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Sample records for volcaniclastic vaughn member

  1. Supercritical sheetflood deposits on the volcaniclastic alluvial fan: the Cretaceous upper Daeri Member, Wido Island, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul Hwang, In; Gihm, Yong Sik; Kim, Min Cheol

    2016-04-01

    The upper Daeri Member is composed of subaerial primary and resedimented pyroclastic deposits. The upper Daeri Member accumulated under influence of tectonic subsidence, and the basin was divided into four blocks (Block 1 to 4) by intrabasinal normal faults (Fault A to C). Vertical separation of Fault B is estimated about 250 m and provided sufficient accommodation space on Block 3 with intrabasinal physiographic relief, resulting in conformable stacking of the upper Daeri Member on a volcaniclastic alluvial fan. The welded pumiceous lapilli tuff (primary one) was deposited by a pyroclastic density current during an explosive volcanic eruption. After the eruption, the resedimented pyroclastic deposits were deposited by episodic sediment gravity flows and are intercalated with the reddish, homogeneous mudstones. In Block 3 the resedimented pyroclastic deposits show an abrupt decrease in ten largest lithic clasts from within 3 km away from Fault B, reflecting rapid waning of parental sediment gravity flows. A wavy bedded lapilli tuff is one of the lithofacies of the resedimented pyroclastic deposits. The wavy bedded lapilli tuff is composed of symmetrical or nearly-symmetrical, wavy stratifications, forming undulatory bed geometry. The wavy stratifications are recognized by distinctive alternations of few cm to 10 cm thick, lapilli-rich and ash-rich layers. Beds of the wavy bedded lapilli tuff are 0.1 to 2 m thick (estimated in crests) and range in wavelength 1.3 m to 12 m (ave. 8 m). Both amplitude and wavelength gradually decrease away from Fault B. The wavy bedded lapilli tuff can laterally be traced over 90 m. Based on undulatory bed geometry and wavy stratifications, the wavy bedded lapilli tuff is interpreted as antidune bedforms, formed by supercritical sheetfloods. The symmetrical or nearly symmetrical wavy stratifications are due to maintenance of stationary state of standing waves of the sheetfloods. A down current decrease in both wavelength and thickness

  2. Late Cretaceous Volcaniclastics in NW Turkey

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    Boehm, Katharina; Wolfgring, Erik; Omer Yilmaz, Ismail; Tüysüz, Okan; Wagreich, Michael

    2015-04-01

    On the southwestern coast of the Black Sea, in the western Pontides Upper Cretaceous tuff layers are present. The tuffs are intercalated with limestones, marls and turbidites and were investigated with focus on their geochemistry, to get new insights to the arrangement of terranes and ocean basins at this time. In the region two Upper Cretaceous volcanic units can be distinguished, separated by distinct red pelagic limestone successions, belonging to the Unaz Formation. The lower volcanic unit is named Dereköy Formation and is Turonian to Santonian in age. It is thought to be deposited within extension structures, contemporaneously with rifting in the western Black Sea basin. The upper volcanic unit is called Cambu Formation. According to biostratigraphic data it is deposited throughout Campanian, when spreading in the western Black Sea basin started. Interpreted as submarine deposits, element mobility has to be taken into account when interpreting geochemical ICP-MS data of the volcaniclastics. Multiple discrimination diagrams with suitable proxies elucidate the type of volcanism and contribute to reconstruction of the tectonic setting. The classified rock types range from basaltic to rhyodacitic in both volcanic formations. Basically degree of differentiation and alkalinity are the parameters looked at, when determining rock types of the volcanic eruption. Further volcanic series are specified as calc-alkaline to shoshonitic. Moreover, a volcanic arc setting seems to be the most likely case, following several discrimination diagrams, as well as normalized multi-element plots. This tectonic setting can be discussed in connection with paleo-tectonic reconstructions. Most cited in literature nowadays are models favoring a northward subduction of the northern branch of Neotethys, creating an extensional setting north of the Pontides. This kind of back arc extension is interpreted as the reason of a southward drift of the Istanbul continental fragment from Eurasia

  3. Geology and geochemistry of the Eocene zeolite bearing volcaniclastic sediments of Metaxades, Thrace, Greece

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    Tsirambides, A.

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The Eocene zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic sediments (Ca-rich clinoptilolite 51 % on average of Metaxades, Thrace, Greece, are studied in terms of geology and chemical composition. The alternating formations along a vertical profile in the Metaxades main quarry face are: Discrete horizons of zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic tuffs, zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic tuffs including pebbles, zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic tuffs including thin silica-rich layers, and a calc-clayey horizon. A positive correlation is observed between MgO and CaO in the volcaniclastic tuffs including silica-rich layers. Sr, Rb and Ba are the most abundant trace elements in alllayers; among them, Sr is found to correlate positively with zeolite. The enrichment of sorne trace elements is mainly attributed to mineral abundances, mineral chemistry or leaching processes. The zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic sediments of Metaxades represent an inhomogeneous sequence, which was deposited in a shallow marine environment under turbulent to quiet sedimentary conditions.Los sedimentos eocenos volcanoclásticos con zeolita (51% de media de clinoptilolita rica en Ca de Metaxades, Tracia, Grecia, se estudian desde el punto de vista geológico y de su composición química. Las formaciones alternantes que se pueden observar en un corte vertical en la cantera principal de Metaxades son: horizontes aislados de tufos volcanoclásticos con zeolita y con delgadas capas ricas en sílice, y un horizonte calco-arcilloso. Se observa una correlación positiva entre MgO y CaO en los tufss volcanoclásticos que presentan capas ricas en sílice. El Sr, el Rb y el Ba son los elementos traza más abundantes en todos los horizontes. Entre ellos, el Sr presenta una correlación positiva con la zeolita. El enriquecimiento en algunos elementos traza se atribuye esencialmente a las abundancias de los minerales, la química mineral, o a fenómenos de lixivinción. Los sedimentos volcanoclásticos con zeolita de

  4. Emplacement temperatures of pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits in kimberlite pipes in southern Africa

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    Fontana, Giovanni; Mac Niocaill, Conall; Brown, Richard J.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Field, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Palaeomagnetic techniques for estimating the emplacement temperatures of volcanic deposits have been applied to pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits in kimberlite pipes in southern Africa. Lithic clasts were sampled from a variety of lithofacies from three pipes for which the internal geology is well constrained (the Cretaceous A/K1 pipe, Orapa Mine, Botswana, and the Cambrian K1 and K2 pipes, Venetia Mine, South Africa). The sampled deposits included massive and layered vent-filling breccias with varying abundances of lithic inclusions, layered crater-filling pyroclastic deposits, talus breccias and volcaniclastic breccias. Basalt lithic clasts in the layered and massive vent-filling pyroclastic deposits in the A/K1 pipe at Orapa were emplaced at >570°C, in the pyroclastic crater-filling deposits at 200-440°C and in crater-filling talus breccias and volcaniclastic breccias at 560°C, although the interpretation of these results is hampered by the presence of Mesozoic magnetic overprints. These temperatures are comparable to the estimated emplacement temperatures of other kimberlite deposits and fall within the proposed stability field for common interstitial matrix mineral assemblages within vent-filling volcaniclastic kimberlites. The temperatures are also comparable to those obtained for pyroclastic deposits in other, silicic, volcanic systems. Because the lithic content of the studied deposits is 10-30%, the initial bulk temperature of the pyroclastic mixture of cold lithic clasts and juvenile kimberlite magma could have been 300-400°C hotter than the palaeomagnetic estimates. Together with the discovery of welded and agglutinated juvenile pyroclasts in some pyroclastic kimberlites, the palaeomagnetic results indicate that there are examples of kimberlites where phreatomagmatism did not play a major role in the generation of the pyroclastic deposits. This study indicates that palaeomagnetic methods can successfully distinguish differences in the

  5. Emplacement temperatures of pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits in kimberlite pipes in southern Africa

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    Fontana, Giovanni; Mac Niocaill, Conall; Brown, Richard J.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Field, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic techniques for estimating the emplacement temperatures of volcanic deposits have been applied to pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits in kimberlite pipes in southern Africa. Lithic clasts were sampled from a variety of lithofacies from three pipes for which the internal geology is well constrained (the Cretaceous A/K1 pipe, Orapa Mine, Botswana, and the Cambrian K1 and K2 pipes, Venetia Mine, South Africa). The sampled deposits included massive and layered vent-filling brecc...

  6. Transport and emplacement of ignimbrites and resedimented volcaniclastics from Gutai Mts., Eastern Carpathians, Romania

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    Alexandrina Fülöp

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Gutâi Mts. had started to be built up in Middle Miocene, ca. 15.4 Ma ago. A series of explosive events developed starting with a major magmatic explosion and caldera collapse responsible for large volumes of ignimbrites. Successive explosions followed caldera collapse triggering a series of pyroclastic currents that underwent subsequent reworking. Mass flow has been the main transport mechanism recorded by the sedimentary structures of either ignimbrites or post-ignimbrites volcaniclastics. Multiple ignimbrite units resulted from subaerial mass flows, successively emplaced by progressive aggradation from the basal layer of a density-stratified pyroclastic current. The overlying sequence is composed of different volcaniclastics of pyroclastic origin interlayered with mudstones. They preserve the original composition of ignimbrites, but lack the evidence of hot-state deposition, recording the emplacement from more or less dilute mass flows. A syn-eruptive stage of resedimentation is suggested prior to emplacement in submarine conditions, determined by the transformation of gas-supported pyroclastic currents into water-supported mass flows after transition from subaerial to submarine conditions. The syn-eruptive resedimented volcaniclastics may be correlated with the ignimbrite-type subaerial pyroclastic flows, but they show different degrees of fluidization due to the impact of submarine environment.

  7. Burned and buried by the Siberian traps: tree trunks in volcaniclastics and lavas

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    Polozov, Alexander G.; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Jerram, Dougal A.; Looy, Cindy

    2017-04-01

    Major Phanerozoic mass extinctions could be explained by intense volcanic activity related to the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs). The Siberian Traps LIP possibly caused the most severe mass extinction on the Earth, the end-Permian extinction. This event is documented by global data showing the extinction of floral and faunal species and by stable isotope excursions. Information about the direct impact of the Siberian Traps on the local flora and fauna is scarce. By our knowledge, no detailed description has been done on the faith of trees in Siberia. However, the story of Late Permian giant trees like Cordaites and wood ferns, could shed light on the impact of the onset of the LIP magmatism and the related mass extinction. For the first time we describe that Late Permian tree trunks were buried in volcaniclastic deposits and at the footwall contact of the oldest lava flows of the Siberian Traps, and despite that this phenomenon is known by local geologists it is not well described in the literature. Tree trunks in volcaniclastic deposits were compressed during consolidation of the volcaniclastic material originated from pyroclastic density currents from nearby volcanic centers. Tree petrification is presented by quartz with minor sulphides, zeolite, calcite and sulphates. Tree trunks at the footwall contact of the lava flows have a better preserved year rings structure and late permineralization presented by calcite with minor quartz and sulphides. Our results demonstrate that intensive magmatic activity related with LIP formation affects land vegetation at various grades. Lavas have had a local violent impact, but burned and buried tree trunks have a better preserved structure reflecting single dominated permineralization processes than the tree trunks buried by pyroclastics that have covered extensive areas and followed by trees compression and later multistage permineralization. In a global context, such type of volcanic activity has a variable

  8. Reservoir quality of intrabasalt volcaniclastic units onshore Faroe Islands, North Atlantic Igneous Province, northeast Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólavsdóttir, Jana; Andersen, Morten Sparre; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    close to a fault. These samples are correlated and compared with the wireline logs from Glyvursnes-1. Based on this comparison, it is found that the porosity of the Argir Beds is best estimated from wireline logs using V P  (P-wave seismic velocity), VS (S-wave seismic velocity), or resistivity logs....... Onshore samples are used as Faroese offshore volcaniclastic intervals are represented by a few confidential samples where the stratigraphic level is uncertain. The onshore samples have been taken from 29 geotechnical (made related to tunnel building, etc.) and 2 scientific (made related to research of the geology...

  9. The origin of volcanic rock fragments in Upper Pliocene Grad Member of the Mura Formation, North-Eastern Slovenia

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    Polona Kralj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Fresh-water, coarse-grained and detritus-dominated Mura Formation in North Eastern Slovenia includes pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits originating from Upper Pliocene volcanic activity of basaltic geochemical character. Although localized in occurrence at the hamlet Grad, these pyroclastic and volcaniclastic sediments forma distinctive depositional unit, for which the term “Grad Member” is proposed and introduced in this paper.In the Grad area no lavas or cinder cones are preserved, and the origin of volcaniclastic fragments still uncertain. For this reason, chemical composition of basaltic rock fragments from the Grad Member volcaniclastics has been studied and compared with basaltic rocks from the neighboring locations at Klöch, Kindsberg, Dölling and Neuhaus. The Grad Member pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits seem to be fed from the same source which is different from the occurrences in Austria. That supports the idea about the existence of a local volcanic centre in the present Grad area. The old volcanic edificeswerepossiblydestroyed by the late-stage hydrovolcanic eruptions, and pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits subjected to constant reworking by fluvial currents in a dynamic sedimentary environment of alluvial fan and braided river systems.

  10. Geostatistics and multivariate analysis as a tool to characterize volcaniclastic deposits: Application to Nevado de Toluca volcano, Mexico

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    Bellotti, F.; Capra, L.; Sarocchi, D.; D'Antonio, M.

    2010-03-01

    Grain size analysis of volcaniclastic deposits is mainly used to study flow transport and depositional processes, in most cases by comparing some statistical parameters and how they change with distance from the source. In this work the geospatial and multivariate analyses are presented as a strong adaptable geostatistical tool applied to volcaniclastic deposits in order to provide an effective and relatively simple methodology for texture description, deposit discrimination and interpretation of depositional processes. We choose the case of Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico) due to existing knowledge of its geological evolution, stratigraphic succession and spatial distribution of volcaniclastic units. Grain size analyses and frequency distribution curves have been carried out to characterize and compare the 28-ka block-and-ash flow deposit associated to a dome destruction episode, and the El Morral debris avalanche deposit originated from the collapse of the south-eastern sector of the volcano. The geostatistical interpolation of sedimentological data allows to realize bidimensional maps draped over the volcano topography, showing the granulometric distribution, sorting and fine material concentration into the whole deposit with respect to topographic changes. In this way, it is possible to analyze a continuous surface of the grain size distribution of volcaniclastic deposits and better understand flow transport processes. The application of multivariate statistic analysis (discriminant function) indicates that this methodology could be useful in discriminating deposits with different origin or different depositional lithofacies within the same deposit. The proposed methodology could be an interesting approach to sustain more classical analysis of volcaniclastic deposits, especially where a clear field classification appears problematic because of a homogeneous texture of the deposits or their scarce and discontinuous outcrops. Our study is an example of the

  11. Garnet-bearing Granulite Facies Rock Xenoliths from Late Mesozoic Volcaniclastic Breccia, Xinyang, Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the primary results of petrologic,mineralogical and petrochemical studies of garnet beating granulite facies rock xenoliths from Xinyang, Henan Province. These xenoliths, which are found in a pipe of late Mesozoic volcaniclastic breccia, are of high density (3.13-3.30 g/cm3) and high seismic velocity (Vp = 7.04-7.31 km/s), being products of underplating of basaltic magmas and had experienced granulite facies metamorphism. The underplating and metamorphism took place before the eruption of the host rock. Petrographical studies and equilibrium T-P calculations show that these xenoliths were captured at a 49 km depth and experienced at least a 16 km uplift before they were captured. The dynamics of the uplift could be related to the continent-continent collision between the North China plate and the Yangtze plate during the Triassic.

  12. Palaeomagnetic Emplacement Temperature Determinations of Pyroclastic and Volcaniclastic Deposits in Southern African Kimberlite Pipes

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    Fontana, G.; Mac Niocaill, C.; Brown, R.; Sparks, R. S.; Matthew, F.; Gernon, T. M.

    2009-12-01

    Kimberlites are complex, ultramafic and diamond-bearing volcanic rocks preserved in volcanic pipes, dykes and craters. The formation of kimberlite pipes is a strongly debated issue and two principal theories have been proposed to explain pipe formation: (1) the explosive degassing of magma, and (2) the interaction of rising magma with groundwater (phreatomagmatism). Progressive thermal demagnetization studies are a powerful tool for determining the emplacement temperatures of ancient volcanic deposits and we present the first application of such techniques to kimberlite deposits. Lithic clasts were sampled from a variety of lithofacies, from three pipes for which the internal geology is well constrained (A/K1 pipe, Orapa Mine, Botswana and the K1 and K2 pipes, Venetia Mine, South Africa). The sampled deposits included massive and layered vent-filling breccias with varying abundances of lithic inclusions and layered crater-filling pyroclastic deposits, talus breccias and volcaniclastic breccias. Lithic clasts sampled from layered and massive vent-filling pyroclastic deposits in A/K1 were emplaced at >590° C. Results from K1 and K2 provide a maximum emplacement temperature limit for vent-filling breccias of 420-460° C; and constrain equilibrium deposit temperatures at 300-340° C. Crater-filling volcaniclastic kimberlite breccias and talus deposits from A/K1 were emplaced at ambient temperatures, consistent with infilling of the pipe by post-eruption epiclastic processes. Identified within the epiclastic crater-fill succession is a laterally extensive 15-20 metre thick kimberlite pyroclastic flow deposit emplaced at temperatures of 220-440° C. It overlies the post-eruption epiclastic units and is considered an extraneous pyroclastic kimberlite deposit erupted from another kimberlite vent. The results provide important constraints on kimberlite emplacement mechanisms and eruption dynamics. Emplacement temperatures of >590°C for pipe-filling pyroclastic deposits

  13. Sequential development of tidal ravinement surfaces in macro- to hypertidal estuaries with high volcaniclastic input: the Miocene Puerto Madryn Formation (Patagonia, Argentina)

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    Scasso, Roberto A.; Cuitiño, José I.

    2016-12-01

    The late Miocene beds of the Puerto Madryn Formation (Provincia del Chubut, Argentina) are formed by shallow marine and estuarine sediments. The latter include several tidal-channel infills well exposed on the cliffy coast of the Peninsula Valdés. The Bahía Punta Fósil and Cerro Olazábal paleochannels are end members of these tidal channels and show a fining-upward infilling starting with intraformational channel lag conglomerates above deeply erosional surfaces interpreted as fluvial ravinement surfaces (the erosion surface formed in the purely fluvial or the fluvially dominated part of the estuary, where erosion is driven by fluvial processes). These are overlain and eventually truncated (and suppressed) by the tidal ravinement surface (TRS), in turn covered with high-energy, bioclastic conglomerates mostly formed in the "tidally dominated/fluvially influenced" part of an estuary. Above, large straight or arcuate point bars with alternatively sandy/muddy seasonal beds and varying trace and body fossil contents were deposited from the freshwater fluvially dominated to saline-water tidally dominated part of the estuary. The upper channel infill is formed by cross-bedded sands with mud drapes and seaward-directed paleocurrents, together with barren, volcaniclastic sandy to muddy heterolithic seasonal rhythmites, both deposited in the fluvially dominated part of the estuary. Volcanic ash driven by the rivers after large explosive volcanic eruptions on land resulted in sedimentation rates as high as 0.9 m per year, preserving (through burial) the morphology of tidal channels and TRSs. The channel deposits were formed in a tide-dominated, macrotidal to hypertidal open estuary with well-developed TRSs resulting from strong tidal currents deeply scouring into the transgressive filling of the channels and eventually cutting the fluvial ravinement surface. The TRSs extended upstream to the inner part of the estuary during long periods of low sedimentation rates

  14. Sequential development of tidal ravinement surfaces in macro- to hypertidal estuaries with high volcaniclastic input: the Miocene Puerto Madryn Formation (Patagonia, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scasso, Roberto A.; Cuitiño, José I.

    2017-08-01

    The late Miocene beds of the Puerto Madryn Formation (Provincia del Chubut, Argentina) are formed by shallow marine and estuarine sediments. The latter include several tidal-channel infills well exposed on the cliffy coast of the Peninsula Valdés. The Bahía Punta Fósil and Cerro Olazábal paleochannels are end members of these tidal channels and show a fining-upward infilling starting with intraformational channel lag conglomerates above deeply erosional surfaces interpreted as fluvial ravinement surfaces (the erosion surface formed in the purely fluvial or the fluvially dominated part of the estuary, where erosion is driven by fluvial processes). These are overlain and eventually truncated (and suppressed) by the tidal ravinement surface (TRS), in turn covered with high-energy, bioclastic conglomerates mostly formed in the "tidally dominated/fluvially influenced" part of an estuary. Above, large straight or arcuate point bars with alternatively sandy/muddy seasonal beds and varying trace and body fossil contents were deposited from the freshwater fluvially dominated to saline-water tidally dominated part of the estuary. The upper channel infill is formed by cross-bedded sands with mud drapes and seaward-directed paleocurrents, together with barren, volcaniclastic sandy to muddy heterolithic seasonal rhythmites, both deposited in the fluvially dominated part of the estuary. Volcanic ash driven by the rivers after large explosive volcanic eruptions on land resulted in sedimentation rates as high as 0.9 m per year, preserving (through burial) the morphology of tidal channels and TRSs. The channel deposits were formed in a tide-dominated, macrotidal to hypertidal open estuary with well-developed TRSs resulting from strong tidal currents deeply scouring into the transgressive filling of the channels and eventually cutting the fluvial ravinement surface. The TRSs extended upstream to the inner part of the estuary during long periods of low sedimentation rates

  15. Petrology, magnetostratigraphy and geochronology of the Miocene volcaniclastic Tepoztlán Formation: implications for the initiation of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (Central Mexico)

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    Lenhardt, Nils; Böhnel, Harald; Wemmer, Klaus; Torres-Alvarado, Ignacio S.; Hornung, Jens; Hinderer, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    The volcaniclastic Tepoztlán Formation (TF) represents an important rock record to unravel the early evolution of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). Here, a depositional model together with a chronostratigraphy of this Formation is presented, based on detailed field observations together with new geochronological, paleomagnetic, and petrological data. The TF consists predominantly of deposits from pyroclastic density currents and extensive epiclastic products such as tuffaceous sandstones, conglomerates and breccias, originating from fluvial and mass flow processes, respectively. Within these sediments fall deposits and lavas are sparsely intercalated. The clastic material is almost exclusively of volcanic origin, ranging in composition from andesite to rhyolite. Thick gravity-driven deposits and large-scale alluvial fan environments document the buildup of steep volcanic edifices. K-Ar and Ar-Ar dates, in addition to eight magnetostratigraphic sections and lithological correlations served to construct a chronostratigraphy for the entire Tepoztlán Formation. Correlation of the 577 m composite magnetostratigraphic section with the Cande and Kent (1995) Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) suggests that this section represents the time intervall 22.8-18.8 Ma (6Bn.1n-5Er; Aquitanian-Burdigalian, Lower Miocene). This correlation implies a deposition of the TF predating the extensive effusive activity in the TMVB at 12 Ma and is therefore interpreted to represent its initial phase with predominantly explosive activity. Additionally, three subdivisions of the TF were established, according to the dominant mode of deposition: (1) the fluvial dominated Malinalco Member (22.8-22.2 Ma), (2) the volcanic dominated San Andrés Member (22.2-21.3 Ma) and (3) the mass flow dominated Tepozteco Member (21.3-18.8 Ma).

  16. Fluid typing and tortuosity analysis with NMR-DE techniques in volcaniclastic reservoirs, Patagonia/Argentina

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    Bustos, Ulises Daniel [Schlumberger Argentina S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina); Breda, Eduardo Walter [Repsol YPF Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    Alternative hydrocarbon-detection techniques are used to differentiate water from hydrocarbon where resistivity-based methods are difficult to apply, such as freshwater reservoirs and complex lithologies. One of these areas is represented by the complex volcaniclastic freshwater reservoirs in the Golfo San Jorge basin, Patagonia Argentina, where water and oil have often identical response on conventional logs. Some advances in hydrocarbon identification based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques were achieved in long T1 environments (very light oils, gas) in the Golfo San Jorge basin by previous NMR fluid typing methods. However, since medium to heavy oils are commonly present in these intervals, hydrocarbon detection by such techniques cannot be properly achieved. In addition, restricted diffusion phenomena recognized in these intervals, constitute further complications in fluid typing since its presence have similar response than native oil. To address this problem, a fluid characterization method using NMR Diffusion-Editing techniques and processing/interpretation with D-T2 maps in a suite of NMR measurements was applied. The technique allowed the detection and evaluation of restricted diffusion in these reservoirs, enabling better hydrocarbon characterization in a broad viscosity range (from light to heavy). The method also improved the petrophysical evaluation because restricted diffusion is related to tortuosity in the reservoir. Since the application of this innovative reservoir evaluation method, fluid prognosis vs well completion results was increased from around 68% to around 88% in Golfo San Jorge basin. Moreover, in some of these areas rates above 95% were recently achieved in 2004. (author)

  17. Constraints on 3D fault and fracture distribution in layered volcanic- volcaniclastic sequences from terrestrial LIDAR datasets: Faroe Islands

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    Raithatha, Bansri; McCaffrey, Kenneth; Walker, Richard; Brown, Richard; Pickering, Giles

    2013-04-01

    Hydrocarbon reservoirs commonly contain an array of fine-scale structures that control fluid flow in the subsurface, such as polyphase fracture networks and small-scale fault zones. These structures are unresolvable using seismic imaging and therefore outcrop-based studies have been used as analogues to characterize fault and fracture networks and assess their impact on fluid flow in the subsurface. To maximize recovery and enhance production, it is essential to understand the geometry, physical properties, and distribution of these structures in 3D. Here we present field data and terrestrial LIDAR-derived 3D, photo-realistic virtual outcrops of fault zones at a range of displacement scales (0.001- 4.5 m) within a volcaniclastic sand- and basaltic lava unit sequence in the Faroe Islands. Detailed field observations were used to constrain the virtual outcrop dataset, and a workflow has been developed to build a discrete fracture network (DFN) models in GOCAD® from these datasets. Model construction involves three main stages: (1) Georeferencing and processing of LIDAR datasets; (2) Structural interpretation to discriminate between faults, fractures, veins, and joint planes using CAD software and RiSCAN Pro; and (3) Building a 3D DFN in GOCAD®. To test the validity of this workflow, we focus here on a 4.5 m displacement strike-slip fault zone that displays a complex polymodal fracture network in the inter-layered basalt-volcaniclastic sequence, which is well-constrained by field study. The DFN models support our initial field-based hypothesis that fault zone geometry varies with increasing displacement through volcaniclastic units. Fracture concentration appears to be greatest in the upper lava unit, decreases into the volcaniclastic sediments, and decreases further into the lower lava unit. This distribution of fractures appears to be related to the width of the fault zone and the amount of fault damage on the outcrop. For instance, the fault zone is thicker in

  18. Subsolidus alkali metasomatism in the metamorphosed Ordovician acid volcanics and volcaniclastics of the Gelnica Group (Gemeric Superunit, Western Carpathians

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    Mária Šimurková

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Early Paleozoic Gelnica Group (Gemeric Superunit, Western Carpathians is composed of low-grade metamorphosed flysch-like sedimentary complexes alternated with volcanogenic complexes built up mostly by acid volcaniclastic rocks. Volcaniclastic rocks and small rhyolite bodies Ordovician in age underwent subsolidus alkali metasomatism locally overprinted by multiple stages of younger metamorphic and hydrothermal alterations. The observed variability in chemical compositions indicates that the most of acid volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks experienced potassic or sodium metasomatic alteration, the unaltered or Mg-metasomatised rocks occur less frequently. The dominating K-metasomatism is related mainly to the K-feldspar, partly also biotite and muscovite/sericite formation at the expense of matrix or original feldspar phenocrysts. The Na-metasomatism is connected with albite formation. The highest concentrations of alkalies (up to 13.52 wt. % K2O and 7.08 wt. % Na2O respectively have been found in rocks originally represented by glassy dacites. The elements like Al, Ti and Zr remain immobile in alkaline metasomatic processes in contrast to Rb or metals. Based on the results from areas with analogical geological structure and evolution, especially the Bergslagen area in Sweden, we suppose that alkali metasomatism in the Gelnica Group is a product of hydrothermal system caused by the infiltration and circulation of sea water. The areas with K-, Na- or Mg-metasomatism represent different parts of the original hydrothermal system, where the K-metasomatism was probably its lower temperature section. This hydrothermal system probably mobilised some metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, Mn for the formation of stratiform sulfide and oxide mineralizations or served as the metal pre-concentrator for younger siderite-sulfide vein deposits.

  19. Social and environmental impact of volcaniclastic flows related to 472 AD eruption at Vesuvius from stratigraphic and geoarcheological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vito, Mauro A.; de Vita, Sandro; Rucco, Ilaria; Bini, Monica; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Aurino, Paola; Cesarano, Mario; Ebanista, Carlo; Rosi, Mauro; Ricciardi, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    There is a growing number of evidences in the surrounding plain of Somma-Vesuvius volcano which indicate that along with primary volcanic processes (i.e. fallout, pyroclastic density currents) the syn-eruptive and post-eruptive volcaniclastic remobilization has severely impacted the ancient civilizations, which flourished in the area. This represents an important starting point for understanding the future hazard related to a potential (and not remote) renewal of volcanic activity of the Campaniana volcanoes. We present geoarcheological and stratigraphic data obtained from the analysis of more than 160 sections in the Campanian plain showing the widespread impact of volcaniclastic debris flows and floods originated from the rapid remobilization of the products of the AD 472 eruption of Somma-Vesuvius, both on the environment and on the human landscape. This eruption was one of the two sub-Plinian historical events of Somma Vesuvius. This event largely impacted the northern and eastern territory surrounding the volcano with deposition of a complex sequence of pyroclastic-fallout and -current deposits. These sequences were variably affected by syn- and post-eruptive mobilization both along the Somma-Vesuvius slopes and the Apennine valleys with the emplacement of thick mud- and debris-flows which strongly modified the preexisting paleogeography of the Plain with irretrievable damages to the agricultural and urban landscape. The multidisciplinary approach to the study of the sequences permitted to reconstruct the palaeoenvironment before the eruption and the timing of the emplacement of both pyroclastic and volcanoclastic deposits. The preexisting landscape was characterized by intense human occupation, although showing strong evidences of degradation and abandonment due to the progressive decline of the Roman Empire. The impact of volcaniclastic flows continued for decades after the eruption as highlighted in the studied sequences by stratigraphic and archaeologic

  20. Emplacement Temperatures of Pyroclastic and Volcaniclastic Deposits in Kimberlite Pipes in Southern Africa: New constraints From Palaeomagnetic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, G. P.; Macniocaill, C.; Brown, R. J.; Sparks, S. R.; Field, M.; Gernon, T. M.

    2009-05-01

    Palaeomagnetic techniques for estimating the emplacement temperatures of volcanic deposits have been applied for the first time to pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits in kimberlite pipes in southern Africa. Lithic clasts were sampled from a variety of lithofacies, from three pipes for which the internal geology is well constrained (A/K1 pipe, Orapa Mine, Botswana and the K1 and K2 pipes, Venetia Mine, South Africa). The sampled deposits included massive and layered vent-filling breccias with varying abundances of lithic inclusions and layered crater-filling pyroclastic deposits, talus breccias and volcaniclastic breccias. Lithic clasts sampled from layered and massive vent-filling pyroclastic deposits in A/K1 were emplaced at >590° C. Results from K1 and K2 provide a maximum emplacement temperature limit for vent-filling breccias of 420-460° C; and constrain equilibrium deposit temperatures at 300-340° C. Crater-filling volcaniclastic kimberlite breccias and talus deposits from A/K1 were emplaced at ambient temperatures, consistent with infilling of the pipe by post-eruption epiclastic processes. Identified within the epiclastic crater- fill succession is a laterally extensive 15-20 metre thick kimberlite pyroclastic flow deposit emplaced at temperatures of 220-440° C. It overlies the post-eruption epiclastic units and is considered an extraneous pyroclastic kimberlite deposit erupted from another kimberlite vent. The emplacement temperature results are comparable to the estimated emplacement temperatures of other kimberlite deposits and pyroclastic deposits from other volcanic systems, and fall within the proposed stability field for common interstitial matrix mineral assemblages within vent-filling volcaniclastic kimberlites. This is in the range where welding and agglutination of juvenile pyroclasts occurs in other types of pyroclastic deposits. Such high emplacement temperatures for vent-filling pyroclastic deposits are consistent with volatile

  1. Glass chemistry in volcaniclastic sediments of ODP Leg 107, Site 650, sedimentary sequence: provenance and chronological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calanchi, Natale; Gasparotto, Giorgio; Romagnoli, Claudia

    1994-03-01

    A detailed chemical investigation of volcanic glass fragments from volcaniclastic strata (6 tephras, 1 volcanic debris flow, 12 volcanic turbidites) of ODP Leg 107, Site 650, sedimentary sequence, leads to a varied pattern in terms of both provenance and age constraints. The six analyzed tephra strata indicate a provenance from at least three different volcanic provinces: Aeolian, Campanian, and Sicilian Channel (Pantelleria Island). The older tephra strata (021, 018, 012) have a large amount of "orogenic" rhyodacite/rhyolite deposits that may be attributed to the Aeolian province, although no subaerial coeval volcanic activity of similar composition has so far been documented in the Aeolian Arc. Tephra 007 is related to the Pantelleria Island activity and, particularly, to an ignimbrite episode dated circa 130 ka. Tephra strata 005 and 003, have a clear Campanian provenance, and are correlated with analogous tephra layers, observed in the Tyrrhenian and Ionian seas, dated circa 107 and 60 ka respectively. In the oldest portion of the sequence (from 1.3 to 0.13 Ma), the volcaniclastic sediments were only derived from the Aeolian domain whereas in the latest 130 ka, the Campanian influx becomes much more predominant. Therefore, a general K-enrichment trend is observed in the temporal sequence of all the analyzed samples (almost 700 point analyses) which may be related both to a variation in the source area and to the specific Pleistocene magmatic evolution of the peri-Tyrrhenian volcanic provinces.

  2. GIS and Remote Sensing based zonation map for volcaniclastic debris flow susceptibility: a case study from area surrounding the Vesuvius (Campania Region, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Marina; Spinetti, Claudia; Sulpizio, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    The volcanic areas affected by pyroclastic deposits and significant hillslopes can be considered zone with high proneness for triggering volcaniclastic debris flows. In fact, in presence of heavy and/or persistent rainfall, loose pyroclastic covers can be remobilized and generate volcaniclastic flows causing disastrous effects. The most important volcanoclastic debris flow in the Campania Region (Italy) has been the Sarno-Quindici event occurred on May 5-6, 1998 that caused the death of more than 150 people and relevant damages to villages at the foot of the Apennine Mountains in the circumvesuvian area. In order to improve the volcaniclastic flow hazard zonation in the area surrounding the Vesuvius volcano, we propose a methodological approach based on remote sensing analyses combined with morphometric study derived from a Digital Elevation Model having a spatial resolution of 10 meters to identify the drainage basins potentially more prone to generate volcaniclastic flows. The satellite high-medium resolution data will be used to derive the land cover mapping. The elaborations will be performed in the GIS environment and the combination of identified drainage basins with the land cover classes will provide the map classifying the areas according to different degree of susceptibility for triggering debris flows.

  3. Upper Cretaceous volcaniclastic sedimentation of the Campos Basin, Southeastern Brazil; Sedimentacao vulcanoclastica do Cretaceo Superior da Bacia de Campos, Sudeste do Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Daisy Barbosa [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia de Sedimentologia e Petrologia], E-mail: daisy@petrobras.com.br

    2005-11-15

    During the Late Cretaceous, the presence of one or more highly explosive volcanoes (plinians) located in the surroundings of the Campos Basin significantly affected the sedimentary record of this basin. Their influence extended in intermittently from the Late Coniacian to the Maastrichtian in two main ways: by the contribution of volcaniclastic deposited intercalated with the coeval marine sediments; and by the action of seismicity and associated earthquakes; which favored the onset of turbidity currents and caused deformations in strata of already deposited sediments. The volcaniclastic ejected by these volcanoes contained volcanic glass of which composition was equivalent to trachyte and showed enrichment in both incompatible trace elements and light rare earth elements. Thus they can be easily differentiated from the materials produced by the stratovolcanoes from the Cabiunas Formation (Lower Cretaceous), which are composed by basic tholeiitic igneous rocks. Deposition of the trachytic volcaniclastic originated two stratigraphic marker beds of great importance in the Campos Basin: '3-Dedos' and '3B' marker beds. The mineralogical, chemical and petrographic study of these horizons has shown that, in spite of representing different depositional facies (ash fall and reworking, respectively), their rocks were formed by volcaniclastic produced by the same type of volcanoes; therefore they represent features of the same geological process. (author)

  4. Volcaniclastic facies architecture of a long-lived, nested silicic tuff ring: the Los Loros volcano, Mendoza, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Károly; Risso, Corina; Nullo, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Los Loros is a small, well-preserved volcanic depression. New K/Ar age dating revealed that the volcano is least 1 million years old. The circular morphology of the ~50 m deep and ~ 1 km broad crater of Los Loros was initially inferred to be of phreatomagmatic origin. Recent work, however, concluded that Los Loros is a far more complex volcano than originally thought; with multiple eruptive phases produced by magmatic and minor phreatomagmatic explosive fragmentation-dominated eruptive processes that consequently formed a low aspect ratio volcano. Previous work also suggested that volcanic rocks of Los Loros were entirely basaltic in composition (Puente Formation) and their age was mid-upper Pleistocene. Newly obtained geochemical data, alongside a new age determination, underlies the fact that the volcano is far older than had been expected from its morphology, and its composition shows no signs of basalt, instead it is trachytic. The volcanic succession forms a ~100 m thick pile sitting directly on Cretaceous continental red beds. The base of the volcanic succession is a polymict volcaniclastic conglomerate with variable bed thickness and occasional cross stratification, indicating a channel-filling nature and an origin from a braided river system. The diversity of the clasts suggests that they likely have been transported from a nearby Miocene back-arc volcanic complex, the Sierra Cachahuén (~40 km), which is a lava dome dominated multiple volcano with thick silicic pyroclastic successions. The volcaniclastic conglomerate is covered by a trachytic pumiceous unit thickening toward the SSE. They are composed of loosely packed rounded pumice lapilli. These beds have a well-sorted texture with no characteristic internal stratification, indicating that they are fall in origin and the bed thickness variation is inferred to reflect the paleo-wind direction. A thick pile of pumiceous tuff (up to 20 m) overlies the basal pumice fall unit. It is stratified, cross

  5. Volcanic succession of the Borovnik Member (Mohorje Formation, Bloke Plateau area, Central Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevo Dozet

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A 75 m thick volcanic succession of the Borovnik Member, Mohorje Formation in the Bloke Plateau area consistsof dacitic and rhyolitic rocks deposited in a shallow-marine environment. Volcanic activity begun with lavaflows that underwent extensive disintegration, autobrecciation and mixing with the underlying unconsolidated fine-grained clastic sediments producing dacite/rhyolite-siltstone peperites. Peperites are very rich in fractured plagioclase phenocrysts, and owing to the incorporation of clastic material, they are commonly depleted in silica.The overlying fining-upward pyroclastic sequence is monotonous. Basal parts mainly consist of coarse-grained vitric tuffs that may contain some smaller pumice lapilli. The overlying volcaniclastics are fine-grained vitric tuffs,and in the uppermost parts of the sequence, they are interbedded with cherts.The study confirms the existence of primary volcaniclastic succession in the Bloke Plateau area and excludes its epiclastic or reworked origin.

  6. Field-trip guide to subaqueous volcaniclastic facies in the Ancestral Cascades arc in southern Washington State—The Ohanapecosh Formation and Wildcat Creek beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzeler, Martin; McPhie, Jocelyn

    2017-06-27

    Partly situated in the idyllic Mount Rainier National Park, this field trip visits exceptional examples of Oligocene subaqueous volcaniclastic successions in continental basins adjacent to the Ancestral Cascades arc. The >800-m-thick Ohanapecosh Formation (32–26 Ma) and the >300-m-thick Wildcat Creek (27 Ma) beds record similar sedimentation processes from various volcanic sources. Both show evidence of below-wave-base deposition, and voluminous accumulation of volcaniclastic facies from subaqueous density currents and suspension settling. Eruption-fed facies include deposits from pyroclastic flows that crossed the shoreline, from tephra fallout over water, and from probable Surtseyan eruptions, whereas re-sedimented facies comprise subaqueous density currents and debris flow deposits.

  7. Lithofacies, biofacies, and ichnoassemblage evolution of a shallow submarine volcaniclastic fan-shelf depositional system (Upper Cretaceous, James Ross Island, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scasso, R. A.; Olivero, E. B.; Buatois, L. A.

    The Upper Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian/lower Maastrichtian) Santa Marta Formation on James Ross Island, Antarctica, represents volcaniclastic shallow marine fan and shelf sedimentation adjacent to an active volcanic arc. A combined analysis of sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and ichnologic data allows for the recognition in this unit of six lithofacies associations, eight biofacies, and five trace fossils assemblages. Lithofacies are dominated by fine, massive, tuffaceous rocks; graded, turbidite-like tuffaceous sandstones; carbonaceous mudstones; resedimented conglomerates; coquinas; sandstones; silty sandstones; and minor stromatolite beds. Biofacies are defined by different composition and relative abundance of elements of the benthic fauna, mainly bivalves, gastropods, and serpulids, with minor elements represented by scaphopods, corals, brachiopods, and echinoids. Trace fossil assemblages include the most common elements of the Skolithos and Cruziana ichnofacies. A striking result of the analysis is that lithofacies, biofacies, and trace fossil assemblages form distinct, non-repetitive, vertically successive horizons, with their distribution boundaries roughly coincident. On this basis, seven major facies groups, showing a distinct combination of lithofacies, biofacies, and trace fossils, are distinguished in the Santa Marta Formation. These non-repetitive, vertically stacked facies groups reveal a one-way evolution of the depositional system during a transgressive-regressive cycle, with a new transgression at the top of the unit. The lower facies groups represent shallow marine settings with a very high rate of volcaniclastic sedimentation within subsiding basin. Shallow, volcaniclastic fan systems were probably formed at the base of delta slope and grew rapidly as a consequence of high sedimentary supply in equilibrium with basin subsidence. The upper facies groups probably represent sedimentation within the marine part of the envisaged deltaic system on a

  8. Turbidity current activity along the flanks of a volcanic edifice: The Mafate volcaniclastic complex, La Réunion Island, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuel, Aude; Sisavath, Emmanuelle; Babonneau, Nathalie; Jorry, Stephan J.; Bachèlery, Patrick; Delacourt, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Recent marine geophysical surveys reveal the existence of well-developed volcaniclastic deep-sea fans around La Réunion Island, Indian Ocean. The Mafate turbidite complex, located in the northwestern part of the island, is a large sedimentary system formed by two coalescent-like volcaniclastic deep-sea fans: the Mafate fan and the Saint-Denis fan. They are both connected to terrestrial rivers supplying sediment produced by erosion on the island, particularly during austral summer cyclonic floods. Through the integration of marine geophysical data (including bathymetry, backscatter multibeam sounder images, TOBI side-scan sonar images and seismic reflection profiles) and piston cores, a submarine morpho-sedimentary map of the surface architecture of the Mafate and Saint-Denis turbidite systems has been established. The systems are divided in three main domains: deep canyons in the proximal area, a channel network in the medial area, and distal depositional lobes on the abyssal sea floor. Two large sediment wave fields also formed as a result of the volcaniclastic turbidity currents. Three piston cores collected along the Mafate complex provide information on the sedimentary processes in this area over the last 25 ka. The record of turbidite events in these cores is interpreted in terms of volcanic and climatic changes that could have controlled the sediment transfer to the deep ocean.

  9. Changing fluvial styles in volcaniclastic successions: A cretaceous example from the Cerro Barcino Formation, Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umazano, A. Martín; Krause, J. Marcelo; Bellosi, Eduardo S.; Perez, Mariano; Visconti, Graciela; Melchor, Ricardo N.

    2017-08-01

    The Cretaceous Puesto La Paloma (PLPM) and Cerro Castaño (CCM) members (Cerro Barcino Formation, Chubut Group) are pyroclastic-rich, alluvial successions deposited in the Somuncurá-Cañadón Asfalto Basin during sag and endorheic conditions. The PLPM comprises sheet-like tuffaceous sandstone strata, whereas the overlying CCM includes sheet-to ribbon-channel sandstone bodies intercalated within tuffaceous and fine-grained sediments. In this context, the goals of this contribution were: i) to make a detailed documentation of the contrasting sedimentary palaeonvironments; and ii) to infer the allocyclic controls that governed the sedimentation of both units. The study area is located in the western sector of the basin, where six localities, which were studied. Six facies associations were defined including ash-falls, sheet-floods, shallow lakes, aeolian, fluvial channel-belts, and reworked debris-flows. We defined four stratigraphic intervals for the studied sections, denominated 1 to 4 in chronological order of deposition, which increase their thicknesses toward the Puesto Mesa-Cerro León site. The interval 1 (18-42 m thick) corresponds to the PLPM and includes numerous pedogenized sheet-flood deposits, carbonate-rich lacustrine, aeolian sandy facies, and ash-fall beds. The interval 1 is interpreted as an ephemeral and unconfined alluvial system that interacted with aeolian dunes and dry interdune zones. The interval 2 (20-47 m thick) represents the lower part of the CCM. It shows an alternation of fluvial channel-belt deposits and vegetated floodplain facies with sediments originated from sheet-floods, lakes, and few ash-falls and debris-flows. The mean palaeoflow was toward E-SE, except in the northernmost locality where the drainage was towards SW. Proportion of channel-belt bodies ranges from 10 to 36%, reaching higher values in the northern part of the study area, where they are also thicker. The interval 2 represents a permanent, meandering or locally low

  10. Vaughn 1:100000 Quad Hydrography DLGs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Digital line graph (DLG) data are digital representations of cartographic information. DLG's of map features are converted to digital form from maps and related...

  11. Horizontal and low-angle cross-stratifications from volcaniclastic sedimentary sequences: Outburst flood deposits, Numazawa and Ontake volcanoes, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kyoko

    2017-04-01

    This talk focuses on the formation and preservation of sedimentary structures such as horizontal and low-angle cross-stratifications in volcaniclastic sedimentary (lahar) sequences. The 5 ka outburst flood deposits in the Tadami river catchment, Numazawa volcano, Japan is presented as a first example. The flood, with a peak discharge of > 37,000-58,000 m^3/s from ignimbrite-dammed valley left pumiceous gravelly sediments with meter-sized boulders in the flow path (Kataoka et al., 2008). Up to 30 m thick sequence attributed to the flood formed a low gradient fan of 10 km long and 1.5-3 km wide, covering an area of 18 km2 with a total volume of > 0.5 km3 at the downstream end of the Tadami River. Outcrop observations accompanied with extensive surveys of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) along 200 to 500 m lateral and longitudinal transects over the flood fan revealed bedforms of the deposits. The profiles show large internal cross structures with 2-5 m amplitude and 10s m wavelength indicating lateral/downstream accretion in flood fan deposits. Some of them are slightly inclined towards upstream (backsets) which may suggest upstream migration of bedforms. These cross stratifications in the GPR profiles correspond to low-angle cross-stratifications or horizontal stratifications observed in outcrops. In outcrops, the stratified flood deposits mainly comprises rounded pumice pebble and cobble gravel and sand sized mineral grains. Bedding structures include horizontal stratifications and low-angle, low-amplitude, long wavelength cross-stratifications that occasionally climb. Individual 5 cm to decimeters-thick bed sets are commonly inversely graded. The deposits imply 1) high sediment concentration within a flow and 2) aggradation and bedform migration occurred in relation with traction carpet sedimentation. Especially thick traction carpets were probably formed because of 1) high stream power to drive near bed layer deeper and 2) a density contrast among volcaniclastic

  12. Distribution and Sources of Trace Metals in Volcaniclastic Sediments of the SuSu Knolls Hydrothermal Field, Eastern Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrischeva, E. H.; Scott, S. D.

    2007-12-01

    Thirty-one sediment cores from the Suzette sulfide mound (renamed Solwara 1 by Nautilus Minerals Inc) in the SuSu Knolls hydrothermal field, eastern Manus back-arc basin, were studied in order to outline anomalies in metal concentrations within the mound and to explain the sources of the anomalies. The sediment cores were collected during expeditions of Nautilus Minerals Inc in 2006 and 2007. The work complements our previous study of metalliferous sediments of the SuSu Knolls and aims to provide guidelines for exploration for seafloor massive sulfide deposits in both modern and ancient back-arc environments. In contrast to mid-ocean ridges, the sedimentation in back-arc basins is more complex and involves deposition of large amount of volcaniclastic material that may mask the hydrothermal signal. The SuSu Knolls are covered by an apron of laminated dark gray volcanic sandy silts and silty sands composed of various amounts of volcanic rock fragments, volcanic glass, Ca plagioclase, pyroxene, cristobalite, Si-rich amorphous material, alunite, pyrite, barite and magnetite. In many cases the gray volcaniclastic sediments exhibit patches and layers having a black or greenish-brown color that contain fecal pellets. On the western slope of Suzette (Solwara 1), dark gray volcaniclastic sediments overlie greenish, greenish-brown and greenish-black volcaniclastic sediments containing up to 10 wt % clay-size component that comprises alteration products of volcanic glass such as smectite, chlorite and X-ray amorphous material. In most cases black and greenish-brown colored sediments contain fecal pellets at different stages of preservation. The distributions of Au (19 ppb to 2 ppm), Cu (159 ppm to 1 wt %), Zn (35 ppm to 1333 ppm), Pb (7 ppm to 977 ppm) and Ba (0.05 wt % to 2.8 wt %) outline patchy anomalies throughout the sediments of the mound. The study showed that some volcaniclastic sediments as deep as 25 cm below seafloor that are proximal to chimneys and chimney

  13. An unusual occurrence of mafic accretionary lapilli in deep-marine volcaniclastics on 'Eua, Tonga: Palaeoenvironment and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, J. K.; Beard, A. D.

    2014-03-01

    Reports of occurrences of accretionary lapilli on Earth, whether in historic time or in the geological record, are restricted to subaerial environments or to shallow marine environments when faunal evidence exists to determine palaeodepths. The proximity of the deep ocean to subduction zones/island arcs (where moist explosive volcanism conducive to ash aggregate formation is common) makes this surprising. In this paper, accretionary lapilli are reported within Middle Miocene mafic glass-rich volcaniclastics on 'Eua, the island closest to the Tonga Trench, a persistent high in the frontal arc basin. The glass in the accretionary lapilli has been subjected to advanced palagonitisation, but concentric layers marked by micro-aggregates containing shard-shaped particles survive to determine one group of occurrences as layered accretionary lapilli. The palaeoenvironment, as established by pelagic microfauna, is clearly deep marine, not less than 1600 m. The host rocks, typically gravel/sand in grain size, contain sedimentary structures (normal grading to inverse and normal-to-inverse grading, lack of grading, large-scale cross-bedding, slump bedding and sedimentary dykes) suggesting that the full spectrum of sediment gravity flow types, including less ordered debris flows, has been active. In an island arc environment, a range of sediment gravity flow types can be initiated, some by pyroclastic flows entering the sea. However, the thin beds of accretionary lapilli do not exhibit features of sediment gravity flow deposits or those of submarine pyroclastic flows. Possible transport processes must account for the matrix between the ash aggregates, which is either coarse-grained or absent. Modelling of particle descent times to 1600 m through a sea water column provides one explanation for the features displayed.

  14. Reconstruction of burial history of eroded Mesozoic strata using kimberlite shale xenoliths, volcaniclastic and crater facies, Northwest Territories, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stasiuk, Lavern D.; Sweet, Art R.; Issler, Dale R. [Natural Resources Canada, Geological Survey of Canada-Calgary, 3303-33rd ST N.W., Calgary AB, Canada (T2L 2A7)

    2006-01-03

    Reconstruction of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary 'cover' on the Precambrian shield in the Lac de Gras diamond field, Northwest Territories, Canada, has been achieved using Cretaceous and early Tertiary sedimentary xenoliths and contemporaneous organic matter preserved in volcaniclastic sediments associated with late Cretaceous to early Tertiary kimberlite pipe intrusions, and in situ, Eocene crater lake, lacustrine and peat bog strata. Percent reflectance in oil (%Ro) of vitrinite within shale xenoliths for: (i) Albian to mid-Cenomanian to Turonian ranges from >0.27 to 0.42 %Ro (mean 0.38 %Ro), (ii) Maastrichtian to early Paleocene from 0.24 to <0.30%; (iii) latest Paleocene to early middle Eocene 0.15 to <0.23 %Ro (mean = 0.18 %Ro). These levels of thermal maturity are corroborated by Rock Eval pyrolysis T{sub max} ({sup o}C) and VIS region fluorescence of liptinites, with wavelengths of maximum emission for sporinite, prasinophyte alginite and dinoflagellates consistent with vitrinite reflectance of 0.20 to <0.50 %Ro. Burial-thermal history modeling, constrained by measured vitrinite reflectance and porosity of shale xenoliths, predicts a maximum burial temperature for Mid to Late Albian strata ({approx}115 Ma) of 60 {sup o}C with {approx}1.2 to 1.4 km of Cretaceous strata in the Lac de Gras kimberlite field region prior to major uplift and erosion, which began at 90 Ma. Late Paleocene to middle Eocene volcanic crater lake lacustrine to peat bog strata were only buried to a few hundreds of meters and are in a peat-brown coal stage of thermal maturation. (author)

  15. Application of Downhole Magnetic Field Measurements in the Identification of Petrological Variations in Basalts, Gabbros and Volcaniclastic Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartetzko, A.; Heike, D.

    2002-12-01

    Downhole magnetic field measurements are routinely carried out during many downhole-logging operations for spatial orientation of borehole wall images. The tools used for this purpose, like the Schlumberger General Purpose Inclinometer Tool (GPIT), were not specifically developed for geological interpretations but comparisons with measurements from precise magnetometers show very good correlations. However, systematic value shifts sometimes occur in some holes and this means that data from the GPIT should be used only qualitatively. We show examples from several holes drilled by the ODP demonstrating the potential of magnetic field logs for geologic and petrologic purposes. Variations in the magnetic field data are caused by different geologic processes in these examples. Injections of Fe-Ti-oxide rich gabbros into olivine gabbro of the lower oceanic crust drilled in ODP Holes 735B and 1105A (SW Indian Ridge) cause distinct signals in the magnetic field logs. The vertical resolution of the tool allows detection of thin layers (10 cm minimum thickness) with small anomalies in the magnetic field logs. Cyclicity in eruption processes at mid-ocean ridges can be revealed using the magnetic field logs. Slight petrologic differences between magmas from different eruptions and changes in the Earth?s magnetic field due to reversals, or secular variations in pauses between the eruptions cause characteristic patterns in the logs (e.g. ODP Holes 395A and 418A). Cooling and subsequent alteration processes cause the formation of different types of Fe- and/or Ti-oxide minerals. Typical examples of the formation of secondary magnetic minerals in subaerial lava flows are seen in ODP Hole 1137A (Kerguelen Plateau). Characteristic anomalies in the magnetic field log correlate well with total gamma ray measurement, which is an indicator for alteration in this type of rocks. Grain Size linked with crystallinity variations in basaltic volcaniclastic deposits and debris flows influence

  16. Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and geothermal reservoir potential of the volcaniclastic Cura-Mallín succession at Lonquimay, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza, Viviana; Le Roux, Jacobus P.; Gutiérrez, Néstor M.; Vicencio, Vladimir E.

    2017-08-01

    The Tolhuaca Volcano near Lonquimay in south-central Chile has been the subject of several studies due to its geothermal manifestations, but little is known about the stratigraphy and reservoir potential of the Cura-Mallín Formation forming its basement. Field work and U-Pb dating of detrital zircons allow us to redefine this succession as the Cura-Mallín Group, consisting of the volcano-sedimentary Guapitrío Formation, sedimentary Río Pedregoso Formation, and volcano-sedimentary Mitrauquén Formation. The Río Pedregoso Formation can be subdivided into three formal units, namely the Quilmahue Member, Rucañanco Member, and Bío-Bío Member. The base of the Quilmahue Member interfingers laterally with the base of the Guapitrío Formation, for which a previous K/Ar date of 22.0 ± 0.9 Ma was apparently discarded by the original authors. However, this date is consistent with the stratigraphic position of the Quilmahue Member and new zircon dates from the overlying units, also coinciding with the initiation of an extensional phase in the Bíobío-Aluminé Basin. Deposition of the Quilmahue Member continued throughout the early Miocene, as confirmed by dates of 17.5 Ma reported by previous authors and 16.5 Ma obtained in this study. The Rucañanco Member was deposited during the Serravalian around 12.6 Ma, whereas the Bío-Bío Member was dated at the Serravalian-Tortonian limit (11.6 Ma). Although all three members were deposited in a fluvio-lacustrine environment, they were dominated respectively by flood plains with crevasse splays, lake margins with distributary mouth bars and Gilbert-type deltas, and distal braided and meandering rivers. Whereas the Quilmahue Member was deposited during basin extension, the Rucañanco Member was formed during a period of basin inversion and compression. Temporary tectonic quiescence during deposition of the Bío-Bío Member allowed denudation of the landscape, but around 9.5 Ma tectonism was renewed again during deposition of

  17. Pleistocene volcaniclastic units from North-Eastern Sicily (Italy): new evidence for calc-alkaline explosive volcanism in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Marcella; Italiano, Francesco; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Tripodo, Alessandro; Baldanza, Angela; Casella, Sergio; Pino, Paolo; Rasa', Riccardo; Russo, Selma

    2016-08-01

    A well-preserved volcaniclastic sequence crops out in Pleistocene marine sediments along the Tyrrhenian coastline of the Calabrian-Peloritani arc (Sicily, Italy), testifying the occurrence of Lower-Middle Pleistocene volcanic activity in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The presence of dominant highly vesicular and minor blocky glassy particles indicates that the volcanic clasts were originated by explosive events related to the ascent and violent emission of volatile-rich magmas accompanied by and/or alternated with hydromagmatic fragmentation due to magma-sea water interaction. Field investigations and sedimentological features of the studied volcaniclastic units suggest a deposition from sediment-water density flows. The chemical classification of the pumice clasts indicates prevalent rhyolitic and dacitic compositions with calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline affinity. The geochemical features of immobile trace elements together with the presence of orthopyroxene are indicative of a provenance from an arc-type environment. The age (from 980-910 to 589 ka), the chemical composition and the evidence of subaerial explosive volcanic activity constrain the origin nature and temporal evolution of the arc-type volcanism in the Southern Tyrrhenian domain. Finally, the new information here provided contribute to a better understanding of the temporal geodynamic evolution of this sector of the Mediterranean domain.

  18. Constraining the alteration history of a Late Cretaceous Patagonian volcaniclastic bentonite-ash-mudstone sequence using K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, L. N.; Hofmann, H.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Smectite is typically considered unsuitable for radiometric dating, as argon (40Ar) produced from decay of exchangeable potassium (40K) located in the interlayer sites can be lost during fluid-rock interaction and/or during wet sample preparation in the laboratory. However, age analysis of Late Cretaceous Argentinian bentonites and associated volcaniclastic rocks from Lago Pellegrini, Northern Patagonia, indicates that, in the case of these very low-permeability rocks, the radioactive 40Ar was retained and thus can provide information on smectite age and the timing of rock alteration. This study presents isotopic results that indicate the ash-to-bentonite conversion and alteration of the overlying tuffaceous mudstones in Northern Patagonia was complete 13-17 my after middle Campanian sedimentation when the system isotopically closed. The general absence of illite in these smectite-rich lithologies reflects the low activity of K and the low temperature (<60 °C) of the formation waters that altered the parent ash.

  19. Thrust duplex deformation in the volcaniclastic sequence of the Fatima fold-and-thrust belt in the west-central Arabian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shafei, Mohamed K.

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we present a field-based structural analysis of the unmetamorphosed Precambrian volcaniclastic sequences of the west-central Arabian Shield. The study area is known as the Fatima fold-and-thrust belt, which is an overturned synclinorium that developed during the Neoproterozoic era. This belt is composed primarily of green mudstone, green sandstone, an andesite flow, limestone, red mudstone and pyroclastic units. This stratigraphic succession, which presents different rheological multilayers, offers significant mesoscale folding and thrust-related structures. Mechanical anisotropy and thickness contrasts have played significant roles in controlling the style of the deformation. Deformed hinge zones, a simple duplex, a domino-style duplex, and imbricated and antiformal stacks are among the thrust-related structures presented and analyzed. The domino-style duplex observed on the backlimbs of the overturned anticlines formed a unique pattern that developed during thrust propagation. The results of this study indicate that the thrust duplex developed according to a thick-skinned model, and it represents a newly recognized tectonic regime in the Arabian Shield. Comprehensive field mapping and structural analyses revealed that the zone under study area was affected by four phases of deformation (D1-D4). The D1 and D2 phases present ductile deformation that developed during the final cratonization and assembly of the Arabian Shield, and they can be recognized at both the map and outcrop scales. The D1 phase represents a progressive regime and is indicated by a NW-SE stress orientation and the formation of a series of coaxial symmetrical NE-SW-plunging folds. NNW-directed thrust-related structures progressively developed during the D2 phase. An approximately fifty-three percent tectonic shortening can be calculated based on the restored structures. D3 and D4 have a brittle nature and are indicated by shearing and normal faulting, respectively.

  20. Eruption-related lahars and sedimentation response downstream of Mount Hood: Field guide to volcaniclastic deposits along the Sandy River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Tom C.; Scott, William E.; Vallance, James W.; Pringle, Patrick T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Late Holocene dome-building eruptions at Mount Hood during the Timberline and Old Maid eruptive periods resulted in numerous dome-collapse pyroclastic flows and lahars that moved large volumes of volcaniclastic sediment into temporary storage in headwater canyons of the Sandy River. During each eruptive period, accelerated sediment loading to the river through erosion and remobilization of volcanic fragmental debris resulted in very high sediment-transport rates in the Sandy River during rain- and snowmelt-induced floods. Large sediment loads in excess of the river's transport capacity led to channel aggradation, channel widening, and change to a braided channel form in the lowermost reach of the river, between 61 and 87 km downstream from the volcano. The post-eruption sediment load moved as a broad bed-material wave, which in the case of the Old Maid eruption took ~2 decades to crest 83 km downstream. Maximum post-eruption aggradation levels of at least 28 and 23 m were achieved in response to Timberline and Old Maid eruptions. In each case, downstream aggradation cycles were initiated by lahars, but the bulk of the aggradation was achieved by fluvial sediment transport and deposition. When the high rates of sediment supply began to diminish, the river degraded, incising the channel fills and forming progressively lower sets of degradational terraces. A variety of debris-flow, hyperconcentrated-flow, and fluvial (upper and lower flow regime) deposits record the downstream passage of the sediment waves that were initiated by these eruptions. The deposits also presage a hazard that may be faced by communities along the Sandy River when volcanic activity at Mount Hood resumes.

  1. Team Member Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    minutes a "facilitator" obtains one idea from each member in turn and writes that idea on a flip chart . No discussion takes place during this step. 4...Step three is repeated until all ideas are listed on the flip chart . 5. Each idea is discussed. Participants seek clarification and express support

  2. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Summer is coming, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 24 € instead of 30 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  3. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 24 € instead of 30 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  4. [Comment on] BOSP members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The new Board on Ocean Science and Policy (BOSP) (Eos, June 7, 1983, p. 402) met for the first time on May 4. John B. Slaughter, former director of the National Science Foundation and now chancellor of the University of Maryland in College Park, is the board's chairman. Other board members are D. James Baker, Jr. (University of Washington, Seattle); Kirk Bryan (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University); John P. Craven (University of Hawaii); Charles L. Drake (Dartmouth College); Paul M. Fye (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Edward D. Goldberg (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); G. Ross Heath (Oregon State University); Judith T. Kildow (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); John A. Knauss (University of Rhode Island); James J. McCarthy (Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University); H. William Menard (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); C. Barry Raleigh (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Roger Revelle (University of California, San Diego); David A. Ross (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Brian J. Rothschild (University of Maryland); William M. Sackett (University of South Florida); John H. Steele (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); and Carl Wunsch (MIT). Wallace Broecker (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), an original board member, resigned after the first meeting. Broecker told Eos that combining the science and policy boards resulted in a new board whose mission is too broad. A new board member will be appointed in Broecker's place

  5. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 23 € instead of 29 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12:00 p.m. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  6. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 23 € instead of 29 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12:00 p.m. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  7. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21,50 € instead of 27 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12:00 p.m. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  8. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21 € instead of 26 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 36 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  9. Complete-member Ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsun-Yu Sharon Chuang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the vast array of ethnographic research methodology, complete-member ethnography (CME is one ethnographic inquiry whose methodological development is still in infantile in intercultural communication research. Specifically in this article, the author includes four major sections to understand and to advance CME. First, the author reviews the historical development of CME, and realizes epistemological intimacy as the core of CME and as how researchers’ complete-memberships may be established. Second, the author explains the concept and practice of epistemological intimacy in extant literature. Third, the author advances the concept of epistemological intimacy to identify and explain five contextual factors that influence a complete-member ethnographer’s complete-membership to his or her research community. The five factors include historicity of identity, institutional memory, situational (intersubjectivity, consensual membership, and symbolic codes. In order to elucidate that said factors are essentially interrelated, the author supplements the five factors with her conceptualizations of selfhood/identity. In the end, the author discusses three potential contributions of how CME can advance critical communication research, which pertain to (a praxis and reflexivity, (b challenging struggles and inequalities in power and privilege, and (c promote hopeful social justice from within.

  10. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    The warm weather arrives, it's time to take advantage of our offers Walibi and Aquapark! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21 € instead of 26 € Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Half-day ticket (5 hours): – Children: 26 CHF instead of 35 CHF – Adults : 32 CHF instead of 43 CHF Day ticket: – Children: 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 36 CHF instead of 49 CHF Free for children under 5.

  11. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    The Courir shops propose the following offer: 15% discount on all articles (not on sales) in the Courir shops (Val Thoiry, Annemasse and Neydens) and 5% discount on sales upon presentation of your Staff Association membership card and an identity card before payment. Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21 € instead of 26 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 36 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  12. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    La banque LCL propose aux membres de l’Association du personnel les avantages suivants : – Un barème Privilège sur le Prêt immobilier – Des avantages tarifaires sur l’épargne, notamment l’assurance-vie. – Un taux préférentiel de prêt à la consommation. En outre, jusqu’au 30 septembre 2013, elle offre 50€ à tous les nouveaux clients, membres de l'Association du personnel. Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Tickets "Zone terrestre" : 21 € instead of de 26 €. Access to Aqualibi : 5 euros instead of 8 euros on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Free car park. * * * * * * * Full day ticket: – Children : 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF &...

  13. Family members' experiences of autopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppewal, F; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    2001-01-01

    Background. The experiences of family members will teach us how to handle an autopsy, the ultimate quality assessment tool. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine surviving family members' experience of autopsy. Method. Seven GPs were asked to approach surviving family members of autopsie

  14. Family members' experiences of autopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppewal, F; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    Background. The experiences of family members will teach us how to handle an autopsy, the ultimate quality assessment tool. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine surviving family members' experience of autopsy. Method. Seven GPs were asked to approach surviving family members of

  15. Life Expectancy of Kibbutz Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Uri; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented demonstrating that the life expectancy of kibbutz members--both men and women--is higher than that of the overall Jewish population in Israel. These data add to and support other research findings illustrating the more positive mental health and well-being found among kibbutz members than among other comparative populations.…

  16. Profile Report: ASHA Member Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Armin D.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The American School Health Association (ASHA) surveyed its members who were nurses to identify their needs for improved member programs and services. Recommendations include that the needs of both school-based nurses and those with administrative roles be considered independently for annual meeting programs. (JN)

  17. Life Expectancy of Kibbutz Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Uri; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented demonstrating that the life expectancy of kibbutz members--both men and women--is higher than that of the overall Jewish population in Israel. These data add to and support other research findings illustrating the more positive mental health and well-being found among kibbutz members than among other comparative populations.…

  18. The Stratigraphy and Lithofacies of the Paleoproterozoic Volcaniclastic Sequences in the Cape Three Points Area- Akodda section of the Southern in Ashanti Belt in the Birimian of southwest Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimaru, S.; Kiyokawa, S.; Ito, T.; Ikehara, M.; Nyame, F. K.; Tetteh, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    volcaniclastic rocks in an oceanic island arc around the West African Craton. Preliminary δ13C analysis gave values of -23.7~ -36.5 ‰ for black shale occupying the middle to upper part of the whole section. The very light carbon isotope ratios suggest deposition of the black shale under highly euxinic conditions like today's Black sea.

  19. Volcano-sedimentary characteristics in the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez District, Egypt: Example of dynamics and fluidization over sedimentary and volcaniclastic beds by emplacement of syn-volcanic basaltic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, E. A.; Abdel Motelib, A.; Hammed, M. S.; El Manawi, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the Neogene lava-sediment mingling from the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez district, Egypt. The lava-sediment interactions as peperites have been identified for the first time at the study area and can be used as paleoenvironmental indicators. The identification of peperite reflects contemporaneous time relationship between volcanism and sedimentation and this finding is of primary importance to address the evolutional reconstruction of the Abu Treifiya Basin. Characterization of the facies architecture and textural framework of peperites was carried out through detailed description and interpretation of their outcrops. The peperites and sedimentary rocks are up to 350 m thick and form a distinct stratigraphic framework of diverse lithology that is widespread over several kilometers at the study area. Lateral and vertical facies of the peperites vary from sediment intercalated with the extrusive/intrusive basaltic rocks forming peperitic breccias to lava-sediment contacts at a large to small scales, respectively. Peperites encompass five main facies types ascribed to: (i) carbonate sediments-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (ii) lava flow-hosted blocky peperites, (iii) volcaniclastics-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (iv) sandstone/siltstone rocks-hosted blocky peperites, and (iv) debris-flows-hosted blocky peperites. Soft sediment deformation structures, vesiculated sediments, sediments filled-vesicles, and fractures in lava flows indicate that lava flows mingled with unconsolidated wet sediments. All the peperites in this study could be described as blocky or fluidal, but mixtures of different clast shapes occur regardless of the host sediment. The presence of fluidal and blocky juvenile clasts elucidates different eruptive styles, reflecting a ductile and brittle fragmentation. The gradual variation from fluidal to blocky peperite texture, producing the vertical grading is affected by influencing factors, e.g., the viscosity, magma

  20. 17 CFR 190.09 - Member property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Member property. 190.09... Member property. (a) Member property. “Member property” means, in connection with a clearing organization bankruptcy, the property which may be used to pay that portion of the net equity claim of a member which...

  1. Energy-Absorbing Beam Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An energy-absorbing (EA) beam member and having a cell core structure is positioned in an aircraft fuselage proximate to the floor of the aircraft. The cell core structure has a length oriented along a width of the fuselage, a width oriented along a length of the fuselage, and a depth extending away from the floor. The cell core structure also includes cell walls that collectively define a repeating conusoidal pattern of alternating respective larger and smaller first and second radii along the length of the cell core structure. The cell walls slope away from a direction of flight of the aircraft at a calibrated lean angle. An EA beam member may include the cell core structure and first and second plates along the length of the cell core structure on opposite edges of the cell material.

  2. Re-membering Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne

    2016-01-01

    Since the break-down of the Soviet Union and the inclusion of a growing number of Post-Soviet countries into the Eurovision Song Contest, the contest has become an occurring occasion for remembering and discussing the nature and limits of “Europe”. This paper explores how the inclusion of Post-So......, Ukraine and Russia in order to explore how they are re-membered in relation to various perceptions of Europe....

  3. Towards mobile staff members management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  4. ASCLS members perceptions regarding research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Lillian; Shanahan, Kristy

    2009-01-01

    One of the benchmarks of a profession is performing, publishing, and presenting research. However, in the Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS) profession, few manuscripts are submitted to the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS) journal, Clinical Laboratory Science, on a regular basis. The problem is that perceptions regarding research, and the role of laboratory professional as researchers, held by ASCLS members may be contributing to the low number of manuscript submissions. To assess these perceptions, an anonymous Likert-scale survey was developed and delivered online using Survey Monkey. Members of ASCLS, with email addresses, were chosen to participate in this survey because they may be most likely to contribute manuscripts for a journal by their own society. About 10% of the 7,000 members who were invited by email chose to participate in this study. Most participants agreed that 1) there is important information to be gathered from research on clinical laboratory specimen results (99.6%), 2) research contributes valuable information to the body of CLS knowledge (99.2%), and 3) conducting research is one of the benchmarks of a profession (92.4%). The majority of participants felt that there are inadequate resources (68.8%) and not enough time (83%) available to conduct research in the clinical laboratory setting. Most participants recognize that many laboratory activities constitute research (86.2%), but only a few are willing to publish research findings on their own (29.2%). Those who are the most likely to publish research findings include men, university faculty, and members who are over 60 years old. University faculty are the most likely to assist others in the writing process. These results show an opportunity exists for ASCLS to foster collaborations between bench technologists and educators willing to assist with the publication process.

  5. Toothbrush contamination in family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Contreras

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial contamination of toothbrushes in family members. Materials and Methods: One hundred and two healthy subjects were included in this descriptive study. Every individual was examined clinically and microbiologically using the CPITN index and collecting subgingival plaque samples. Each participant received a toothbrush for home use and after one month they returned it to the investigators. All toothbrushes were cultured to determine the presence of periodontopathic bacteria and enteric rods. Wilkoxon signed rank test and t student test (P d"0.05 were used to compare differences in the subgingival microbiota and toothbrush contamination and CPITN index among family members. Results: A high proportion of toothbrushes resulted highly contaminated with enteric rods (P d"0.001 compared to the subgingival environment where periodontopathic bacteria were more prevalent. The most frequent microorganisms found in toothbrushes used by parents and children for one month were Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae species (>50% and Fusobacterium spp (30%. Conclusions: High levels of enteric rods were commonly detected in toothbrushes used for 1 month among members of the families. These opportunistic organisms may have an important role in oral infections including gingivitis and periodontitis. Monthly replacement or disinfection of the toothbrush can reduce the risk of bacterial transmission/translocation and thus diminish the incidence of biofilm associated oral diseases.

  6. 7 CFR 983.42 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... members and nomination of successor members. Nomination of committee members and alternates shall follow...) Successor members. Subsequent to the first nomination of committee members under this part, persons to be nominated to serve on the committee as producer or handler members shall be selected pursuant to...

  7. 7 CFR 930.28 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... alternate member may not act in the place and stead of such member. In the event a member and his or her... group (grower or handler) as the member. In the event of the death, removal, resignation...

  8. 7 CFR 929.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... absence of such member and may perform such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal... member is selected and has qualified. In the event both a member and alternate member from the...

  9. Crushing behavior of lightmass structural member

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kil-Sung LEE; Yong-June YANG; Woo-Chae HWANG; In-Young YANG

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) of the advanced composite materials is widely used in lightmass structural materials of air planes, ship and automobiles because of high strength and stiffness. In this study, experimental investigation was performed for each specimen. The square section members consist of aluminum, CFRP and hybrid (aluminum/CFRP) member, and hat-shaped section members consist of CFRP and hybrid (aluminum/CFRP) members specimen. Based on the collapse characteristics of aluminum square section member, the collapse characteristics and energy absorption capability of hat-shaped section members were analyzed. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed. In the lightmass design aspect, the collapse characteristics and energy absorption capability of the members were compared.

  10. Members of Parliament on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.

    at political party meetings and at public meetings and hearings. However, the upcoming of new social media like Facebook provides new, interesting platforms for this conversation. And many opinion makers and scholars have high expectations for the democratic potential of these platforms. The paper examines...... what happens when traditional democratic conversations between citizens and politicians are moved away from the old face-to-face meetings and into Facebook. Through interviews with Danish Members of Parliament (MPs) the paper examines the advantages and disadvantages of online democratic conversations...... on Facebook as experienced by the MPs. The paper builds on a former quantitative mapping of the political conversation activities between Danish MPs and their followers on Facebook (Sørensen, 2015)....

  11. 7 CFR 985.25 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE... member's absence, (b) in the event of the member's death, removal, resignation, or...

  12. 7 CFR 1425.19 - Member cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member cooperatives. 1425.19 Section 1425.19... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS § 1425.19 Member cooperatives. A CMA may obtain loans or LDP's on behalf of a member cooperative when the...

  13. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  14. 7 CFR 946.23 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... such member's absence. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member... the event that both a member and his or her alternate are unable to attend a Committee meeting,...

  15. 7 CFR 959.31 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... designated to do so by the member for whom he is an alternate. In the event both a member of the committee... or grower) to serve in such member's place and stead. In the event of the death, removal,...

  16. 7 CFR 923.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member, his alternate shall act for him until a successor for such member is selected and has qualified. In the event both a member of...

  17. 7 CFR 922.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements..., shall act in the place and stead of such member and perform such other duties as assigned. In the event... until a successor for such member is selected and has qualified. In the event both a member of...

  18. International Focus: Highlighting APPA Members Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazner, Steve, Comp.

    2011-01-01

    While most APPA member institutions are located in the United States and Canada, there are also 45 of member institutions located internationally--from Australia and New Zealand to Southeast Asia to the Middle East to Europe. This article focuses on four of its international members: (1) American University of Kuwait (AUK); (2) American University…

  19. Members of the LHC Resources Review Boards

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Members of the LHCRRB visiting Point 2, hosting the ALICE experiment From l. to r. : W. Korda, Head of the VIP Office; P. Rimmer, CERN public relations, J. Seed, Member of the LHCRRB, J.-P. Revol, ALICE CERN Team Leader; J. Bartke, Member of the LHCRRB; F. Suransky, Member of the LHCRRB; J. Schukraft, Spokesperson, ALICE experiment and S. Molinari, VIP Office. Photo 02: Members of the LHC Resources Review Boards visiting the ALICE magnet at Point 2. L. to. r.: O. Dines-Hansen, H. Boggild, S. Irgens-Jensens, H.A. Gustafsson Photo 03: Members of the LHCRRB visiting Point 2, hosting the ALICE experiment From l. t to r.: J.Richter, Member of the LHCRRB; H. Gutbrod, Deputy Spokesperson, ALICE experiment; G. Paic, ALICE experiment; D. Muller, Member of the LHCRRB; P. Brau-Munzinger, ALICE experiment; R. Santo, Member of the LHCRRB, A. Van Rijn, Member of the LHCRRB; J. Engelen, Member of the LHCRRB.

  20. Member end releases in framed structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, J. M.

    1993-02-01

    Discontinuities such as internal hinges are commonly encountered in framed structures. A general method of including discontinuities in stiffness method analyses of planar frames by the release of member end forces is developed. Modifications are made to the member stiffness matrix and equivalent joint load vector to account for the released end forces. A FORTRAN algorithm is given that makes the necessary modifications to the member stiffness matrix and equivalent joint load vector for the standard planar frame member. The algorithm allows combinations of up to three member end forces to be released (specified at zero or nonzero values). An algorithm is also given that calculates the unknown member end displacements at the released member end forces. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the uses and capabilities of the algorithms.

  1. 7 CFR 989.29 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Committee § 989.29 Initial members and nomination of successor members. (a) Initial members. Members and... in nomination shall be given the opportunity to provide the committee a short statement outlining... during the preceding crop year on the Committee. Nominations shall be made by and from handlers,...

  2. 7 CFR 932.130 - Public member and alternate public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements. (1) The public member and alternate public member shall not be a producer, handler, or family... processing of olives; nor shall they be either an officer, director, or employee, or family member of an officer, director, or employee of any firm engaged in such activities. (2) The public member and...

  3. Biology of anterior cruciate ligament injury and repair: Kappa delta ann doner vaughn award paper 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Martha Meaney; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are currently treated by removing the injured ligament and replacing it with a tendon graft. Recent studies have examined alternative treatment methods, including repair and regeneration of the injured ligament. In order to make such an approach feasible, a basic understanding of ACL biology and its response to injury is needed. Identification of obstacles to native ACL healing can then be identified and potentially resolved using tissue engineering strategies-first, with in vitro screening assays, and then with in vivo models of efficacy and safety. This Perspectives paper outlines this path of discovery for optimizing ACL healing using a bio-enhanced repair technique. This journey required constructing indices of the functional tissue response, pioneering physiologically based methods of biomechanical testing, developing, and validating clinically relevant animal models, and creating and optimizing translationally feasible scaffolds, surgical techniques, and biologic additives. Using this systematic translational approach, "bio-enhanced" ACL repair has been advanced to the point where it may become an option for future treatment of acute ACL injuries and the prevention of subsequent post-traumatic osteoarthritis associated with this injury.

  4. 51 CAS Members Elected in 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Atotal of 51 prominent Chinese scientists were elected CAS members in 2005. The announce ment was made at a press conference held on Dec. 16 in Beijing. CAS President LU Yongxiang was present at the conference to give a briefing on the election and the new members.

  5. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business. ...

  6. School Board Member Recruitment in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistone, Peter J.

    Employing a process model of political recruitment, this study investigated the relative impact of a school district's social, economic, and political structure on school board member recruitment. The process data were collected by means of structured interviews with neophyte school board members in a stratified sample of school boards in the…

  7. 7 CFR 916.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... member and perform such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or... qualified. In the event both a member of the committee and his alternate are unable to attend a...

  8. 7 CFR 915.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... and stead of such member. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a.... In the event both a member and his alternate are unable to attend a committee meeting, the...

  9. 7 CFR 925.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... program duties by the chairman or the committee. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or... and has qualified. In the event that both a member and that member's alternate are unable to attend...

  10. Educational Faculty Members' Perceptions on Multicultural Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, Rafet; Aslan, Dolgun

    2016-01-01

    This purpose of this study is to determine how the perceptions of teaching personnel members were conceptualized through use of metaphorical images with regard to the multicultural teacher. In this study, a phenomenological design, a type of qualitative research design was used. A total of 323 teaching personnel members employed at 71 educational…

  11. CERN Member States signatures at LEP inauguration

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The signatures of the dignitaries who represented CERN's Member States on the occasion of the Inauguration of LEP on 13 November 1989. The Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was inaugurated in the presence of some 1500 guests, including Heads of State and Ministers from all of CERN's 14 Member States.

  12. Faculty Members on Boards of Trustees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Patterson, Richard W.; Key, Andrew V.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2011-12 academic year, a group of faculty and student researchers at the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute (CHERI) gathered information on which public and private institutions had faculty members on boards of trustees and obtained the names of the faculty members serving in these roles. In April and May 2012, the authors…

  13. Methods of Assessment for Affected Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Velleman, Richard; Copello, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The article begins by making the point that a good assessment of the needs and circumstances of family members is important if previous neglect of affected family members is to be reversed. The methods we have used in research studies are then described. They include a lengthy semi-structured interview covering seven topic areas and standard…

  14. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    promotion causing excessive stress . 7 4. Service members sacrificing their own personal health to try to meet demands of military and family (e.g...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-2-0113 TITLE: Spouses/ Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keith D...SUBTITLE Spouses/ Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0113 5c. PROGRAM

  15. Israel, CERN’s new Member State

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 15 January 2014, the official Israeli Flag-raising Ceremony took place to mark the accession of Israel to Membership of CERN, bringing the Organization’s number of Member States to 21.

  16. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  17. Member states buoy up beleagured EMBL

    CERN Multimedia

    Balter, M

    1999-01-01

    EMBL's governing council, made up of delegates from the lab's 16 member countries, agreed in principle to meet the costs of a multimillion-dollar pay claim, the result of a recent ruling by the ILO in Geneva (1 page).

  18. Employability Development Teams: Team Member Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Mary L.; Lewis, Meharry H.

    1972-01-01

    The authors point out that team roles are designed to be complementary, but much of the frustration that develops among team members is due to lack of role definition and too much overlapping of responsibility. (Author)

  19. Results of the recent TDA member survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    This article fully outlines active TDA members' responses to the various questions posed by the recent membership survey. Every effort was made to ensure the accuracy of the results. To this end, a professional research firm was employed to cross tabulate answers and analyze the data. A thorough reading will provide you with the TDA members' perspective on a wide range of important dental issues.

  20. Migration processes in SCO member states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Sergeevna Antonyuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns modern state and development of migration processes in SCO member states. As a main method of research statistical analysis was applied. The article shows that migration streams between SCO member states are rather intensive, and the problem of labor migration becomes more and more urgent. The countries of consuming and supplying of labour force are clearly differentiated in the region. For some countries, labor export is the key sector of economy. At the same time, interstate relations between SCO member states sometimes are rather disputed. The most urgent factors causing the development of migration processes in the region were determined. Among them, thefactor of growing outflows from China isespecially noted. It is noted that migration processes are discussed by SCO member states nowadays in terms of illegal migration and international criminality connected with it. It means that the question of labor migration is a real problem. It is indicated that the creation of a specific joint commission on migration policy affiliated with the Council of Foreign Ministers of SCO member states is the necessary condition of effective interaction in migration questions within the framework of Shanghai Cooperation Organization.

  1. Radioactive waste management in member states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this part of the report is to present a brief overview of key issues in radioactive waste management on a nation-by-nation basis. Member State representatives were asked to address nine questions in no more than three or four pages. Hence, by design, the presentations are not comprehensive. Even so, the information set out here should provide the reader valuable insights into the nature of problems associated with radioactive waste management. The materials may also be used as a ready reference for specific information about radioactive waste management in individual Member States as well as for comparative purposes. (author).

  2. Metabolic regulation by p53 family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkers, Celia R; Maddocks, Oliver D K; Cheung, Eric C; Mor, Inbal; Vousden, Karen H

    2013-11-05

    The function of p53 is best understood in response to genotoxic stress, but increasing evidence suggests that p53 also plays a key role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis. p53 and its family members directly influence various metabolic pathways, enabling cells to respond to metabolic stress. These functions are likely to be important for restraining the development of cancer but could also have a profound effect on the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes. A better understanding of the metabolic functions of p53 family members may aid in the identification of therapeutic targets and reveal novel uses for p53-modulating drugs.

  3. Geneva University honours two CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Albert Hofmann Steve Myers On 8 June, two CERN staff members will receive Geneva University's highest distinction. On the proposal of the University's particle physicists, Steve Myers and Albert Hoffmann, who orchestrated LEP commissioning and operation and were instrumental in its success, will awarded the distinction of doctor honoris causa. The ceremony, interspersed with musical interludes, will be followed by a formal reception and is open to all. The Uni Dufour car park will be free to members of the public attending the ceremony. 8 June 2001 at 10.00 a.m. Uni Dufour, Auditoire Piaget 24, rue Général Dufour, Geneva.

  4. Development prospects of the banking industry in the new EU member countries and forthcoming member countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Košak

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Bank consolidation has substantially decreased the number of banks in European banking, which has had important implications for the banking sectors structure in all EU member countries. The consolidation processes have had a tremendous impact on the developments in banking sectors of new EU member countries, wheremajor structural changes have been initiated mostly by new entrant banks from the old EU member countries. The future banking development in new EU member countries will very likely follow some main patterns known from the old EU members. Rather speculative conjectures, which are based on a comparison with banking sectors in other EU member countries indicate, that the total-asset-to-GDPratio in new member countries should further improve in the future. The banking sector growth will be based mostly on the growth of the credit to non-banking sector, while banks are not expected anymore to use non-bank deposits as a predominant way of funding. Instead potentials for alternative funding possibilities should be activated. Although the non-bank financial intermediaries in new EU membersrepresent a serious competition to banks, their relative underdevelopment prevents them from impacting the developments in banking sectors as known from old EU member countries.

  5. Israel, CERN’s new Member State

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 15 January 2014, the official Israeli Flag-raising Ceremony took place to mark the accession of Israel to Membership of CERN, bringing the Organization’s number of Member States to 21.     For more information, click here.

  6. Synthesis of novel 15-membered macrolide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Qing Xian; Shu Tao Ma; Bo Jiao

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop new antibiotics effective against resistant bacteria,a series of novel 15-membered macrolide derivatives were designed and synthesized by the modification of hydroxyl groups at C-11,C-12 and C-4" positions.Their structures were confirmed by MS,IR,1H NMR or 13C NMR.

  7. Goal Reasoning for an Autonomous Squad Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    2015 Annual Conference on Advances in Cognitive Systems: Workshop on Goal Reasoning Goal Reasoning for an Autonomous Squad Member Kellen...20375 USA Abstract Autonomous agents are beginning to play larger roles within team-oriented tasks and missions in various domains. Many reasoning ...present a goal reasoning system for this agent that integrates natural language processing, explanation generation, and plan recognition components

  8. Observations of an Adjunct Faculty Member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, Richard R.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the rewards and frustrations of part-time teaching from the viewpoint of an adjunct faculty member. Includes an examination of the forces which separate full- and part-time instructors and a description of the personal rewards which motivate career persons to teach on the side. (JP)

  9. Inelastic Deformation Analysis of Aluminum Bending Members

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ming; SHI Yongjiu; WANG Yuanqing

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum alloys are typical nonlinear materials, and consequently bending members made of this material exhibit a nonlinear behavior. Most design codes do not pay much attention to such deformations and adopt a simple linear analysis for the calculation of deflections. This paper presents an investigation of the nonlinear deformation of aluminum bending members using the finite-element analysis (FEA). The plastic adaptation coefficient, which can be used to limit the residual deflection, is introduced, and the influence of residual deflection is investigated. A method for evaluating the plastic adoption coefficient is proposed. This paper also shows the load-deflection curve of aluminum bending members and the influence of several parameters. A semi-empirical formula is derived, and some numerical examples are given by FEA. The coefficients of the semi-empirical formula are modified by the FEA results using the nonlinear fitting method. Based on these results, two improved design methods for strength and deformation of aluminum bending members are proposed. Through the comparison with test data, these methods are proved to be suitable for structural design.

  10. 7 CFR 924.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of... qualified. In the event both a member of the committee and his alternate are unable to attend a...

  11. Board Member Testifies at Cyber Safety Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Mary

    2011-01-01

    House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Healthy Families and Communities unanimously expressed concern for the growing trend in cyberbullying during a hearing last June 24. The event, which featured National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) board member Barbara-Jane Paris and other witnesses, including TV personality Dr. Phil…

  12. 42 CFR 93.214 - Institutional member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Institutional member. 93.214 Section 93.214 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  13. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  14. Neighborhood Variation in Gang Member Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Charles M.; Schnebly, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between neighborhood structure, violent crime, and concentrations of gang members at the neighborhood level. We rely on official police gang list data, police crime data, and two waves of decennial census data characterizing the socioeconomic and demographic conditions of 93 neighborhoods in Mesa, Arizona.…

  15. Publication Characteristics of Members of the AAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1990-10-01

    For each of the 4995 persons listed in the 1989 American Astronomical Society Membership Directory, we noted their total 1984-88 publications as listed in the Author Index of Astronomy and Astrophysics Abstracts. The members are subdivided as retired (mean of 0.61 paper/yr), foreign (3.89), Full (3.34), Division Affiliates (1.76), Associate (1.48), and Junior (0.79) members. For Full members the frequencies of various publication rates are listed; the median is 2.28 papers/yr. The Full members are subdivided by affiliations, namely private institutions (mean of 4.71 papers/yr), university (3.89), government-funded (3.46), commercial company (1.81), and unknown affiliations (0.84). We looked up the listed publications for four high producers who each average 25.7 papers/yr. We found that 55% of those are preprints, abstracts, conference papers, and other secondary material. Furthermore, they average 4.2 authors per original research paper. If we divide each original research paper by the number of authors, these four average only the equivalent of 4.0 single-author research papers/yr. A sample of moderate producers also have 53% of their publications as abstracts, conference papers, etc., and they average 4.2 authors per original research paper. We conclude that the average Full AAS member produces the equivalent of 1/2 single-author original-research paper/yr and 23% of them produce more than 1 such paper/yr.

  16. Why 4-H Members Leave: A Study of Discontinuance through Both Current 4-H Members and Former Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilek, Kevin Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    4-H members quit. It is part of every 4-H program, and according to the research, it is even part of growing up. If only we knew why they quit, we could possibly do something about it. To date, the reasons youth join 4-H have been more thoroughly researched than the reasons they quit. This study explores why youth choose to discontinue membership…

  17. Why 4-H Members Leave: A Study of Discontinuance through Both Current 4-H Members and Former Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilek, Kevin Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    4-H members quit. It is part of every 4-H program, and according to the research, it is even part of growing up. If only we knew why they quit, we could possibly do something about it. To date, the reasons youth join 4-H have been more thoroughly researched than the reasons they quit. This study explores why youth choose to discontinue membership…

  18. Migration from New EU Member Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pytlikova, Mariola

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of the paper is to give predictions of the migration potential from the 7 new EU member countries to the EEA/EU-13 countries. Being able to analyze 'real' migration behavior from these particular countries over the period 1990-2000 helps me to avoid problems related to (double) out......-of sample forecasts and to the assumption of invariance of migration behavior across a space that previous studies had to hold. Results of the econometric analyses reveal the importance of controlling for pairs of countries unobserved heterogeneity. Preliminary results regarding the predictions of future...... gross and net migration flows show that the magnitude of the estimated gross and net migration flows is relatively high and lower, respectively, compared to forecasts from previous studies. Such a development in gross and net migration flows indicates that migration from the new EU member countries...

  19. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrive Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Photo 01: CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani (left) speaks to Forum members and public figures from the Geneva area during the visit. In the background is Jean-Claude Landry from the Department of the Interior, Agriculture and Environment, State of Geneva. Photo 02: CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani (left) speaks to Forum members and public figures from the Geneva area during the visit. In the background is Bernard Ecoffey, Founder of the Forum Engelberg.

  20. STS-64 SAFER Assembly development team members

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system, to be tested on the STS-64 flight, is surrounded by the team members who have spent a number of recent man hours in preparation for the system's first test-flight. In front are (left to right) Russell L. Flack and Bob Lowe. In the back row are (left to right) Jack D. Humphreys, Chuck Deason, Bill Wood and James Brown.

  1. New Members of CPAFFC Executive Council

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The Executive Council of the CPAFFC gained two new members in 2015—vice presidents Lin Yi and Song Jingwu.Lin Yi,born in Guangdong Province in 1966 and a graduate of Peking University,joined the CPAFFC in 1989 and has been engaged in people-to-people diplomacy ever since,serving successively as deputy director and director of the Fourth Division of the Department of Asian

  2. Lithuania to become Associate Member of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Haffner, Julie

    2017-01-01

    On 27 June 2017, in Vilnius, Lithuania, CERN Director General, Fabiola Gianotti, and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Lithuania, Linas Linkevičius, in the presence of the President of the Republic of Lithuania, Dalia Grybauskaitė, signed the Agreement admitting Lithuania as an Associate Member of CERN. The last step for the Agreement to enter into force requires final approval by the Government of Lithuania.

  3. Member State Event: Telling CERN's story !

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As part of the events to mark the Laboratory's fiftieth anniversary, members of the CERN personnel are telling the story of CERN. Robert Cailliau (on the right), currently responsible for CERN's external communications, and Chiara Mariotti (in the center), a physicist working at CMS, were invited to talk about the history of CERN and the Web at a conference in the 'Science Thursdays' series entitled 'From the Quark to the Web' in Turin on 26 February.

  4. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. He is pictured here (right) alongside CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani during the visit of Forum members to CERN.

  5. Perceptions of teamwork among code team members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahramus, Tara; Frewin, Sarah; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Sole, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) teams, known as code teams, provide coordinated and evidenced-based interventions by various disciplines during a CPA. Teamwork behaviors are essential during CPA resuscitation and may have an impact on patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of teamwork during CPA events among code team members and to determine if differences in perception existed between disciplines within the code team. A prospective, descriptive, comparative design using the Code Teamwork Perception Tool online survey was used to assess the perception of teamwork during CPA events by medical residents, critical care nurses, and respiratory therapists. Sixty-six code team members completed the Code Teamwork Perception Tool. Mean teamwork scores were 2.63 on a 5-point scale (0-4). No significant differences were found in mean scores among disciplines. Significant differences among scores were found on 7 items related to code leadership, roles and responsibilities between disciplines, and in those who had participated on a code team for less than 2 years and certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support for less than 4 years. Teamwork perception among members of the code team was average. Teamwork training for resuscitation with all disciplines on the code team may promote more effective teamwork during actual CPA events. Clinical nurse specialists can aid in resuscitation efforts by actively participating on committees, identifying opportunities for improvement, being content experts, leading the development of team training programs, and conducting research in areas lacking evidence.

  6. Member State Event: Telling CERN's Story

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As part of the events to mark the Laboratory's fiftieth anniversary, members of the CERN personnel are telling the story of CERN. Robert Cailliau (on the right of the photograph), co-inventor of the Web and currently responsible for CERN's external communications, and Chiara Mariotti (in the center), a physicist working at CMS, were invited to talk about the history of CERN and the Web at a conference in the 'Science Thursdays' series entitled 'From the Quark to the Web' in Turin on 26 February. This was not their first appearance before a non-specialist audience (almost 1000 people that day!) eager to find out what goes on in a unique research centre like CERN as talking about the Laboratory's activities and its history are part and parcel of their work for the Organization. Anniversary Events in the Member States: This 'Science Thursday' event devoted to CERN was one of Italy's contributions to CERN's fiftieth anniversary celebrations. Coming up soon in the Member States: Italy International Centre...

  7. A Non-Member Spouse's Entitlement To The Member's Pension Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motseotsile Clement Marumoagae

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important that married couples seek legal advice with regard to the assets falling within their joint estate, more particularly their retirement benefits. This article reflects on the entitlement (if any of non-member spouses to their spouses' retirement fund benefits. Pension benefits can be due before, during or after divorce, and parties to the marriage should be aware of their rights with regard to the accruing pension benefits of their spouses. While it is settled law that non-member spouses are entitled to receive a portion of their member spouses' pension benefits (known as "pension interest" immediately on divorce, it is not particularly clear whether non-member spouses are also entitled to receive the same before or sometime after divorce. In this article I provide a contextual understanding of the entitlements (if any which spouses or former spouses of members of pension funds have on such member spouses' retirement benefits. Furthermore, it shown in this article that various divisions of South African High Courts have been inconsistent in how they have approached the issue of the pension interest between divorcing spouses or divorced ex-spouses.

  8. Crows cross-modally recognize group members but not non-group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Noriko; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2012-05-22

    Recognizing other individuals by integrating different sensory modalities is a crucial ability of social animals, including humans. Although cross-modal individual recognition has been demonstrated in mammals, the extent of its use by birds remains unknown. Herein, we report the first evidence of cross-modal recognition of group members by a highly social bird, the large-billed crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). A cross-modal expectancy violation paradigm was used to test whether crows were sensitive to identity congruence between visual presentation of a group member and the subsequent playback of a contact call. Crows looked more rapidly and for a longer duration when the visual and auditory stimuli were incongruent than when congruent. Moreover, these responses were not observed with non-group member stimuli. These results indicate that crows spontaneously associate visual and auditory information of group members but not of non-group members, which is a demonstration of cross-modal audiovisual recognition of group members in birds.

  9. Istributed Modelling of Shallow Landsliding In Volcaniclastic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, G. B.; dal Negro, P.; Frattini, P.

    Shallow landslides as soil slip and soil slip-debris flows frequently occur as diffused instability phenomena. Pyroclastic soils show a great susceptibility to this kind of landslides. An example is represented by the severe landslide event that in 1998 struck the Pizzo d'Alvano slopes, in the Campania region (Southern Italy). Prolonged rainfall triggered hundreds of soil slips, most of which transforming into rapid debris flows. A previous study by deterministic modelling showed the relevance of different factors in determining landslides, namely, soil layering, vertical changing of soil properties, stratigraphical discontinuities and contributing areas upslope of the source areas. In this study a spatially distributed approach is implemented in order to model this type of events, taking into account the focused predisposing factors. Several hydrologic models have been coupled with the infinite slope stability approach to individuate areas most prone to failure. These models have been implemented in a GIS environ- ment by introducing topographic data, recorded hourly rainfall intensities, land use and physico-mechanical properties. Model calibration has been accomplished com- paring the obtained landslide pattern with that observed in 1998 and with past insta- bilities. The advantage of this approach is that landslide hazard evaluation is spatially distributed, differently from most of the traditional evaluation strategies. The main disadvantage is that slope stability is also used as an indirect estimator of the capa- bility of hydrological models to explain water infiltration process. The result is the introduction of additional sources of uncertainty. In practice, an absolute evaluation of the hydrological model is not always possible. Steady state models are usually the more pessimistic ones and are usually strongly influenced by the topographic factor (contributing area). This approach is then too conservative and it is difficult to choose the correct values of rainfall intensity to be introduced. Transient models considering water infiltration seem to be much more reliable especially when spatially distributed rainfall are introduced.

  10. Method of recertifying a loaded bearing member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method is described of recertifying a loaded bearing member using ultrasound testing to compensate for different equipment configurations and temperature conditions. The standard frequency F1 of a reference block is determined via an ultrasonic tone burst generated by a first pulsed phased locked loop (P2L2) equipment configuration. Once a lock point number S is determined for F1, the reference frequency F1a of the reference block is determined at this lock point number via a second P2L2 equipment configuration to permit an equipment offset compensation factor Fo1=((F1-F1a)/F1)(1000000) to be determined. Next, a reference frequency F2 of the unloaded bearing member is determined using a second P2L2 equipment configuration and is then compensated for equipment offset errors via the relationship F2+F2(Fo1)/1000000. A lock point number b is also determined for F2. A resonant frequency F3 is determined for the reference block using a third P2L2 equipment configuration to determine a second offset compensation factor F02=((F1-F3)/F1) 1000000. Next the resonant frequency F4 of the loaded bearing member is measured at lock point number b via the third P2L2 equipment configuration and the bolt load determined by the relationship (-1000000)CI(((F2-F4)/F2)-Fo2), wherein CI is a factor correlating measured frequency shift to the applied load. Temperature compensation is also performed at each point in the process.

  11. Chromosomal aberrations in ISS crew members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Christian; Goedecke, Wolfgang; Antonopoulos, Alexandra

    2012-07-01

    High energy radiation is a major risk factor in manned space missions. Astronauts and cosmonauts are exposed to ionising radiations of cosmic and solar origin, while on the Earth's surface people are well protected by the atmosphere and a deflecting magnetic field. There are now data available describing the dose and the quality of ionising radiation on-board of the International Space Station (ISS). Nonetheless, the effect of increased radiation dose on mutation rates of ISS crew members are hard to predict. Therefore, direct measurements of mutation rates are required in order to better estimate the radiation risk for longer duration missions. The analysis of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a well established method to measure radiation-induced mutations. We present data of chromosome aberration analyses from lymphocyte metaphase spreads of ISS crew members participating in short term (10-14 days) or long term (around 6 months) missions. From each subject we received two blood samples. The first sample was drawn about 10 days before launch and a second one within 3 days after return from flight. From lymphocyte cultures metaphase plates were prepared on glass slides. Giemsa stained and in situ hybridised metaphases were scored for chromosome changes in pre-flight and post-flight blood samples and the mutation rates were compared. Results obtained in chromosomal studies on long-term flight crew members showed pronounced inter-individual differences in the response to elevated radiation levels. Overall slight but significant elevations of typical radiation induced aberrations, i.e., dicentric chromosomes and reciprocal translocations have been observed. Our data indicate no elevation of mutation rates due to short term stays on-board the ISS.

  12. Members of the State Council of Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Luncheon hosted by the Director-General for members of the State Council of Geneva: From left to right A. Naudi; J. May; M. Carlo Lamprecht, State Council - Employement, Foreign Office and Economic Departement; M. Robert Hensler, State Chancellor; L. Maiani, CERN Director General; H.F. Hoffmann; M. Robert Cramer, State Council - Environment, Agriculture and Interior Departement; J.Van Der Boon; M. Laurent Moutinot, State Council - Installation, equipment and housing Departement; C. Détraz; C. Wyss; P. Jenni; G. Hentsch; M. Pierre-François Unger, State Council - Health and Social Action Departement; G. Stassinakis; M. Bourquin, CERN Council President.

  13. Collective members in West European political parties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez, José Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the collective members of political parties. Collective members can be defined as organizations having both full self-government rights and entitlements to decision-making processes in the political parties in which they are embedded. This article proposes a basic descriptive typology of collective members that takes into consideration their sociopolitical nature (party political or functional and their pattern of articulation within the party in which they are embedded (whether they help to articulate the whole party structure or not. It also illustrates these subtypes by examining European organizations that meet (or are close to meeting the main defining characteristics of collective members. This examination is based on the analysis of all parties that attained at least 4% of the votes in the last national parliamentary elections in 10 European countries. The article concludes with an analysis of the determinants and prospects of this type of party structure.Este artículo estudia los miembros colectivos de los partidos políticos. Los miembros colectivos pueden ser definidos como organizaciones que poseen a la vez derechos de autogobierno plenos y derecho a participar en los procesos de toma decisiones en el partido político en el que están integrados. El artículo propone una tipología descriptiva de los miembros colectivos que tiene en cuenta su naturaleza sociopolítica (partidista o funcional y su patrón de articulación dentro del partido en el que están integrados (si ayudan o no a articular el conjunto de la estructura partidaria. Asimismo, el artículo ilustra estos subtipos a partir del examen de varias organizaciones políticas europeas que cumplen (o se acercan a cumplir las características definitorias de los miembros colectivos. Este análisis se basa en el examen de todas las organizaciones políticas que alcanzaron más de un 4% de los votos en las últimas elecciones parlamentarias de 10 pa

  14. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Photo 01: Members of the Forum Engelberg and public figures from Geneva visit SM18, the test hall for LHC magnets: (left to right) N. Siegel, Prof. Dr. Med. Bernard Mach, Mr Alexander Höchli, H. Wenninger, Mrs Mireille Quirina, Mme Konrade Von Bremen, Mrs Thérèse Wolf, Prof. Roger Berthouzoz, Mrs Marie-Anne Heimo, Mr Bernard Ecoffey.

  15. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Photo 01: Thérèse Wolf, Secretary of Forum Engelberg; Alain Hervé; Horst Wenninger; and Alexander Höchli, Forum member and former Landammann of the canton of Obwalden, at the CMS detector's assembly site.

  16. Migration from the new EU member countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise Møller; Lund Thomsen, Trine

    2012-01-01

    and working conditions in their home countries as well as being of another cultural background than their Danish colleagues brings with it many challenges. This article examines the consequences of low-skilled labour migration to Denmark from the new EU member countries in Eastern Europe. The article...... investigates the potentials, limitations and conflicts of interests that are connected with temporary employment of Eastern European migrant workers within the unskilled labour sectors seen from the perspective of Danish labour market actors; politicians, labour marked unions, Danish employers, Danish...

  17. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Horst Wenninger (left) in animated discussion with Alexander Höchli, member of the Institutional Committee of Forum Engelberg and former Landammann of the canton of Obwalden.

  18. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Summer work for children of members of the personnel During the period from 13 June to 16 September 2011 inclusive, there will be a limited number of jobs for summer work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature), which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all contracts will be 4 weeks and the allowance will be 1717 CHF for this period. Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_intranet/wd_pds?p_web_site_id=1&p_web_page_id=8886&p_no_apply=&p_show=N Completed application forms must be returned by 11 April 2011 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available by the end of May 2011. For further information, please con...

  19. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Summer work for children of members of the personnel During the period from 14 June to 17 September 2010 inclusive, a limited number of jobs for summer work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all contracts will be 4 weeks and the allowance will be 1717 CHF for this period. Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=7716 Completed application forms must be returned by 9 April 2010 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 21 May 2010. For further information, please contact: Inger.Carriero@cern.ch Tel. 71372

  20. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period mid-June to mid-September 2002, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1564.- for this period. Application form can be obtained from Martine PLAZA, Personnel Management Group (by using the slip below or by electronic mail to Martine.Plaza@cern.ch)) or on the web. Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 3 May 2002 at the l...

  1. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period from 16 June to 12 September 2008 inclusive, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature), which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of appointments will be 4 weeks and the allowance for this period will be 1663.- CHF. Candidates should apply via HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=6160 Completed application forms must be made on-line by 13 April 2008 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 18 May 2008. For further information, please contact: mailto:Geraldine.Ballet@cer...

  2. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Summer work for children of members of the personnel During the period from 14 June to 17 September 2010 inclusive, a limited number of jobs for summer work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all contracts will be 4 weeks and the allowance will be 1717 CHF for this period. Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=7716 Completed application forms must be returned by 9 April 2010 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 21 May 2010. For further information, please contact: Inger.Carriero@cern.ch Tel. 71372

  3. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period mid-June to mid-September 2005, a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) will be available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children having previously worked at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks and the allowance for the period will be CHF 1621.- net. Candidates should apply via the HR Department's electronic recruitment system (E-rt) : http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/internal/personnel/pmd/cr/Staff-kids-05.pdf Completed application forms must be returned to this Service by 8 April 2005 ...

  4. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnelDuring the period 12 June to 15 September 2006 included, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of jobs available, no children who have previously worked at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1640.- for this period. Candidates should apply via HR department's electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=4691 Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 17 April 2006 at the latest. The results of t...

  5. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period from 15 June to 11 September 2009 inclusive, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature), which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks and the allowance will be CHF 1717. - for this period. Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=6970 Completed application forms must be returned by 10 April 2009 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 22 May 2009. For further information, please contact: mailto:Inger.Carriero...

  6. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period from 15 June to 11 September 2009 inclusive, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature), which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks and the allowance will be CHF 1717. - for this period. Candidates should apply via HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=6970 Completed application forms must be returned by 10 April 2009 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 22 May 2009. For further information, please contact: mailto:Inger.Carriero@cern.c...

  7. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period from 16 June to 12 September 2008 inclusive, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature), which will be open to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of appointments will be 4 weeks and the allowance for this period will be 1663.- CHF. Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=6160 Completed application forms must be made on-line by 13 April 2008 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 18 May 2008. For further information, please contact: Geraldine.Ballet@cern.ch HR ...

  8. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period from 16 June to 12 September 2008 inclusive, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature), which will be open to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of appointments will be 4 weeks and the allowance for this period will be 1663 CHF. Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=6160 Completed application forms must be submitted on-line by 13 April 2008 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 18 May 2008. For further information, please contact: mailto:Geraldine.Ballet@cern....

  9. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period from 15 June to 11 September 2009 inclusive, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature), which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks and the allowance will be CHF 1717. - for this period. Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=6970 Completed application forms must be returned by 10 April 2009 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 22 May 2009. For further information, please contact: mailto:Inger.Carriero@...

  10. To all members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Martine Briant

    2006-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnelDuring the period 12 June to 15 September 2006 included, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of jobs available, no children who have previously worked at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1640.- for this period. Candidates should apply via HR department's electronic recruitment system (E-rt) : https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=4691 Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 17 April 2006 at the latest. The results of ...

  11. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period mid-June to mid-September 2003, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1582.- for this period. Application form can be obtained from Martine PLAZA, HR Division (by electronic mail to Martine.Plaza@cern.ch) or at http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/general/HN-personnel/ Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 2 May 2003 at t...

  12. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period mid-June to mid-September 2002, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1564.- for this period. Application form can be obtained from Martine PLAZA, Personnel Management Group (by using the slip below or by electronic mail to Martine.Plaza@cern.ch)) or on the web. Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 3 May 2002 at the l...

  13. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period mid-June to mid-September 2003, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1582.- for this period. Application form can be obtained from Martine PLAZA, HR Division (by electronic mail to Martine.Plaza@cern.ch) or at http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/general/HN-personnel/ Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 2 May 2003 at th...

  14. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Temporary work for children of members of the personnel During the period mid-June to mid-September 2003, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1582.- for this period. Application form can be obtained from Martine PLAZA, HR Division (by using the slip in the bulletin or by electronic mail to Martine.Plaza@cern.ch) or at http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/general/HN-personnel/ Completed application forms must be returne...

  15. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996.Seated here at a presentation by Peter Jenni, spokesperson for the ATLAS collaboration, during the visit of Forum members and Geneva public figures are Bernard Ecoffey, Founder of the Forum Engelberg (left), and Jean-Claude Landry, Department of the Interior, Agriculture and Environment, state of Geneva. Photo 01: (left to right) Bernard Ecoffey, Jean-Claude Landry and Peter Jenni. Photos 02, 03: (left to right) Jean-Claude Landry, Bernard Ecoffey and Peter Jenni.

  16. Consumers fireworks - Differences between European members states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astondoa, I. [Pirotecnia Astondoa, S. A. (Spain); Rodriguez-Brunchu, G. [A..F. A. P. E. Pirotecnia S. A. (Spain)

    2000-04-01

    The availability of fireworks to consumers varies between European countries in terms of policies and legislation that control their sale, the types of fireworks legally available, the quantities and times of the year when fireworks can be purchased and used. The authors of this paper attempt to provide an assessment of the situation in seven member countries of the European Community, namely, the United Kingdom, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. The quality and quantity of data available varies from country to country, however, the objectives of providing an up-to-date picture of the legislation, policies, classification, frequency of sale, age restrictions on purchase, and special prohibitions applicable to fireworks in each of the countries, is achieved. 1 ref., tabs.

  17. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Photo 01: Raymond Battistella - Director-General of SIG, Geneva's utilities provider (left) - and Bernard Ecoffey, Founder of the Forum Engelberg. In the background is the CMS magnet system under construction. The red concentric rings are part of the barrel yoke, which returns the magnetic flux generated by the superconducting coil. Supported from the innermost barrel ring is the outer cylinder of the vacuum tank that will house the superconducting coil. Photo 02: Alexander Höchli, member of the Institutional Committee of Forum Engelberg and former Landammann of the canton of Obwalden (left), with Raymond Battistella, Di...

  18. Family Members' Reports of the Technology Use of Family Members with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, S. B.; Wehmeyer, M. L.; Davies, D. K.; Stock, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A nationwide survey of family members of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities ranging in age from birth through adulthood was conducted to replicate a similar effort by Wehmeyer and update the knowledge base concerning technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Method: Survey responses…

  19. Perspectives and expectations of union member and non- union member teachers on teacher unions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncer FİDAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Unions, which can be regarded as one of the constitutive elements of democracy, are the pressure groups in political and social fields. Unions were born out of industrial confrontations and expanded into the field of public services over time, and thus teachers – who are also public employees-, also obtained the right to establish and affiliate to unions. In this research the views of union member and non-union member teachers on the most important functions and operational effectiveness of unions, teachers’ expectations from unions and teachers’ evaluation of the solidarity, competition and cooperation between unions were determined and the perspectives of teachers on unionization were revealed. qualitative research design was used. The data needed were collected through semi-structured interviews from volunteering union member and non-union member teachers who were working in the primary and secondary schools in Ankara province and who were selected through “maximum variation sampling approach”. The data were then analyzed by using the content analysis technique. In conclusion, it was found that political ideology was the most important reason for membership of teachers’ unions. Protection and development of personal rights was found to be the most important function of teacher unions and unions were thought to be insufficient in performing those functions.

  20. 48 CFR 6301.2 - Qualifications of members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contract law. ... CONTRACT APPEALS BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS 6301.2 Qualifications of members. Each member of the Board must... administrative law judges appointed pursuant to section 3105 of title 5 of the United States Code, with...

  1. When a Service Member May Be at Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issue for service members and their loved ones. Stress that never seems to let up can affect anyone, and some service members may be at greater risk for suicide than others. Factors may include: Being a young, ...

  2. China-ASEAN Association Entrepreneur Council Member Delegation in Singapore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The China-ASEAN Association Entrepreneur Council Member Delegation, comprising ten people, visited Singapore from February 22 to March 1, 2009 at the invitation of the Singapore-China Friendship Association. During the visit, members of the

  3. Party member recruitment and the representativeness of party membership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina

    Party membership figures are in decline. However, parties are still recruiting party members. Are there any differences in the social and political characteristics of old and new party members? If there is a difference, are new party members more or less representative for party voters than old...

  4. 7 CFR 1210.404 - Importer member nomination and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Importer member nomination and selection. 1210.404... WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Nominating Procedures Importer Members § 1210.404 Importer member nomination and selection. (a) The Board shall include one or more representatives of importers, who shall...

  5. 7 CFR 1230.33 - Appointment of importer members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appointment of importer members. 1230.33 Section 1230... National Pork Producers Delegate Body § 1230.33 Appointment of importer members. The Secretary shall appoint the importer members of each Delegate Body after consultation with importers....

  6. Intensifying the Group Member's Experience Using the Group Log.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.

    1983-01-01

    Presents the use of a group log in which members analyze the content and process of each session using a suggested format. The log promotes dialogue between the leader and each group member and involves members more fully in the group process. Feedback indicates the log is valuable. (JAC)

  7. The relationship between mental health workers and family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bovenkamp, H.M.; Trappenburg, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between family members and mental health care workers to learn more about the support available to family members of mental health patients. Methods Eighteen interviews were conducted with family members, seven with professionals and two with patients. Observation

  8. Mass relations among family members of quarks and leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Gilani, A H S

    2005-01-01

    The various mass relations among members of quark and lepton families are given. Three mass relations for the charm, beauty, and top quark family members are given and three mass relations for the electron, muon, and tau lepton family members are presented.

  9. Found Poems, Member Checking and Crises of Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Rosemary C.

    2013-01-01

    In order to establish veracity, qualitative researchers frequently rely on member checks to insure credibility by giving participants opportunities to correct errors, challenge interpretations and assess results; however, member checks are not without drawbacks. This paper describes an innovative approach to conducting member checks. Six members…

  10. 12 CFR 745.13 - Notification to members/shareholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notification to members/shareholders. 745.13 Section 745.13 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS... Notification to members/shareholders. Each insured credit union shall provide notice to its members...

  11. Using artificial team members for team training in virtual environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diggelen, J. van; Muller, T.; Bosch, K. van den

    2010-01-01

    In a good team, members do not only perform their individual task, they also coordinate their actions with other members of the team. Developing such team skills usually involves exercises with all members playing their role. This approach is costly and has organizational and educational drawbacks.

  12. 50 CFR 600.245 - Council member compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership § 600.245 Council member compensation. (a) All voting Council members whose eligibility for compensation has... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Council member compensation....

  13. 50 CFR 600.210 - Terms of Council members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership § 600.210 Terms of Council members. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR 59151, Sept. 27, 2010. (a) Voting members (other... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Terms of Council members. 600.210...

  14. 29 CFR 511.4 - Compensation of committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation of committee members. 511.4 Section 511.4... WAGE ORDER PROCEDURE FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.4 Compensation of committee members. Each member of an industry committee will be allowed per diem compensation at the rate specified in Chapter 304 of...

  15. The relationship between mental health workers and family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bovenkamp, H.; Trappenburg, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between family members and mental health care workers to learn more about the support available to family members of mental health patients. Methods Eighteen interviews were conducted with family members, seven with professionals and two with patients.

  16. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    During the period mid-June to mid-September 2001, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (that is, anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1538.- net for this period. Application forms can be obtained via the Web at the following address: http://cern.web.cern.ch/CERN/Divisions/PE/ under the heading 'Other Useful Links' or from Paula Barriere, Personnel Management Group (by using the slip below or by electronic mail to Paula.Barriere@.cern.ch). Completed applic...

  17. Radio Properties of Brightest Cluster Members

    CERN Document Server

    Andernach, H

    2009-01-01

    We searched the literature for radio images and fluxes of brightest cluster members (BCMs) in 1169 Abell clusters, selected on the basis of their BM or RS type or on textual notes in the Abell catalog indicating the presence of dominant galaxies. We inspected the images of existing radio surveys (NVSS, SUMSS, FIRST, WENSS, etc.) and used the CATS and VizieR catalog browsers, as well as additional literature, to collect radio fluxes and radio morphologies for 1423 BCMs. We found 578 (41%) of these BCMs with detected radio emission, of which 223 are detected at only a single frequency. Using the survey images and published high-resolution images, we estimated the best available position angle for the innermost radio structure and for the largest angular size of each source. DSS images were used to obtain the orientation of the optical major axis of the outer envelope of the BCMs, and the acute difference angle between major optical and radio axes was derived for 102 objects. Its distribution shows a similar bim...

  18. Ombuds' Corner: Users and Staff Members

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2010-01-01

    In this series, the Bulletin aims to explain the role of the Ombuds at CERN by presenting practical examples of misunderstandings that could have been resolved by the Ombuds if he had been contacted earlier. Please note that, in all the situations we present, the names are fictitious and used only to improve clarity. 
     Pam* and Jeff* are both physicists working on the same project for an experiment. Pam is from a collaborating institute and Jeff is a CERN staff member. As the project is being developed at CERN they both share the same technical support available in the Laboratory. At the beginning they organised themselves so they could get the support that both of them needed. When some milestones concerning the delivery of parts became urgent, they started to actually compete for the same resources, which could not possibly satisfy all requests at the same time. With the time pressure increasing, Jeff started to accuse Pam of diverting the resources for her own share of the proj...

  19. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    During the period mid-June to mid-September 2001, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (that is, anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1538.- net for this period. Application forms can be obtained via the Web at the following address: http://cern.web.cern.ch/CERN/Divisions/PE/ under the heading 'Other Useful Links' or from Paula Barriere, Personnel Management Group (by using the slip below or by electronic mail to Paula.Barriere@.cern.ch). Completed applic...

  20. Insider Research with Family Members who have a Member Living with Rare Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Foster PhD

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author explores insider research in relation to family members facing a diagnosis of rare cancer, using her experiences as one such family member undertaking doctoral research into journeys similar to hers. The “insider” issue is explored through three realms: the ethical realm, including issues of “fitness” to undertake the research; the methodological realm, including how data are obtained and used; and the trustworthiness realm, including research rigor. The exploration of her insider experiences includes personal challenges in relation to facing familiar emotionally charged experiences, insights gained as a result of her insider status, and her ability to join with participants in ways that might not be possible for an outsider. In the paper the author challenges taken-for-granted assumptions that trustworthiness can be assured only from the position of “objective” researcher. Rather, this analysis places knowledge gained through the processes and products of research as constituted and contextualized.

  1. 19 CFR 122.75b - Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic manifest requirement for crew members... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Documents Required for Clearance and Permission To Depart; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard...

  2. Prevalence, Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Smoking Among SEPAR Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Reina, Segismundo; Jiménez Ruiz, Carlos A; de Higes Martinez, Eva; Garcia Rueda, Marcos; Callejas González, Francisco J; de Granda Orive, Jose I; Vaquero Lozano, Paz; de Lucas Ramos, Pilar; Alfageme Michavila, Inmaculada

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of smoking among SEPAR members, and their approach to smoking cessation in their patients. An online survey was completed by 640 members (496 pulmonologists, 45 nurses, 34 thoracic surgeons, 37 physiotherapists, and 28 other specialists). Of the members interviewed, 5% confessed that they were smokers: 3.5% pulmonologists; 8.9% nurses; 8.8% thoracic surgeons, and 13.5% physiotherapists. A total of 96% of members assign a lot or quite a lot of importance to setting an example; 98% of members always or often ask their patients about their smoking habit. The most effective anti-smoking intervention, according to 77% of members, is a combination of drugs and psychological support. These results are an indicator of the awareness and commitment of SEPAR members to smoking and its cessation. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Catching up with the Vaughn express: Six years of standards-based teacher evaluation and performance pay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M. Kellor

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods of paying and evaluating teachers in the United States are longstanding, but discussions about changing these systems to support teacher quality and student achievement goals are becoming more common. Efforts to make significant changes to these programs can be difficult and take many years to design, gain approval, and implement; thus, few examples of alternative teacher compensation and evaluation systems exist. Relieved from many of the restrictions and requirements associated with most traditional public school systems, charter schools often are better positioned to implement changes more quickly than a traditional school, yet their experiences can provide useful information for others who are engaging in similar activities. Thus, the experience of a large urban charter school that designed and implemented an innovative teacher compensation system and standards-based teacher evaluation system that has been in place for six years offers important lessons in designing, implementing, evaluating and refining these systems.

  4. Various Lifestyle Factors of Flight Crew Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Various Lifestyle Factors of Flight Crew Members The main aim of the research was to analyze certain lifestyle factors of flight crew members. This profession has rather high demands relating to body type, basic skills, as well as good mental and physical condition. The sample of respondents included 76 members of the Adria Airways d. d. cabin crew (19.7% men and 80.3% women with the average age of 30.3 years (SD = 9.88, most of them (74.1% finished high school and only one third had a full-time work contract. Using a questionnaire, we investigated the amount of exercise they get during work and in their free time, as well as their health conditions. Results show that in their free time most of the respondents participate in sports, with outdoor sports being the most popular form of exercise (running and walking, hiking, skiing, and swimming. The respondents spend most of their time at work standing up (18.4% and walking (27.6%. Many of them (35% find that they have to maintain postures that are uncomfortable. Most of them experience a combination of all the above. Most (38.2% do sports at least twice a week, and as many as 84.2% 3 to 5 times a week. Only 4% of the respondents participate in sports activities organized by their employer. Most (77.6% believe themselves to be in good health and only 6.6% believe themselves to be often under stress. Relatively many smoke. Among health problems, the highest percentage (46.1% of respondents list fatigue, followed by back pain (34.2% and neck pain (30.3%. Considering the characteristics of this profession, we recommend cabin crew members do aerobic exercise as well as more complex and preventative sport exercises intended to prevent back pain, and also to do more exercises for strength, core stability and flexibility. Různé faktory životního stylu členů letové posádky Hlavním cílem výzkumu bylo analyzovat některé faktory životního stylu členů letových posádek. Tato profese klade

  5. Measurement and comparison of nursing faculty members' critical thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondy, Laurie C

    2011-03-01

    Nursing faculty members strive to teach students to think critically. It has long been assumed that nursing faculty members are good at critical thinking because they are expected to teach these skills to students, but this assumption has not been well supported empirically. Faculty members question their ability to think critically and are unsure of their skills. The purpose of this study was to address this assumption by measuring nursing faculty members' critical thinking skills and compare the faculty mean score to that of a student norming group, and to the mean scores of other nursing faculty studies. Findings can be used to increase nursing faculty members' understanding of their critical thinking skills, prompt discussion about critical thinking skills, and to help faculty members address concerns and uncertainty about the concept of critical thinking. This study also helps establish an empirical basis for future research.

  6. Pride and prejudice in high school gang members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A Y

    1994-01-01

    This study compared gang versus nongang high school students along measures of self-esteem, racial attitudes, and their self-professed role models. A total of 78 Caucasian (65 nongang and 13 gang members) and 77 African-American students (41 nongang and 36 gang members) participated. Results indicated that gang members had significantly lower levels of self-esteem compared to their nongang peers. All students, regardless of ethnicity, manifested negative racial stereotyping toward racial outgroups; gang members were not more racially prejudiced compared to other students. The role model data revealed that overall, gang members could name fewer role models than did their nongang peers. African-American students who were not gang members were much more likely to mention a parent or teacher as a role model. A regression analysis indicated that the absence of parental or teacher roles models was the best predictor of gang membership. These results are conceptualized within the framework provided by social identity theory.

  7. Additional TWA Members? Spectroscopic verification of kinematically selected TWA candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Song, I; Zuckerman, B; Song, Inseok

    2002-01-01

    We present spectroscopic measurements of the 23 new candidate members of the TW Hydrae Association from Makarov & Fabricius (2000). Based on Halpha and Li 6708 A strengths together with location on a color-magnitude diagram for Hipparcos TWA candidates, we found only three possible new members (TYC 7760-0835-1, TYC 8238-1462-1, and TYC 8234-2856-1) in addition to the already known member, TWA 19. This eliminated most of the candidates more distant than 100 pc. Three Tycho stars, almost certainly members of the Lower Centaurus Crux association, are the most distant members of the TWA. A claim of isotropic expansion of TWA has to be re-evaluated based on our new results. Generally, one cannot identify new members of a diffuse nearby stellar group based solely on kinematic data. To eliminate interlopers with similar kinematics, spectroscopic verification is essential.

  8. Surgical safety checklists briefings: Perceived efficacy and team member involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, D S; McComb, S

    2016-06-01

    Researchers have shown inconsistencies in compliance, outcomes and attitudes of surgical team members related to surgical safety checklist briefings. The purpose of this study was to examine surgical circulator and scrub practitioners' perceptions of safety checklist briefings and team member involvement, and to identify potential improvements in the process based on those perceptions. An anonymous survey was conducted with members of the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) and the Association of Surgical Technologists (AST). Questions focused on perceptions of checklist briefing efficacy and team member involvement in safety practices. From the 346 usable responses, a third respondent group of self-identified perioperative leaders emerged. Significant results were obtained related to leaders' perceptions, post-procedure briefings and various perceptions of team member involvement. Study results indicate that variances in safety practices continue as perceived by surgical team members thus presenting opportunities for further examination and improvement of processes in reducing surgical errors.

  9. Family Members' Experience With Hospice in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, L Ashley; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker; Kruse, Robin; Lewis, Alexandra; Demiris, George

    2016-05-01

    Research has documented numerous benefits and challenges associated with receipt of hospice care in nursing homes; however, study of this partnership from the perspective of residents' family members has been limited. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore family members' experience with hospice services received in the nursing home setting. Researchers conducted a secondary data analysis of 175 family member interviews using a thematic analytic approach. Findings highlighted the critical role of communication in supporting residents and their family members. Care coordination, support and oversight, and role confusion also impacted family members' experience of hospice care in the nursing home. Efforts directed at enhancing communication and more clearly articulating the roles of members of the health care team are indicated.

  10. Transient response of lattice structures based on exact member theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melvin S.

    1989-01-01

    The computer program BUNVIS-RG, which treats vibration and buckling of lattice structures using exact member stiffness matrices, has been extended to calculate the exact modal mass and stiffness quantities that can be used in a conventional transient response analysis based on modes. The exact nature of the development allows inclusion of local member response without introduction of any interior member nodes. Results are given for several problems in which significant interaction between local and global response occurs.

  11. Brand Community and Its Effect on Apple Community Members

    OpenAIRE

    Tejuja, Roshni Arun

    2011-01-01

    Research on brand communities have only been restricted to brand and consumer. Only little research has been conducted on brand communities and its members. Moreover the effects of brand communities on its members have not yet been researched. This paper aims at gaining the members perspective about the brand and their attributed or attitude towards it. The paper will focus on various components such as loyalty, trust, consumer empowerment, elements of brand community, pricing, linking t...

  12. E-Commerce in OIC members: Facts - Challenges - Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Abdali, Abid

    2005-01-01

    The study seeks to explore the importance of E-Commerce and ICT and their impact on economies of OIC members. Challenges and obstacles of E-Commerce application in member states are analyzed and discussed. The study has concluded that E-Commerce has become an important application in most member states. It also showed that despite there has been growth in the application of E-Commerce in some countries, but in general OIC members as a whole are still behind in the track compared to other grou...

  13. The Foreign Policies of European Union Member States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreign Policies of EU Member States provides a clear and current overview of the motivations and outcomes of EU Member States regarding their foreign policy-making within and beyond the EU. It provides an in-depth analysis of intra-EU policy-making and sheds light, in an innovative and understan......Foreign Policies of EU Member States provides a clear and current overview of the motivations and outcomes of EU Member States regarding their foreign policy-making within and beyond the EU. It provides an in-depth analysis of intra-EU policy-making and sheds light, in an innovative...

  14. TEACHING IN ONLINE COURSES: Experiences of Instructional Technology Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omur AKDEMIR

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Internet and computer technology have altered the education landscape. Online courses are offered throughout the world. Learning about the experiences of faculty members is important to guide practitioners and administrators. Using qualitative research methodology, this study investigated the experiences of faculty members teaching online courses. A convenience sampling was used to select the instructional technology faculty members to investigate their experiences in online courses. Semi-structured interviews with faculty members teaching online courses were used as the primary source to collect data about the experiences of faculty members in online courses. Results of the study showed that faculty members' interest in using technology and the amount of time available to them for online course design affected the quality of online courses. The findings of this study also indicated that design quality of online courses is affected by the interest of faculty members to use the technology and the time that they can devote to planning, designing, and developing online courses. The poor design of existing online courses, high learning expectations of ndividuals from these courses, and the future of online courses are the concerns of faculty members. Higher education institutions should support workshops and trainings to increase the skills and interests of non-instructional design faculty members to design and develop online courses.

  15. Paper 6: EUROCAT member registries: organization and activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenlees, Ruth; Neville, Amanda; Addor, Marie-Claude

    2011-01-01

    anomalies covered by their region. Associate members transmit aggregate case counts for each EUROCAT anomaly subgroup by year and by type of birth. This article describes the organization and activities of each of the current 29 full member and 6 associate member registries of EUROCAT.......EUROCAT is a network of population-based congenital anomaly registries providing standardized epidemiologic information on congenital anomalies in Europe. There are three types of EUROCAT membership: full, associate, or affiliate. Full member registries send individual records of all congenital...

  16. Teaching Styles and Occupational Stress among Chinese University Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-fang

    2007-01-01

    The primary aim of this research is to investigate the predictive power of occupational stress for teaching style among university faculty members. A sample of 144 faculty members from a large university in the People's Republic of China rated themselves on three ability scales and responded to the Thinking Styles in Teaching Inventory and to four…

  17. Core and Common Members in Chinese Farmer Cooperatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q.X. Liang (Qiao Xin); G.W.J. Hendrikse (George); Z. Huang (Zuhui); X. Xu (Xuchu)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis paper addresses the distinction between core members and common members in farmer cooperatives in China in terms of the allocation of ownership rights, decision rights, and income rights. Empirical results from a multiple case study indicate that the life cycle and the governance ch

  18. 75 FR 62486 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 117 and 121 RIN 2120-AJ58 Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest... flight, duty and rest regulations applicable to certificate holders and their flightcrew members. The FAA... and Rest Requirements'' (75 FR 55852). The proposed regulation recognizes the growing similarities...

  19. Teaching Styles and Occupational Stress among Chinese University Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-fang

    2007-01-01

    The primary aim of this research is to investigate the predictive power of occupational stress for teaching style among university faculty members. A sample of 144 faculty members from a large university in the People's Republic of China rated themselves on three ability scales and responded to the Thinking Styles in Teaching Inventory and to four…

  20. Leading Teams of Leaders: What Helps Team Member Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Monica; Young, Lissa; Weiner, Jennie; Wlodarczyk, Steven

    2010-01-01

    School districts are moving toward a new form of management in which superintendents need to form and nurture leadership teams. A study of 25 such teams in Connecticut suggests that a team's effectiveness is maximized when the team members are coached by other team members, not the superintendent, and when they are coached on task-related…

  1. Analysis of Member State RED implementation. Final Report (Task 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, D.; Alberici, S.; Toop, G. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kretschmer, B. [Institute for European Environmental Policy IEEP, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    This report describes the way EU Member States have transposed the sustainability and chain of custody requirements for biofuels as laid down in the Renewable Energy Directive (RED) and Fuel Quality Directive (FQD). In the assessment of Member States' implementation, the report mainly focuses on effectiveness and administrative burden. Have Member States transposed the Directives in such a way that compliance with the sustainability criteria can be ensured as effectively as possible? To what extent does the Member States' implementation lead to unnecessary administrative burden for economic operators in the (bio)fuel supply chain? The report focuses specifically on the transposition of the sustainability and chain of custody requirements, not on the target for renewables on transport. This means that for example the double counting provision is not included as part of the scope of this report. This report starts with an introduction covering the implementation of the Renewable Energy (and Fuel Quality) Directive into national legislation, the methodology by which Member States were assessed against effectiveness and administrative burden and the categorisation of Member State's national systems for RED-implementation (Chapter 1). The report continues with a high level description of each Member State system assessed (Chapter 2). Following this, the report includes analysis of the Member States on the effectiveness and administrative burden of a number of key ('major') measures (Chapter 3). The final chapter presents the conclusions and recommendations (Chapter 4)

  2. The Impact of Having Children on Party Member Activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Party member activism varies in type and intensity, and it is necessary to take this into consideration when explaining the degree of participation. One potential explanation for the level of party member participation is the extent to which there are children in the household. Based on the Danis...

  3. Nine Ways a Superintendent Can Corral a Maverick Board Member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Robert

    1983-01-01

    The author's suggestions for dealing with single-issue board members include preparing for potential problems before "mavericks" take their seats, being fair to the maverick member's single issue, alerting mavericks to public pressure, and conducting a board self-analysis session. (JBM)

  4. Understanding the Everyday Practice of Individualized Education Program Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 states that individualized education program (IEP) teams are composed of members with distinct identities, roles, expertise, and histories. Although team members must work together to implement educational and related services for learners with special needs, little is known about…

  5. Faculty Member Perceptions of Academic Leadership Styles at Private Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidman, Lori Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The leadership style of academic leaders was studied through the eyes of faculty members. This empirical study looked at faculty perceptions of academic leadership with the use of a numerical survey as the basis for observation. Faculty members at six private liberal arts institutions completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) in…

  6. 12 CFR 215.8 - Records of member banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of member banks. 215.8 Section 215.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM LOANS TO EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, DIRECTORS, AND PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS OF MEMBER BANKS (REGULATION O) § 215.8 Records...

  7. Some functional and adaptive aspects of vessel member morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P.

    1976-01-01

    The hypothesis of functionally adaptive diversification of wood structure in the course of evolution as advanced by Carlquist is critically tested for vessel member length and type of perforation plate. The functional significance of within-tree variation in vessel member morphology is discussed

  8. The Problems Facing Multidisciplinary Teams: As Perceived by Team Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the problems team members perceive to exist on multidisciplinary teams. Results indicated the two major areas of concern for urban, multidisciplinary team members were: too constrictive a set of team roles and goals, and teams functioning under extensive pressure with minimal support. (Author)

  9. 48 CFR 2905.403 - Requests from Members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests from Members of Congress. 2905.403 Section 2905.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Release Of Information 2905.403 Requests from Members of...

  10. 7 CFR 917.68 - Liability of committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Liability of committee members. 917.68 Section 917.68 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 917.68 Liability of committee members....

  11. Scholarship and the Professional Identity of Community College Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, James C.

    2015-01-01

    The institutional culture of community colleges often fosters a professional identity among faculty members that sees research, publication, and other forms of out-of-class scholarship as detrimental to teaching and student learning. But the professional associations established by and for community college faculty members in specific academic…

  12. Easy access to 6-membered iminoalditols - important glycosidase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundt, Inge

    of 6-membered iminoalditols were observed. The use of triethylamine in methanol thus gave methylesters of 6-membered iminouronic acids. Reduction of the ester group with sodium borohydride gave the target compounds. The mechanisms of the reactions will be discussed as well as specific results obtained...

  13. STS-86 crew members Bloomfield and Chretien in white room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    While a white room closeout crew member looks on, STS-86 Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, at right, gets some assistance from fellow crew member, Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, before entering the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A.

  14. Vertical load capacities of roof truss cross members

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gearhart David F.; Mohamed Khaled Morsy

    2016-01-01

    Trusses used for roof support in coal mines are constructed of two grouted bolts installed at opposing forty-five degree angles into the roof and a cross member that ties the angled bolts together. The load on the cross member is vertical, which is transverse to the longitudinal axis, and therefore the cross member is loaded in the weakest direction. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the vertical load capacity and deflection of three different types of cross members. Single-point load tests, with the load applied in the center of the specimen and double-point load tests, with a span of 2.4 m, were con-ducted. For the single-point load configuration, the yield of the 25 mm solid bar cross member was nom-inally 98 kN of vertical load, achieved at 42 cm of deflection. For cable cross members, yield was not achieved even after 45 cm of deflection. Peak vertical loads were about 89 kN for 17 mm cables and 67 kN for the 15 mm cables. For the double-point load configurations, the 25 mm solid bar cross mem-bers yielded at 150 kN of vertical load and 25 cm of deflection. At 25 cm of deflection individual cable strands started breaking at 133 and 111 kN of vertical load for the 17 and 15 mm cable cross members respectively.

  15. An Exploration of Group and Member Development in Experiential Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Prochenko, Yulia; Stulmaker, Hayley; Huffman, David; Fernando, Delini; Swan, Karrie

    2014-01-01

    In this phenomenological study, we explored 52 group members' development in experiential groups. Specifically, participants completed 10 weekly journal reflections about their experiences as members and also reflected on the group's overall development. Four overall themes--exploration, transition, working, closure--as well as multiple subthemes…

  16. Evolution properties of the community members for dynamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Guo, Qiang; Li, Sheng-Nan; Han, Jing-Ti; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    The collective behaviors of community members for dynamic social networks are significant for understanding evolution features of communities. In this Letter, we empirically investigate the evolution properties of the new community members for dynamic networks. Firstly, we separate data sets into different slices, and analyze the statistical properties of new members as well as communities they joined in for these data sets. Then we introduce a parameter φ to describe community evolution between different slices and investigate the dynamic community properties of the new community members. The empirical analyses for the Facebook, APS, Enron and Wiki data sets indicate that both the number of new members and joint communities increase, the ratio declines rapidly and then becomes stable over time, and most of the new members will join in the small size communities that is s ≤ 10. Furthermore, the proportion of new members in existed communities decreases firstly and then becomes stable and relatively small for these data sets. Our work may be helpful for deeply understanding the evolution properties of community members for social networks.

  17. Role Perception among Faculty Members at Teacher Education Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobgeld, Esther; Teichman-Weinberg, Ariela; Wasserman, Egoza; Barchilon Ben-Av, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine how faculty members at academic colleges of education perceive their role and to consider elements of their work that need to be included in a professional profile definition. All faculty of one college of education were asked: "What are the tasks/obligations of a faculty member at a college of education?…

  18. Perceived Family Resources Based on Number of Members with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Melinda; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how the number of family members with ADHD affects other family members' perceived resources. Method: A total of 40 adolescents diagnosed with ADHD and their mothers, fathers, and adolescent siblings living in the household participated. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze family-level data from a total…

  19. Active member bridge feedback control for damping augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Lurie, Boris J.

    1992-01-01

    An active damping augmentation approach using active members in a structural system is described. The problem of maximizing the vibration damping in a lightly damped structural system is considered using the analogy of impedance matching between the load and source impedances in an electrical network. The proposed active damping augmentation approach therefore consists of finding the desired active member impedances that maximize the vibration damping, and designing a feedback control in order to achieve desired active member impedances. This study uses a bridge feedback concept that feeds back a combination of signals from sensors of the axial force and relative velocity across the active member to realize the desired active member impedance. The proposed active damping augmentation approach and bridge feedback concept were demonstrated on a three-longeron softly suspended truss structure.

  20. Comparison of learning styles of pharmacy students and faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Stephanie Y; Alhreish, Suhail K; Popovich, Nicholas G

    2012-12-12

    To compare dominant learning styles of pharmacy students and faculty members and between faculty members in different tracks. Gregorc Style Delineator (GSD) and Zubin's Pharmacists' Inventory of Learning Styles (PILS) were administered to students and faculty members at an urban, Midwestern college of pharmacy. Based on responses from 299 students (classes of 2008, 2009, and 2010) and 59 faculty members, GSD styles were concrete sequential (48%), abstract sequential (18%), abstract random (13%), concrete random (13%), and multimodal (8%). With PILS, dominant styles were assimilator (47%) and converger (30%). There were no significant differences between faculty members and student learning styles nor across pharmacy student class years (p>0.05). Learning styles differed between men and women across both instruments (pstyles (p=0.01). Learning styles differed among respondents based on gender and faculty track.

  1. 19 CFR 122.49b - Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... system approved by CBP and must set forth the information specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial... “non-crew member” is limited to all-cargo flights. (On a passenger or dual flight (passengers and cargo...

  2. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 748 - Guidance on Response Programs for Unauthorized Access to Member Information and Member Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... unions to develop appropriate security programs, and issued appendix A, reflecting its expectation that... identity theft. When member notification is warranted, a credit union may not forgo notifying its customers... information and assistance. 41 The notice also should remind members of the need to remain vigilant over...

  3. Development of magnetostrictive active members for control of space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Avakian, Kevin M.; Fenn, Ralph C.; Gaffney, Monique S.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Boudreau, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this Phase 2 Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) project was to determine the technical feasibility of developing magnetostrictive active members for use as truss elements in space structures. Active members control elastic vibrations of truss-based space structures and integrate the functions of truss structure element, actively controlled actuator, and sensor. The active members must control structural motion to the sub-micron level and, for many proposed space applications, work at cryogenic temperatures. Under this program both room temperature and cryogenic temperature magnetostrictive active members were designed, fabricated, and tested. The results of these performance tests indicated that room temperature magnetostrictive actuators feature higher strain, stiffness, and force capability with lower amplifier requirements than similarly sized piezoelectric or electrostrictive active members, at the cost of higher mass. Two different cryogenic temperature magnetostrictive materials were tested at liquid nitrogen temperatures, both with larger strain capability than the room temperature magnetostrictive materials. The cryogenic active member development included the design and fabrication of a cryostat that allows operation of the cryogenic active member in a space structure testbed.

  4. Assessing needs of family members of inpatients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bužgová, R; Špatenková, N; Fukasová-Hajnová, E; Feltl, D

    2016-07-01

    To provide high-quality and effective cancer care, problems and unmet needs of family members during their relatives' hospitalisation have to be identified as well. The aims were to determine how needs of family members of patients with terminal cancer are met and to analyse factors that influence them. The needs were assessed with the Family Inventory of Needs. Each item (n = 20) represents one need of family members, for which the importance and satisfaction are rated. The study comprised 270 family members of hospitalised advanced cancer patients staying in the University Hospital Ostrava who were receiving palliative care. The family members preferred sufficient basic information and patient comfort. The unmet needs were support of hope (73%) and provision of information (65%). The unmet needs were more frequently identified by women, individuals with lower education, younger persons, unemployed, patients' children and family members of patients with generally unfavourable health status (P family members may improve their quality of life.

  5. Health Behaviors in Family Members of Patients Completing Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanec, Susan R.; Flocke, Susan A.; Daly, Barbara J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe the impact of the cancer experience on the health behaviors of survivors’ family members and to determine factors associated with family members’ intentions for health behavior change. Design Descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational study. Setting A National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in the Midwestern United States. Sample 39 family members and 50 patients with diagnoses of breast, colon, head and neck, lung, or prostate cancer who were completing definitive cancer treatment. Methods Patients and family members were approached in the clinic at 3 weeks or less before the completion of their course of treatment. Family members completed surveys and a structured interview in-person or via telephone. Main Research Variables Intention, perceived benefit, and confidence for eating a healthy diet, physical activity, and smoking cessation; emotional distress; and family cohesiveness, conflict, and expressiveness. Findings Family members had, on average, high ratings for intention, perceived benefit, and confidence related to behaviors of eating a healthy diet and doing 30 minutes of daily moderate physical activity. They also had high ratings for the extent to which the cancer experience raised their awareness of their own cancer risk and made them think about having screening tests; ratings were lower for making changes in their health behaviors. Distress scores of family members were high at the completion of cancer treatment. Greater intention for physical activity and nutrition was associated with greater perceived benefit and confidence. Higher scores for family expressiveness was associated with intention for nutrition. Greater intention for smoking cessation was associated only with confidence. Conclusions Family members expressed strong intentions to engage in health-promoting behaviors related to physical activity and nutrition at the transition to post-treatment survivorship. Implications for

  6. The challenges of reintegration for service members and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Steven J; Antonides, Bradley J

    2013-10-01

    The ongoing wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have posed a number of reintegration challenges to service members. Much of the research focuses on those service members experiencing psychological problems and being treated at the VA. In this article, we contend that much of the distress service members experience occurs following deployment and is a consequence of the difficulties encountered during their efforts to successfully reintegrate into their families and communities. We propose a new conceptual framework for intervening in this reintegration distress that is psycho-educational in nature as well as a new delivery model for providing such services. An example of this new intervention framework is presented.

  7. Intraoperative monitoring technician: a new member of the surgical team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly S; Brown, Debra S

    2011-02-01

    As surgery needs have increased, the traditional surgical team has expanded to include personnel from radiology and perfusion services. A new surgical team member, the intraoperative monitoring technician, is needed to perform intraoperative monitoring during procedures that carry a higher risk of central and peripheral nerve injury. Including the intraoperative monitoring technician on the surgical team can create challenges, including surgical delays and anesthesia care considerations. When the surgical team members, including the surgeon, anesthesia care provider, and circulating nurse, understand and facilitate this new staff member's responsibilities, the technician is able to perform monitoring functions that promote the smooth flow of the surgical procedure and positive patient outcomes.

  8. Means to flexibly attach lens frames to temple members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harry D.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a band hinge for flexibly connecting the temple member to the lens frame thereby preventing damage from inadvertent pressure or cyclic wear. A distinguishing feature of the invention is the use of a band hinge that holds together the temple member and the lens frame without the use of a pin or screw hinging mechanism. The invention allows for a high degree of freedom of movement for the temple member with respect to the lens frame which will prevent most forms of damages to the glasses from these types of events.

  9. Replacing the Irreplaceable: Fast Algorithms for Team Member Recommendation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Liangyue; Tong, Hanghang; Cao, Nan; Ehrlich, Kate; Lin, Yu-Ru; Buchler, Norbou

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of Team Member Replacement: given a team of people embedded in a social network working on the same task, find a good candidate who can fit in the team after one team member becomes unavailable. We conjecture that a good team member replacement should have good skill matching as well as good structure matching. We formulate this problem using the concept of graph kernel. To tackle the computational challenges, we propose a family of fast algorithms by (a) d...

  10. Youth Gang Members: Psychiatric Disorders and Substance Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert John Sargent

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Approximately 260,000 of youth in the United States are gang-affiliated. There is a paucity of data available to identify the prevalence of mental health disorders in this population. Gang members share many of the features of “at risk” or juvenile justice involved youth who deny gang membership. The authors identified rates of psychiatric disorders within a juvenile justice population delineated in three categories: gang members, friends of gang members, and non-gang members. Methods: A retrospective review of records obtained by a juvenile probation department. A large detention center conducted mental health screenings on 7,615 youth aged 13–17. The mental health screenings were performed by either a master level or doctoral level mental health professional. Odds ratios were computed as an effect size for gender, race/ethnic differences, and gang-membership associations with self-reported psychiatric and substance use disorders. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the risk for psychiatric and substance use disorders among gang-members and friends of gang members. Diagnostic information was generated through a clinical interview and flexible battery. Results: Of the 7,615 youth in this study, ~50% had contact with gangs; 11% were self-identified gang-members, and 38% acknowledged having at least one friendship with a gang member. Similar to other studies, being male was a risk-factor for gang-membership (2.31 odds. In this multi-racial and ethnic study, Latinos had a greater affiliation with gang membership and association with gang members as friends (1.44 odds. Gang members were found to have increased rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (1.77 odds, current substance abuse (2.58 odds, oppositional defiant disorder, (1.24 odds and conduct disorder (4.05 odds; however, they were less likely to have an adjustment disorder than non-gang members (0.70 odds. Conclusions: Juveniles who received a mental health assessment

  11. To all members of the personnel: Summer work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    During the period from 16 June to 12 September 2014 inclusive, a limited number of jobs for summer work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization).   Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all contracts will be 4 weeks and the allowance will be CHF 1500.- for this period. Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (http://ert.cern.ch ): http://jobs.web.cern.ch/job/10996. Completed application forms must be returned by 6 April 2014 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available by the end of May 2014. For further information, please contact: Virginie.Galvin@cern.ch, Tel.: 72855 (or Geraldine.Ballet@cern.ch, Tel.: 74151).  HR Department

  12. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL: Summer work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    During the period from 17 June to 13 September 2013 inclusive, a limited number of jobs for summer work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) will be available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization). Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all contracts will be 4 weeks and the allowance will be CHF 1500.- for the whole period.  Candidates should apply via HR Department’s electronic recruitment system: https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_portal.show_job?p_web_site_id=1&p_web_page_id=10691 Completed application forms must be returned by 12 April 2013 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available by the end of May 2013. For further information, please contact: Virginie.Galvin@cern.ch - Tel. 72855 (Geraldine.Ballet@cern.ch - Tel. 74151) HR Departm...

  13. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL: Temporary work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    During the period mid-June to mid-September 2004, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1600.- for this period. An application form can be obtained from Martine PLAZA, HR Department (by using the slip below or by electronic mail to Martine.Plaza@cern.ch) or to the web. Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 2 April 2004 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 30 Apri...

  14. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL Temporary work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    During the period mid-June to mid-September 2001, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (that is, anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1538.- net for this period. Application forms can be obtained via the Web at the following address: http://cern.web.cern.ch/CERN/Divisions/PE/ under the heading 'Other Useful Links' or from Paula Barriere, Personnel Management Group (by using the slip below or by electronic mail to Paula.Barriere@.cern.ch). Completed applic...

  15. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL: Temporary work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    During the period mid-June to mid-September 2004, there will be a limited number of vacancies for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of vacancies available, no children previously appointed at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1600.- for this period. An application form can be obtained from Martine PLAZA, HR Department (by using the slip below or by electronic mail to Martine.Plaza@cern.ch) or at: http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/HumanResources/internal/personnel/pmd/cr.asp Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 2 April 2004 a...

  16. One member, two leaders: extending leader-member exchange theory to a dual leadership context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthi, Prajya R; Erdogan, Berrin; Anand, Smriti; Liden, Robert C; Chaudhry, Anjali

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we develop and test a model that extends leader-member exchange (LMX) theory to a dual leadership context. Drawing upon relative deprivation theory, we assert that when employees work for 2 leaders, each relationship exists within the context of the other relationship. Thus, the level of alignment or misalignment between the 2 relationships has implications for employees' job satisfaction and voluntary turnover. Employing polynomial regression on time-lagged data gathered from 159 information technology consultants nested in 26 client projects, we found that employee outcomes are affected by the quality of the relationship with both agency and client leaders, such that the degree of alignment between the 2 LMXs explained variance in outcomes beyond that explained by both LMXs. Results also revealed that a lack of alignment in the 2 LMXs led to asymmetric effects on outcomes, such that the relationship with agency leader mattered more than the relationship with one's client leader. Finally, frequency of communication with the agency leader determined the degree to which agency LMX affected job satisfaction in the low client LMX condition.

  17. Application of clan member signal method in structural damage detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Xun; B.F. Spencer; Lu Shunan

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that in most cases, a reference is necessary for structural health diagnosis, and it is very difficult to obtain such a reference for a given structure. In this paper, a clan member signal method (CMSM) is proposed for use in structures consisting of groups (or clans) that have the same geometry, i.e., the same cross section and length, and identical boundary conditions. It is expected that signals measured on any undamaged member in a clan after an event could be used as a reference for any other members in the clan. To verify the applicability of the proposed method, a steel truss model is tested and the results show that the CMSM is very effective in detecting local damage in structures composed of identical slender members.

  18. 29 CFR 452.47 - Employer or supervisor members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... members. Inasmuch as it is an unfair labor practice under the Labor Management Relations Act (LMRA) for... unreasonable for the union to prohibit them from running for office. An overall consideration in...

  19. CERN´s Library: members of the Scientific Information Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The Scientific Information Service in the Education and Technology Transfer division is responsible for maintaining and updating the CERN Library and Scientific Archives. The members of the group are pictured here in CERN's central library.

  20. STUDY ON COMMUNICATION TEAM’S MEMBERS ROLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina BORCA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of the management strategy for increasing the competitiveness of modern organizations is more effective if it is correlated with the organizational communication strategy. Team communication of an organization must be an agile one, its agility depending decisively on the way it was constituted, the assigned role for each team member, the statuses etc. A valuation of all skills and abilities of each member of the communication team is therefore required to harmonize and integrate the team into the overall structure of the company. The objective of the paper is to identify the extent to which the formal role of each team member is the same (almost the same with the role determined by applying the Belbin test. The results of the research are prerequisites for development of measures for individual professional development and integration /reintegration of team members in order to increase agility.

  1. 76 FR 80902 - Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board; Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... on performance appraisals assigned to individual members of the agency's Senior Executive Service... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tonya Turner, Deputy Associate Director for Human Resources, Court Services... SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board;...

  2. How do they become nodes? Revisiting team member network centrality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuwen; Ipe, Minu

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the antecedents of team member network centrality using a sample of 207 team members. Team member network centrality indicates how closely the individual is linked to others in the group. The authors investigated the role of personality traits, interpersonal citizenship behavior (ICB), education, and team tenure on an individual's network centrality. The authors also examined the mediating effect of ICB on the relationship between personality traits and team member network centrality. Results supported the relation between (a) personal traits--conscientiousness and agreeableness--and (b) ICB and network centrality. In addition, ICB mediated the relation between conscientiousness and network centrality and between agreeableness and network centrality, respectively. That is, people who are more conscientious and agreeable manifest more ICB and therefore more possibly become nodes within their teams' social network. Further, results supported the idea that education and team tenure are positively related to network centrality. The authors discuss the theoretical contributions and implications.

  3. Influence of group member familiarity on online collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Jeroen; Erkens, Gijsbert; Kirschner, Paul A.; Kanselaar, Gellof

    2010-01-01

    Janssen, J. J. H. M., Erkens, G., Kirschner, P. A., & Kanselaar, G. (2009). Influence of group member familiarity on online collaborative learning computers in human behaviour. Computers in Human Behavior, 25, 261-270.

  4. Attitudes Toward Automated Information Retrieval Services Among RASD Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitecki, Danuta A.

    1976-01-01

    Summary of survey of the American Library Association Reference and Adult Services Division (RASD) members concerning attitudes toward, need for, and preferences in acquiring information on automated information retrieval services. (KP)

  5. Coping Strategies of Family Members of Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis M. Eaton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory research paper investigated the coping strategies of families of hospitalized psychiatric patients and identified their positive and negative coping strategies. In this paper, the coping strategies of 45 family members were examined using a descriptive, correlational, mixed method research approach. Guided by the Neuman Systems Model and using the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales and semistructured interviews, this paper found that these family members used more emotion-focused coping strategies than problem-focused coping strategies. The common coping strategies used by family members were communicating with immediate family, acceptance of their situation, passive appraisal, avoidance, and spirituality. The family members also utilized resources and support systems, such as their immediate families, mental health care professionals, and their churches.

  6. CPPCC Member Talk About the Shanghai World Expo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ At 15:00 on March 8,the Second Session of the Eleventh CPPCC National Committee press conference was held at press releasing office of the Great Hall,the theme was "CPPCC members talk about the Shanghai World Expo.

  7. Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grief at Work Working Through Grief About Us Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members By ... fatal heart attacks occur in the workplace. Other deaths — from accidents, for example — can also happen during ...

  8. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  9. Cyclometalation reactions five-membered ring products as universal reagents

    CERN Document Server

    Omae, Iwao

    2014-01-01

    Offering unrivalled breadth of coverage on the topic, this review of cyclometalation reactions and organometallic intramolecular-coordination five-membered ring products includes discussion of vital commercial aspects such as synthetic applications.

  10. Leader–Member Skill Distance, Team Cooperation, and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Longwei; Li, Yuan; Li, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    performance. Building upon input-process-output framework from the perspective of individualist and collectivist cultures, we propose that the association between leader–member skill distance and team performance has an inverted-U shape in individualist cultures. Further, in such cultures, team cooperation...... can augment the positive effect of leader–member skill distance on team performance. In contrast, in collectivist cultures, the association between leader–member skill distance and team performance has a monotonic and positive shape, and team cooperation will attenuate the positive effect of leader......–member skill distance on team performance. We find the empirical support for our views with a mixed-methods design: a qualitative study interviewing informants in different cultures to clarify the psychological mechanisms, and also a quantitative study analyzing the data from US’s National Basketball...

  11. Scientific collaboration between 'old' and 'new' member states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu; Mitze, Timo Friedel

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides new insights on the effects of the enlargement of the European Union (EU) and European integration by investigating the issue of scientific collaboration among the new EU member states vis-à-vis the old EU member states. The question addressed is whether the EU membership foll...... ‘internal market’ in research. We also find evidence for early anticipation effects of the consecutive EU accession.......This paper provides new insights on the effects of the enlargement of the European Union (EU) and European integration by investigating the issue of scientific collaboration among the new EU member states vis-à-vis the old EU member states. The question addressed is whether the EU membership...

  12. Team members' emotional displays as indicators of team functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Astrid C; Van Kleef, Gerben A; Sanchez-Burks, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Emotions are inherent to team life, yet it is unclear how observers use team members' emotional expressions to make sense of team processes. Drawing on Emotions as Social Information theory, we propose that observers use team members' emotional displays as a source of information to predict the team's trajectory. We argue and show that displays of sadness elicit more pessimistic inferences regarding team dynamics (e.g., trust, satisfaction, team effectiveness, conflict) compared to displays of happiness. Moreover, we find that this effect is strengthened when the future interaction between the team members is more ambiguous (i.e., under ethnic dissimilarity; Study 1) and when emotional displays can be clearly linked to the team members' collective experience (Study 2). These studies shed light on when and how people use others' emotional expressions to form impressions of teams.

  13. Detached eclipsing binaries with very unequal members - HR 7464

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M.

    1984-06-01

    Waelkens and Rufener's (1983) photoelectric lightcurve (as yet unexplored) of the newly discovered eclipsing binary HR 7464 has been analyzed. The photometric solution presented here reveals that this binary is an A5m + G main sequence detached system, which is particularly remarkable for the great dissimilarity between its members. The frequency of detached eclipsing pairs with very unequal members (i.e., with low mass ratio) is then discussed; some bimodality in the innate mass ratio distribution of close binaries is inferred.

  14. Country variations in family members' informal pressure to drink less

    OpenAIRE

    Holmila, Marja; Raitasalo, Kirsimarja; Knibbe, Ronald; Selin, Klara

    2009-01-01

    The paper examines how family members in 18 countries attempt to influence each other to drink less. Data come from the GENACIS (Gender, Alcohol and Culture: an International Study) dataset. Countries included were Argentina, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, India, Japan, Nigeria, Norway, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Uganda, UK and Uruguay (overall sample 44,115). In each country, the percentage of people who had experienced family member pressure to drink...

  15. [Food hygiene training of members of corporate public catering committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Gianluigi; Laurenti, Patrizia; Gerardo Cairo, Antonio; Ricciardi, Gualtiero

    2007-01-01

    A food hygiene training course was offered to 25 members of the public catering committees of seven corporate restaurants. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the course and identify critical topics, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire before and after completing the training course. Results are presented in this article and underscore the importance of training members of public catering committees in addition to food handlers.

  16. Cooling apparatus with a resilient heat conducting member

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2016-06-14

    A cooling structure including a thermally conducting central element having a channel formed therein, the channel being configured for flow of cooling fluid there through, a first pressure plate, and a first thermally conductive resilient member disposed between the thermally conducting central element and the first pressure plate, wherein the first pressure plate, the first thermally conductive resilient member, and the thermally conducting central element form a first heat transfer path.

  17. Effective healthcare teams require effective team members: defining teamwork competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Leggat Sandra G

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Although effective teamwork has been consistently identified as a requirement for enhanced clinical outcomes in the provision of healthcare, there is limited knowledge of what makes health professionals effective team members, and even less information on how to develop skills for teamwork. This study identified critical teamwork competencies for health service managers. Methods Members of a state branch of the professional association of Australian health service managers...

  18. SEISMIC BEHAVIOR OF STEEL RIGID FRAME WITH IMPERFECT BRACE MEMBERS

    OpenAIRE

    AFZALI, Hamid; Yamao, Toshitaka; アフザリ, ハミッド; 山尾, 敏孝

    2015-01-01

    Model of a steel rigid frame made of thin-walled box section with existence of I-section brace member with initial overall and local imperfection adopted to investigate buckling effects on steel structural behavior as it was subjected to earthquake excitation. In order to take into account of the influence of local deflections on structural response, shell elements were employed to model brace member as well as base columns. Cross sections components with relatively high amplitude of buckling...

  19. Publication rates of editorial board members in oral health journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Junges, Roger; Haas, Alex Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the publication rate of editorial board members in their board journals and to evaluate associated variables. We evaluated the ten highest-ranked journals according to the 5-year impact factor under 'Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine' subject category for 2010, 2011, and 2012. All original research papers with at least one member of the editorial board as author were counted. Final analyses assessed associated variables such as size of the editorial board, number of papers published each year, and each journal's impact factor. Overall, there was an increase in the average number of articles published from 2010 (115.2 ± 52.2) to 2012 (134.7 ± 47.4). The number and percentage of articles published with editorial board members as authors over the three years did not follow the same pattern, with a slight decrease from 2010 to 2011 and an increase in 2012. The number of articles with editorial board members as authors was significantly higher for journals with impact factors ≥4.0. Journals with a higher impact factor and larger editorial board were associated with higher chances of editorial board members publishing in their respective journals. Participation of editorial board members as authors in publishing varies significantly among journals.

  20. Understanding type 2 diabetes: including the family member's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological and social factors and diabetes outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes and their family members. METHODS: A total of 153 patients with type 2 diabetes were assessed at a diabetes outpatient clinic and postal questionnaires were sent to nominated family members. The measures examined were diabetes knowledge, social support, well-being, and illness perceptions. RESULTS: When compared with those with diabetes, family members reported lower positive well-being and lower levels of satisfaction with support. They also perceived diabetes as a more cyclical illness, which was controlled more by treatment than by the individual. Family members also reported that the person with diabetes was more emotionally distressed and knew more about diabetes than the patient had actually reported himself or herself. There were no differences between the family members of those in good or poor glycaemic control. CONCLUSIONS: This study reinforces the importance of understanding social context and illness beliefs in diabetes management. It also highlights the potential for including family members in discussions and education about diabetes management.

  1. Publication rates of editorial board members in oral health journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Kuchenbecker RÖSING

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure the publication rate of editorial board members in their board journals and to evaluate associated variables. We evaluated the ten highest-ranked journals according to the 5-year impact factor under ‘Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine’ subject category for 2010, 2011, and 2012. All original research papers with at least one member of the editorial board as author were counted. Final analyses assessed associated variables such as size of the editorial board, number of papers published each year, and each journal’s impact factor. Overall, there was an increase in the average number of articles published from 2010 (115.2 ± 52.2 to 2012 (134.7 ± 47.4. The number and percentage of articles published with editorial board members as authors over the three years did not follow the same pattern, with a slight decrease from 2010 to 2011 and an increase in 2012. The number of articles with editorial board members as authors was significantly higher for journals with impact factors ≥4.0. Journals with a higher impact factor and larger editorial board were associated with higher chances of editorial board members publishing in their respective journals. Participation of editorial board members as authors in publishing varies significantly among journals.

  2. Strengthening of Corroded Reinforced SCC-RAP Members with CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdel-Mohti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is one of the major problems affecting the durability of reinforced concrete (RC structures. This paper investigates the effect of rebar corrosion on the performance of reinforced self-consolidating concrete (SCC members and the effectiveness of repair. A control RC member, which has no corrosion problem, was prepared to compare against corroded and repaired members. A number of reinforced concrete members having up to 50% corrosion level were constructed and tested to study the effect of corrosion on the structural performance of RC members. The beams with corrosion problem were repaired using carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP sheets and U-wraps. All of the beams constructed, which are either not repaired or repaired, in this study were tested under two static line loads until failure. The effect of corrosion and effectiveness of repairing technique were assessed by evaluating the performance in terms of load carrying capacity, deflection, and ductility. Test results revealed that as the corrosion level increases, the loss in load carrying capacity increases. Repairing using CFRP improved the performance of corroded members. For example, when 50% corrosion level was achieved, the beam lost approximately 57% of its load carrying capacity, but when it was repaired, it recovered about 42% of its load carrying capacity.

  3. The process of desistance among core ex-gang members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Rony; Abu-Raiya, Hisham; Heineberg, Yotam; Zimbardo, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Research has established robust links between gang membership, delinquency, violence and victimization. Yet studies examining the process of gang desistance in general and that of core gang members in particular, are quite rare. The current study aims to identify factors associated with desistance of core gang members as well as describe the nature of the process that these "formers" have undergone. Thirty-nine core ex-gang members (80% males and 20% females) from the San Francisco Bay area and Los Angeles, with an average length of 11.6-years gang membership, were interviewed regarding their involvement in the gang and the desistance process. A systematic qualitative analysis based on grounded theory methodology was mainly utilized. We found that the decision to leave the gang is a result of a combination of push (e.g., personal and vicarious victimization, burnout of gang lifestyle, disillusionment by the gang) and pull (e.g., parenthood, family responsibilities, religious and cultural awakening) factors that evolved over time. Push factors were more dominant in this domain. We also found that while male core ex-gang members tended to leave the gang more frequently because of push factors, female ex-gang members were more inclined to desist due to pull factors. Our analysis also showed that core gang members shared a general pattern of the desistance process comprising of the following 5 stages: triggering, contemplation, exploration, exiting and maintenance. Based on these results, we outlined stage-specific recommendations for agents of societal change to help in facilitating the desistance of core gang members. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. [The effect of group size on salience of member desirability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimori, S

    1993-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that undesirable members are salient in a small group, while desirable members become salient in a larger group. One hundred and forty-five students were randomly assigned to twelve conditions, and read sentences desirably, undesirably, or neutrally describing each member of a college student club. The twelve clubs had one of three group sizes: 13, 39, or 52, and the proportion of the desirable or undesirable to the neutral was either 11:2 or 2:11, forming a three-way (3 x 2 x 2) factorial. Twelve subjects each were asked to make proportion judgments and impression ratings. Results indicated that proportion of the undesirable members was over estimated when the group size was 13, showing negativity bias, whereas proportion of the desirable was overestimated when the size was 52, displaying positivity bias. The size 39 showed neither positivity nor negativity bias. These results along with those from impression ratings suggested that salience of member desirability interacted with group size. It is argued that illusory correlation and group cognition studies may well take these effects into consideration.

  5. Country variations in family members' informal pressure to drink less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmila, Marja; Raitasalo, Kirsimarja; Knibbe, Ronald; Selin, Klara

    2009-04-01

    The paper examines how family members in 18 countries attempt to influence each other to drink less. Data come from the GENACIS (Gender, Alcohol and Culture: an International Study) dataset. Countries included were Argentina, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, India, Japan, Nigeria, Norway, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Uganda, UK and Uruguay (overall sample 44,115). In each country, the percentage of people who had experienced family member pressure to drink less were compared to country abstinence rate, mean drinking volume per drinker and other societal-level factors. While countries differed greatly on proportion of drinkers having experienced family members' pressure to drink less, in all countries drinking women reported less pressure than drinking men in their own society. In all studied countries, informal pressure was exerted most often by the spouse or sexual partner. However, other family members were also involved. Informal pressure was found to be highly correlated with the country's socioeconomic conditions. Informal pressure to drink less by family members is on one hand an expression of social and family problems, caused by heavy drinking, especially in the economically less developed countries, suggesting alcohol-related deprivation. On the other hand, similar gender differences were seen in all the societies, men reporting receiving more informal pressure than women. Thus, informal pressure to drink less tended to reflect the gender conflict caused by heavy use of alcohol by men.

  6. Member Perspectives on the Role of BDSM Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Benjamin C; Butler, Sarah E; McGraw, Ryan; Cannes, Shelby Marie; Smith, Joanna

    2015-10-19

    Bondage-discipline/Dominance-submission/sadomasochism (BDSM) is an often misunderstood and misrepresented social phenomenon warranting further discourse and study. Community-based research that engages member perspective can assist in understanding socially marginalized experiences. The current study examined the role, meaning, and function of BDSM communities from the perspective of self-identified members. Seven nominal group technique workshops were conducted representing a variety of practitioner experiences and identities. Workshops involved 48 participants and resulted in the generation of 133 unique terms describing the role of BDSM communities in their lives. Terms were coded using a five-step procedure involving both academic and community members. A total of 15 categories were identified and included domains such as acceptance, sexual expression, friendship, safety, and sharing of educational knowledge. Results underscore the multifaceted nature of the role of such communities. While results consisted of mostly positive features, participants also identified certain negative aspects, such as conflict among members. Results from the study provide a succinct, member-derived, structured inventory of the role of BDSM communities that can serve to validate and synthesize existing research, improve dissemination of community voice around BDSM, and inform future research. We conclude with a discussion of the study's implications for sex education, clinical practice, and community dissemination.

  7. Patient and family members perspectives on radioactive iodine treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, P.; Fitch, M.I. [Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-08-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of patients who received radioactive iodine therapy and their family members. The main objective of the survey was to gain an understanding of the experience of receiving radioactive iodine from the patient and family's perspective. The data from this study helped to inform the ARCP and GMA as they developed AC-9 - Principles of the management of radionuclide therapies. A survey was distributed to 700 patients and family members through physicians at 8 sites across Canada. Locations included: Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Ontario (2 sites), Quebec (2 sites), Manitoba and British Columbia. A total of 190 patients and 140 family members returned completed surveys. Data was analyzed separately for individuals treated as inpatients and those treated as outpatients. The results of the survey provided a perspective from patients and families about their experiences regarding radioactive iodine therapy. The data indicate variation in patients' and family members' perspectives about how precautions are to be implemented. Both patients and family members expressed the desire for more information regarding many aspects of the treatment experience. The results have implications for the development of patient information, continuing education (in particular in the areas of precaution), the provision of access to supportive and counselling services, and the importance of looking at the individual situations of patients and their families. (author)

  8. Faculty members' use of power: midwifery students' perceptions and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantek, Filiz; Gezer, Nurdan

    2010-08-01

    the power dynamics of relationships/interactions between faculty members and students are of crucial importance for positive student outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the perceptions and expectations of midwifery students in relation to the use of power by faculty members and bases of power. descriptive, quantitative study. a school for health sciences in Turkey. 122 midwifery students at the school. data were collected using a perceived leadership power survey, and analysed by frequency distribution, arithmetic mean, variance analysis and Cronbach's alpha. the students perceived that faculty members used coercive power most often and used reward power least often. Students expected their instructors to use expert power. In addition, in the examination of relationships between power bases, it was determined that there were positive correlations between legitimate, referent, reward and expert power, but coercive power was only positively correlated with legitimate power. this study found that students expect faculty members to use expert power, and faculty members need to reconsider their power bases. The factors affecting the perceptions of midwifery students regarding the use of power should be analysed in more detail. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Postanesthesia care unit visitation decreases family member anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amy J; Deselms, JoAnn; Ruyle, Shelley; Morrissey-Lucas, Marcella; Kollar, Suzie; Cannon, Shelly; Schick, Lois

    2012-02-01

    Despite advocacy by professional nursing organizations, no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have evaluated the response of family members to a visit with an adult patient during a postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay. Therefore, the purpose of this RCT was to evaluate the impact of a brief PACU visitation on the anxiety of family members. The study was conducted in a phase I PACU of a large community-based hospital. Subjects were designated adult family members or significant others of an adult PACU patient who had undergone general anesthesia. A pretest-posttest RCT design was used. The dependent variable was the change in anxiety scores of the visitor after seeing his or her family member in the PACU. Student t test (unpaired, two tailed) was used to determine if changes in anxiety scores (posttest score-pretest score) were different for the PACU visit and no visit groups. A total of 45 participants were studied over a 3-month period, with N=24 randomly assigned to a PACU visit and N=21 assigned to usual care (no PACU visit). Participants in the PACU visit group had a statistically significant (P=.0001) decrease in anxiety after the visitation period (-4.11±6.4); participants in the usual care group (no PACU visit) had an increase in anxiety (+4.47±6.6). The results from this study support the value and importance of PACU visitation for family members.

  10. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  11. Preserving performance of concrete members under seismic loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn M.; Unzicker, Jacob

    1998-06-01

    Normal reinforced concrete lacks the ability to directly respond to the formation of cracking within its own cross section during dynamic loading. A way to introduce this ability is to apply self-healing concepts in the design of reinforced concrete members. Such members could then 'intelligently' react in the event of damaging forces -- by deriving the means of repair from within themselves. Self- healing involves the timed release of adhesive into the member at the time of cracking. Chemically inert encapsulations are filled with adhesive and cast within the cross section of the member. At the onset of cracking, the wall fractures, allowing adhesive to exit and penetrate the developing crack. With this method, adhesives with different characteristics could be applied to different areas of a monolithic, reinforced concrete structural system, in order to accomplish specific results. For example, high strength adhesive could be used in areas where increased stiffness was desired, and more flexible adhesive could be potentially be used to improve energy dissipation or damping. The method would be most appropriate for highly indeterminate structures, where moment redistribution between members tends to 'refocus' stress temporarily. This gives the adhesive time to repair the cracked section and improve local capacity against further damage.

  12. 19 CFR 122.49c - Master crew member list and master non-crew member list requirement for commercial aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Master crew member list and master non-crew member... Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing Within, and Overflying the United States § 122.49c Master crew member list and master non-crew member list requirement for commercial aircraft arriving in,...

  13. Teenage pregnancy in adolescents with an incarcerated household member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Mathilde Logan; Loper, Ann Booker

    2014-03-01

    This study examines the association between the incarceration of a household member and adolescent pregnancy, and evaluates whether this association extends beyond that of other variables associated with sexual health. We used data from 12 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: Child and Young Adult. After eliminating males and individuals who did not respond to key questions, a sample of 1,229 girls (ages 14-19) was analyzed. Girls who experienced the incarceration of a household member faced more demographic and family environment risk factors than those who did not. Regression analyses demonstrated that the addition of a household incarceration variable afforded superior prediction of teenage pregnancy relative to the prediction based on demographic and family features alone. Programs that are directed toward reducing teen pregnancy will benefit from attention to the home situation of the at-risk girl, particularly the experience of household member incarceration and related family dynamics.

  14. The theory of the disease of the group members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Lata Chiodi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The group members shall draw up a theory of the genesis of mental suffering, which is part of the group’s culture. This is an implicit theory. It has not been disseminated, organized and systematized. However, the group members make use of it. Its recognition is an important point of reference for the analyst. An analyst who is able to recognize its features and content will understand better how the group is progressing in its attempt to achieve health. The recognition of this theory also helps the analyst understand what image the group members have of themselves as a group.Keywords: Psychopathology, Psychoanalysis, Group psychotherapy, Psychological Field Theory, Group self-representation

  15. Two Quantum Protocols for Oblivious Set-member Decision Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Run-Hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we defined a new secure multi-party computation problem, called Oblivious Set-member Decision problem, which allows one party to decide whether a secret of another party belongs to his private set in an oblivious manner. There are lots of important applications of Oblivious Set-member Decision problem in fields of the multi-party collaborative computation of protecting the privacy of the users, such as private set intersection and union, anonymous authentication, electronic voting and electronic auction. Furthermore, we presented two quantum protocols to solve the Oblivious Set-member Decision problem. Protocol I takes advantage of powerful quantum oracle operations so that it needs lower costs in both communication and computation complexity; while Protocol II takes photons as quantum resources and only performs simple single-particle projective measurements, thus it is more feasible with the present technology.

  16. Residence in Switzerland of partners of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    1. Definitions a) CERN Staff Rules and Regulations Article S IV 1.02 of the Staff Rules defines a "partner", irrespective of gender, as "any person linked to an employed member of the personnel by a partnership officially registered in a Member State". Partners are regarded as family members for the purposes of protection against the financial consequences of illness and accidents. b) Swiss Federal Law Under Swiss federal law, to which the text below essentially refers, the following definitions apply: "partners": a couple of the same sex (linked by a registered partnership), "common-law spouses": a couple of the opposite sex (unmarried). Provided that they are aged 18 or more and are not blood relatives, two people of the same sex ("partners") may officially register their partnership with the competent registry office in order to give it a legal framework (a civil partnership commonly known as the Federal PACS...

  17. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2015-08-11

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  18. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2014-01-07

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  19. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2017-08-22

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  20. Assessment and recommendations of compounding education in AACP member institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Robert; Augustine, Sam; Birnie, Christine; Nagel, Karen; Ray, Dipan; Ruble, James; Scolaro, Kelly; Athay Adams, Jennifer

    2012-09-10

    In August 2009, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Council of Sections established a Task Force to assess the current status of compounding education at its member institutions and to provide recommendations for future direction. The Task Force conducted a survey in late June 2010 of faculty members enrolled in the AACP Pharmaceutics and Pharmacy Practice sections to gain qualitative information of the current state of compounding education. The survey results were then organized around eight curricular topics for which the Task Force members provided interpretations and recommendations. A final report was sent to the AACP Council of Sections on February 15, 2011. This publication provides the information contained in that final report to the professional community.

  1. Stuck threaded member extractor tool and extraction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscosky, James M.; Essay, Shane M.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed is a tool having a tapered first portion configured to translate a rotational force to the stuck member, a second portion connecting with the first portion and configured to translate the rotational force to the tapered first portion, a planar tip at an end of the first portion and perpendicular to a central axis passing through the first portion and the second portion, a plurality of left-handed splines extending helically around the central axis from the tip toward the second portion, a driver engaged with the second portion and configured to receive a third rotational force from a mechanical manipulator, and a leak seal connected to the driver and configured to form a seal around the stuck member and at least a portion of the driver and prevent gases opposite the stuck member from escaping.

  2. Characterization of Argonaute family members in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gen-Hong Wang; Liang Jiang; Li Zhu; Ting-Cai Cheng; Wei-Huan Niu; Ya-Fei Yan; Qing-You Xia

    2013-01-01

    The Argonaute protein family is a highly conserved group of proteins,which have been implicated in RNA silencing in both plants and animals.Here,four members of the Argonaute family were systemically identified based on the genome sequence of Bombyx mori.Based on their sequence similarity,BmAgo1 and BmAgo2 belong to the Ago subfamily,while BmAgo3 and BmPiwi are in the Piwi subfamily.Phylogenetic analysis reveals that silkworm Argonaute family members are conserved in insects.Conserved amino acid residues involved in recognition of the 5' end of the small RNA guide strand and of the conserved(aspartate,aspartate and histidine [DDH])motif present in their PIWI domains suggest that these four Argonaute family members may have conserved slicer activities.The results of microarray expression analysis show that there is a low expression level for B.mori Argonaute family members in different tissues and different developmental stages,except for BmPiwi.All four B.mori Argonaute family members are upregulated upon infection with B.mori nucleopolyhedrovirus.The complete coding sequence of BmPiwi,the homolog of Drosophila piwi,was cloned and its expression occurred mainly in the area where spermatogonia and spermatocytes appear.Our results provide an overview of the B.mori Argonaute family members and suggest that they may have multiple roles.In addition,this is also the first report,to our knowledge,of the response of RNA silencing machinery to DNA virus infection in insects.

  3. Union members at the polls in diverse trade union landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Christoph; Rennwald, Line

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates to what extent social democratic parties still benefit from the support of union members at the polls. Not only are social democratic parties confronted with new competitors in the party systems, but also the union confederations of the socialist labour movement are in s......This article investigates to what extent social democratic parties still benefit from the support of union members at the polls. Not only are social democratic parties confronted with new competitors in the party systems, but also the union confederations of the socialist labour movement...

  4. INTERESTS OF THE MEMBER STATES IN THE EURASIAN ECONOMIC UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Michałowski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the interests of the member countries in the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU, which is formed by Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Armenia and Kyrgyzstan. The author argues that Russia has been involved in the project primarily for geopolitical reasons. Belarus, Kazakhstan, Armenia and Kyrgyzstan have perceived the integration within EEU primarily through the possible economic benefits. While analyzing the interests of the members in the EEU, the author also refers to the development of the economic situation in each country in recent years. The starting point for discussion is the analysis of benefits of economic integration in the light of theory.

  5. Union members at the polls in diverse trade union landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Christoph; Rennwald, Line

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates to what extent social democratic parties still benefit from the support of union members at the polls. Not only are social democratic parties confronted with new competitors in the party systems, but also the union confederations of the socialist labour movement...... are in some countries losing their dominant position due to the rise of separate professional confederations. It is argued in the article that the effect of union membership on voting choice is conditioned by the structure of the trade union movement. The support of union members for social democracy...

  6. Service Members' Experiences in Staying Connected With Family While Deployed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Susan W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the communication issues experienced by service members staying connected with families while deployed. Qualitative design guided data collection using interviews with 20 key informants who had been deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan. Inductive content analysis and NVivo software enabled data analysis. From the data, 5 main themes emerged: Creating Normalcy Through Connecting With Others; Understanding the Spoken and Unspoken; Connecting and Disconnecting; Changing Sense of Self; and Sustaining a Common Bond. A collective understanding of common communication challenges emerged that had an impact on service member/family relationships, mission focus, and safety.

  7. Culturing captures members of the soil rare biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Ashley; Hogan, Clifford S; Klimowicz, Amy K; Linske, Matthew; McManus, Patricia S; Handelsman, Jo

    2012-09-01

    The ecological significance of rare microorganisms within microbial communities remains an important, unanswered question. Microorganisms of extremely low abundance (the 'rare biosphere') are believed to be largely inaccessible and unknown. To understand the structure of complex environmental microbial communities, including the representation of rare and prevalent community members, we coupled traditional cultivation with pyrosequencing. We compared cultured and uncultured bacterial members of the same agricultural soil, including eight locations within one apple orchard and four time points. Our analysis revealed that soil bacteria captured by culturing were in very low abundance or absent in the culture-independent community, demonstrating unexpected accessibility of the rare biosphere by culturing.

  8. The social worker. A member of the primary care team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falloon, D

    1998-12-01

    The primary health care team at present does not include social workers as routine members. If however, we, accept the World Health Organization definition of health, which includes social well being, then it follows that the social worker should be considered as a member of the health team to attend to this aspect of health in the service delivery mix. This paper presents the experience of a social worker assigned to the August Town/Hermitage Type III health centre during the period March 1995 to February 1996 and her contribution to patient welfare. The expected roles of the social worker and his or her contribution to the health team are outlined.

  9. A corpus-based study on images of family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Ishikawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovative computer technology has sparked a revolutionary change in the area of languageanalysis. Individual researchers are increasingly likely to access huge corpora containingseveral hundred million words and to analyze the data using highly developed languageanalyzers via the Internet. Sketch Engine is one of such online language analyzers, whichregards the Internet as a data source for linguistic studies. The online system allows us toanalyze a wide range of Japanese texts with more than 400 million words, as well as texts inother languages. In this paper, we will examine the use of the words for family members inJapanese texts and reveal images of each member role hidden in the same.

  10. Characterization of ricin toxin family members from Ricinus communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshin, Jonathan; Danielsen, Mark; Credle, Joel J; Weeks, Andrea; O'Connell, Kevin P; Dretchen, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Ricin inhibits translation by removal of a specific adenine from 28S RNA. The Ricinus communis genome encodes seven full-length ricin family members. All encoded proteins have the ability of hydrolyzing adenine in 28S rRNA. As expected, these proteins also inhibited an in vitro transcription/translation system. These data show that the ricin gene family contains at least seven members that have the ability to inhibit translation and that may contribute to the toxicity of R. communis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. GENERAL GOVERNMENT DEFICIT AND PUBLIC DEBT IN EU MEMBER STATES

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is the presentation and the attempt to analyse such phenomena as: an excessive general government deficit and public debt in EU Member States over the past 3 years. For the European Union the years 2008-2010 were the time when public finances of most member countries worsened dramatically. The average budget deficit in the EU increased during that period to a value of almost 7% compared to gross domestic product and public debt reached almost 80% of GDP. Referring the ...

  12. The impact of stage hypnosis on audience members and participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKillop, James; Jay Lynn, Steven; Meyer, Eric

    2004-07-01

    Before and after a stage-hypnosis performance, 67 audience members and 6 participants completed the Hypnotic Attitudes Questionnaire (HAQ), the Posthypnotic Experience Scale (PES), and several questions related to attitudes about performing in public. Audience members' beliefs about hypnosis (HAQ total and factor scores),experience ratings (PES factor scores: pleasantness, anger/irritability,anxiety), and responses to the performance-related questions changed in a positive direction after the performance. The participants in the show reported no significant pre- to postperformance changes. How-ever, there were indications that the on stage participants exhibited generally favorable attitudes toward hypnosis and performing before they engaged in the actual performance.

  13. Members of Parliament of the Islamic Republic of Iran

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Five members of the Iranian parliament involved in legislation for science, research and education funding in Iran visited CERN in May. They are pictured here in building SM18, which houses the test string for LHC magnets: (left to right) H.E. Mr A. Mojtahed-Shabestari, Deputy Ambassador of the Islamic Republic of Iran in Geneva; Dr D. Blechschmidt, CERN Non Member-State Relations; Dr A.-R. Baharvand MP; Dr H. Amiri MP; Dr N. Siegel, Insertion, Correctors and Protection Group, LHC division; Dr H. Afarideh MP; Dr R. Seddighi MP; and Dr A. Shirzad.

  14. Effect of Fiber Reinforcement on the Response of Structural Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Gregor; Li, Victor

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a series of investigations on the effect of fiber reinforcement on the response of structural members in direct tension and flexure under reversed cyclic loading conditions. The design approach of the fiber reinforced cementitious composite is based on fracture mechanics prin...... to conventional reinforced concrete include improved composite integrity, energy dissipation, ductility, and damage tolerance....

  15. Size effects in plastic hinges of reinforced concrete members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.; Walraven, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Reasons for size dependence of rotation capacity of plastic hinges are discussed. The increase of ductility with decreasing member size is interpreted from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics of concrete. The results of the introductory test series on simply supported slender beams loaded in three-p

  16. Size Effects in Plastic Hinges of Reinforced Concrete Members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bigaj, A.; Walraven, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Reasons for size dependence of rotation capacity of plastic hinges are discussed. The increase of ductility with decreasing member size is interpreted from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics of concrete. The results of the introductory test series on simply supported slender beams loaded in three-p

  17. How to make an impression on members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, K

    1997-04-01

    Individuals elect Members of Congress, and individuals can also affect what those elected officials do once in office. It is vitally important that agencies and individuals get involved in influencing what their representatives and senators do, as those congressional votes will have a direct impact on how the home care and home care aide industry does business.

  18. Effective Collaboration among the Gross Motor Assessment Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menear, Kristi S.; Davis, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the gross motor assessment team (GMAT) members' roles and collaborative approach to making appropriate decisions and modifications when addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities in physical education. Case studies of students are used to demonstrate effective uses of the GMAT. The primary outcome of the GMAT's…

  19. 76 FR 76161 - Notice of Appointment of New FASAB Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board Notice of Appointment of New FASAB Member AGENCY: Federal Accounting Standards Advisory... Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) beginning January 1, 2012. Mr. McCall has over forty years...

  20. Leader-Member Exchange, Communication Frequency And Burnout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mr Graham, L N; van Witteloostuijn, A.

    2010-01-01

    In a field study of 128 middle-managers in similar roles but in different organizations within the UK public sector, we find that the quality of their leader-member exchange (LMX) relationship with their immediate supervisor is negatively related to the three dimensions of burnout. As hypothesized,

  1. 2006 Gender Relations of Active-Duty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    37 15. Percent of Women Who Indicated Circumstances of Threats or Physical Force in Unwanted Sexual ...of Threats or Physical Force in Unwanted Sexual Contact, by Paygrade............................................................................42 17...18. Percent of Service Members Who Indicated Threats or Physical Force in Unwanted Sexual Contact, by Gender

  2. 77 FR 73911 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... and Rest Requirements AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Availability of... Regulatory Impact Analysis of its final rule amending its existing flight, duty and rest regulations... Register as Flight Crew Member Duty and Rest Requirements on January 4, 2012. 77 FR 330. The regulations...

  3. 75 FR 63424 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 117 and 121 RIN 2120-AJ58 Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest..., to amend its existing flight, duty and rest regulations applicable to certificate holders and their... and Rest Requirements.'' The proposed regulation recognizes the growing similarities between the types...

  4. Effective Collaboration among the Gross Motor Assessment Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menear, Kristi S.; Davis, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the gross motor assessment team (GMAT) members' roles and collaborative approach to making appropriate decisions and modifications when addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities in physical education. Case studies of students are used to demonstrate effective uses of the GMAT. The primary outcome of the GMAT's…

  5. Debris Disks of Members of the Blanco 1 Open Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Stauffer, J R; James, D; Noriega-Crespo, A; Strom, S E; Wolk, S; Meyer, M; Carpenter, J; Navascues, D Barrado y; Micela, G; Backman, D; Cargile, P A

    2010-01-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope to obtain Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 um photometry for 37 members of the ~100 Myr old open cluster Blanco 1. For the brightest 25 of these stars (where we have 3sigma uncertainties less than 15%), we find significant mid-IR excesses for eight stars, corresponding to a debris disk detection frequency of about 32%. The stars with excesses include two A stars, four F dwarfs and two G dwarfs. The most significant linkage between 24 um excess and any other stellar property for our Blanco 1 sample of stars is with binarity. Blanco 1 members that are photometric binaries show few or no detected 24 um excesses whereas a quarter of the apparently single Blanco 1 members do have excesses. We have examined the MIPS data for two other clusters of similar age to Blanco 1 -- NGC 2547 and the Pleiades. The AFGK photometric binary star members of both of these clusters also show a much lower frequency of 24 um excesses compared to stars that lie near the single...

  6. Social Cues of (Un)Trustworthy Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the way in which and the extent to which students engage in social categorization during the process of self-selecting team members for a team assignment. The discovery-oriented method of grounded theory was used. Data were gathered from a sample of 38 undergraduate marketing and management students using the Zaltman…

  7. 12 CFR 1261.3 - Designation of member directorships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designation of member directorships. 1261.3 Section 1261.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK DIRECTORS Federal Home Loan Bank Boards of Directors: Eligibility and Elections §...

  8. Social Cues of (Un)Trustworthy Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the way in which and the extent to which students engage in social categorization during the process of self-selecting team members for a team assignment. The discovery-oriented method of grounded theory was used. Data were gathered from a sample of 38 undergraduate marketing and management students using the Zaltman…

  9. Key members of the XS-1 Research Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    1948-01-01

    NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit XS-1 Team members and USAF Pilots. From Left to Right: Joseph Vensel, Head of Operations; Gerald Truszynski, Head of Instrumentation; Captain Charles Chuck Yeager, USAF pilot; Walter Williams, Head of the Unit; Major Jack Ridley, USAF pilot; and De E. Beeler, Head of Engineers.

  10. Party financing and referendum campaigns in EU member states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Klingeren; M. Orozco; J. van Spanje; C. de Vreese

    2015-01-01

    This study has been prepared by the Amsterdam School of Communication Research (ASCoR), part of the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, University of Amsterdam (UvA). It comprises 1) an up-to-date inventory of party finance rules within the EU Member States, 2) an overview of the regulations

  11. Burnout and Humor Usage among Community College Nursing Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Laura A.

    2000-01-01

    Assesses the correlation of burnout among community college nursing faculty members and their use of humor to mediate academic stress related to burnout. Differences in burnout between high versus low humor usage respondents showed a higher sense of personal accomplishment with high humor usage. Of those with low humor usage, workload was related…

  12. Organisational Stress among Faculty Members of Higher Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areekkuzhiyil, Santhosh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Quality faculty members is a must for any higher education institution aspiring for Quality. Organisational stress one of the most important factors influencing the quality and efficiency of the faculty. Hence, the Organisational stress has to be managed in such a way that it should contribute to the quality of higher education. Hence…

  13. Exploring Knowledge Sharing among Members of a Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Selena S.; Ruona, Wendy E. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that explored knowledge sharing among members of a community of practice (CoP) in a large, urban high school. Findings suggest that social relationships, informal channels, community culture, levels of trust, and spatial factors influence knowledge sharing, and that CoPs have the potential to…

  14. A Family Affair : Explaining Co-Working By Family Members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, Esther de; Lippe, Tanja van der; Raub, Werner; Weessie, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on co-working by intimate partners and other family members in entrepreneurs’ businesses. We hypothesize that co-working by family is beneficial because it reduces trust problems associated with employment relations. On the other hand, co-working is risky because co-working family

  15. Demographic and Behavioral Characteristics of Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Robert Jack; Brady, E. Michael; Thaxton, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    The number of lifelong learning institutes (LLIs) is growing across the United States and it is important for educational planners and administrators to know about current demographic and behavioral characteristics of program participants. A 14-question survey was administered via SurveyMonkey to members who use computers in eight Osher Lifelong…

  16. 12 CFR 1261.5 - Determination of member votes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of member votes. 1261.5 Section 1261.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK DIRECTORS Federal Home Loan Bank Boards of Directors: Eligibility and Elections § 1261.5 Determination...

  17. 12 CFR 1261.15 - Minimum number of member directorships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum number of member directorships. 1261.15 Section 1261.15 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK DIRECTORS Federal Home Loan Bank Boards of Directors: Eligibility and Elections § 1261.15...

  18. Leader-Member Exchange Theory in Higher and Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Robert Leo

    2013-01-01

    Unlike many other prominent leadership theories, leader-member exchange (LMX) theory does not focus on the specific characteristics of an effective organizational leader. Rather, LMX focuses on the nature and quality of the relationships between a leader and his or her individual subordinates. The ideal is for a leader to develop as many…

  19. The structure of marketing cooperative : A members perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalogeras, N.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Dijk, van G.; Lans, van der I.A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines marketing cooperatives’ (MCs’) structure from a members’ perspective. We support the notion that the utility that members derive from the attributes of MC’s structure enhances our insight in members’ commitment. Using a conjoint experimental design, we elicit the utility that pro

  20. A Family Affair : Explaining Co-Working By Family Members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, Esther de; Lippe, Tanja van der; Raub, Werner; Weessie, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on co-working by intimate partners and other family members in entrepreneurs’ businesses. We hypothesize that co-working by family is beneficial because it reduces trust problems associated with employment relations. On the other hand, co-working is risky because co-working family

  1. Macroeconomic sources of foreign exchange risk in new EU members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocenda, Evzen; Poghosyan, Tigran

    2009-01-01

    We address the issue of foreign exchange risk and its macroeconomic determinants in several new EU members. We derive the observable macroeconomic factors-consumption and inflation-using the Stochastic discount factor (SDF) approach. The joint distribution of excess returns in the foreign exchange m

  2. Individual and Collective Mobility Strategies among Minority Group Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Fathali M.; Perreault, Stephane

    1992-01-01

    Presents results of a study of predictions from major intergroup theories concerning factors involved in individual and collective mobility strategies of minority group members. Reports support for predictions of social identity theory, relative deprivation theory, and resource mobilization theory. Found that less talented minority group members…

  3. Leader-member exchange, work engagement, and job performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breevaart, K.; Bakker, A.B.; Demerouti, E.; van den Heuvel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the process through which leader-member exchange (LMX) is related to followers’ job performance. Integrating the literature on LMX theory and resource theories, the authors hypothesized that the positive relationship between LMX and employee job

  4. 50 CFR 600.250 - Council member training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership § 600.250 Council... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Council member training. 600.250 Section... to matters before the Councils and shall make the training course available to all Council...

  5. 7 CFR 932.129 - Nomination procedures for producer members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... producer wishes to participate shall be the producer's choice. (4) Any member of a producer's family (husband, wife, son or daughter) may vote on behalf of an owner-operated, landlord-tenant, family enterprise, or other farming unit. (5) Any authorized officer or employee of a corporation which is...

  6. Learning Conditions, Members' Motivation and Satisfaction: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimas, Isabel Dórdio; Rebelo, Teresa; Lourenço, Paulo Renato

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to contribute to the clarification of the conditions under which teams can be successful, especially those related to team learning. To attain this goal, in the present study, the mediating role played by team members' motivation on the relationship between team learning conditions (shared learning beliefs…

  7. Medical history. TMA 50-year club members helped make it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BeSaw, L

    1995-11-01

    They survived the Great Depression, won a world war, and touched millions of lives--from the downtrodden to heads of state--while helping to bring about the greatest advances in medicine the world has ever known. Now in retirement, the members of the Texas Medical Association's 50-Year Club look back and marvel at what they have witnessed.

  8. Pride and Prejudice in High School Gang Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alvin Y.

    1994-01-01

    Compared gang versus nongang high school students along measures of self-esteem, racial attitudes, and self-professed role models. Results from 78 white and 77 black students revealed that gang members had significantly lower levels of self-esteem compared to nongang peers. All students, regardless of ethnicity, manifested negative racial…

  9. 12 CFR 917.4 - Bank Member Products Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... systems, procedures and internal controls; and (7) Address the maintenance of appropriate operational and... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bank Member Products Policy. 917.4 Section 917.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FEDERAL HOME...

  10. Network's cardiology data help member groups benchmark performance, market services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Data-driven cardiac network improves outcomes, reduces costs. Thirty-seven high-volume network member hospitals are using detailed demographic, procedure, and outcomes data in benchmarking and marketing efforts, and network physicians are using the aggregate data on 120,000 angioplasty and bypass procedures in research studies. Here are the details, plus sample reports.

  11. NASA Facts, Mars as a Member of the Solar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    Presented is one of a series of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facts about the exploration of Mars. In this publication, emphasis is placed on the planet Mars as a member of the Solar System and a detailed description is given related to historical accounts of the planet's existence and its travels. The physical…

  12. BRIC welcome South Africa as its newest member

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    South Africa has recently been accepted by BRIC as a full member of the group,which currently comprises Brazil,Russia,India and China.Song Guoyou,Associate Professor with the Center for American Studies at Fudan University,shared his opinion on the significance of South Africa’s accession to this emerging economies’ club. Edited excerpts follow:

  13. American Thoracic Society member survey on climate change and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfaty, Mona; Bloodhart, Brittany; Ewart, Gary; Thurston, George D; Balmes, John R; Guidotti, Tee L; Maibach, Edward W

    2015-02-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), in collaboration with George Mason University, surveyed a random sample of ATS members to assess their perceptions of, clinical experiences with, and preferred policy responses to climate change. An e-mail containing an invitation from the ATS President and a link to an online survey was sent to 5,500 randomly selected U.S. members; up to four reminder e-mails were sent to nonrespondents. Responses were received from members in 49 states and the District of Columbia (n = 915); the response rate was 17%. Geographic distribution of respondents mirrored that of the sample. Survey estimates' confidence intervals were ±3.5% or smaller. Results indicate that a large majority of ATS members have concluded that climate change is happening (89%), that it is driven by human activity (68%), and that it is relevant to patient care ("a great deal"/"a moderate amount") (65%). A majority of respondents indicated they were already observing health impacts of climate change among their patients, most commonly as increases in chronic disease severity from air pollution (77%), allergic symptoms from exposure to plants or mold (58%), and severe weather injuries (57%). A larger majority anticipated seeing these climate-related health impacts in the next 2 decades. Respondents indicated that physicians and physician organizations should play an active role in educating patients, the public, and policy makers on the human health effects of climate change. Overall, ATS members are observing that human health is already adversely affected by climate change and support responses to address this situation.

  14. Consultancy agreement between supervisory board members and the company whose activities they supervise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsen Bačić

    2015-09-01

    Finally, the author explains when and why Art. 270. Companies act must be implemented on consultancy agreements between a supervisory board member and a dependent company, a supervisory board member and a member of the board of managers and on contracts between the company whose supervisory board member is a member and the public limited company they supervise. The research concludes that the domestic law has appropriately regulated consulting activity of supervisory board members.

  15. Epidemiological criminology: drug use among African American gang members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Mark M; Pack, Robert P; Akers, Timothy A

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological methods and public health theories can be tied to theories of crime and delinquency and used to create evidence-based policy. Interdisciplinary theoretical approaches to existing, and emerging, public health and criminal justice problems hold great promise. Differential association theory postulates that close association with delinquent peers leads to an increase in deviant activities such as illicit drug use. Social cognitive theory postulates that health behavior change is driven by the interaction of (a) cognitive states that support a health outcome, (b) the social and contextual environment, (c) and individual action. Combined, these theories can be applied to drug eradication programs as well as other health and crime issues. Focus groups and interviews were performed to identify rates of illicit substance use among incarcerated African American adolescent male gang members and nongang members. The policy recommendations illustrate the convergence of criminological and epidemiological theory under the new paradigm of epidemiological criminology or ''EpiCrim.''

  16. Uniaxial Tension Test of Slender Reinforced Early Age Concrete Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to obtain the tensile properties of early age concrete based on a uniaxial tension test employing RC slender members. First, the paper shows that concrete strain is equal to the strain of rebar at the mid-span of the RC member. The tensile Young’s modulus and the strain capacity of early age concrete are estimated using strain measurements. The experiment indicated that the tensile Young’s modulus at an early age is higher than the compressive modulus. This observation was similar to one found in a previous investigation which used a direct tension test of early age concrete. Moreover, the paper describes how an empirical equation for mature concrete can be applied to the relation between uniaxial tensile strength and splitting tensile strength even in early age concrete. Based on a uniaxial tension test, the paper proposes an empirical equation for the relationship between standard bond stresses and relative slip.

  17. THE FISCAL PRESSURE IN THE EU MEMBER STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOBROTĂ GABRIELA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of an economy is determined in a significant proportion by the tax system structure, by how it exercises its functions and ensures the collection of state resources. A high tax efficiency, due to the acceptability of tax provisions are the ideal conditions of any tax system. In this context, it is obvious that most tax systems have undergone significant changes under the impact of the action of a complex system of factors. Increased need for resources in various countries was reflected in attempts to identify the relationship that allows both the securing of the necessary funds and their economic and social development. The quantification of the fiscal pressure on the EU member states show a wide range of tax rates. This paper makes a comparative analysis of the degree of taxation in the EU member states.

  18. Mineralogy of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewards, T.; Williams, M.L.; Keil, K. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1991-03-01

    This report characterizes the mineralogy of the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation based on studies of samples from cores of eight boreholes surrounding the WIPP repository. This investigation has three main goals: to obtain accurate modal compositions of all the samples selected; to investigate both the lateral and vertical variation of the mineralogy of the Culebra unit; and, to characterize water-bearing fracture surfaces in particular detail. The Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation is mineralogically and texturally heterogeneous, both vertically and horizontally. Although the predominant mineral is dolomite, important constituents of the formation are clay, quartz, gypsum, and calcite. Trace minerals include halite, phyllosilicates of metamorphic origin, feldspar, and pyrite. 24 refs., 90 figs., 27 tabs.

  19. Two Methods for Deriving Members' Weights in Group Decision Making

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ze-shui

    2001-01-01

    The Analytic Hierarchy Process is a powerful technique for group decision making. Both theWeighted Arithmetic Mean Method (WAMM) and Weighted Geometric Mean Method (WGMM) are themost common group preference aggregation methods in AHP. In order to use the WAMM and WGMM, onehas to find the weights to be assigned to the members of the group. This is often a difficult task, especiallyso if the group is large as in the case of public policy decisions. These situations need an objective method toderive members'weights. But a few studies are available in the literature. Based on judgement matrices anderror analyses, this paper presents two practical and efficient methods for addressing such situations. Somenumerical examples are also given.

  20. Global transcriptional regulator TrmB family members in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minwook; Park, Soyoung; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2016-10-01

    Members of the TrmB family act as global transcriptional regulators for the activation or repression of sugar ABC transporters and central sugar metabolic pathways, including glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and other metabolic pathways, and also as chromosomal stabilizers in archaea. As a relatively newly classified transcriptional regulator family, there is limited experimental evidence for their role in Thermococcales, halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC1, and crenarchaea Sulfolobus strains, despite being one of the extending protein families in archaea. Recently, the protein structures of Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB and TrmBL2 were solved, and the transcriptomic data uncovered by microarray and ChIP-Seq were published. In the present review, recent evidence of the functional roles of TrmB family members in archaea is explained and extended to bacteria.

  1. Understanding family member suicide narratives by investigating family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnarajah, Dorothy; Maple, Myfanwy; Minichiello, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The complex family environments in which a suicide death had previously occurred were explored in a qualitative study of narratives of suicide-bereaved participants. The participants searched for reasons why the suicide occurred in their family. Family patterning stories and the context of the environment in which the suicide death occurred provided an additional depth of meaning into the relational aspects of the family. Fractured families emerged as an important theme. Shared in the narratives were stories of conditions within the family that may have contributed to vulnerability towards persistent negative feelings about their lives, their family, and their future. The study also identifies the strengths of family culture that led to resilience in the suicide bereaved. These stories highlight the importance of support for those bereaved by the suicide of a close family member and the issues that places people in vulnerable situations that perhaps may explain the increased risk of suicide for those bereaved family members.

  2. [Proxy consent and responsibility: professional autonomy and adamant family members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touwen, D P; Cools, H J M; Engberts, D P

    2010-02-01

    Research into the role of family members in the decision making process concerning medical treatment of incompetent patients in nursing home care, shows that the involvement of a proxy decision maker implies a greater responsibility of the physician. It is the duty of the proxy decision-maker (mostly a family member) to look after the incompetent patient's interests. But it is the physician's duty to decide whether the proxy decision maker indeed fulfills this task. Even so, the physician has the professional responsibility to decide on the medical course of action. Involvement of others (relations and other health care professionals) is of great importance to the answer to the question 'What is good for this patient?' but does not absolve the physician from the obligation to decide professionally what is the right thing to do.

  3. EMU – Fiscal Challenges: Conclusions For the New EU Members.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to evaluate fiscal challenges which are facing the Economic and Monetary Union countries after four years of monetary union functioning. Then, the author formulates conclusions for accession countries which are planning to become members of the Economic and Monetary Unions in the near future. The first part of the paper deals with the criteria of fiscal stabilization within EMU, their significance and links to economic growth. On the one hand, these criteria limit poss...

  4. Stepping Up: Burden Sharing by NATO’s Newest Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    growth had an inverse impact on military spending and was statistically significant for non-U.S. NATO allies. The 55 results were not...higher level than that of the Poles . Figure 3-3. Relative Troop Contributions of New versus Old Members to NRF 5. This case study yields mixed... earth - quake relief efforts. Since these large states had an advantage in air capability, it is again not unexpected that they contributed these

  5. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    The 38 staff members who are celebrating 25 years at CERN in 2010 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 21 October. ASBURY David IT HEGARTY Seamus HR BAUDRENGHIEN Philippe BE ISNARD Christian IT BERGSMA Felix PH JONES Robert IT BERNAL Jean-Manuel TE JOUBERJEAN Franck IT BERRIG Olav Ejner BE LAGRANGE Thierry FP BONT Hillebrand GS MARIN Antonio BE BOURGEOIS Nicolas PH MESENGE Pascal EN BOURREL Thierry EN MISSIAEN Dominique   BE ...

  6. The Cohesiveness of Muslim Pangestu Members in Salatiga, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suciati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The drying of spirituality and weakening of cohesiveness in the midst of materialistic hedonistic modern world become major challenge for the adherents of official religions in Indonesia. The practice of religions is considered too much focusing on ritual aspects. Therefore, those teachings cannot give the real meaningfulness of religious life. Consequently, some adherents of official religions begin to see other spiritual/mysticism sects. This study describes the social cohesiveness among muslims who become members of Pangestu, a spiritual-mysticism sect widely spreading among Javanese society in Indonesia. This research shows that the Pangestu in Salatiga, Central Java, can fulfill social, economic, and spiritual needs of its members. Among the underlying factors that make Pangestu succeed to meet its members’ needs and expectations are the capability of the members to intensely communicate with each other through meetings and bawaraos (Jv, informal gathering, the great concern between members, good-example of leadership, the defense of Pangestu’s good name, and the satisfaction in experiencing meaningfulness of religious practices.[Kekeringan spiritual dan lemahnya kebersamaan di tengah dunia modern yang serba hedonistik menjadi tantangan utama bagi para pemeluk agama di Indonesia. Praktik-praktik keagamaan terlalu banyak terfokus pada aspek ritual, sehingga ajaran agama tidak mampu menghadirkan praktek-praktek keagamaan yang benar-benar bermakna. Hal ini mendorong sebagian pemeluk agama untuk melirik aliran kepercayaan dan kebatinan. Artikel ini mendeskripsikan keguyuban sosial di antara orang-orang Islam yang menjadi anggota Pangestu, sebuah aliran kepercayaan di Indonesia yang banyak menyebar terutama di kalangan masyarakat Jawa. Penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa Pangestu di Salatiga, Jawa Tegah, mampu memenuhi kebutuhan sosial, ekonomi, dan spiritual para anggotanya. Di antara faktor yang menentukan keberhasilan Pangestu dalam memenuhi

  7. Modeling and characterization of strengthened concrete tension members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Stang, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The structural potential for cracking of externally strengthened concrete tension members, can be predicted with three parameters, describing the structural cracking potential based on fracture mechanical properties of the of concrete and interface between concrete and strengthening medium....... With these parameters, it is possible to design reinforcement and obtain a required cracking behavior of a given structure. Design recommendations for single and multiple cracking of the tension specimen are given in terms of fracture mechanical parameters, and a structural stiffness parameter....

  8. Family members' experiences of schizophrenic disorders and violence.

    OpenAIRE

    Barlas, J.

    2008-01-01

    This review paper investigated the effects of violence by people with mental health problems. It briefly considered the link between mental illness and violence, before reviewing the literature on the targets of violence from people with mental health problems, concurrently addressing methodological limitations. Family members and/or caregivers are often the victims of violent behaviour from individuals with mental health problems. The effects of this violence were reviewed, integrating findi...

  9. Science in the house 2014 with members of parliament

    OpenAIRE

    Magri, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Scientists and researchers met on Thursday 25th September with Members of Parliament in the Committee Room at the Presidential Palace in Valletta for Science in the House. A poster exhibition consisting of 13 posters representative of various research disciplines studied at the University of Malta. The event was inaugurated under the auspices of the Office of the Speaker at the House of Representatives, The Grand Master’s Palace, Valletta.

  10. Role model behaviors of nursing faculty members in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunklin, Areewan; Sawasdisingha, Piyawan; Viseskul, Nongkran; Funashima, Naomi; Kameoka, Tomomi; Nomoto, Yuriko; Nakayama, Toshiko

    2011-03-01

    Being a role model is very important in order for nurse teachers to promote students' competence and confidence. This descriptive study aimed at exploring the role model behavior of nursing faculty members in Thailand. The Self-Evaluation Scale on Role Model Behaviors for Nursing Faculty (Thai version) was used to collect data from 320 nursing faculty members in eight schools of nursing, four university nursing schools, one college under the Ministry of Public Health, one under the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration, and two private schools of nursing. The results revealed that the mean score of the overall items in the role model behaviors of nursing faculty members in Thailand, as perceived by themselves, was at a high level. The scores on each subscale of the role model behaviors also were high and related to respect for students, enthusiastic and high-quality teaching activities, showing the value of nursing practice and the nursing profession, social appropriateness, and ongoing professional development. The results can be used to further develop nurse professionals and to improve the effectiveness of clinical teaching in Thailand.

  11. TAX SYSTEM FOR MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL LIVING IN FRANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    - Declaration of income for 2001 - This text is also available on the Human Resources Division website. Important The French tax authorities have informed the Organization of certain changes to the tax system applicable to certain members of the CERN personnel residing in France. The CERN Management is currently seeking to clarify a number of points relating to the application of these measures. For the moment, members of the personnel residing in France are requested to follow the instructions outlined below and any other related instructions published later in 2002. To deal with the increasing number of requests for personal advice, the Human Resources Division has set up a Help-Desk, on 72838 (*), which will direct you to the relevant in-house or outside services. However, as the Human Resources Division cannot speak for the tax authorities and does not have the necessary resources to handle all the problems that are referred to it, members of the personnel are strongly urged to contact the Fren...

  12. Research Performances of Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoubnasabjafari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scientometric analysis of academic institutions provides useful information for policy makers, international and national organizations to invest in the research fields of the institutions to gain more outputs with less cost. The objectives of this work were to report a scientometric analysis of Islamic states considering a number of indicators. Methods: The number of articles and patents published by members of organization of Islamic conference were extracted from ScopusTM along with the top journals, authors, document type, universities, language of the publications and subjects. Results: The analyses of data revealed that Turkey is the leading country followed by Iran, Egypt, Malaysia and Nigeria when total numbers of indexed articles in ScopusTM are considered. When the articles of 2006-2010 are considered the ranks are Turkey, Iran, Malaysia, Egypt and Pakistan. Conclusion: the increased pattern was observed for scientific performances of OIC members however, more investments are required to fill the gap between OIC members and the leading countries.

  13. Application of size effect to compressive strength of concrete members

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jin-Keun Kim; Seong-Tae Yi

    2002-08-01

    It is important to consider the effect of size when estimating the ultimate strength of a concrete member under various loading conditions. Well known as the size effect, the strength of a member tends to decrease when its size increases. Therefore, in view of recent increased interest in the size effect of concrete this research focuses on the size effect of two main classes of compressive strength of concrete: pure axial compressive strength and flexural compressive strength. First, fracture mechanics type size effect on the compressive strength of cylindrical concrete specimens was studied, with the diameter, and the height/diameter ratio considered as the main parameters. Theoretical and statistical analyses were conducted, and a size effect equation was proposed to predict the compressive strength specimens. The proposed equation showed good agreement with the existing test results for concrete cylinders. Second, the size, length, and depth variations of a flexural compressive member have been studied experimentally. A series of -shaped specimens subjected to axial compressive load and bending moment were tested. The shape of specimens and the test procedures used were similar to those by Hognestad and others. The test results are curve-fitted using Levenberg-Marquardt’s least squares method (LSM) to obtain parameters for the modified size effect law (MSEL) by Kim and co workers. The results of the analysis show that the effect of specimen size, length, and depth on ultimate strength is significant. Finally, more general parameters for MSEL are suggested.

  14. The novel interleukin-1 cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Madelaine; Frey, Silke; Hueber, Axel J

    2017-03-01

    This review provides an update on the new interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine family members in inflammatory diseases with focus on recent findings concerning the family members IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 and their different expression patterns. The IL-1 cytokines are known to be involved in many different inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The latest IL-1 family members, IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 have been shown to be differently regulated during course of disease. Studies of patients suffering from inflammatory diseases revealed that those cytokines are upregulated in the serum as well as in inflamed tissue. Both, epithelial cells and infiltrating peripheral mononuclear blood cells serve as source of the cytokines IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 triggering different outcomes. These results could be confirmed in different mouse models and in-vitro and ex-vivo studies. IL-36, IL-37, and IL-38 are involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory diseases psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, systemic lupus erythematosus as well as Crohn's disease. Thereby IL-36 acts proinflammatory triggering further inflammatory mediators. In contrast, IL-37 and IL-38 are upregulated to counteract. Understanding the imbalance of the IL-1 family is crucial for future therapeutics.

  15. Attitude toward Plagiarism among Iranian Medical Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Emami-Razavi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess attitude towards plagiarism in faculty members of Medical School at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. One hundred and twenty medical faculty members ofTehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to answer to valid and reliable Persian version of attitude towards plagiarism questionnaire. Attitude toward plagiarism, positive attitude toward self-plagiarism and plagiarism acceptance were assessed. Eighty seven filled-up questionnaires were collected. Mean total number of correct answers was 11.6 ± 3.1. Mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating self-plagiarism was 1.7 ± 0.4 and mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating plagiarism acceptance was 1.4 ± 0.2. There was no significant correlation between plagiarism acceptance and self-plagiarism (r=0.17, P=0.1. It is essential to provide materials (such as workshops, leaflets and mandatory courses to make Iranian medical faculty members familiar with medicalresearch ethics issues such as plagiarism.

  16. Attitude toward plagiarism among Iranian medical faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Hassanpour, Kiana; Aramesh, Kiarash; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess attitude towards plagiarism in faculty members of Medical School at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. One hundred and twenty medical faculty members of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to answer to valid and reliable Persian version of attitude towards plagiarism questionnaire. Attitude toward plagiarism, positive attitude toward self-plagiarism and plagiarism acceptance were assessed. Eighty seven filled-up questionnaires were collected. Mean total number of correct answers was 11.6±3.1. Mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating self-plagiarism was 1.7±0.4 and mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating plagiarism acceptance was 1.4±0.2. There was no significant correlation between plagiarism acceptance and self-plagiarism (r=0.17, P=0.1). It is essential to provide materials (such as workshops, leaflets and mandatory courses) to make Iranian medical faculty members familiar with medical research ethics issues such as plagiarism.

  17. The serendipitous origin of chordate secretin peptide family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Vieira, Florbela A; Gomes, Ana S; Power, Deborah M

    2010-05-06

    The secretin family is a pleotropic group of brain-gut peptides with affinity for class 2 G-protein coupled receptors (secretin family GPCRs) proposed to have emerged early in the metazoan radiation via gene or genome duplications. In human, 10 members exist and sequence and functional homologues and ligand-receptor pairs have been characterised in representatives of most vertebrate classes. Secretin-like family GPCR homologues have also been isolated in non-vertebrate genomes however their corresponding ligands have not been convincingly identified and their evolution remains enigmatic. In silico sequence comparisons failed to retrieve a non-vertebrate (porifera, cnidaria, protostome and early deuterostome) secretin family homologue. In contrast, secretin family members were identified in lamprey, several teleosts and tetrapods and comparative studies revealed that sequence and structure is in general maintained. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP, VIP and GCG are the most highly conserved members and two major peptide subfamilies exist; i) PACAP-like which includes PACAP, PRP, VIP, PH, GHRH, SCT and ii) GCG-like which includes GCG, GLP1, GLP2 and GIP. Conserved regions flanking secretin family members were established by comparative analysis of the Takifugu, Xenopus, chicken and human genomes and gene homologues were identified in nematode, Drosophila and Ciona genomes but no gene linkage occurred. However, in Drosophila and nematode genes which flank vertebrate secretin family members were identified in the same chromosome. Receptors of the secretin-like family GPCRs are present in protostomes but no sequence homologues of the vertebrate cognate ligands have been identified. It has not been possible to determine when the ligands evolved but it seems likely that it was after the protostome-deuterostome divergence from an exon that was part of an existing gene or gene fragment by rounds of gene/genome duplication. The duplicate exon

  18. The serendipitous origin of chordate secretin peptide family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Ana S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secretin family is a pleotropic group of brain-gut peptides with affinity for class 2 G-protein coupled receptors (secretin family GPCRs proposed to have emerged early in the metazoan radiation via gene or genome duplications. In human, 10 members exist and sequence and functional homologues and ligand-receptor pairs have been characterised in representatives of most vertebrate classes. Secretin-like family GPCR homologues have also been isolated in non-vertebrate genomes however their corresponding ligands have not been convincingly identified and their evolution remains enigmatic. Results In silico sequence comparisons failed to retrieve a non-vertebrate (porifera, cnidaria, protostome and early deuterostome secretin family homologue. In contrast, secretin family members were identified in lamprey, several teleosts and tetrapods and comparative studies revealed that sequence and structure is in general maintained. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP, VIP and GCG are the most highly conserved members and two major peptide subfamilies exist; i PACAP-like which includes PACAP, PRP, VIP, PH, GHRH, SCT and ii GCG-like which includes GCG, GLP1, GLP2 and GIP. Conserved regions flanking secretin family members were established by comparative analysis of the Takifugu, Xenopus, chicken and human genomes and gene homologues were identified in nematode, Drosophila and Ciona genomes but no gene linkage occurred. However, in Drosophila and nematode genes which flank vertebrate secretin family members were identified in the same chromosome. Conclusions Receptors of the secretin-like family GPCRs are present in protostomes but no sequence homologues of the vertebrate cognate ligands have been identified. It has not been possible to determine when the ligands evolved but it seems likely that it was after the protostome-deuterostome divergence from an exon that was part of an existing gene or gene fragment

  19. CHIS - Information concerning the health insurance of frontalier workers who are family members of a CHIS main member

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    We recently informed you that the Organization was still in discussions with the Host State authorities to clarify the situation regarding the health insurance of frontalier workers who are family members (as defined in the Staff Rules and Regulations) of a CHIS main member, and that we were hoping to arrive at a solution soon.   After extensive exchanges, we finally obtained a response a few days ago from the Swiss authorities, with which we are fully satisfied and which we can summarise as follows: 1) Frontalier workers who are currently using the CHIS as their basic health insurance can continue to do so. 2) Family members who become frontalier workers, or those who have not yet exercised their “right to choose” (droit d’option) can opt to use the CHIS as their basic health insurance. To this end, they must complete the form regarding the health insurance of frontaliers, ticking the LAMal box and submitting their certificate of CHIS membership (available from U...

  20. 42 CFR 456.603 - Financial interests and employment of team members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Financial interests and employment of team members... of team members. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section— (1) (2) No member of a team that reviews care in an ICF may have a financial interest in or be employed by any ICF. (b) A member...

  1. 7 CFR 927.21 - Nomination and selection of members and their respective alternates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nomination and selection of members and their... Bodies § 927.21 Nomination and selection of members and their respective alternates. Grower members and... processors. Public members for each committee shall be nominated by the Fresh Pear Committee and...

  2. 12 CFR 701.3 - Member inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member inspection of credit union books... inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes. (a) Member inspection rights. A group of members of a...) Accounting books and records; and (2) Minutes of the proceedings of the credit union's members, board of...

  3. Synthesis and stereochemistry of 6-membered ring phosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Pungente

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organophosphorus compounds have important industrial and biomedical applications as pharmaceutical and agrochemical agents, as well as transition state analogs for the production of monoclonal antibodies. Methods: Two diastereomers of a 6-membered ring, cyclic phenyl phosphonate were synthesized in 8 steps from 1,3-butanediol. Results: The stereochemistry of the diastereomers was elucidated on the basis of H NMR nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE difference experiments. Conclusions: Such cyclic phosphonates may have utility serving as transition state analogs for the production of monoclonal antibodies.

  4. Recurrent cutaneous abscesses in two Italian family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cantisani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Environmental mycobacteria are the causative factors of an increasing number of infections worldwide. Cutaneous infections as a result of such mycobacteria are often misdiagnosed, and their treatment is difficult since they can show in vivo and in vitro multidrug resistance. Absence of pathognomonic clinical signs and variable histological findings often delay diagnosis. We report a case of localized recurrent soft tissue swelling by Mycobacterium marinum in 2 members of the same family. The cases are being reported for their uncommon clinical presentation and the associated etiological agent. Patients recovered completely following therapy with rifampicin 600 mg plus isoniazide 300 mg daily for 45 days.

  5. The podiatrist as a member of the sports medicine team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David W

    2015-04-01

    This article reviews the history of sports medicine highlighting the "jogging boom" of the 1970s and the advocacy of Dr George Sheehan, which boosted the position of podiatry in sports medicine. Significant events in mainstream sports medicine that promoted the rise of podiatric medicine are discussed. Reasons as to why podiatric medicine should be a member of the sports medicine team are outlined, and lastly, examples that highlight podiatric medicine as participants alongside other specialties in the evaluation and care of athletes are given.

  6. A new member of the multidisciplinary ALS team: the otolaryngologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Adam D; Griffin, Garrett R; Hogikyan, Norman D; Feldman, Eva L

    2012-02-01

    The multidisciplinary approach to treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has improved the overall care of patients suffering from this disease ( 1 , 2 ). This approach typically has included neurologists, physiatrists, occupational therapists, respiratory therapists and speech therapists. Dysphonia, dysarthria, and dysphagia are three of the most common bulbar manifestations of ALS, and are often the presenting symptoms in bulbar-onset patients. Despite this, otolaryngologists are often not included in ALS management until a tracheostomy is considered. The otolaryngologist can play an important role in early diagnosis and subsequent management of bulbar manifestations of ALS, and would be a valuable member of the multidisciplinary team.

  7. The Transition from Clinical Staff Member to Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicher, Brian; Collins, Sandra K

    2016-01-01

    Internally promoting clinical staff members into management positions is often a wise organizational strategy. Although there are advantages in doing such, there are also a number of challenges. Newly appointed managers may need introductory management level training given technical expertise does not always equate to management expertise. Devoting time to teaching even the most basic management skills will assure a more seamless role transition for the promoted employee. Upper administration also needs to be aware that possessing clinical expertise does not always serve as a precursor to promotion. Not every clinical employee, regardless of how proficient they are in their technical roles, seeks to be a manager.

  8. Gang Member: Who Says? Definitional and Structural Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Smithson, Hannah; Monchuk, Leanne; Armitage, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Owing to a number of high profile shootings in the UK over the past decade, there has been a significant amount of media and political interest in youth gangs. This chapter reports on a study conducted in 2009 in a large city in the North of England. It discusses the structure and formation of gangs in this city from the view of the young people identified as gang members and those responsible for this identification, i.e. police officers. Findings demonstrated that few of the young people vi...

  9. Energy conversion device with support member having pore channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri [Longmont, CO; Wind, Rikard A [Johnstown, CO

    2014-01-07

    Energy devices such as energy conversion devices and energy storage devices and methods for the manufacture of such devices. The devices include a support member having an array of pore channels having a small average pore channel diameter and having a pore channel length. Material layers that may include energy conversion materials and conductive materials are coaxially disposed within the pore channels to form material rods having a relatively small cross-section and a relatively long length. By varying the structure of the materials in the pore channels, various energy devices can be fabricated, such as photovoltaic (PV) devices, radiation detectors, capacitors, batteries and the like.

  10. Substance abusers' personality disorders and staff members' emotional reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    workshops completed a self-report inventory of emotional reactions to patients, the Feeling Word Checklist-58, and substance abusers completed a self-report of DSM-IV personality disorder, the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Disorder Questionnaire. Correlational analysis and multiple regression analysis...... impact on emotional reactions. Conclusion The findings confirm clinical experiences that personality disorder features in patients with substance abuse have an impact on staff members reactions to them. These reactions should be considered in supervision of staff, and in treatment models for patients...... with co-morbid personality disorders and substance abuse....

  11. The Model of Tourist Virtual Community Members Engagement Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Stepaniuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Building numerous and active virtual tourist communities involved in the tourist brand, connected with product, attraction or travel destination is a significant challenge for a dynamic and competitive tourist market. The main aim of presented pilot study was the drawing up guidelines for development of users engagement of selected virtual tourist communities on the example of Facebook. For that purpose a ranking of the most popular indicators of thematic areas, around which virtual tourist communities are formed was built. Simultaneously a typology of members of virtual tourist communities was presented as well as motives for the participation in communities gathered around the definite subject matter were analysed.

  12. Member State Foreign Policy towards EU Military Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodt, Annemarie Peen

    2015-01-01

    suggest that another operation in CAR may be underway shortly. The EU’s military endeavours are particularly interesting to this enquiry, as they suggest a radical change in the cohort of member states’ foreign policy towards the Union, which until the turn of the Millennium had been considered by its MS......, amongst others, as a predominantly ‘civilian power’. The significance of such a change merits a chapter that delves deeper into MS foreign policy specifically related to EU military operations.The rationale for this research is to further unpack intra-EU foreign policy and its effect on the external...

  13. Some basic design methods for HSC Structural Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Hoang, Cao Linh; Hagsten, Lars German

    1998-01-01

    Key-note paper.The paper deals with methods based on the theory of plasticity to be used in the design of reinforced concrete members of high strength concrete. Formulae for the bending capacity of beams subjected to pure bending are given. Methods for shear design of beams are described. Emphasis...... is put on the recently developed crack sliding model applicable to non-shear reinforced beams and lightly shear reinforced beams. The consequences of sliding in cracks on the strength of disk elements are also described. The methods described are compared with results of tests with high strength concrete...

  14. Bibliometric analysis of anaesthesia journal editorial board members: correlation between journal impact factor and the median h-index of its board members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, P S; Hudetz, J A

    2011-09-01

    h-index is useful for quantifying scholarly activity in medicine, but this statistic has not been extensively applied as a measure of productivity in anaesthesia. We conducted a bibliometric analysis of h-index in editorial board members and tested the hypothesis that editorial board members of anaesthesia journals with higher impact factors (IFs) have higher h-indices. Ten of 19 journals with 2009 IF>1 were randomly chosen from Journal Citation Reports(®). Board members were identified using each journal's website. Publications, citations, citations per publication, and h-index for each member were obtained using Scopus(®). Four hundred and twenty-three individuals filled 481 anaesthesia editorial board positions. The median h-index of all editorial board members was 14. Board members published 75 papers (median) with 1006 citations and 13 citations per publication. Members serving on journals with IF greater than median had significantly (Peditorial board members and its IF (h-index=3.01×IF+6.85; r( 2)=0.452; P=0.033) was observed for the 10 journals examined. Board members of subspeciality-specific journals had bibliometric indices that were less than those at general journals. The h-index was greater in individuals serving more than one journal. European editorial board members had higher h-index values than their American colleagues. The results suggest that editorial board members of anaesthesia journals with higher IFs have higher h-indices.

  15. MESSAGE TO MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL OF SWISS NATIONALITY

    CERN Multimedia

    Legal Service

    2002-01-01

    15 November 2002 Reimbursement of Swiss income tax The Swiss authorities have introduced a new system of taxation with effect from this year onwards. The main feature of this new system is that the tax year henceforth coincides with the year in which income is earned. One major practical consequence is that Swiss members of the personnel will receive a provisional income tax demand that must be settled by the date shown; however, the final income tax demand will not be sent until up to several months later. Hitherto, the CERN Administration only recognised this final demand as proof of payment for the reimbursement of Swiss income tax. In view of the delay the new procedure will generate between the settlement of the provisional demand and receipt of the final demand, and to avoid members of the personnel having to bear the cost of an advance payment, the CERN Administration has decided to align its reimbursement procedure with the new system of taxation. In future, the provisional income tax demand will also...

  16. Gender differences in life expectancy among kibbutz members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, U; Cohen, J

    1985-01-01

    A literature review of findings reveals that the life expectancy (LE) of females is longer than that of males and that a strong relationship exists between LE and gender differences in LE. The arguments of biological vs societal reasons for such gender differences are presented and the kibbutz society is offered as a setting to test the rivaling hypotheses. It is argued that the kibbutz society offers more similar roles for both genders than outside the kibbutz and therefore the gender differences in LE should be reduced in comparison to what is expected, given the very high LE of kibbutz members. Statistical data of the kibbutz population between the years 1975-1980 are analyzed and the results support the following conclusions: female members have higher LE but the difference is much less than expected on the basis of a regression analysis of data from 73 societies; the difference is smaller due to the relatively higher gain in LE by males; the gender differences are even smaller at age 50 compared to LE differences at birth. The Discussion section dwells upon interpretations of the findings and argues against alternative interpretations that assume selection processes for the kibbutz population. Suggestions for further studies are also made.

  17. Tax system for members of the personnel living in France

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2005-01-01

    - DECLARATION OF INCOME FOR 2004 - http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/generalinfo/impots/impots.asp IMPORTANT Members of the personnel residing in France are requested to follow the instructions (seen and approved by the Tax Office (CDI) in Bellegarde) outlined below. To deal with the large number of requests for personal advice, the Human Resources Department has set up a Helpdesk, Tel. 72838, to direct you to the relevant in-house or outside services. However, as the Human Resources Department cannot speak for the tax authorities and does not have the necessary resources to handle all the problems that are referred to it, members of the personnel are strongly recommended to contact the French tax authorities directly, either at the information desks organised at the places and times given below or via their local tax offices ('Centre des Impôts' and/or 'Trésorerie'). Practical information on the procedures for income declaration and income tax calculation in France can be obtained on...

  18. Tax system for members of the personnel living in France

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2005-01-01

    - DECLARATION OF INCOME FOR 2004 - http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/generalinfo/impots/impots.asp IMPORTANT Members of the personnel residing in France are requested to follow the instructions (seen and approved by the Tax Office (CDI) in Bellegarde) outlined below. To deal with the large number of requests for personal advice, the Human Resources Department has set up a Helpdesk, Tel. 72838, to direct you to the relevant in-house or outside services. However, as the Human Resources Department cannot speak for the tax authorities and does not have the necessary resources to handle all the problems that are referred to it, members of the personnel are strongly recommended to contact the French tax authorities directly, either at the information desks organised at the places and times given below or via their local tax offices ('Centre des Impôts' and/or 'Trésorerie'). Practical information on the procedures for income declaration and income tax calculation in France can be obtained o...

  19. Fiscal Efficiency of VAT in EU Member States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Adamczyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Value added tax (VAT in the countries of European Union is one of the most important sources of tax revenues. During the recent financial crisis, the importance of this tax has increased significantly. Despite of the fact that VAT is the best harmonized tax in the EU, the construction of VAT in member states may significantly differ. The differences may relate to issues such as the number and the level of applicable tax rates and the range of goods and services covered by the preferential VAT rates. The aim of the article is to evaluate the functioning of VAT in the EU member states. The evaluation will be carried out with the use of the synthetic measure of development. The criteria for evaluation will be provided by performance parameters such as VAT revenue ratio (VRR and the relation of VAT revenues to GDP. The carried out analysis will specify in which VAT works best. It will be also possible to identify the factors that determine the fiscal efficiency of this tax.

  20. A survey of NAPNAP members' clinical and professional research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Kathleen J; Lewin, Linda C; Niederhauser, Victoria P; Brady, Margaret A; Jones, Dolores; Butz, Arlene; Gallo, Agatha M; Schindler, Christine A; Trent, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this methodological article is to describe the development, implementation, and analysis of the survey used to determine NAPNAP members' ranking of research priorities, to describe the top priorities ranked by participants, and to determine if priorities differed by area of practice (primary, acute, or specialty care) or participant age. A cross-sectional descriptive design with an online survey was used. Completed by 324 NAPNAP members, the survey consisted of a demographic section and 90 statements in two domains: Clinical Priorities and Professional Role Priorities. Survey respondents strongly supported the top priorities with an average overall mean score of 4.0 or above on a 5-point Likert scale. Only three of the top 10 clinical and professional priorities differed by area of practice. No clinical priorities and only three professional priorities differed by age. The survey results were used to develop the NAPNAP Research Agenda. Both the survey results and the agenda can provide guidance for the NAPNAP Board, committees and interests groups as they develop initiatives and programs. Copyright © 2012 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. End-Member Formulation of Solid Solutions and Reactive Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtner, Peter C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A model for incorporating solid solutions into reactive transport equations is presented based on an end-member representation. Reactive transport equations are solved directly for the composition and bulk concentration of the solid solution. Reactions of a solid solution with an aqueous solution are formulated in terms of an overall stoichiometric reaction corresponding to a time-varying composition and exchange reactions, equivalent to reaction end-members. Reaction rates are treated kinetically using a transition state rate law for the overall reaction and a pseudo-kinetic rate law for exchange reactions. The composition of the solid solution at the onset of precipitation is assumed to correspond to the least soluble composition, equivalent to the composition at equilibrium. The stoichiometric saturation determines if the solid solution is super-saturated with respect to the aqueous solution. The method is implemented for a simple prototype batch reactor using Mathematica for a binary solid solution. Finally, the sensitivity of the results on the kinetic rate constant for a binary solid solution is investigated for reaction of an initially stoichiometric solid phase with an undersaturated aqueous solution.

  2. C8, a new member of the convertase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzaniti, A; Goodge, K; Jay, P; Taviaux, S A; Lam, M H; Berta, P; Martin, T J; Moseley, J M; Gillespie, M T

    1996-01-01

    A novel subtilisin-like protein, PC8, was identified by PCR using degenerate primers to conserved amino acid residues in the catalytic region of members of the prohormone convertase family. PC8 was predicted to be 785 residues long and was structurally related to the mammalian convertases furin, PACE4, PC1 and PC2, sharing more than 50% amino acid identity over the catalytic region with these family members. PC8 possessed the catalytically important Asp, His, Asn and Ser amino acids, the homo B domain of this family of enzymes and a C-terminal hydrophobic sequence indicative of a transmembrane domain. Structurally, PC8 is more related to furin and PACE4 than to PC1 or PC2. Like furin and PACE4, PC8 mRNA was found to be widely expressed; this is in contrast with PC1 and PC2, which have a restricted distribution. Two transcripts, of 4.5 and 3.5 kb, were detected in both human cell lines and rat tissues. Unlike furin and PACE4, both of which map to chromosome 15, PC8 maps to chromosome 11q23-11q24, suggesting that this gene may have resulted from an ancient gene duplication event from either furin or PACE4, or conversely that these genes arose from PC8. PMID:8615762

  3. PC8 [corrected], a new member of the convertase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzaniti, A; Goodge, K; Jay, P; Taviaux, S A; Lam, M H; Berta, P; Martin, T J; Moseley, J M; Gillespie, M T

    1996-03-15

    A novel subtilisin-like protein, PC8, was identified by PCR using degenerate primers to conserved amino acid residues in the catalytic region of members of the prohormone convertase family. PC8 was predicted to be 785 residues long and was structurally related to the mammalian convertases furin, PACE4, PC1 and PC2, sharing more than 50% amino acid identity over the catalytic region with these family members. PC8 possessed the catalytically important Asp, His, Asn and Ser amino acids, the homo B domain of this family of enzymes and a C-terminal hydrophobic sequence indicative of a transmembrane domain. Structurally, PC8 is more related to furin and PACE4 than to PC1 or PC2. Like furin and PACE4, PC8 mRNA was found to be widely expressed; this is in contrast with PC1 and PC2, which have a restricted distribution. Two transcripts, of 4.5 and 3.5 kb, were detected in both human cell lines and rat tissues. Unlike furin and PACE4, both of which map to chromosome 15, PC8 maps to chromosome 11q23-11q24, suggesting that this gene may have resulted from an ancient gene duplication event from either furin or PACE4, or conversely that these genes arose from PC8.

  4. Nutrititional Status Assessment of International Space Station Crew Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Zwart, S. R.; Block, G.; Rice, B. I.; Davis-Street, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Defining optimal nutrient requirements is imperative to ensure crew health on long-duration space exploration missions. To date, nutrient requirement data have been extremely limited because of small sample sizes and difficulties associated with collecting biological samples. In this study, we examined changes in body composition, bone metabolism, hematology, general blood chemistry, and blood levels of selected vitamins and minerals after long-duration (128-195 d) space flight aboard the International Space Station. Crew members consumed an average of 80% of the recommended energy intakes, and on landing day their body weight had decreased (P=0.051). After flight, hematocrit was less, and serum femtin was greater than before flight (PSerum iron, ferritin saturation, and transferrin had decreased after flight. The finding that other acute-phase proteins, including ceruloplasmin, retinol binding protein, transthyretin, and albumin were not changed after flight suggests that the changes in iron metabolism may not be strictly due to an inflammatory response. Urinary 8- hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration was greater and superoxide dismutase was less after flight, indicating that oxidative damage had increased (Pserum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly decreased after flight (Pserum concentration of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, was elevated only in crew members who landed in Russia, probably because of the longer time lapse between landing and sample collection. These data provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin D status, and oxidative damage remain critical concerns for long-duration space flight.

  5. Organ Donation Campaigns: Perspective of Dialysis Patient's Family Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makmor Tumin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Solving the dilemma of the organ shortage in Malaysia requires educating Malaysians about organ donation and transplantation. This paper aims at exploring the average Malaysian households ' preferred channels of campaigns and the preferred campaigners in a family setting, targeting at the dialysis family members.We analyzed the responses of 350 respondents regarding organ donation campaigns. The respondents are 2 family members of 175 dialysis patients from 3 different institutions. The information on respondents' willingness to donate and preferred method and channel of organ donation campaign were collected through questionnaire.Malaysian families have a good tendency to welcome campaigns in both the public and private (their homes spheres. We also found that campaigns facilitated by the electronic media (Television and Radio and executed by experienced doctors are expected to optimize the outcomes of organ donation, in general. Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics. However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P <0.05.Ethnic differences imply that necessary modifications on the campaign channels and campaigners should also be taken under consideration. By identifying the preferred channel and campaigners, this study hopes to shed some light on the ways to overcome the problem of organ shortage in Malaysia.

  6. Effective healthcare teams require effective team members: defining teamwork competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leggat Sandra G

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although effective teamwork has been consistently identified as a requirement for enhanced clinical outcomes in the provision of healthcare, there is limited knowledge of what makes health professionals effective team members, and even less information on how to develop skills for teamwork. This study identified critical teamwork competencies for health service managers. Methods Members of a state branch of the professional association of Australian health service managers participated in a teamwork survey. Results The 37% response rate enabled identification of a management teamwork competency set comprising leadership, knowledge of organizational goals and strategies and organizational commitment, respect for others, commitment to working collaboratively and to achieving a quality outcome. Conclusion Although not part of the research question the data suggested that the competencies for effective teamwork are perceived to be different for management and clinical teams, and there are differences in the perceptions of effective teamwork competencies between male and female health service managers. This study adds to the growing evidence that the focus on individual skill development and individual accountability and achievement that results from existing models of health professional training, and which is continually reinforced by human resource management practices within healthcare systems, is not consistent with the competencies required for effective teamwork.

  7. STS-69 Crew members display 'Dog Crew' patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Following their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the five astronauts assigned to Space Shuttle Mission STS-69 display the unofficial crew patch for their upcoming spaceflight: the Dog Crew II patch. Mission Commander David M. Walker (center) and Payload Commander James S. Voss (second from right) previously flew together on Mission STS-53, the final dedicated Department of Defense flight on the Space Shuttle. A close comradery formed among Walker, Voss and the rest of the crew, and they dubbed themselves the 'dogs of war', with each of the STS-53 'Dog Crew' members assigned a 'dog tag' or nickname. When the STS-69 astronauts also became good buddies, they decided it was time for the Dog Crew II to be named. Walker's dog tag is Red Dog, Voss's is Dogface, Pilot Kenneth D. Cockrell (second from left) is Cujo, space rookie and Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt (left) is Under Dog, and Mission Specialist James H. Newman (right) is Pluato. The Dog Crew II patch features a bulldog peering out from a doghouse shaped like the Space Shuttle and lists the five crew member's dog names. The five astronauts are scheduled to lift off on the fifth Shuttle flight of the year at 11:04 a.m. EDT, August 31, aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour.

  8. Differential expression of Notch family members in astrocytomas and medulloblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Yu, Shizhu; Jiang, Rongcai; Kang, Chunsheng; Wang, Guangxiu; Jiang, Hao; Pu, Peiyu

    2009-12-01

    Notch signaling pathway plays an integral role in determining cell fates in development. Growing evidence demonstrates that Notch signaling pathway has versatile effects in tumorigenesis depending on the tumor type, grade and stage. Notch signaling pathway is deregulated in some brain tumors. To examine the differential expression of Notch family members (Notch1, 2, 3, 4) in human astrocytomas and medulloblastomas, and to evaluate their roles in the development of both tumor types. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were used to detect Notch1, 2, 3, 4 expression in tissue microarray and freshly resected tissue samples of normal brain, astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. Notch family members were not expressed or barely detectable in normal brain tissues. Notch1, 3, 4 were highly expressed but Notch2 was not expressed in astrocytomas. The percentage of immunopositive tumor cells and level of Notch1 expression was increased with tumor grade. In addition, overexpression of Notch2 was detected in medulloblastomas in contrast to low or no expression of Notch1, 3, 4. Differential expression of Notch1, 2, 3, 4 is detected in astrocytomas and medulloblastomas, that may be related to their different roles playing in the development of brain tumors.

  9. Temporary work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL During the period 11 June to 14 September 2007 inclusive, a limited number of temporary jobs at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of jobs available, no children who have previously worked at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1663.- for this period. Candidates should apply via the HR Department's electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=5466 Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 13 April 2007 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 11 May 200...

  10. Temporary work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL During the period 11 June to 14 September 2007 inclusive, a limited number of temporary jobs at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of jobs available, no children who have previously worked at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1663.- for this period. Candidates should apply via the HR Department's electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=5466 Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 13 April 2007 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available on 11 May 2...

  11. Temporary work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL During the period 12 June to 15 September 2006 included, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of jobs available, no children who have previously worked at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1640.- for this period. Candidates should apply via HR department's electronic recruitment system (E-rt) : https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=4691 Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 17 April 2006 at the latest. The results of the selection will be...

  12. Temporary work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL During the period 11 June to 14 September 2007 included, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of jobs available, no children who have previously worked at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1663.- for this period. Candidates should apply via HR department's electronic recruitment system (E-rt): https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=5466 Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 13 April 2007 at the latest. The results of the selection will be...

  13. Temporary work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE PERSONNEL During the period 12 June to 15 September 2006 included, there will be a limited number of jobs for temporary work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature) which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with CERN). It should be noted that candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and that they must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. In view of the limited number of jobs available, no children who have previously worked at CERN under this scheme can be considered. The duration of all appointments will be 4 weeks, the allowance being CHF 1640.- for this period. Candidates should apply via HR department's electronic recruitment system (E-rt) : https://ert.cern.ch/browse_www/wd_pds?p_web_page_id=4691 Completed application forms must be returned to this service by 17 April 2006 at the latest. The results of the selection will be a...

  14. Organ Donation Campaigns: Perspective of Dialysis Patient's Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Makmor; Raja Ariffin, Raja Noriza; Mohd Satar, NurulHuda; Ng, Kok-Peng; Lim, Soo-Kun; Chong, Chin-Sieng

    2014-07-01

    Solving the dilemma of the organ shortage in Malaysia requires educating Malaysians about organ donation and transplantation. This paper aims at exploring the average Malaysian households ' preferred channels of campaigns and the preferred campaigners in a family setting, targeting at the dialysis family members. We analyzed the responses of 350 respondents regarding organ donation campaigns. The respondents are 2 family members of 175 dialysis patients from 3 different institutions. The information on respondents' willingness to donate and preferred method and channel of organ donation campaign were collected through questionnaire. Malaysian families have a good tendency to welcome campaigns in both the public and private (their homes) spheres. We also found that campaigns facilitated by the electronic media (Television and Radio) and executed by experienced doctors are expected to optimize the outcomes of organ donation, in general. Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics. However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P preferred channel and campaigners, this study hopes to shed some light on the ways to overcome the problem of organ shortage in Malaysia.

  15. THE COMPETITIVENESS OF EMU MEMBER STATES IN THE FINANCIAL CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilescu Felician

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the financial crisis the imbalances in the euro area have been underlined. The issue had been previously debated during the years preceding the financial crisis, but the strong global economic expansion and the ongoing economic integration within the euro area partly masked the problems arising from these differential developments. This paper analyses the advantages and disavantages of the monetary union before and during the financial crisis and focuses on identifying solutions to correct the structural problems that are at the root of the economic divergencies within the euro area. Another issue that we discuss is how did price competitiveness diverged from one euro-area member state to another since the introduction of the euro, causing gains in price competitiveness for a small group of countries and significant losses for a larger group. The issue of competitiveness is essential for Romania as we are heading towards joining the euro zone.

  16. Nursing interventions for family members waiting during cardiac procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trecartin, Kelly; Carroll, Diane L

    2011-08-01

    Anxiety is shared by patients and family members (FMs) and can increase throughout the FMs waiting during invasive cardiac procedures (ICP). The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of an informational report (IR) and a postprocedure visit (PPV), on the anxiety of waiting FMs. There were 151 FMs assigned to 3 groups; Group 1 (50 FMs: standard of care [SOC]), Group 2 (50 FMs: SOC + IR), and Group 3 (51 FMs: SOC + IR + PPV). Pre/ postvariables measured were: blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), skin temperature (ST), and anxiety. When comparing the BP, HR, ST, and anxiety there were no differences between groups with either SOC or IR. There was a significant reduction in anxiety, from baseline to the PPV in Group 3 (F = 10.1; p < .000). A PPV had an impact on FMs and a PPV should be incorporated as a nursing intervention during ICP.

  17. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    The 27 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2012 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 2 November.   BARRIN Laurence  -  PH BILLEN Ronald  -  BE BOUCHÉ Jean-Marc  -  HR BURKHARDT Helmut  -  BE CARLIER Etienne  -  TE CASS Antony  -  IT CHAN KWOK CHEON Anne Belinda  -  IT CHARRUE Pierre  -  BE COLLIER Paul  -  BE CUENCA PEREZ Antonio  -  GS DE JONGHE Jurgen  -  GS DEFERT Philippe  -  IT ELSENER Konrad  -  PH FROIDEVAUX Daniel  -  PH GRIGGS Christopher  -  PH MATHEYS Jean-Pol  -  HR MEIJERS Franciscus  -  PH MERTENS Volker  -  TE METRAL Gabriel  -  BE NECCA Rene  -  EN PACE Alberto&...

  18. MODIS Science Team Member Semi-annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermote, Eric; ElSaleous, Nazmi; Fisher, Paul; Karakos, Damianos; Ray, James; Vermeulen, Anne

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-annual report of the MODerate resolution imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Science Team Members. The most important activities undertaken during this reporting period are the following: 1) Versions 2.1 and 2.2 surface reflectance L2/L3 DAAC/SDST delivery; 2) Version 2.0 1km and 250m VI product delivery (assist Arizona); 3) Version 2.1 surface reflectance L2 testing; 4) Land Synthetic data set generator improvements; 5) QA; 6) Surface reflectance error budget generation (SWAMP request); 7) SCF Hardware; 8) Aerosol transport modeling; 9) Aerosol optical depth retrieval from AVHRR data; 10) Aerosol characteristics retrieval from SeaWIFS/AVHRR fusioned data; 11) Validation activities; 12) Aerosol climatology; and 13) 6S code. The report includes summaries of the topics above.

  19. Embedded Librarian as Research Team Member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Frances A; Kaplan, F Thomas D

    2017-03-01

    Adding a librarian to an upper extremity surgical and therapy practice has many advantages (educational, research, remaining on the cutting edge of technology). As an embedded team member, the librarian at the Indiana Hand to Shoulder Center prepares literature reviews, creates Google Scholar Alerts for individual clinicians, and introduces developing technologies such as 3-dimensional printers, Smartphone Apps, and online access to nontraditional resources. With the librarian relieving clinicians of these responsibilities, surgeons can devote more time to clinical and research activities. Private practices unable to support their own librarian could share access to a librarian via Skype, Face Time, and video conferencing. Another small practice alternative is contracting services from a local medical school library that designates a librarian as its liaison.

  20. Quality Interaction Between Mission Assurance and Project Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong-Fu, Helenann H.; Wilson, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    Mission Assurance independent assessments started during the development cycle and continued through post launch operations. In operations, Health and Safety of the Observatory is of utmost importance. Therefore, Mission Assurance must ensure requirements compliance and focus on process improvements required across the operational systems including new/modified products, tools, and procedures. The deployment of the interactive model involves three objectives: Team member Interaction, Good Root Cause Analysis Practices, and Risk Assessment to avoid reoccurrences. In applying this model, we use a metric based measurement process and was found to have the most significant effect, which points to the importance of focuses on a combination of root cause analysis and risk approaches allowing the engineers the ability to prioritize and quantify their corrective actions based on a well-defined set of root cause definitions (i.e. closure criteria for problem reports), success criteria and risk rating definitions.

  1. Team members cheer their team during FIRST competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Members of a FIRST robotic team cheer their teammates on during early competition at the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held March 9-11 in the KSC Visitor Complex Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students from all over the country are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  2. Astronaut David Brown talks to FIRST team members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown talks with FIRST team members, Baxter Bomb Squad, from Mountain Home High School, Mountain Home, Ariz., during the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  3. Banking Sectors in the new European Union Member States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Stefański

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of his article is to analyze the economic position and financial strength of banking sectors in the new European Union member states (EU-12. The banking sector consists of all banks that operate in a given country except for the central bank and non-operating banks, such as those in the state of insolvency or liquidation. The author discusses EU-12 banking sectors with regard to a number of economic and financial indices, including the size of assets, the degree of their concentration, ownership types, financial results and efficiency. The analysis is followed by an attempt to evaluate those sectors and assess their financial stability and resistance to macroeconomic and banking risks. Action EU-12 banking sectors in the time of financial crisis is presented as well. Analysis is accompanied by the hypothesis, that about further development of UE-12 banking sectors will decide foreign owners of banks.

  4. EIROforum welcomes the European XFEL as a new member

    CERN Multimedia

    Francesco Poppi

    2010-01-01

    The European research facility XFEL has become the eighth member of EIROforum. Just as political and economic interests have become unified within Europe, scientific research is benefiting from a similar alliance.   Massimo Altarelli, Chairman of the XFEL Management Board (left) and Francesco Romanelli, Chairman of the EIROforum (right). In the back (left to right): Francesco Sette (ESRF), Felicitas Pauss (CERN), Iain Mattaj (EMBL), Richard Wagner (ILL), Rowena Sirey (ESO) and David Southwood (ESA). In this day and age, scientific research is oriented towards large-scale projects, which require the involvement of a large number of partners – meaning funding institutes or national governments – and, obviously, the cooperation of the leading experts in a variety of related fields. For these reasons, it is essential to encourage synergies on an international level, combining resources, facilities and expertise. This is the quest of EIROforum, which brings together research organ...

  5. Substance abusers' personality disorders and staff members' emotional reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    workshops completed a self-report inventory of emotional reactions to patients, the Feeling Word Checklist-58, and substance abusers completed a self-report of DSM-IV personality disorder, the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Disorder Questionnaire. Correlational analysis and multiple regression analysis......Background Previous research has indicated that aggressive behaviour and DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders (PD) may be associated with professionals' emotional reactions to clients, and that cluster C PD may be associated with positive emotional reactions. Methods Staff members recruited from...... was used to assess the associations between personality disorders and emotional reations. Results Cluster B disorder features were associated with feeling distance to patients, and cluster C disorder features were associated with feeling helpful towards patients. Cluster A disorders had no significant...

  6. Experimental evaluation of active-member control of precision structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanson, James; Blackwood, Gary; Chu, Cheng-Chih

    1989-01-01

    The results of closed loop experiments that use piezoelectric active-members to control the flexible motion of a precision truss structure are described. These experiments are directed toward the development of high-performance structural systems as part of the Control/Structure Interaction (CSI) program at JPL. The focus of CSI activity at JPL is to develop the technology necessary to accurately control both the shape and vibration levels in the precision structures from which proposed large space-based observatories will be built. Structural error budgets for these types of structures will likely be in the sub-micron regime; optical tolerances will be even tighter. In order to achieve system level stability and local positioning at this level, it is generally expected that some form of active control will be required.

  7. Quality interaction between mission assurance and project team members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong-Fu, Helenann; Wilson, Robert K.

    2006-06-01

    Mission Assurance's independent assessments started during the SPITZER development cycle and continued through post-launch operations. During the operations phase, the health and safety of the observatory is of utmost importance. Therefore, Mission Assurance must ensure requirements compliance and focus on the process improvements required across the operational systems, including new/modified products, tools, and procedures. To avoid problem reoccurrences, an interactive model involving three areas was deployed: Team Member Interaction, Root Cause Analysis Practices, and Risk Assessment. In applying this model, a metric-based measurement process was found to have the most significant benefit. Considering a combination of root cause analysis and risk approaches allows project engineers to the ability to prioritize and quantify their corrective actions based on a well-defined set of root cause definitions (i.e., closure criteria for problem reports), success criteria, and risk rating definitions.

  8. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 34 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2006 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 1st November. BELLEMAN Jeroen / AB BERTOLA Dominique / DSU BOLDI Armand / TS BOLLET André / AT BRANDT Daniel / DSU CACCIOPPOLI Michel /TS CALDERONE Antonino / TS CLARET René /TS COSSEY PUGET Françoise / PH DALEXANDRO Noël / AT DECOMBAZ Michel / TS DELLA NEGRA Michel / PH DINIUS Arend / AB FOSTER David / IT FROMM Christine / DSU GROS Daniel / TS GUDET Denis / TS LEWIS Julian / AB MAPELLI Livio / PH MASSON Albert / TS MOINE Catherine / PH MÜLLER Hans / PH ODIER Patrick / AB PANMAN Jaap / PH POOLE John / AB PROLA-TESSAUR Maureen / AT RAPHOZ Jean-Pierre / IT ROSTANT Jeanne / PH RUGO Erminio / AB VAN HERWIJNEN Eric / PH WERNER Per / PH WILDNER Elena / AT WILKINSON Jonathan / DSU WISZNIOWSKI Thierry / AB

  9. Parading memory and re-member-ing conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQuaid, Sara Dybris

    Parading memory and re-member-ing conflict: Collective memory in transition in Northern Ireland This paper leverages an understanding of collective memory to examine the politico-cultural practice of parading in Northern Ireland and so extends our knowledge of the role of memory and commemoration...... understandings of the role of history and memory as conflict dynamics, as well as strategies for studying these as both critical events and as critical continuities. In Northern Ireland, parades provide a unique case for this approach as they draw on and reframe collective memories through partly ritualised...... these ways, they are vernaculars that can unsettle received or official narratives attempting to smooth over differences and anxieties in transitory times. The emotive use of collective memory to charge processes of identity formation often form part of protracted and sectarian conflict (Horowitz [1985] 2000...

  10. Six-Membered Aromatic Polyazides: Synthesis and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapyshev, Sergei V

    2015-10-21

    Aromatic polyazides are widely used as starting materials in organic synthesis and photochemical studies, as well as photoresists in microelectronics and as cross-linking agents in polymer chemistry. Some aromatic polyazides possess high antitumor activity, while many others are of considerable interest as high-energy materials and precursors of high-spin nitrenes and C₃N₄ carbon nitride nanomaterials. The use of aromatic polyazides in click-reactions may be a new promising direction in the design of various supramolecular systems possessing interesting chemical, physical and biological properties. This review is devoted to the synthesis, properties and applications of six-membered aromatic compounds containing three and more azido groups in the ring.

  11. Celebrating staff members with 25 years of service

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The 27 staff members who are celebrating 25 years at CERN in 2011 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 8 November.     Alvarez-Gaume Luis PH   Arruat Michel BE   Bonneau Pierre EN   Bordry Frederick TE   Camporesi Tiziano PH   Chevallay Eric EN   De Rijk Gijsbertus TE   Denuziere Dominique TE   Divia Roberto PH   Esteveny Laure DG   Giguet Jean-Michel BE   Haug Friedrich TE   Herr Werner BE   Jones Peter IT   Jonker Michael TE   Jost Beat PH   Linssen Lucie PH   Mage-Granados Patricia DG   Martinez Yanez Pablo BE   N...

  12. Aligning Provider Team Members With Polyvalent Community Health Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Beth A; Davis, Sheila; Kulbok, Pamela; Frank-Lightfoot, Loraine; Sgarlata, Lisa; Poree, Shawanda

    2015-01-01

    In light of the fragmentation of health care services and the need for health promotion and disease prevention, it is time to consider the important role community health workers (CHWs) could play as part of the health care team. Globally, CHWs tend to focus on a single patient condition, resulting in fragmented, uncoordinated health care services. Polyvalent (or multimodal) CHWs can provide a comprehensive, patient-centric range of care coordination services with other members of the health care team, ultimately improving patient outcomes and decreasing the cost of care. The potential benefits of the polyvalent CHW to the health care team are not widely understood in the United States. To fill this knowledge gap, a toolkit for nurse leaders in mainstream health care settings was created. The toolkit outlines the key elements essential to a successful CHW program and offers strategies for navigating the various challenges involved when integrating this new role into existing models of care.

  13. First PS magnet unit, with members of the Magnet Group.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1956-01-01

    Members of the Magnet Group, sitting atop the first unit of the PS combined-function magnet. The picture was taken at the Institute of Physics of Geneva University, as CERN was still a muddy construction site at that time. All these people have now retired, but all of the magnets are still pulsing away. Front row (left to right): R.Tinguely, C.Germain, G.Plass, D.Neet, B.de Raad, M.Cavallaro, K.H.Reich, G.Kuhn, J.Nilsson, C.A.Ramm, Paillard. Second row: L.Resegotti, M.Niklaus, C.J.Zilverschoon, R.Bertolotto, Marcellin, G.Brianti, P.Collet. Standing behind: B.Kuiper.

  14. Staff members with 25 years’ service at CERN in 2009

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    The 62 staff members who are celebrating 25 years' service at CERN in 2009 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 17 November. ARNAUDON Luca/BE BEL Jean-François/TE BERTINELLI Francesco/TE BLAND Alastair/BE BLOCH Philippe/PH BORCIER Luc/EN BRUNEL Xavier/PH BURKIMSHER Paul/EN CAMPI Domenico/PH CATTAI Ariella/PH DALIN Jean-Michel/EN DANGOISSE Claude/IT DAVIDS Daniel/EN DI MAIO Franck/BE FERRARI Claude/EN FISCHER Klaus/TE FOLLEY Adrian/PH FORMENTI Fabio/TE GATIGNON Laurentius/EN GIACHINO Rossano/BE GONIDEC Allain/PH GRAFSTROM Per/PH HANCOCK Steven/BE HATCH Mark/PH HEMMER Frederic/IT HOURICAN Michael/TE ...

  15. Proposed level of Member States' contributions as from 2006

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The document "The scientific activities of CERN and budget estimates for the years 2006-2009 and Projections for the year 2010" was presented to the Finance Committee in June. At its June Session, the Council requested the Management to prepare the Preliminary Draft Budget for 2006 on the basis of an income level corresponding to the 2005 contributions at 2005 prices, excluding the additional income resulting from the exceptional indexation of the two Host States. This document contains a proposal for a contribution level that takes account of these constraints, and expresses the need for a decision on the special cases of three Member States contributions. The Finance Committee is invited to recommend and the Council to approve the minimum level of contributions of 977.3 MCHF in 2006, with the consideration of possible transition measures for the contributions of Finland, Greece and Portugal. Additional voluntary contributions from the Host States and application of agreed transition measures will allow the ...

  16. Actions and mode of actions of FGF19 subfamily members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2008-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are humoral factors with diverse biological functions. While most FGFs were shown to work as local factors regulating cell growth and differentiation, recent investigations indicated that FGF19 subfamily members, FGF15/19, FGF21 and FGF23 work as systemic factors. FGF15/19 produced by intestine inhibits bile acid synthesis and FGF21from liver is involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In addition, FGF23 was shown to be produced by bone and regulate phosphate and vitamin D metabolism. Furthermore, these FGFs require klotho or betaklotho for their actions in addition to canonical FGF receptors. It is possible that these FGFs together with their receptor systems might be targets for novel therapeutic measures in the future.

  17. GRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF LAFFER'S THEORY FOR EUROPEAN UNION MEMBER STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LILIANA BUNESCU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most times the current situation of one or another country depends on the historical development of own tax system. A practical question of any governance is to determine the optimal taxation rate level, bringing to the state the highest tax revenues. A good place to start is with what is popularly known as the Laffer curve. This paper aims to determine in graphical terms the level where European economies ranks by using Laffer curve based on the data series provided by the European Commission and the World Bank. Graphical analysis of Laffer's theory can emphasize only the positioning on one or another side of point for maximum tax revenues, a position that can influence fiscal policy decisions. Conclusions at European Union level are simple. Value of taxation rate for fiscal optimal point varies from one Member State to another, from 48.9% in Denmark to 28% in Romania, with an average of 37.1% for the EU-27.

  18. Six-Membered Aromatic Polyazides: Synthesis and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Chapyshev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic polyazides are widely used as starting materials in organic synthesis and photochemical studies, as well as photoresists in microelectronics and as cross-linking agents in polymer chemistry. Some aromatic polyazides possess high antitumor activity, while many others are of considerable interest as high-energy materials and precursors of high-spin nitrenes and C3N4 carbon nitride nanomaterials. The use of aromatic polyazides in click-reactions may be a new promising direction in the design of various supramolecular systems possessing interesting chemical, physical and biological properties. This review is devoted to the synthesis, properties and applications of six-membered aromatic compounds containing three and more azido groups in the ring.

  19. Summer work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    During the period from 18 June to 14 September 2012 inclusive, there will be a limited number of jobs for summer work at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature), which will be made available to children of members of the personnel i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization.   Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance cover for both illness and accident. The duration of all contracts will be 4 weeks and the allowance will be CHF 1717.- for this period.  Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system (e-RT) here. Completed application forms must be returned by 10 April 2012 at the latest.  The results of the selection will be available by the end of May 2012. For further information, please contact: Virginie.Galvin@cern.ch HR Department Tel. 72855

  20. Sleep and Military Members: Emerging Issues and Nonpharmacological Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cary A. Brown

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many individuals who work in the military experience sleep deficiency which presents a significant problem given the nature of their work. The cause of their sleep problems is likely multifactorial, stemming from the interplay between their personal health, habits and lifestyle juxtaposed with the stress of their military work such as emotional and physical trauma experienced in service. Objective. To present an overview of sleep deficiency in military members (MMs and review of nonpharmacological treatment options. Discussion. Although there are a number of promising nonpharmacological treatment options available for people working in the military who experience problems sleeping, testing interventions within the context of the military are still in the early stages. Further research utilizing rigorous design and standardized, context appropriate outcome measures is needed to help treat this burgeoning problem.

  1. Ethical Leadership and Leader Member Exchange (LMX Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babič Šejla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to evaluate the contribution that developments in the area of ethical leadership and trust have made to our understanding of effective people management within organisations. This paper is based on a case study from Harvard Business Review (2007 called "IBM - Leading the Turnaround". The author will use Leader Member Exchange (LMX theory by Graen and Uhl-Bien (1995 and integrate the ideas of ethical leadership to critically evaluate the leadership style of the CEO of IBM Louis V. Gerstner that led to the turnaround of IBM. In particular, the author will focus on the following question: What role did trust play in the leadership style of Gerstner in the transformation of IBM?

  2. Astronaut David Brown talks with team members from South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown looks over the robot named 'L'il Max' with members of the team The Bot Kickers! from Northwestern High School, Rock Hill, S.C. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition being held March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  3. Cultivating and Benefiting from Member Familiarity in Temporary Work Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessel, Shannon

    In this paper, I investigate an example of short-duration, time-bound project work conducted by high-performing groups in order to surprise our expectations regarding the motivations and potential to cooperate and to cultivate group member familiarity within such temporary organizations. Project...... participants included seven string quartets that worked together in different combinations and without the expectation of future collaboration across groups. I consider what motivated cooperation and relationship-oriented activities as well as the conditions which enabled these activities to emerge despite...... limited time and a perceived short shadow of the future. Several contributions result: First, I challenge our expectation that a short shadow of the future will decrease the likelihood of cooperation by demonstrating how the clan-like tendency to construct common values and aspirations motivated...

  4. Comparative Price Levels of New EU Member Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taušer Josef

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes comparative price levels of 10 new EU member countries from Central, East, and South-East Europe and discusses their main determinants. A comparison of comparative price levels is logically followed by a comparison of relative GDP per capita in purchasing power parities. Further, the Balassa-Samuelson efect is theoretically explained and empirically tested using a sample of EU27 countries (excluding Luxemburg. The results of simple regression analysis confrm that diferences in comparative price levels can be explained by the diferences in relative GDP per capita in purchasing power parities. Besides the Balassa-Samuelson efect there are, however, many other factors that have an impact on comparative price levels. Tey are related to the lower competitiveness of domestic companies on international markets as the result of such factors as a lower quality of production, inefcient organizational structures and management styles, insufcient marketing and business skills, or a poor approach to international distribution channels.

  5. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    The 30 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2015 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 10 December.        Renaud Barillere EN   Edgar Birker  DG   Sergio Calatroni  TE   Paola Catapano  DG   Christophe  Delamare GS   Philippe Farthouat  PH   Roger Forty  PH   Yves Gaillard   TE   Clara Gaspar  PH   Jean-Christophe  Gayde  EN   Hubert   Gerwig PH   Simone  Giani PH   Jean-Pierre Granchelli  EN   Juan Guijarro  IT   Helene Haller  PH   John Harvey  PH   Vincenzo Innocente PH ...

  6. Breastfeeding practices and policies in WHO European Region Member States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci Bosi, Ayse Tulay; Eriksen, Kamilla Gehrt; Sobko, Tanja; Wijnhoven, Trudy M A; Breda, João

    2016-03-01

    To provide an update on current practices and policy development status concerning breastfeeding in the WHO European Region. National surveys and studies conducted by national health institutions were prioritized. Sub-national data were included where no national data or studies existed. Information on national breastfeeding policies was collected mainly from the WHO Seventh Meeting of Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative Coordinators and European Union projects. Owing to the different data sources and methods, any comparisons between countries must be made with caution. WHO European Member States. Data from fifty-three WHO European Member States were investigated; however, a large proportion had not reported any data. Rates of early initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding and continued breastfeeding to 1 year all varied considerably within the WHO European Region. Exclusive breastfeeding rates declined considerably after 4 months, and were low in infants under 6 months and at 6 months of age. The majority of the countries with existing data reported having a national infant and young child feeding policy and the establishment of a national committee on breastfeeding or infant and young child feeding. The majority of the countries with existing data reported having baby-friendly hospitals, although the proportion of baby-friendly hospitals to the total number of national hospitals with maternity units was low in most countries. Breastfeeding practices within the WHO European Region, especially exclusive breastfeeding rates, are far from complying with the WHO recommendations. There are marked differences between countries in breastfeeding practices, infant and young child feeding policy adoption and proportion of baby-friendly hospitals.

  7. A Qualitative Study of Faculty Members' Views of Women Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Carol; Griffin, Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Concurrent with the evolving role of the department chair in academic medicine is the entry of women physicians into chair positions. Because implicit biases that stereotypically masculine behaviors are required for effective leadership remain strong, examining faculty members' perceptions of their chair's leadership in medical school departments with women chairs can provide insight into the views of women leaders in academic medicine and the complex ways in which gender may impact these chairs' leadership style and actions. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with 13 male and 15 female faculty members representing all faculty tracks in three clinical departments chaired by women. Inductive, qualitative analysis of the subsequent text allowed themes to emerge across interviews. Results Four themes emerged regarding departmental leadership. One dealt with the leadership of the previous chair. The other three described the current chair's characteristics (tough, direct, and transparent), her use of communal actions to help support and mentor her faculty, and her ability to build power through consensus. Because all three chairs were early in their tenure, a wait and see attitude was frequently expressed. Faculty generally viewed having a woman chair as an indication of positive change, with potential individual and institutional advantages. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that the culture of academic medicine has moved beyond questioning women physicians' competence to lead once they are in top organizational leadership positions. The findings are also consonant with experimental research indicating that women leaders are most successful when they pair stereotypic male (agentic) behaviors with stereotypic female (communal) behaviors. All three chairs exhibited features of a transformational leadership style and characteristics deemed essential for effective leadership in academic medicine. PMID:20156081

  8. Nutrititional Status Assessment of International Space Station Crew Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Zwart, S. R.; Block, G.; Rice, B. I.; Davis-Street, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Defining optimal nutrient requirements is imperative to ensure crew health on long-duration space exploration missions. To date, nutrient requirement data have been extremely limited because of small sample sizes and difficulties associated with collecting biological samples. In this study, we examined changes in body composition, bone metabolism, hematology, general blood chemistry, and blood levels of selected vitamins and minerals after long-duration (128-195 d) space flight aboard the International Space Station. Crew members consumed an average of 80% of the recommended energy intakes, and on landing day their body weight had decreased (P=0.051). After flight, hematocrit was less, and serum femtin was greater than before flight (Pretinol binding protein, transthyretin, and albumin were not changed after flight suggests that the changes in iron metabolism may not be strictly due to an inflammatory response. Urinary 8- hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration was greater and superoxide dismutase was less after flight, indicating that oxidative damage had increased (P<0.05). Despite the reported use of vitamin D supplements during flight, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly decreased after flight (P<0.01). Bone resorption was increased after flight, as indicated by several urinary markers of bone resorption. Bone formation, assessed by serum concentration of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, was elevated only in crew members who landed in Russia, probably because of the longer time lapse between landing and sample collection. These data provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin D status, and oxidative damage remain critical concerns for long-duration space flight.

  9. Eurotermbank – Term Bank of the New Eu Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Auksoriūtė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A European Commission project EuroTermBank - Collection of Pan-European Terminology Resources through Cooperation of Terminology Institutions - has been working already for two years starting from January 2005. Project coordinator was Tilde (Latvia, the project partners were: Institute for Information Management at Cologne University of Applied Sciences (Germany, Center for Language Technology at University of Copenhagen (Denmark, Institute of the Lithuanian Language (Lithuania, Terminology Commission of Latvian Academy of Science (Latvia, MorphoLogic (Hungary, University of Tartu (Estonia, Information Processing Center (Poland. EuroTermBank project has been focused on harmonization and consolidation of terminology work in new EU member states, transferring experience from other European Union terminology networks and accumulating competencies and efforts of the new EU countries. The result of the project is a centralized online term bank for languages of new EU member countries interlinked to other terminology banks and resources. The term bank is accessible via internet and it contains over 600 000 terminological entries, in which there are more than 1, 5 million terms in 25 languages. It has a link with four external data bases: TermNet.lv, OLSTEN, MoBiDic and Lietuvos Respublikos terminų bankas. In EuroTermBank there are over 78 000 Lithuanian terms and their equivalents in other languages from 11 sources. Terms in this term bank are arranged according to subject fields from Eurovoc – an official multilingual thesaurus of the European Union. The address of EuroTermBank web page is www.eurotermbank.com.

  10. 75 FR 7469 - Panel Member List for Hydropower Licensing Study Dispute Resolution; Notice Extending Filing Date...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Panel Member List for Hydropower Licensing Study Dispute Resolution; Notice Extending Filing Date for Applications for Panel Member List for Hydropower Licensing Study Dispute... in the Commission's hydropower integrated licensing process (ILP) study dispute resolution process...

  11. VIP visit to CERN P5 CMS of Pakistan Science Members

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    VIP visit to CERN P5 CMS of PAEC & JCPC Science Members List of PAEC Visitors: Dr. Badar Suleman - Member Science PAEC & Member of JCPC Dr. Waqar M. Butt - Member Engineering (Head of HMC3) Dr. Maqsood Ahmad - Chief Scientist (Head of Accelerator Project) List of CMS participants: Prof. Joseph Incandela, CMS Spokesperson Dr. Austin Ball, CMS Technical Coordinator Mr Andrzej Charkiewicz, CMS Resources Manager Dr. Michael Hoch, CMS Outreach activities, CMS photographer and guide Dr. Achille Petrilli, CMS Team Leader

  12. Changing development prospects for the Central and Eastern European EU member states

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Beáta

    2013-01-01

    One of the fundamental goals of European integration is to provide less-developed member states opportunities for convergence and strengthen economic and social cohesion. Before the crisis the convergence process was impressive in the new member states. This success raises the question of how the institutions of the new EU member states match the institution types previously worked out for the old member states, and whether they resemble any of the broadly accepted four models of capitalism (...

  13. Self-other rating agreement and leader-member exchange (LMX): a quasi-replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuto, John E; Wilmot, Michael P; Singh, Matthew; Story, Joana S P

    2012-04-01

    Data from a sample of 83 elected community leaders and 391 direct-report staff (resulting in 333 useable leader-member dyads) were reanalyzed to test relations between self-other rating agreement of servant leadership and member-reported leader-member exchange (LMX). Polynomial regression analysis indicated that the self-other rating agreement model was not statistically significant. Instead, all of the variance in member-reported LMX was accounted for by the others' ratings component alone.

  14. Reforming STEM Undergraduate Education: What's a Faculty Member to Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairweather, J.

    2011-12-01

    Efforts to improve undergraduate STEM education lie at the forefront of many national educational policies. The recent National Academies of Science study of discipline-based educational research (DBER)is typical of such efforts. Most of the initiatives to improve student learning in STEM focus on the the student or the instructor in the classroom (Austin, 2011). This focus is consistent with the work by Seymour & Hewitt (1997), which found that poor teaching in STEM adversely affects learning and retention in the major. Professional development efforts focus on helping the individual STEM faculty member to figure out what to do to improve student learning. Substantial research (Austin, 2011) shows that the origin of many learning problems lies beyond the control of the instructor or the individual classroom. In these circumstances what is a STEM faculty member to do? This paper explores answers to this question. The first step is to define the nature of the problem. Is it related to classroom teaching and learning such as knowledge, skills, and interest in the major? If so then what environmental factors affect strategic alternatives, including type of course, instructor characteristics, and prior teaching experience (Fairweather & Rhoads, 1995)? Does good disciplinary-based research on the learning problem exist? If so then how can the research results be translated into practice? If not then does good research from other disciplines exist? If relevant evidenced-based research does not exist at all then how can STEM instructors learn to evaluate key learning outcomes and find ways to ameliorate problems? Despite appearances not all STEM teaching and learning problems are classroom-based. Some problems derive from curricula, others from faculty work-related issues such as rewards and work load. Any classroom reform effort must reflect accurately the system in which the teaching and learning take place. Understanding these systemic interactions improves the ability

  15. Dynamic posture analysis of Spacelab-1 crew members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D J; Reschke, M F; Homick, J E; Werness, S A

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic posture testing was conducted on the science crew of the Spacelab-1 mission on a single axis linear motion platform. Tests took place in pre- and post-flight sessions lasting approximately 20 min each. The pre-flight tests were widely spaced over the several months prior to the mission while the post-flight tests were conducted over the first, second, fourth, and sixth days after landing. Two of the crew members were also tested on the day of landing. Consistent with previous postural testing conducted on flight crews, these crew members were able to complete simple postural tasks to an acceptable level even in the first few hours after landing. Our tests were designed to induce dynamic postural responses using a variety of stimuli and from these responses, evaluate subtle changes in the postural control system which had occurred over the duration of the flight. Periodic sampling post-flight allowed us to observe the time course of readaptation to terrestrial life. Our observations of hip and shoulder position, when subjected to careful analysis, indicated modification of the postural response from pre- to post-flight and that demonstrable adjustments in the dynamic control of their postural systems were taking place in the first few days after flight. For transient stimuli where the platform on which they were asked to stand quickly moved a few centimeters fore or aft then stopped, ballistic or open loop 'programs' would closely characterize the response. During these responses the desired target position was not always achieved and of equal importance not always properly corrected some 15 seconds after the platform ceased to move. The persistent observation was that the subjects had a much stronger dependence on visual stabilization post-flight than pre-flight. This was best illustrated by a slow or only partial recovery to an upward posture after a transient base-of-support movement with eyes open. Postural responses to persistent wideband pseudorandom

  16. Phosphorus flows and balances of the European Union Member States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijk, Kimo C. van, E-mail: kimo.vandijk@wur.nl [Department of Soil Quality, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Lesschen, Jan Peter, E-mail: janpeter.lesschen@wur.nl [Department of Soil Quality, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Oenema, Oene, E-mail: oene.oenema@wur.nl [Department of Soil Quality, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    Global society faces serious “phosphorus challenges” given the scarcity, essentiality, unequal global distribution and, at the same time, regional excess of phosphorus (P). Phosphorus flow studies can be used to analyze these challenges, providing insight into how society (re)uses and loses phosphorus, identifying potential solutions. Phosphorus flows were analyzed in detail for EU-27 and its Member States. To quantify food system and non-food flows, country specific data and historical context were considered. The sectors covered were crop production (CP), animal production (AP), food processing (FP), non-food production (NF) and consumption (HC). The results show that the EU-27 imported 2392 Gg P in 2005, half of which accumulated in agricultural soils (924 Gg) and half was lost as waste (1217 Gg). Net accumulation was 4.9 kg P/ha/year ranging between + 23.2 (Belgium) and − 2.8 (Slovakia). From the system losses, 54% was lost from HC in diverse waste flows and 28% from FP, mainly through incinerated slaughter residues. The largest HC losses (655 Gg) were wastewater (55%), food waste (27%), and pet excreta (11%). Phosphorus recycling rates were 73% in AP, 29% in FP, 21% in HC and ~ 0% in NF. The phosphorus use efficiencies showed that, relative to sector input, about 70% was taken up by crops (CP), 24% was retained in animals (AP), 52% was contained in food products (FP), 76% was stored in non-food materials (NF), and 21% was recycled (HC). Although wide-ranging variation between countries, generally phosphorus use in EU-27 was characterized by relatively (1) large dependency on (primary) imports, (2) long-term accumulation in agricultural soils, especially in west European countries, (3) leaky losses throughout entire society, especially emissions to the environment and sequestered waste, (4) little recycling with the exception of manure, and (5) low use efficiencies, because of aforementioned issues, providing ample opportunities for improvement

  17. 76 FR 70057 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions to Disregarded Entities; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BJ07 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA...) (concerning individuals who work for certain family members), 3127 (concerning members of religious faiths... their parents) of the Internal Revenue Code (``Code'') to entities that are disregarded as separate...

  18. 76 FR 71259 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions to Disregarded Entities; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BJ07 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA... for certain family members), 3127 (concerning members of religious faiths), and 3306(c)(5) (concerning persons employed by children and spouses and children under 21 employed by their parents) of the...

  19. 76 FR 76037 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions to Disregarded Entities; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BJ07 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA... for certain family members), 3127 (concerning members of religious faiths), and 3306(c)(5) (concerning persons employed by children and spouses and children under 21 employed by their parents) of the...

  20. 42 CFR 456.604 - Physician team member inspecting care of recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physician team member inspecting care of recipients... Intermediate Care Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.604 Physician team member inspecting care of recipients. No physician member of a team may inspect the care of a recipient for whom he...

  1. 5 CFR 734.405 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... and Positions § 734.405 Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan political office, or a...

  2. 7 CFR 7.18 - Terms of office of county and community members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms of office of county and community members. 7.18... STABILIZATION AND CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.18 Terms of office of county and community members. The term of office of county and community committee members and alternates to...

  3. 75 FR 65437 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Defense Cargo Riding Gang Members (DFARS Case...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Defense Cargo Riding Gang Members (DFARS Case 2007-D002) AGENCY: Defense... 3504 addresses requirements that apply to riding gang members and DoD- exempted individuals who perform.... 109-364). Section 3504 addresses requirements that apply to riding gang members and...

  4. Cultivating Political Powerhouses: TFA Corps Members Experiences That Shape Local Political Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Rebecca; White, Rachel; Reckhow, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, Teach for America (TFA) has invested in developing corps members as leaders. Although TFA asks corps members for a two-year commitment, TFA celebrates the achievements of alumni who have gone on to careers in politics, public policy, and advocacy. Thus, many community leaders see the arrival of TFA corps members as having a…

  5. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... serious health condition, the family member is unable to care for his or her own basic medical, hygienic... transfer to a nursing home. The employee need not be the only individual or family member available to care... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember...

  6. 7 CFR 917.17 - Nomination of shipper members of the Control Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nomination of shipper members of the Control Committee....17 Nomination of shipper members of the Control Committee. Nominations for the 12 members of the Control Committee to represent shippers shall be made in the following manner: (a) By February 1 of...

  7. 7 CFR 915.160 - Public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public member eligibility requirements and nomination... requirements and nomination procedures. (a) Public member and alternate member candidates shall not represent... candidates should be able to devote sufficient time to attend committee activities regularly and...

  8. 7 CFR 917.18 - Nomination of commodity committee members of the Control Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nomination of commodity committee members of the... Administrative Bodies § 917.18 Nomination of commodity committee members of the Control Committee. Nominations... following manner: (a) A nomination for one member shall be made by each commodity committee...

  9. 7 CFR 929.160 - Public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public member eligibility requirements and nomination... § 929.160 Public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures. (a) Public member and... committee activities regularly and to familiarize themselves with the background and economies of...

  10. 29 CFR 458.2 - Bill of rights of members of labor organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bill of rights of members of labor organizations. 458.2... § 458.2 Bill of rights of members of labor organizations. (a)(1) Equal rights. Every member of a labor organization shall have equal rights and privileges within such organization to nominate candidates, to vote in...

  11. Staff members with 25 years’ service at CERN in 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 24 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2007 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 11 October. Mr.\tBLEUS Baudouin\tAB Mr.\tBRUNEL Bernard\tPH Mr.\tCAILLET Norbert\tHR Dr.\tCASPERS Friedhelm\tAB Mr.\tCHEVRET Thierry\tTS Mr.\tCUMER Gérard\tTS Mrs.\tDA COSTA Maryse\tIT Mrs.\tDELAMARE Catherine\tIT Mr.\tERIKSSON Tommy\tAB Mrs.\tFOFFANO Susan\tIT Mr.\tGONZALEZ José Luis\tAB Mr.\tHUTCHINS Stephen\tAB Dr.\tKLEMPT Wolfgang\tPH Mr.\tLEVRIER François\tTS Dr.\tMARCHIORO Alessandro\tPH Mr.\tNORMANN Lasse\tAB Dr.\tRAICH Ulrich\tAB Mr.\tREBUT Michel\tPH Mr.\tRUSSO Aniello\tAT Dr.\tSTAMPFLI Lorenz\tDSU Mrs.\tTUUVA Martine\tTS Dr.\tWEISZ Sylvain\tTS Mr.\tYVON Guy\tAB Mr.\tZIEGLER Patrice\tTS

  12. Losing a valued member of the medical practice team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Losing a valued member of your staff can be disruptive, painful, and costly to your medical practice. And despite your best intentions and impeccable employee management policies and skills, things will happen beyond your control, and people move on. Being prepared for that possibility will help you minimize and contain the damage and move your practice forward. This article suggests 15 strategies that you can use to mitigate the effects of losing a valued employee. These include strategies to protect your practice's interests and several that will smooth the transition for your remaining staff. This article also describes 10 ways that losing a valued employee can impact a practice. It offers 10 additional strategies to help you cope with the death of an employee, one of the most difficult challenges a practice manager may ever face. This article further suggests several easy-to-implement practice management techniques that will help you soften the blow of employee turnover. It offers a sample farewell letter to announce an employee's departure from your practice and suggests six knowledge transfer questions to ask before the employee leaves. Finally, this article provides a comprehensive list of more than 30 thoughtful, eye-opening, and revealing questions that you can ask in an employee exit interview or exit survey.

  13. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association.

  14. Exercise habit formation in new gym members: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Navin; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2015-08-01

    Reasoned action approaches have primarily been applied to understand exercise behaviour for the past three decades, yet emerging findings in unconscious and Dual Process research show that behavior may also be predicted by automatic processes such as habit. The purpose of this study was to: (1) investigate the behavioral requirements for exercise habit formation, (2) how Dual Process approach predicts behaviour, and (3) what predicts habit by testing a model (Lally and Gardner in Health Psychol Rev 7:S137-S158, 2013). Participants (n = 111) were new gym members who completed surveys across 12 weeks. It was found that exercising for at least four bouts per week for 6 weeks was the minimum requirement to establish an exercise habit. Dual Process analysis using Linear Mixed Models (LMM) revealed habit and intention to be parallel predictors of exercise behavior in the trajectory analysis. Finally, the habit antecedent model in LLM showed that consistency (β = .21), low behavioral complexity (β = .19), environment (β = .17) and affective judgments (β = .13) all significantly (p < .05) predicted changes in habit formation over time. Trainers should keep exercises fun and simple for new clients and focus on consistency which could lead to habit formation in nearly 6 weeks.

  15. Hereditary Angioedema: Three Cases Report, Members of the Same Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Kolokotronis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This current clinical case report highlights three cases of Hereditary angioedema (HAE patients who are all members of the same family (father and his two daughters. The father has C1–INH deficiency, while his daughters have low C1–INH levels: the first possesses only 10% function and the second has low C1–INH level with 0% function. Of note, the second daughter was discovered to have HAE at the age of 2, thus making her the youngest known HAE case report in the English literature.Methods: Assess the efficacy of administration of C1-INH before dental operation as regards the prevention of HAE episode, when total or partial C1-INH deficiency exists.Results: Acute angioedema leading to laryngeal oedema is a possibly fatal complication for HAE patients undergoing dental procedures. Use of both short-term and long-term HAE prophylaxis prior to dental operations might be life saving for those patients.Conclusions: Prevention and early recognition of potential laryngeal oedema that can occur as a complication of dental procedures may be lifesaving for HAE patients.

  16. DISTRIBUTION ASPECTS OF THE DIRECT PAYMENTS BETWEEN EU MEMBER STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina FINTINERU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available EC proposals concerning CAP reform for 2014-2020 try to cope both with the wide variety of agricultural systems and economic structures of the 27 EU MS but also with current global challenges that agriculture has to face: food security and poverty reduction, climate changes or biodiversity loss. This article aims to analyse the proposed measures consistency with the current situation of Romanian agriculture. Distribution aspects of the direct payments between Member States are concerned. The data are originated in FADN and Eurostat statistics, and a non parametric approach is used in order to better understand the correlation between the direct payments proposed for 2014 -2020 and some socio economic criteria.The paper provides a brief analysis of the existing research concerning the distributional aspects (studies and statistics and contributes to the debate by examining if the proposed redistribution is a consistent and coherent answer to the future challenges the agriculture has to meet in the future and to the targeted equity criteria.

  17. Summer work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2016-01-01

    During the period from 13 June to 9 September 2016 inclusive, there will be a limited number of opportunities for summer work at CERN (normally unskilled work of routine nature), which will be made available to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization).     Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all contracts will be four weeks and the subsistence allowance will be CHF 1500.- for this period.  Candidates should apply via the HR department’s electronic recruitment system: https://jobs.web.cern.ch/job/11758. Completed application forms must be returned by 4 April 2016 at the latest. The results of the selection will be available by the end of May 2016. For further information, please contact: Virginie.Galvin@cern.ch - Tel.: 72855...

  18. INTERVIEW WITH MR. WILHELM SCHUSTER, MEMBER OF BIOCOOP SIBIU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Foca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This interview was taken at the Conference on Social economy – innovative model for promoting the active inclusion of disadvantaged groups organized during 12-14 October 2012 in Bucharest and attended by initiators and promoters of social economy activities in Romania and other European states. Mr. Wilhelm Schuster is a member of BIOCOOP and works in Moșna commune, Sibiu district. He owns an organic farm where he works together with his family and trades regional organic produce. His experience in the business is extensive due to his frequent participation in farmers’ meetings and exchanges of know-how organized in Europe and in the US. In the interview below, Mr. Schuster made a brief presentation of the BIOCOOP commercial cooperative and highlighted the following issues: why he set up the cooperative, what were his main achievements, what kind of challenges he came across in this business, and how to promote cooperatives in general. Mr. Schuster believes BIOCOOP can be seen as a best practice of the Romanian social economy and urges consumers to have confidence in the regional organic products they buy.

  19. Phylogeny of rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitulle, C; Dorsch, M; Kazda, J; Wolters, J; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-07-01

    The 16S rRNAs from nine rapidly growing Mycobacterium species were partially sequenced by using the dideoxynucleotide-terminated, primer extension method with cDNA generated by reverse transcriptase. The sequences were aligned with 47 16S rRNA or DNA sequences that represented 30 previously described and 5 undescribed species of the genus Mycobacterium, and a dendrogram was constructed by using equally weighted distance values. Our results confirmed the phylogenetic separation of the rapidly and slowly growing mycobacteria and showed that the majority of the slowly growing members of the genus represent the most recently evolved organisms. The 24 strains which represented 21 rapidly growing species constituted several sublines, which were defined by the following taxa: (i) Mycobacterium neoaurum and M. diernhoferi, (ii) M. gadium, (iii) the M. chubuense cluster, (iv) the M. fortuitum cluster, (v) M. kommossense, (vi) M. sphagni, (vii) M. fallax and M. chitae, (viii) M. aurum and M. vaccae, (ix) the M. flavescens cluster, and (x) M. chelonae subsp. abscessus. Our phylogenetic analysis confirmed the validity of the phenotypically defined species mentioned above, but our conclusions disagree with most of the conclusions about intrageneric relationships derived from numerical phenetic analyses.

  20. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The 74 staff members who have spent 25 years at CERN in 2005 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 22 November. ADRIAN Gilbert / AB ALLIOD Marie-Noëlle / AB ANTOINET Gérard / SC AUBERT Marc / TS AUQUIER Christian / SC BAIRD Simon / AB BARRAS Suzanne / PH BAUD Richard / AT BELLONI Jean / SC BERTUOL Gilbert / SC BLANC Jean-Luc / AB BONVALLET Guy / SC BOSSUS Patrice / SC BROERE Johannes / AB BRU Yvon / TS BURDAIRON Alain / TS CANARD Philippe / AT CAVALLO Patrice / SC CHARRA Patrick / PH CHATAIGNEAU Marc / SC COLIN Gilles / SC DAHLEN Pierre / AB DE GROOT Johannes / PH DEDOBBELER Bernard / TS DELCAMBRE Jean Pierre / SC DELENCLOS Yves / TS DEROYER Patrick / SC DESBISSONS Christian / SC DRAPER Mick / AB DROUX Pascal / FI DUCASTEL Claude / TS DUMUR Alain / SC FOCKER Gerrit / AB FOFFANO Giuseppe / TS FORRAT Isabelle / IT FREI Marie-José / DSU FRESSARD Michel / TS GAGNIERE Daniel / TS GIUDICI Pierre-Ange / PH GOICOECHEA Bernard / TS GUEHO Alain / TS GUENEHEC François / SC JE...

  1. Strange Stars : An interesting member of the compact object family

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Manjari; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2008-01-01

    We have studied strange star properties both at zero temperature and at finite temperatures and searched signatures of strange stars in gamma-ray, x-ray and radio astronomy. We have a set of Equations of State (EoS) for strange quark matter (SQM) and solving the TOV equations, we get the structure of strange stars. The maximum mass for a strange star decreases with the increase of temperature, because at high temperatures, the EoS become softer. One important aspect of strange star is that, surface tension depends on the size and structure of the star and is significantly larger than the conventional values. Moment of inertia is another important parameter for compact stars as by comparing theoretical values with observed estimate, it is possible to constrain the dense matter Equation of State. We hope that this approach will help us to decide whether the members of the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039 are neutron stars or strange stars.

  2. Under Stress: Europeanisation and Trade Associations in the Members States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Lehmkuhl

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Until today, it is relatively disputed how European integration impacts on domestic associations and the patterns of public-private interactions at the national level. While some predict a withering away of national corporatisms, others predict they would be reinforced. By making organization theory available to institution-theoretical approaches, the paper offers a conceptual means that makes it possible to present an encompassing and theory-guided picture of the impact of European integration on societal structures in the member states. Associations - in the presented cases, business associations of the transport sector in Germany and the Netherlands -, as intermediate organisations operate at the interface between private and public actors and incorporate the dynamics of their political and economic environments in both structural and strategic terms. It is argued that the way in which the configuration of associations within a sector changes in the course of European integration relates to efforts at this intermediate level to maintain or increase its relative autonomy from both its constituencies and its interlocutors.

  3. EU MEMBER STATES AND FISCAL DECENTRALIZATION– EMPIRICAL COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žan Oplotnik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of an article is to compare systems of fiscal decentralization in EU member states according to selected quantitative criteria and European Charter of Local Self-Government principles. The results show that a higher number of lower levels of government usually indicate a greater share of local finance within the total public finance, however, this finding does not confirm the inverse link. Even though the structure of expenditures in EU countries is similar, the shares of funds for the implementation of individual tasks differ significantly. On average, the countries allocate most funds to education, social security, healthcare, administration and political systems, with only a quarter of the countries recording the same or higher amounts of revenues than expenditures. Most of the countries still cover the existing deficit either through transfers from the central to lower levels of government or through equalization schemes or borrowing, which otherwise represents a departure from one of the basic principles of the Charter, which stipulates that financial resources must be commensurate with the responsibilities of local self-government.

  4. Interventions for family members caring for an elder with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Gayle J; Winter, Mary A

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews 73 published and unpublished research reports of interventions for family members caring for an elder with dementia by nurse researchers and researchers from other disciplines. Reports were identified through searches of MEDLINE, CINAHL, Social Science Index, PsycINFO, ERIC, Social Work Abstracts, American Association of Retired Persons database, CRISP index of the National Institutes of Health, Cochrane Center database, and Dissertation Abstracts using the following search terms: caregiver, caregiving, dementia, Alzheimer's, intervention study, evaluation study, experimental, and quasi-experimental design. Additional keywords were used to narrow or expand the search as necessary. All nursing research was included in the review and nonnursing research was included if published between 1991 and 2001. Studies were included if they used a design that included a treatment and control group or a one-group, pretest-posttest design (ex post facto designs were included if they used a comparison group). Key findings show that approximately 32% of the study outcomes (e.g., burden, depression, knowledge) were changed after intervention in the desired direction. In addition, several problematic issues were identified including small, diverse samples; lack of intervention specificity; diversity in the length, duration, and intensity of the intervention strategies; and problematic outcome measures.

  5. Family members' influence on family meal vegetable choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich, Tionni R; Brown, J Lynne; Miller-Day, Michelle; Kelley, Kevin J; Lengerich, Eugene J

    2010-01-01

    Characterize the process of family vegetable selection (especially cruciferous, deep orange, and dark green leafy vegetables); demonstrate the usefulness of Exchange Theory (how family norms and experiences interact with rewards and costs) for interpreting the data. Eight focus groups, 2 with each segment (men/women vegetable likers/dislikers based on a screening form). Participants completed a vegetable intake form. Rural Appalachian Pennsylvania. Sixty-one low-income, married/cohabiting men (n = 28) and women (n = 33). Thematic analysis within Exchange Theory framework for qualitative data. Descriptive analysis, t tests and chi-square tests for quantitative data. Exchange Theory proved useful for understanding that regardless of sex or vegetable liker/disliker status, meal preparers see more costs than rewards to serving vegetables. Experience plus expectations of food preparer role and of deference to family member preferences supported a family norm of serving only vegetables acceptable to everyone. Emphasized vegetables are largely ignored because of unfamiliarity; family norms prevented experimentation and learning through exposure. Interventions to increase vegetable consumption of this audience could (1) alter family norms about vegetables served, (2) change perceptions of experiences, (3) reduce social and personal costs of serving vegetables, and (4) increase tangible and social rewards of serving vegetables. Copyright 2010 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Summer work for children of members of the personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    During the period from 15 June to 11 September 2015 inclusive, there will be a limited number of summer jobs at CERN (normally unskilled work of a routine nature) will be offered to children of members of the personnel (i.e. anyone holding an employment or association contract with the Organization).   Candidates must be aged between 18 and 24 inclusive on the first day of the contract, and must have insurance coverage for both illness and accident. The duration of all contracts will be 4 weeks and the subsistence allowance will be 1500 CHF for this period. Candidates should apply via the HR Department’s electronic recruitment system: https://jobs.web.cern.ch/job/11323. Completed application forms must be returned by 5 April 2015 at the latest.  The results of the selection will be available by the end of May 2015. For further information, please contact: Virginie.Galvin@cern.ch, tel. 72855 (Geraldine.Ballet@cern.ch, tel. 74151) HR Department

  7. Investigating social discrimination of group members by laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyesinghe, Siobhan M; McLeman, Morven A; Owen, Rachael C; McMahon, Claire E; Wathes, Christopher M

    2009-05-01

    Social relationships in domestic fowl are commonly assumed to rely on social recognition and its pre-requisite, discrimination of group-mates. If this is true, then the unnatural physical and social environments in which commercial laying hens are typically housed, when compared with those in which their progenitor species evolved, may compromise social function with consequent implications for welfare. Our aims were to determine whether adult hens can discriminate between unique pairs of familiar conspecifics, and to establish the most appropriate method for assessing this social discrimination. We investigated group-mate discrimination using two learning tasks in which there was bi-directional exchange of visual, auditory and olfactory information. Learning occurred in a Y-maze task (psocial discrimination or to the response task. Learning also failed to occur in this familiar/unfamiliar social discrimination task (p=0.001; n=1/10). Our findings demonstrate unequivocally that adult laying hens kept in small groups, under environmental conditions more consistent with those in which sensory capacities evolved, can discriminate group members: however, appropriate methods to demonstrate discrimination are crucial.

  8. Leader-Member Exchange Theory in Higher and Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Leo Power

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike many other prominent leadership theories, leader-member exchange (LMX theory does not focus on the specific characteristics of an effective organizational leader. Rather, LMX focuses on the nature and quality of the relationships between a leader and his or her individual subordinates. The ideal is for a leader to develop as many high-quality relationships as possible. This will lead to increases in subordinates’ sense of job satisfaction and organizational citizenship, as well as to increased productivity and attainment of organizational goals. LMX has been criticized for its potential to alienate some subordinates, failing to account for the effects of group dynamics and social identity, and failing to provide specific advice on how leaders can develop high-quality relationships. However, LMX has been heralded as an important leadership theory in higher and distance educational contexts because of its emphasis on promoting autonomy and citizenship, as well as its ability to complement and mediate transformational leadership styles. Recent authors have attempted to provide specific advice for leaders who want to learn how to build and capitalize on the high-quality relationships described by LMX theory.

  9. Keck Adaptive Optics Observations of TW Hydrae Association Members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macintosh, B; Max, C; Zuckerman, B; Becklin, E E; Kaisler, D; Lowrance, P; Weinberger, A; Chirstou, J; Schneider, G; Acton, S

    2001-05-30

    Adaptive optics (AO) on 8-10 m telescopes is an enormously powerful tool for studying young nearby stars. It is especially useful for searching for companions. Using AO on the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope we have measured the position of the brown dwarf companion to TWA5 and resolved the primary into an 0.055{double_prime} double. Over the next several years follow-up astrometry should permit an accurate determination of the masses of these young stars. We have also re-observed the candidate extrasolar planet TWAGB, but measurements of its motion relative to TWA6A are inconclusive. We are carrying out a search for new planetary or brown dwarf companions to TWA stars and, if current giant planet models are correct, are currently capable of detecting a 1 Jupiter-mass companion at {approx} 1.0{double_prime} and a 5 Jupiter-mass companion at {approx} 0.5{double_prime} around a typical TWA member.

  10. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The following staff members with 25 years' service in 2003 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 20 November 2003: ALLIOD Patrick/ATGESCHONKE Gunther/AB AYMON Marcel/HRGLASER Maurice/EP BAUDET Serge/TISHUGOT Bernard/AB BENOIT-JEANNIN Brigitte/SPLJOUVE Christian/AT BERRY Peter/HRJULLIARD André/ST BIERI Catherine/STLAFAGE Patrice/ST BLANC Didier/STLAJUST Danièle/DSU BLANC Michel/ITLEGRAND Dominique/AT BOCH Guy/ITLONG Serge/EST BONZANO Roberto/STLYONNET André/EP BURCKHART Doris/EPMALOD-DOGNIN Jean-Pierre/ST BURNS Alan/ABMAURY Stephan/AC BURTIN Gérard/ABMILES John/AT CARENA Wisla/EPMONET René/EST CASTEL André/ESTMULLER André/TIS CLIFF Frank/HRPERREAL Pierre/AT CUCCURU Giovanni/ATPETERSEN Jørgen/EP DAMIANI Michel/ABPETIT Patrick/EP DELUCINGE Evelyne/ATPIERRE Patrice/AB DHOTE Patrick/SPLROUX Jacques/EP FLUCKIGER François/ITSAMYN Dirk/EP FORESTE Antonio/ESTSAVIOZ Jean Jacques/AB FRAIS...

  11. Carbon Nanotubes as a chemical sensor: Six membered ring molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumanasekera, G. U.; Adu, C. K. A.; Pradhan, B. K.; Romero, H. E.; Eklund, P. C.

    2002-03-01

    The thermoelectric response of a mat of a carbon nanotubes has been shown to be sensitive to the details of the molecule-SWNT interaction. In this presentation, we consider the effects of the adsorption of the six-membered-ring hydrocarbon molecules with varying π electron population (C_6H_n; n=6,8,10,12), heteroatoms (N), and adducts, etc. A wide variety of the thermoelectric response to these similar molecules is observed. For example, adsorption of Benzene (n=6) induces a giant increase of the thermopower, even reversing the sign. As the π electrons of the molecule are removed (i.e., increasing hydrogenation), the effect disapears. Thus, a selective chemical response is observed. The phenomenon is identied with scattering driven by the coupling of the π electrons in the molecule and the nanotube wall. Pyridine, on the otherhand, drives the thermopower more negative, and decreases the resistivity, suggesting charge transfer between nanotube and adsorbed molecule. Work supported by ONR # N00014-99-1-0619

  12. Military service absences and family members' mental health: A timeline followback assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Aubrey J; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-08-01

    Although military service, and particularly absence due to deployment, has been linked to risk for depression and anxiety among some spouses and children of active duty service members, there is limited research to explain the heterogeneity in family members' reactions to military service stressors. The current investigation introduces the Timeline Followback Military Family Interview (TFMFI) as a clinically useful strategy to collect detailed time-linked information about the service member's absences. Two dimensions of parent absence--the extent to which absences coincide with important family events and cumulative time absent--were tested as potential risks to family members' mental health. Data from 70 mother-adolescent pairs revealed that the number of important family events missed by the service member was linked to elevated youth symptoms of depression, even when accounting for the number of deployments and cumulative duration of the service member's absence. However, youth who reported more frequent contact with the service member during absences were buffered from the effects of extensive absence. Mothers' symptoms were associated with the cumulative duration of the service members' time away, but not with family events missed by the service member. These results identify circumstances that increase the risk for mental health symptoms associated with military family life. The TFMFI provides an interview-based strategy for clinicians wishing to understand military family members' lived experience during periods of service-member absence. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Experimental Study on a Single Layer Two-Way Grid Shell with Tension Members

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghao Zhang; Masumi Fujimoto; Atsuo Takino; Katsuhiko Imai

    2015-01-01

    Single layer two⁃way grid shell with in⁃plane and out⁃of⁃plane tension members is a new type of single⁃layer latticed shell roofs. Compared with traditional single⁃layer latticed shells, this new type has a unique mesh form and excellent rigidity. In order to further understand the buckling behaviors of single layer two⁃way grid cylindrical shell roof with tension members, the buckling experiments have been undertaken to investigate the effect of tension members, in either out⁃of⁃plane or in⁃plane placement. A single layer two⁃way grid cylindrical shell roof with out⁃of⁃plane tension members has been tested under symmetric and asymmetric loading. The tension member placement, the introducing initial axial force to tension members and the load patterns are considered to investigate the buckling behavior. Experimental results indicate that four long out⁃of⁃plane tension members work well under symmetrical loading, but only two long out⁃of⁃plane tension members work under asymmetrical loading. It can be concluded that the PC bar members used as tension members for this study are useful in the construction of a single layer two⁃way grid cylindrical shell roof with structural members intersecting at small angles.

  14. Method of producing ceramic distribution members for solid state electrolyte cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Douglas J. (Inventor); Galica, Leo M. (Inventor); Losey, Robert W. (Inventor); Suitor, Jerry W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solid state electrolyte cells apparatus and method of producing is disclosed. The apparatus can be used for separating oxygen from an oxygen-containing feedstock or as a fuel cell for reacting fluids. Cells can be stacked so that fluids can be introduced and removed from the apparatus through ceramic distribution members having ports designed for distributing the fluids in parallel flow to and from each cell. The distribution members can also serve as electrodes to membranes or as membrane members between electrodes, The distribution member design does not contain any horizontal internal ports which allows the member to be thin. A method of tape casting in combination with an embossing method allows intricate radial ribs and bosses to be formed on each distribution member. The bosses serve as seals for the ports and allow the distribution members to be made without any horizontal internal ports.

  15. Geographic Data as Personal Data in Four EU Member States

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, A. J.; van Loenen, B.; Zevenbergen, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    The EU Directive 95/46/EC on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data aims at harmonising data protection legislation in the European Union. This should promote the free flow of products and services within the EU. This research found a wide variety of interpretations of the application of data protection legislation to geographic data. The variety was found among the different EU Member States, the different stakeholders and the different types of geographic data. In the Netherlands, the Data Protection Authority (DPA) states that panoramic images of streets are considered personal data. While Dutch case law judges that the data protection legislation does not apply if certain features are blurred and no link to an address is provided. The topographic datasets studied in the case studies do not contain personal data, according to the Dutch DPA, while the German DPA and the Belgian DPA judge that topographic maps of a large scale can contain personal data, and impose conditions on the processing of topographic maps. The UK DPA does consider this data outside of the scope of legal definition of personal data. The patchwork of differences in data protection legislation can be harmonised by using a traffic light model. This model focuses on the context in which the processing of the data takes place and has four categories of data: (1) sensitive personal data, (2) personal data, (3), data that can possibly lead to identification, and (4) non-personal data. For some geographic data, for example factual data that does not reveal sensitive information about a person, can be categorised in the third category giving room to opening up data under the INSPIRE Directive.

  16. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  17. Staff members with 25 years’ service at CERN in 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The 47 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2008 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 24 October. Mr.\tAllen\tDavid John\tAB Dr.\tBailey\tRoger\tAB Mr.\tBlas\tAlfred\tAB Mr.\tBobbio\tPiero\tAB Dr.\tBona\tMaurizio\tSC Mr.\tBrachet\tJean-Pierre\tTS Dr.\tBurckhart\tHelfried\tPH Miss\tButtay\tCatherine\tFI Mr.\tCatherall\tRichard\tAB Mr.\tCoin\tAndré-Yvon\tTS Dr.\tCornelis\tKarel\tAB Dr.\tDavenport\tMartyn\tPH Mr.\tDehavay\tClaude\tAB Mr.\tDenblyden\tJean-Loup\tPH Mr.\tDenis\tBernard\tDSU Mr.\tDuret\tMax\tAT Mr.\tEvans\tJohn\tIT Mrs.\tFavrot\tVéronique\tIT Mr.\tFowler\tAntony\tAB Mrs.\tGalmant\tCatherine\tAB Mr.\tGuillaume\tJean-Claude\tTS Mrs.\tJerdelet\tJocelyne\tDSU Dr.\tKostro\tKrzysztof\tAB Mr.\tKuczerowski\tJoseph\tAB Mr.\tLappe\tJean-Pierre\tTS Mrs.\tLaverrière\tCatherine\tSC Mr.\tLeggiero\tLuigi\tTS Mr.\tManglunki\tDjango\tAB Mr.\tMartens\tReinoud\tIT Mr.\tMartinez\tGeorges\tSC Mr.\tMonchalin\tPhilippe\tSC Mr.\tMoret\tPhilippe\tDSU Mr.\tOlesen\tGert\tPH Mr.\tPasinelli\tSergi...

  18. Can Spiritual Intelligence Affect Professionalism in Medical Faculty Members?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Karimi Moonaghi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regarding to the importance of spiritual intelligence and professionalism in faculty development, this study aimed to determine the level of spiritual intelligence, the level of professional development and leadership, and performance of professional responsibilities as two components of professionalism, and the relationship between spiritual intelligence and professionalism.Methods: This is a correlation cross-sectional study with 160 medical faculty members as subjects, which was defined base on stratified probability sampling in one of the medical universities in Iran. King’s modified spiritual intelligence questionnaire and teaching competency self assessment instrument of Alabama University were used. Statistical tests such as t-test, two-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal–Wallis, spearman and regressions were applied to analyze. P-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results: The results showed that the mean score of spiritual intelligence was 63±1.2, which classifies as moderate. The median score of professional development and leadership was 9 with range between 4 and 12; and the median score of performance of professional responsibilities was 17 with range between 5 and 20. There was a significant relationship between spiritual intelligence and performance of professional responsibilities (rs=0.23, p=0.003. There was no significant relationship between spiritual intelligence and professional development and leadership (rs=0.13, p=0.11. Conclusion: We found a significant relationship between spiritual intelligence and self assessed professionalism components in performance of professional responsibilities dimension, indicating that spiritual intelligence can be the basis for professional promotion.

  19. Student service members/veterans on campus: Challenges for reintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsari, Brian; Yurasek, Ali; Miller, Mary Beth; Murphy, James G; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Martens, Matthew P; Darcy, Monica G; Carey, Kate B

    2017-01-01

    Many returning OIF/OEF/OND Veterans are seeking higher education in an effort to develop a meaningful career and financial stability. Evidence suggests that student service members/veterans (SSM/Vs) are experiencing less academic success than other students. The purpose of this review is to identify the unique challenges of SSM/Vs and evaluate current campus efforts to facilitate their retention and academic performance. With a focus on SSM/Vs attending colleges and universities, we obtained 57 peer-reviewed and 73 gray literature records published between 2001 and 2015. The current SSM/V literature contains an abundance of gray literature, and the empirical research tends to be limited by cross-sectional design and small sample sizes. SSM/Vs encounter significant personal and environmental challenges when transitioning from the military to college campuses. A variety of services have been developed to address the needs of the SSM/V population, but the efficacy of these services remains largely unknown. In conclusion, there is a clear need to provide education to faculty, students, and staff regarding the experiences of SSM/Vs. Efforts to enhance screening for, availability of, and SSM/V engagement in mental health services would also be beneficial, as would improved availability of and SSM/V access to academic support. All future programs designed to address the unique challenges of SSM/Vs in the academic environment should also be systematically implemented and evaluated. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Expression and evolution of members of the Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote surface antigen multigene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruef, B J; Dawson, B D; Tewari, D; Fouts, D L; Manning, J E

    1994-01-01

    The trypomastigote specific surface antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi are encoded by a supergene family which includes the TSA family. The TSA family is characterized by the presence of a 27-bp tandem repeat array in the coding region. Here, we report the characterization and analysis of the three TSA family members in the Esmeraldo strain of the parasite. In this strain 2 distinct telomeric members are expressed abundantly as 3.7-kb mRNAs, while the remaining member is located at an internal chromosomal site and is expressed at less than 2% of the level seen for the telomeric members. Based on hybridization to DNA separated by PFGE, 3 chromosomes of sizes 1.8 Mb, 0.98 Mb, and 0.90 Mb each contain one of the telomeric members. In addition, the two smaller chromosomes also contain the single internal member. Since both chromosomes contain similar TSA family members, and vary only slightly in size, we suggest that they are homologues. Comparisons of the nucleotide sequences of the different members of the family show that the internal gene differs from the telomeric genes primarily in sequences found 3' of the repeat array. These comparisons also reveal that the three genes are analogous, supporting the hypothesis that short segments between the family members are exchanged by gene conversion events. We propose that similar conversion events between members of different gene families may generate some of the diversity found within the supergene family.

  1. Quality of life and health status of dyads of women with lung cancer and family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Linda; Cooley, Mary E; Brown, Jean K; Williams, Roma D; Chernecky, Cynthia; Padilla, Geraldine; Danao, Leda Layo

    2006-11-27

    To describe and compare the quality of life (QOL) and health status of dyads of women with lung cancer and their family members and to explore the correlates of family members' QOL. Descriptive, cross-sectional. Interview, self-report. 51 dyads consisting of women with lung cancer and their family members. One-time assessment of family members' and patients' QOL, health status, and demographics and patients' clinical characteristics. Family and patient QOL and health status. QOL of the dyads was not significantly related. Poorer physical QOL of family members was associated with older age, comorbid conditions, less education, and alcohol use. Poorer emotional QOL of family members was associated with younger age, depressed mood, and not being a spouse. Fifty-nine percent of family members had comorbid conditions. Significantly more family members continued to smoke and use alcohol. The QOL of family members of patients with lung cancer is diminished when their own health status is compromised. Further study is needed. Additional study is needed to identify family members at risk for diminished QOL and with compromised health status because these factors might affect ability to support patients with lung cancer.

  2. Characterization of members to stellar kinematic groups using chemical tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, H. M.

    2014-10-01

    In this thesis we have characterized more than one thousand late-type stars. For this characterization we have been making use of high resolution spectroscopy (R > 40,000) taken in different spectrographs, HERMES at the Mercator telescope in La Palma, FOCES in the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto, the Coudé-Echelle spectrograph at 2 m-the Alfred- Jensch-Teleskop in Tautenburg, and UVES at the Very Large Telescope in La Silla. Stellar spectroscopy, in particular at high-resolution, is a modern tool that allows us to extract a lot of information of a given star. In particular, we have obtained their atmospheric parameters, namely: effective temperature (Teff), surface gravity (log g), microturbulent velocity (ξ), and iron abundance ([Fe/H], used as a metallicity proxy). An automatic code (StePar) has been developed. This code allows to derive stellar atmospheric parameters (Teff , log g, ξ, and [Fe/H]) only in a few minutes. Also, with these parameters at hand we have derived chemical abundances for 20 different chemical elements: Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, and Nd, which offer many or at least some isolated transitions in the wavelength range of the spectra taken with these spectrographs. This work comprises two publications in Astronomy & Astrophysics. The first one is about chemical tagging applied to the Hyades SC (see Chapter 2 or Tabernero et al. 2012). The second paper is a in-depth study of the chemical composition of candidate members to the Ursa Major MG (see Chapter 3 or Tabernero et al. 2015). Additionally there is another chapter that comprises the analysis of Galactic stars within the GAIA ESO Survey stars (GES, Gilmore et al. 2012; Randich & Gilmore 2013) whose data have contributed to the publication of some release (Lanzafame et al. 2014; Smiljanic et al. 2014) and science papers (Jofre et al. 2014; Sousa et al. 2014; Spina et al. 2014a,b) that made use the survey results. The two papers included in

  3. Emotional disorders in pairs of patients and their family members during and after ICU stay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rego Lins Fumis

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients and family members undergo different experiences of suffering from emotional disorders during ICU stay and after ICU discharge. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms in pairs (patient and respective family member, during stay at an open visit ICU and at 30 and 90-days post-ICU discharge. We hypothesized that there was a positive correlation with the severity of symptoms among pairs and different patterns of suffering over time. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in a 22-bed adult general ICU including patients with >48 hours stay. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS was completed by the pairs (patients/respective family member. Interviews were made by phone at 30 and 90-days post-ICU discharge using the Impact of Event Scale (IES and the HADS. Multivariate models were constructed to predict IES score at 30 days for patients and family members. RESULTS: Four hundred and seventy one family members and 289 patients were interviewed in the ICU forming 184 pairs for analysis. Regarding HADS score, patients presented less symptoms than family members of patients who survived and who deceased at 30 and 90-days (p<0.001. However, family members of patients who deceased scored higher anxiety and depression symptoms (p = 0.048 at 90-days when compared with family members of patients who survived. Patients and family members at 30-days had a similar IES score, but it was higher in family members at 90-days (p = 0.019. For both family members and patients, age and symptoms of anxiety and depression during ICU were the major determinants for PTSD at 30-days. CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety, depression and PTSD symptoms were higher in family members than in the patients. Furthermore, these symptoms in family members persisted at 3 months, while they decreased in patients.

  4. The burden of living with and caring for a suicidal family member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Columba; McGowan, Iain; O'Neill, Siobhan; Kernohan, George

    2014-10-01

    The family has a primary role in caring for family members who are suicidal and in the prevention of future suicide. However, the impact that suicidal behaviour has on these family members is poorly understood. To explore the lived experiences of participants who cared for suicidal family members. Eighteen participants were interviewed using a short topic guide. Responses were digitally recorded and transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. One overarching theme: "Hard work for the whole family" and four sub-themes: (i) Family burden, (ii) competing pressures, (iii) secrecy and shame and (iv) helplessness and guilt. Caring for a suicidal family member may be euphemistically summarised as "hard work" that impacts heavily on the day-to-day tasks of other family members. Participants spent much time worrying and ruminating about the risk of suicide in their family member. Mental health care professionals ought to acknowledge and address the impact that suicidal behaviour has on family carers.

  5. Member Checking: A Tool to Enhance Trustworthiness or Merely a Nod to Validation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Linda; Scott, Suzanne; Cavers, Debbie; Campbell, Christine; Walter, Fiona

    2016-06-22

    The trustworthiness of results is the bedrock of high quality qualitative research. Member checking, also known as participant or respondent validation, is a technique for exploring the credibility of results. Data or results are returned to participants to check for accuracy and resonance with their experiences. Member checking is often mentioned as one in a list of validation techniques. This simplistic reporting might not acknowledge the value of using the method, nor its juxtaposition with the interpretative stance of qualitative research. In this commentary, we critique how member checking has been used in published research, before describing and evaluating an innovative in-depth member checking technique, Synthesized Member Checking. The method was used in a study with patients diagnosed with melanoma. Synthesized Member Checking addresses the co-constructed nature of knowledge by providing participants with the opportunity to engage with, and add to, interview and interpreted data, several months after their semi-structured interview. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Predicting health plan member retention from satisfaction surveys: the moderating role of intention and complaint voicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, John W

    2008-01-01

    Many health plans have tried to increase member retention by improving their scores on customer satisfaction surveys. However, prior research has demonstrated weak relationships between member satisfaction and retention, suggesting that other variables are needed to understand how satisfaction impacts member retention. In a longitudinal study 4,806 health plan members who completed satisfaction surveys were re-assessed three years later; we compared measures of satisfaction, intention, and complaining behavior from voluntary disenrollees and retained members. The relationship between satisfaction and retention was moderated by members' intentions to disenroll. The findings suggest that health plans can enhance the predictive validity of their satisfaction surveys by including measures of both satisfaction and intentions.

  7. Educational Background and Academic Rank of Faculty Members within US Schools of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assemi, Mitra; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Sowinski, Kevin M; Corelli, Robin L

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To characterize the educational background and academic rank of faculty members in US schools of pharmacy, estimate the extent to which they are employed by institutions where they received previous training, and determine whether differences in degree origin and rank exist between faculty members in established (≤1995) vs newer programs. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) faculty database and demographic information from the public domain. Results. Among 5516 faculty members, 50.3% held two or more types of degrees. Established schools had a higher median number of faculty members and a higher mean faculty rank than did newer schools. Conclusion. The difference in mean faculty rank highlights the shortage of experienced faculty members in newer schools. Future research efforts should investigate educational attainment in correlation to other faculty and school characteristics and prospectively track and report trends related to pharmacy faculty members composition.

  8. Perceptions of distance education among nursing faculty members in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Josephine M

    2009-06-01

    A strategy to increase access to nursing education, train nurses for practice, and prepare future nurse educators is distance education. Faculty member shortages are cited as the main reason for not accepting qualified applicants. Faculty members are the core of nursing education. In order to address nursing faculty members' concerns regarding distance education and to assist in faculty member recruitment, retention, growth, and development in order to improve and enhance the quality of distance education, one must answer the question: What are nursing faculty members' perceptions of distance education in nursing? Utilizing a number of databases to locate research specific to this topic, this article provides an integrative review of the nursing literature to ascertain the faculty members' perspective of distance education. The research was analyzed, findings summarized, and limitations mentioned. Utilizing a brief supplementary review of the literature, the implications, recommendations, and need for future research are discussed.

  9. Russian influence on NATO member/non-member relationships : a case study of the US-Ukraine military to military relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Righello, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. This thesis explores Russia's attempts to influence NATO bilateral relationships between members and non-members (partners) and examines the US-Ukraine military-to-military program as its case study. The thesis begins by describing Russia's relations with NATO, centering on NATO enlargement and its role in the NATO-Russia relationship. It then examines the US-Ukraine relationship, with a specific eye toward military-to-military relati...

  10. Paleobotany and palynology of the Bristol Hill Coal Member (Bond Formation) and Friendsville Coal Member (Mattoon Formation) of the Illinois Basin (Upper Pennsylvania)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, D.A.; Phillips, T.L. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Late Pennsylvanian coal swamps of the Illinois Basin were dominated by Psaronius tree ferns with a spatially heterogeneous distribution of medullosan pteridosperms (subdominant), calamites, sigillarian lycopsids, and cordaites. Miospore and coal-ball plant assemblages from the Missourian-age Bristol Hill Coal Member (Bond Formation) and Friendsville Coal Member (Mattoon Formation) of southeastern Illinois were quantified to analyze vegetational patterns in Late Pennsylvanian peat swamps and to compare vegetational composition of the coals.

  11. MOTIVES FOR RESIDENTIAL MOBILITY IN LATER LIFE: POST-MOVE PERSPECTIVES OF ELDERS AND FAMILY MEMBERS*

    OpenAIRE

    SERGEANT, JULIE F.; Ekerdt, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move within the past year, and with 14 extended family members. Reasons for moving (from perspectives of both elders who moved and their family members) were...

  12. The experience of family members of ICU patients who require extensive monitoring: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claudia DiSabatino; Custard, Kristi

    2014-09-01

    A mixed methods study using family research with a phenomenological approach (n = 5 families) was conducted to explore family members' perceptions about the extensive monitoring technology used on their critically ill family member after cardiac surgery, as experienced when family members initially visited the patient in the cardiovascular intensive care unit. Five relevant themes emerged: overwhelmed by all of the machines; feelings of uncertainty; methods of coping; meaning of the numbers on the machines; and need for education.

  13. Correlates and outcomes of worries about hypoglycemia in family members of adults with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, Francois; Holt, Richard I G

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We examined (a) the demographic and clinical correlates of worries about hypoglycemia in adult family members of adults with diabetes, and (b) the association of these worries with measures of diabetes support. METHODS: The second multinational Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAW...... member involvement in diabetes care. Similar results were found for worries about nocturnal events. CONCLUSION: Worries about hypoglycemia were common in family members and were associated with suboptimal diabetes support. This issue therefore deserves increased clinician attention....

  14. Empowering family members in end-of-life care decision making in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Annette M

    2009-01-01

    Critical care nurses are often faced with working with families during the end-of-life care of a loved one. Often there is indecisiveness in family members of critically ill patients when faced with making these difficult decisions. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe origins of indecisiveness in family members of critically ill patients who are faced with end-of-life care decisions. Strategies to empower family members during this crucial time are also discussed.

  15. Increasing Treatment Seeking Among At-Risk Service Members Returning from Warzones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0032 TITLE: Increasing Treatment Seeking Among At- Risk Service Members Returning from Warzones PRINCIPAL...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-2-0032 Increasing Treatment Seeking Among At- Risk Service Members Returning from Warzones 5b...include area code) Nothing listed 15 USAMRMC 2 Abstract Increasing Treatment Seeking Among At- Risk Service Members Returning from Warzones PI

  16. Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-17

    AND SUBTITLE Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Testimony Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members...Jennie W. Wenger1 The RAND Corporation Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans2 Before the Committees on

  17. Managerial Insights into the Effects of Interactions on Replacing Members of a Team

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Solow; George Vairaktarakis; Sandy Kristin Piderit; Ming-chi Tsai

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for studying the effects of interactions among team members on the process of replacing members of a team in an organization. The model provides the ability to control the number of members that interact with each individual on the team. Through the use of analysis and computer simulations, it is shown how the amount of interaction affects the tradeoff between the expected performance and the number of replacements and interviews needed to find a good team us...

  18. A study on Factors Affecting Application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by Faculty Members of

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Biglari; Hossein Agahi

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to investigate the factors affecting on ICT application by faculty members of University of Razi. A descriptive-correlative research survey method was used. The statistical population of this research consist of faculty members of University of Kermanshah (N=271). Sampling method was stratified randomization (n=116). Questionnaire was used for data collection, the validity of which was confirmed by the opinions of some of professionals and faculty members of Agricultu...

  19. Suicidal Ideation and Distress in Family Members Bereaved by Suicide in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Sara; Campos, Rui C.; Tavares, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    The present study assessed the impact of suicide and distress on suicidal ideation in a sample of 93 Portuguese family members bereaved by suicide. A control community sample of 102 adults also participated. After controlling for educational level, those bereaved by the suicide of a family member were found to have higher levels of suicidal ideation. Forty-two percent of family members had Suicide Ideation Questionnaire scores at or above the cutoff point. General distress, dep...

  20. Evaluation of the Separation of Service Members Who Made a Report of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-09

    member’s NDMC diagnosis made by a physiatrist or PhD level psychologist ? 153 (93%) 85 (99%) 42 (100%) 49 (80%) 329 (93%) Did diagnosis include...statement / judgment from physiatrist or PhD-level psychologist the service member’s disorder was so severe the service member’s ability to function...IDP Area Was service member’s diagnosis corroborated by peer psychiatrist or PhD-level psychologist or higher level mental health professional? N/A