fault scarps and valleys locate the fault especially in its northernmost and southernmost part; geomorphic features related with Kyaukkyan Fault activity are sag ponds, shutter ridges, offset and beheaded streams, triangular facets and low-sinuosity mountain fronts. Geomorphic markers of young fault activity such as offset and deformed alluvial fans, wind-gaps were also identified during field observation. The fault's central section is characterised by a complex pull-apart system, whose normal border faults show signals of relatively slow neotectonic activity. In the central part of the basin, deformation of Quaternary sediments by a locally-buried cross-basin fault system includes dip-slip faulting, where subsidence adjacent to linear ridges is suggested by notably active mountain fronts, dextral strike-slip faulting and local transpression. Although no direct evidence of a 1912 surface rupture has been detected, the fresh geomorphic expression of the cross-basin fault system indicates that it is likely to have been the focus of that event

  19. Laboratory micro-seismic signature of shear faulting and fault slip in shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarout, J.; Le Gonidec, Y.; Ougier-Simonin, A.; Schubnel, A.; Guéguen, Y.; Dewhurst, D. N.

    2017-03-01

    This article reports the results of a triaxial deformation experiment conducted on a transversely isotropic shale specimen. This specimen was instrumented with ultrasonic transducers to monitor the evolution of the micro-seismic activity induced by shear faulting (triaxial failure) and subsequent fault slip at two different rates. The strain data demonstrate the anisotropy of the mechanical (quasi-static) compliance of the shale; the P-wave velocity data demonstrate the anisotropy of the elastic (dynamic) compliance of the shale. The spatio-temporal evolution of the micro-seismic activity suggests the development of two distinct but overlapping shear faults, a feature similar to relay ramps observed in large-scale structural geology. The shear faulting of the shale specimen appears quasi-aseismic, at least in the 0.5 MHz range of sensitivity of the ultrasonic transducers used in the experiment. Concomitantly, the rate of micro-seismic activity is strongly correlated with the imposed slip rate and the evolution of the axial stress. The moment tensor inversion of the focal mechanism of the high quality micro-seismic events recorded suggests a transition from a non-shear dominated to a shear dominated micro-seismic activity when the rock evolves from initial failure to larger and faster slip along the fault. The frictional behaviour of the shear faults highlights the possible interactions between small asperities and slow slip of a velocity-strengthening fault, which could be considered as a realistic experimental analogue of natural observations of non-volcanic tremors and (very) low-frequency earthquakes triggered by slow slip events.

  20. Fault zone architecture within Miocene–Pliocene syn-rift sediments, Northwestern Red Sea, Egypt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Khairy S Zaky

    2017-04-01

    The present study focusses on field description of small normal fault zones in Upper Miocene–Pliocene sedimentary rocks on the northwestern side of the Red Sea, Egypt. The trend of these fault zones is mainly NW–SE. Paleostress analysis of 17 fault planes and slickenlines indicate that the tension direction is NE–SW. The minimum (σ3) and intermediate (σ2) paleostress axes are generally sub-horizontal and the maximum paleostress axis (σ1) is sub-vertical. The fault zones are composed of damage zones and fault core. The damage zone is characterized by subsidiary faults and fractures that are asymmetrically developed on the hanging wall and footwall of the main fault. The width of the damage zone varies for each fault depending on the lithology, amount of displacement and irregularity of the fault trace. The average ratio between the hanging wall and the footwall damage zones width is about 3:1. The fault core consists of fault gouge and breccia. It is generally concentrated in a narrow zone of ∼0.5 to ∼8 cm width. The overall pattern of the fault core indicates that the width increases with increasing displacement. The faults with displacement <1 m have fault cores ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 cm, while the faults with displacements of >2 m have fault cores ranging from 4.0 to 8.0 cm. The fault zones are associated with sliver fault blocks, clay smear, segmented faults and fault lenses’ structural features. These features are mechanically related to the growth and linkage of the fault arrays. The structural features may represent a neotectonic and indicate that the architecture of the fault zones is developed as several tectonic phases.

  1. Remote Sensing as a First Step in Geothermal Exploration in the Xilingol Volcanic Field in NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, F.; Huang, S.; Xiong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable and low-carbon energy source independent of climate change. It is most abundant in Cenozoic volcanic areas where high temperature can be obtained within a relatively shallow depth. Geological structures play an important role in the transfer and storage of geothermal energy. Like other geological resources, geothermal resource prospecting and exploration require a good understanding of the host media. Remote sensing (RS) has the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution and broad spatial coverage over the conventional geological and geophysical prospecting techniques, while geographical information system (GIS) has intuitive, flexible, and convenient characteristics. In this study, RS and GIS techniques are utilized to prospect the geothermal energy potential in Xilingol, a Cenozoic volcanic area in the eastern Inner Mongolia, NE China. Landsat TM/ETM+ multi-temporal images taken under clear-sky conditions, digital elevation model (DEM) data, and other auxiliary data including geological maps of 1:2,500,000 and 1:200,000 scales are used in this study. The land surface temperature (LST) of the study area is retrieved from the Landsat images with a single-channel algorithm. Prior to the LST retrieval, the imagery data are preprocessed to eliminate abnormal values by reference to the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the improved normalized water index (MNDWI) on the ENVI platform developed by ITT Visual Information Solutions. Linear and circular geological structures are then inferred through visual interpretation of the LST maps with references to the existing geological maps in conjunction with the computer automatic interpretation features such as lineament frequency, lineament density, and lineament intersection. Several useful techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA), image classification, vegetation suppression, multi-temporal comparative analysis, and 3D Surface View based on DEM data are

  2. Evidence for Late Oligocene-Early Miocene episode of transtension along San Andreas Fault system in central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, R.G.

    1986-04-01

    The San Andreas is one of the most intensely studied fault systems in the world, but many aspects of its kinematic history remain controversial. For example, the period from the late Eocene to early Miocene is widely believed to have been a time of negligible strike-slip movement along the San Andreas fault proper, based on the rough similarity of offset of the Eocene Butano-Point of rocks Submarine Fan, the early Miocene Pinnacles-Neenach volcanic center, and an early Miocene shoreline in the northern Gabilan Range and San Emigdio Mountains. Nonetheless, evidence indicates that a late Oligocene-early Miocene episode of transtension, or strike-slip motion with a component of extension, occurred within the San Andreas fault system. The evidence includes: (1) about 22-24 Ma, widespread, synchronous volcanic activity occurred at about 12 volcanic centers along a 400-km long segment of the central California coast; (2) most of these volcanic centers are located along faults of the San Andreas system, including the San Andreas fault proper, the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault, and the Zayante-Vergeles fault, suggesting that these and other faults were active and served as conduits for magmas rising from below; (3) during the late Oligocene and early Miocene, a pull-apart basin developed adjacent to the San Andreas fault proper in the La Honda basin near Santa Cruz; and (4) during the late Oligocene and early Miocene, active faulting, rapid subsidence, and marine transgression occurred in the La Honda and other sedimentary basins in central California. The amount of right-lateral displacement along the San Andreas fault proper during this transtentional episode is unknown but was probably about 7.5-35 km, based on model studies of pull-apart basin formation. This small amount of movement is well within the range of error in published estimates of the offset of the Eocene to early Miocene geologic features noted.

  3. Detection and Classification of Volcanic Earthquakes/Tremors in Central Anatolian Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Metin; Arda Özacar, A.; Bülent Tank, S.; Uslular, Göksu; Kuşcu, Gonca; Türkelli, Niyazi

    2017-04-01

    Central Anatolia has been characterized by active volcanism since 10 Ma which created the so called Central Anatolia Volcanic Province (CAVP) where a series of volcanoes are located along the NE-SW trend. The petrological investigations reveal that the magma source in the CAVP has both subduction and asthenospheric signature possibly due to tearing of ongoing northward subduction of African plate along Aegean and Cyprus arcs. Recently, a temporary seismic array was deployed within the scope of Continental Dynamics: Central Anatolian Tectonics (CD-CAT) project and provided a unique opportunity to study the deep seismic signature of the CAVP. Passive seismic imaging efforts and magnetotellurics (MT) observations revealed low velocity and high conductivity zones supporting the presence of localized partial melt bodies beneath the CAVP at varying depths, especially around Mt. Hasan which exhibits both geological and archeological evidences for its eruption around 7500 B.C. In Central Anatolia, local seismicity detected by the CD-CAT array coincides well with the active faults zones. However, active or potentially active volcanoes within CAVP are characterized by the lack of seismic activity. In this study, seismic data recorded by permanent stations of Regional Earthquake-Tsunami Monitoring Center were combined with temporary seismic data collected by the CD-CAT array to improve sampling density across the CAVP. Later, the continuous seismic waveforms of randomly selected time intervals were manually analyzed to identify initially undetected seismic sources which have signal characters matching to volcanic earthquakes/tremors. For candidate events, frequency spectrums are constructed to classify the sources according to their physical mechanisms. Preliminary results support the presence of both volcano-tectonic (VT) and low-period (LT) events within the CAVP. In the next stage, the spectral and polarization analyses techniques will be utilized to the entire seismic

  4. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  5. Fault tolerant control with torque limitation based on fault mode for ten-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hong; Xu Jinquan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel fault tolerant control with torque limitation based on the fault mode for the ten-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) under various open-circuit and short-circuit fault conditions, which includes the optimal torque control and the torque limitation control based on the fault mode. The optimal torque control is adopted to guarantee the ripple-free electromagnetic torque operation for the ten-phase motor system under the post-fault condition. Furthermore, we systematically analyze the load capacity of the ten-phase motor system under different fault modes. And a torque limitation control approach based on the fault mode is proposed, which was not available earlier. This approach is able to ensure the safety operation of the faulted motor system in long operating time without causing the overheat fault. The simulation result confirms that the proposed fault tolerant control for the ten-phase motor system is able to guarantee the ripple-free electromagnetic torque and the safety operation in long operating time under the normal and fault conditions.

  6. The relationship of near-surface active faulting to megathrust splay fault geometry in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S.; Liberty, L. M.; Haeussler, P. J.; Northrup, C.; Pratt, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    We interpret regionally extensive, active faults beneath Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, to be structurally linked to deeper megathrust splay faults, such as the one that ruptured in the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Western PWS in particular is unique; the locations of active faulting offer insights into the transition at the southern terminus of the previously subducted Yakutat slab to Pacific plate subduction. Newly acquired high-resolution, marine seismic data show three seismic facies related to Holocene and older Quaternary to Tertiary strata. These sediments are cut by numerous high angle normal faults in the hanging wall of megathrust splay. Crustal-scale seismic reflection profiles show splay faults emerging from 20 km depth between the Yakutat block and North American crust and surfacing as the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults. A distinct boundary coinciding beneath the Hinchinbrook Entrance causes a systematic fault trend change from N30E in southwestern PWS to N70E in northeastern PWS. The fault trend change underneath Hinchinbrook Entrance may occur gradually or abruptly and there is evidence for similar deformation near the Montague Strait Entrance. Landward of surface expressions of the splay fault, we observe subsidence, faulting, and landslides that record deformation associated with the 1964 and older megathrust earthquakes. Surface exposures of Tertiary rocks throughout PWS along with new apatite-helium dates suggest long-term and regional uplift with localized, fault-controlled subsidence.

  7. Fault tolerant control with torque limitation based on fault mode for ten-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel fault tolerant control with torque limitation based on the fault mode for the ten-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM under various open-circuit and short-circuit fault conditions, which includes the optimal torque control and the torque limitation control based on the fault mode. The optimal torque control is adopted to guarantee the ripple-free electromagnetic torque operation for the ten-phase motor system under the post-fault condition. Furthermore, we systematically analyze the load capacity of the ten-phase motor system under different fault modes. And a torque limitation control approach based on the fault mode is proposed, which was not available earlier. This approach is able to ensure the safety operation of the faulted motor system in long operating time without causing the overheat fault. The simulation result confirms that the proposed fault tolerant control for the ten-phase motor system is able to guarantee the ripple-free electromagnetic torque and the safety operation in long operating time under the normal and fault conditions.

  8. Active faulting in apparently stable peninsular India: Rift inversion and a Holocene-age great earthquake on the Tapti Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, Alex; Mitra, Supriyo; Sloan, R. Alastair; Gaonkar, Sharad; Reynolds, Kirsty

    2014-08-01

    We present observations of active faulting within peninsular India, far from the surrounding plate boundaries. Offset alluvial fan surfaces indicate one or more magnitude 7.6-8.4 thrust-faulting earthquakes on the Tapti Fault (Maharashtra, western India) during the Holocene. The high ratio of fault displacement to length on the alluvial fan offsets implies high stress-drop faulting, as has been observed elsewhere in the peninsula. The along-strike extent of the fan offsets is similar to the thickness of the seismogenic layer, suggesting a roughly equidimensional fault rupture. The subsiding footwall of the fault is likely to have been responsible for altering the continental-scale drainage pattern in central India and creating the large west flowing catchment of the Tapti river. A preexisting sedimentary basin in the uplifting hanging wall implies that the Tapti Fault was active as a normal fault during the Mesozoic and has been reactivated as a thrust, highlighting the role of preexisting structures in determining the rheology and deformation of the lithosphere. The slip sense of faults and earthquakes in India suggests that deformation south of the Ganges foreland basin is driven by the compressive force transmitted between India and the Tibetan Plateau. The along-strike continuation of faulting to the east of the Holocene ruptures we have studied represents a significant seismic hazard in central India.

  9. Volcanic Ash Nephelometer Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes may enable unprecedented observations of...

  10. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  11. System of Volcanic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. HÉDERVARI

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison is made among the systems of B. G.
    Escher (3, of R. W. van Bemmelen (1 and that of the author (4. In this
    connection, on the basis of Esclier's classification, the terms of "constructiv
    e " and "destructive" eruptions are introduced into the author's system and
    at the same time Escher's concept on the possible relation between the depth
    of magma-chamber and the measure of the gas-pressure is discussed briefly.
    Three complementary remarks to the first paper (4 011 the subject of system
    of volcanic activity are added.

  12. Fault Length Vs Fault Displacement Evaluation In The Case Of Cerro Prieto Pull-Apart Basin (Baja California, Mexico) Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.; Nava Pichardo, F. A.; Farfan, F.; Garcia Arthur, M. A.; Orozco, L.; Brassea, J.

    2013-05-01

    The Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin is located in the southern part of San Andreas Fault system, and is characterized by high seismicity, recent volcanism, tectonic deformation and hydrothermal activity (Lomnitz et al, 1970; Elders et al., 1984; Suárez-Vidal et al., 2008). Since the Cerro Prieto geothermal field production started, in 1973, significant subsidence increase was observed (Glowacka and Nava, 1996, Glowacka et al., 1999), and a relation between fluid extraction rate and subsidence rate has been suggested (op. cit.). Analysis of existing deformation data (Glowacka et al., 1999, 2005, Sarychikhina 2011) points to the fact that, although the extraction changes influence the subsidence rate, the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. Tectonic faults act as water barriers in the direction perpendicular to the fault, and/or separate regions with different compaction, and as effect the significant part of the subsidence is released as vertical displacement on the ground surface along fault rupture. These faults ruptures cause damages to roads and irrigation canals and water leakage. Since 1996, a network of geotechnical instruments has operated in the Mexicali Valley, for continuous recording of deformation phenomena. To date, the network (REDECVAM: Mexicali Valley Crustal Strain Measurement Array) includes two crackmeters and eight tiltmeters installed on, or very close to, the main faults; all instruments have sampling intervals in the 1 to 20 minutes range. Additionally, there are benchmarks for measuring vertical fault displacements for which readings are recorded every 3 months. Since the crackmeter measures vertical displacement on the fault at one place only, the question appears: can we use the crackmeter data to evaluate how long is the lenth of the fractured fault, and how quickly it grows, so we can know where we can expect fractures in the canals or roads? We used the Wells and Coppersmith (1994) relations between

  13. Numerical modelling of fault reactivation in carbonate rocks under fluid depletion conditions - 2D generic models with a small isolated fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhua; Clennell, Michael B.; Delle Piane, Claudio; Ahmed, Shakil; Sarout, Joel

    2016-12-01

    This generic 2D elastic-plastic modelling investigated the reactivation of a small isolated and critically-stressed fault in carbonate rocks at a reservoir depth level for fluid depletion and normal-faulting stress conditions. The model properties and boundary conditions are based on field and laboratory experimental data from a carbonate reservoir. The results show that a pore pressure perturbation of -25 MPa by depletion can lead to the reactivation of the fault and parts of the surrounding damage zones, producing normal-faulting downthrows and strain localization. The mechanism triggering fault reactivation in a carbonate field is the increase of shear stresses with pore-pressure reduction, due to the decrease of the absolute horizontal stress, which leads to an expanded Mohr's circle and mechanical failure, consistent with the predictions of previous poroelastic models. Two scenarios for fault and damage-zone permeability development are explored: (1) large permeability enhancement of a sealing fault upon reactivation, and (2) fault and damage zone permeability development governed by effective mean stress. In the first scenario, the fault becomes highly permeable to across- and along-fault fluid transport, removing local pore pressure highs/lows arising from the presence of the initially sealing fault. In the second scenario, reactivation induces small permeability enhancement in the fault and parts of damage zones, followed by small post-reactivation permeability reduction. Such permeability changes do not appear to change the original flow capacity of the fault or modify the fluid flow velocity fields dramatically.

  14. A Neural Network Appraoch to Fault Diagnosis in Analog Circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尉乃红; 杨士元; 等

    1996-01-01

    Thia paper presents a neural network based fault diagnosis approach for analog circuits,taking the tolerances of circuit elements into account.Specifically,a normalization rule of input information,a pseudo-fault domain border(PFDB)pattern selection method and a new output error function are proposed for training the backpropagation(BP) network to be a fault diagnoser.Experimental results demonstrate that the diagnoser performs as well as or better than any classical approaches in terms of accuracy,and provides at least an order-of-magnitude improvement in post-fault diagnostic speed.

  15. Fault kinematic and Mesozoic paleo-stress evolution of the Hoop fault complex, Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchebes, Marie; Athmer, Wiebke; Stueland, Eirik; Robertson, Sarah C.; Bounaim, Aicha; Steckhan, Dirk; Hellem Boe, Trond; Brenna, Trond; Sonneland, Lars; Reidar Granli, John

    2016-04-01

    The Hoop fault complex is an extensional fault system characterized by a series of multiscale half- and full-grabens trending NNE-SSW, NE-SW and E-W, and transfer zones striking ENE-WSW. In a joint collaboration between OMV Norge and Schlumberger Stavanger Research, the tectonic history of the Hoop area was assessed. A dense fault network was extracted from 3D seismic data using a novel workflow for mapping large and complex fault systems. The characterization of the fault systems was performed by integrating observations from (1) fault plane analysis, (2) geometrical shapes and crosscutting relationships of the different fault sets, (3) time-thickness maps, and (4) by establishing the relative timing of the tectonic events on key seismic lines orthogonal to the main fault strike azimuths. At least four successive extensional tectonic events affecting the Hoop fault complex have been identified in the Mesozoic. The first tectonic event is characterized by an Upper Triassic extensional event with an E-W trending maximum horizontal paleo-stress direction (Phase 1). This event led to new accommodation space established as a set of full-grabens. The grabens were orthogonally crosscut during the Middle Jurassic by a set of NNE-SSW striking grabens and half-grabens (Phase 2). Phase 3 was inferred from a set of E-W striking reactivated normal faults sealed by the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous sequence. In the Lower Cretaceous, the general trend of the maximum horizontal paleo-stress axis of Phase 2 rotates clockwise from NNE-SSW to NE-SW (Phase 4). This stress rotation induced the reactivation of Phase 2 and Phase 3 normal fault sets, producing west-dipping half-grabens/tilt-block systems and transtensional fault zones. A comparison between our results and the Mesozoic regional-scale tectonic events published for the Atlantic-Arctic region agrees with our reconstructed paleo-stress history. This implies that the Hoop fault complex is the result of far-field forces

  16. Core Description and Characteristics of Fault Zones from Hole-A of the Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Chao Yeh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project was conducted in drill site Dakeng, Taichung City of central western Taiwan during 2004 - 2005 principally to investigate the rupture mechanism in the northern segment of the Chi-Chi earthquake of 21 September 1999, and also to examine regional stratigraphy and tectonics. Core examination (500 - 1800 m of Hole-A gave profound results aiding in illustrating the lithologic column, deformation structure, and architectural pattern of fault zones along the borehole. Lithology column of Hole-A was identified downward as the Cholan Formation (500 - 1027 m, Chinshui Shale (1027 - 1268 m, Kueichulin Formation (1268 - 1712 m, and back to the Cholan Formation (1712 - 2003 m again. A dramatic change is observed regarding sedimentation age and deformation structure around 1712 m. Along the core, most bedding dips _ _ Around 1785 m, bedding dip jumps up to _ the bottom of borehole. Five structure groups of different orientations (dip direction/dip are observed throughout the core. Based on the orientation and sense of shear, they are categorized as thrust (105/30, left-lateral fault (015/30 - 80, right-lateral fault (195/30 - 80, normal fault (105/5 - 10, and backthrust (285/40 - 50. Ten fault zones have been recognized between 500 and 2003 m. We interpret the fault zone located at around 1111 m as being the most likely candidate for rupture deformation during Chi-Chi earthquake. The fault zone seated around 1712 m is recognized as the Sanyi fault zone which is 600 m beneath the Chelungpu fault zone. Ten fault zones including thrust faults, strike-slip faults and backthrust are classified as the Chelungpu Fault System (1500 m. According to the deformation textures within fault zones, the fault zones can be categorized as three types of deformation: distinct fracture deformation, clayey-gouge deformation, and soft-rock deformation. Fracture deformation is dominant within the Chelungpu Fault System and abother two

  17. Volcan Reventador's Unusual Umbrella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P.; Gioia, G.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the past two decades, field observations of the deposits of volcanoes have been supplemented by systemmatic, and sometimes, opportunistic photographic documentation. Two photographs of the umbrella of the December 3, 2002 eruption of Volcan Reventador, Ecuador, reveal a prominently scalloped umbrella that is unlike any umbrella previously documented on a volcanic column. The material in the umbrella was being swept off a descending pyroclastic flow, and was, therefore, a co-ignimbrite cloud. We propose that the scallops are the result of a turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with no precedents in volcanology. We ascribe the rare loss of buoyancy that drives this instability to the fact that the Reventador column fed on a cool co-ignimbrite cloud. On the basis of the observed wavelength of the scallops, we estimate a value for the eddy viscosity of the umbrella of 4000 ~m2/s. This value is consistent with a previously obtained lower bound (200 ~m2/s, K. Wohletz, priv. comm., 2005). We do not know the fate of the material in the umbrella subsequent to the photos. The analysis suggests that the umbrella was negatively buoyant. Field work on the co-ignimbrite deposits might reveal whether or not