WorldWideScience

Sample records for volcanic rocks erupted

  1. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  2. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  3. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  4. Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenesis of Volcanic Rocks as Exemplified by Volcanic Rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁庚; 叶霖

    1997-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang,occurring in the collision zone between the Siberia Plate and the Junggar Plate,are distributed along the Eritix River Valley in northern Xinjiang.The volcanic rocks were dated at Late Paleozoic and can be divided into the spilite-keratophyre series and the basalt-andesite series.The spilite-keratophyre series volcanic rocks occur in the Altay orogenic belt at the southwest margin of the Siberia Plate.In addition to sodic volcanic rocks.There are also associated potassic-sodic volcanic rocks and potassic volcanic rocks.The potassic-sodic volcanic rocks occur at the bottom of the eruption cycle and control the distribution of Pb and Zn deposits.The potassic volcanic rocks occur at the top of the eruption cycle and are associated with Au and Cu mineralizations.The sodic volcanic rocks occur in the middle stage of eruption cycle and control the occurrence of Cu(Zn) deposits.The basalt-andesite series volcanic rocks distributed in the North Junggar orogenic belt at the north margin of the Junggar-Kazakstan Plate belong to the potassic sodic volcain rocks.The volcanic rocks distributed along the Ulungur fault are relatively rich in sodium and poor in potassium and are predominated by Cu mineralization and associated with Au mineralization.Those volcanic rocks distributed along the Ertix fault are relatively rich in K and poor in Na,with Au mineralization being dominant.

  5. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  6. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  7. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the ‘strength’ of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  8. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Thermal-IR Observations of Jupiter and Io with ISAAC at the VLT Summary Impressive thermal-infrared images have been obtained of the giant planet Jupiter during tests of a new detector in the ISAAC instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). . They show in particular the full extent of the northern auroral ring and part of the southern aurora. A volcanic eruption was also imaged on Io , the very active inner Jovian moon. Although these observations are of an experimental nature, they demonstrate a great potential for regular monitoring of the Jovian magnetosphere by ground-based telescopes together with space-based facilities. They also provide the added benefit of direct comparison with the terrestrial magnetosphere. PR Photo 21a/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (L-band: 3.5-4.0 µm) . PR Photo 21b/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 4.07 µm) . PR Photo 21c/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.28 µm) . PR Photo 21d/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.21 µm) . PR Photo 21e/01 : ISAAC image of the Jovian aurorae (false-colour). PR Photo 21f/01 : ISAAC image of volcanic activity on Io . Addendum : The Jovian aurorae and polar haze. Aladdin Meets Jupiter Thermal-infrared images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io have been obtained during a series of system tests with the new Aladdin detector in the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) , in combination with an upgrade of the ESO-developed detector control electronics IRACE. This state-of-the-art instrument is attached to the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The observations were made on November 14, 2000, through various filters that isolate selected wavebands in the thermal-infrared spectral region [1]. They include a broad-band L-filter (wavelength interval 3.5 - 4.0 µm) as well as several narrow-band filters (3.21, 3.28 and 4.07 µm). The filters allow to record the light from different components of the Jovian atmosphere

  9. Volcanic eruptions and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The historical record of large volcanic eruptions from 1500 to 1980 is subjected to detailed time series analysis. In two weak but probably statistically significant periodicities of about 11 and 80 yr, the frequency of volcanic eruptions increases (decreases) slightly around the times of solar minimum (maximum). Time series analysis of the volcanogenic acidities in a deep ice core from Greenland reveals several very long periods ranging from about 80 to about 350 yr which are similar to the very slow solar cycles previously detected in auroral and C-14 records. Solar flares may cause changes in atmospheric circulation patterns that abruptly alter the earth's spin. The resulting jolt probably triggers small earthquakes which affect volcanism.

  10. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  11. About the Mechanism of Volcanic Eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to the volcanic eruption theory is proposed. It is based on a simple physical mechanism of the imbalance in the system "magma-crust-fluid". This mechanism helps to explain from unified positions the different types of volcanic eruptions. A criterion of imbalance and magma eruption is derived. Stratovolcano and caldera formation is analyzed. High explosive eruptions of the silicic magma is discussed

  12. Chlorine isotope composition of volcanic rocks and gases at Stromboli volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy): Inferences on magmatic degassing prior to 2014 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Marcello; Rizzo, Andrea L.; Barnes, Jaime D.; D'Auria, Luca; Martelli, Mauro; Bobrowski, Nicole; Wittmer, Julian

    2017-04-01

    Among the magmatic volatiles, chlorine (Cl) is degassed at shallow depths offering the opportunity to investigate the behavior of magmatic degassing close to the surface, and the possible occurrence of chemical and isotopic fractionation related to gas/melt partitioning. However, it is still unclear if the isotopic composition of Cl (δ37Cl) can be used as a proxy of magmatic degassing. In this work, we investigate the concentrations of chlorine and sulfur, and the Cl isotope composition of rocks and plume gases collected at Stromboli volcano, Aeolian Islands, Italy. This volcano was chosen because it is characterized by persistent eruptive activity (i.e., Strombolian explosions) and by the presence of magma at very shallow levels in the conduits. Rocks belonging to the different magmatic series erupted throughout the formation of the volcano have δ37Cl values ranging between - 1.0 and + 0.7‰. The isotopic composition seems independent of the Cl concentration of the rocks, but shows a negative correlation with SiO2 content. Plume gases have a greater isotopic compositional variability than the rocks (- 2.2‰ ≤ δ37Cl ≤ + 1.5‰) and the composition seems related to the level of volcanic activity at Stromboli. Gases collected in 2011-2013 during days of ordinary eruptive activity are characterized by δ37Cl values ranging from + 0.3 to + 1.5‰ and S/Cl molar ratios between 1.4 and 2.2, similar to previous S/Cl measurements performed at Stromboli with other techniques. Plume gases collected in July 2014, in days of high-level eruptive activity preceding the onset of the 2014 effusive eruption, have negative δ37Cl values (- 2.2‰ ≤ δ37Cl ≤ - 0.1‰) and S/Cl between 0.9 and 1.2, which are among the lowest S/Cl values measured at this volcano. The amplitude of the volcanic tremor and the variation in the inclination of very long period (VLP) seismic signal polarization clearly indicate that in July 2014 the intensity and frequency of Strombolian

  13. The pre-Kos Plateau Tuff Volcanic Rocks on Kefalos Peninsula (Kos Island, Dodecanese, Greece): Crescendo to the Largest Eruption of the Modern Aegean Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, O.; Schnyder, C.

    2006-12-01

    Young volcanic rocks (K-Ar ages of 3 to 0.5 Ma) from the Kefalos Peninsula (Kos Island, Dodecanese, Greece) erupted prior to the voluminous (>60 km\\ 3) Kos Plateau Tuff (KPT; Ar-Ar age of 0.16 Ma) were studied in order to better define the conditions that led to the paroxysmal eruption of the modern Aegean Arc. Two different whole-rock compositions were sampled on Kefalos peninsula; dacites (63-65 wt% SiO2) and rhyolites (75-77 wt% SiO2). Kefalos dacites are crystal-rich (>40% crystals), show high Sr-Ba contents compared to other continental arcs, and have "adakitic" Sr/Y ratios (>40). Kefalos rhyolites are typical high- SiO2 arc magmas, similar in composition and mineralogy to the KPT, but displaying lower crystallinities (30% in most of the KPT). The high Sr/Y ratios of the dacites is surprising in an area where the subducting slab is not particularly hot and the continental crust relatively thin (~30 km). If the low Y and high Sr-Ba contents result from the fact that magma formed deep enough to supress plagioclase and have garnet present, dacite magma generation must have occurred in the mantle. There is geochemical and mineralogical evidence for the Kefalos and KPT rhyolites being generated by fractional crystallization from magmas similar to the Kefalos dacites. However, the few distinctions between KPT and Kefalos rhyolites (KPT is more voluminous, contains more crystals, has lower whole-rock U and Th contents, and lower MgO-SiO2, but higher Al2O3-FeOtot in biotite) suggest slightly different conditions in the magma chambers. These observations, together with increasing explosivity of the volcanic products from ~3 Ma to 0.16 Ma, may indicate that the build-up to the large KPT eruption could be the result of an increase in magmatic water input in the system through time.

  14. Scaling properties of planetary calderas and terrestrial volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sanchez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Volcanism plays an important role in transporting internal heat of planetary bodies to their surface. Therefore, volcanoes are a manifestation of the planet's past and present internal dynamics. Volcanic eruptions as well as caldera forming processes are the direct manifestation of complex interactions between the rising magma and the surrounding host rock in the crust of terrestrial planetary bodies. Attempts have been made to compare volcanic landforms throughout the solar system. Different stochastic models have been proposed to describe the temporal sequences of eruptions on individual or groups of volcanoes. However, comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for volcano formation and eruption and more specifically caldera formation remains elusive. In this work, we propose a scaling law to quantify the distribution of caldera sizes on Earth, Mars, Venus, and Io, as well as the distribution of calderas on Earth depending on their surrounding crustal properties. We also apply the same scaling analysis to the distribution of interevent times between eruptions for volcanoes that have the largest eruptive history as well as groups of volcanoes on Earth. We find that when rescaled with their respective sample averages, the distributions considered show a similar functional form. This result implies that similar processes are responsible for caldera formation throughout the solar system and for different crustal settings on Earth. This result emphasizes the importance of comparative planetology to understand planetary volcanism. Similarly, the processes responsible for volcanic eruptions are independent of the type of volcanism or geographical location.

  15. Ozone depletion following future volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Klobas, J.; Wilmouth, David M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Anderson, James G.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    2017-07-01

    While explosive volcanic eruptions cause ozone loss in the current atmosphere due to an enhancement in the availability of reactive chlorine following the stratospheric injection of sulfur, future eruptions are expected to increase total column ozone as halogen loading approaches preindustrial levels. The timing of this shift in the impact of major volcanic eruptions on the thickness of the ozone layer is poorly known. Modeling four possible climate futures, we show that scenarios with the smallest increase in greenhouse gas concentrations lead to the greatest risk to ozone from heterogeneous chemical processing following future eruptions. We also show that the presence in the stratosphere of bromine from natural, very short-lived biogenic compounds is critically important for determining whether future eruptions will lead to ozone depletion. If volcanic eruptions inject hydrogen halides into the stratosphere, an effect not considered in current ozone assessments, potentially profound reductions in column ozone would result.

  16. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  17. Toward Forecasting Volcanic Eruptions using Seismic Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Brenguier, Florent; Campillo, Michel; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Duputel, Zacharie; Coutant, Olivier; Nercessian, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    During inter-eruption periods, magma pressurization yields subtle changes of the elastic properties of volcanic edifices. We use the reproducibility properties of the ambient seismic noise recorded on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano to measure relative seismic velocity variations of less than 0.1 % with a temporal resolution of one day. Our results show that five studied volcanic eruptions were preceded by clearly detectable seismic velocity decreases within the zone of magma injection. These precursors reflect the edifice dilatation induced by magma pressurization and can be useful indicators to improve the forecasting of volcanic eruptions.

  18. Relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption inferred from historical records

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪洲; 高峰; 吴雪娟; 孟宪森

    2004-01-01

    A large number of seismic records are discovered for the first time in the historical materials about Wudalianchi volcanic group eruption in 1720~1721, which provides us with abundant volcanic earthquake information. Based on the written records, the relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption is discussed in the paper. Furthermore it is pointed that earthquake swarm is an important indication of volcanic eruption. Therefore, monitoring volcanic earthquakes is of great significance for forecasting volcanic eruption.

  19. Geological characteristics and eruption cycle partition of jurassic volcanic rocks from Northern Abagaqi, Inner Mongolia%内蒙古阿巴嘎旗北部侏罗纪火山岩地质特征与喷发旋回

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何雨栗; 李小强; 杨国林; 王浩飞; 王文佳; 孙柏年

    2014-01-01

    内蒙古阿巴嘎旗北部位于西伯利亚板块东南大陆边缘晚古生代陆缘增生带的二连-贺根山板块对接带的西北侧。晚古生代至中新生代岩浆及火山活动频繁,火山岩分布广泛。通过对该区1:5万区域地质填图和实测地质剖面工作,以及室内的详细研究发现出露于本区的侏罗纪火山岩(白音高老组J3 b)以中酸性熔岩和火山碎屑岩为主,岩性特征自下而上具有喷发韵律性。依据岩石组合、岩石特征反映其为陆相火山岩建造。将本区白音高老组火山岩定为中酸性火山喷发旋回,依据岩相划分出5个喷发韵律,每一韵律岩浆成分总体上以流纹质为主,底部常为英安质或安山质,以爆发相为主,喷溢相较少,说明该时期火山活动较强,属较强盛时期。总体上白音高老组反映了喷溢-爆发相、爆发相相间的周期,具有由弱到强的反韵律特征。%The Northern Abagaqi is located in the northwest of the suture belt between Erlian and Hegenshan Plate that is part of the accretion zone of late paleozoic continental margin on the southeast continental margin of the Siberian Plate. The volcanic magma activity is frequent and volcanic rocks are widely distributed from the late paleozoic to the middle cenozoic. Based on 1:50 000 regional geological mapping of the actual geological section and a detailed research on Northern Abagaqi, the Baiyingaolao Formation (J3b) of jurassic rock, was given a intermediate-acid lava and pyroclastic rock priority and its lithologic structure was of bottom-up eruption rhythmicity. According to the rock assemblage and characteristics, the rock reflected its continental volcanic building. The Baiyingaolao Formation volcanic rocks had an acidic volcanic eruption cycle, on account of the facies that could be divided into five eruption rhythms, and each rhythm magma composition was of mainly rhyolitic volcanic rock, and its bottom was often of

  20. Triggering of volcanic eruptions by large earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    When a large earthquake occurs near an active volcano, there is often concern that volcanic eruptions may be triggered by the earthquake. In this study, recently accumulated, reliable data were analyzed to quantitatively evaluate the probability of the occurrence of new eruptions of volcanoes located near the epicenters of large earthquakes. For volcanoes located within 200 km of large earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 or greater, the eruption occurrence probability increases by approximately 50% for 5 years after the earthquake origin time. However, no significant increase in the occurrence probability of new eruptions was observed at distant volcanoes or for smaller earthquakes. The present results strongly suggest that new eruptions are likely triggered by static stress changes and/or strong ground motions caused by nearby large earthquakes. This is not similar to the previously presented evidence that volcanic earthquakes at distant volcanoes are remotely triggered by surface waves generated by large earthquakes.

  1. Io - One of at Least Four Simultaneous Erupting Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of an active volcanic eruption on Jupiter's satellite Io was taken 1 hour, 52 minutes after the accompanying picture, late in the evening of March 4, 1979, Pacific time. On the limb of the satellite can be seen one of at least four simultaneous volcanic eruptions -- the first such activity ever observed on another celestial body. Seen against the limb are plume-like structures rising more than 60 miles (100 kilometers) above the surface. Several eruptions have been identified with volcanic structures on the surface of Io, which have also been identified by Voyager 1's infrared instrument as being abnormally hot -- several hundred degrees warmer than surrounding terrain. The fact that several eruptions appear to be occurring at the same time suggests that Io has the most active surface in the solar system and that volcanism is going on there essentially continuously. Another characteristic of the observed volcanism is that it appears to be extremely explosive, with velocities more than 2,000 miles an hour (at least 1 kilometer per second). That is more violent than terrestrial volcanoes like Etna, Vesuvius or Krakatoa.

  2. SO2 flux and the thermal power of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Richard W.; Hughes, Graham O.

    2016-09-01

    A description of the dynamics, chemistry and energetics governing a volcanic system can be greatly simplified if the expansion of magmatic gas can be assumed to be adiabatic as it rises towards the surface. The conditions under which this assumption is valid are clarified by analysis of the transfer of thermal energy into the low conductivity wallrocks traversed by fractures and vents from a gas phase expanding over a range of mass flux rates. Adiabatic behavior is predicted to be approached typically within a month after perturbations in the release of source gas have stabilized, this timescale being dependent upon only the characteristic length scale on which the host rock is fractured and the thermal diffusivity of the rock. This analysis then enables the thermal energy transport due to gas release from volcanoes to be evaluated using observations of SO2 flux with reference values for the H2O:SO2 ratio of volcanic gas mixtures discharging through high temperature fumaroles in arc and mantle-related volcanic systems. Thermal power estimates for gas discharge are 101.8 to 104.1 MWH during quiescent, continuous degassing of arc volcanoes and 103.7 to 107.3 MWH for their eruptive stages, the higher value being the Plinean Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Fewer data are available for quiescent stage mantle-related volcanoes (Kilauea 102.1 MWH) but for eruptive events power estimates range from 102.8 MWH to 105.5 MWH. These estimates of thermal power and mass of gas discharges are commensurate with power estimates based on the total mass of gas ejected during eruptions. The sustained discharge of volcanic gas during quiescent and short-lived eruptive stages can be related to the hydrodynamic structure of volcanic systems with large scale gaseous mass transfer from deep in the crust coupled with episodes of high level intrusive activity and gas release.

  3. Historical Significant Volcanic Eruption Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A significant eruption is classified as one that meets at least one of the following criteriacaused fatalities, caused moderate damage (approximately $1 million or...

  4. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  5. Global Significant Volcanic Eruptions Database, 4360 BC to present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Significant Volcanic Eruptions Database is a global listing of over 600 eruptions from 4360 BC to the present. A significant eruption is classified as one that...

  6. Volcanic tremors: Good indicators of change in plumbing systems during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárraga, Marta; Martí, Joan; Abella, Rafael; Carniel, Roberto; López, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Geophysical and geochemical signals recorded during episodes of unrest preceding volcanic eruptions provide information on movements of magma inside the lithosphere and on how magma prepares to reach the surface. When the eruption ensues continuous volcanic monitoring can reveal the nature of changes occurring in the volcano's plumbing system, which may be correlated with changes in both eruption behaviour and products. During the 2011-2012 submarine eruption of El Hierro (Canary Islands), the seismic signal, surface deformation, a broad stain on the sea surface of the eruption site, and the occasional appearance of floating lava balloons and pyroclastic fragments were the main observable signs. A strong continuous tremor in the vent accompanied the eruption and varied significantly in amplitude, frequency and dynamical parameters. We analysed these variations and correlated them with changes in the distribution of earthquakes and in the petrology of the erupting magma. This enabled us to relate variations in tremors to changes in the (i) stress conditions of the plumbing system, (ii) dimensions of the conduit and vent, (iii) intensity of the explosive episodes, and (iv) rheological changes in the erupting magma. The results obtained show how the tremor signal was strongly influenced by stress changes in the host rock and in the rheological variations in the erupting magma. We conclude that the tracking of real-time syn-eruptive tremor signals via the observation of variations in plumbing systems and magma physics is a potentially effective tool for interpreting eruption dynamics, and suggest that similar variations observed in pre-eruptive tremors will have a similar origin.

  7. Volcanic rock properties control sector collapse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes constructed by superimposed layers of varying volcanic materials are inherently unstable structures. The heterogeneity of weak and strong layers consisting of ash, tephra and lavas, each with varying coherencies, porosities, crystallinities, glass content and ultimately, strength, can promote volcanic flank and sector collapses. These volcanoes often exist in areas with complex regional tectonics adding to instability caused by heterogeneity, flank overburden, magma movement and emplacement in addition to hydrothermal alteration and anomalous geothermal gradients. Recent studies conducted on the faulting properties of volcanic rocks at variable slip rates show the rate-weakening dependence of the friction coefficients (up to 90% reduction)[1], caused by a wide range of factors such as the generation of gouge and frictional melt lubrication [2]. Experimental data from experiments conducted on volcanic products suggests that frictional melt occurs at slip rates similar to those of plug flow in volcanic conduits [1] and the bases of mass material movements such as debris avalanches from volcanic flanks [3]. In volcanic rock, the generation of frictional heat may prompt the remobilisation of interstitial glass below melting temperatures due to passing of the glass transition temperature at ˜650-750 ˚C [4]. In addition, the crushing of pores in high porosity samples can lead to increased comminution and strain localisation along slip surfaces. Here we present the results of friction tests on both high density, glass rich samples from Santaguito (Guatemala) and synthetic glass samples with varying porosities (0-25%) to better understand frictional properties underlying volcanic collapse events. 1. Kendrick, J.E., et al., Extreme frictional processes in the volcanic conduit of Mount St. Helens (USA) during the 2004-2008 eruption. J. Structural Geology, 2012. 2. Di Toro, G., et al., Fault lubrication during earthquakes. Nature, 2011. 471(7339): p. 494-498. 3

  8. Learning to recognize volcanic non-eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal of volcanology is to answer the questions of when, where, and how a volcano will erupt—in other words, eruption prediction. Generally, eruption predictions are based on insights from monitoring data combined with the history of the volcano. An outstanding example is the A.D. 1980–1986 lava dome growth at Mount St. Helens, Washington (United States). Recognition of a consistent pattern of precursors revealed by geophysical, geological, and geochemical monitoring enabled successful predictions of more than 12 dome-building episodes (Swanson et al., 1983). At volcanic systems that are more complex or poorly understood, probabilistic forecasts can be useful (e.g., Newhall and Hoblitt, 2002; Marzocchi and Woo, 2009). In such cases, the probabilities of different types of volcanic events are quantified, using historical accounts and geological studies of a volcano's past activity, supplemented by information from similar volcanoes elsewhere, combined with contemporary monitoring information.

  9. Burst conditions of explosive volcanic eruptions recorded on microbarographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M.M.; Chouet, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate pressure disturbances in the atmosphere that propagate away either as acoustic or as shock waves, depending on the explosivity of the eruption. Both types of waves are recorded on microbarographs as 1- to 0.1-hertz N-shaped signals followed by a longer period coda. These waveforms can be used to estimate burst pressures end gas concentrations in explosive volcanic eruptions and provide estimates of eruption magnitudes.

  10. Rapid laccolith intrusion driven by explosive volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Jonathan M.; Cordonnier, Benoit; Schipper, C. Ian; Tuffen, Hugh; Baumann, Tobias S.; Feisel, Yves

    2016-11-01

    Magmatic intrusions and volcanic eruptions are intimately related phenomena. Shallow magma intrusion builds subsurface reservoirs that are drained by volcanic eruptions. Thus, the long-held view is that intrusions must precede and feed eruptions. Here we show that explosive eruptions can also cause magma intrusion. We provide an account of a rapidly emplaced laccolith during the 2011 rhyolite eruption of Cordón Caulle, Chile. Remote sensing indicates that an intrusion began after eruption onset and caused severe (>200 m) uplift over 1 month. Digital terrain models resolve a laccolith-shaped body ~0.8 km3. Deformation and conduit flow models indicate laccolith depths of only ~20-200 m and overpressures (~1-10 MPa) that likely stemmed from conduit blockage. Our results show that explosive eruptions may rapidly force significant quantities of magma in the crust to build laccoliths. These iconic intrusions can thus be interpreted as eruptive features that pose unique and previously unrecognized volcanic hazards.

  11. Supercomputer modeling of volcanic eruption dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, S.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Woo, Mahn-Ling [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Our specific goals are to: (1) provide a set of models based on well-defined assumptions about initial and boundary conditions to constrain interpretations of observations of active volcanic eruptions--including movies of flow front velocities, satellite observations of temperature in plumes vs. time, and still photographs of the dimensions of erupting plumes and flows on Earth and other planets; (2) to examine the influence of subsurface conditions on exit plane conditions and plume characteristics, and to compare the models of subsurface fluid flow with seismic constraints where possible; (3) to relate equations-of-state for magma-gas mixtures to flow dynamics; (4) to examine, in some detail, the interaction of the flowing fluid with the conduit walls and ground topography through boundary layer theory so that field observations of erosion and deposition can be related to fluid processes; and (5) to test the applicability of existing two-phase flow codes for problems related to the generation of volcanic long-period seismic signals; (6) to extend our understanding and simulation capability to problems associated with emplacement of fragmental ejecta from large meteorite impacts.

  12. Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Russia: preventing the danger of volcanic eruptions to aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girina, O.; Neal, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) has been a collaborative project of scientists from the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Surveys, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (IVS, KB GS and AVO). The purpose of KVERT is to reduce the risk of costly, damaging, and possibly deadly encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds. To reduce this risk, KVERT collects all possible volcanic information and issues eruption alerts to aviation and other emergency officials. KVERT was founded by Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry FED RAS in 1993 (in 2004, IVGG merged with the Institute of Volcanology to become IVS). KVERT analyzes volcano monitoring data (seismic, satellite, visual and video, and pilot reports), assigns the Aviation Color Code, and issues reports on eruptive activity and unrest at Kamchatkan (since 1993) and Northern Kurile (since 2003) volcanoes. KVERT receives seismic monitoring data from KB GS (the Laboratory for Seismic and Volcanic Activity). KB GS maintains telemetered seismic stations to investigate 11 of the most active volcanoes in Kamchatka. Data are received around the clock and analysts evaluate data each day for every monitored volcano. Satellite data are provided from several sources to KVERT. AVO conducts satellite analysis of the Kuriles, Kamchatka, and Alaska as part of it daily monitoring and sends the interpretation to KVERT staff. KVERT interprets MODIS and MTSAT images and processes AVHRR data to look for evidence of volcanic ash and thermal anomalies. KVERT obtains visual volcanic information from volcanologist's field trips, web-cameras that monitor Klyuchevskoy (established in 2000), Sheveluch (2002), Bezymianny (2003), Koryaksky (2009), Avachinsky (2009), Kizimen (2011), and Gorely (2011) volcanoes, and pilots. KVERT staff work closely with staff of AVO, AMC (Airport Meteorological Center) at Yelizovo Airport and the Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), the

  13. The evolution of pore connectivity in volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombier, Mathieu; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Gurioli, Lucia; Scheu, Bettina; Kueppers, Ulrich; Di Muro, Andrea; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-03-01

    Pore connectivity is a measure of the fraction of pore space (vesicles, voids or cracks) in a material that is interconnected on the system length scale. Pore connectivity is fundamentally related to permeability, which has been shown to control magma outgassing and the explosive potential of magma during ascent in the shallowest part of the crust. Here, we compile a database of connectivity and porosity from published sources and supplement this with additional measurements, using natural volcanic rocks produced in a broad range of eruptive styles and with a range of bulk composition. The database comprises 2715 pairs of connectivity C and porosity ϕ values for rocks from 35 volcanoes as well as 116 products of experimental work. For 535 volcanic rock samples, the permeability k was also measured. Data from experimental studies constrain the general features of the relationship between C and ϕ associated with both vesiculation and densification processes, which can then be used to interpret natural data. To a first order, we show that a suite of rocks originating from effusive eruptive behaviour can be distinguished from rocks originating from explosive eruptive behaviour using C and ϕ. We observe that on this basis, a particularly clear distinction can be made between scoria formed in fire-fountains and that formed in Strombolian activity. With increasing ϕ, the onset of connectivity occurs at the percolation threshold ϕc which in turn can be hugely variable. We demonstrate that C is an excellent metric for constraining ϕc in suites of porous rocks formed in a common process and discuss the range of ϕc values recorded in volcanic rocks. The percolation threshold is key to understanding the onset of permeability, outgassing and compaction in shallow magmas. We show that this threshold is dramatically different in rocks formed during densification processes than in rocks formed in vesiculating processes and propose that this value is the biggest factor in

  14. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  15. 云南腾冲全新世火山岩地球化学特征及其成因%A study on the geochemical characteristics and petrogenesis of Holocene volcanic rocks in the Tengchong volcanic eruption field, Yunnan Province, SW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李欣; 刘嘉麒

    2012-01-01

    Studies of major element, trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of the Hotocene volcanic rocks in the Tengchong volcanic eruption field, including Heikongshan, Dayingshan and Maanshan volcanic rocks, indicate they are high potassium cale-alkaline series rocks including trachybasalt, basaltic trachyandesite, trachyandensite, and dacite. These rocks are enriched in LILE and LREE, and depleted in Nb-Ta-Ti in mantle-normalized incompatible trace element patterns. They have relatively high "Sr/ "Sr (0.705862-0.710614), low l43Nd/144Nd (0.511941 -0.512526) and relatively high radiogenic Pb isotopes (208Pb/204Pb = 38.962-39. 155, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.620~15.659 and, 206Pb/204Pb = 17. 872-18.269). The geochemical characteristics of the Holocene volcanic rocks in the Tengchong volcanic eruptive field indicate that the magma sources of Heikongshan, Dayingshan, Maanshan are from enriched mantle which possibly resulted from palaeo-oceanic crust subduction. The magma sources of these three volcanoes are same but with different evolution stage. The magma evolution of Dayingshan is higher than that of Heikongshan and Maanshan. The comparison with geochemical characteristics of post - collisional K-rich rocks in South Tibet shows that the magma sources of Holocene volcanic rocks in the Tengchong volcanic eruption field and post-collisional K-rich rocks in South Tibet are different%通过对腾冲火山群的黑空山、打莺山和马鞍山火山岩主量元素、微量元素、Sr-Nd-Pb同位素地球化学的研究表明,腾冲全新世火山岩为高钾钙碱性系列,包括粗面玄武岩、玄武粗安岩、粗面安山岩和英安岩.该套火山岩富集大离子亲石元素和轻稀土元素,亏损Nb-Ta-Ti不相容元素,具有高的87Sr/86Sr比值(0.705862 ~0.710614),低的143Nd/144Nd比值(0.511941~0.512526)和较高的放射性成因Pb同位素组成(208Pb/204Pb =38.962~ 39.155;207Pb/204Pb=15.620 ~ 15.659;206Pb/204Pb=17.872~18.269).主量、微量和同

  16. Nano-volcanic Eruption of Silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-kang; Nagao, Shijo; Yokoi, Emi; Oh, Chulmin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Yu-chen; Lin, Shih-guei; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Silver (Ag) is one of the seven metals of antiquity and an important engineering material in the electronic, medical, and chemical industries because of its unique noble and catalytic properties. Ag thin films are extensively used in modern electronics primarily because of their oxidation-resistance. Here we report a novel phenomenon of Ag nano-volcanic eruption that is caused by interactions between Ag and oxygen (O). It involves grain boundary liquation, the ejection of transient Ag-O fluids through grain boundaries, and the decomposition of Ag-O fluids into O2 gas and suspended Ag and Ag2O clusters. Subsequent coating with re-deposited Ag-O and the de-alloying of O yield a conformal amorphous Ag coating. Patterned Ag hillock arrays and direct Ag-to-Ag bonding can be formed by the homogenous crystallization of amorphous coatings. The Ag “nano-volcanic eruption” mechanism is elaborated, shedding light on a new mechanism of hillock formation and new applications of amorphous Ag coatings. PMID:27703220

  17. Nano-volcanic Eruption of Silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Kang; Nagao, Shijo; Yokoi, Emi; Oh, Chulmin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Yu-Chen; Lin, Shih-Guei; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2016-10-01

    Silver (Ag) is one of the seven metals of antiquity and an important engineering material in the electronic, medical, and chemical industries because of its unique noble and catalytic properties. Ag thin films are extensively used in modern electronics primarily because of their oxidation-resistance. Here we report a novel phenomenon of Ag nano-volcanic eruption that is caused by interactions between Ag and oxygen (O). It involves grain boundary liquation, the ejection of transient Ag-O fluids through grain boundaries, and the decomposition of Ag-O fluids into O2 gas and suspended Ag and Ag2O clusters. Subsequent coating with re-deposited Ag-O and the de-alloying of O yield a conformal amorphous Ag coating. Patterned Ag hillock arrays and direct Ag-to-Ag bonding can be formed by the homogenous crystallization of amorphous coatings. The Ag “nano-volcanic eruption” mechanism is elaborated, shedding light on a new mechanism of hillock formation and new applications of amorphous Ag coatings.

  18. Months between rejuvenation and volcanic eruption at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Christy B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Boyce, Jeremy W

    2015-01-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Valles, USA. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming super-eruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses geospeedometry of trace element profiles with nanometer resolution in sanidine crystals to reveal that Yellowstone’s most recent volcanic cycle began when remobilization of a near- or sub-solidus silicic magma occurred less than 10 months prior to eruption, following a 220,000 year period of volcanic repose. Our results reveal a geologically rapid timescale for rejuvenation and effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava even after protracted cooling of the subvolcanic system, which is consistent with recent physical modeling that predict a timescale of several years or less. Future renewal of rhyolitic volcanism at Yellowstone is likely to require an energetic intrusion of mafic or silicic magma into the shallow subvolcanic reservoir and could rapidly generate an eruptible rhyolite on timescales similar to those documented here.

  19. On a Possible Unified Scaling Law for Volcanic Eruption Durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Nunnari, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Volcanoes constitute dissipative systems with many degrees of freedom. Their eruptions are the result of complex processes that involve interacting chemical-physical systems. At present, due to the complexity of involved phenomena and to the lack of precise measurements, both analytical and numerical models are unable to simultaneously include the main processes involved in eruptions thus making forecasts of volcanic dynamics rather unreliable. On the other hand, accurate forecasts of some eruption parameters, such as the duration, could be a key factor in natural hazard estimation and mitigation. Analyzing a large database with most of all the known volcanic eruptions, we have determined that the duration of eruptions seems to be described by a universal distribution which characterizes eruption duration dynamics. In particular, this paper presents a plausible global power-law distribution of durations of volcanic eruptions that holds worldwide for different volcanic environments. We also introduce a new, simple and realistic pipe model that can follow the same found empirical distribution. Since the proposed model belongs to the family of the self-organized systems it may support the hypothesis that simple mechanisms can lead naturally to the emergent complexity in volcanic behaviour.

  20. Katmai volcanic cluster and the great eruption of 1912

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, W.; Fierstein, J.

    2000-01-01

    In June 1912, the world's largest twentieth century eruption broke out through flat-lying sedimentary rocks of Jurassic age near the base of Trident volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. The 60 h ash-flow and Plinian eruptive sequence excavated and subsequently backfilled with ejecta a flaring funnel-shaped vent since called Novarupta. The vent is adjacent to a cluster of late Quaternary stratocones and domes that have released about 140 km3 of magma in the past 150 k.y. Although the 1912 vent is closest to the Trident group and is also close to Mageik and Griggs volcanoes, it was the summit of Mount Katmai, 10 km east of Novarupta, that collapsed during the eruption to form a 5.5 km3 caldera. Many earthquakes, including 14 in the range M 6-7, took place during and after the eruption, releasing 250 times more seismic energy than the 1991 caldera-forming eruption of the Philippine volcano, Pinatubo. The contrast in seismic behavior may reflect the absence of older caldera faults at Mount Katmai, lack of upward (subsidence opposing) magma flow owing to lateral magma withdrawal in 1912, and the horizontally stratified structure of the thick shale-rich Mesozoic basement. The Katmai caldera compensates for only 40% of the 13 km3 of 1912 magma erupted, which included 7-8 km3 of slightly zoned high-silica rhyolite and 4.5 km3 of crystal-rich dacite that grades continuously into 1 km3 of crystal-rich andesite. We have now mapped, sampled, and studied the products of all 20 components of the Katmai volcanic cluster. Pyroxene dacite and silicic andesite predominate at all of them, and olivine andesite is also common at Griggs, Katmai, and Trident volcanoes, but basalt and rhyodacite have erupted only at Mount Katmai. Rhyolite erupted only in 1912 and is otherwise absent among Quaternary products of the cluster. Pleistocene products of Mageik and Trident and all products of Griggs are compositionally distinguishable from those of 1912 at Novarupta. Holocene products of Mount

  1. Volcanic Eruption: Students Develop a Contingency Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Dangerous, loud, sensational, exciting - natural hazards have what it takes to get students attention around the globe. Arising interest is the first step to develop an intrinsic motivation to learn about the matter and endure the hardships that students might discover along the way of the unit. Natural hazards thereby establish a close-knit connection between physical and anthropological geography through analyzing the hazardous event and its consequences for the people living in the affected area. Following a general principle of didactics we start searching right on our doorsteps to offer students the possibility to gain knowledge on the familiar and later transfer it to the unknown example. Even in Southwest Germany - a region that is rather known for its wine than its volcanic activity - we can find a potentially hazardous region. The "Laacher See" volcano (a caldera lake) in northern Rhineland-Palatinate is according to Prof. H.U. Schminke a "potentially active volcano" . Its activity can be proven by seismic activities, or experienced when visiting the lake's southeastern shore, where carbondioxid and sulphur gases from the underlying magma chamber still bubble up. The Laacher See is part of a range of volcanoes (classified from 'potentially active' to 'no longer active') of the East Eifel Volcanic Field. Precariously the Laacher See is located closely to the densely populated agglomerations of Cologne (NE, distance: 45 km) and the former capital Bonn (NE: 35km), as well as Koblenz (E: 24km) and the Rhine river. Apart from that, the towns of Andernach (E: 8km ± 30 000 inhabitants) and Mayen (SW: 11km ±20 000 inhabitants) and many smaller towns and villages are nearby due to economic reasons. The number of people affected by a possible eruption easily exceeds two million people considering the range as prime measurement. The underlying danger, as projected in a simulation presented by Prof. Schminke, is a lava stream running down the Brohltal valley

  2. Volcanic ash plume identification using polarization lidar: Augustine eruption, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhu, Jiang; Webley, Peter W.; Dean, K.; Cobb, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    During mid January to early February 2006, a series of explosive eruptions occurred at the Augustine volcanic island off the southern coast of Alaska. By early February a plume of volcanic ash was transported northward into the interior of Alaska. Satellite imagery and Puff volcanic ash transport model predictions confirm that the aerosol plume passed over a polarization lidar (0.694 mm wavelength) site at the Arctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. For the first time, lidar linear depolarization ratios of 0.10 – 0.15 were measured in a fresh tropospheric volcanic plume, demonstrating that the nonspherical glass and mineral particles typical of volcanic eruptions generate strong laser depolarization. Thus, polarization lidars can identify the volcanic ash plumes that pose a threat to jet air traffic from the ground, aircraft, or potentially from Earth orbit.

  3. Satellite-based detection of volcanic sulphur dioxide from recent eruptions in Central and South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Loyola

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions can emit large amounts of rock fragments and fine particles (ash into the atmosphere, as well as several gases, including sulphur dioxide (SO2. These ejecta and emissions are a major natural hazard, not only to the local population, but also to the infrastructure in the vicinity of volcanoes and to aviation. Here, we describe a methodology to retrieve quantitative information about volcanic SO2 plumes from satellite-borne measurements in the UV/Visible spectral range. The combination of a satellite-based SO2 detection scheme and a state-of-the-art 3D trajectory model enables us to confirm the volcanic origin of trace gas signals and to estimate the plume height and the effective emission height. This is demonstrated by case-studies for four selected volcanic eruptions in South and Central America, using the GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 instruments.

  4. Impacts do not initiate volcanic eruptions: Eruptions close to the crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Melosh, H. J.

    2003-10-01

    Many papers on meteorite impact suggest that large impacts can induce volcanic eruptions through decompression melting of the underlying rocks. We perform numerical simulations of the impact of an asteroid with a diameter of 20 km striking at 15 km·s-1 into a target with a near-surface temperature gradient of 13 K·km-1 (“cold” case) or 30 K·km-1 (“hot” case). The impact creates a 250 300-km-diameter crater with ˜10,000 km3 of impact melt. However, the crater collapses almost flat, and the pressure field returns almost to the initial lithostat. Even an impact this large cannot raise mantle material above the peridotite solidus by decompression. Statistical considerations also suggest that impacts cannot be the common initiator of large igneous provinces any time in post heavy bombardment Earth history.

  5. Database for potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Melissa N.; Ramsey, David W.; Miller, C. Dan

    2011-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the past 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State's citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. This digital release contains information from maps of potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in the state of California, published as Plate 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1847. The main component of this digital release is a spatial database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map plate, main report text, and accompanying hazard tables from Bulletin 1847. It should be noted that much has been learned about the ages of eruptive events in the State of California since the publication of Bulletin 1847 in 1989. For the most up to date information on the status of California volcanoes, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

  6. What We Can Learn from the Next Large Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2015-12-01

    The April 1982 eruption of El Chichón in México stimulated interest in the climate response to volcanic eruptions and produced very useful observations and modeling studies. The last large volcanic eruption, the June 15, 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, was the best observed eruption ever, and serves as a canonical example for studies of aerosol production and transport, climate response, and deposition on ice sheets. However, many aspects of both eruptions were poorly observed, climate model simulations of the response are imperfect, and new scientific issues, such as stratospheric sulfate geoengineering, raise new scientific questions that could be answered by better observations of the next large volcanic eruption. In this talk I will summarize what we know and do not know about large volcanic eruptions, and discuss new questions that can be addressed by being prepared for the next large eruption. These include: How and how fast will SO2 convert to sulfate aerosols? How will the aerosols grow? What will be the size distribution of the resulting sulfate aerosol particles? How will the aerosols be transported throughout the stratosphere? How much fine ash gets to the stratosphere, how long does it stay there, and what are its radiative and chemical impacts? How will temperatures change in the stratosphere as a result of the aerosol interactions with shortwave (particularly near IR) and longwave radiation? Are there large stratospheric water vapor changes associated with stratospheric aerosols? Is there an initial injection of water from the eruption? Is there ozone depletion from heterogeneous reactions on the stratospheric aerosols? As the aerosols leave the stratosphere, and as the aerosols affect the upper troposphere temperature and circulation, are there interactions with cirrus and other clouds?

  7. Geomorphic Consequences of Volcanic Eruptions in Alaska: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta–Katmai eruption, the 1989–1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed.A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment–water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite

  8. Geomorphic consequences of volcanic eruptions in Alaska: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-10-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta-Katmai eruption, the 1989-1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed. A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment-water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite large

  9. Global monsoon precipitation responses to large volcanic eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Chai, Jing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-11

    Climate variation of global monsoon (GM) precipitation involves both internal feedback and external forcing. Here, we focus on strong volcanic forcing since large eruptions are known to be a dominant mechanism in natural climate change. It is not known whether large volcanoes erupted at different latitudes have distinctive effects on the monsoon in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH). We address this issue using a 1500-year volcanic sensitivity simulation by the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM1). Volcanoes are classified into three types based on their meridional aerosol distributions: NH volcanoes, SH volcanoes and equatorial volcanoes. Using the model simulation, we discover that the GM precipitation in one hemisphere is enhanced significantly by the remote volcanic forcing occurring in the other hemisphere. This remote volcanic forcing-induced intensification is mainly through circulation change rather than moisture content change. In addition, the NH volcanic eruptions are more efficient in reducing the NH monsoon precipitation than the equatorial ones, and so do the SH eruptions in weakening the SH monsoon, because the equatorial eruptions, despite reducing moisture content, have weaker effects in weakening the off-equatorial monsoon circulation than the subtropical-extratropical volcanoes do.

  10. Volcanic Eruptions in the southern Red Sea 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsson, Sigurjón; Xu, Wenbin; Ruch, Joël

    2017-04-01

    After more than a century of volcanic quiescence the southern Red Sea has seen three volcanic eruptions during the past decade. The eruptions occurred on Jebel at Tair Island in 2007-8 and within the Zubair archipelago in 2011-12 and 2013. As the islands are remote, without geophysical instrumentation, and lack direct observers, we obtained most of the information about these eruptions from studying Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and optical satellite images. We used the images to deduce the timing and progress of the volcanic activity and to constrain the geometry of the dikes feeding the eruptions. The Jebel at Tair eruption started energetically and caused damage to Yemeni military buildings on the island and even a few casualties. The erupted lava came from a short summit fissure and covers about 6 km2, which is almost half of the island. The fissure orientations of this and previous eruptions indicate that the stress field on Tair Island is temporarily varying and isolated from the regional Red Sea stress field. The eruptions within the Zubair archipelago, which is located about 50 km southeast of Tair Island, produced two new islands and were fed by dikes much larger than the small size of the new islands might suggest. This is indicated by relative displacements between different islands in the archipelago, derived from offset tracking of SAR images. Together the three volcanic eruptions and several seismic swarms indicate that the southern Red Sea has been experiencing a rifting episode with multiple dike intrusions and meter-scale extension, and that this part of the plate boundary is more active than previously thought.

  11. Critical review of a new volcanic eruption chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhäuser, Dagmar L.; Neuhäuser, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Sigl. et al. (2015, Nature) present historical evidence for 32 volcanic eruptions to evaluate their new polar ice core 10-Be chronology - 24 are dated within three years of sulfur layers in polar ice. Most of them can be interpreted as weather phenomena (Babylonia: disk of sun like moon, reported for only one day, e.g. extinction due to clouds), Chinese sunspot reports (pellet, black vapor, etc.), solar eclipses, normal ice-halos and coronae (ring, bow, etc.), one aurora (redness), red suns due to mist drops in wet fog or fire-smoke, etc. Volcanic dust may facilitate detections of sunspots and formation of Bishop's ring, but tend to inhibit ice-halos, which are otherwise often reported in chronicles. We are left with three reports possibly indicating volcanic eruptions, namely fulfilling genuine criteria for atmospheric disturbances due to volcanic dust, e.g. bluish or faint sun, orange sky, or fainting of stars for months (BCE 208, 44-42, and 32). Among the volcanic eruptions used to fix the chronology (CE 536, 626, 939, 1257), the reports cited for the 930s deal only with 1-2 days, at least one reports an eclipse. In the new chronology, there is a sulfur detection eight years after the Vesuvius eruption, but none in CE 79. It may appear surprising that, from BCE 500 to 1, all five northern sulfur peaks labeled in figure 2 in Sigl et al. are systematically later by 2-4 years than the (corresponding?) southern peaks, while all five southern peaks from CE 100 to 600 labeled in figure 2 are systematically later by 1-4 years than the (corresponding?) northern peaks. Furthermore, in most of their six strongest volcanic eruptions, temperatures decreased years before their sulfur dating - correlated with weak solar activity as seen in radiocarbon, so that volcanic climate forcing appears dubious here. Also, their 10-Be peaks at CE 775 and 994 are neither significant nor certain in dating.

  12. Sulfur isotopic characteristics of volcanic products from the September 2014 Mount Ontake eruption, Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ikehata, Kei; Maruoka, Teruyuki

    2016-01-01

    .... Ontake eruption were investigated. The volcanic ash samples were found to be composed of altered volcanic fragments, alunite, anhydrite, biotite, cristobalite, gypsum, ilmenite, kaolin minerals, native sulfur, orthopyroxene...

  13. Satellite Observations of Atmospheric SO2 from Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    Volcanoes are an important source of various atmospheric trace gases. Volcanic eruptions and their emissions are sporadic and intermittent and often occur in uninhabited regions. Therefore assessing the amount and size of the gaseous and particulate emission from volcanoes is difficult. Satellite remote sensing measurements provide one well suited opportunity to overcome this difficulty. Onboard ERS-2, GOME's moderate spectral resolution enables us to apply the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm to retrieve SO2 column densities from radiance/irradiance measurements in UV spectral region. Volcanic emissions can cause significant variations of climate on a variety of time scales; just one very large eruption can cause a measurable change in the Earth's climate with a time scale of a few years. Stratospheric aerosols produced by volcanic eruptions can influence stratospheric chemistry both through chemical reactions that take place on the surface of the aerosols and through temperature changes induced by their presence in the stratosphere. In this work we give a comprehensive overview on several volcanoes and the retrieval of SO2 column densities from GOME data for the years 1996 - 2002. The focus is on both eruption and out gassing scenarios from different volcanic eruptions in Italy, Iceland, Congo/ Zaire, Ecuador and Mexico.

  14. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have a significant impact on the Earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes, the stratosphere is also influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg - Modular Earth Submodel System (ECHAM/MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the long-wave volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour induced by the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on tropospheric water vapour and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are evident, if the long-wave forcing is strong enough. Our results are corroborated by additional sensitivity simulations of the Mount Pinatubo period with reduced nudging and reduced volcanic aerosol extinction.

  15. On the origin of Mount Etna eruptive cycles and Stromboli volcano paroxysms: implications for an alternative mechanism of volcanic eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    New mechanism of imbalance between magma column and fluid volume, accumulated in the magmatic system, is considered as a driving force of the volcanic eruption. Conditions of eruption based on this mechanism are used to explain main features of the volcanic activity (eruptive cycles and paroxysms) of the volcanoes Etna and Stromboli (Italy).

  16. The effect of volcanic eruptions on the hydrological cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, Carley; Hegerl, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    Large explosive volcanic eruptions inject sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere where it is oxidised to sulphate aerosols which reflect sunlight. This causes a reduction in global temperature and precipitation lasting a few years. We investigate the robust features of this precipitation response, comparing climate model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) archive to three observational datasets, including one with ocean coverage. Global precipitation decreases significantly following eruptions in CMIP5 models, with the largest decrease in wet tropical regions. This also occurs in observational land data, and ocean data in the boreal cold season. In contrast, the dry tropical ocean regions show an increase in precipitation in CMIP5 models. Monsoon regions dry following eruptions in both models and observations, whilst in response to individual eruptions, the ITCZ shifts away from the hemisphere with the greater concentration of aerosols in CMIP5. The ocean response in CMIP5 is longer lasting than that over land, but observational results are too noisy to confirm this. We detect the influence of volcanism on precipitation in the boreal cold season, although the models underestimate the size of the response, whilst in the warm season the volcanic influence is marginally detectable. We then examine whether the influence of volcanoes can be seen in streamflow records for 50 major world rivers. Significant reductions in flow are found for the Amazon, Congo, Nile, Orange, Ob, Yenisey and Kolyma amongst others. When neighbouring rivers are combined into regions, informed by climate model predictions of the precipitation response to eruptions, decreases in streamflow can be detected in northern South American, central African and high-latitude Asian rivers and increases in southern South American and SW North American rivers. An improved understanding of how the hydrological cycle responds to volcanic eruptions is valuable in

  17. Crustal and tectonic controls on large-explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Tom; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Quantifying the frequency-Magnitude (f-M) relationship for volcanic eruptions is important to estimate volcanic hazard. Furthermore, understanding how this relationship varies between different groups of volcanoes can provide insights into the processes that control the size and rate of volcanic events. Using a Bayesian framework, which allows us to conceptualise the volcanic record as a series of individual and unique time series, associated by a common group behaviour, we identify variations in the size and rate of volcanism in different volcanic arcs. These variations in behaviour are linked to key parameters that include the motion of subduction, rate of subduction, age of the slab and thickness of the crust. The effects of these parameters on volcanism are interpreted in terms of variations in mantle productivity and the thermal efficiency of magma transfer in arc crustal systems. Understanding the link between subduction architecture, heat content of magmatic systems, and volcanic activity will serve to improve our capacity to quantify volcanic hazard in regions with limited geological and historical records of volcanic activity.

  18. Determination of ancient volcanic eruption center based on gravity methods (3D) in Gunungkidul area Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Agus; Sismanto, Setiawan, Ary; Pramumijoyo, Subagyo

    2016-05-01

    Ancient eruption centers can be determined by detecting the position of the ancient volcanic material, it is important to understand the elements of ancient volcanic material by studying the area geologically and prove the existence of an ancient volcanic eruption centers using geophysics gravity method. The measuring instrument is Lacoste & Romberg gravimeter type 1115, the number of data are 900 points. The area 60×40 kilometers, the modeling 3D software is reaching depth of 15 km at the south of the island of Java subduction zone. It is suported by geological data in the field that are found as the following: 1. Pyroclastic Fall which is a product of volcanic eruptions, and lapilli tuff with felsic mineral. 2. Pyroclastic flow with Breccia, tuffaceous sandstone and tuff breccia. 3. Hot springs near Parangwedang Parangtritis. 4. Igneous rock with scoria structure in Parang Kusumo, structured amigdaloida which is the result of the eruption of lava/volcanic eruptions, and Pillow lava in the shows the flowing lava into the sea. Base on gravity anomaly shows that there are strong correlationship between those geological data to the gravity anomaly. The gravblox modeling (3D) shows the position of ancient of volcanic eruption in this area clearly.

  19. Impacts of a Pinatubo-size volcanic eruption on ENSO

    KAUST Repository

    Predybaylo, Evgeniya

    2017-01-16

    Observations and model simulations of the climate responses to strong explosive low-latitude volcanic eruptions suggest a significant increase in the likelihood of El Niño during the eruption and posteruption years, though model results have been inconclusive and have varied in magnitude and even sign. In this study, we test how this spread of responses depends on the initial phase of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the eruption year and on the eruption\\'s seasonal timing. We employ the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory CM2.1 global coupled general circulation model to investigate the impact of the Pinatubo 1991 eruption, assuming that in 1991 ENSO would otherwise be in central or eastern Pacific El Niño, La Niña, or neutral phases. We obtain statistically significant El Niño responses in a year after the eruption for all cases except La Niña, which shows no response in the eastern equatorial Pacific. The eruption has a weaker impact on eastern Pacific El Niños than on central Pacific El Niños. We find that the ocean dynamical thermostat and (to a lesser extent) wind changes due to land-ocean temperature gradients are the main feedbacks affecting El Niño development after the eruption. The El Niño responses to eruptions occurring in summer are more pronounced than for winter and spring eruptions. That the climate response depends on eruption season and initial ENSO phase may help to reconcile apparent inconsistencies among previous studies.

  20. Silicate melt inclusion evidence for extreme pre-eruptive enrichment and post-eruptive depletion of lithium in silicic volcanic rocks of the western United States: implications for the origin of lithium-rich brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, Albert H.; Todorov, T.I.; Mercer, C.N.; Adams, D.T.; Marsh, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether anatectic and/or highly fractionated lithophile element-enriched rhyolite tuffs deposited in arid lacustrine basins lose enough lithium during eruption, lithification, and weathering to generate significant Li brine resources, pre-eruptive melt compositions, preserved in inclusions, and the magnitude of post-eruptive Li depletions, evident in host rhyolites, were documented at six sites in the western United States. Each rhyolite is a member of the bimodal basalt-rhyolite assemblage associated with extensional tectonics that produced the Basin and Range province and Rio Grande rift, an evolving pattern of closed drainage basins, and geothermal energy or mineral resources. Results from the 0.8 Ma Bishop tuff (geothermal) in California, 1.3 to 1.6 Ma Cerro Toledo and Upper Bandelier tephra (geothermal) and 27.9 Ma Taylor Creek rhyolite (Sn) in New Mexico, 21.7 Ma Spor Mountain tuff (Be, U, F) and 24.6 Ma Pine Grove tuff (Mo) in Utah, and 27.6 Ma Hideaway Park tuff (Mo) in Colorado support the following conclusions. Melt inclusions in quartz phenocrysts from rhyolite tuffs associated with hydrothermal deposits of Sn, Mo, and Be are extremely enriched in Li (1,000s of ppm); those from Spor Mountain have the highest Li abundance yet recorded (max 5,200 ppm, median 3,750 ppm). Forty-five to 98% of the Li present in pre-eruptive magma was lost to the environment from these rhyolite tuffs. The amount of Li lost from the small volumes (1–10 km3) of Li-enriched rhyolite deposited in closed basins is sufficient to produce world-class Li brine resources. After each eruption, meteoric water leaches Li from tuff, which drains into playas, where it is concentrated by evaporation. The localized occurrence of Li-enriched rhyolites may explain why brines in arid lacustrine basins seldom have economic concentrations of Li. Considering that hydrothermal deposits of Sn, Mo, Be, U, and F may indicate potential for Li brines in nearby basins, we surmise that the

  1. The lateral extent of volcanic interactions during unrest and eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Juliet; Robertson, Elspeth; Cashman, Katharine

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions often occur simultaneously or tap multiple magma reservoirs. Such lateral interactions between magmatic systems are attributed to stress changes or hydraulic connections but the precise conditions under which coupled eruptions occur have yet to be quantified. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar satellite data to analyse the surface deformation generated by volcanic unrest in the Kenyan Rift. We identify several magma sources located at depths of 2-5 km importantly, sources that are spaced less than about 10 km apart interact, whereas those spaced more than about 25 km apart do not. However, volcanoes up to 25 km apart have interacted in the geologic past. Thus, volcanic coupling is not simply controlled by the distance between the magma reservoirs. We then consider different tectonic settings globally, including intraplate volcanoes such as Hawaii and Yellowstone, arc volcanism in Alaska and Chile, and other rift settings, such as New Zealand, Iceland and Afar. We find that the most closely spaced magmatic interactions are controlled by the extent of a shallow crystal mush layer, stress changes can couple large eruptions over distances of about 20-40 km, and only large dyke intrusions or subduction earthquakes could generate coupled eruptions over distances of about 50-100 km.

  2. Emotional Eruptions, Volcanic Activity and Global Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2011-01-01

    The eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April 2010 set off a number of environmental, economic and cultural effects obstructing thousands of people in the midst of their global mobility flows. It halted, as well, the exchange of goods and commodities and exposed the vulnerability of...

  3. Emotional Eruptions, Volcanic Activity and Global Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2011-01-01

    The eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April 2010 set off a number of environmental, economic and cultural effects obstructing thousands of people in the midst of their global mobility flows. It halted, as well, the exchange of goods and commodities and exposed the vulnerability...

  4. Did the Nabro volcanic eruption directly overshoot the tropopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Steiner, Andrea K.; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Brenot, Hugues; Rieckh, Therese

    2015-04-01

    During the night of 12 to 13 June 2011 an explosive eruption occurred at the Nabro volcano located in Eritrea (13.4°N, 41.7°E). This has been recognized as the largest volcanic eruption since Pinatubo 1991, ejecting ash and sulfur dioxide (SO2) into the atmosphere, spreading over more than 60 degrees in latitude and more than 100 degrees in longitude within a few days and lasting for more than 15 days. While there is agreement on the fact that the eruptive mass reached the stratosphere, the processes bringing the cloud to the lower stratosphere are still much debated. For solving this issue we used about 300 atmospheric profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) observations and analyzed the pre-eruption conditions and the impact of the eruption itself on the tropospheric and stratospheric thermal structure. The GPS RO technique enables measurements of the atmospheric parameters in nearly any meteorological condition, with global coverage, high vertical resolution and high accuracy, making RO data well suited to study the thermodynamic structure of volcanic clouds and their impact on climate. In the Nabro area there are no ground based measurements that can be used for such kind of studies and, in the period of the eruption, there are no acquisitions by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. By analyzing the RO bending angle anomaly in the volcanic cloud area, we evaluated the cloud top altitude and compared it to the tropopause altitude (also derived from RO) in the same area. Moreover, we analyzed the RO temperature profiles before and after the eruption. Our results show that the volcanic cloud directly overshoot the tropopause and that the injected SO2 warmed the lower stratosphere in an area of about 10x10 degrees in latitude and longitude for 6 months, which is consistent with the effect found on a larger scale for the Pinatubo eruption in 1991. This study shows the capabilities

  5. Lunar Pyroclastic Eruptions: Basin Volcanism's Dying Gasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Nahm, A.; McGovern, P. J.; Kring, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between mare volcanism and impact basins has long been recognized, although the degree of influence basin formation has on volcanism remains a point of contention. For example, did melting of magma sources result from thermal energy imparted by a basin-forming event? Did basin impacts initiate mantle overturn of the unstable LMO cumulate pile, causing dense ilmenite to sink and drag radioactive KREEPy material to provide the thermal energy to initiate melting of the mare sources? Did the dramatically altered stress states provide pathways ideally suited for magma ascent? The chemistry of sampled lunar volcanic glasses indicates that they experienced very little fractional crystallization during their ascent to the surface - they have pristine melt compositions. Volatile abundances, including recent measurements of OH [1,2] suggest that the mantle source of at least the OH-analyzed glasses have a water abundance of ~700 ppm - comparable to that of Earth's upper mantle. More recently, [3] showed that the abundance of OH and other volatiles measured in these glasses is positively correlated with trace element abundances, which is expected since water is incompatible in a magma. Volatile enrichment in a deep mantle source would lower the melting temperature and provide the thrust for magma ascent through 500 km of mantle and crust [4]. We are exploring the idea that such basin-related lunar pyroclastic volcanism may represent the last phase of basaltic volcanism in a given region. Remote sensing studies have shown volcanic glasses are fairly common, and often found along the perimeter of mare-filled basins [5]. Recent modeling of the stresses related to the basin-forming process [6,7] show that basin margins provide the ideal conduit for low-volume lunar pyroclastic volcanism (compared with the high output of mare volcanism). Schrödinger's basin floor is largely composed of a compositionally uniform impact breccia. The exceptions are two distinct and

  6. Small volcanic eruptions and the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, David M.

    2012-09-01

    Understanding of volcanic activity and its impacts on the atmosphere has evolved in discrete steps, associated with defining eruptions. The eruption of Krakatau, Indonesia, in August 1883 was the first whose global reach was recorded through observations of atmospheric phenomena around the world (Symons 1888). The rapid equatorial spread of Krakatau's ash cloud revealed new details of atmospheric circulation, while the vivid twilights and other optical phenomena were soon causally linked to the effects of particles and gases released from the volcano (e.g. Stothers 1996, Schroder 1999, Hamilton 2012). Later, eruptions of Agung, Bali (1963), El Chichón, Mexico (1982) and Pinatubo, Philippines (1991) led to a fuller understanding of how volcanic SO2 is transformed to a long-lived stratospheric sulfate aerosol, and its consequences (e.g. Meinel and Meinel 1967, Rampino and Self 1982, Hoffman and Rosen 1983, Bekki and Pyle 1994, McCormick et al 1995). While our ability to track the dispersal of volcanic emissions has been transformed since Pinatubo, with the launch of fleets of Earth-observing satellites (e.g. NASA's A-Train; ESA's MetOp) and burgeoning networks of ground-based remote-sensing instruments (e.g. lidar and sun-photometers; infrasound and lightning detection systems), there have been relatively few significant eruptions. Thus, there have been limited opportunities to test emerging hypotheses including, for example, the vexed question of the role of 'smaller' explosive eruptions in perturbations of the atmosphere—those that may just be large enough to reach the stratosphere (of size 'VEI 3', Newhall and Self 1982, Pyle 2000). Geological evidence, from ice-cores and historical eruptions, suggests that small explosive volcanic eruptions with the potential to transport material into the stratosphere should be frequent (5-10 per decade), and responsible for a significant proportion of the long-term time-averaged flux of volcanic sulfur into the stratosphere

  7. Physical Volcanology and Hazard Analysis of a Young Volcanic Field: Black Rock Desert, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, A. R.

    2009-05-01

    The Black Rock Desert volcanic field, located in west-central Utah, consists of ~30 small-volume monogenetic volcanoes with compositions ranging from small rhyolite domes to large basaltic lava flow fields. The field has exhibited bimodal volcanism for > 9 Ma with the most recent eruption of Ice Springs volcano ˜ 600 yrs ago. Together this eruptive history along with ongoing geothermal activity attests to the usefulness of a hazard assessment. The likelihood of a future eruption in this area has been calculated to be ˜ 8% over the next 1 Ka (95% confidence). However, many aspects of this field such as the explosivity and nature of many of these eruptions are not well known. The physical volcanology of the Tabernacle Hill volcano, suggests a complicated episodic eruption that may have lasted up to 50 yrs. The initial phreatomagmatic eruptions at Tabernacle Hill are reported to have begun ~14 Ka. This initial eruptive phase produced a tuff cone approximately 150 m high and 1.5 km in diameter with distinct bedding layers. Recent mapping and sampling of Tabernacle Hill's lava field, tuff cone and intra-crater deposits were aimed at better constraining the eruptive history, physical volcanology, and explosive energy associated with this eruption. Blocks ejected during the eruption were mapped and analyzed to yield minimum muzzle velocities of 60 - 70 meters per second. These velocities were used in conjunction with an estimated shallow depth of explosion to calculate an energy yield of ˜ 0.5 kT.

  8. Laboratory studies on electrical effects during volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Büttner

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study reports on electrical phenomena during the explosive eruption of a basaltoid silicate melt. Contact electricity is produced in the phase of thermo-hydraulic fracturing of magma during the explosive interaction with water. The electrical charge produced is directly proportional to the force of the explosion, as the force of explosion is linearly proportional to the surface generated by the thermo-hydraulic fracturing. Simulation of the ejection history using inerted gas as a driving medium under otherwise constant conditions did not result in significant electric charging. The results have the potential to explain in nature observed lightening in eruption clouds of explosive volcanic events.

  9. Late Cretaceous intraplate silicic volcanic rocks from the Lake Chad region: An extension of the Cameroon volcanic line?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellnutt, J. G.; Lee, T.-Y.; Torng, P.-K.; Yang, C.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    2016-07-01

    Silicic volcanic rocks at Hadjer el Khamis, near Lake Chad, are considered to be an extension of the Cameroon volcanic line (CVL) but their petrogenetic association is uncertain. The silicic rocks are divided into peraluminous and peralkaline groups with both rock types chemically similar to within-plate granitoids. In situ U/Pb zircon dating yielded a mean 206Pb/238U age of 74.4 ± 1.3 Ma indicating the magmas erupted ˜10 million years before the next oldest CVL rocks (i.e., ˜66 Ma). The Sr isotopes (i.e., ISr = 0.7021-0.7037) show a relatively wide range but the Nd isotopes (i.e., 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51268-0.51271) are uniform and indicate that the rocks were derived from a moderately depleted mantle source. Thermodynamic modeling shows that the silicic rocks likely formed by fractional crystallization of a mafic parental magma but that the peraluminous rocks were affected by low temperature alteration processes. The silicic rocks are more isotopically similar to Late Cretaceous basalts identified within the Late Cretaceous basins (i.e., 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51245-0.51285) of Chad than the uncontaminated CVL rocks (i.e., 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51270-0.51300). The age and isotopic compositions suggest the silicic volcanic rocks of the Lake Chad region are related to Late Cretaceous extensional volcanism in the Termit basin. It is unlikely that the silicic volcanic rocks are petrogenetically related to the CVL but it is possible that magmatism was structurally controlled by suture zones that formed during the opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean and/or the Pan-African Orogeny.

  10. Towards forecasting volcanic eruptions on a global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, A. J.; Heimisson, E. R.; Gaddes, M.; Bagnardi, M.; Sigmundsson, F.; Spaans, K.; Parks, M.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Holohan, E. P.; Wright, T. J.; Jonsdottir, K.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Dumont, S.; Ofeigsson, B.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions can cause loss of life, damage health, and have huge economic impacts, providing strong societal motivation for predicting eruptive behavior prior to and during eruptions. I will present here recent progress we have made in mechanical modelling with a predictive capacity, and how we are expanding volcano monitoring to a global scale. The eruption of Bardarbunga volcano, Iceland, in 2014-2015 was the largest eruption there for more than 200 years, producing 1.6 km3of lava. Prior to eruption, magma propagated almost 50 km beneath the surface, over a period of two weeks. Key questions to answer in advance of such eruptions are: will it erupt, where, how much and for how long? We developed a model based on magma taking a path that maximizes energy release, which aligns well with the actual direction taken. Our model also predicts eruption in a topographic low, as actually occurred. As magma was withdrawn, the volcano surface sagged downwards. A coupled model of magma flow and piston-like collapse predicts a declining magma flow rate and ground subsidence rate, in accordance with that observed. With such a model, observations can be used to predict the timescale and rates of eruption, even before one starts. The primary data needed to constrain these predictive models are measurements of surface deformation. In Iceland, this is achieved using high accuracy GPS, however, most volcanoes have no ground instrumentation. A recent ESA mission, Sentinel-1, can potentially image deformation at almost all subaerial volcanoes every 6 days, using a technique called interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). This will allow us to detect early stages of magma migration at any volcano, then task other satellites to acquire data at a higher rate. We are working on a system to process all Sentinel-1 data in near-real time, which is a big data challenge. We have also developed new algorithms that maximize signal extraction from each new acquisition and

  11. Bromo volcano area as human-environment system: interaction of volcanic eruption, local knowledge, risk perception and adaptation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachri, Syamsul; Stötter, Johann; Sartohadi, Junun

    2013-04-01

    People in the Bromo area (located within Tengger Caldera) have learn to live with the threat of volcanic hazard since this volcano is categorized as an active volcano in Indonesia. During 2010, the eruption intensity increased yielding heavy ash fall and glowing rock fragments. A significant risk is also presented by mass movement which reaches areas up to 25 km from the crater. As a result of the 2010 eruption, 12 houses were destroyed, 25 houses collapsed and there were severe also effects on agriculture and the livestock sector. This paper focuses on understanding the interaction of Bromo volcanic eruption processes and their social responses. The specific aims are to 1) identify the 2010 eruption of Bromo 2) examine the human-volcano relationship within Bromo area in general, and 3) investigate the local knowledge related to hazard, risk perception and their adaptation strategies in specific. In-depth interviews with 33 informants from four districts nearest to the crater included local people and authorities were carried out. The survey focused on farmers, key persons (dukun), students and teachers in order to understand how people respond to Bromo eruption. The results show that the eruption in 2010 was unusual as it took continued for nine months, the longest period in Bromo history. The type of eruption was phreatomagmatic producing material dominated by ash to fine sand. This kind of sediment typically belongs to Tengger mountain eruptions which had produced vast explosions in the past. Furthermore, two years after the eruption, the interviewed people explained that local knowledge and their experiences with volcanic activity do not influence their risk perception. Dealing with this eruption, people in the Bromo area applied 'lumbung desa' (traditional saving systems) and mutual aid activity for surviving the volcanic eruption. Keywords: Human-environment system, local knowledge, risk perception, adaptation strategies, Bromo Volcano Indonesia

  12. Compound Antidunes: a Key to Detect Catastrophic Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, S.; Nemoto, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Antidunes are common in pyroclastic flow and surge deposits. However, the compound or nested occurrence of antidunes, where smaller antidunes reside within a larger-scale antidune, has seldom been documented or discussed in both pyroclastic and siliciclastic depositional settings. Without realizing this complexity, the frequency and magnitude of volcanic eruptions estimated from pyroclastic deposits are severely unrealistic. We have documented the Holocene outcrops of the antidune-bearing pyroclastites in Niijima Island, 100 miles SSW of Tokyo, Japan. The pyroclastites were formed by the eruptions in 886 AD Along the Habushiura coast in the southeastern part of the island, these outcrops form up to 50 m high cliffs, and are laterally traceable over 5 km from the volcano crater that shed the pyroclastites in the northward (downcurrent) direction. These pyroclastites were previously interpreted as recording about 30 small eruptions, each forming a 0.5-2 meter thick subhorizontal couplet of pumice (inversely grading) and lithic (normal grading) debris, with cm-m thick antidunes. However, we postulate that each of these couplets does not record a single volcanic eruption, but a much shorter time. These couplets occur between concave-up vertical accretion surfaces, which have both upstream- and downstream-migration components, within a 5-15 meter thick compound antidune (our "rank-1" antidune). Three erosively stacked compound antidunes form the coastal cliffs in the Habushiura coast, and each compound antidune is about ten times thicker than antidunes reported by earlier workers (corresponding to our "rank-2 antidunes" that nest within a rank-1 antidune, and "rank-3 antidunes" that nest within a rank-2 antidune). Hence, the Habushiura cliffs represent only three eruption events (instead of 30 events), but each representing much larger magnitude of eruptions. The geometry of these antidunes is comparable to "sediment waves" or "cyclic steps" of siliciclastic deposits

  13. Revisiting the observed surface climate response to large volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Fabian; Mitchell, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the range in presently available observational, reanalysis and model data, we revisit the surface climate response to large tropical volcanic eruptions from the end of the 19th century until present. We focus on the dynamically driven response of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the radiative-driven tropical temperature response. Using 10 different reanalysis products and the Hadley Centre Sea Level Pressure observational dataset (HadSLP2) we confirm a positive tendency in the phase of the NAO during boreal winters following large volcanic eruptions, although we conclude that it is not as clear cut as the current literature suggests. While different reanalyses agree well on the sign of the surface volcanic NAO response for individual volcanoes, the spread in the response is often large (˜ 1/2 standard deviation). This inter-reanalysis spread is actually larger for the more recent volcanic eruptions, and in one case does not encompass observations (El Chichón). These are all in the satellite era and therefore assimilate more atmospheric data that may lead to a more complex interaction for the surface response. The phase of the NAO leads to a dynamically driven warm anomaly over northern Europe in winter, which is present in all datasets considered. The general cooling of the surface temperature due to reduced incoming shortwave radiation is therefore disturbed by dynamical impacts. In the tropics, where less dynamically driven influences are present, we confirm a predominant cooling after most but not all eruptions. All datasets agree well on the strength of the tropical response, with the observed and reanalysis response being statistically significant but the modelled response not being significant due to the high variability across models.

  14. Spatial variation of volcanic rock geochemistry in the Virunga Volcanic Province: Statistical analysis of an integrated database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barette, Florian; Poppe, Sam; Smets, Benoît; Benbakkar, Mhammed; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2017-10-01

    We present an integrated, spatially-explicit database of existing geochemical major-element analyses available from (post-) colonial scientific reports, PhD Theses and international publications for the Virunga Volcanic Province, located in the western branch of the East African Rift System. This volcanic province is characterised by alkaline volcanism, including silica-undersaturated, alkaline and potassic lavas. The database contains a total of 908 geochemical analyses of eruptive rocks for the entire volcanic province with a localisation for most samples. A preliminary analysis of the overall consistency of the database, using statistical techniques on sets of geochemical analyses with contrasted analytical methods or dates, demonstrates that the database is consistent. We applied a principal component analysis and cluster analysis on whole-rock major element compositions included in the database to study the spatial variation of the chemical composition of eruptive products in the Virunga Volcanic Province. These statistical analyses identify spatially distributed clusters of eruptive products. The known geochemical contrasts are highlighted by the spatial analysis, such as the unique geochemical signature of Nyiragongo lavas compared to other Virunga lavas, the geochemical heterogeneity of the Bulengo area, and the trachyte flows of Karisimbi volcano. Most importantly, we identified separate clusters of eruptive products which originate from primitive magmatic sources. These lavas of primitive composition are preferentially located along NE-SW inherited rift structures, often at distance from the central Virunga volcanoes. Our results illustrate the relevance of a spatial analysis on integrated geochemical data for a volcanic province, as a complement to classical petrological investigations. This approach indeed helps to characterise geochemical variations within a complex of magmatic systems and to identify specific petrologic and geochemical investigations

  15. Hydrogeomorphic effects of explosive volcanic eruptions on drainage basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Thomas C.; Major, Jon J.

    2014-01-01

    Explosive eruptions can severely disturb landscapes downwind or downstream of volcanoes by damaging vegetation and depositing large volumes of erodible fragmental material. As a result, fluxes of water and sediment in affected drainage basins can increase dramatically. System-disturbing processes associated with explosive eruptions include tephra fall, pyroclastic density currents, debris avalanches, and lahars—processes that have greater impacts on water and sediment discharges than lava-flow emplacement. Geo-morphic responses to such disturbances can extend far downstream, persist for decades, and be hazardous. The severity of disturbances to a drainage basin is a function of the specific volcanic process acting, as well as distance from the volcano and magnitude of the eruption. Postdisturbance unit-area sediment yields are among the world's highest; such yields commonly result in abundant redeposition of sand and gravel in distal river reaches, which causes severe channel aggradation and instability. Response to volcanic disturbance can result in socioeconomic consequences more damaging than the direct impacts of the eruption itself.

  16. Internal triggering of volcanic eruptions: tracking overpressure regimes for giant magma bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, Samantha; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Ghiorso, Mark S.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding silicic eruption triggers is paramount for deciphering explosive volcanism and its potential societal hazards. Here, we use phase equilibria modeling to determine the potential role of internal triggering - wherein magmas naturally evolve to a state in which eruption is inevitable - in rhyolitic magma bodies. Whole-rock compositions from five large to super-sized rhyolitic deposits are modeled using rhyolite-MELTS. By running simulations with varying water contents, we can track crystallization and bubble exsolution during magma solidification. We use simulations with variable enthalpy and fixed pressure for the five compositions. The interplay between bubble exsolution and crystallization can lead to an increase in the system volume, which can lead to magma overpressurization. We find that internal triggering is possible for high-silica rhyolite magmas crystallizing at pressures below 300 MPa (50 wt.%, which makes magma immobile - high-silica rhyolite eruptions from such depths would require external triggering, but examples are scarce or entirely absent. Calculated crystallinities at which the critical overpressure threshold is reached compare favorably with observed crystal contents in natural samples for many systems, suggesting that internal evolution plays a critical role in triggering eruptions. Systems in which fluid saturation happens late relative to crystallization or in which degassing is effective can delay or avoid internal triggering. We argue that priming by crystallization and bubble exsolution is critical for magma eruption, and external triggering serves simply as the final blow - rather than being the driving force - of explosive rhyolitic eruptions.

  17. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  18. 40Ar/39Ar dating, geochemistry, and isotopic analyses of the quaternary Chichinautzin volcanic field, south of Mexico City: implications for timing, eruption rate, and distribution of volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, J. L.; Layer, P. W.; Lassiter, J. C.; Benowitz, J. A.; Macías, J. L.; Ramírez-Espinosa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Monogenetic structures located at the southern and western ends of the Chichinautzin volcanic field (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico) yield 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 1.2 Ma in the western portion of the field to 1.0-0.09 Ma in the southern portion, all of which are older than the volcanic field. These new ages indicate: (1) an eruption rate of 0.47 km3/kyr, which is much lower than the 11.7 km3/kyr previously estimated; (2) that the Chichinautzin magmatism coexisted with the Zempoala (0.7 Ma) and La Corona (1.0 Ma) polygenetic volcanoes on the southern edge of Las Cruces Volcanic Range (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt); and confirm (3) that the drainage system between the Mexico and Cuernavaca basins was closed during early Pleistocene forming the Texcoco Lake. Whole-rock chemistry and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic data indicate heterogeneous magmatism throughout the history of Chichinautzin activity that likely reflects variable degrees of slab and sediment contributions to the mantle wedge, fractional crystallization, and crustal assimilation. Even with the revised duration of volcanism within the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, its eruption rate is higher than most other volcanic fields of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and is comparable only to the Tacámbaro-Puruaran area in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field to the west. These variations in eruption rates among different volcanic fields may reflect a combination of variable subduction rates of the Rivera and Cocos plates along the Middle America Trench, as well as different distances from the trench, variations in the depth with respect to the subducted slab, or the upper plate characteristics.

  19. Major impact of volcanic gases on the chemical composition of precipitation in Iceland during the 2014-2015 Holuhraun eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Stefánsson, Gerdur; Keller, Nicole S.; Barsotti, Sara; Sigurdsson, Árni; Thorláksdóttir, Svava Björk; Pfeffer, Melissa Anne; Eiríksdóttir, Eydís. S.; Jónasdóttir, Elín. Björk; Löwis, Sibylle; Gíslason, Sigurdur R.

    2017-02-01

    The Holuhraun eruption in 2014-2015 was the largest in Iceland for more than 200 years. It resulted in emissions of large quantities of volcanic gases into the atmosphere (11 megaton (Mt) SO2, 0.1 Mt HCl, and 0.05 Mt HF). During the eruption the volcanic gases had major effects on F, SO4 and to a lesser extent Cl concentrations in precipitaxtion throughout Iceland, effects not observed in recent decades. The concentrations of F, Cl, and SO4 (n = 705) reached values of 444 µm 12,270 µm, and 17,324 µm during the eruption and were on average 20 times higher for F and SO4 and much lower for Cl compared to preeruption times. The concentrations of major cations (Si, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe) (n = 151) in the precipitation were taken as having originated from seawater spray and dissolution of rock dust and aerosol. Based on the mixing model developed here, it is demonstrated that the source of the enrichment of F and SO4 was indeed the volcanic gas emissions with >60-100 mol % of SO4 and F in the precipitation originated from volcanic gas, whereas the Cl originated mostly from seawater spray, making the volcanic gas input of Cl relatively less important than for F and SO4. The results showed that large volcanic eruptions can have major effects on atmospheric chemistry and impact the composition of precipitation.

  20. Palaeomagnetic constraints on the age of Lomo Negro volcanic eruption (El Hierro, Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasante-Marcos, Víctor; Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier

    2014-12-01

    A palaeomagnetic study has been carried out in 29 cores drilled at six different sites from the volcanic products of Lomo Negro eruption (El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain). Systematic thermal and alternating field demagnetization of the samples' natural remanent magnetization revealed a northward, stable palaeomagnetic direction similar in all the samples. Rock magnetic experiments indicate that this palaeomagnetic component is carried by a mixture of high-Ti and low-Ti titanomagnetite crystals typical of basaltic lithologies that have experienced a significant degree of oxyexsolution during subaerial cooling. The well constrained palaeomagnetic direction of Lomo Negro lavas was used to perform a palaeomagnetic dating of the volcanic event, using the SHA.DIF.14k global geomagnetic model restricted for the last 3000 yr. It can be unambiguously concluded that Lomo Negro eruption occurred well before the previously proposed date of 1793 AD, with three different age ranges being statistically possible during the last 3 ka: 115 BC-7 AD, 410-626 AD and 1499-1602 AD. The calibration of a previously published non-calibrated 14C dating suggests a XVI c. date for Lomo Negro eruption. This conclusion leaves open the possibility that the seismic crisis occurred at El Hierro in 1793 AD was related to an intrusive magmatic event that either did not reach the surface or either culminated in an unregistered submarine eruption similar to the one occurred in 2011-2012 at the southern off-shore ridge of the island.

  1. UK Hazard Assessment for a Laki-type Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Claire; Felton, Chris; Daud, Sophie; Aspinall, Willy; Braban, Christine; Loughlin, Sue; Hort, Matthew; Schmidt, Anja; Vieno, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    Following the impacts of the Eyjafjallajokull eruption in 2010, two types of volcanic eruption have been added to the UK Government's National Risk Register for Civil Emergencies. One of these, a large gas-rich volcanic eruption, was identified as a high impact natural hazard, one of the three highest priority natural hazards faced by the UK. This eruption scenario is typified by the Laki eruption in Iceland in 1783-1784. The Civil Contingency Secretariat (CCS) of the UK's Cabinet Office, responsible for Civil Protection in the UK, has since been working on quantifying the risk and better understanding its potential impacts. This involves cross-cutting work across UK Government departments and the wider scientific community in order to identify the capabilities needed to respond to an effusive eruption, to exercise the response and develop increased resilience where possible. As part of its current work, CCS has been working closely with the UK Met Office and other UK agencies and academics (represented by the co-authors and others) to generate and assess the impacts of a 'reasonable worst case scenario', which can be used for decision making and preparation in advance of an eruption. Information from the literature and the findings of an expert elicitation have been synthesised to determine appropriate eruption source term parameters and associated uncertainties. This scenario is then being used to create a limited ensemble of model simulations of the dispersion and chemical conversion of the emissions of volcanic gases during such an eruption. The UK Met Office's NAME Lagrangian dispersion model and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology's EMEP4UK Eulerian model are both being used. Modelling outputs will address the likelihood of near-surface concentrations of sulphur and halogen species being above specified health thresholds. Concentrations at aviation relevant altitudes will also be evaluated, as well as the effects of acid deposition of volcanic species on

  2. IPLOR performance in detecting infrasound from volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghica, Daniela; Popa, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    Plostina infrasound array (IPLOR) is located in the central part of Romania, in Vrancea region, its current configuration consisting of 6 elements equipped with Chaparral Physics sensors deployed over a 2.5 km aperture. The array detectability observed after processing of more than 6 years of data has shown that IPLOR is more effective in measuring mainly infrasound signals produced by natural and anthropogenic impulsive sources. This can be explained by the sensors' characteristics (frequency response, dynamic range) and the large aperture of array. Among the types of events observed with IPLOR, an emphasis can be given to the Mt. Etna volcanic eruptions as one of the powerful infrasound source recorded by the array. Located at about 1320 km distance from volcano, the array has proved efficient in observing both large and small eruptions. In case of the most large eruptive episodes occurred lately (April and October 2013, December 2015), long duration infrasonic signals were detected, the initial impulsive signature of the volcanic explosion being followed by a long train of irregular waves with smaller amplitudes and higher frequency, extended over periods ranging from 6 hours to more than three days (in December 2015). For the purpose of assessing the IPLOR performance in detecting Etna eruptions, the signal interactive analysis was performed using WinPMCC, CEA/DASE version of PMCC software. The infrasound detections obtained were plotted in function of back-azimuth, velocity and frequency, showing that the detectability is dependent both on the diurnal variations of the noise around the array (during the night the human activity diminishes) and on the seasonally dependent stratospheric winds (westward propagation during summer and eastward propagation during winter). In case of the Etna eruptive episodes detected by IPLOR, the back azimuth observed is in good agreement with the expected value (230o), i.e. an average value of 232±2o could be resolved. The

  3. Petrologic and petrographic variation of youthful eruptive products in the Tuxtla Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, C. B.; Kobs Nawotniak, S. E.; Fredrick, K. C.; Espindola, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is located near the Gulf of Mexico in the southern part of the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Volcanism in the region began around 7 Ma and has continued until recent times with the volcano San Martín Tuxtla’s latest eruptions in AD 1664 and 1793. The TVF rocks are mainly of alkaline composition and have been divided into two separate volcanic series, an older and younger. The TVF is a structural high located between the Veracruz Basin to the southwest and the Gulf of Mexico to the northeast, characterized by relatively thin crust with the depth to the Moho around 28 to 34 km. The TVF is unique because it is isolated from the nearest volcanic fields (the Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central American Volcanic Belt and the Eastern Alkaline Province) by at least 230km and because of the on-going debate over its magmatic origin. Many models have been proposed to explain the TVF’s alkaline nature in a unique location with most linking it either to the subduction of the Cocos plate to the west of Mexico and/or to extensional faulting in the region. The purpose of our study was to determine systematic changes in the youthful volcanic deposits across the TVF. Regional and local mapping was conducted and lava and scoria samples were collected from seven sites associated with two vent clusters in the TVF. Mapping of the easternmost cluster of deposits suggests chronological emplacement of the deposits through superposition and vent location and morphology. The petrography of lava and tephra deposits may further indicate magmatic origins and other factors influencing the development of the field, including chronology and possible mixing and/or differentiation. Previous published studies analyzed samples near the San Martin Tuxtla volcanic center. Their data is used as a comparative reference for these samples, most of which were collected from another, younger cluster east of Laguna Catemaco. From this study, a better understanding of past eruptive

  4. Exploring the Potential Impacts of Historic Volcanic Eruptions on the Contemporary Global Food System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Michael J.; Chon, S.; Wada, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of volcanic impacts on crops is urgently needed, as volcanic eruptions and the associated climate anomalies can cause unanticipated shocks to food production. Such shocks are a major concern given the fragility of the global food system.

  5. Bromine release during Plinian eruptions along the Central American Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansteen, T. H.; Kutterolf, S.; Appel, K.; Freundt, A.; Perez-Fernandez, W.; Wehrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanoes of the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) have produced at least 72 highly explosive eruptions within the last 200 ka. The eruption columns of all these “Plinian” eruptions reached well into the stratosphere such that their released volatiles may have influenced atmospheric chemistry and climate. While previous research has focussed on the sulfur and chlorine emissions during such large eruptions, we here present measurements of the heavy halogen bromine by means of synchrotron radiation induced micro-XRF microanalysis (SR-XRF) with typical detection limits at 0.3 ppm (in Fe rich standard basalt ML3B glass). Spot analyses of pre-eruptive glass inclusions trapped in minerals formed in magma reservoirs were compared with those in matrix glasses of the tephras, which represent the post-eruptive, degassed concentrations. The concentration difference between inclusions and matrix glasses, multiplied by erupted magma mass determined by extensive field mapping, yields estimates of the degassed mass of bromine. Br is probably hundreds of times more effective in destroying ozone than Cl, and can accumulate in the stratosphere over significant time scales. Melt inclusions representing deposits of 22 large eruptions along the CAVA have Br contents between 0.5 and 13 ppm. Br concentrations in matrix glasses are nearly constant at 0.4 to 1.5 ppm. However, Br concentrations and Cl/Br ratios vary along the CAVA. The highest values of Br contents (>8 ppm) and lowest Cl/Br ratios (170 to 600) in melt inclusions occur across central Nicaragua and southern El Salvador, and correlate with bulk-rock compositions of high Ba/La > 85 as well as low La/Yb discharged 700 kilotons of Br. On average, each of the remaining 21 CAVA eruptions studied have discharged c.100 kilotons of bromine. During the past 200 ka, CAVA volcanoes have emitted a cumulative mass of 3.2 Mt of Br through highly explosive eruptions. There are six periods in the past (c. 2ka, 6ka, 25ka, 40ka, 60ka, 75

  6. Some isotopic and geochemical anomalies observed in Mexico prior to large scale earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz R, S. de la; Armienta, M.A.; Segovia A, N

    1992-05-15

    A brief account of some experiences obtained in Mexico, related with the identification of geochemical precursors of volcanic eruptions and isotopic precursors of earthquakes and volcanic activity is given. The cases of three recent events of volcanic activity and one large earthquake are discussed in the context of an active geological environment. The positive results in the identification of some geochemical precursors that helped to evaluate the eruptive potential during two volcanic crises (Tacana 1986 and Colima 1991), and the significant radon-in-soil anomalies observed during a volcanic catastrophic eruption (El Chichon, 1982) and prior to a major earthquake (Michoacan, 1985) are critically analysed. (Author)

  7. Characterizing Volcanic Eruptions on Venus: Some Realistic (?) Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofan, E. R.; Glaze, L. S.; Grinspoon, D. H.

    2011-01-01

    When Pioneer Venus arrived at Venus in 1978, it detected anomalously high concentrations of SO2 at the top of the troposphere, which subsequently declined over the next five years. This decline in SO2 was linked to some sort of dynamic process, possibly a volcanic eruption. Observations of SO2 variability have persisted since Pioneer Venus. More recently, scientists from the Venus Express mission announced that the SPICAV (Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Venus) instrument had measured varying amounts of SO2 in the upper atmosphere; VIRTIS (Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer) measured no similar variations in the lower atmosphere (ESA, 4 April, 2008). In addition, Fegley and Prinn stated that venusian volcanoes must replenish SO2 to the atmosphere, or it would react with calcite and disappear within 1.9 my. Fegley and Tremain suggested an eruption rate on the order of approx 1 cubic km/year to maintain atmospheric SO2; Bullock and Grinspoon posit that volcanism must have occurred within the last 20-50 my to maintain the sulfuric acid/water clouds on Venus. The abundance of volcanic deposits on Venus and the likely thermal history of the planet suggest that it is still geologically active, although at rates lower than Earth. Current estimates of resurfacing rates range from approx 0.01 cubic km/yr to approx 2 cubic km/yr. Demonstrating definitively that Venus is still volcanically active, and at what rate, would help to constrain models of evolution of the surface and interior, and help to focus future exploration of Venus.

  8. Hydrogen isotope investigation of amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in silicic magmas erupted at Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, S.J.; Feeley, T.C.; Clynne, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratio, water content and Fe3 +/Fe2 + in coexisting amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in volcanic rocks can provide insight into shallow pre- and syn-eruptive magmatic processes such as vesiculation, and lava drainback with mixing into less devolatilized magma that erupts later in a volcanic sequence. We studied four ~ 35 ka and younger eruption sequences (i.e. Kings Creek, Lassen Peak, Chaos Crags, and 1915) at the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), California, where intrusion of crystal-rich silicic magma mushes by mafic magmas is inferred from the varying abundances of mafic magmatic inclusions (MMIs) in the silicic volcanic rocks. Types and relative proportions of reacted and unreacted hydrous phenocryst populations are evaluated with accompanying chemical and H isotope changes. Biotite phenocrysts were more susceptible to rehydration in older vesicular glassy volcanic rocks than coexisting amphibole phenocrysts. Biotite and magnesiohornblende phenocrysts toward the core of the Lassen Peak dome are extensively dehydroxylated and reacted from prolonged exposure to high temperature, low pressure, and higher fO2 conditions from post-emplacement cooling. In silicic volcanic rocks not affected by alteration, biotite phenocrysts are often relatively more dehydroxylated than are magnesiohornblende phenocrysts of similar size; this is likely due to the ca 10 times larger overall bulk H diffusion coefficient in biotite. A simplified model of dehydrogenation in hydrous phenocrysts above reaction closure temperature suggests that eruption and quench of magma ascended to the surface in a few hours is too short a time for substantial H loss from amphibole. In contrast, slowly ascended magma can have extremely dehydrogenated and possibly dehydrated biotite, relatively less dehydrogenated magnesiohornblende and reaction rims on both phases. Eruptive products containing the highest proportions of mottled dehydrogenated crystals could indicate that within a few days

  9. Volcanic Rocks As Targets For Astrobiology Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, N.

    2010-12-01

    Almost two decades of study highlight the importance of terrestrial subaqueous volcanic rocks as microbial habitats, particularly in glass produced by the quenching of basaltic lava upon contact with water. On Earth, microbes rapidly begin colonizing glassy surfaces along fractures and cracks exposed to water. Microbial colonization of basaltic glass leads to enhanced alteration through production of characteristic granular and/or tubular bioalteration textures. Infilling of formerly hollow alteration textures by minerals enable their preservation through geologic time. Basaltic rocks are a major component of the Martian crust and are widespread on other solar system bodies. A variety of lines of evidence strongly suggest the long-term existence of abundant liquid water on ancient Mars. Recent orbiter, lander and rover missions have found evidence for the presence of transient liquid water on Mars, perhaps persisting to the present day. Many other solar system bodies, notably Europa, Enceladus and other icy satellites, may contain (or have once hosted) subaqueous basaltic glasses. The record of terrestrial glass bioalteration has been interpreted to extend back ~3.5 billion years and is widespread in modern oceanic crust and its ancient metamorphic equivalents. The terrestrial record of glass bioalteration strongly suggests that glassy or formerly glassy basaltic rocks on extraterrestrial bodies that have interacted with liquid water are high-value targets for astrobiological exploration.

  10. Developing a NASA strategy for sampling a major Pinatubo-like volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, P. A.; Jucks, K. W.; Maring, H. B.

    2016-12-01

    Based on history, it is reasonable to expect a major volcanic eruption in the foreseeable future. By "major volcanic eruption", we mean an eruption that injects a substantial amount of material, gases and particles, into the stratosphere as a result of one eruption event. Such a volcanic eruption can impact weather, climate, and atmospheric chemistry on regional, hemispheric and global scales over significant time periods. Further, such an eruption can be an unintended analog for a number of geo-engineering schemes for mitigating greenhouse warming of the Earth. In order to understand and project the consequences of a major eruption, it is necessary to make a number of observations from a variety of perspectives. Such an eruption will occur, in the immediate sense, unexpectedly. Therefore, it is wise to have a thoughtfully developed plan for executing a rapid response that makes useful observations. A workshop was held on 17-18 May 2016 at NASA GSFC to develop a NASA observation strategy that could be quickly implemented in response to a major volcanic eruption, and would characterize the changes to atmospheric (especially stratospheric) composition following a large volcanic eruption. In this presentation we will provide an overview of the elements of this strategy with respect to satellite, balloon, ground, and aircraft observations. In addition, models simulations and forecasts will play a key role in any response strategy. Results will also be shown from a spectrum of simulations of volcanic eruptions that support this NASA strategy.

  11. Volcanic gas composition, metal dispersion and deposition during explosive volcanic eruptions on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renggli, C. J.; King, P. L.; Henley, R. W.; Norman, M. D.

    2017-06-01

    The transport of metals in volcanic gases on the Moon differs greatly from their transport on the Earth because metal speciation depends largely on gas composition, temperature, pressure and oxidation state. We present a new thermochemical model for the major and trace element composition of lunar volcanic gas during pyroclastic eruptions of picritic magmas calculated at 200-1500 °C and over 10-9-103 bar. Using published volatile component concentrations in picritic lunar glasses, we have calculated the speciation of major elements (H, O, C, Cl, S and F) in the coexisting volcanic gas as the eruption proceeds. The most abundant gases are CO, H2, H2S, COS and S2, with a transition from predominantly triatomic gases to diatomic gases with increasing temperatures and decreasing pressures. Hydrogen occurs as H2, H2S, H2S2, HCl, and HF, with H2 making up 0.5-0.8 mol fractions of the total H. Water (H2O) concentrations are at trace levels, which implies that H-species other than H2O need to be considered in lunar melts and estimates of the bulk lunar composition. The Cl and S contents of the gas control metal chloride gas species, and sulfide gas and precipitated solid species. We calculate the speciation of trace metals (Zn, Ga, Cu, Pb, Ni, Fe) in the gas phase, and also the pressure and temperature conditions at which solids form from the gas. During initial stages of the eruption, elemental gases are the dominant metal species. As the gas loses heat, chloride and sulfide species become more abundant. Our chemical speciation model is applied to a lunar pyroclastic eruption model with isentropic gas decompression. The relative abundances of the deposited metal-bearing solids with distance from the vent are predicted for slow cooling rates (<5 °C/s). Close to a volcanic vent we predict native metals are deposited, whereas metal sulfides dominate with increasing distance from the vent. Finally, the lunar gas speciation model is compared with the speciation of a H2O-, CO

  12. Temporal variations in the constituents of volcanic ash and adherent water-soluble components in the Unzen Fugendake eruption during 1990-1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, K.; Hirabayashi, J.; Ohba, T.; Ossaka, J.; Yamamoto, M.; Akagi, S.; Ozawa, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2001-07-01

    A change in the chemical compositions of volcanic gases is one of the noticeable phenomena that frequently occurs prior to an eruption. Analysis of the water-soluble components adhering to volcanic ash is available for remote monitoring of volcanic gases from inaccessible volcanoes. It is a secure method for monitoring volcanic activity without using particular devices. Prolonged volcanic eruption at the Unzen Fugendake volcano from 1990 to 1995 started with a phreatic eruption after 198 years of dormancy. Volcanic activity changed from a phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruption to a magmatic eruption with pyroclastic flows in May 1991. The relationship between the chemical composition of volcanic ash and the contents of the water-soluble components adhering to it are discussed in relation to the early stage of the long-term eruption. Volcanic ash ejected by phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruption before dome formation was the product of the alteration in the volcanoclastic materials beneath the surface. The ash had a high content of water-soluble components, which was caused by the absorption of hydrogen chloride and sulfur dioxide gases from magma into wet debris before dome formation. Volcanic ashes which were generated by pyroclastic flows after dome formation were fresh lava fragments. While the contents of water-soluble sulfate adhering to the ash noticeably decreased, those of water-soluble chloride adhering to the ash hardly decreased. The considerable decrease in the contents of water-soluble sulfate was caused by the reaction of volcanic gases with dry lava fragments. Contrary to this, the concentration of hydrogen chloride gas in ash clouds was extremely high, which obstructed the decrease in the water-soluble chloride content in the ash. Volatility of chlorine and sulfur from volcanic rock suggests that the inner temperature of pyroclastic flows was higher than 600~700° C at least.

  13. Fragmentation Speed and Permeability of hot Volcanic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheu, B.; Mueller, S.; Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    The speed of fragmentation may control the explosive behaviour of silicic volcanoes. It is directly affected by the gas pressure within the volcano, which else influences the eruptive behaviour of the volcano. We used two techniques to analyse the speed of fragmentation. At both the fragmentation is triggered by the rapid decompression inside a high-pressure autoclave. Firstly at room temperature a set of two pressure transducers record the differential pressure loss above and below the cylindrical sample (d = 25mm, l = 60 mm). Secondly at temperatures of 850°C two platinum wires are inserted at known distance into the sample cylinder and used as electrical conductors to record the rupture time. The recorded time difference and the distance between the conductors are used to recalculate the speed of the fragmentation wave. This speed depends on porosity, texture and initial pressure difference. Further, the results show a decrease of fragmentation speed while propagating through the rock sample. We propose this effect to be linked to the density changes of the gas and therefore the reducing flow rates through the rock sample (gas permeability). Up to today permeability measurements have only been performed on cold porous rocks (e.g. Eichelberger et al. 1986, Klug & Cashman 1996), because measurements with higher temperatures are not possible with common gas permeameters. Investigating the permeability of volcanic rocks in a hot state (up to 850°C) provides a better insight into the degassing processes under natural conditions. Therefore, any new experimental set-up is expected to yield information about the temperature dependency of permeability in volcanic rocks. The present experiments have been performed on samples with a wide range of porosities, collected from block-and-ash flows on Merapi (Indonesia), Unzen (Japan) and from pumices on Lipari Island (Italy). Permeability was measured using a modified set-up of the fragmentation apparatus. Below the sample a

  14. Volcanic hazards from Bezymianny- and Bandai-type eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, L.; Glicken, H.; Ui, T.

    1987-01-01

    Major slope failures are a significant degradational process at volcanoes. Slope failures and associated explosive eruptions have resulted in more than 20 000 fatalities in the past 400 years; the historic record provides evidence for at least six of these events in the past century. Several historic debris avalanches exceed 1 km3 in volume. Holocene avalanches an order of magnitude larger have traveled 50-100 km from the source volcano and affected areas of 500-1500 km2. Historic eruptions associated with major slope failures include those with a magmatic component (Bezymianny type) and those solely phreatic (Bandai type). The associated gravitational failures remove major segments of the volcanoes, creating massive horseshoe-shaped depressions commonly of caldera size. The paroxysmal phase of a Bezymianny-type eruption may include powerful lateral explosions and pumiceous pyroclastic flows; it is often followed by construction of lava dome or pyroclastic cone in the new crater. Bandai-type eruptions begin and end with the paroxysmal phase, during which slope failure removes a portion of the edifice. Massive volcanic landslides can also occur without related explosive eruptions, as at the Unzen volcano in 1792. The main potential hazards from these events derive from lateral blasts, the debris avalanche itself, and avalanche-induced tsunamis. Lateral blasts produced by sudden decompression of hydrothermal and/or magmatic systems can devastate areas in excess of 500km2 at velocities exceeding 100 m s-1. The ratio of area covered to distance traveled for the Mount St. Helens and Bezymianny lateral blasts exceeds that of many pyroclastic flows or surges of comparable volume. The potential for large-scale lateral blasts is likely related to the location of magma at the time of slope failure and appears highest when magma has intruded into the upper edifice, as at Mount St. Helens and Bezymianny. Debris avalanches can move faster than 100 ms-1 and travel tens of

  15. The influence of eruption season on the global aerosol evolution and radiative impact of tropical volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of tropical volcanic eruptions using a general circulation model with coupled aerosol microphysics are used to assess the influence of season of eruption on the aerosol evolution and radiative impacts at the Earth's surface. This analysis is presented for eruptions with SO2 injection magnitudes of 17 and 700 Tg, the former consistent with estimates of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the later a near-"super eruption". For each eruption magnitude, simulations are performed with eruptions at 15° N, at four equally spaced times of year. Sensitivity to eruption season of aerosol optical depth (AOD, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave (SW radiative flux is quantified by first integrating each field for four years after the eruption, then calculating for each cumulative field the absolute or percent difference between the maximum and minimum response from the four eruption seasons. Eruption season has a significant influence on AOD and clear-sky SW radiative flux anomalies for both eruption magnitudes. The sensitivity to eruption season for both fields is generally weak in the tropics, but increases in the mid- and high latitudes, reaching maximum values of ~75 %. Global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies show sensitivity to eruption season on the order of 15–20 %, which results from differences in aerosol effective radius for the different eruption seasons. Smallest aerosol size and largest cumulative impact result from a January eruption for Pinatubo-magnitude eruption, and from a July eruption for the near-super eruption. In contrast to AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies, all-sky SW anomalies are found to be insensitive to season of eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude eruption experiment, due to the reflection of solar radiation by clouds in the mid- to high latitudes. However, differences in all-sky SW anomalies between eruptions in different seasons are significant for the larger eruption magnitude, and the ~15 % sensitivity to

  16. Strong Constraints on Aerosol-Cloud Interactions from Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavelle, Florent F.; Haywood, Jim M.; Jones, Andy; Gettelman, Andrew; Clarisse, Lieven; Bauduin, Sophie; Allan, Richard P.; Karset, Inger Helene H.; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; hide

    2017-01-01

    Aerosols have a potentially large effect on climate, particularly through their interactions with clouds, but the magnitude of this effect is highly uncertain. Large volcanic eruptions produce sulfur dioxide, which in turn produces aerosols; these eruptions thus represent a natural experiment through which to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions. Here we show that the massive 2014-2015 fissure eruption in Holuhraun, Iceland, reduced the size of liquid cloud droplets - consistent with expectations - but had no discernible effect on other cloud properties. The reduction in droplet size led to cloud brightening and global-mean radiative forcing of around minus 0.2 watts per square metre for September to October 2014. Changes in cloud amount or cloud liquid water path, however, were undetectable, indicating that these indirect effects, and cloud systems in general, are well buffered against aerosol changes. This result will reduce uncertainties in future climate projections, because we are now able to reject results from climate models with an excessive liquid-water-path response.

  17. Ice nucleating properties of volcanic ash particles from the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, G.; Zelenyuk, A.; Beranek, J.

    2011-12-01

    The volcanic ash from the volcanic emissions can significantly contribute to the natural source of aerosols in the atmosphere. In the vicinity and downwind of eruption site, the transported ash might have a stronger impact on the aviation industry, regional air quality, and climate. Despite the environmental significance of ash, our understanding of ash particles reacting with other volcanic plume constituents is rudimentary. In particular, the complex interactions between the water vapor and ash particles under different meteorological conditions that lead to cloud hydrometeors are poorly understood. To improve our understanding, we focus on investigating the ice formation properties of ash particles collected from the recent volcanic eruption. It was observed that the ash particles are less efficient ice nuclei compared to the natural dust particles in the deposition nucleation regime, but have similar efficiencies in the condensation freezing mode. The ice nucleated ash particles are separated from the interstitial particles, and further evaporated to understand the elemental composition, size, shape and morphology of the ice residue using the single particle mass spectrometer. The elemental composition reveals that majority of the elements are also present in the natural dust particles, but subtle differences are observed. This suggests that particle properties play an important role in the ice nucleation process.

  18. Volcanic hazard assessment for the Canary Islands (Spain) using extreme value theory, and the recent volcanic eruption of El Hierro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobradelo, R.; Martí, J.; Mendoza-Rosas, A. T.; Gómez, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Canary Islands are an active volcanic region densely populated and visited by several millions of tourists every year. Nearly twenty eruptions have been reported through written chronicles in the last 600 years, suggesting that the probability of a new eruption in the near future is far from zero. This shows the importance of assessing and monitoring the volcanic hazard of the region in order to reduce and manage its potential volcanic risk, and ultimately contribute to the design of appropriate preparedness plans. Hence, the probabilistic analysis of the volcanic eruption time series for the Canary Islands is an essential step for the assessment of volcanic hazard and risk in the area. Such a series describes complex processes involving different types of eruptions over different time scales. Here we propose a statistical method for calculating the probabilities of future eruptions which is most appropriate given the nature of the documented historical eruptive data. We first characterise the eruptions by their magnitudes, and then carry out a preliminary analysis of the data to establish the requirements for the statistical method. Past studies in eruptive time series used conventional statistics and treated the series as an homogeneous process. In this paper, we will use a method that accounts for the time-dependence of the series and includes rare or extreme events, in the form of few data of large eruptions, since these data require special methods of analysis. Hence, we will use a statistical method from extreme value theory. In particular, we will apply a non-homogeneous Poisson process to the historical eruptive data of the Canary Islands to estimate the probability of having at least one volcanic event of a magnitude greater than one in the upcoming years. Shortly after the publication of this method an eruption in the island of El Hierro took place for the first time in historical times, supporting our method and contributing towards the validation of

  19. Aborted eruptions at Mt. Etna (Italy) in spring 2007 unveiled by an integrated study of gas emission and volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsaperla, S.; Behncke, B.; Giammanco, S.; Neri, M.; Langer, H.; Pecora, E.; Salerno, G.

    2012-04-01

    In spring 2007, a sequence of paroxysmal episodes took place at the Southeast Crater of Mt. Etna, Italy. Eruptive activity, characterised by Strombolian explosions, lava fountains, emission of lava flows and tephra, were all associated with an outstanding increase in the amplitude of volcanic tremor. In periods of quiescence between the eruptive episodes, recurring phases of seismic unrest were observed in forms of small temporary enhancements of the volcanic tremor amplitude, even though none of them culminated in eruptive activity. Here, we present the results of an integrated geophysical and geochemical data analysis encompassing records of volcanic tremor, thermal data, plume SO2 flux and radon over two months. We conclude that between February and April 2007, magma triggered repeated episodes of gas pulses and rock fracturing, but failed to reach the surface. Our multidisciplinary study allowed us to unveil these 'aborted' eruptions by investigating the long-temporal evolution of gas measurements along with seismic radiation. Short-term changes were additionally highlighted using a method of pattern classification based on Kohonen Maps and Fuzzy Clustering applied to volcanic tremor and radon data.

  20. MeMoVolc report on classification and dynamics of volcanic explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, C.; Cioni, R.; Costa, A.; Druitt, T.; Phillips, J.; Pioli, L.; Andronico, D.; Harris, A.; Scollo, S.; Bachmann, O.; Bagheri, G.; Biass, S.; Brogi, F.; Cashman, K.; Dominguez, L.; Dürig, T.; Galland, O.; Giordano, G.; Gudmundsson, M.; Hort, M.; Höskuldsson, A.; Houghton, B.; Komorowski, J. C.; Küppers, U.; Lacanna, G.; Le Pennec, J. L.; Macedonio, G.; Manga, M.; Manzella, I.; Vitturi, M. de'Michieli; Neri, A.; Pistolesi, M.; Polacci, M.; Ripepe, M.; Rossi, E.; Scheu, B.; Sulpizio, R.; Tripoli, B.; Valade, S.; Valentine, G.; Vidal, C.; Wallenstein, N.

    2016-11-01

    Classifications of volcanic eruptions were first introduced in the early twentieth century mostly based on qualitative observations of eruptive activity, and over time, they have gradually been developed to incorporate more quantitative descriptions of the eruptive products from both deposits and observations of active volcanoes. Progress in physical volcanology, and increased capability in monitoring, measuring and modelling of explosive eruptions, has highlighted shortcomings in the way we classify eruptions and triggered a debate around the need for eruption classification and the advantages and disadvantages of existing classification schemes. Here, we (i) review and assess existing classification schemes, focussing on subaerial eruptions; (ii) summarize the fundamental processes that drive and parameters that characterize explosive volcanism; (iii) identify and prioritize the main research that will improve the understanding, characterization and classification of volcanic eruptions and (iv) provide a roadmap for producing a rational and comprehensive classification scheme. In particular, classification schemes need to be objective-driven and simple enough to permit scientific exchange and promote transfer of knowledge beyond the scientific community. Schemes should be comprehensive and encompass a variety of products, eruptive styles and processes, including for example, lava flows, pyroclastic density currents, gas emissions and cinder cone or caldera formation. Open questions, processes and parameters that need to be addressed and better characterized in order to develop more comprehensive classification schemes and to advance our understanding of volcanic eruptions include conduit processes and dynamics, abrupt transitions in eruption regime, unsteadiness, eruption energy and energy balance.

  1. Impacts of volcanic eruptions and geoengineering on Arctic climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, Mira

    Stratospheric aerosols can produce large radiative forcing and climate response, often amplified in the Arctic. Here I study the Arctic response to natural (volcanic eruptions) and potential anthropogenic (geoengineering) stratospheric sulfate aerosols. I use a regional climate model and global climate model output from two modeling intercomparison projects. First, I investigate the relative impacts of changes in radiation and advection on snow extent over Baffin Island with the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Model results show it is possible to suddenly lower the snowline by amounts comparable to those seen during the Little Ice Age with an average temperature decrease of --3.9 +/- 1.1 K from present. Further, sea ice expansion following large volcanic eruptions would have significant affects on inland temperatures, especially in the fall. Next, I analyze Last Millennium simulations from the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project 3 to assess whether state-of-the-art global climate models produce sudden changes and persistence of cold conditions after large volcanic eruptions as inferred by geological records and previous climate modeling. North Atlantic sea ice and Baffin Island snow cover showed large-scale expansion in the simulations, but none of the models produced significant centennial-scale effects. Warm Baffin Island summer climates stunt snow expansion in some models completely, and model topography misses the critical elevations that could sustain snow on the island. This has critical consequences for ice and snow formation and persistence in regions such as the Arctic where temperatures are near freezing and small temperature changes affect the state of water. Finally, I analyze output from the Geoengineering Modeling Intercomparison Project to examine whether geoengineering by injection of sulfate aerosols into the lower stratosphere prevents the demise of minimum annual sea ice extent, or slows spring snow cover loss. Despite

  2. Zircon U-Pb geochronology of the volcanic rocks from Fanchang-Ningwu volcanic basins in the Lower Yangtze region and its geological implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun; LIU HaiQuan; SONG ChuanZhong; XU XiSheng; AN YaJun; LIU Jia; DAI LiQun

    2009-01-01

    The latest eruptions in two important Mesozoic volcanic basins of Fanchang and Ningwu located in the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River formed the bimodal volcanic rocks of the Kedoushan Formation and ultrapotassic volcanic rocks of the Niangniangshan Formation,respectively.The representative volcanic rocks of the two Formations were selected for LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating.The results indicate that there exist a large amount of magmatic zircons as indicated by high Th/U ratios in these volcanic rocks.The weighted mean age of 21 analyses is 130.7±1.1 Ma for the Kedoushan Formation,and that of 20 analyses is 130.6±1.1 Ma for the Niangniangshan Formation.These U-Pb ages are interpreted to represent the formation times of the volcanic rocks.In combination with other known geochronological data for Mesozoic volcanic rocks from the Lower Yangtze region,it is proposed that the latest volcanic activations in the Jinniu,Luzong,Fanchang and Ningwu volcanic basins probably came to end prior to ca.128 Me.There is no significant time interval between the early and later volcanic activities in the Luzong and Ningwu basins,suggesting e short duration of volcanic activities and thus implying the onset of an extensional tectonic setting at about 130 Ma in the Lower Yangtze region.Integrated studies reveal that the Early Cretaceous magmatic activities and their geochronological framework in the Lower Yangtze region are a response to progressively dynamic deep processes that started with the transformation of tectonic setting from compression to extension,followed by delaminating of the lower part of the thickened lithosphere,lithospheric thinning,asthenosphere upwelling,and crust-mantle interaction.

  3. Eruption time series statistically examined: Probabilities of future eruptions at Villarrica and Llaima Volcanoes, Southern Volcanic Zone, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Wehrmann, Heidi

    2010-06-01

    Probabilistic forecasting of volcanic eruptions is a central issue of applied volcanology with regard to mitigating consequences of volcanic hazards. Recent years have seen great advances in the techniques of statistical analysis of volcanic eruption time series, which constitutes an essential component of a multi-discipline volcanic hazard assessment. Here, two of the currently most active volcanoes of South America, Villarrica and Llaima, are subjected to an established statistical procedure, with the aim to provide predictions for the likelihood of future eruptions within a given time interval. In the eruptive history of both Villarrica and Llaima Volcanoes, time independence of eruptions provides consistency with Poissonian behaviour. A moving-average test, helping to assess whether the distribution of repose times between eruptions changes in response to the time interval considered, validates stationarity for at least the younger eruption record. For the earlier time period, stationarity is not entirely confirmed, which may artificially result from incompleteness of the eruption record, but can also reveal fluctuations in the eruptive regime. To take both possibilities into account, several different distribution functions are fit to the eruption time series, and the fits are evaluated for their quality and compared. The exponential, Weibull and log-logistic distributions are shown to fit the repose times sufficiently well. The probability of future eruptions within defined time periods is therefore estimated from all three distribution functions, as well as from a mixture of exponential distribution (MOED) for the different eruption regimes and from a Bayesian approach. Both the MOED and Bayesian estimates intrinsically predict lower eruption probabilities than the exponential distribution function, while the Weibull distributions have increasing hazard rates, hence giving the highest eruption probability forecasts. This study provides one of the first

  4. The influence of eruption season on the global aerosol evolution and radiative impact of tropical volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of tropical volcanic eruptions using a general circulation model with coupled aerosol microphysics are used to assess the influence of season of eruption on the aerosol evolution and radiative impacts at the Earth's surface. This analysis is presented for eruptions with SO2 injection magnitudes of 17 and 700 Tg, the former consistent with estimates of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption, the later a near-"super eruption". For each eruption magnitude, simulations are performed with eruptions at 15° N, at four equally spaced times of year, and sensitivity to eruption season is quantified as the difference between the maximum and minimum cumulative anomalies.

    Eruption season has a significant influence on aerosol optical depth (AOD and clear-sky shortwave (SW radiative flux anomalies for both eruption magnitudes. The sensitivity to eruption season for both fields is generally weak in the tropics, but increases in the mid- and high latitudes, reaching maximum values of ~80 %. Global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies show sensitivity to eruption season on the order of 15–20 %, which results from differences in aerosol effective radius for the different eruption seasons. Smallest aerosol size and largest cumulative impact result from a January eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude, and from a July eruption for the near-super eruption. In contrast to AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies, all-sky SW anomalies are found to be insensitive to season of eruption for the Pinatubo-magnitude eruption experiment, due to the reflection of solar radiation by clouds in the mid- to high latitudes. However, differences in all-sky SW anomalies between eruptions in different seasons are significant for the larger eruption magnitude, and the ~15 % sensitivity to eruption season of the global mean all-sky SW anomalies is comparable to the sensitivity of global mean AOD and clear-sky SW anomalies. Our estimates of sensitivity to eruption season

  5. Age, distance, and geochemical evolution within a monogenetic volcanic field: Analyzing patterns in the Auckland Volcanic Field eruption sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvec, Nicolas Le; Bebbington, Mark S.; Lindsay, Jan M.; McGee, Lucy E.

    2013-09-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a young active monogenetic basaltic field, which contains ˜50 volcanoes scattered across the Auckland metropolitan area. Understanding the temporal, spatial, and chemical evolution of the AVF during the last c.a. 250 ka is crucial in order to forecast a future eruption. Recent studies have provided new age constraints and potential temporal sequences of the past eruptions within the AVF. We use this information to study how the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers evolves with time, and how the chemical composition of the erupted magmas evolves with time and space. We seek to develop a methodology which compares successive eruptions to describe the link between geochemical and spatiotemporal evolution of volcanic centers within a monogenetic volcanic field. This methodology is tested with the present day data of the AVF. The Poisson nearest neighbor analysis shows that the spatial behavior of the field has been constant overtime, with the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers fitting the Poisson model within the significance levels. The results of the meta-analysis show the existence of correlations between the chemical composition of the erupted magmas and distance, volume, and time. The apparent randomness of the spatiotemporal evolution of the volcanic centers observed at the surface is probably influenced by the activity of the source. The methodology developed in this study can be used to identify possible relationships between composition trends and volume, time and/or distance to the behavior of the source, for successive eruptions of the AVF.

  6. Chronology and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks in Woruo Mountain region,Northern Qiangtang depression:Implications to the Late Triassic volcanic-sedimentary events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A suite of sedimentary-volcaniclastic rocks intercalated with the volcanic rocks unconformably overlies the Triassic Xiaochaka Formation in the Woruo Mountain region, Qiangtang Basin, northern Tibet. The vitric tuff from the base of these strata gives a SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age of 216 ± 4.5 Ma, which represents the age of the Late Triassic volcanic-sedimentary events in the Woruo Mountain region, and is consistent with that of the formation of the volcanic rocks from the Nadi Kangri Formation in the Nadigangri-Shishui River zone. There is a striking similarity in geochemical signatures of the volcanic rocks from the Woruo Mountain region and its adjacent Nadigangri-Shishui River zone, indicating that all the volcanic rocks from the Qiangtang region might have the same magmatic source and similar tectonic setting during the Late Triassic. The proper recognition of the Late Triassic large-scale volcanic eruption and volcanic-sedimentary events has important implications for the interpretation of the Late Triassic biotic extinction, climatic changes and regressive events in the eastern Tethyan domain, as well as the understanding of the initiation and nature, and sedimentary features of the Qiangtang Basin during the Late Triassic-Jurassic.

  7. Chronology and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks in Woruo Mountain region, Northern Qiangtang depression: Implications to the Late Triassic volcanic-sedimentary events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; FU XiuGen; CHEN WenXi; WANG ZhengJiang; TAN FuWen; CHEN Ming; ZHUO JieWen

    2008-01-01

    A suite of sedimentary-volcaniclastic rocks intercalated with the volcanic rocks unconformably overlies the Triassic Xiaochaka Formation in the Woruo Mountain region, Qiangtang Basin, northern Tibet. The sents the age of the Late Triassic volcanic-sedimentary events in the Woruo Mountain region, and is consistent with that of the formation of the volcanic rocks from the Nadi Kangri Formation in the Nadigangri-Shishui River zone. There is a striking similarity in geochemical signatures of the volcanic rocks from the Woruo Mountain region and its adjacent Nadigangri-Shishui River zone, indicating that all the volcanic rocks from the Qiangtang region might have the same magmatic source and similar tectonic setting during the Late Triassic. The proper recognition of the Late Triassic large-scale volcanic eruption and volcanic-sedimentary events has important implications for the interpretation of the Late Triassic biotic extinction, climatic changes and regressive events in the eastern Tethyan domain,as well as the understanding of the initiation and nature, and sedimentary features of the Qiangtang Basin during the Late Triassic-Jurassic.

  8. Basement faults and volcanic rock distributions in the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Ordos Basin are of mainly two types: one in the basin and the other along the margin of the basin. Besides those along the margin, the marginal volcanic rocks also include the volcanic rocks in the Yinshanian orogenic belt north of the basin. Based on the latest collection of gravitational and aeromagnetic data, here we interpret basement faults in the Ordos Basin and its peripheral region, compare the faults derived from aeromagnetic data with those from seismic data, and identify the geological ages of the fault development. Two aeromagnetic anomaly zones exist in the NE-trending faults of the southern basin, and they are in the volcanic basement formed in pre-Paleozoic. These NE-trending faults are the channel of volcanic material upwelling in the early age (Archean-Neoproterozoic), where igneous rocks and sedimentary rocks stack successively on both sides of the continental nucleus. In the Cambrian, the basin interior is relatively stable, but in the Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic, the basin margin underwent a number of volcanic activities, accompanied by the formation of nearly north-south and east-west basement faults in the basin periphery and resulting in accumulation of great amount of volcanic materials. Volcanic tuff from the basin periphery is discovered in the central basin and volcanic materials are exposed in the margins of the basin. According to the source-reservoir-cap rock configuration, the basin peripheral igneous traps formed in the Indosinian-Early Yanshanian and Late Hercynian are favorable exploration objectives, and the volcanic rocks in the central basin are the future target of exploration.

  9. Holocene volcanic rocks in Jingbo Lake region--Diversity of magmatism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Qicheng; SUN Qian; LI Ni; WANG Tuanhua

    2006-01-01

    During the time from 5500 a to 5200 a BP more than 10 Holocene volcanoes in Jingbo Lake region erupted and the volcanic rocks covered an area of about 500 km2. Holocene volcanic rocksin Jingbo Lake region belong to the potassium-rich rocks and contain three rock types: trachybasalts, basanites and phonotephrites. Various types of magmatism formed in a small area and in a short period of time came from partial melting of potassically-metasomatised lithospheric mantle. The diversity of magmatism can be explained by that Jingbo Lake is situated in the back-arc extensional region of East Asian continent subducted by the Pacific Ocean, and potassic fluid derived from mantle wedge or dehydration of subducted slab can result in a high heterogeneity of the mantle beneath this region. Based on the pressure estimation of clinopyroxene megacrysts, we estimate that phonotephrite magma fractionally crystallize at ca. 52-54 km down the earth.

  10. Using Blogs to Promote Alternative Perspective to Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamane, A.

    2011-12-01

    Distance learning is becoming more common in many higher education institutions making asynchronous online tools an essential component to promote positive student outcomes. California State University Los Angeles's online Natural Disasters course implements blogs as a collaborative constructive tool to allow students to build knowledge with their peers rather than to receive a body of facts in isolation. Blogs allow participants to post a chronological series of entries that give insight to thoughts and feelings about a specific event to a broader audience. In this course, students adopt an alternate identity and create a first-person commentary or diary entry as if they witnessed a historical volcanic event. Peers are instructed to post comments to blogs by offering sympathy, advice, solutions, or encouragement. Roleplaying between participants provides the opportunity for students to be engaged through multiple perspectives - a powerful means to understand societal impacts and to gain valuable insights. The blogging activity is devised so that novice students can complete the task on their own, yet read blog posts and comments from more capable peers. Anecdotal evidence suggests students have a greater appreciation and a deeper understanding of the impacts that volcanic eruptions have on society and the environment.

  11. Geology and stratigraphy of the Challis Volcanic Group and related rocks, Little Wood River area, south-central Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Richard F.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    2005-01-01

    The southwestern part of the Challis volcanic field occupies the valley of the Little Wood River and its tributaries in the Hailey and Idaho Falls 1??2? quadrangles of south-central Idaho. The Little Wood River area is a structurally controlled topographic basin that is partly filled by Eocene Challis Volcanic Group and younger rocks. Rock types in the Challis Volcanic Group of the Little Wood River area include, in order of decreasing abundance, andesite lava flows and tuff breccia, dacite lava flows and flow breccia, volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks, lithic tuff, nonvolcanic conglomerate, and rhyolite dikes. A basal nonvolcanic conglomerate, that locally rests on upper Paleozoic sedimentary rocks at a regional unconformity, was deposited prior to eruption of volcanic rocks. Andesite was the first volcanic rock erupted and is a voluminous sequence as thick as 3,000 ft (1,000 m). Locally thick volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks accumulated in topographic lows. A sharp transition marks the beginning of dacite eruption from fissures and flow-dome complexes. Dacite flows and breccias are as thick as 2,000 ft (600 m). An upper volcaniclastic unit was deposited in paleotopographic lows following emplacement of the main dacite unit. Next, a widespread, distinctive, lithic rich ash flow tuff, correlated with the tuff of Stoddard Gulch, was deposited over much of the area. Deposition of the tuff was followed by eruption of thin andesite and dacite lava flows and deposition of conglomeratic sedimentary rocks. The entire sequence was then intruded by a dacite flow-dome complex composed of at least three separate intrusions. The Challis Volcanic Group in the study area is calcalkaline. Andesitic rocks are typically high potassium basaltic andesite, high potassium andesite, shoshonite, and banakite (latite). Dacitic rocks are high potassium dacite and trachyte. Tuffs and vitrophyres range in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte. The paleotopographic basin in which the

  12. Evaluation of climate impacts after a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Anton; Kokkola, Harri; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Niemeier, Ulrike; Timmreck, Claudia; Lehtinen, Kari; Hakkarainen, Hanne; Korhonen, Hannele

    2016-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by injecting sulfur to the stratosphere is one of the most discussed geoengineering methods, because it has been suggested to be affordable and effective and its impacts have been thought to be predictable based on volcanic eruptions. Injecting sulfur to the stratosphere could be seen as an analogy of large volcanic eruptions, where large amounts of sulfur dioxide are released into the stratosphere. In the atmosphere sulfur dioxide oxidizes and forms aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols which reflect incoming solar radiation back to space. If SRM is ever used to cool the climate it is possible that a large volcanic eruption could happen also during the SRM, which would lead temporally to a very strong cooling. The simulations in this study were performed in two steps. In the first step, we used the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-HAM-SALSA to define global aerosol fields in scenarios with stratospheric sulfur injections and/or a volcanic eruption. In the second step of the study we performed climate simulations using Max-Planck-Institute's Earth system model (MPI-ESM) by using aerosol fields defined by MAECHAM5-HAM-SALSA. We studied scenarios of volcanic eruptions in two different locations and seasons and during the SRM sulfur injections and without injections. According to our simulations the radiative impacts of the eruption and SRM are not additive and the radiative effects and climate changes occurring after the eruption depend strongly on whether SRM is continued or suspended after the eruption. Adding to this, sulfate burden and radiative forcing after the volcanic eruption decrease significantly faster if the volcanic eruption happens during the geoengineering injections. In this situation, sulfur from the eruption does not only form new particles but it also condenses into pre-existing particles. Furthermore, the new small particles that are formed after the eruption coagulate effectively with the existing larger particles from

  13. Evolution and genesis of volcanic rocks from Mutnovsky Volcano, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Robertson, K.; Smith, E.; Selyangin, O.; Kiryukhin, A.; Mulcahy, S. R.; Walker, J. D.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents new geochemical data for Mutnovsky Volcano, located on the volcanic front of the southern portion of the Kamchatka arc. Field relationships show that Mutnovsky Volcano is comprised of four distinct stratocones, which have grown over that past 80 ka. The youngest center, Mutnovsky IV, has produced basalts and basaltic andesites only. The three older centers (Mutnovsky I, II, III) are dominated by basalt and basaltic andesite (60-80% by volume), but each has also produced small volumes of andesite and dacite. Across centers of all ages, Mutnovsky lavas define a tholeiitic igneous series, from 48-70% SiO2. Basalts and basaltic andesites have relatively low K2O and Na2O, and high FeO* and Al2O3 compared to volcanic rocks throughout Kamchatka. The mafic lavas are also depleted in the light rare earth elements (REEs), with chondrite-normalized La/Sm arc volcanic rocks worldwide. Radiogenic isotope ratios (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf) are similar for samples from all four eruptive centers, and indicate that all samples were produced by melting of a similar source mixture. No clear age-progressive changes are evident in the compositions of Mutnovsky lavas. Mass balance and assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) modeling of major and rare earth elements (REEs) indicate that basaltic andesites were produced by FC of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine from a parental basalt, combined with assimilation of a melt composition similar to dacite lavas present at Mutnovsky. This modeling also indicates that andesites were produced by FC of plagioclase from basaltic andesite, combined with assimilation of dacite. Dacites erupted from Mutnovsky I and II have low abundances of REEs, and do not appear to be related to mafic magmas by FC or AFC processes. These dacites are modeled as the products of dehydration partial melting at mid-crustal levels of a garnet-free, amphibole-bearing basaltic rock, which itself formed in the mid-crust by emplacement of magma that

  14. Phreatomagmatic and water-influenced Strombolian eruptions of a small-volume parasitic cone complex on the southern ringplain of Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand: Facies architecture and eruption mechanisms of the Ohakune Volcanic Complex controlled by an unstable fissure eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kósik, S.; Németh, K.; Kereszturi, G.; Procter, J. N.; Zellmer, G. F.; Geshi, N.

    2016-11-01

    The Ohakune Volcanic Complex is a late Pleistocene tuff ring - scoria/spatter cone complex located south of Ruapehu volcano. This small-volume volcano consists of an outer E-W elongated compound tuff ring edifice, three inner scoria-spatter cones and further volcanic depressions, located on the Ohakune Fault. We quantified accurately the variations of the eruptive styles and processes through time by systematic sampling of key stratigraphic marker beds at proximal and distal locations, and the determination of grain size distribution, componentry, density and vesicularity. Using a Digital Terrain Model coupled with stratigraphic data, we also determined the spatial distribution and volume of each identified unit and individual edifices within the Ohakune Volcanic Complex. Activity began with a shallow phreatomagmatic phase characterized by an almost continuous generation of a low eruptive column, accompanied by wet pyroclastic density currents, together with the ejection of juvenile fragments and accidental lithics from the surrounding country rocks. Subsequent activity was dominated by a variety of Strombolian eruptions exhibiting differing intensities that were at times disrupted by phreatic blasts or phreatomagmatic explosions due to the interaction with external water and/or sudden changes in magma discharge rate. At least three major vent-shifting events occurred during the eruption, which is demonstrated by the truncation of the initial tuff ring and the infilling of the truncated area by several coarse grained surge units. Our study indicates that approx. 12 × 106 m3 DRE magma erupted within maximum 2.5 to 5 months through multiple vents. The erupted magma ascended from a depth of 16-18 km, and reached the surface within approximately 50 h. Alternating eruption styles, frequent vent-shifting and a variety of emplacement mechanisms inferred from the deposits of the Ohakune Volcanic Complex demonstrate the unpredictable nature of small-volume volcanism

  15. Source of the great A.D. 1257 mystery eruption unveiled, Samalas volcano, Rinjani Volcanic Complex, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Franck; Degeai, Jean-Philippe; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Guillet, Sébastien; Robert, Vincent; Lahitte, Pierre; Oppenheimer, Clive; Stoffel, Markus; Vidal, Céline M; Surono; Pratomo, Indyo; Wassmer, Patrick; Hajdas, Irka; Hadmoko, Danang Sri; de Belizal, Edouard

    2013-10-15

    Polar ice core records attest to a colossal volcanic eruption that took place ca. A.D. 1257 or 1258, most probably in the tropics. Estimates based on sulfate deposition in these records suggest that it yielded the largest volcanic sulfur release to the stratosphere of the past 7,000 y. Tree rings, medieval chronicles, and computational models corroborate the expected worldwide atmospheric and climatic effects of this eruption. However, until now there has been no convincing candidate for the mid-13th century "mystery eruption." Drawing upon compelling evidence from stratigraphic and geomorphic data, physical volcanology, radiocarbon dating, tephra geochemistry, and chronicles, we argue the source of this long-sought eruption is the Samalas volcano, adjacent to Mount Rinjani on Lombok Island, Indonesia. At least 40 km(3) (dense-rock equivalent) of tephra were deposited and the eruption column reached an altitude of up to 43 km. Three principal pumice fallout deposits mantle the region and thick pyroclastic flow deposits are found at the coast, 25 km from source. With an estimated magnitude of 7, this event ranks among the largest Holocene explosive eruptions. Radiocarbon dates on charcoal are consistent with a mid-13th century eruption. In addition, glass geochemistry of the associated pumice deposits matches that of shards found in both Arctic and Antarctic ice cores, providing compelling evidence to link the prominent A.D. 1258/1259 ice core sulfate spike to Samalas. We further constrain the timing of the mystery eruption based on tephra dispersal and historical records, suggesting it occurred between May and October A.D. 1257.

  16. Volcanic sulfur dioxide index and volcanic explosivity index inferred from eruptive volume of volcanoes in Jeju Island, Korea: application to volcanic hazard mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bokyun; Yun, Sung-Hyo

    2016-04-01

    Jeju Island located in the southwestern part of Korea Peninsula is a volcanic island composed of lavaflows, pyroclasts, and around 450 monogenetic volcanoes. The volcanic activity of the island commenced with phreatomagmatic eruptions under subaqueous condition ca. 1.8-2.0 Ma and lasted until ca. 1,000 year BP. For evaluating volcanic activity of the most recently erupted volcanoes with reported age, volcanic explosivity index (VEI) and volcanic sulfur dioxide index (VSI) of three volcanoes (Ilchulbong tuff cone, Songaksan tuff ring, and Biyangdo scoria cone) are inferred from their eruptive volumes. The quantity of eruptive materials such as tuff, lavaflow, scoria, and so on, is calculated using a model developed in Auckland Volcanic Field which has similar volcanic setting to the island. The eruptive volumes of them are 11,911,534 m3, 24,987,557 m3, and 9,652,025 m3, which correspond to VEI of 3, 3, and 2, respectively. According to the correlation between VEI and VSI, the average quantity of SO2 emission during an eruption with VEI of 3 is 2-8 × 103 kiloton considering that the island was formed under intraplate tectonic setting. Jeju Island was regarded as an extinct volcano, however, several studies have recently reported some volcanic eruption ages within 10,000 year BP owing to the development in age dating technique. Thus, the island is a dormant volcano potentially implying high probability to erupt again in the future. The volcanoes might have explosive eruptions (vulcanian to plinian) with the possibility that SO2 emitted by the eruption reaches stratosphere causing climate change due to backscattering incoming solar radiation, increase in cloud reflectivity, etc. Consequently, recommencement of volcanic eruption in the island is able to result in serious volcanic hazard and this study provides fundamental and important data for volcanic hazard mitigation of East Asia as well as the island. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: This research was supported by a grant [MPSS

  17. Is there a geochemical link between volcanic and plutonic rocks in the Organ Mountains caldera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memeti, V.; Davidson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Results from separate volcanic and plutonic studies have led to inconsistent conclusions regarding the origins and thus links between volcanic and plutonic systems in continental arcs and the magmatic processes and time scales responsible for their compositional variations. Some have suggested that there is a geochemical and geochronological disconnect between volcanic and plutonic rocks and hence have questioned the existence of magma mush columns beneath active volcanoes. Investigating contemporary volcanic and plutonic rocks that are spatially connected is thus critical in exploring these issues. The ca. 36 Ma Organ Mountains caldera in New Mexico, USA, represents such a system exposing contemporaneous volcanic and plutonic rocks juxtaposed at the surface due to tilting during extensional tectonics along the Rio Grande Rift. Detailed geologic and structural mapping [1] and 40Ar/39Ar ages of both volcanics and plutons [2] demonstrate the spatial and temporal connection of both rock types with active magmatism over >2.5 myr. Three caldera-forming ignimbrites erupted within 600 kyr [2] from this system with a total erupted volume of 500-1,000 km3 as well as less voluminous pre- and post-caldera trachyte and andesite lavas. The ignimbrite sequence ranges from a crystal-poor, high-SiO2 rhyolite at the base to a more crystal-rich, low-SiO2 rhyolite at the top. Compositional zoning with quartz-monzonite at the base grading to syenite and alaskite at the top is also found in the Organ Needle pluton, the main intrusion, which is interpreted to be the source for the ignimbrites [1]. Other contemporaneous and slightly younger plutons have dioritic to leucogranitic compositions. We examined both volcanic and plutonic rocks with petrography and their textural variations with color cathodoluminescence, and used whole rock element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotope geochemistry to constrain magma compositions and origins. Electron microprobe analyses on feldspars have been completed to

  18. Video Analysis of Eddy Structures from Explosive Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M. A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present a method of analyzing turbulent eddy structures in explosive volcanic eruptions using high definition video. Film from the eruption of Sakurajima on 25 September 2011 was analyzed using a modified version of FlowJ, a Java-based toolbox released by National Institute of Health. Using the Lucas and Kanade algorithm with a Gaussian derivative gradient, it tracks the change in pixel position over a 23 image buffer to determine the optical flow. This technique assumes that the optical flow, which is the apparent motion of the pixels, is equivalent to the actual flow field. We calculated three flow fields per second for the duration of the video. FlowJ outputs flow fields in pixels per frame that were then converted to meters per second in Matlab using a known distance and video rate. We constructed a low pass filter using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and critical point analysis to identify the underlying eddy structure with boundaries determined by tracing the flow lines. We calculated the area of each eddy and noted its position over a series of velocity fields. The changes in shape and position were tracked to determine the eddy growth rate and overall eddy rising velocity. The eddies grow in size 1.5 times quicker than they rise vertically. Presently, this method is most successful in high contrast videos when there is little to no effect of wind on the plumes. Additionally, the pixel movement from the video images represents a 2D flow with no depth, while the actual flow is three dimensional; we are continuing to develop an algorithm that will allow 3D reprojection of the 2D data. Flow in the y-direction lessens the overall velocity magnitude as the true flow motion has larger y-direction component. POD, which only uses the pattern of the flow, and analysis of the critical points (points where flow is zero) is used to determine the shape of the eddies. The method allows for video recorded at remote distances to be used to study eruption dynamics

  19. Numerical models of volcanic eruption plumes: inter-comparison and sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio; Suzuki, Yujiro; Folch, Arnau; Cioni, Raffaello

    2016-10-01

    The accurate description of the dynamics of convective plumes developed during explosive volcanic eruptions represents one of the most crucial and intriguing challenges in volcanology. Eruptive plume dynamics are significantly affected by complex interactions with the surrounding atmosphere, in the case of both strong eruption columns, rising vertically above the tropopause, and weak volcanic plumes, developing within the troposphere and often following bended trajectories. The understanding of eruptive plume dynamics is pivotal for estimating mass flow rates of volcanic sources, a crucial aspect for tephra dispersion models used to assess aviation safety and tephra fallout hazard. For these reasons, several eruption column models have been developed in the past decades, including the more recent sophisticated computational fluid dynamic models.

  20. Measuring Water Vapor and Ash in Volcanic Eruptions with a Millimeter-Wave Radar/Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Bryan, Sean; Vanderkluysen, Loÿc; Groppi, Christopher; Paine, Scott; Bliss, Daniel W; Aberle, James; Mauskopf, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter-wave remote sensing technology can significantly improve measurements of volcanic eruptions, yielding new insights into eruption processes and improving forecasts of drifting volcanic ash for aviation safety. Radiometers can measure water vapor density and temperature inside eruption clouds, improving on existing measurements with infrared cameras that are limited to measuring the outer cloud surface. Millimeter-wave radar can measure the 3D mass flow of volcanic ash inside eruption plumes and drifting fine ash clouds, offering better sensitivity than existing weather radar measurements and the unique ability to measure ash particle size in-situ. Here we present sensitivity calculations in the context of developing the WAMS (Water and Ash Millimeter-wave Spectrometer) instrument. WAMS, a radar/radiometer system constructed with off-the-shelf components, would be able to measure water vapor and ash throughout an entire eruption cloud, a unique capability.

  1. Strength and deformation properties of volcanic rocks in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    2016-01-01

    rock from Iceland has been the topic for rock mechanical studies carried out by Ice-landic guest students at the Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Den-mark over a number of years in cooperation with University of Iceland, Vegagerðin (The Icelandic Road Directorate......) and Landsvirkjun (The National Power Company of Iceland). These projects involve engineering geological properties of volcanic rock in Iceland, rock mechanical testing and parameter evaluation. Upscaling to rock mass properties and modelling using Q- or GSI-methods have been studied by the students......Tunnelling work and preinvestigations for road traces require knowledge of the strength and de-formation properties of the rock material involved. This paper presents results related to tunnel-ling for Icelandic water power plants and road tunnels from a number of regions in Iceland. The volcanic...

  2. Erupted frothy xenoliths may explain lack of country-rock fragments in plutons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Schmeling, Harro; Koyi, Hemin; Blythe, Lara

    2016-11-01

    Magmatic stoping is discussed to be a main mechanism of magma emplacement. As a consequence of stoping, abundant country-rock fragments should occur within, and at the bottom of, magma reservoirs as “xenolith graveyards”, or become assimilated. However, the common absence of sufficient amounts of both xenoliths and crustal contamination have led to intense controversy about the efficiency of stoping. Here, we present new evidence that may explain the absence of abundant country-rock fragments in plutons. We report on vesiculated crustal xenoliths in volcanic rocks that experienced devolatilisation during heating and partial melting when entrained in magma. We hypothesise that the consequential inflation and density decrease of the xenoliths allowed them to rise and become erupted instead of being preserved in the plutonic record. Our thermomechanical simulations of this process demonstrate that early-stage xenolith sinking can be followed by the rise of a heated, partially-molten xenolith towards the top of the reservoir. There, remnants may disintegrate and mix with resident magma or erupt. Shallow-crustal plutons emplaced into hydrous country rocks may therefore not necessarily contain evidence of the true amount of magmatic stoping during their emplacement. Further studies are needed to quantify the importance of frothy xenolith in removing stoped material.

  3. Erupted frothy xenoliths may explain lack of country-rock fragments in plutons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R; Schmeling, Harro; Koyi, Hemin; Blythe, Lara

    2016-11-02

    Magmatic stoping is discussed to be a main mechanism of magma emplacement. As a consequence of stoping, abundant country-rock fragments should occur within, and at the bottom of, magma reservoirs as "xenolith graveyards", or become assimilated. However, the common absence of sufficient amounts of both xenoliths and crustal contamination have led to intense controversy about the efficiency of stoping. Here, we present new evidence that may explain the absence of abundant country-rock fragments in plutons. We report on vesiculated crustal xenoliths in volcanic rocks that experienced devolatilisation during heating and partial melting when entrained in magma. We hypothesise that the consequential inflation and density decrease of the xenoliths allowed them to rise and become erupted instead of being preserved in the plutonic record. Our thermomechanical simulations of this process demonstrate that early-stage xenolith sinking can be followed by the rise of a heated, partially-molten xenolith towards the top of the reservoir. There, remnants may disintegrate and mix with resident magma or erupt. Shallow-crustal plutons emplaced into hydrous country rocks may therefore not necessarily contain evidence of the true amount of magmatic stoping during their emplacement. Further studies are needed to quantify the importance of frothy xenolith in removing stoped material.

  4. A novel apparatus for the simulation of eruptive gas-rock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayris, P. M.; Cimarelli, C.; Delmelle, P.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Vasseur, J.; Suzuki, Y. J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical interactions between hot volcanic gases and co-erupted magmatic and lithic particles within eruption plumes and pyroclastic flows are increasingly investigated for their relevance to the impacts of ash emission on natural and human environments. Laboratory experiments are critical to our understanding of high-temperature gas-ash interactions, but previous studies are yet to replicate the chemical composition of the high-temperature volcanic gases involved. Here, we present a unique apparatus, the Advanced Gas-Ash Reactor, capable of generating an atmosphere of H2O, CO2, SO2 and HCl at temperatures ranging from 200 to 900 °C, under variable heating and cooling rates. Experiments utilising the reactor can inform investigations of a range of topics, from subsurface gas-rock interaction and in-plume gas adsorption processes, to the effect of ash surface chemistry on marine nutrient loadings and atmospheric chemistry. Our results demonstrate the differences in high-temperature gas uptake by volcanic glass powders under both hydrous and anhydrous atmospheres and, accordingly, demonstrate the utility of the new reactor.

  5. Radiative and climate impacts of a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laakso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Both explosive volcanic eruptions, which emit sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, and stratospheric geoengineering via sulfur injections can potentially cool the climate by increasing the amount of scattering particles in the atmosphere. Here we employ a global aerosol-climate model and an earth system model to study the radiative and climate impacts of an erupting volcano during solar radiation management (SRM. According to our simulations, the radiative impacts of an eruption and SRM are not additive: in the simulated case of concurrent eruption and SRM, the peak increase in global forcing is about 40 % lower compared to a corresponding eruption into a clean background atmosphere. In addition, the recovery of the stratospheric sulfate burden and forcing was significantly faster in the concurrent case since the sulfate particles grew larger and thus sedimented faster from the stratosphere. In our simulation where we assumed that SRM would be stopped immediately after a volcano eruption, stopping SRM decreased the overall stratospheric aerosol load. For the same reasons, a volcanic eruption during SRM lead to only about 1/3 of the peak global ensemble-mean cooling compared to an eruption under unperturbed atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, the global cooling signal was seen only for 12 months after the eruption in the former scenario compared to over 40 months in the latter. In terms of the global precipitation rate, we obtain a 36 % smaller decrease in the first year after the eruption and again a clearly faster recovery in the concurrent eruption and SRM scenario. We also found that an explosive eruption could lead to significantly different regional climate responses depending on whether it takes place during geoengineering or into an unperturbed background atmosphere. Our results imply that observations from previous large eruptions, such as Mt Pinatubo in 1991, are not directly applicable when estimating the potential consequences of a

  6. Integrated Geophysical Techniques for Exploring Deep Volcanic Rock Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuXuejun; UDechun; ZhangChangjiang; RanXuefeng

    2003-01-01

    The Carboniferous and Pre-Carboniferous formations in Ludong, Zhungar basin, contain favorable oil/gas reservoirs. The Carboniferous formations, however, are complex in structure and exhibit lateral variations in lithology. Seismic reflections from Pre-Triassic formations are poor and the volcanic reservoirs are very difficult to identify. The analysis of physical properties concluded that the major targets in this region, i.e., the top of the Jurassic and Carboniferous formations, provide distinct density interfaces. The basic, intermediate and acid volcanic rocks were also different in density,resulting in distinguishable gravity anomalies. The differences in magnetism in this region existed not only between the volcanic rocks and clastic sedimentary rocks but also among volcanic rocks with different compositions. All formations and volcanic rocks of different lithologies presented high and low resistance interbeds, which are characterized by regional trends.The modeling study demonstrated that non-seismic integrated geophysical techniques should be feasible in this region, especiaUy the high-precision gravity/magnetic methods combined with long offset transient electromagnetic sounding.

  7. Tree Rings and Volcanic Eruptions: Reviewing the Potential of Dendrochemistry for the Absolute Dating of Past Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, C.; Manning, S. W.; Coleman, M.; Jarvis, K.

    2003-12-01

    Investigations of volcanic impact on human society and the environment are presently restrained by a lack of secure absolute dates for eruptions prior to the last few hundred years. The degree of impact and recovery, and the scope of any sociological repercussions, can only be fully explored if working from a precise, known, starting point and against a secure absolute timescale. A potential means to high resolution dating for the majority of the Holocene lies with globally available, absolutely dated tree ring chronologies. Many of these have been shown to record short term climatic alterations in periods following volcanic eruptions of known or approximate date. This argument however, has been based on an apparent correlation between the dates of specific tree ring growth anomalies and the dates of a number of eruptions in the recent historical period. The statistical correlation is less than decisive and the exact volcano-climate-tree growth linkage is by no means universally agreed. It has been suggested that a potential means to solve this problem and to attach absolute dates to volcanic eruptions via tree rings may lie in the chemistry of the annual woody increment. This paper assesses the potential of conventional Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) versus laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) in terms of exploring this research objective. It also reviews the prospects for a dendrochemical resolution to the problem of attributing an absolute date to the volcanic eruptions of prehistory.

  8. Paleomagnetic evidence for an episodic eruptive history of the Cerros del Rio volcanic field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M. R.; Thompson, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Pliocene to Quaternary (~2.6-1.14 Ma) Cerros del Rio volcanic field of northern New Mexico forms a dissected basaltic plateau sourced by multiple eruptive centers. Paleomagnetic data compliment geologic mapping, geochronologic and geochemical data to define the spatial and temporal eruptive history of Cerros del Rio volcanic deposits. The preserved stratigraphic sequence reflects three principal phases of volcanism; 1) 2.7-2.6 Ma, 2) 2.5-2.2 Ma, and 3) 1.5-1.1 Ma. Paleomagnetic data collected from 85 sites that span the area of the volcanic field largely sample phase-1 deposits that record the Guass normal-polarity chron or phase-2 deposits that record the Matuyama reversed-polarity chron. A grand mean of individual sites (excluding transitional directions) is D = 352.8°, I = 49.7°, k= 14, a95 = 3.9. However, normal- and reversed-polarity group means are not statistically antipodal, with the normal-polarity inclination being significantly shallower than an expected (55°) dipole inclination. This failed reversal test suggests that paleosecular variation has not be fully averaged within both polarity groups, despite a basis on abundant data from multiple eruptive centers. Compared to variation recorded by the full volcanic field, site directions from individual eruptive centers have restricted dispersion, indicating that the centers formed quickly relative to paleosecular variation. Grouping data within individual eruptive centers to calculate eruptive-group means (EGM), directions of the normal- and reversed-polarity EGM remain skewed from antipodal. Modal analysis demonstrates the presence of multiple directional clusters among the normal-polarity EGM whereas the frequency distribution of reversed polarity EGM are symmetrical about their maximum. These paleomagnetic directional characteristics indicate that voluminous phase-1 deposits of the Cerros del Rio volcanic field probably erupted episodically during short time intervals and that several individual

  9. Northern Hemisphere winter warming and summer monsoon reduction after volcanic eruptions over the last millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambri, Brian; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Robock, Alan; Slawinska, Joanna

    2017-08-01

    Observations show that all recent large tropical volcanic eruptions (1850 to Present) were followed by surface winter warming in the first Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter after the eruption. Recent studies show that climate models produce a surface winter warming response in the first winter after the largest eruptions but require a large ensemble of simulations to see significant changes. It is also generally required that the eruption be very large, and only two such eruptions occurred in the historical period: Krakatau in 1883 and Pinatubo in 1991. Here we examine surface winter warming patterns after the 10 largest volcanic eruptions between 850 and 1850 in the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project 3 last millennium simulations and in the Community Earth System Model Last Millennium Ensemble. These eruptions were all larger than those since 1850. Though the results depend on both the individual models and the forcing data set used, we have found that models produce a surface winter warming signal in the first winter after large volcanic eruptions, with higher temperatures over NH continents and a stronger polar vortex in the lower stratosphere. We also examined NH summer precipitation responses in the first year after the eruptions and find clear reductions of summer Asian and African monsoon rainfall.

  10. Radiative and climate impacts of a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laakso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Both explosive volcanic eruptions, which emit sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, and stratospheric geoengineering via sulfur injections can potentially cool the climate by increasing the amount of scattering particles in the atmosphere. Here we employ a global aerosol-climate model and an Earth system model to study the radiative and climate changes occurring after an erupting volcano during solar radiation management (SRM. According to our simulations the radiative impacts of the eruption and SRM are not additive and the radiative effects and climate changes occurring after the eruption depend strongly on whether SRM is continued or suspended after the eruption. In the former case, the peak burden of the additional stratospheric sulfate as well as changes in global mean precipitation are fairly similar regardless of whether the eruption takes place in a SRM or non-SRM world. However, the maximum increase in the global mean radiative forcing caused by the eruption is approximately 21 % lower compared to a case when the eruption occurs in an unperturbed atmosphere. In addition, the recovery of the stratospheric sulfur burden and radiative forcing is significantly faster after the eruption, because the eruption during the SRM leads to a smaller number and larger sulfate particles compared to the eruption in a non-SRM world. On the other hand, if SRM is suspended immediately after the eruption, the peak increase in global forcing caused by the eruption is about 32 % lower compared to a corresponding eruption into a clean background atmosphere. In this simulation, only about one-third of the global ensemble-mean cooling occurs after the eruption, compared to that occurring after an eruption under unperturbed atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, the global cooling signal is seen only for the 12 months after the eruption in the former scenario compared to over 40 months in the latter. In terms of global precipitation rate, we obtain a 36

  11. Radiative and climate impacts of a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, A.; Kokkola, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Niemeier, U.; Timmreck, C.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hakkarainen, H.; Korhonen, H.

    2016-01-01

    Both explosive volcanic eruptions, which emit sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, and stratospheric geoengineering via sulfur injections can potentially cool the climate by increasing the amount of scattering particles in the atmosphere. Here we employ a global aerosol-climate model and an Earth system model to study the radiative and climate changes occurring after an erupting volcano during solar radiation management (SRM). According to our simulations the radiative impacts of the eruption and SRM are not additive and the radiative effects and climate changes occurring after the eruption depend strongly on whether SRM is continued or suspended after the eruption. In the former case, the peak burden of the additional stratospheric sulfate as well as changes in global mean precipitation are fairly similar regardless of whether the eruption takes place in a SRM or non-SRM world. However, the maximum increase in the global mean radiative forcing caused by the eruption is approximately 21 % lower compared to a case when the eruption occurs in an unperturbed atmosphere. In addition, the recovery of the stratospheric sulfur burden and radiative forcing is significantly faster after the eruption, because the eruption during the SRM leads to a smaller number and larger sulfate particles compared to the eruption in a non-SRM world. On the other hand, if SRM is suspended immediately after the eruption, the peak increase in global forcing caused by the eruption is about 32 % lower compared to a corresponding eruption into a clean background atmosphere. In this simulation, only about one-third of the global ensemble-mean cooling occurs after the eruption, compared to that occurring after an eruption under unperturbed atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, the global cooling signal is seen only for the 12 months after the eruption in the former scenario compared to over 40 months in the latter. In terms of global precipitation rate, we obtain a 36 % smaller decrease in the

  12. Communicating likelihoods and probabilities in forecasts of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Emma E. H.; McClure, John; Johnston, David M.; Paton, Douglas

    2014-02-01

    The issuing of forecasts and warnings of natural hazard events, such as volcanic eruptions, earthquake aftershock sequences and extreme weather often involves the use of probabilistic terms, particularly when communicated by scientific advisory groups to key decision-makers, who can differ greatly in relative expertise and function in the decision making process. Recipients may also differ in their perception of relative importance of political and economic influences on interpretation. Consequently, the interpretation of these probabilistic terms can vary greatly due to the framing of the statements, and whether verbal or numerical terms are used. We present a review from the psychology literature on how the framing of information influences communication of these probability terms. It is also unclear as to how people rate their perception of an event's likelihood throughout a time frame when a forecast time window is stated. Previous research has identified that, when presented with a 10-year time window forecast, participants viewed the likelihood of an event occurring ‘today’ as being of less than that in year 10. Here we show that this skew in perception also occurs for short-term time windows (under one week) that are of most relevance for emergency warnings. In addition, unlike the long-time window statements, the use of the phrasing “within the next…” instead of “in the next…” does not mitigate this skew, nor do we observe significant differences between the perceived likelihoods of scientists and non-scientists. This finding suggests that effects occurring due to the shorter time window may be ‘masking’ any differences in perception due to wording or career background observed for long-time window forecasts. These results have implications for scientific advice, warning forecasts, emergency management decision-making, and public information as any skew in perceived event likelihood towards the end of a forecast time window may result in

  13. Effect of volatiles erupted from Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic activities on paleo-environmental changes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the determination of composition of volcanic volatiles and petrologic estimation of the total mass of volatiles erupted,we showed important advances in the study of the impact of Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic activities on paleo-environmental changes in China.The volcanic activities include western Liaoning and Zhangjiakou Mesozoic intermediate-acidic explosive eruptions,southern Tibet and Shanwang Cenozoic volcanism,and Mt.Changbai volcanic eruption around one thousand years ago.The paper predominantly discusses the earth's surface temperature changes,ozone depletion,acidic rain formation and mass mortalities of vertebrate induced by the Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanism in China.

  14. Volcanic stratigraphy of intermediate to acidic rocks in southern Paraná Magmatic Province, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Angélica Polo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first map in detail scale for an area covered by Palmas type volcanic rocks in the south border of the eocretaceous Paraná Magmatic Province, south Brazil. The study of the structural features coupled with petrography and geochemistry made it possible to separate these rocks into three main volcanic sequences and recognize their stratigraphy. The older Caxias do Sul sequence rests directly over the first low-Ti basalt flows (Gramado type, and corresponds to the stacking of lobated lava flows, laminar flows and lava domes, mostly emitted as continuous eruptions; only the latest eruptions are intercalated with thin sandstone deposits. These rocks have dacitic composition (~ 68 wt% SiO2 with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and subordinate pyroxenes and Ti-magnetite immersed in glassy or devitrified matrix. A second volcanic sequence, named Barros Cassal, is composed of several lava flows of basaltic andesite, andesitic and dacitic composition (~ 54; ~ 57 and ~ 63 wt% SiO2 , respectively, with microphenocrysts of plagioclase, pyroxenes and Ti-magnetite. The frequent intercalation of sandstone between the flows attests to the intermittent behaviour of this event. The upper sequence, Santa Maria, is made up of more silica-rich (~ 70 wt% SiO2 rocks occurring as laminar flows, lobated flows and lava-domes. These rocks have rhyolitic composition with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and Ti-magnetite set in a glassy or devitrified matrix with microlites. The structures and textures of all three silicic sequences favor the interpretation that they had a predominantly effusive character, which is thought to be a reflection of the remarkably high temperatures of the lavas (~ 1,000 ºC.

  15. Aspects of historical eruptive activity and volcanic unrest at Mt. Tongariro, New Zealand: 1846-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Bradley J.; Potter, Sally H.

    2014-10-01

    The 6 August and 21 November 2012 eruptions from Upper Te Maari crater have heightened interest in past activity at Mt. Tongariro, New Zealand. Risks caused by volcanic hazards are increasingly being quantified by using probability estimates through expert elicitation, partly based on the frequency of past eruptions. To maximise the accuracy of these risk values at Mt. Tongariro, a historical eruption catalogue is required. This paper presents the findings of a detailed historical chronology of unrest and eruptions at Mt. Tongariro between 1846 AD and 2013 AD. It builds on the findings of previous researchers, highlighting that volcanic eruptions and unrest have occurred frequently from this volcano. Eruptions are now thought to have occurred at Mt. Tongariro in 1869, 1892, 1896-97, 1899, 1926, 1927, 1934 and 2012. Eruptions also potentially occurred in 1846, 1855, 1886, and 1928, in addition to frequent eruptions from neighbouring Mt. Ngauruhoe. The number of recognised eruptions during the 1896-97 episode has increased to 18, and the Red Crater area has been found to be more active than previously appreciated. Multiple episodes of unrest not resulting in eruptions have also been identified. New eruption recurrence rates are derived from this catalogue, with the baseline probability of the onset of an eruption episode calculated to be 0.07 per year (if 1896-97 and 2012 are considered as one episode each, and all others separately), and the maximum eruption rate within an eruption episode is 18 per year. These new data contribute towards risk assessments for future eruptions at Mt. Tongariro.

  16. Large Early Permian eruptive complexes in northern Saxony, Germany: Volcanic facies analysis and geochemical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Marcel; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Repstock, Alexander; Heuer, Franziska

    2017-04-01

    (Vorerzgebirgs-Senke, Nordwestsächsischer Vulkanitkomplex, Geraer Becken). Unpublished PhD thesis, TU Bergakademie Freiberg. HILDRETH, W. (1981): Gradients in silicic magma chambers: Implications for lithospheric magmatism. Journal of Geophysical Research (86), p. 10153-10192. Hoffmann, U.; Breitkreuz, C.; Breiter, K.; Sergeev, S.; Stanek, K.; Tichomirowa, M. (2013): Carboniferous-Permian volcanic evolution in Central Europe - U/Pb ages of volcanic rocks in Saxony (Germany) and northern Bohemia (Czech Republic). Int. J. Earth Sci. (Geol. Rdsch.), 102: p. 73-99. Huber, C.; Bachmann, O.; Dufek, J. (2012): Crystal-poor versus crystal-rich ignimbrites: A competition between stirring and reactivation. Geology, 2 (40), p. 115-118. Mason, B. G., Pyle, D. M. & Oppenheimer, C. (2004): The size and frequency of the largest explosive eruptions on Earth. Bull. Volcanology, 66, p. 735-748. Schneider, J.W.; Rößler, R.; Fischer, F. (2012): Rotliegend des Chemnitz-Beckens (syn. Erzgebirge-Becken). - In: Deutsche Stratigraphische Kommission (Ed.): Stratigraphie von Deutschland X. Rotliegend. Teil I: Innervariscische Becken. Schriftenreihe der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Geowissenschaften, Heft 61: pp. 530-588; Hannover. Walter, H. (2006): Das Rotliegend der Nordwestsächsischen Senke. Veröff. Museum Naturkunde, 29, p. 157-176.

  17. From Magma Chamber to Tephra- what can volcanic titanite tell us about pre-eruptive processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iddon, Fiona; McLeod, Graham; Dempster, Tim; Walshaw, Richard; Everard, Lucie

    2014-05-01

    Large volume, apparently homogenous, crystal rich pyroclastic deposits, or so called 'monotonous intermediates' are often considered to represent erupted batholiths. Their formation and life-cycle can be preceded and eruptions triggered by highly complex magma chamber processes, with multiple periods of recharge, mixing and thermal oscillations [1]. This information is difficult to observe, even at the crystal scale due to fragmentation or re-equilibration with subsequent recharge events. Titanite is a geochemically robust mineral that acts as a reservoir for trace elements, in particular the HFSEs and REEs. This ability to act as a primary control on the trace element budget of a melt [2], coupled with its refractory nature, allows titanite to preserve compositional zoning, proven to act as a reliable record of magma chamber conditions even in long-lived plutons [3]. This study extends the use of titanite to volcanic rocks via a coupled micro-textural and geochemical study of titanites from the Fish Canyon Tuff, Colorado. Regarded as the largest ever recorded pyroclastic deposit, it is thought that the batholith-sized magma chamber cooled to a rigid crystalline mush prior to thermal rejuvenation via underplating mafic magma [1]. It is additionally suggested this may have acted as a trigger for the eruption [1]. Results have shown the titanites to possess trace element zoning reflecting changes in melt composition and chamber conditions. Dissolution horizons and inclusion suites additionally provide evidence for multiple changes in temperature and oxygen fugacity aiding the interpretation of pre-eruptive processes. The study is ongoing with investigation of titanite from the Cerro Galan Ignimbrite, Argentina. The deposit again is suggested to have undergone a complex magma chamber growth and recharge history, with further proposals of multiple magma storage locations at different crustal levels [4]. The crystal zoning may provide further evidence for this, however

  18. Modeling Volcanic Eruption Parameters by Near-Source Internal Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, M.; Barfucci, G.; de Angelis, S.; Delle Donne, D.; Lacanna, G.; Marchetti, E.

    2016-11-01

    Volcanic explosions release large amounts of hot gas and ash into the atmosphere to form plumes rising several kilometers above eruptive vents, which can pose serious risk on human health and aviation also at several thousands of kilometers from the volcanic source. However the most sophisticate atmospheric models and eruptive plume dynamics require input parameters such as duration of the ejection phase and total mass erupted to constrain the quantity of ash dispersed in the atmosphere and to efficiently evaluate the related hazard. The sudden ejection of this large quantity of ash can perturb the equilibrium of the whole atmosphere triggering oscillations well below the frequencies of acoustic waves, down to much longer periods typical of gravity waves. We show that atmospheric gravity oscillations induced by volcanic eruptions and recorded by pressure sensors can be modeled as a compact source representing the rate of erupted volcanic mass. We demonstrate the feasibility of using gravity waves to derive eruption source parameters such as duration of the injection and total erupted mass with direct application in constraining plume and ash dispersal models.

  19. Lidar Observations of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer After the Mt. Pinatubo Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Tomohiro; Uchino, Osamu; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    1992-01-01

    The volcano Mt. Pinatubo located on the Luzon Island, Philippines, had explosively erupted on June 15, 1991. The volcanic eruptions such as volcanic ash, SO2 and H2O reached into the stratosphere over 30 km altitude by the NOAA-11 satellite observation and this is considered one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in this century. A grandiose volcanic eruption influences the atmosphere seriously and causes many climatic effects globally. There had been many impacts on radiation, atmospheric temperature and stratospheric ozone after some past volcanic eruptions. The main cause of volcanic influence depends on stratospheric aerosol, that stay long enough to change climate and other meteorological conditions. Therefore it is very important to watch stratospheric aerosol layers carefully and continuously. Standing on this respect, we do not only continue stratospheric aerosol observation at Tsukuba but also have urgently developed another lidar observational point at Naha in Okinawa Island. This observational station could be thought valuable since there is no lidar observational station in this latitudinal zone and it is much nearer to Mt. Pinatubo. Especially, there is advantage to link up these two stations on studying the transportation mechanism in the stratosphere. In this paper, we present the results of lidar observations at Tsukuba and Naha by lidar systems with Nd:YAG laser.

  20. Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

    1980-09-01

    Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

  1. Role of eruption season in reconciling model and proxy responses to tropical volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Samantha; Fasullo, John T.; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Tomas, Robert A.; Gao, Chaochao

    2017-02-01

    The response of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) to tropical volcanic eruptions has important worldwide implications, but remains poorly constrained. Paleoclimate records suggest an “El Niño-like” warming 1 year following major eruptions [Adams JB, Mann ME, Ammann CM (2003) Nature 426:274-278] and “La Niña-like” cooling within the eruption year [Li J, et al. (2013) Nat Clim Chang 3:822-826]. However, climate models currently cannot capture all these responses. Many eruption characteristics are poorly constrained, which may contribute to uncertainties in model solutions—for example, the season of eruption occurrence is often unknown and assigned arbitrarily. Here we isolate the effect of eruption season using experiments with the Community Earth System Model (CESM), varying the starting month of two large tropical eruptions. The eruption-year atmospheric circulation response is strongly seasonally dependent, with effects on European winter warming, the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the southeast Asian monsoon. This creates substantial variations in eruption-year hydroclimate patterns, which do sometimes exhibit La Niña-like features as in the proxy record. However, eruption-year equatorial Pacific cooling is not driven by La Niña dynamics, but strictly by transient radiative cooling. In contrast, equatorial warming the following year occurs for all starting months and operates dynamically like El Niño. Proxy reconstructions confirm these results: eruption-year cooling is insignificant, whereas warming in the following year is more robust. This implies that accounting for the event season may be necessary to describe the initial response to volcanic eruptions and that climate models may be more accurately simulating volcanic influences than previously thought.

  2. Role of eruption season in reconciling model and proxy responses to tropical volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Samantha; Fasullo, John T; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L; Tomas, Robert A; Gao, Chaochao

    2017-02-21

    The response of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) to tropical volcanic eruptions has important worldwide implications, but remains poorly constrained. Paleoclimate records suggest an "El Niño-like" warming 1 year following major eruptions [Adams JB, Mann ME, Ammann CM (2003) Nature 426:274-278] and "La Niña-like" cooling within the eruption year [Li J, et al. (2013) Nat Clim Chang 3:822-826]. However, climate models currently cannot capture all these responses. Many eruption characteristics are poorly constrained, which may contribute to uncertainties in model solutions-for example, the season of eruption occurrence is often unknown and assigned arbitrarily. Here we isolate the effect of eruption season using experiments with the Community Earth System Model (CESM), varying the starting month of two large tropical eruptions. The eruption-year atmospheric circulation response is strongly seasonally dependent, with effects on European winter warming, the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the southeast Asian monsoon. This creates substantial variations in eruption-year hydroclimate patterns, which do sometimes exhibit La Niña-like features as in the proxy record. However, eruption-year equatorial Pacific cooling is not driven by La Niña dynamics, but strictly by transient radiative cooling. In contrast, equatorial warming the following year occurs for all starting months and operates dynamically like El Niño. Proxy reconstructions confirm these results: eruption-year cooling is insignificant, whereas warming in the following year is more robust. This implies that accounting for the event season may be necessary to describe the initial response to volcanic eruptions and that climate models may be more accurately simulating volcanic influences than previously thought.

  3. Linking magma reservoir processes to the frequency and magnitude of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Tom; Caricchi, Luca

    2016-04-01

    The frequency of volcanic eruptions is fundamentally related to processes controlling the accumulation of eruptible magma at depth and the pressurisation of the magmatic reservoir. Here we present a combined statistical-empirical approach to link the frequency and magnitude of volcanic eruptions observed in different arcs to important parameters controlling the growth of subvolcanic reservoirs of eruptible magma. Such understanding is important for two reasons; firstly it presents an insight into how and why the frequency of eruptions varies between different groups of volcanoes; and secondly, it provides constraints for models that are used to interpret geochemical and geophysical data. To perform the analysis we further develop an analytical model that uses a Monte Carlo sampling approach to simulate the accumulation and eruption of magmatic reservoirs (Caricchi et al., 2014). By inverting the geological record of volcanic eruptions we can solve the Monte Carlo model to quantify parameters such as magma input and frequency of magma injection. Our results indicate systematic variation in the frequency of eruptions of various magnitudes between exchangeable groups of volcanoes, which can be related to variations of parameters such as average magma fluxes and thickness of the crust. Caricchi, L., C. Annen, J. Blundy, G. Simpson, and V. Pinel, 2014, Nature Geoscience, v. 7, no. 2, p. 126-130, doi:10.1038/ngeo2041.

  4. Interaction of Volcanic Forcing and El Nino: Sensitivity to the Eruption Magnitude and El Nino Intensity

    KAUST Repository

    Predybaylo, Evgeniya

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic aerosols formed in the stratosphere after strong explosive eruptions influence Earth\\'s radiative balance, affecting atmospheric and oceanic temperatures and circulation. It was observed that the recent volcanic eruptions frequently occurred in El Nino years. Analysis of the paleo data confirms that the probability of a sequent El Nino occurrence after the eruption increases. To better understand the physical mechanism of this interaction we employed ocean-atmosphere coupled climate model CM2.1, developed in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, and conducted a series of numerical experiments using initial conditions with different El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) strengths forced by volcanic eruptions of different magnitudes, Pinatubo of June 1991 and Tambora of April 1815: (i) strong ENSO/Pinatubo, (ii) weak ENSO/Pinatubo, (iii) strong ENSO/Tambora. The amount of ejected material from the Tambora eruption was about three times greater than that of the Pinatubo eruption. The initial conditions with El Nino were sampled from the CM2.1 long control run. Our simulations show the enhancement of El Nino in the second year after an eruption. We found that the spatial-temporal structure of model responses is sensitive to both the magnitude of an eruption and the strength of El Nino. We analyzed the ocean dynamic in the tropical Pacific for all cases to uncover the physical mechanism, resulting in the enhanced and/or prolonged El Nino.

  5. Volcanic eruption volume flux estimations from very long period infrasound signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Taishi; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takeshi; Iguchi, Masato; Hendrasto, Muhamad

    2017-01-01

    We examine very long period infrasonic signals accompanying volcanic eruptions near active vents at Lokon-Empung volcano in Indonesia, Aso, Kuchinoerabujima, and Kirishima volcanoes in Japan. The excitation of the very long period pulse is associated with an explosion, the emerging of an eruption column, and a pyroclastic density current. We model the excitation of the infrasound pulse, assuming a monopole source, to quantify the volume flux and cumulative volume of erupting material. The infrasound-derived volume flux and cumulative volume can be less than half of the video-derived results. A largely positive correlation can be seen between the infrasound-derived volume flux and the maximum eruption column height. Therefore, our result suggests that the analysis of very long period volcanic infrasound pulses can be helpful in estimating the maximum eruption column height.

  6. Fluorine geochemistry in volcanic rock series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecher, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A new analytical procedure has been established in order to determine low fluorine concentrations (30–100 ppm F) in igneous rocks, and the method has also proven successful for higher concentrations (100–4000 ppm F). Fluorine has been measured in a series of olivine tholeiites from the Reykjanes...... Peninsula, a tholeiite to rhyolitic rock series from Kerlingarfjöll, central Iceland, and an alkaline rock series from Jan Mayen that ranges from ankaramites to trachytes. Fluorine is not appreciably degassed during extrusion and appears to be insensitive to slight weathering. The olivine tholeiites from...... the Reykjanes Peninsula have F contents of 30–300 ppm and exhibit linear increases proportional to the incompatible elements K, P, and Ti. Such incompatible behaviour for F has been confirmed for the less evolved rocks of the other series. The tholeiites from Kerlingarfjöll (100–2000 ppm F) show a linear...

  7. Satellite observations of lightning-generated NOx in volcanic eruption clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon; Krotkov, Nickolay; Pickering, Ken; Allen, Dale; Bucsela, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The generation of NO2 by lightning flashes is known to be an important source of NOx in the free troposphere, particularly in the tropics, with implications for ozone production. Although UV-visible satellite observations of lightning-generated NOx (LNOx) in thunderstorms have been previously reported, here we present the first satellite observations of LNOx generated by lightning in explosive volcanic eruption clouds (vLNOx) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard NASA's Aura satellite. To date we have identified vLNOx in operational OMI NO2 measurements (OMNO2) during the high-latitude eruptions of Okmok (Aleutian Is; July 2008), Kasatochi (Aleutian Is; August 2008), Redoubt (Alaska; March 2009) and Grimsvötn (Iceland; May 2011), although analysis of OMNO2 data for other eruptions is underway. We use World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) observations to verify the occurrence and location of lightning flashes in the volcanic eruption clouds. All the vLNOx anomalies are associated with strong UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) signals due to volcanic ash. Preliminary analysis shows that the maximum vLNOx column detected by OMI decreases linearly with time since eruption, and suggests that the vLNOx signal is transient and can be detected up to ~5-6 hours after an eruption. Detection of vLNOx is hence only possible for eruptions occurring a few hours before the daytime OMI overpass. Based on the number of lightning flashes detected by WWLLN in each eruption cloud, we also estimate the vLNOx production efficiency (moles vLNOx per flash). Preliminary estimates for the 2008 Kasatochi eruption suggest that this is significantly higher than the production efficiency in thunderstorms, but may be biased high due to the low detection efficiency of WWLLN (aviation hazards due to volcanic ash. Furthermore, the vLNOx observations may provide information on air entrainment in volcanic eruption columns, which is required for some volcanic ash dispersion models. Although

  8. Climate response to the Samalas volcanic eruption in 1257 revealed by proxy records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Sébastien; Corona, Christophe; Stoffel, Markus; Khodri, Myriam; Lavigne, Franck; Ortega, Pablo; Eckert, Nicolas; Sielenou, Pascal Dkengne; Daux, Valérie; Churakova (Sidorova), Olga V.; Davi, Nicole; Edouard, Jean-Louis; Zhang, Yong; Luckman, Brian H.; Myglan, Vladimir S.; Guiot, Joël; Beniston, Martin; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2017-01-01

    The eruption of Samalas in Indonesia in 1257 ranks among the largest sulfur-rich eruptions of the Common Era with sulfur deposition in ice cores reaching twice the volume of the Tambora eruption in 1815. Sedimentological analyses of deposits confirm the exceptional size of the event, which had both an eruption magnitude and a volcanic explosivity index of 7. During the Samalas eruption, more than 40 km3 of dense magma was expelled and the eruption column is estimated to have reached altitudes of 43 km. However, the climatic response to the Samalas event is debated since climate model simulations generally predict a stronger and more prolonged surface air cooling of Northern Hemisphere summers than inferred from tree-ring-based temperature reconstructions. Here, we draw on historical archives, ice-core data and tree-ring records to reconstruct the spatial and temporal climate response to the Samalas eruption. We find that 1258 and 1259 experienced some of the coldest Northern Hemisphere summers of the past millennium. However, cooling across the Northern Hemisphere was spatially heterogeneous. Western Europe, Siberia and Japan experienced strong cooling, coinciding with warmer-than-average conditions over Alaska and northern Canada. We suggest that in North America, volcanic radiative forcing was modulated by a positive phase of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Contemporary records attest to severe famines in England and Japan, but these began prior to the eruption. We conclude that the Samalas eruption aggravated existing crises, but did not trigger the famines.

  9. Monitoring El Hierro submarine volcanic eruption events with a submarine seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Molino, Erik; Lopez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    A submarine volcanic eruption took place near the southernmost emerged land of the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain), from October 2011 to February 2012. The Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) seismic stations network evidenced seismic unrest since July 2012 and was a reference also to follow the evolution of the seismic activity associated with the volcanic eruption. From the beginning of the eruption a geophone string was installed less than 2 km away from the new volcano, next to La Restinga village shore, to record seismic activity related to the volcanic activity, continuously and with special interest on high frequency events. The seismic array was endowed with 8, high frequency, 3 component, 250 Hz, geophone cable string with a separation of 6 m between them. The analysis of the dataset using spectral techniques allows the characterization of the different phases of the eruption and the study of its dynamics. The correlation of the data analysis results with the observed sea surface activity (ash and lava emission and degassing) and also with the seismic activity recorded by the IGN field seismic monitoring system, allows the identification of different stages suggesting the existence of different signal sources during the volcanic eruption and also the posteruptive record of the degassing activity. The study shows that the high frequency capability of the geophone array allow the study of important features that cannot be registered by the standard seismic stations. The accumulative spectral amplitude show features related to eruptive changes.

  10. Impact of explosive volcanic eruptions on the main climate variability modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingedouw, Didier; Mignot, Juliette; Ortega, Pablo; Khodri, Myriam; Menegoz, Martin; Cassou, Christophe; Hanquiez, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    Volcanic eruptions eject largeamounts of materials into the atmosphere, which can have an impact on climate. In particular, the sulphur dioxide gas released in the stratosphere leads to aerosol formation that reflects part of the incoming solar radiation, thereby affecting the climate energy balance. In this review paper, we analyse the regional climate imprints of large tropical volcanic explosive eruptions. For this purpose, we focus on the impact on three major climatic modes, located in the Atlantic (the North Atlantic Oscillation: NAO and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation: AMO) and Pacific (the El Niño Southern Oscillation, ENSO) sectors. We present an overview of the chain of events that contributes to modifying the temporal variability of these modes. Our literature review is complemented by new analyses based on observations of the instrumental era as well as on available proxy records and climate model simulations that cover the last millennium. We show that the impact of volcanic eruptions of the same magnitude or weaker than 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the NAO and ENSO is hard to detect, due to the noise from natural climate variability. There is however a clear impact of the direct radiative forcing resulting from tropical eruptions on the AMO index both in reconstructions and climate model simulations of the last millennium, while the impact on the ocean circulation remains model-dependent. To increase the signal to noise ratio and better evaluate the climate response to volcanic eruptions, improved reconstructions of these climatic modes and of the radiative effect of volcanic eruptions are required on a longer time frame than the instrumental era. Finally, we evaluate climate models' capabilities to reproduce the observed and anticipated impacts and mechanisms associated with volcanic forcing, and assess their potential for seasonal to decadal prediction. We find a very large spread in the simulated responses across the different climate

  11. Characterization of fine volcanic ash from explosive eruption from Sakurajima volcano, South Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayama, F.; Furukawa, R.; Ishizuka, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Geshi, N.; Oishi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can affect infrastructure and ecosystem by their dispersion of the volcanic particle. Characterization of volcanic particle expelled by explosive eruption is crucial for evaluating for quantitative hazard assessment by future volcanic eruption. Especially for fine volcanic ash less than 64 micron in diameter, it can disperse vast area from the source volcano and be easily remobilized by surface wind and precipitation after the deposition. As fine volcanic ash is not preserved well at the earth surface and in strata except for enormously large scale volcanic eruption. In order to quantify quantitative characteristics of fine volcanic ash particle, we sampled volcanic ash directly falling from the eruption cloud from Showa crater, the most active vent of Sakurajima volcano, just before landing on ground. We newly adopted high precision digital microscope and particle grain size analyzer to develop hazard evaluation method of fine volcanic ash particle. Field survey was performed 5 sequential days in January, 2013 to take tamper-proof volcanic ash samples directly obtained from the eruption cloud of the Sakurajima volcano using disposable paper dishes and plastic pails. Samples were taken twice a day with time-stamp in 40 localities from 2.5 km to 43 km distant from the volcano. Japan Meteorological Agency reported 16 explosive eruptions of vulcanian style occurred during our survey and we took 140 samples of volcanic ash. Grain size distribution of volcanic ash was measured by particle grain size analyzer (Mophologi G3S) detecting each grain with parameters of particle diameter (0.3 micron - 1 mm), perimeter, length, area, circularity, convexity, solidity, and intensity. Component of volcanic ash was analyzed by CCD optical microscope (VHX-2000) which can take high resolution optical image with magnifying power of 100-2500. We discriminated each volcanic ash particle by color, texture of surface, and internal structure. Grain size

  12. Applications of Terrestrial Remote Sensing to Volcanic Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewit, M.; Williams-Jones, G.; Stead, D.; Kremsater, R.; So, M.; Francioni, M.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing methods are widely used in geological applications today. The physical properties of rock such as composition, texture and structure have previously been difficult to accurately quantify through remote sensing, however, new research in the fields of terrestrial LiDAR and infrared thermography has proven useful in the differentiation of lithology in sedimentary outcrops. This study focuses on the application of these methods, in conjunction with digital photogrammetry, to a number of volcanic rock masses in the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt (GVB) and Chilcotin Group (CG) of British Columbia. The GVB is a chain of volcanoes and related features extending through southwestern British Columbia and is the northern extension of the Cascade Volcanic Arc. The CG is an assemblage of Neogene-aged lavas covering nearly 36,500 km2 in central British Columbia. We integrate infrared chronothermography, which enables the characterization of temporal change in the thermal signature, laser waveform attributes such as amplitude and intensity, and digital photogrammetry, in order to distinguish between a range of rock types, lithologies and structures. This data is compared to laboratory experiments on field samples and ground-truth information collected by classical geological and geotechnical methods. Our research clearly shows that it is possible to remotely map, in 3D, otherwise inaccessible volcanic rock masses.

  13. Pore Structure of Cement Pastes Blended with Volcanic Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Lehua; ZHOU Shuangxi; LI Liling

    2016-01-01

    The pore parameters of cement pastes blended with volcanic rock at the curing age of 1, 28 and 90 d were de-termined by a mercury intrusion porosimetry. The pore structure of the pastes was characterized through the analysis of porosity, average pore diameter, the most probable pore aperture, pore size distribution, as well as total pore volume. For the improvement of mechanical property and durability of cement-based material, the correlation of the formed pore structure with hydration time and replacement level of volcanic rock for cement was revealed. The results indicate that volcanic rock can diminish porosity and reduce pore size in cement paste when curing time prolongs, which is particu-larly prominent with replacement level of less than 20% in late period. The more harmful pores (i.e., capillary pore) are gradually transformed into harmless pore (i.e., gel pores or micropore), even fully filled and disappeared when hydration products increase. The pore structure of the cement paste is thus refined. The beneficial effect of volcanic rock on the pore structure of cement paste could enhance the mechanical property and durability of cement-based material.

  14. SHRIMP dating of volcanic rock in the Zhangwu-Heishan area, West Liaoning province, China: Its relationship with coal-bearing strata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Houan; Xu Debin; Li Baofang; Shao Longyi

    2011-01-01

    The Zhangwu-Heishan area is located to the east of the Fuxin-Yixian Basin and is mostly covered with volcanic rock.At various periods,different geologists had varying opinions about their age and periods of volcanic eruptions,especially on sequences between volcanic rock and main coal-beating strata,which affect the direction of searching for coal,as well as prospecting the entire research area.During our study,we carried out detailed field investigations in this research area; observed and recorded the main representative outcrops of volcanic rock.We collected over 20 volcanic rock samples and tested the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe Ⅱ (SHRIMP Ⅱ) U-Pb isotope age of 11 samples.The age of our volcanic rock samples ranged between 56.0 ± 2.9 and 132.3 ± 2.3 Ma.After taking earlier investigations into consideration,we concluded that,except for a suite of paleogene olivine basalt,the volcanic rock in the Zhangwu-Heishan area is younger than the coal-beating Shahai Formation.It is therefore most unlikely to find coal seams equivalent to those of the early Cretaceous Shahai Formation in Fuxin Basin below volcanic rock.

  15. The volcanic response to deglaciation: Evidence from glaciated arcs and a reassessment of global eruption records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Sebastian F. L.; Pyle, David M.; Mather, Tamsin A.

    Several lines of evidence have previously been used to suggest that ice retreat after the last glacial maximum (LGM) resulted in regionally-increased levels of volcanic activity. It has been proposed that this increase in volcanism was globally significant, forming a substantial component of the post-glacial rise in atmospheric CO2, and thereby contributing to climatic warming. However, as yet there has been no detailed investigation of activity in glaciated volcanic arcs following the LGM. Arc volcanism accounts for 90% of present-day subaerial volcanic eruptions. It is therefore important to constrain the impact of deglaciation on arc volcanoes, to understand fully the nature and magnitude of global-scale relationships between volcanism and glaciation. The first part of this paper examines the post-glacial explosive eruption history of the Andean southern volcanic zone (SVZ), a typical arc system, with additional data from the Kamchatka and Cascade arcs. In all cases, eruption rates in the early post-glacial period do not exceed those at later times at a statistically significant level. In part, the recognition and quantification of what may be small (i.e. less than a factor of two) increases in eruption rate is hindered by the size of our datasets. These datasets are limited to eruptions larger than 0.1 km3, because deviations from power-law magnitude-frequency relationships indicate strong relative under-sampling at smaller eruption volumes. In the southern SVZ, where ice unloading was greatest, eruption frequency in the early post-glacial period is approximately twice that of the mid post-glacial period (although frequency increases again in the late post-glacial). A comparable pattern occurs in Kamchatka, but is not observed in the Cascade arc. The early post-glacial period also coincides with a small number of very large explosive eruptions from the most active volcanoes in the southern and central SVZ, consistent with enhanced ponding of magma during

  16. 'Failed' eruptions revealed by integrated analysis of gas emission and volcanic tremor data at Mt. Etna, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, G. G.; Falsaperla, S. M.; Behncke, B.; Langer, H. K.; Neri, M.; Giammanco, S.; Pecora, E.; Biale, E.

    2013-12-01

    Mt Etna in Sicily is among the most intensely monitored and studied volcanoes on Earth due to its very frequent activity, and its location in a densely populated area. Through a sophisticated monitoring system run by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV-OE), scientists are gaining every day and in real time a picture of the state of volcanic activity of Etna. During the spring of 2007, various episodes of paroxysmal activity occurred at the South-East Crater, one of the four summit craters of Mt Etna. These episodes were always associated with a sharp increase in the amplitude of the volcanic tremor as well as changes in the spectral characteristics of this signal. Eruptive activity ranged from strong Strombolian explosions to lava fountains coupled with copious emission of lava flows and tephra. During inter-eruptive periods, recurrent seismic unrest episodes were observed in form of both temporary enhancements of the volcanic tremor amplitude as well as changes of spectral characteristics. These changes often triggered the automatic alert systems in the operation room of the INGV-OE, even though not being followed by manifest eruptive activity at the surface. The influence of man-made or meteorologically induced noise could be ruled out as a cause for the alarms. We therefore performed a multi-parametric analysis of these inter-eruptive periods by integrating seismic volcanic tremor, in-soil radon, plume SO2 flux and thermal data, discussing the potential volcano-dependent source of these episodes. Short-term changes were investigated applying pattern classification, in particular Kohonen Maps and fuzzy clustering, simultaneously on volcanic tremor, radon and ambient parameters (pressure and temperature). The well established SO2 flux and thermal radiation data were used as the 'smoking gun', for certifying that the observed changes in seismic and in radon data can be considered as volcanogenic. Our results unveil ';failed

  17. Simulation of the trans-oceanic tsunami propagation due to the 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Choi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption has generated a destructive tsunami higher than 40 m on the Indonesian coast where more than 36 000 lives were lost. Sea level oscillations related with this event have been reported on significant distances from the source in the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Evidence of many manifestations of the Krakatau tsunami was a subject of the intense discussion, and it was suggested that some of them are not related with the direct propagation of the tsunami waves from the Krakatau volcanic eruption. Present paper analyzes the hydrodynamic part of the Krakatau event in details. The worldwide propagation of the tsunami waves generated by the Krakatau volcanic eruption is studied numerically using two conventional models: ray tracing method and two-dimensional linear shallow-water model. The results of the numerical simulations are compared with available data of the tsunami registration.

  18. K-Ar ages for the Yahazudake volcanic rocks from southwest Kyushu, Japan; Kyushu nanseibu yahazudake kazanganrui no K-Ar nendai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokose, H.; Kikuchi, W. [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan)] Nagao, K. [Okayama Univ. (Japan)264000] Kodama, K. [Kochi Univ. (Japan)

    1998-05-05

    Many volcanic rocks, seemed to be erupted during the period from the Pliocene epoch to the Pleistocene epoch, are distributed abounding in Kyushu, Japan. In this study, K-Ar ages determination about the 4 samples which represents the Hisatsu volcanic rocks distributed around Yahazudake and rhyolite distributed in Gesujima placed in the southernmost extremity of Amakusa Shimojima, was conducted. And consideration of time/space distribution of the Hisatsu volcanic rocks upon collecting the data which were reported until now and the data obtained by the present K-Ar age determination, was done. In the result of the present measurement, the absolute age of the Hisatsu volcanic rocks distributed around Minamata-shi became clear. I was clarified that Yahazudake volcanic rocks consisted of andesite, which is comparatively lacking in potassium, were formed during about 100 thousand years from 1.98 to 2.08 Ma, and Ontake volcanic rocks which exists for the bottom erupted at about 2.15 Ma. And, the age value of 2.89 Ma was obtained from Ushibuka rhyolite distributed in Gesujima. 35 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Reconstructing the plinian and co-ignimbrite sources of large volcanic eruptions: A novel approach for the Campanian Ignimbrite

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Marti; Arnau Folch; Antonio Costa; Samantha Engwell

    2016-01-01

    The 39 ka Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) super-eruption was the largest volcanic eruption of the past 200 ka in Europe. Tephra deposits indicate two distinct plume forming phases, Plinian and co-ignimbrite, characteristic of many caldera-forming eruptions. Previous numerical studies have characterized the eruption as a single-phase event, potentially leading to inaccurate assessment of eruption dynamics. To reconstruct the volume, intensity, and duration of the tephra dispersal, we applied a compu...

  20. Living through a volcanic eruption: Understanding the experience of survivors as a phenomenological existential phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsini, Sri; Mills, Jane; West, Caryn; Usher, Kim

    2016-06-01

    Mount Merapi in Indonesia is the most active volcano in the world with its 4-6-year eruption cycle. The mountain and surrounding areas are populated by hundreds of thousands of people who live near the volcano despite the danger posed to their wellbeing. The aim of this study was to explore the lived experience of people who survived the most recent eruption of Mount Merapi, which took place in 2010. Investigators conducted interviews with 20 participants to generate textual data that were coded and themed. Three themes linked to the phenomenological existential experience (temporality and relationality) of living through a volcanic eruption emerged from the data. These themes were: connectivity, disconnection and reconnection. Results indicate that the close relationship individuals have with Mount Merapi and others in their neighbourhood outweighs the risk of living in the shadow of an active volcano. This is the first study to analyze the phenomenological existential elements of living through a volcanic eruption.

  1. Eruptive Productivity of the Ceboruco-San Pedro Volcanic Field, Nayarit, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H. M.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Delgado-Granados, H.

    2002-12-01

    High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology coupled with GIS spatial analysis provides constraints on magma eruption rates over the past 1 Myr of the Ceboruco-San Pedro volcanic field (1870 km2), located in the Tepic-Zacoalco rift in western Mexico. The volcanic field is part of the Trans Mexican Volcanic arc and is dominated by the andesitic-dacitic stratocone of Volcan Ceboruco and includes peripheral fissure-fed flows, domes, and monogenetic cinder cones. The ages of these volcanic features were determined using 40Ar/39Ar laser step-heating techniques on groundmass or mineral separates, with 78% of the 52 analyses yielding plateau ages with a 2 sigma error < 50 kyrs. The volumes were determined using high resolution (1:50,000) digital elevation models, orthophotos, and GIS software, which allowed for the delineation of individual volcanic features, reconstruction of the pre-eruptive topography, and volume calculations by linear interpolation. The relative proportions of the 80 km3 erupted over the past 1 Myr are 14.5% basaltic andesite, 64.5% andesite, 20% dacite, and 1% rhyolite, demonstrating the dominance of intermediate magma types (in terms of silica content). Overall, there appears to be no systematic progression in the eruption of different magma types (e.g., basalt, andesite, dacite, etc.) with time. However, more than 75% of the total volume of lava within the Ceboruco-San Pedro volcanic field erupted in the last 100 kyrs. This reflects the youthfulness of Volcan Ceboruco, which was constructed during the last 50 kyrs and has a present day volume of 50 +/- 2.5 km3, accounting for 81% of the andesite and 50% of the dacite within the volcanic field. Eleven cinder cones, ranging from the Holocene to 0.37 Ma, display a narrow compositional range, with 52-58 wt% SiO2, 3-5.5 wt% MgO, and relatively high TiO2 concentrations (0.9-1.8 wt%). The total volume of the cinder cones is 0.83 km3. No lavas with < 51 wt% SiO2 have erupted in the past 1 Myr. Peripheral

  2. Climate effects of high-latitude volcanic eruptions: Role of the time of year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan

    2011-01-01

    We test how the time of year of a large Arctic volcanic eruption determines the climate impacts by conducting simulations with a general circulation model of Earth's climate. For eruptions injecting less than about 3 Tg of SO2 into the lower stratosphere, we expect no detectable climatic effect, no matter what the season of the eruption. For an injection of 5 Tg of SO2 into the lower stratosphere, an eruption in the summer would cause detectable climate effects, whereas an eruption at other times of the year would cause negligible effects. This is mainly due to the seasonal variation in insolation patterns and sulfate aerosol deposition rates. In all cases, the sulfate aerosols that form get removed from the atmosphere within a year after the eruption by large-scale deposition. Our simulations of a June eruption have many similar features to previous simulations of the eruption of Katmai in 1912, including some amount of cooling over Northern Hemisphere continents in the summer of the eruption, which is an expected climate response to large eruptions. Previous Katmai simulations show a stronger climate response, which we attribute to differences in choices of climate model configurations, including their specification of sea surface temperatures rather than the use of a dynamic ocean model as in the current simulations.

  3. Monitoring gas emissions can help forecast volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Maarten de Moor,; Bo Galle,

    2015-01-01

    As magma ascends in active volcanoes, dissolved volatiles partition from melt into a gas phase, rise, and are released into the atmosphere from volcanic vents. The major components of high-temperature volcanic gas are typically water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide. 

  4. Constraining Transient Climate Sensitivity Using Coupled Climate Model Simulations of Volcanic Eruptions

    KAUST Repository

    Merlis, Timothy M.

    2014-10-01

    Coupled climate model simulations of volcanic eruptions and abrupt changes in CO2 concentration are compared in multiple realizations of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model, version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The change in global-mean surface temperature (GMST) is analyzed to determine whether a fast component of the climate sensitivity of relevance to the transient climate response (TCR; defined with the 1%yr-1 CO2-increase scenario) can be estimated from shorter-time-scale climate changes. The fast component of the climate sensitivity estimated from the response of the climate model to volcanic forcing is similar to that of the simulations forced by abrupt CO2 changes but is 5%-15% smaller than the TCR. In addition, the partition between the top-of-atmosphere radiative restoring and ocean heat uptake is similar across radiative forcing agents. The possible asymmetry between warming and cooling climate perturbations, which may affect the utility of volcanic eruptions for estimating the TCR, is assessed by comparing simulations of abrupt CO2 doubling to abrupt CO2 halving. There is slightly less (~5%) GMST change in 0.5 × CO2 simulations than in 2 × CO2 simulations on the short (~10 yr) time scales relevant to the fast component of the volcanic signal. However, inferring the TCR from volcanic eruptions is more sensitive to uncertainties from internal climate variability and the estimation procedure. The response of the GMST to volcanic eruptions is similar in GFDL CM2.1 and GFDL Climate Model, version 3 (CM3), even though the latter has a higher TCR associated with a multidecadal time scale in its response. This is consistent with the expectation that the fast component of the climate sensitivity inferred from volcanic eruptions is a lower bound for the TCR.

  5. Effects of deglaciation on the petrology and eruptive history of the Western Volcanic Zone, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Deborah E.; Sinton, John M.; Grönvold, Karl; Kurz, Mark D.

    2015-06-01

    New observations and geochemical analyses of volcanic features in the 170-km-long Western Volcanic Zone (WVZ) of Iceland constrain spatial and temporal variations in volcanic production and composition associated with the last major deglaciation. Subglacial eruptions represent a significant portion of the late Quaternary volcanic budget in Iceland. Individual features can have volumes up to ˜48 km3 and appear to be monogenetic. Subaqueous to subaerial transition zones provide minimum estimates of ice sheet thickness at the time of eruption, although water-magma interactions and fluctuating lake levels during eruption can lead to complex lithological sequences. New major and trace element data for 36 glacial and postglacial eruptive units, combined with observations of lava surface quality, passage zone heights, and 3He exposure ages of some glacial units, indicate a maximum in volcanic production in the WVZ during the last major ice retreat. Anomalously high volcanic production rates continue into the early postglacial period and coincide with significant incompatible element depletions and slightly higher CaO and SiO2 and lower FeO content at a given MgO. Subglacial units with strong incompatible element depletions also have lava surfaces that lack evidence of subsequent glaciation. These units likely formed after the onset of deglaciation, when rapidly melting ice sheets increased decompression rates in the underlying mantle, leading to anomalously high melting rates in the depleted upper mantle. This process also can explain the eruption of extremely depleted picritic lavas during the early postglacial period. These new observations indicate that the increased volcanic activity associated with glacial unloading peaked earlier than previously thought, before Iceland was completely ice free.

  6. Eruption rates and compositional trends at Los Humeros Volcanic Center, Puebla, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriz, H.; Mahood, G. A.

    1984-09-01

    The present investigation has the objective to relate chemical trends in the products of the Los Humeros volcanic center to the center's physical evolution. Eruptive products of this young volcanic system span the range basalt through high-silica rhyolite, but show an overall trend with time toward increasingly mafic compositions. It is pointed out that this pattern is most likely a product of an increasing volumetric rate of eruption which exceeded the rate of regeneration of differentiated magma. Representative analytical and petrographic data in the context of establishing petrological trends are presented.

  7. Western Alborz Volcanic Rocks, a new Geochemical Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, M.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanic and pyroclastic rocks of Eocene age comprise vast outcrops of Alborz Mountain Range, a fold-thrusted structural unit extending across northern Iran for 2000 km in a curvilinear pattern. In his account of structural evolution of Iranian plateau, Berberian (1983; p. 55) ascribed these rocks to a subduction-type magmatism. Based on a tectonostratigraphic study, these rocks are attributed to an arc-type magmatism (Alavi; 1996, p. 29). Recently a new data set of major and trace element (including REE) analyses of volcanic rocks from western Alborz, some 50 km west of city of Qazvin, has been made available (Asiabanha, 2001). Careful examination of the data (i.e., those of basic-intermediate rocks) in present study revealed, for the first time, some geochemical characteristics which have important implications on the geodynamic synthesis of this structural unit. The rocks contain 50-60 wt% SiO2. They lie in the midalkaline-to-subalkaline domain of TAS diagram (Middlemost, 1997; p.216) and fall in the calcalkaline field of AFM diagram. The volcanic rocks display two distinct chondrite-normalized REE patterns, one is MREE-depleted while the other is a rather smooth uniform M-HREE pattern. These are called MREE-depleted and smooth M-HREE series. Basic rocks from the latter contain higher silica than the former (>53 vs. >50 wt%), yet they show lower incompatible elements (e.g., K and Rb) and HFSE contents. These features can not be explained by differentiation and might be interpreted as implying the involvement of two source regions. Chondrite-normalized trace element patterns of the MREE-depleted series is more akin to the island arc calcalkaline (IACA) basic rocks than the basic rocks from any other tectonic settings. However, island arc products, known for being depleted in HFSE relative to other incompatible elements, differ from the MREE-depleted series which is rich in both HFSE and incompatible elements. One may advocate the role of OIB-type mantle

  8. Hydrocarbon- Generating Model of the Area Covered With Volcanic Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Zhanqian; Zhang Yuwei

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of Oil & gas fields shows their close relationship with the most active tectonic regions. This is not a coincidence but having a scientific reasons. The crustal active regions, refer to the places where the active natural earthquake, volcanic activities, underground water happened, and the areas of the leaking off of natural gas to the surface of the crust. The magma of volcanic activities brings the organic "kitchen range body" hydrocarbon- generating model and inorganic genetic hydrocarbon to the regions covered by volcanic rock. Underground water brings a catalytic hydrocarbongenerating model for organic matter, and the leaking- off of H2 and CO2 contributes a synthetic hydrocarbon - generating model. Volcanic activities bring the assemblage of Source, Reservoir and Seal formed by the sediments and magma the sedimentary basins, and the hydrocarbon - generating system with a "water - volcano" binary structure is formed. All these conditions are favorable and excellent for the formation of oil & gas fields. The distribution of American oil & gas fields have very close relationship with the mines of Fe, Mn, Ct, Mo, W and V, deposits of Zn, Cu, V, Pb, Al and Hg, and the deposits of fluorite, sulfur, potassium salt, phosphate and halite, and the distribution of sulfate- chloride of river water. The reason why few oil & gas fields discovered in the regions covered by volcanic rock in western America maybe because of the view of "inconsistency between petroleum and volcano". Further more, It's very difficult to carry out a geophysical exploration in such kinds of regions.This paper examined a few hydrocarbon-generating models (systems) mentioned above and came up with some fresh ideas on the exploration in the areas covered with volcanic rocks.

  9. Timing and climate forcing of volcanic eruptions for the past 2,500 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, M; Winstrup, M; McConnell, J R; Welten, K C; Plunkett, G; Ludlow, F; Büntgen, U; Caffee, M; Chellman, N; Dahl-Jensen, D; Fischer, H; Kipfstuhl, S; Kostick, C; Maselli, O J; Mekhaldi, F; Mulvaney, R; Muscheler, R; Pasteris, D R; Pilcher, J R; Salzer, M; Schüpbach, S; Steffensen, J P; Vinther, B M; Woodruff, T E

    2015-07-30

    Volcanic eruptions contribute to climate variability, but quantifying these contributions has been limited by inconsistencies in the timing of atmospheric volcanic aerosol loading determined from ice cores and subsequent cooling from climate proxies such as tree rings. Here we resolve these inconsistencies and show that large eruptions in the tropics and high latitudes were primary drivers of interannual-to-decadal temperature variability in the Northern Hemisphere during the past 2,500 years. Our results are based on new records of atmospheric aerosol loading developed from high-resolution, multi-parameter measurements from an array of Greenland and Antarctic ice cores as well as distinctive age markers to constrain chronologies. Overall, cooling was proportional to the magnitude of volcanic forcing and persisted for up to ten years after some of the largest eruptive episodes. Our revised timescale more firmly implicates volcanic eruptions as catalysts in the major sixth-century pandemics, famines, and socioeconomic disruptions in Eurasia and Mesoamerica while allowing multi-millennium quantification of climate response to volcanic forcing.

  10. Risk assessment of the impact of future volcanic eruptions on direct normal irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Blanc, Philippe; Vignola, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosols from Plinian volcanic eruptions affect the solar surface irradiance forcing by scattering the solar radiation as it passes through the Earth atmosphere. Since these aerosols have high single scattering albedos they mostly affect direct normal irradiances (DNI). The effect on global horizontal irradiance (GHI) is less because some of the scattered irradiance reaches the surface as diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI) and adds to the GHI. DNI is the essential input to concentrating solar thermal electric power (CSP/STE) and concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) plants. Therefore, an assessment of the future potential variability in the DNI resource caused by Plinian volcanic eruptions is desirable. Based on investigations of the El Chichón and Pinatubo eruptions, the microphysical, and thereby optical, properties of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols are well known. Given these, radiative transfer computations of the DNI resource can be made. The DNI resource includes forward scattered irradiance within the acceptance angle of a given CSP/STE or CPV plant. The rarity of Plinian eruptions poses a challenge for assessing the statistical risk of future eruptions and its potential of risk in the electricity production. Here we present and discuss methods to account for these potential volcanic eruptions for technical and economical studies including scenarios with very high probability of exceedance (e.g. P99 scenarios) for risk assessment of DNI-based solar power projects.

  11. Beyond baking soda: Demonstrating the link between volcanic eruptions and viscosity to all ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithka, I. N.; Walters, R. L.; Harpp, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Public interest in volcanic eruptions and societal relevance of volcanic hazards provide an excellent basis for successful earth science outreach. During a museum-based earth science outreach event free and open to the public, we used two new interactive experiments to illustrate the relationship between gas content, magma viscosity, and eruption style. Learning objectives for visitors are to understand: how gas drives volcanic eruptions, the differences between effusive and explosive eruption styles, viscosity's control on gas pressure within a magma reservoir, and the role of gas pressure on eruption style. Visitors apply the scientific method by asking research questions and testing hypotheses by conducting the experiments. The demonstrations are framed with real life examples of volcanic eruptions (e.g., Mt. St. Helens eruption in 1980), providing context for the scientific concepts. The first activity demonstrates the concept of fluid viscosity and how gas interacts with fluids of different viscosities. Visitors blow bubbles into water and corn syrup. The corn syrup is so viscous that bubbles are trapped, showing how a more viscous material builds up higher gas pressure. Visitors are asked which kind of magma (high or low viscosity) will produce an explosive eruption. To demonstrate an explosive eruption, visitors add an Alka-Seltzer tablet to water in a snap-top film canister. The reaction rapidly produces carbon dioxide gas, increasing pressure in the canister until the lid pops off and the canister launches a few meters into the air (tinyurl.com/nzsgfoe). Increasing gas pressure in the canister is analogous to gas pressure building within a magma reservoir beneath a volcano. The lid represents high-viscosity magma that prevents degassing, causing gas pressure to reach explosive levels. This interactive activity is combined with a display of an effusive eruption: add vinegar to baking soda in a model volcano to produce a quick-flowing eruption. These

  12. Atmospheric processes affecting the separation of volcanic ash and SO2 in volcanic eruptions: inferences from the May 2011 Grímsvötn eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Fred; Woodhouse, Mark; Huppert, Herbert E.; Prata, Andrew; Thordarson, Thor; Carn, Simon

    2017-09-01

    The separation of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas is sometimes observed during volcanic eruptions. The exact conditions under which separation occurs are not fully understood but the phenomenon is of importance because of the effects volcanic emissions have on aviation, on the environment, and on the earth's radiation balance. The eruption of Grímsvötn, a subglacial volcano under the Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland during 21-28 May 2011 produced one of the most spectacular examples of ash and SO2 separation, which led to errors in the forecasting of ash in the atmosphere over northern Europe. Satellite data from several sources coupled with meteorological wind data and photographic evidence suggest that the eruption column was unable to sustain itself, resulting in a large deposition of ash, which left a low-level ash-rich atmospheric plume moving southwards and then eastwards towards the southern Scandinavian coast and a high-level predominantly SO2 plume travelling northwards and then spreading eastwards and westwards. Here we provide observational and modelling perspectives on the separation of ash and SO2 and present quantitative estimates of the masses of ash and SO2 that erupted, the directions of transport, and the likely impacts. We hypothesise that a partial column collapse or sloughing fed with ash from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) occurred during the early stage of the eruption, leading to an ash-laden gravity intrusion that was swept southwards, separated from the main column. Our model suggests that water-mediated aggregation caused enhanced ash removal because of the plentiful supply of source water from melted glacial ice and from entrained atmospheric water. The analysis also suggests that ash and SO2 should be treated with separate source terms, leading to improvements in forecasting the movement of both types of emissions.

  13. Atmospheric processes affecting the separation of volcanic ash and SO2 in volcanic eruptions: inferences from the May 2011 Grímsvötn eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Prata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The separation of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide (SO2 gas is sometimes observed during volcanic eruptions. The exact conditions under which separation occurs are not fully understood but the phenomenon is of importance because of the effects volcanic emissions have on aviation, on the environment, and on the earth's radiation balance. The eruption of Grímsvötn, a subglacial volcano under the Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland during 21–28 May 2011 produced one of the most spectacular examples of ash and SO2 separation, which led to errors in the forecasting of ash in the atmosphere over northern Europe. Satellite data from several sources coupled with meteorological wind data and photographic evidence suggest that the eruption column was unable to sustain itself, resulting in a large deposition of ash, which left a low-level ash-rich atmospheric plume moving southwards and then eastwards towards the southern Scandinavian coast and a high-level predominantly SO2 plume travelling northwards and then spreading eastwards and westwards. Here we provide observational and modelling perspectives on the separation of ash and SO2 and present quantitative estimates of the masses of ash and SO2 that erupted, the directions of transport, and the likely impacts. We hypothesise that a partial column collapse or sloughing fed with ash from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs occurred during the early stage of the eruption, leading to an ash-laden gravity intrusion that was swept southwards, separated from the main column. Our model suggests that water-mediated aggregation caused enhanced ash removal because of the plentiful supply of source water from melted glacial ice and from entrained atmospheric water. The analysis also suggests that ash and SO2 should be treated with separate source terms, leading to improvements in forecasting the movement of both types of emissions.

  14. First observations of volcanic eruption clouds from L1 by DSCOVR/EPIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, S. A.; Krotkov, N. A.; Taylor, S.; Fisher, B. L.; Li, C.; Hughes, E. J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Prata, F.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ash have been measured by ultraviolet (UV) sensors on US and European polar-orbiting satellites since the late 1970s. Although successful, the main limitation of these UV observations from low-Earth orbit has been poor temporal resolution. Timeliness can be crucial when detecting hazardous volcanic eruption clouds that threaten aviation, and most operational geostationary satellites cannot detect SO2, a key tracer of volcanic plumes. In 2015, the launch of the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) provided the first opportunity to observe volcanic clouds from the L1 Lagrange point. EPIC is a 10-band spectroradiometer spanning UV to near-IR wavelengths with two UV channels sensitive to SO2, and a ground resolution of 25 km. The unique L1 vantage point provides continuous observations of the sunlit Earth disk, potentially offering multiple daily observations of volcanic SO2 and ash clouds in the EPIC field of view. When coupled with complementary retrievals from polar-orbiting UV and infrared (IR) sensors such as the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the increased observation frequency afforded by DSCOVR/EPIC will permit more timely volcanic eruption detection, improved trajectory modeling, and novel analyses of the temporal evolution of volcanic clouds. We demonstrate the sensitivity of EPIC UV radiances to volcanic clouds using examples from the first year of EPIC observations including the December 2015 paroxysmal eruption of Etna volcano (Italy). When combined with OMI and OMPS measurements, the EPIC SO2 data permit hourly tracking of the Etna eruption cloud as it drifts away from the volcano. We also describe ongoing efforts to adapt existing UV backscatter (BUV) algorithms to produce operational EPIC SO2 and Ash Index (AI) products.

  15. Probabilities of future VEI ≥ 2 eruptions at the Central American Volcanic Arc: a statistical perspective based on the past centuries' eruption record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Wehrmann, Heidi

    2014-10-01

    A probabilistic eruption forecast is provided for seven historically active volcanoes along the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA), as a pivotal empirical contribution to multi-disciplinary volcanic hazards assessment. The eruption probabilities are determined with a Kaplan-Meier estimator of survival functions, and parametric time series models are applied to describe the historical eruption records. Aside from the volcanoes that are currently in a state of eruptive activity (Santa María, Fuego, and Arenal), the highest probabilities for eruptions of VEI ≥ 2 occur at Concepción and Cerro Negro in Nicaragua, which are likely to erupt to 70-85 % within the next 10 years. Poás and Irazú in Costa Rica show a medium to high eruption probability, followed by San Miguel (El Salvador), Rincón de la Vieja (Costa Rica), and Izalco (El Salvador; 24 % within the next 10 years).

  16. Counteracting the climate effects of volcanic eruptions using short-lived greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestvedt, Jan S.; Samset, Bjørn H.; Shine, Keith P.

    2014-12-01

    A large volcanic eruption might constitute a climate emergency, significantly altering global temperature and precipitation for several years. Major future eruptions will occur, but their size or timing cannot be predicted. We show, for the first time, that it may be possible to counteract these climate effects through deliberate emissions of short-lived greenhouse gases, dampening the abrupt impact of an eruption. We estimate an emission pathway countering a hypothetical eruption 3 times the size of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. We use a global climate model to evaluate global and regional responses to the eruption, with and without counteremissions. We then raise practical, financial, and ethical questions related to such a strategy. Unlike the more commonly discussed geoengineering to mitigate warming from long-lived greenhouse gases, designed emissions to counter temporary cooling would not have the disadvantage of needing to be sustained over long periods. Nevertheless, implementation would still face significant challenges.

  17. Volcanic Eruptions in the Southern Red Sea During 2007–2013

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Sigurjon

    2015-04-03

    The first volcanic eruption known to occur in the southern Red Sea in over a century started on Jebel at Tair Island in September 2007. The early phase of the eruption was energetic, with lava reaching the shore of the small island within hours, destroying a Yemeni military outpost and causing a few casualties. The eruption lasted several months, producing a new summit cone and lava covering an area of 5.9 km2, which is about half the area of the island. The Jebel at Tair activity was followed by two more eruptions within the Zubair archipelago, about 50 km to the southeast, in 2011–2012 and 2013, both of which started on the seafloor and resulted in the formation of new islands. The first of these eruptions started in December 2011 in the northern part of the archipelago and lasted for about one month, generating a small (0.25 km2) oval-shaped island. Coastal erosion during the first two years following the end of the eruption has reduced the size of the island to 0.19 km2. The second event occurred in the central part of the Zubair Islands and lasted roughly two months (September–November, 2013), forming a larger (0.68 km2) island. The recent volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea are a part of increased activity seen in the entire southern Red Sea region following the onset of a rifting episode in Afar (Ethiopia) in 2005.

  18. The Spatial Response of the Climate System to Explosive Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P. M.; Jones, P. D.; Pengqun, Jia

    1996-05-01

    Determining the spatial response of the climate system to volcanic forcing is of importance in the development of short-term climate prediction and in the assesment of anthropogenic factors such as global warming. The June 1991 eruption of the Phillippine volcano, Mount Pinatubo, provides an important opportunity to test existing understanding and extend previous emperical analyses of volcanic effect. We identify the spatial climate response to historic eruptions in the surface air temperature and mean-sea- level pressure record and use this information to assess the impact of the Pinatubo eruption. The Pinatubo eruption clearly generated significant global cooling during the years after the event. The magnitude and timing of the cooling is similar to that associated with previous equatorial eruptions. There is good agreement between the spatial patterns of tempurature and circulation anomalies associated with the historic eruptions and those following the Mount Pinatubo event. Evidence of limited higher latitude warming and a major change in the atmospheric circulation is found over the Northern Hemisphere during the first winter after the equatorial eruptions analysed, followed by widespread cooling, but limited change in the atmosphere circulation, during the subsquent 2 years.

  19. Stability of volcanic conduits: insights from magma ascent modelling and possible consequences on eruptive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, Alvaro; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Cioni, Raffaello; Neri, Augusto

    2017-04-01

    Geological evidences of changes in volcanic conduit geometry (i.e. erosive processes) are common in the volcanic record, as revealed by the occurrence of lithic fragments in most pyroclastic deposits. However, the controlling factors of conduit enlargement mechanisms are still partially unclear, as well as the influence of conduit geometry in the eruptive dynamics. Despite physical models have been systematically used for studying volcanic conduits, their mechanical stability has been poorly addressed. In order to study the mechanical stability of volcanic conduits during explosive eruptions, we present a 1D steady-state model which considers the main processes experimented by ascending magmas, such as crystallization, drag forces, fragmentation, outgassing and degassing; and the application of the Mogi-Coulomb collapse criterion, using a set of constitutive equations for studying typical cases of rhyolitic and trachytic explosive volcanism. From our results emerge that conduit stability is mainly controlled by magma rheology and conduit dimensions. Indeed, in order to be stable, feeding conduits of rhyolitic eruptions need larger radii respect to their trachytic counterparts, which is manifested in the higher eruption rates usually observed in rhyolitic explosive eruptions, as confirmed by a small compilation of global data. Additionally, for both magma compositions, we estimated a minimum magma flux for developing stable conduits (˜3ṡ106 kg/s for trachytic magmas and ˜8ṡ107 kg/s for rhyolitic magmas), which is consistent with the unsteady character commonly observed in low-mass flux events (e.g. sub-Plinian eruptions), which would be produced by episodic collapse events of the volcanic conduit, opposite to the mainly stationary high-mass flux events (e.g. Plinian eruptions), characterized by stable conduits. For a given magma composition, a minimum radius for reaching stable conditions can be computed, as a function of inlet overpressure and water content

  20. Forecasting volcanic ash dispersal and coeval resuspension during the April-May 2015 Calbuco eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckziegel, F.; Bustos, E.; Mingari, L.; Báez, W.; Villarosa, G.; Folch, A.; Collini, E.; Viramonte, J.; Romero, J.; Osores, S.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric dispersion of volcanic ash from explosive eruptions or from subsequent fallout deposit resuspension causes a range of impacts and disruptions on human activities and ecosystems. The April-May 2015 Calbuco eruption in Chile involved eruption and resuspension activities. We overview the chronology, effects, and products resulting from these events, in order to validate an operational forecast strategy for tephra dispersal. The modelling strategy builds on coupling the meteorological Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF/ARW) model with the FALL3D dispersal model for eruptive and resuspension processes. The eruption modelling considers two distinct particle granulometries, a preliminary first guess distribution used operationally when no field data was available yet, and a refined distribution based on field measurements. Volcanological inputs were inferred from eruption reports and results from an Argentina-Chilean ash sample data network, which performed in-situ sampling during the eruption. In order to validate the modelling strategy, results were compared with satellite retrievals and ground deposit measurements. Results indicate that the WRF-FALL3D modelling system can provide reasonable forecasts in both eruption and resuspension modes, particularly when the adjusted granulometry is considered. The study also highlights the importance of having dedicated datasets of active volcanoes furnishing first-guess model inputs during the early stages of an eruption.

  1. ENSO response to high-latitude volcanic eruptions: the role of the initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Caballero, Rodrigo; Battisti, David S.

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions can have major impacts on global climate affecting both atmospheric and ocean circulation through changes in atmospheric chemical composition and optical properties. The residence time of volcanic aerosol from strong eruptions is around 2-3 years and attention has consequently focused on their short-term impacts, and in particular on tropical eruptions. The long-term, ocean-mediated response has been less studied and large uncertainties remain. Moreover, studies have largely focused on tropical eruptions; high-latitude eruptions have drawn less attention because their impacts have been thought to be merely hemispheric rather than global and no study has hitherto investigated the long-term effects of such eruptions. Here we use a climate model to show that large summer high-latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere could cause an El Niño-like anomaly in the equatorial Pacific during the first 8-9 months after the start of the eruption owing to a strong hemispheric cooling. The hemispherically asymmetric cooling shifts the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone southwards, triggering a weakening of the trade winds over the western and central equatorial Pacific that leads to an El Niño-like anomaly. However, the El Niño-like anomaly strongly depends on the initial ENSO state: a 3-time larger response is shown when the climate system is going towards a La Niña compared to when is going towards an El Niño. Finally, the eruption also leads to a strengthening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the first twenty-five years after the eruption, followed by a weakening lasting at least 35 years. The long-lived changes in the AMOC strength also alter the variability of El Niño-Southern Oscillation.

  2. Study on relationship between historical volcanic eruptions and historical strong earthquakes in China and its adjacent regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This thesis lists and describes 6 pairs of tectonic events, i.e., historical volcanic eruptions associated with historical strong earthquakes, based on the analysis for the records of historical volcanic eruptions and historical strong earthquakes in China and its adjacent region since the first record. And discusses the relationship between historical eruptions and strong earthquakes by means of analyzing the characteristics of tectonic events themselves, plate movement, regional seismicity, and regional stress environment in China and its adjacent region.

  3. The strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks: A 2D approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Xu, Tao; Chen, Chong-feng; Tang, Chun'an

    2016-06-01

    Volcanic rocks typically contain heterogeneities in the form of crystals and pores. We investigate here the influence of such heterogeneity on the strength of volcanic rocks using an elastic damage mechanics model in which we numerically deform two-dimensional samples comprising low-strength elements representing crystals and zero-strength elements representing pores. These circular elements are stochastically generated so that there is no overlap in a medium representing the groundmass. Our modelling indicates that increasing the fraction of pores and/or crystals reduces the strength of volcanic rocks, and that increasing the pore fraction results in larger strength reductions than increasing the crystal fraction. The model also highlights an important weakening role for pore diameter, but finds that crystal diameter has a less significant influence for strength. To account for heterogeneity (pores and crystals), we propose an effective medium approach where we define an effective pore fraction ϕp‧ = Vp/(Vp + Vg) where Vp and Vg are the pore and groundmass fractions, respectively. Highly heterogeneous samples (containing high pore and/or crystal fractions) will therefore have high values of ϕp‧, and vice-versa. When we express our numerical samples (more than 200 simulations spanning a wide range of crystal and pore fractions) in terms of ϕp‧, we find that their strengths can be described by a single curve for a given pore diameter. To provide a predictive tool for the strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks, we propose a modified version of 2D solution for the Sammis and Ashby (1986) pore-emanating crack model, a micromechanical model designed to estimate strength using microstructural attributes such as porosity, pore radius, and fracture toughness. The model, reformulated to include ϕp‧ (and therefore crystal fraction), captures the strength curves for our numerical simulations over a sample heterogeneity range relevant to volcanic systems. We find

  4. Model guidance for deployment of observational resources following a major volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, P. R.; Aquila, V.; LeGrande, A. N.; Tsigaridis, K.; Newman, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines increased the stratospheric aerosol burden by orders of magnitude and perturbed the global Earth system by modifying the atmosphere's radiation balance, perturbing tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, increasing stratospheric water vapor concentration, changing the chemical balance of the stratosphere, enhancing ozone depletion, and modifying the dynamics of the stratosphere. We know from the smaller El Chichón eruption in Mexico in 1982 that the climate response to large eruptions is not simply proportional to the amount of sulfur emitted: while Mt. Pinatubo injected more than twice as much sulfate aerosol as El Chichón, it produced a much smaller tropical stratospheric warming. The climate response to a major volcanic eruption depends thus on a number of factors, including the amount of material released (including sulfur, water, and halogen compounds), the altitude of injection, the latitude, and season. Characterizing important parameters following an eruption and monitoring the subsequent volcanic plume evolution will be important activities for the international research community in the weeks-to-months-to-years following a major eruption. In order to provide NASA advance guidance to support its deployment of airborne and in situ resources following a major eruption, we have performed a series of simulations with two Earth system models—the NASA GSFC Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5), and the GISS ModelE—in which we explore the evolution of the volcanic plume resulting from a Pinatubo-magnitude eruption. In particular, we explore the evolution of the resulting aerosol plume, including its amount, altitude, lifetime, and particle size distribution, as well as recovery of the perturbed atmosphere to pre-eruption conditions. Our suite of simulations investigates both the month and latitude of the eruption as important factors in determining the plume evolution. We use two Earth

  5. The radiative impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have significant impact on the earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes also the stratosphere is influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the EMAC model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour after the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as important sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on the tropospheric water vapour and ENSO are evident.

  6. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km far from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  7. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and the Volcanic Ash Radar Retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  8. The nearshore benthic community of Kasatochi Island, one year after the 2008 volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, S.C.; Bodkin, J.L.; Chenelot, H.; Esslinger, G.G.; Hoberg, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    A description is presented of the nearshore benthic community of Kasatochi Island 1012 months after a catastrophic volcanic eruption in 2008. The eruption extended the coastline of the island approximately 400 m offshore, mainly along the south, southeast, and southwest shores, to roughly the 20 m isobath. Existing canopy kelp of Eualaria (Alaria) fistulosa, as well as limited understory algal species and associated fauna (e.g., urchin barrens) on the hard substratum were apparently buried following the eruption. Samples and observations revealed the substrate around the island in 2009 was comprised almost entirely of medium and coarse sands with a depauperate benthic community, dominated by opportunistic pontogeneiid amphipods. Comparisons of habitat and biological communities with other nearby Aleutian Islands, as well as with the Icelandic volcanic island of Surtsey, confirm dramatic reductions in flora and fauna consistent with an early stage of recovery from a large-scale disturbance event. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  9. Short-term spasmodic switching of volcanic tremor source activation in a conduit of the 2011 Kirishima eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, T.; Uehira, K.; Yamashita, Y.; Nakamoto, M.; Miyazaki, M.; Chikura, H.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic tremors are seismic indicators providing clues for magma behavior, which is related to volcanic eruptions and activity. Detection of spatial and temporal variations of volcanic tremors is important for understanding the mechanism of volcanic eruptions. However, temporal variations of tremor activity in short-term than a minute have not been previously detected by seismological observations around volcanoes. Here, we show that volcanic tremor sources were activated at the top of the conduit (i.e. the crater) and at its lower end by analyzing seismograms from a dense seismic array during the 2011 Kirishima eruption. We observed spasmodic switching in the seismic ray direction during a volcanic tremor sequence. Such fine volcanic tremor structure suggests an interaction between tremor sources located in both deep and shallow depths. Our result suggests that seismic array observations can monitor the magma behavior and contribute to the evaluation of the activity's transition.

  10. Dispersion of the Volcanic Sulfate Cloud from the Mount Pinatubo Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, Valentina; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Colarco, Peter R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    We simulate the transport of the volcanic cloud from the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo with the GEOS-5 general circulation model. Our simulations are in good agreement with observational data. We tested the importance of initial condition corresponding to the specific meteorological situation at the time of the eruption by employing reanalysis from MERRA. We found no significant difference in the transport of the cloud. We show how the inclusion of the interaction between volcanic sulfate aerosol and radiation is essential for a reliable simulation of the transport of the volcanic cloud. The absorption of long wave radiation by the volcanic sulfate induces a rising of the volcanic cloud up to the middle stratosphere, combined with divergent motion from the latitude of the eruption to the tropics. Our simulations indicate that the cloud diffuses to the northern hemisphere through a lower stratospheric pathway, and to mid- and high latitudes of the southern hemisphere through a middle stratospheric pathway, centered at about 30 hPa. The direction of the middle stratospheric pathway depends on the season. We did not detect any significant change of the mixing between tropics and mid- and high latitudes in the southern hemisphere.

  11. Volcanic plume measurements using a UAV for the 2014 Mt. Ontake eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Toshiya; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Terada, Akihiko; Yoshimoto, Mitsuhiro; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke; Shinohara, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    A phreatic eruption of Mt. Ontake, Japan, started abruptly on September 27, 2014, and caused the worst volcanic calamity in recent 70 years in Japan. We conducted volcanic plume surveys using an electric multirotor unmanned aerial vehicle to elucidate the conditions of Mt. Ontake's plume, which is flowing over 3000 m altitude. A plume gas composition, sulfur dioxide flux and thermal image measurements and a particle sampling were carried out using the unmanned aerial vehicle for three field campaigns on November 20 and 21, 2014, and June 2, 2015. Together with the results of manned helicopter and aircraft observations, we revealed that the plume of Mt. Ontake was not directly emitted from the magma but was influenced by hydrothermal system, and observed SO2/H2S molar ratios were decreasing after the eruption. High SO2 flux of >2000 t/d observed at least until 20 h after the onset of the eruption implies significant input of magmatic gas and the flux quickly decreased to about 130 t/d in 2 months. In contrast, H2S fluxes retrieved using SO2/H2S ratio and SO2 flux showed significantly high level of 700-800 t/d, which continued at least between 2 weeks and 2 months after the eruption. This is a peculiar feature of the 2014 Mt. Ontake eruption. Considering the trends of the flux changes of SO2 and H2S, we presume that majority of SO2 and H2S are supplied, respectively, from high-temperature magmatic fluid of a deep origin and from hydrothermal system. From the point of view of SO2/H2S ratios and fumarolic temperatures, the plume degassing trend after the 2014 eruption is following the similar course as that after the 1979 eruptions, and we speculate the 2014 eruptive activity will cease slowly similar to the 1979 eruption.

  12. Impacts of high-latitude volcanic eruptions on ENSO and AMOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S R; Chafik, Leon; Caballero, Rodrigo; Battisti, David S

    2015-11-10

    Large volcanic eruptions can have major impacts on global climate, affecting both atmospheric and ocean circulation through changes in atmospheric chemical composition and optical properties. The residence time of volcanic aerosol from strong eruptions is roughly 2-3 y. Attention has consequently focused on their short-term impacts, whereas the long-term, ocean-mediated response has not been well studied. Most studies have focused on tropical eruptions; high-latitude eruptions have drawn less attention because their impacts are thought to be merely hemispheric rather than global. No study to date has investigated the long-term effects of high-latitude eruptions. Here, we use a climate model to show that large summer high-latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere cause strong hemispheric cooling, which could induce an El Niño-like anomaly, in the equatorial Pacific during the first 8-9 mo after the start of the eruption. The hemispherically asymmetric cooling shifts the Intertropical Convergence Zone southward, triggering a weakening of the trade winds over the western and central equatorial Pacific that favors the development of an El Niño-like anomaly. In the model used here, the specified high-latitude eruption also leads to a strengthening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the first 25 y after the eruption, followed by a weakening lasting at least 35 y. The long-lived changes in the AMOC strength also alter the variability of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  13. Sulfur isotopic characteristics of volcanic products from the September 2014 Mount Ontake eruption, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Kei; Maruoka, Teruyuki

    2016-07-01

    Components and sulfur isotopic compositions of pyroclastic materials from the 2014 Mt. Ontake eruption were investigated. The volcanic ash samples were found to be composed of altered volcanic fragments, alunite, anhydrite, biotite, cristobalite, gypsum, ilmenite, kaolin minerals, native sulfur, orthopyroxene, plagioclase, potassium feldspar, pyrite, pyrophyllite, quartz, rutile, and smectite, and most of these minerals were likely derived from the acidic alteration zones of Mt. Ontake. The absence of juvenile material in the eruptive products indicates that the eruption was phreatic. The sulfur isotopic compositions of the water-leached sulfate, hydrochloric acid-leached sulfate, acetone-leached native sulfur, and pyrite of the samples indicate that these sulfur species were produced by disproportionation of magmatic SO2 in the hydrothermal system at temperatures of 270-281 °C. This temperature range is consistent with that inferred from the hydrothermal mineral assemblage (e.g., pyrophyllite and rutile) in the 2014 pyroclastic materials (200-300 °C). Except for the sulfur isotopic compositions of anhydrite, which may have been altered by incorporation of sulfate minerals in a fumarolic area with lower sulfur isotopic values into the underground materials during the 1979 eruption, no significant differences in the mineral assemblages and sulfur isotopic compositions of the pyroclastic materials were identified between the products of the 2014 and 1979 Ontake phreatic eruptions, which suggests geochemical similarities in the underlying hydrothermal systems before the 2014 and 1979 eruptions.

  14. European Hydroclimate Response to Volcanic Eruptions over the Past Nine Centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yujuan; Gao, Chaochao

    2017-04-01

    The climatic aftermath of the 1815 Tambora eruption in Europe suggests large volcanic eruptions can introduce environmental and societal consequences in this region. Here, we analyze the European summer hydrological response to 31 tropical and 44 Northern Hemisphere mid-to-high latitude eruptions over the past nine centuries, using a newly published reconstruction of global volcanism and a proxy record of droughts (Old World Drought Atlas) coupled with a superposed epoch analysis. Our results show a significant wetting response (at the 95% confidence level) for year 0 and year 1 after tropical eruptions. Spatially, wetting occurs in northeast and southern Europe, while a drying response develops in central and northwest Europe. Both the wetting and drying responses increase with the eruption magnitude. Large high latitude eruptions tend to cause a drying response. Correcting for the effects of El Nino does not noticeably change the response patterns. Our results verify previous modeling studies from a longer term proxy perspective, and indicate that future stratospheric aerosol perturbations are likely to further separate modern and 20th central hydroclimate conditions in Europe during the boreal summers. Complex regional variability exists, and regions such as the Balkan Peninsula may experience intensified wetting. The results may therefore illuminate potential effects of stratospheric geoengineering in Europe.

  15. Volcanic Ash and Aviation - the 2014 Eruptions of Kelut and Sangeang Api, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupper, A. C.; Jansons, E.

    2014-12-01

    Two significant eruptions in Indonesia during the first part of 2014 have highlighted the continuing challenges of safe air traffic management around volcanic ash clouds. The stratospheric eruption of Kelut (also known as Kelud) in Java late on 13 February 2014 resulted in widespread aviation disruption over Indonesia and at least one serious volcanic ash encounter from an international airline. An upper-tropospheric eruption of Sangeang Api in the Lesser Sunda Islands on 30 May 2014 did not result in any known aircraft encounters, but did result in many delays and flight cancellations between Indonesia and Australia. In both cases, the eruption and resultant ash clouds were relatively well observed, if subject to the usual issues in characterising such clouds. For example, as tropical eruptions frequently reach 15 km amsl and above due to the height of the tropical tropopause, it is frequently very difficult to provide an accurate estimation of conditions at the cruising levels of aircraft, at 10-11 km (or lower for shorter domestic routes). More critically, the challenge of linking operational results from two scientific professions (volcanology and meteorology) with real-time aviation users remains strongly evident. Situational awareness of domestic and international airlines, ground-based monitoring and communications prior to and during the eruption, receiving and sharing pilot reports of volcanic ash, and appropriate flight responses all remain inadequate even in relatively fine conditions, with an unacceptable ongoing risk of serious aviation encounters should improvements not be made. Despite the extensive efforts of the International Civil Aviation Organization, World Meteorological Organization, and all partners in the International Airways Volcano Watch, and despite the acceleration of work on the issue since 2010, volcanic ash management remains sub-optimal.

  16. Zircon U-Pb Age Determination of Volcanic Eruptions in Lutao and Lanyu in the Northern Luzon Magmatic Arc

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    Wen-Yu Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports for the first time zircon U-Pb ages of volcanic rocks and sands from Lutao and Lanyu, two islets off SE Taiwan in the north Luzon arc. The samples include (1 seven andesites from four volcanic units and three river/beach sands from Lutao and (2 five basaltic andesites from four volcanic units and two river/beach sands from Lanyu. The Lutao andesites contain abundant magmatic zircons, aging from ~1.54 to ~1.24 Ma for individual sample, which yielded an overall mean 206Pb/238U age of 1.31 ±± 0.03 Ma (n = 190, MSWD = 2.6. This is slightly older than, or broadly coincident with, a mean 206Pb/238U age of 1.23 ±± 0.03 Ma (n = 103, MSWD = 1.9 given by detrital zircons from the three sands. The Lanyu volcanics appear to have less abundant magmatic zircons, aging from ~2.72 to ~2.35 Ma for individual sample, which yielded an overall mean 206Pb/238U age of 2.61 ±± 0.13 Ma (n = 11, MSWD = 1.8. This accords with a mean 206Pb/238U age of 2.69 ±± 0.11 Ma (n = 34, MSWD = 4.7 obtained by detrital zircons from the two sands. The age data suggest that in Lutao and Lanyu the major volcanic eruptions occurred at ~1.3 and ~2.6 Ma, respectively. Moreover, volcanic samples from both islets contain various amounts of older inherited zircons, ~11% in Lutao and up to ~82% in Lanyu, which together with detrital zircons from the sands show main age peaks at ~150 Ma and ~1.9 and ~2.5 Ga, consistent with the notion for a _ continental crust involved in the genesis of the northern Luzon magmatic arc.

  17. Strengths and strain energies of volcanic edifices: implications for eruptions, collapse calderas, and landslides

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    A. Gudmundsson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural hazards associated with volcanic edifices depend partly on how fracture resistant the edifices are, i.e. on their strengths. Observations worldwide indicate that large fluid-driven extension fractures (dikes, inclined sheets, shear fractures (landslides, and mixed-mode fractures (ring dikes and ring faults normally propagate more easily in a basaltic edifice (shield volcano than in a stratovolcano. For example, dike-fed eruptions occur once every few years in many basaltic edifices but once every 102-3 yr in many stratovolcanoes. Large landslides and caldera collapses also appear to be more common in a typical basaltic edifice/shield volcano than in a typical stratovolcano. In contrast to a basaltic edifice, a stratovolcano is composed of mechanically dissimilar rock layers, i.e. layers with mismatching elastic properties (primarily Young's modulus. Elastic mismatch encourages fracture deflection and arrest at contacts and increases the amount of energy needed for a large-scale edifice failure. Fracture-related hazards depend on the potential energy available to propagate the fractures which, in turn, depends on the boundary conditions during fracture propagation. Here there are two possible scenarios: one in which the outer boundary of the volcanic edifice or rift zone does not move during the fracture propagation (constant displacement; the other in which the boundary moves (constant load. In the former, the total potential energy is the strain energy stored in the volcano before fracture formation; in the latter, the total potential energy is the strain energy plus the work done by the forces moving the boundary. Constant-displacement boundary conditions favor small eruptions, landslides, and caldera collapses, whereas constant-load conditions favor comparatively large eruptions, landslides, and collapses. For a typical magma chamber (sill-like with a diameter of 8 km, the strain energy change due to magma-chamber inflation

  18. Trace Element Geochemistry of Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks in Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈道公; 李彬贤; 等

    1989-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rock of Shandong Province are mainly alkalic and strongly alkalic basaltic rocks.The Contents of major and trace elements including transitional,incompatible and rare-earth elements were determined.The chemical characterisitics of major and trace elements indicate that these basaltic rocks were derived from a mantle source and probably represent a primary magma,I,e.,unmodifiecd partical melts of mantle peridotite in terms of Mg values,correlatione between P2O5 and Ce,Sr,Ni and Rb concentrations,mantle xenoliths,etc.The abundances of trace elements vary systematically from west to east.The compatible transition elements such as Co,Ni,and Cr show a remarkable depletion,whereas the incompatible and rare-earth elements are abundant as viewed from the chondrite-nor-malized patterns.The chemical composition and correlation are consistent with the tectonic setting.According to the batch and fractional partial melting theory,the trace element contents of Shandong volcanic rocks can be calculated from the two-component mixing model.

  19. Multi-decadal satellite measurements of passive and eruptive volcanic SO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon; Yang, Kai; Krotkov, Nickolay; Prata, Fred; Telling, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Periodic injections of sulfur gas species (SO2, H2S) into the stratosphere by volcanic eruptions are among the most important, and yet unpredictable, drivers of natural climate variability. However, passive (lower tropospheric) volcanic degassing is the major component of total volcanic emissions to the atmosphere on a time-averaged basis, but is poorly constrained, impacting estimates of global emissions of other volcanic gases (e.g., CO2). Stratospheric volcanic emissions are very well quantified by satellite remote sensing techniques, and we report ongoing efforts to catalog all significant volcanic SO2 emissions into the stratosphere and troposphere since 1978 using measurements from the ultraviolet (UV) Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS; 1978-2005), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI; 2004 - present) and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS; 2012 - present) instruments, supplemented by infrared (IR) data from HIRS, MODIS and AIRS. The database, intended for use as a volcanic forcing dataset in climate models, currently includes over 600 eruptions releasing a total of ~100 Tg SO2, with a mean eruption discharge of ~0.2 Tg SO2. Sensitivity to SO2 emissions from smaller eruptions greatly increased following the launch of OMI in 2004, but uncertainties remain on the volcanic flux of other sulfur species other than SO2 (H2S, OCS) due to difficulty of measurement. Although the post-Pinatubo 1991 era is often classified as volcanically quiescent, many smaller eruptions (Volcanic Explosivity Index [VEI] 3-4) since 2000 have injected significant amounts of SO2 into the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS), peaking in 2008-2011. We also show how even smaller (VEI 2) tropical eruptions can impact the UTLS and sustain above-background stratospheric aerosol optical depth, thus playing a role in climate forcing on short timescales. To better quantify tropospheric volcanic degassing, we use ~10 years of operational SO2 measurements by OMI to identify the

  20. Characterization of volcanic deposits and geoarchaeological studies from the 1815 eruption of Tambora volcano

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    Igan Supriatman Sutawidjaja

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol1no1.20066aThe eruption of Tambora volcano on the island of Sumbawa in 1815 is generally considered as the largest and the most violent volcanic event in recorded history. The cataclysmic eruption occurred on 11 April 1815 was initiated by Plinian eruption type on 5 April and killed more than 90,000 people on Sumbawa and nearby Lombok. The type plinian eruptions occurred twice and ejected gray pumice and ash, to form stratified deposits as thick as 40-150 cm on the slopes and mostly distributed over the district west of the volcano. Following this, at about 7 pm, on 11 April the first pyroclastic surge was generated and progressively became greater extending to almost whole direction, mainly to the north, west, and south districts from the eruption center. The deadliest volcanic eruption buried ancient villages by pyroclastic surge and flow deposits in almost intact state, thus preserving important archaeological evidence for the period. High preservation in relatively stable conditions and known date of the eruptions provide approximate dating for the archaeological remains. Archaeological excavations on the site uncovered a variety of remains were relieved by ground penetrating radar (GPR to map structural remains of the ancient villages under the pyroclastic surge and flow deposits. These traverses showed that GPR could define structures as deep as 10 m (velocity 0.090 m/ns and could accurately map the thickness of the stratified volcanic deposits in the Tambora village area.    

  1. Characterization of volcanic deposits and geoarchaeological studies from the 1815 eruption of Tambora volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igan Supriatman Sutawidjaja

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol1no1.20066aThe eruption of Tambora volcano on the island of Sumbawa in 1815 is generally considered as the largest and the most violent volcanic event in recorded history. The cataclysmic eruption occurred on 11 April 1815 was initiated by Plinian eruption type on 5 April and killed more than 90,000 people on Sumbawa and nearby Lombok. The type plinian eruptions occurred twice and ejected gray pumice and ash, to form stratified deposits as thick as 40-150 cm on the slopes and mostly distributed over the district west of the volcano. Following this, at about 7 pm, on 11 April the first pyroclastic surge was generated and progressively became greater extending to almost whole direction, mainly to the north, west, and south districts from the eruption center. The deadliest volcanic eruption buried ancient villages by pyroclastic surge and flow deposits in almost intact state, thus preserving important archaeological evidence for the period. High preservation in relatively stable conditions and known date of the eruptions provide approximate dating for the archaeological remains. Archaeological excavations on the site uncovered a variety of remains were relieved by ground penetrating radar (GPR to map structural remains of the ancient villages under the pyroclastic surge and flow deposits. These traverses showed that GPR could define structures as deep as 10 m (velocity 0.090 m/ns and could accurately map the thickness of the stratified volcanic deposits in the Tambora village area.    

  2. Electrical activity during the 2006 Mount St. Augustine volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Edens, H. E.; Aulich, G. D.; McNutt, S.R.; Tytgat, Guy; Clark, E.

    2007-01-01

    By using a combination of radio frequency time-of-arrival and interferometer measurements, we observed a sequence of lightning and electrical activity during one of Mount St. Augustine's eruptions. The observations indicate that the electrical activity had two modes or phases. First, there was an explosive phase in which the ejecta from the explosion appeared to be highly charged upon exiting the volcano, resulting in numerous apparently disorganized discharges and some simple lightning. The net charge exiting the volcano appears to have been positive. The second phase, which followed the most energetic explosion, produced conventional-type discharges that occurred within plume. Although the plume cloud was undoubtedly charged as a result of the explosion itself, the fact that the lightning onset was delayed and continued after and well downwind of the eruption indicates that in situ charging of some kind was occurring, presumably similar in some respects to that which occurs in normal thunderstorms.

  3. Bidecadal North Atlantic ocean circulation variability controlled by timing of volcanic eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingedouw, Didier; Ortega, Pablo; Mignot, Juliette; Guilyardi, Eric; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Butler, Paul G; Khodri, Myriam; Séférian, Roland

    2015-03-30

    While bidecadal climate variability has been evidenced in several North Atlantic paleoclimate records, its drivers remain poorly understood. Here we show that the subset of CMIP5 historical climate simulations that produce such bidecadal variability exhibits a robust synchronization, with a maximum in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) 15 years after the 1963 Agung eruption. The mechanisms at play involve salinity advection from the Arctic and explain the timing of Great Salinity Anomalies observed in the 1970s and the 1990s. Simulations, as well as Greenland and Iceland paleoclimate records, indicate that coherent bidecadal cycles were excited following five Agung-like volcanic eruptions of the last millennium. Climate simulations and a conceptual model reveal that destructive interference caused by the Pinatubo 1991 eruption may have damped the observed decreasing trend of the AMOC in the 2000s. Our results imply a long-lasting climatic impact and predictability following the next Agung-like eruption.

  4. Pre-eruption deformation and seismic anomalies in 2012 in Tolbachik volcanic zone, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim; Titkov, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    Tolbachik volcanic zone (active volcano Plosky Tolbachik, dormant volcano Ostry Tolbachik and Tolbachik zone of cinder cones) is situated in the south part of Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes in Kamchatka. All historical fissure eruptions of Tolbachik volcanic zone (1740, 1941, 1975-76 and 2012-13) were connected with one or another activity of Plosky Tolbachik volcano. In 1941 the fissure vent was occurred during the completion of 1939-41 terminal eruption of Plosky Tolbachik. In 1975 the Large Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (LTFE) was forestalled by Plosky Tolbachik terminal activity of the Hawaiian type and then was accompanied by the catastrophic collapse in the crater of Plosky Tolbachik. What events took place in the vicinity of Plosky Tolbachik in 2012 before the 2012-13 fissure eruption? In contrast of the 1975-76 LTFE the eruption 2012-13 was not preceded by intensive seismic preparation. Nowadays Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes is under monitoring by 12 seismic stations, so we can investigate seismicity in details on the lower energy level then forty years ago. We analyzed seismicity of Plosky Tolbachik using regional catalogue 1999-2012. Anomalies of low-energy (M≥1.5) seismicity parameters (increase of seismicity rate and seismic energy) were discovered. This is evidence of seismic activization covered the whole Plosky Tolbachik volcano. The significance of this anomaly was estimated by distribution function of emitted seismic energy. Statistically significant transition of seismicity from background level to high and extremely high levels was revealed. It corresponds to multiple growth of earthquake number and seismic energy in 2012, July-November (five months before the eruption). The seismicity transition from background level to high level was happen in August 2012. During last three weeks before fissure eruption seismicity of analyzed seismoactive volume was on extremely high level. Earthquakes from fissure site directly appeared only on November 27

  5. Investigating the value of passive microwave observations for monitoring volcanic eruption source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Cimini, Domenico; Marzano, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions inject both gas and solid particles into the Atmosphere. Solid particles are made by mineral fragments of different sizes (from few microns to meters), generally referred as tephra. Tephra from volcanic eruptions has enormous impacts on social and economical activities through the effects on the environment, climate, public health, and air traffic. The size, density and shape of a particle determine its fall velocity and thus residence time in the Atmosphere. Larger particles tend to fall quickly in the proximity of the volcano, while smaller particles may remain suspended for several days and thus may be transported by winds for thousands of km. Thus, the impact of such hazards involves local as well as large scales effects. Local effects involve mostly the large sized particles, while large scale effects are caused by the transport of the finest ejected tephra (ash) through the atmosphere. Forecasts of ash paths in the atmosphere are routinely run after eruptions using dispersion models. These models make use of meteorological and volcanic source parameters. The former are usually available as output of numerical weather prediction models or large scale reanalysis. Source parameters characterize the volcanic eruption near the vent; these are mainly the ash mass concentration along the vertical column and the top altitude of the volcanic plume, which is strictly related to the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source. These parameters should be known accurately and continuously; otherwise, strong hypothesis are usually needed, leading to large uncertainty in the dispersion forecasts. However, direct observations during an eruption are typically dangerous and impractical. Thus, satellite remote sensing is often exploited to monitor volcanic emissions, using visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) channels available on both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites. VIS and IR satellite imagery are very useful to monitor

  6. Sponge Cake or Champagne? Bubbles, Magmatic Degassing and Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K.; Pioli, L.; Belien, I.; Wright, H.; Rust, A.

    2007-12-01

    Vesiculation is an unavoidable consequence of magma decompression; the extent to which bubbles travel with ascending magma or leave the system by separated or permeable flow will determine the nature of the ensuing eruption. Bubbles travel with the melt from which they exsolve if the rise time of bubbles through the melt (the 'drift velocity') is much less than the rise rate of the magma (sponge cake). This condition is most likely to be met in viscous melts (where bubble rise velocities are low) and in melts that experience rapid decompression (high ascent velocities). Under these conditions, bubble expansion within the melt continues until sufficient bubble expansion causes coalescence and the development of a permeable network. Typical pumice vesicularities of 70-80% and permeabilities of 10-12 m2 constrain this limit under conditions appropriate for subplinian to plinian eruptions (mass fluxes > 106 kg/s). Slower rise rates (and lower mass fluxes) that characterize effusive eruptions produce silicic lavas with a wider range of vesicularities. In general, permeability decreases with decreasing sample vesicularity as bubbles deform (as evidenced by anisotropy in permeability and electrical conductivity) and pore apertures diminish. Degassing efficiency (and resulting densification of magma within the conduit) under these conditions is determined by permeability and the time allowed for gas escape. Bubbles rise through the melt if the drift velocity exceeds the velocity of magma ascent (champagne). This condition is most easily met in volatile-rich, low viscosity (mafic) melts at low to moderate fluxes. At very low magma flux, magma eruption rate is determined by the extent to which magma is entrained and ejected by rising gases (strombolian eruptions); when bubbles are too small, or are rising too slowly, they may not break the surface at all, but instead may be concentrated in a near-surface layer (surface foam). As the magma flux increases, segregation of

  7. The Persistence of Volcanic Ash in the Tropical Stratosphere after the Kelud Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernier, J. P.; Fairlie, T. D.; Deshler, T.; Knepp, T. N.; Natarajan, M.; Foster, K.; Trepte, C. R.; Thomason, L. W.; Bedka, K. M.; Wienhold, F.

    2014-12-01

    An increase of volcanic activity over the past decade is thought to have contributed significantly to the global warming "hiatus". Thus, it is important to improve our understanding of the microphysical and optical properties of even small volcanic plumes as well as their associated climate impacts. On February 13th, 2014, the Mt Kelud volcano, located near 4°S on the island of Java (Indonesia), injected volcanic gases and ash into the tropical stratosphere. An overpass of the CALIPSO lidar during the active phase of the eruption showed volcanic materials reaching 26 km with the main volcanic cloud near 18-19 km. This is the highest altitude volcanic injection since Mt Pinatubo in 1991. CALIPSO has tracked the dispersion of the Kelud plume throughout the tropical lower stratosphere (~20N-20S) since then. Depolarization lidar measurements (0.3-0.4) indicate that the plume was likely composed of irregularly shaped ash particles during the first few days after the eruption, and that sulfate aerosol (spherical droplets) formed thereafter, gradually lowering the mean depolarization to 0.1-0.2. In May, 2014, we mounted a 2-week campaign to Darwin (Australia) to measure several profiles of backscatter in red and blue channels, and one profile of aerosol size distribution using two optical particle counters, one with an inlet heated to 200°C. The purpose was to characterize particle sizes, optical properties, and sulfate fraction from a relatively fresh volcanic plume in the low stratosphere. Preliminary results from the campaign suggest the persistence of ash particles at the bottom of the Kelud plume 3 months after the eruption. This is significant because the climate impact of ash is neglected in most climate models.

  8. Early Cretaceous bimodal volcanic rocks in the southern Lhasa terrane, south Tibet: Age, petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Ding, Lin; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Zhang, Li-Yun; Yue, Ya-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Limited geochronological and geochemical data from Early Cretaceous igneous rocks of the Gangdese Belt have resulted in a dispute regarding the subduction history of Neo-Tethyan Ocean. To approach this issue, we performed detailed in-situ zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic, whole-rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic analyses on Late Mesozoic volcanic rocks exposed in the Liqiongda area, southern Lhasa terrane. These volcanic rocks are calc-alkaline series, dominated by basalts, basaltic andesites, and subordinate rhyolites, with a bimodal suite. The LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating results of the basaltic andesites and rhyolites indicate that these volcanic rocks erupted during the Early Cretaceous (137-130 Ma). The basaltic rocks are high-alumina (average > 17 wt.%), enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs), showing subduction-related characteristics. They display highly positive zircon εHf(t) values (+ 10.0 to + 16.3) and whole-rock εNd(t) values (+ 5.38 to + 7.47). The silicic suite is characterized by low Al2O3 (extracted from a source metasomatized by slab-derived components for the petrogenesis of mafic rocks, whereas the subsequent mafic magma underplating triggered partial melting of the juvenile crust to generate acidic magma. Our results confirm the presence of Early Cretaceous volcanism in the southern Lhasa terrane. Combined with the distribution of the contemporary magmatism, deformation style, and sedimentary characteristics in the Lhasa terrane, we favor the suggestion that the Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere was flat-lying beneath the Lhasa terrane during the Early Cretaceous.

  9. Mineralogical study on volcanic ash of the eruption on September 27, 2014 at Ontake volcano, central Japan: correlation with porphyry copper systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yusuke; Imura, Takumi; Hayashi, Shintaro; Ohba, Tsukasa

    2016-04-01

    The volcanic ash of the eruption on September 27, 2014 at Ontake volcano consists mostly of altered rock fragments. The ash contains partly altered volcanic rock fragments consisting of primary igneous minerals (plagioclase, orthopyroxene, titanomagnetite, and feldspars) and volcanic glass accompanied by alteration minerals to some extents, and contains no juvenile fragments. These features indicate that the eruption was a non-juvenile hydrothermal eruption that was derived from the hydrothermal system developed under the crater. The major minerals derived from hydrothermal alteration zones are silica mineral, kaolin-group mineral, smectite, pyrophyllite, muscovite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, pyrite, K-feldspar, albite, and rutile. Minor chlorite, biotite, and garnet are accompanied. Five types of alteration mineral associations are identified from observations on individual ash particles: silica-pyrite, silica-pyrite ± alunite ± kaolin, silica-pyrophyllite-pyrite, silica-muscovite ± chlorite, and silica-K-feldspar ± albite ± garnet ± biotite. The associations indicate development of advanced argillic, sericite, and potassic alteration zones under the crater. Occurrence of anhydrite veinlet and the set of alteration zones indicate hydrothermal alteration zones similar to late-stage porphyry copper systems. Comparing the mineral associations with the geologic model of the late-stage porphyry copper systems, the source depths of mineral associations are estimated to range from near surface to >2 km. The depths of advanced argillic alteration, sericite, and potassic zones are 0 to ~2, ~1.5 to ~2, and >2 km, respectively.

  10. Identifying the volcanic eruption depicted in a neolithic painting at Catalhoyuk, Central Anatolia, Turkey.

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    Axel K Schmitt

    Full Text Available A mural excavated at the Neolithic Çatalhöyük site (Central Anatolia, Turkey has been interpreted as the oldest known map. Dating to ∼6600 BCE, it putatively depicts an explosive summit eruption of the Hasan Dağı twin-peaks volcano located ∼130 km northeast of Çatalhöyük, and a birds-eye view of a town plan in the foreground. This interpretation, however, has remained controversial not least because independent evidence for a contemporaneous explosive volcanic eruption of Hasan Dağı has been lacking. Here, we document the presence of andesitic pumice veneer on the summit of Hasan Dağı, which we dated using (U-Th/He zircon geochronology. The (U-Th/He zircon eruption age of 8.97±0.64 ka (or 6960±640 BCE; uncertainties 2σ overlaps closely with (14C ages for cultural strata at Çatalhöyük, including level VII containing the "map" mural. A second pumice sample from a surficial deposit near the base of Hasan Dağı records an older explosive eruption at 28.9±1.5 ka. U-Th zircon crystallization ages in both samples range from near-eruption to secular equilibrium (>380 ka. Collectively, our results reveal protracted intrusive activity at Hasan Dağı punctuated by explosive venting, and provide the first radiometric ages for a Holocene explosive eruption which was most likely witnessed by humans in the area. Geologic and geochronologic lines of evidence thus support previous interpretations that residents of Çatalhöyük artistically represented an explosive eruption of Hasan Dağı volcano. The magmatic longevity recorded by quasi-continuous zircon crystallization coupled with new evidence for late-Pleistocene and Holocene explosive eruptions implicates Hasan Dağı as a potential volcanic hazard.

  11. Magmatic controls on eruption dynamics of the 1950 yr B.P. eruption of San Antonio Volcano, Tacaná Volcanic Complex, Mexico-Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Juan Carlos; Gardner, James Edward; Macías, José Luis; Meriggi, Lorenzo; Santo, Alba Patrizia

    2013-07-01

    San Antonio Volcano, in the Tacaná Volcanic Complex, erupted ~ 1950 yr. B.P., with a Pelean type eruption that produced andesitic pyroclastic surges and block-and-ash flows destroying part of the volcano summit and producing a horse-shoe shaped crater open to the SW. Between 1950 and 800 yr B.P. the eruption continued with effusive andesites followed by a dacite lava flow and a summit dome, all from a single magma batch. All products consist of phenocrysts and microphenocrysts of zoned plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, magnetite ± ilmenite, set in partially crystallized groundmass of glass and microlites of the same mineral phases, except for the lack of amphibole. Included in the andesitic blocks of the block-and-ash flow deposit are basaltic andesite enclaves with elongated and ellipsoidal forms and chilled margins. The enclaves have intersertal textures with brown glass between microphenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, pyroxene, and olivine, and minor proportions of phenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, and pyroxene. A compositional range obtained of blocks and enclaves resulted from mixing between andesite (866 °C ± 22) and basaltic andesite (enclaves, 932 °C ± 22), which may have triggered the explosive Pelean eruption. Vestiges of that mixing are preserved as complex compositional zones in plagioclase and clinopyroxene-rich reaction rims in amphibole in the andesite. Whole-rock chemistry, geothermometry, experimental petrology and modeling results suggest that after the mixing event the eruption tapped hybrid andesitic magma (≤ 900 °C) and ended with effusive dacitic magma (~ 825 °C), all of which were stored at ~ 200 MPa water pressure. A complex open-system evolution that involved crustal end-members best explains the generation of effusive dacite from the hybrid andesite. Amphibole in the dacite is rimmed by reaction products of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxides produced by decompression during ascent. Amphibole in the andesite

  12. Initial fate of fine ash and sulfur from large volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Niemeier

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Large volcanic eruptions emit huge amounts of sulfur and fine ash into the stratosphere. These products cause an impact on radiative processes, temperature and wind patterns. In simulations with a General Circulation Model including detailed aerosol microphysics, the relation between the impact of sulfur and fine ash is determined for different eruption strengths and locations, one in the tropics and one in high Northern latitudes. Fine ash with effective radii between 1 μm and 15 μm has a lifetime of several days only. Nevertheless, the strong absorption of shortwave and longwave radiation causes additional heating and cooling of ±20 K/day and impacts the evolution of the volcanic cloud. Depending on the location of the volcanic eruption, transport direction changes due to the presence of fine ash, vortices develop and temperature anomalies at ground increase. The results show substantial impact on the local scale but only minor impact on the evolution of sulfate in the stratosphere in the month after the simulated eruptions.

  13. Initial fate of fine ash and sulfur from large volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Self

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Large volcanic eruptions emit huge amounts of sulfur and fine ash into the stratosphere. These products cause an impact on radiative processes, temperature and wind patterns. In simulations with a General Circulation Model including detailed aerosol microphysics, the relation between the impact of sulfur and fine ash is determined for different eruption strengths and locations, one in the tropics and one in high Northern latitudes. Fine ash with effective radii between 1 μm and 15 μm has a lifetime of several days only. Nevertheless, the strong absorption of shortwave and long-wave radiation causes additional heating and cooling of ±20 K/day and impacts the evolution of the volcanic cloud. Depending on the location of the volcanic eruption, transport direction changes due to the presence of fine ash, vortices develop and temperature anomalies at ground increase. The results show substantial impact on the local scale but only minor impact on the evolution of sulfate in the stratosphere in the month after the simulated eruptions.

  14. Petrology, Geochemistry and Nd-Sr-Pb Isotopic Properties of Volcanic Rocks in Daheishan Island, Penglai, Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yongtao; Li Anchun

    2003-01-01

    The major elements, trace elements, K-Ar age and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic systems of the Cenozoic volcanic rocks in Daheishan Island and Cishan, Penglai, Shandong Province are measured. The volcanic rocks ( olivine-nephelinite and nepheline-basanite ) in Daheishan Island erupted periodically in an interval of 0.32 Ma, from 8.72 Ma, 8.39 Ma, 8.08 Ma to 7.73 Ma. The volcanic rocks are all rich in light REEs. They are similar to the OIB-type alkali basalt in the trace elements normalized model by primordial mantle: rich in high field elements such as Nb and Ta, and imcompatible elements such as Cs, Rb, Ba, Th, U. The volcanic rocks show a depletion of K and Rb elements. It is suggested by the trace elements that the olivine-nephelinite in Daheishan Island is originated from deep resources under the continental mantle. ε Nd (0) values of the volcanic rocks in Daheishan Island and Cisban are 5.31 ~ 8.51 and 7.33 respectively, suggesting that the volcanic rocks are from the depleted mantle resources, which have higher Sm/Nd ratios than the CHUR. 143Nd /144Nd ratios of Daheishan Island olivine-nephelinite and Cishan alkali basalts are 0.512 910 ~ 0.513 074 and 0.513 014 respectively. The 87Sr /86Sr of Daheishan Island volcanic rocks are lower than that of Cishan, 0.703 427 ~ 0.703 482 and 0.703 895 respectively. The Daheishan Island olivinenephelinite has the Pb isotopic values as follows: 206Pb /204pb = 18.028 9 ~ 17.972 8, 207Pb /204pb= 15.435 8 ~ 15.402 2 and 208Pb /204Pb = 38.087 6 ~ 37.997 5, lower than those of Cishan basanite. The Cishan basanite has 206Pb /204pb = 18.240 1, 207Pb /204Pb = 15.564 5 and 208Pb /204pb = 38.535. The authors suggest that the olivine-nephelinite in Daheishan Island is similar to the E-type MORB or Hawaii OIB, and the alkali basalts in Cishan similar to the Kerguelen OIB. The dominant mantle components of DM+PREMA and perhaps DM ( Dupal type ) are the dominant mantle components for volcanic rocks in Daheishan Island and Cishan. The

  15. Transient changes in bacterioplankton communities induced by the submarine volcanic eruption of El Hierro (Canary Islands.

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    Isabel Ferrera

    Full Text Available The submarine volcanic eruption occurring near El Hierro (Canary Islands in October 2011 provided a unique opportunity to determine the effects of such events on the microbial populations of the surrounding waters. The birth of a new underwater volcano produced a large plume of vent material detectable from space that led to abrupt changes in the physical-chemical properties of the water column. We combined flow cytometry and 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons (V1-V3 regions for Bacteria and V3-V5 for Archaea to monitor the area around the volcano through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases (November 2011 to April 2012. Flow cytometric analyses revealed higher abundance and relative activity (expressed as a percentage of high-nucleic acid content cells of heterotrophic prokaryotes during the eruptive process as compared to post-eruptive stages. Changes observed in populations detectable by flow cytometry were more evident at depths closer to the volcano (~70-200 m, coinciding also with oxygen depletion. Alpha-diversity analyses revealed that species richness (Chao1 index decreased during the eruptive phase; however, no dramatic changes in community composition were observed. The most abundant taxa during the eruptive phase were similar to those in the post-eruptive stages and to those typically prevalent in oceanic bacterioplankton communities (i.e. the alphaproteobacterial SAR11 group, the Flavobacteriia class of the Bacteroidetes and certain groups of Gammaproteobacteria. Yet, although at low abundance, we also detected the presence of taxa not typically found in bacterioplankton communities such as the Epsilonproteobacteria and members of the candidate division ZB3, particularly during the eruptive stage. These groups are often associated with deep-sea hydrothermal vents or sulfur-rich springs. Both cytometric and sequence analyses showed that once the eruption ceased, evidences of the volcano-induced changes were no longer

  16. Transient Changes in Bacterioplankton Communities Induced by the Submarine Volcanic Eruption of El Hierro (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Isabel; Arístegui, Javier; González, José M.; Montero, María F.; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Gasol, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    The submarine volcanic eruption occurring near El Hierro (Canary Islands) in October 2011 provided a unique opportunity to determine the effects of such events on the microbial populations of the surrounding waters. The birth of a new underwater volcano produced a large plume of vent material detectable from space that led to abrupt changes in the physical-chemical properties of the water column. We combined flow cytometry and 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons (V1–V3 regions for Bacteria and V3–V5 for Archaea) to monitor the area around the volcano through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases (November 2011 to April 2012). Flow cytometric analyses revealed higher abundance and relative activity (expressed as a percentage of high-nucleic acid content cells) of heterotrophic prokaryotes during the eruptive process as compared to post-eruptive stages. Changes observed in populations detectable by flow cytometry were more evident at depths closer to the volcano (~70–200 m), coinciding also with oxygen depletion. Alpha-diversity analyses revealed that species richness (Chao1 index) decreased during the eruptive phase; however, no dramatic changes in community composition were observed. The most abundant taxa during the eruptive phase were similar to those in the post-eruptive stages and to those typically prevalent in oceanic bacterioplankton communities (i.e. the alphaproteobacterial SAR11 group, the Flavobacteriia class of the Bacteroidetes and certain groups of Gammaproteobacteria). Yet, although at low abundance, we also detected the presence of taxa not typically found in bacterioplankton communities such as the Epsilonproteobacteria and members of the candidate division ZB3, particularly during the eruptive stage. These groups are often associated with deep-sea hydrothermal vents or sulfur-rich springs. Both cytometric and sequence analyses showed that once the eruption ceased, evidences of the volcano-induced changes were no longer observed

  17. Multiple dendrochronological responses to the eruption of Cinder Cone, Lassen Volcanic National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, P.R.; Ort, M.H.; Anderson, K.C.; Clynne, M.A.; May, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Two dendrochronological properties – ring width and ring chemistry – were investigated in trees near Cinder Cone in Lassen Volcanic National Park, northeastern California, for the purpose of re-evaluating the date of its eruption. Cinder Cone is thought to have erupted in AD 1666 based on ring-width evidence, but interpreting ring-width changes alone is not straightforward because many forest disturbances can cause changes in ring width. Old Jeffrey pines growing in Cinder Cone tephra and elsewhere for control comparison were sampled. Trees growing in tephra show synchronous ring-width changes at AD 1666, but this ring-width signal could be considered ambiguous for dating the eruption because changes in ring width can be caused by other events. Trees growing in tephra also show changes in ring phosphorus, sulfur, and sodium during the late 1660s, but inter-tree variability in dendrochemical signals makes dating the eruption from ring chemistry alone difficult. The combination of dendrochemistry and ring-width signals improves confidence in dating the eruption of Cinder Cone over the analysis of just one ring-growth property. These results are similar to another case study using dendrochronology of ring width and ring chemistry at Parícutin, Michoacán, Mexico, a cinder cone that erupted beginning in 1943. In both cases, combining analysis with ring width and ring chemistry improved confidence in the dendro-dating of the eruptions.

  18. Global Temperature Response to the Major Volcanic Eruptions in Multiple Reanalysis Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, M.; Hibino, T.; Mehta, S. K.; Gray, L. J.; Mitchell, D.; Anstey, J.

    2015-12-01

    Global temperature response to the eruptions of Mount Agung in 1963, El Chichón in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo in 1991 is investigated using nine reanalysis datasets (JRA-55, MERRA, ERA-Interim, NCEP-CFSR, JRA-25, ERA-40, NCEP-1, NCEP-2, and 20CR). Multiple linear regression is applied to the zonal and monthly mean time series of temperature for two periods, 1979-2009 (for eight reanalysis datasets) and 1958-2001 (for four reanalysis datasets), by considering explanatory factors of seasonal harmonics, linear trends, Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, solar cycle, and El Niño Southern Oscillation. The residuals are used to define the volcanic signals for the three eruptions separately. In response to the Mount Pinatubo eruption, most reanalysis datasets show strong warming signals (up to 2-3 K for one-year average) in the tropical lower stratosphere and weak cooling signals (down to -1 K) in the subtropical upper troposphere. For the El Chichón eruption, warming signals in the tropical lower stratosphere are somewhat smaller than those for the Mount Pinatubo eruption. The response to the Mount Agung eruption is asymmetric about the equator with strong warming in the Southern Hemisphere midlatitude upper troposphere to lower stratosphere. Comparison of the results from several different reanalysis datasets confirms the atmospheric temperature response to these major eruptions qualitatively, but also shows quantitative differences even among the most recent reanalysis datasets.

  19. Eruptive History of the Rhyolitic Guangoche Volcano, Los Azufres Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel Granados, E.; Arce, J. L.; Macias, J. L.; Layer, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Guangoche is a rhyolitic and polygenetic volcano with a maximum elevation of 2,760 meters above sea level. It is situated to the southwest of the Los Azufres Volcanic Field (LAVF), in the central sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Guangoche volcano is the youngest volcano described within the LAVF. It shows a horseshoe shaped crater open to the south, with a central lava dome. Its eruptive history during late Pleistocene has been intense with six explosive eruptions that consists of: 1) A southwards sector collapse of the volcano that generated a debris avalanche deposit with megablocks of heterogenous composition; 2) A plinian-type eruption that generated a pumice fall deposit and pyroclastic density currents by column collapse at 30.6 ka; 3) A plinian-type eruption "White Pumice Sequence" (29 ka) that developed a 22-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 7.0 x 107 kg/s (vol. = 0.53 km3); 4) A dome-destruction event, "Agua Blanca Pyroclastic Sequence" at 26.7 ka, that deposited a block-and-ash flow deposit; 5) A subplinian-plinian type eruption "Ochre Pyroclastic Sequence" (<26 ka) with an important initial phreatomagmatic phase, that generated pyroclastic density currents and pumice fallouts. The subplinian-plinian event generated a 16-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 1.9 x 107 kg/s, and magma volume of 0.38 km3; 6) The eruptive history ended with a subplinian eruption (<<26 ka), that generated a multilayered fall deposit, that developed a 11-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 2.9 x 106 kg/s and a magma volume of 0.26 km3. Volcanic activity at Guangoche volcano has been intense and future activity should not be discarded. Unfortunately, the last two events have not been dated yet. Guangoche rhyolitic magma is characterized by low-Ba contents suggesting crystal mush extraction for their genesis.

  20. Bombs, flyin' high. In-flight dynamics of volcanic bombs from Strombolian to Vulcanian eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, Jacopo; Alatorre, Miguel; Cruz Vázquez, Omar; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Ricci, Tullio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Palladino, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    Bomb-sized (larger than 64 mm) pyroclasts are a common product of explosive eruptions and a considerable source of hazard, both from directly impacting on people and properties and from wildfires associated with their landing in vegetated areas. The dispersal of bombs is mostly modeled as purely ballistic trajectories controlled by gravity and drag forces associated with still air, and only recently other effects, such as the influence of eruption dynamics, the gas expansion, and in-flight collisions, are starting to be quantified both numerically and observationally. By using high-speed imaging of explosive volcanic eruptions here we attempt to calculate the drag coefficient of free-flying volcanic bombs during an eruption and at the same time we document a wide range of in-flight processes affecting bomb trajectories and introducing deviations from purely ballistic emplacement. High-speed (500 frames per second) videos of explosions at Stromboli and Etna (Italy), Fuego (Gatemala), Sakurajima (Japan), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Batu Tara (Indonesia) volcanoes provide a large assortment of free-flying bombs spanning Strombolian to Vulcanian source eruptions, basaltic to andesitic composition, centimeters to meters in size, and 10 to 300 m/s in fly velocity. By tracking the bombs during their flying trajectories we were able to: 1) measure their size, shape, and vertical component of velocity and related changes over time; and 2) measure the different interactions with the atmosphere and with other bombs. Quantitatively, these data allow us to provide the first direct measurement of the aerodynamic behavior and drag coefficient of volcanic bombs while settling, also including the effect of bomb rotation and changes in bomb shape and frontal section. We also show how our observations have the potential to parameterize a number of previously hypothesized and /or described but yet unquantified processes, including in-flight rotation, deformation, fragmentation, agglutination

  1. The Effect of Degassing Efficiency on the Fragmentation Behavior of Volcanic Rocks

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    Mueller, S.; Scheu, B.; Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2005-12-01

    The degassing efficiency of volcanic rocks is a decisive measure for the eruptive style and thus the explosivity of a volcano, since it directly affects magma fragmentation behaviour. Vesicles in ascending magma may bear overpressure if the relevant magma viscosity entails a relaxation time scale which is significantly larger than the time scale of ambient pressure reduction due to magma ascent. As long as this overpressure does not overcome the tensile strength of the magma, the system is in a structurally stable state, eventually degassing quiescently via an interconnected pore network. However, if a decompressive event (e.g. sector collapse) disturbs this stable pressure situation, two possible scenarios are conceivable: (1) An interconnected pore network has been established whose permeability is sufficiently high, so vesicle overpressure can be reduced efficiently by gas filtration. (2) The permeability of the network (or cluster of isolated pores, respectively) is low and gas overpressure can not be reduced within the required time scale. In this case the expansion of the pressurized gas may cause bubble wall failure and magma fragmentation into pyroclasts. This study compares experimentally derived fragmentation threshold values of volcanic rock samples, determined with a shock-tube based setup, to unsteady-state permeability values of the same sample sets. In order to cover a wide range in rock properties, we analysed samples from a broad variety of volcanic deposits. Among the treated volcanoes were Colima (Mexico), Bezymianny (Russia), Krakatoa and Merapi, (both Indonesia), Unzen (Japan), Lipari and Campi Flegrei (both Italy), Pinatubo (Philippines), and Santorini (Greece). The correlation of extensive databases of both investigated parameters revealed that permeabilities above a transition zone between 10-13 and 10-12 m2 shift the fragmentation threshold towards higher values. By means of this dataset the influence of the permeability on fragmentation

  2. Petrography, Geochemistry and Petrogenesis of Volcanic Rocks, NW Ghonabad, Iran

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    Sedigheh Zirjanizadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The study area is located in NW Gonabad, Razavi Khorasan Province, northern Lut block and eastern Iran north of the Lut Block. Magmatism in NW Gonabad produced plutonic and volcanic rock associations with varying geochemical compositions. These rocks are related to the Cenozoic magmatic rocks in Iran and belong to the Lut Block volcanic–plutonic belt. In this study, petrogenesis of volcanic units in northwest Gonabad was investigated. The volcanic rocks are andesites/trachyandesites, rhyolites, dacites/ rhyodacites and pyroclastics.These rocks show porphyritic, trachytic and embayed textures in phenocrysts with plagioclase, sanidine and quartz (most notably in dacite and rhyolite, hornblende and rare biotite. The most important alteration zones are propylitic, silicification and argillic.Four kaolinite- bearing clay deposits have been located in areas affectedby hydrothermal alteration of Eocene rhyolite, dacite and rhyodacite. Analytical techniques Five samples were analyzed for major elements by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF and six samples were analyzed for trace elements using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS in the Acme Laboratories, Vancouver (Canada.Sr and Nd isotopic compositions were determined for four whole-rock samples at the Laboratório de GeologiaIsotópica da Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal. Results Petrography. The rocks in this area are consist of trachyte, andesite/ trachyandesite, dacite/ rhyodacite, principally as ignimbrites and soft tuff. The textures of phenocrysts are mainly porphyritic, glomerophyric, trachytic and embayed textures in plagioclase, hornblende and biotite. The groundmasses consist of plagioclase and fine-grainedcrystals of hornblende. Plagioclase phenocrysts and microlitesare by far the most abundant textures in andesite - trachyandesites (>25% and in size from 0.01 to 0.1mm. Euhedral to subhedral hornblende phenocrysts areabundant (3-5%and 0.1 to 0

  3. Ocean response to volcanic eruptions in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Yanni

    2014-09-01

    We examine the oceanic impact of large tropical volcanic eruptions as they appear in ensembles of historical simulations from eight Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models. These models show a response that includes lowering of global average sea surface temperature by 0.1–0.3 K, comparable to the observations. They show enhancement of Arctic ice cover in the years following major volcanic eruptions, with long-lived temperature anomalies extending to the middepth and deep ocean on decadal to centennial timescales. Regional ocean responses vary, although there is some consistent hemispheric asymmetry associated with the hemisphere in which the eruption occurs. Temperature decreases and salinity increases contribute to an increase in the density of surface water and an enhancement in the overturning circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean following these eruptions. The strength of this overturning increase varies considerably from model to model and is correlated with the background variability of overturning in each model. Any cause/effect relationship between eruptions and the phase of El Niño is weak.

  4. The effects of volcanic eruptions at 1982 and 1991 on the variation of the solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.; Mohamed, A.

    A few large volcanic eruptions occur each century, which cause aerosol content of the stratosphere. This increase in the stratospheric aerosol content in turn affects the radiation balance of the earth. The eruption must be highly explosive and send large quantities of sulfur dioxide gas and dust vented into stratosphere could affect climate. This was thought to be likely because: a)Estimates of surface temperature over wide spread parts of the globe often showed a drop after a huge volcanic eruption. b)The measured intensity of direct solar beam was always reduced through the difference radiation usually increased to partially compensate. Measurements of solar radiation during the period from 1 January 1981 to 31 December 1994 at three different stations in Egypt, namely, Cairo, Khargha, Tahrir on cloudless days showed significant changes in solar radiation from 1981 to 1982, and 1990 to 1991. An increase in diffuse sky total radiation and a concomitant decrease in global radiation. It is possible the increase in diffuse sky total radiation and a concomitant decease in global radiation are due to the E1 - Chichon eruption in South Mexico on 28 March and 3-4 April 1982, and the Pinatubo eruption on southern Luzon in the Phillippines in June 1991.

  5. Volcanic ash hazard climatology for an eruption of Hekla Volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbetter, Susan J.; Hort, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Ash produced by a volcanic eruption on Iceland can be hazardous for both the transatlantic flight paths and European airports and airspace. In order to begin to quantify the risk to aircraft, this study explored the probability of ash from a short explosive eruption of Hekla Volcano (63.98°N, 19.7°W) reaching European airspace. Transport, dispersion and deposition of the ash cloud from a three hour 'explosive' eruption with an initial plume height of 12 km was simulated using the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment, NAME, the model used operationally by the London Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre. Eruptions were simulated over a six year period, from 2003 until 2008, and ash clouds were tracked for four days following each eruption. Results showed that a rapid spread of volcanic ash is possible, with all countries in Europe facing the possibility of an airborne ash concentration exceeding International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) limits within 24 h of an eruption. An additional high impact, low probability event which could occur is the southward spread of the ash cloud which would block transatlantic flights approaching and leaving Europe. Probabilities of significant concentrations of ash are highest to the east of Iceland, with probabilities exceeding 20% in most countries north of 50°N. Deposition probabilities were highest at Scottish and Scandinavian airports. There is some seasonal variability in the probabilities; ash is more likely to reach southern Europe in winter when the mean winds across the continent are northerly. Ash concentrations usually remain higher for longer during summer when the mean wind speeds are lower.

  6. Volatile Evolution of Magma Associated with the Solchiaro Eruption in the Phlegrean Volcanic District (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, R.; Bodnar, R. J.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Fedele, L.; Shimizu, N.; Hunter, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Phlegrean volcanic district (PVD) in southern Italy is one of the best known volcanic hazard areas in the world. More than 1.5 million people live in close proximity to the volcanic centers. The PVD comprises three volcanic fields: the Campi Flegrei caldera and the islands of Ischia and Procida. We studied volatiles plus major and trace elements in the magma associated with the Solchiaro eruption on the Island of Procida, Italy, to gain a better understanding of the relationship between pre-eruptive volatiles and magmatic evolution. The Solchiaro eruption is one of the more primitive products erupted in the PVD and provides information on the source of later more evolved magmas associated with this volcanic system. The composition of the magma before eruption was determined by analyzing 104 melt inclusions (MIs) in forsteritic olivine, glass embayment plus rim glasses, and high vesciculated glasses selected from 4 representative samples. The composition of MIs was recalculated and ranges from basaltic to trachy-basaltic. Among major elements potassium shows the highest variability, from 0.5 to 6 wt%. MI define a continuous trend based on major and minor element compositions. Embayments matrix glass and high vesciculated glasses define a field that suggests a discontinuous process. Compatible to incompatible trace element ratios in early melts are highly variable and represent the melt phase before or at the very beginning of assimilation-fractional crystallization (FCA) processes. Intermediate melt compositions reflect continuing FCA processes, late melt compositions suggest that the FCA process was aborted before eruption. Volatile contents of early melt are highly variable and reflect source heterogeneities, and the melts are interpreted to be undersaturated. Intermediate melts were volatile saturated and H2O-CO2 contents define a degassing path. Depths of trapping of MI range from 4.4 to 2.2 km, and are calculated based on Newman and Lowenstern (2002) and

  7. Radiocarbon Dates from Volcanic Deposits of the Chaos Crags and Cinder Cone Eruptive Sequences and Other Deposits, Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Michael A.; Christiansen, Robert L.; Trimble, Deborah A.; McGeehin, John P.

    2008-01-01

    This contribution reports radiocarbon ages obtained from charcoal, wood and other samples collected between 1979 and 2001 in Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity and a few samples from other nearby localities. Most of the samples are from the Chaos Crags and Cinder Cone eruptive sequences. Brief summaries are given of the Chaos Crags and Cinder Cone eruptive sequences.

  8. Study on Mechanism of Formation of Volcanic Rock in North Altay by Using Rare Earths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁峰; 周涛发; 岳书仓

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of rare earth elements in the Devonian and Carboniferous volcanic rocks were studied in the north Altay. And the mechanism of formation of volcanic rocks were discussed by using the rare earth elements. The correlativity of rare earth elements and major elements shows that the fractional crystallization is undistinguishable during the formation of Devonian and Carboniferous volcanic rocks, and the mechanism of formation of volcanic rocks may be the partial melting. The further study of the relationship of manifold rare earth elements shows that the mechanism of formation of Devonian and Carboniferous volcanic rocks in the north Altay is the partial melting. And the result also shows that the rare earth elements in the Devonian and Carboniferous volcanic rocks inherited the characteristics of those in its source materiels.

  9. Eruption chronology of Ciomadul, a long dormant dacitic volcanic system in the Eastern Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Kata; Harangi, Szabolcs; Dunkl, István; Lukács, Réka; Kiss, Balázs; Schmitt, Axel K.; Seghedi, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade, the zircon (U-Th)/He geochronology has become a promising method for dating eruption histories even in case of very young (Quaternary) volcanic products. It is proved to be particularly applicable when other dating methods such as radiocarbon, K/Ar, and 40Ar/39Ar techniques encounter analytical or interpretational difficulties often caused by a lack of appropriate materials for dating. Zircon (U-Th)/He method can be used to infer the date of the rapid cooling of the erupted magma, i.e. the eruption age. However, when the crystals formed less than ~350 ka, correction for U-series disequilibrium is necessary. The effect of the secular disequilibrium can be corrected by the U-Th zircon dates, which provides additional information also about the timescale of the magma storage. Here, we provide a detailed zircon (U-Th)/He dating approach to refine the eruption chronology of the Ciomadul dacite volcanic complex, found at the East Carpathians, eastern-central Europe. It is characterized by an intermittent precursor lava dome activity with extrusion of 0.1-0.6 km3 dacitic magma, followed by the build-up of a massive lava dome complex with two explosion craters. The erupted products are fairly homogeneous dacite with similar mineral cargo. During the field campaigns we focused on the volcanic products of the Ciomadul lava dome complex and sampled all the known localities to cover the whole volcanic period and avoid sampling bias. According to the new (U-Th)/He results the precursor lava domes were formed between ~1000 and 300 ka, during several intermittent eruption events which were separated by long repose times: Bába Laposa: 950±50 ka, Delaul Mare: 840±12 ka, Puturosul: 710±50 ka, Bálványos: 580±20 ka and Turnul Apor: 330±40 ka. After another long quiescence, volcanic activity renewed at about 200 ka and became more productive. Numerous lava domes were developed between ca. 160 and 100 ka, which form the 10-12 km3 central lava dome edifice

  10. Idiosyncrasies of volcanic sulfur viscosity and the triggering of unheralded volcanic eruptions

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    Teresa eScolamacchia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Unheralded blue-sky eruptions from dormant volcanoes cause serious fatalities, such as at Mt. Ontake (Japan on 27 September 2014. Could these events result from magmatic gas being trapped within hydrothermal system aquifers by elemental sulfur (Se clogging pores, due to sharp increases in its viscosity when heated above 159oC? This mechanism was thought to prime unheralded eruptions at Mt. Ruapehu in New Zealand. Impurities in sulfur (As, Te, Se are known to modify S-viscosity and industry experiments showed that organic compounds, H2S, and halogens dramatically influence Se viscosity under typical hydrothermal heating/cooling rates and temperature thresholds. However, the effects of complex sulfur compositions are currently ignored at volcanoes, despite its near ubiquity in long-lived volcano-hydrothermal systems. Models of impure S behavior must be urgently formulated to detect pre-eruptive warning signs before the next blue-sky eruption

  11. Volcanic tremor associated with eruptive activity at Bromo volcano

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    E. Gottschämmer

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Three broadband stations were deployed on Bromo volcano, Indonesia, from September to December 1995. The analysis of the seismograms shows that the signals produced by the volcanic sources cover the frequency range from at least 25 Hz down to periods of several minutes and underlines, therefore, the importance of broadband recordings. Frequency analysis reveals that the signal can be divided into four domains. In the traditional frequency range of volcanic tremor (1-10 Hz sharp transitions between two distinct values of the tremor amplitude can be observed. Additional tremor signal including frequencies from 10 to 20 Hz could be found during late November and early December. Throughout the whole experiment signals with periods of some hundred seconds were observed which are interpreted as ground tilts. For these long-period signals a particle motion analysis was performed in order to estimate the source location. Depth and radius can be estimated when the source is modeled as a sudden pressure change in a sphere. The fourth frequency range lies between 0.1 and 1 Hz and is dominated by two spectral peaks which are due to marine microseism. The phase velocity and the direction of wave propagation of these signals could be determined using the tripartite-method.

  12. Time correlation by palaeomagnetism of the 1631 eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Volcanological and volcanic hazard implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, J. C.; Principe, C.; Rosi, M.; Soler, V.

    1993-11-01

    The 1631 eruption of Mount Vesuvius was the most destructive episode in the recent volcanic history of Vesuvius and the last in which large pyroclastic flows were emitted. The controversy about whether lava flows were also generated in this eruption, as sustained in the mapping by Le Hon (1866) and by the interpretation by some authors (Burri et al., 1975; Rolandi et al., 1991) of eyewitness accounts, is important not only for a better understanding of the eruption but also for the implications in the prediction of volcanic hazards of this volcano, set in an overpopulated area with more than 3 million people potentially at risk. Short-period palaeomagnetic techniques (secular variation curve) have been applied to correlate lava flows interpreted as produced in the event of 1631 with the pyroclastic flow of this same eruption and other lava flows unquestionably emitted prior to this eruptive event. The model that best fits the results obtained suggests that the presumed 1631 lava flows were not the result of a single eruptive event but were, in fact, produced by several different eruptions. These lava flows also have a better palaeomagnetic correlation with the medieval lava flows than with the pyroclastic flow of 1631, whose juvenile pumice clasts have a well-defined single component magnetization that fits in the expected corresponding position of the secular variation curve for that age. The palaeomagnetic characteristics of the 1631 pyroclastic flow are compatible with a "hot" depositional temperature (apparently above the Curie point of magnetite, 585 °C) for the juvenile pumice fragments (magmatic fraction) and a "cold" deposition for the non-magmatic fraction. This suggests the lack of thermal equilibration during transport of the larger clasts, probably due to the short distance travelled by the pyroclastic flows. The main volcanological and volcanic hazard issues of this work are that the 1631 event was entirely explosive and that pyroclastic flow activity

  13. K-Ar geochronology of the late cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Cordillera Occidental, southernmost Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosdal, Richard M.; Farrar, Edward; Clark, Alan H.

    1981-05-01

    Twenty-four K-Ar radiometric ages are presented for late Cenozoic continental volcanic rocks of the Cordillera Occidental of southernmost Perú (lat. 16° 57'-17° 36'S). Rhyodacitic ignimbrite eruptions began in this transect during the Late Oligocene and continued episodically through the Miocene. The development of andesitic-dacitic strato volcanoes was initiated in the Pliocene and continues to the present. The earliest ignimbrite flows (25.3-22.7 Ma) are intercalated in the upper, coarsely-elastic member of the Moquegua Formation and demonstrate that this sedimentary unit accumulated in a trough, parallel to Andean tectonic trends, largely in the Oligocene. More voluminous ash-flow eruptions prevailed in the Early Miocene (22.8-17.6 Ma) and formed the extensively preserved Huaylillas Formation. This episode was coeval with a major phase of Andean uplift, and the pyroclastics overlie an erosional surface of regional extent incised into a Paleogene volcano-plutonic arc terrain. An age span of 14.2-8.9 Ma (mid-Late Miocene) is indicated for the younger Chuntacala Formation, which again comprises felsic ignimbrite flows, largely restricted to valleys incised into the pre-Huaylillas Formation lithologies, and, at lower altitudes, an extensive aggradational elastic facies. The youngest areally extensive ignimbrites, constituting the Sencca Formation, were extruded during the Late Miocene. In the earliest Pliocene, the ignimbrites were succeeded by more voluminous calcalkaline, intermediate flows which generated numerous large and small stratovolcanoes; these range in age from 5.3 to 1.6 Ma. Present-day, or Holocene, volcanism is restricted to several large stratovolcanoes which had begun their development during the Pleistocene (by 0.7 Ma). The late Oligocene/Early Miocene (ca. 22-23 Ma) reactivation of the volcanic arc coincided with a comparable increase in magmatic activity throughout much of the Cordilleras Occidental and Oriental of the Central Andes.

  14. Geochemistry of middle Tertiary volcanic rocks in the northern Aquarius Mountains, west-central Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, A.M.; Haxel, G.B.

    1993-04-01

    The northern Aquarius Mountains volcanic field ([approximately]50km east of Kingman) covers an area of 400 km[sup 2], bounded by upper Trout Creek (S), the Truxton Valley (N), the Big Sandy Valley (W), and Cross Mountain (E). The volcanic sequence rests upon a pre-middle Eocene erosional surface. The lowest units is a 250 m-thick unit of rhyolitic pyroclastic breccias and airfall tuffs. Successively younger units are: basanite flows and cinder cones; hornblende latite flows and domes; porphyritic dacite flows, domes, and breccias; alkali basalt intrusions; and low-silica rhyolite domes and small high=silica rhyolite flows. Dacite is volumetrically dominant, and erupted primarily from vents in and around Cedar Basin (Penitentiary Mtn 7.5[prime] quad.). Other geologists have obtained K-Ar dates [approximately]24--20 Ma for the basanites and latites. The alkali basalts, latites, dacites, and rhyolites evidently constitute a genetically-related high-K to shoshonitic calcalkaline suite with chemistry typical of subduction-related magmatism: enrichment in LILE and LREE, and depletion of Nb and Ta relative to K and La and of Ti relative to Hf and Yb. Each rock type is unique and distinguishable in K/Rb and Rb/Sr. The basanites are primitive (mg=0.75--0.78), have intraplate affinities (La/Nb[<=]1), and show consistent and distinctive depletion of K relative to the other LILE. The presence of these basanites in an early Miocene volcanic sequence is unusual or unexpected, as they predate (by [approximately]10 m.y.) the regional eruption of asthenosphere-derived basalts associated with Basin-and-Range extension.

  15. Case Study of Volcanic Rock Reservoir--Beibao Area of Nanbao Sag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Qijun; Wan Zhimin; Jiao Shouquan; Liu Laixiang

    1997-01-01

    @@ Preface Crude has been produced from volcanic rock reservoirs inAmerica, Libya, Indonesia and Japan, according to the available data. Oil and gas Production from volcanic rock reservoirs in Japan accounts for 30% of the total, with the recoverable reserves estimated at 48% of the total. Oil and gas traps of volcanic rock reservoir with better reservoir properties and flow potential have been discovered in Liaohe, Erlian, Jizhong, Huanghua, Jiyang, Linqing,Jiangsu and Xinjiang of China since the 1970's. However,the systematic study of volcanic rock reservoir is just in the beginning.

  16. El Chichon volcanic ash in the stratosphere - Particle abundances and size distributions after the 1982 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Clanton, U. S.; Gabel, E. M.; Warren, J. L.

    1983-11-01

    Volcanic ash particles collected from the stratosphere after the March/April, 1982 explosive eruption of El Chichon volcano, Mexico, were mostly 2-40 micron vesicular shards of silicic volcanic glass that varied in abundance, at 16.8-19.2 km altitude, from 200 per cu m (30-49 deg N lat.) in May to 1.3 per cu m (45-75 deg N) in October. At the minimum, the ash cloud covered latitudes 10-60 deg N in July and 10 deg S-75 deg N in October. In May and July, ash particles were mostly free, individual shards (and clusters of shards) but, by October, were intimately associated with liquid droplets (presumably, sulfuric acid). In May 1982, the total stratospheric burden of ash was at least 240 tons (2.2 x 10 to the 8th g) although the total ash injected into the stratosphere by the eruption was probably 480-8400 tons.

  17. Detection of volcanic sulfate aerosol with Envisat MIPAS shown for the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessbach, Sabine; Hoffmann, Lars; Spang, Reinhold; von Hobe, Marc; Müller, Rolf; Riese, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosol is known to have a strong impact on climate. Transport pathways of sulfur dioxide and sulfate aerosol to the stratosphere are still discussed. It is known that volcanic eruptions can inject significant amounts of sulfur directly into the stratosphere. Most sulfur, however, is injected into the troposphere and only a fraction of it can make its way into the stratosphere. Global and altitude resolved time series of observations are a valuable source of information for sulfur dioxide and sulfate aerosol detection. Here we present a new aerosol detection method for the infrared limb sounder Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) and the results for the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions. The new detection method utilizes three infrared window regions that are located around 830, 960, and 1224 cm-1. The combination of these three windows allows for a better detection of enhanced aerosol events in the troposphere as well as the discrimination from ice clouds. With this new method the 10 year record of MIPAS measurements was analyzed. The most remarkable sulfate aerosol events follow the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions. After these eruptions enhanced aerosol is detected in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region. Within one to two months it spreads over most of the northern hemisphere. In the tropics the aerosol reaches altitudes up to around 20 km and in the Arctic up to 15 km. The enhanced aerosol signal can be observed for about 5, 7, and up to 10 month for the Kasatochi, Sarychev, and Nabro eruptions, respectively. During this period the enhanced aerosol detections decrease in number, strength, and observation altitude. After the Nabro eruption on 13 June 2011 volcanic aerosol is detected in the UTLS region two days after the initial eruption. The following days the aerosol moves around the northern edge of the Asian monsoon region, is then transported southwards and later

  18. Revisiting the Atmospheric Rise Heights of Volcanic Eruption Plumes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Mastin, L. G.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Amanda Meyer, Alexa R. Van Eaton, Larry G. Mastin, Amanda B. Clarke Evidence for both effusive and explosive volcanism in the geological record of Mars has highlighted questions about the behavior of eruption plumes in the Martian atmosphere. How does the atmospheric structure of Mars (with surface pressures <1% and gravity <40% that of Earth) affect the rise height of volcanic ash and climate-forcing gases? Early modeling studies suggested that Martian plumes may rise significantly higher than their terrestrial equivalents (Wilson and Head, 1994, Rev. Geophys., 32, 221-263), but the validity of these models was called into question by Glaze and Baloga (2002, JGR, 107, 5086). Here we reevaluate the limitations of plume rise models using a steady-state 1-D model for volcanic plumes (Plumeria: Mastin, 2014, JGR, doi:10.1002/2013JD020604). We have used Plumeria to simulate plume heights using a range of atmospheric profiles representing both modern and 'early' Mars, and a range of volcanic eruption rates from 1 x 103 to 1 x 1010 kg s-1. The model assumes perfect coupling of particles with the gas phase in the plume (pseudogas assumption), and Stokes number analysis indicates that this is a reasonable assumption for particle diameters less than 5 mm to 1 micron, depending on the eruption rate. Our estimates of local Knudsen numbers support the continuum assumption for this model. Therefore, we suggest that even simplified fluid dynamics models may provide first-order insights into the rise of volcanic gases - and to some extent, fine ash particles - on Mars. Our results show that volcanic plumes in a modern Martian atmosphere may rise three times higher than those from equivalent eruption rates on Earth, potentially reaching 120 km above the surface. We provide a series of new theoretical eruption rate-plume height scaling relationships that may be useful for considering plume injection heights, climate impacts and global-scale ash dispersal patterns (e.g., Kerber et

  19. New constraints on the pyroclastic eruptive history of the Campanian volcanic Plain (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vivo, B.; Rolandi, G.; Gans, P.B.; Calvert, A.; Bohrson, W.A.; Spera, F.J.; Belkin, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    The ∼ 150 km3 (DRE) trachytic Campanian Ignimbrite, which is situated north-west of Naples, Italy, is one of the largest eruptions in the Mediterranean region in the last 200 ky. Despite centuries of investigation, the age and eruptive history of the Campanian Ignimbrite is still debated, as is the chronology of other significant volcanic events of the Campanian Plain within the last 200–300 ky. New 40Ar/39Ar geochronology defines the age of the Campanian Ignimbrite at 39.28 ± 0.11 ka, about 2 ky older than the previous best estimate. Based on the distribution of the Campanian Ignimbrite and associated uppermost proximal lithic and polyclastic breccias, we suggest that the Campanian Ignimbrite magma was emitted from fissures activated along neotectonic Apennine faults rather than from ring fractures defining a Campi Flegrei caldera. Significantly, new volcanological, geochronological, and geochemical data distinguish previously unrecognized ignimbrite deposits in the Campanian Plain, accurately dated between 157 and 205 ka. These ages, coupled with a xenocrystic sanidine component > 315 ka, extend the volcanic history of this region by over 200 ky. Recent work also identifies a pyroclastic deposit, dated at 18.0 ka, outside of the topographic Campi Flegrei basin, expanding the spatial distribution of post-Campanian Ignimbrite deposits. These new discoveries emphasize the importance of continued investigation of the ages, distribution, volumes, and eruption dynamics of volcanic events associated with the Campanian Plain. Such information is critical for accurate assessment of the volcanic hazards associated with potentially large-volume explosive eruptions in close proximity to the densely populated Neapolitan region.

  20. FIERCE: FInding volcanic ERuptive CEnters by a grid-searching algorithm in R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, Roberto; Guzmán, Silvina; Neri, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Most eruptions are fed by dikes whose spatial distribution can provide important insights into the positions of possible old eruptive centers that are no longer clearly identifiable in the field. Locating these centers can in turn have further applications, e.g., in hazard assessment. We propose a purely geometrical algorithm—implemented as an R open-source script—named FIERCE (FInding volcanic ERuptive CEnters) based on the number of intersections of dikes identified within a grid of rectangular cells overlain onto a given search region. The algorithm recognizes radial distributions, tangential distributions, or combinations of both. We applied FIERCE to both well-known and less-studied volcanic edifices, in different tectonic settings and having different evolution histories, ages, and compositions. At Summer Coon volcano, FIERCE demonstrated that a radial dike distribution clearly indicates the position of the central vent. On Etna, it confirmed the position of the most important ancient eruptive centers and allowed us to study effects of the structural alignments and topography. On Stromboli, FIERCE not only enabled confirmation of some published locations of older vents but also identified possible vent areas not previously suggested. It also highlighted the influence of the regional structural trend and the collapse scars. FIERCE demonstrated that the dikes at the Somma-Vesuvius were emplaced before formation of Mt. Somma's caldera and indicated a plausible location for the old volcanic crater of Mt. Somma which is compatible with previous studies. At the Vicuña Pampa Volcanic Complex, FIERCE highlights the position of two different vents of a highly degraded volcano.

  1. Snow and ice perturbation during historical volcanic eruptions and the formation of lahars and floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jon J.; Newhall, Christopher G.

    1989-10-01

    Historical eruptions have produced lahars and floods by perturbing snow and ice at more than 40 volcanoes worldwide. Most of these volcanoes are located at latitudes higher than 35°; those at lower latitudes reach altitudes generally above 4000 m. Volcanic events can perturb mantles of snow and ice in at least five ways: (1) scouring and melting by flowing pyroclastic debris or blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, (2) surficial melting by lava flows, (3) basal melting of glacial ice or snow by subglacial eruptions or geothermal activity, (4) ejection of water by eruptions through a crater lake, and (5) deposition of tephra fall. Historical records of volcanic eruptions at snow-clad volcanoes show the following: (1) Flowing pyroclastic debris (pyroclastic flows and surges) and blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris are the most common volcanic events that generate lahars and floods; (2) Surficial lava flows generally cannot melt snow and ice rapidly enough to form large lahars or floods; (3) Heating the base of a glacier or snowpack by subglacial eruptions or by geothermal activity can induce basal melting that may result in ponding of water and lead to sudden outpourings of water or sediment-rich debris flows; (4) Tephra falls usually alter ablation rates of snow and ice but generally produce little meltwater that results in the formation of lahars and floods; (5) Lahars and floods generated by flowing pyroclastic debris, blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, or basal melting of snow and ice commonly have volumes that exceed 105 m3. The glowing lava (pyroclastic flow) which flowed with force over ravines and ridges...gathered in the basin quickly and then forced downwards. As a result, tremendously wide and deep pathways in the ice and snow were made and produced great streams of water (Wolf 1878).

  2. Snow and ice perturbation during historical volcanic eruptions and the formation of lahars and floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jon J.; Newhall, Christopher G.

    1989-01-01

    Historical eruptions have produced lahars and floods by perturbing snow and ice at more than 40 volcanoes worldwide. Most of these volcanoes are located at latitudes higher than 35°; those at lower latitudes reach altitudes generally above 4000 m. Volcanic events can perturb mantles of snow and ice in at least five ways: (1) scouring and melting by flowing pyroclastic debris or blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, (2) surficial melting by lava flows, (3) basal melting of glacial ice or snow by subglacial eruptions or geothermal activity, (4) ejection of water by eruptions through a crater lake, and (5) deposition of tephra fall. Historical records of volcanic eruptions at snow-clad volcanoes show the following: (1) Flowing pyroclastic debris (pyroclastic flows and surges) and blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris are the most common volcanic events that generate lahars and floods; (2) Surficial lava flows generally cannot melt snow and ice rapidly enough to form large lahars or floods; (3) Heating the base of a glacier or snowpack by subglacial eruptions or by geothermal activity can induce basal melting that may result in ponding of water and lead to sudden outpourings of water or sediment-rich debris flows; (4) Tephra falls usually alter ablation rates of snow and ice but generally produce little meltwater that results in the formation of lahars and floods; (5) Lahars and floods generated by flowing pyroclastic debris, blasts of hot gases and pyroclastic debris, or basal melting of snow and ice commonly have volumes that exceed 105 m3.The glowing lava (pyroclastic flow) which flowed with force over ravines and ridges...gathered in the basin quickly and then forced downwards. As a result, tremendously wide and deep pathways in the ice and snow were made and produced great streams of water (Wolf 1878).

  3. Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) simulations of climate following volcanic eruptions

    KAUST Repository

    Driscoll, Simon

    2012-09-16

    The ability of the climate models submitted to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) database to simulate the Northern Hemisphere winter climate following a large tropical volcanic eruption is assessed. When sulfate aerosols are produced by volcanic injections into the tropical stratosphere and spread by the stratospheric circulation, it not only causes globally averaged tropospheric cooling but also a localized heating in the lower stratosphere, which can cause major dynamical feedbacks. Observations show a lower stratospheric and surface response during the following one or two Northern Hemisphere (NH) winters, that resembles the positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Simulations from 13 CMIP5 models that represent tropical eruptions in the 19th and 20th century are examined, focusing on the large-scale regional impacts associated with the large-scale circulation during the NH winter season. The models generally fail to capture the NH dynamical response following eruptions. They do not sufficiently simulate the observed post-volcanic strengthened NH polar vortex, positive NAO, or NH Eurasian warming pattern, and they tend to overestimate the cooling in the tropical troposphere. The findings are confirmed by a superposed epoch analysis of the NAO index for each model. The study confirms previous similar evaluations and raises concern for the ability of current climate models to simulate the response of a major mode of global circulation variability to external forcings. This is also of concern for the accuracy of geoengineering modeling studies that assess the atmospheric response to stratosphere-injected particles.

  4. A great volcanic eruption around AD 1300 recorded in lacustrine sediment from Dongdao Island, South China Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhongkang Yang; Nanye Long; Yuhong Wang; Xin Zhou; Yi Liu; Liguang Sun

    2017-02-01

    The contents of Ti, Al and Fe₂O₃ in a lacustrine sediment core (DY6) collected from Dongdao Island, South China Sea (SCS), were determined to be much higher than those in the three major sediment endmembers (coral sand, guano and plants), and their likely sources include terrigenous dust and volcanic ash. At 61 cm (~AD 1300), the contents of Ti, Al and Fe₂O₃ have an abnormally high spike, which cannot be explained by terrigenous dust. The Sr and Nd isotope compositions at 61 cm are in excellent agreement with those in volcanic materials, but they are significantly different from those in terrigenous dust, implying a possible material input from historical volcanic eruptions in the lacustrine sediment DY6. The documented great Samalas volcanic eruption at AD 1257 in Indonesia is likely the candidate for this volcanic eruption.

  5. A great volcanic eruption around AD 1300 recorded in lacustrine sediment from Dongdao Island, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongkang; Long, Nanye; Wang, Yuhong; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Yi; Sun, Liguang

    2017-02-01

    The contents of Ti, Al and Fe 2 O 3 in a lacustrine sediment core (DY6) collected from Dongdao Island, South China Sea (SCS), were determined to be much higher than those in the three major sediment end-members (coral sand, guano and plants), and their likely sources include terrigenous dust and volcanic ash. At 61 cm (˜AD 1300), the contents of Ti, Al and Fe 2 O 3 have an abnormally high spike, which cannot be explained by terrigenous dust. The Sr and Nd isotope compositions at 61 cm are in excellent agreement with those in volcanic materials, but they are significantly different from those in terrigenous dust, implying a possible material input from historical volcanic eruptions in the lacustrine sediment DY6. The documented great Samalas volcanic eruption at AD 1257 in Indonesia is likely the candidate for this volcanic eruption.

  6. Global temperature response to the major volcanic eruptions in multiple reanalysis data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fujiwara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The global temperature responses to the eruptions of Mount Agung in 1963, El Chichón in 1982, and Mount Pinatubo in 1991 are investigated using nine currently available reanalysis data sets (JRA-55, MERRA, ERA-Interim, NCEP-CFSR, JRA-25, ERA-40, NCEP-1, NCEP-2, and 20CR. Multiple linear regression is applied to the zonal and monthly mean time series of temperature for two periods, 1979–2009 (for eight reanalysis data sets and 1958–2001 (for four reanalysis data sets, by considering explanatory factors of seasonal harmonics, linear trends, Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, solar cycle, and El Niño Southern Oscillation. The residuals are used to define the volcanic signals for the three eruptions separately, and common and different responses among the older and newer reanalysis data sets are highlighted for each eruption. In response to the Mount Pinatubo eruption, most reanalysis data sets show strong warming signals (up to 2–3 K for 1-year average in the tropical lower stratosphere and weak cooling signals (down to −1 K in the subtropical upper troposphere. For the El Chichón eruption, warming signals in the tropical lower stratosphere are somewhat smaller than those for the Mount Pinatubo eruption. The response to the Mount Agung eruption is asymmetric about the equator with strong warming in the Southern Hemisphere midlatitude upper troposphere to lower stratosphere. Comparison of the results from several different reanalysis data sets confirms the atmospheric temperature response to these major eruptions qualitatively, but also shows quantitative differences even among the most recent reanalysis data sets. The consistencies and differences among different reanalysis data sets provide a measure of the confidence and uncertainty in our current understanding of the volcanic response. The results of this intercomparison study may be useful for validation of climate model responses to volcanic forcing and for assessing proposed

  7. Global temperature response to the major volcanic eruptions in multiple reanalysis data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, M.; Hibino, T.; Mehta, S. K.; Gray, L.; Mitchell, D.; Anstey, J.

    2015-12-01

    The global temperature responses to the eruptions of Mount Agung in 1963, El Chichón in 1982, and Mount Pinatubo in 1991 are investigated using nine currently available reanalysis data sets (JRA-55, MERRA, ERA-Interim, NCEP-CFSR, JRA-25, ERA-40, NCEP-1, NCEP-2, and 20CR). Multiple linear regression is applied to the zonal and monthly mean time series of temperature for two periods, 1979-2009 (for eight reanalysis data sets) and 1958-2001 (for four reanalysis data sets), by considering explanatory factors of seasonal harmonics, linear trends, Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, solar cycle, and El Niño Southern Oscillation. The residuals are used to define the volcanic signals for the three eruptions separately, and common and different responses among the older and newer reanalysis data sets are highlighted for each eruption. In response to the Mount Pinatubo eruption, most reanalysis data sets show strong warming signals (up to 2-3 K for 1-year average) in the tropical lower stratosphere and weak cooling signals (down to -1 K) in the subtropical upper troposphere. For the El Chichón eruption, warming signals in the tropical lower stratosphere are somewhat smaller than those for the Mount Pinatubo eruption. The response to the Mount Agung eruption is asymmetric about the equator with strong warming in the Southern Hemisphere midlatitude upper troposphere to lower stratosphere. Comparison of the results from several different reanalysis data sets confirms the atmospheric temperature response to these major eruptions qualitatively, but also shows quantitative differences even among the most recent reanalysis data sets. The consistencies and differences among different reanalysis data sets provide a measure of the confidence and uncertainty in our current understanding of the volcanic response. The results of this intercomparison study may be useful for validation of climate model responses to volcanic forcing and for assessing proposed geoengineering by stratospheric

  8. Psychological aspects in a volcanic crisis: El Hierro Island eruption (October, 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, P.; Llinares, A.; Garcia, A.; Marrero, J. M.; Ortiz, R.

    2012-04-01

    The recent eruption on the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) has shown that Psychology plays an important role in the emergence management of a natural phenomenon. However, Psychology continues to have no social coverage it deserves in the mitigation of the effects before, during and after the occurrence of a natural phenomenon. Keep in mind that an unresolved psychological problem involves an individual and collective mismatch may become unrecoverable. The population of El Hierro has been under a state of alert since July 2011, when seismic activity begins, until the occurrence of submarine eruption in October 2011 that is held for more than three months. During this period the inhabitants of the small island have gone through different emotional states ranging from confusion to disappointment. A volcanic eruption occurs not unexpectedly, allowing to have a time of preparation / action before the disaster. From the psychological point of view people from El Hierro Island have responded to different stages of the same natural process. Although the island of El Hierro is of volcanic origin, the population has no historical memory since the last eruption occurred in 1793. Therefore, the educational system does not adequately address the formation in volcanic risk. As a result people feel embarrassment when the seismovolcanic crisis begins, although no earthquakes felt. As an intermediate stage, when the earthquakes are felt by the population, scientists and operational Emergency Plan care to inform and prepare actions in case of a possible eruption. The population feel safe despite the concerns expressed by not knowing where, how and when the eruption will occur. Once started the submarine eruption, taking into account that all the actions (evacuation, relocation, etc.) have worked well and that both their basic needs and security are covered there are new states of mind. These new emotional states ranging from disenchantment with the phenomenology of the

  9. Flow-to-fracture transition in a volcanic mush plug may govern normal eruptions at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, J.; Keller, T.; Cashman, K. V.; Persson, P.-O.

    2016-12-01

    Stromboli is a model volcano for studying eruptions driven by degassing. The current paradigm posits that Strombolian eruptions represent the bursting of gas slugs ascending through melt-filled conduits, but petrological observations show that magma at shallow depth is crystalline enough to form a three-phase plug consisting of crystals, bubbles, and melt. We combine a 1-D model of gas flushing a crystalline mush with a 3-D stress model. Our results suggest that localized gas segregation establishes hot conduits of mobile magma within a stagnant plug. The plug is prone to tensile failure controlled by gas overpressure and tectonic stress, with failure most likely beneath the observed vent locations. We hence argue that Strombolian eruptions are related to plug failure rather than flow. Our proposed three-phase model of the shallow plumbing system may provide a promising framework for integrating geophysical, petrological, and morphological observations at Stromboli and in open-system volcanism more generally.

  10. Nightfire method to track volcanic eruptions from multispectral satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Grigory; Zhizhin, Mikhail; Melnikov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the first results of an application of the Nightfire hotspot algorithm towards volcano activity detection. Nightfire algorithm have been developed to play along with a Suomi-NPP polar satellite launched in 2011, which has a new generation multispectral VIIRS thermal sensor on board, to detect gas flares related to the upstream and downstream production of oil and natural gas. Simultaneously using of nighttime data in SWIR, MWIR, and LWIR sensor bands the algorithm is able to estimate the hotspot temperature, size and radiant heat. Four years of non-filtered observations have been accumulated in a spatio-temporal detection database, which currently totals 125 GB in size. The first part of this work presents results of retrospective cross-match of the detection database with the publicly available observed eruptions databases. The second part discusses how an approximate 3D shape of a lava lake could be modeled based on the apparent source size and satellite zenith angle. The third part presents the results of fusion Landsat-8 and Himawari-8 satellites data with the VIIRS Nightfire for several active volcanoes.

  11. Age and whole rock glass compositions of proximal pyroclastics from the major explosive eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius: A review as a tool for distal tephrostratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacroce, Roberto; Cioni, Raffaello; Marianelli, Paola; Sbrana, Alessandro; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Donahue, Douglas J.; Joron, Jean Louis

    2008-10-01

    A review of compositional data of the major explosive eruptions of Vesuvius is presented, comparing compositions (major elements) of whole rock with glass shards from the proximal deposits, hopefully useful for long-distance correlation. A critical review of published and new geochronological data is also provided. All available 14C ages are calibrated to give calendar ages useful for the reconstruction of the volcanological evolution of the volcanic complex. The pyroclastic deposits of the four major Plinian eruptions (22,000 yr cal BP "Pomici di Base", 8900 yr cal BP "Mercato Pumice", 4300 yr cal BP "Avellino Pumice", and A.D. 79 "Pompeii Pumice") are widely dispersed and allow a four-folded, Plinian to Plinian, stratigraphic division: 1. B-M (between Pomici di Base and Mercato); 2. M-A (between Mercato and Avellino); 3. A-P (between Avellino and Pompeii); 4. P-XX (from the Pompeii Pumice to the last erupted products of the XXth century). Within each interval, the age, lithologic and compositional features of pyroclastic deposits of major eruptions, potentially useful for tephrostratigraphic purposes on distal areas, are briefly discussed. The Vesuvius rocks are mostly high Potassic products, widely variable in terms of their silica saturation. They form three groups, different for both composition and age: 1. slightly undersaturated, older than Mercato eruption; 2. mildly undersaturated, from Mercato to Pompeii eruptions; 3. highly undersaturated, younger than Pompeii eruption. For whole rock analyses, the peculiar variations in contents of some major and trace elements as well as different trends in element/element ratios, allow a clear, unequivocal, easy diagnosis of the group they belong. Glass analyses show large compositional overlap between different groups, but selected element vs. element plots are distinctive for the three groups. The comparative analysis of glass and whole rock major element compositions provides reliable geochemical criteria helping

  12. The timing and intensity of column collapse during explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazzo, Guillaume; Kaminski, Edouard; Tait, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Volcanic columns produced by explosive eruptions commonly reach, at some stage, a collapse regime with associated pyroclastic density currents propagating on the ground. The threshold conditions for the entrance into this regime are mainly controlled by the mass flux and exsolved gas content at the source. However, column collapse is often partial and the controls on the fraction of total mass flux that feeds the pyroclastic density currents, defined here as the intensity of collapse, are unknown. To better understand this regime, we use a new experimental apparatus reproducing at laboratory scale the convecting and collapsing behavior of hot particle-laden air jets. We validate the predictions of a 1D theoretical model for the entrance into the regime of partial collapse. Furthermore, we show that where a buoyant plume and a collapsing fountain coexist, the intensity of collapse can be predicted by a universal scaling relationship. We find that the intensity of collapse in the partial collapse regime is controlled by magma gas content and temperature, and always exceeds 40%, independent of peak mass flux and total erupted volume. The comparison between our theoretical predictions and a set of geological data on historic and pre-historic explosive eruptions shows that the model can be used to predict both the onset and intensity of column collapse, hence it can be used for rapid assessment of volcanic hazards notably ash dispersal during eruptive crises.

  13. Reconciling the observed and modeled Southern Hemisphere circulation response to volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Marie C.; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Deser, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Confusion exists regarding the tropospheric circulation response to volcanic eruptions, with models and observations seeming to disagree on the sign of the response. The forced Southern Hemisphere circulation response to the eruptions of Pinatubo and El Chichón is shown to be a robust positive annular mode, using over 200 ensemble members from 38 climate models. It is demonstrated that the models and observations are not at odds, but rather, internal climate variability is large and can overwhelm the forced response. It is further argued that the state of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation can at least partially explain the sign of the observed anomalies and may account for the perceived discrepancy between model and observational studies. The eruptions of both El Chichón and Pinatubo occurred during El Niño events, and it is demonstrated that the Southern Annular Mode anomalies following volcanic eruptions are weaker during El Niño events compared to La Niña events.

  14. Characteristics of volcanic tremor accompanying the September 24th, 1986 explosive eruption of Mt. Etna (Italy

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    R. Cristofolini

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Features of the volcanic tremor recorded before, during and after the eruptive event which occurred at Mt. Etna on September 24th 1986, are described. The whole eruption was particularly short in time (about eight hours and characterized by an extremely violent explosive activity with lava fountains a few hundred meters high. As the complete record of the seismic signals generated during the whole eruptive episode was available, a detailed spectral analysis of the volcanic tremor recorded at four stations, located at increasing distance from the summit of the volcano, was carried out. Fourier analysis, that was performed using temporal windows of about 11 min in duration, pointed to some large fluctuations of the overall spectral amplitude, as well as some frequency variations of the dominant spectral peaks. The ratio of the overall spectral amplitude recorded at the highest station and at the peripheral ones, was calculated in the two spectral bands 1.0-2.5 and 2.6-6.0 Hz, respectively. The significant contribution of energy at low frequency values supports the hypothesis of a subvertical planar source, which was active during the paroxysmal stage of the eruption. Such results are also supported by the analysis of the attenuation function of the spectral amplitude.

  15. Dynamic winter climate response to large tropical volcanic eruptions since 1600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Mann, Michael E.; Faluvegi, G.

    2004-03-01

    We have analyzed the mean climate response pattern following large tropical volcanic eruptions back to the beginning of the 17th century using a combination of proxy-based reconstructions and modern instrumental records of cold-season surface air temperature. Warm anomalies occur throughout northern Eurasia, while cool anomalies cover northern Africa and the Middle East, extending all the way to China. In North America, the northern portion of the continent cools, with the anomalies extending out over the Labrador Sea and southern Greenland. The analyses confirm that for two years following eruptions the anomalies strongly resemble the Arctic Oscillation/Northern Annular Mode (AO/NAM) or the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the Atlantic-Eurasian sector. With our four-century record, the mean response is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level over much of the Northern Hemisphere land area. However, the standard deviation of the response is larger than the mean signal nearly everywhere, indicating that the anomaly following a single eruption is unlikely to be representative of the mean. Both the mean response and the variability can be successfully reproduced in general circulation model simulations. Driven by the solar heating induced by the stratospheric aerosols, these models produce enhanced westerlies from the lower stratosphere down to the surface. The climate response to volcanic eruptions thus strongly suggests that stratospheric temperature and wind anomalies can affect surface climate by forcing a shift in the AO/NAM or NAO.

  16. Global temperature response to the major volcanic eruptions in multiple reanalysis datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fujiwara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Global temperature response to the eruptions of Mount Agung in 1963, El Chichón in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo in 1991 is investigated using nine reanalysis datasets (JRA-55, MERRA, ERA-Interim, NCEP-CFSR, JRA-25, ERA-40, NCEP-1, NCEP-2, and 20CR. Multiple linear regression is applied to the zonal and monthly mean time series of temperature for two periods, 1979–2009 (for eight reanalysis datasets and 1958–2001 (for four reanalysis datasets, by considering explanatory factors of seasonal harmonics, linear trends, Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, solar cycle, and El Niño Southern Oscillation. The residuals are used to define the volcanic signals for the three eruptions separately. In response to the Mount Pinatubo eruption, most reanalysis datasets show strong warming signals (up to 2–3 K for one-year average in the tropical lower stratosphere and weak cooling signals (down to −1 K in the subtropical upper troposphere. For the El Chichón eruption, warming signals in the tropical lower stratosphere are somewhat smaller than those for the Mount Pinatubo eruption. The response to the Mount Agung eruption is asymmetric about the equator with strong warming in the Southern Hemisphere midlatitude upper troposphere to lower stratosphere. The response to three other smaller-scale eruptions in the 1960s and 1970s is also investigated. Comparison of the results from several different reanalysis datasets confirms the atmospheric temperature response to these major eruptions qualitatively, but also shows quantitative differences even among the most recent reanalysis datasets.

  17. A statistical method linking geological and historical eruption time series for volcanic hazard estimations: Applications to active polygenetic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando

    2008-09-01

    The probabilistic analysis of volcanic eruption time series is an essential step for the assessment of volcanic hazard and risk. Such series describe complex processes involving different types of eruptions over different time scales. A statistical method linking geological and historical eruption time series is proposed for calculating the probabilities of future eruptions. The first step of the analysis is to characterize the eruptions by their magnitudes. As is the case in most natural phenomena, lower magnitude events are more frequent, and the behavior of the eruption series may be biased by such events. On the other hand, eruptive series are commonly studied using conventional statistics and treated as homogeneous Poisson processes. However, time-dependent series, or sequences including rare or extreme events, represented by very few data of large eruptions require special methods of analysis, such as the extreme-value theory applied to non-homogeneous Poisson processes. Here we propose a general methodology for analyzing such processes attempting to obtain better estimates of the volcanic hazard. This is done in three steps: Firstly, the historical eruptive series is complemented with the available geological eruption data. The linking of these series is done assuming an inverse relationship between the eruption magnitudes and the occurrence rate of each magnitude class. Secondly, we perform a Weibull analysis of the distribution of repose time between successive eruptions. Thirdly, the linked eruption series are analyzed as a non-homogeneous Poisson process with a generalized Pareto distribution as intensity function. As an application, the method is tested on the eruption series of five active polygenetic Mexican volcanoes: Colima, Citlaltépetl, Nevado de Toluca, Popocatépetl and El Chichón, to obtain hazard estimates.

  18. Retrieval and intercomparison of volcanic SO2 injection height and eruption time from satellite maps and ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Federica; Burton, Mike; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Corradini, Stefano; Salerno, Giuseppe; Merucci, Luca; Di Grazia, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    Syneruptive gas flux time series can, in principle, be retrieved from satellite maps of SO2 collected during and immediately after volcanic eruptions, and used to gain insights into the volcanic processes which drive the volcanic activity. Determination of the age and height of volcanic plumes are key prerequisites for such calculations. However, these parameters are challenging to constrain using satellite-based techniques. Here, we use imagery from OMI and GOME-2 satellite sensors and a novel numerical procedure based on back-trajectory analysis to calculate plume height as a function of position at the satellite measurement time together with plume injection height and time at a volcanic vent location. We applied this new procedure to three Etna eruptions (12 August 2011, 18 March 2012 and 12 April 2013) and compared our results with independent satellite and ground-based estimations. We also compare our injection height time-series with measurements of volcanic tremor, which reflects the eruption intensity, showing a good match between these two datasets. Our results are a milestone in progressing towards reliable determination of gas flux data from satellite-derived SO2 maps during volcanic eruptions, which would be of great value for operational management of explosive eruptions.

  19. The influence of volcanic eruptions on growth of central European trees in NE Germany during the last Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, H.; Heinrich, I.; Heussner, K. U.; Helle, G.

    2011-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions have strong impacts on the global climate, lowering the global temperature and increasing the diffuse light fraction for one to several years after the eruptions. It has been argued that due to scattering by volcanic sulfur aerosol the more diffuse light fraction can be used more efficiently by forests. However, other observations suggest a growth decrease because of the cooler conditions following large eruption. Trees growing to the north of the temperate zone are mainly temperature-limited and therefore a reduction in ring width after large volcanic eruptions seems inevitable. Since tree growth in the temperate zone is less limited by temperature than by other climate parameters such as precipitation, it was hypothesized that tree growth may not suffer from lower temperatures so much but profit from increased diffuse light and reduced water stress. Therefore, a database of long tree-ring chronologies originating from several sites in NE-Germany was used to test whether tree growth suffered or profited from the globally changed conditions after large eruptions. The growth relationships were tested against 49 individual large volcanic eruptions from the last 1000 years. High-resolution ice core records of sulfate measurements calibrated against atmospheric observations after modern eruptions identified the timing and magnitude of the eruptions since 1000 CE. A more negative influence on tree growth was detected in two tree-ring width chronologies of oak and pine (Quercus robur L. and Pinus sylvestris L.) originating from three different sites (Greifswald, Eberswalde and Saxony) in eastern Germany for up to four years after large eruptions. Overall, the long tree-ring chronologies covering more or less the last millennium indicated a more negative relationship to volcanic eruptions. In comparison, the chronologies of Q. robur reveal a more negative response after large eruptions than those of P. sylvestris. Only in Greifswald both tree

  20. On the impact of different volcanic hot spot detection methods on eruption energy quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergola, Nicola; Coviello, Irina; Falconieri, Alfredo; Lacava, Teodosio; Marchese, Francesco; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have shown that sensors like the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) may be effectively used to identify volcanic hotspots. These sensors offer in fact some spectral channels in the Medium Infrared (MIR) and Thermal Infrared (TIR) bands together with a good compromise between spatial and temporal resolution suited to study and monitor thermal volcanic activity. Many algorithms were developed to identify volcanic thermal anomalies from space with some of them that were extensively tested in very different geographich areas. In this work, we analyze the volcanic radiative power (VRP) representing one of parameters of major interest for volcanologists that may be estimated by satellite. In particular, we compare the radiative power estimations driven by some well-established state of the art hotspot detection methods (e.g. RSTVOLC, MODVOLC, HOTSAT). Differences in terms of radiative power estimations achieved during recent Mt. Etna (Italy) eruptions will be evaluated, assessing how much the VRP retrieved during effusive eruptions is affected by the sensitivity of hotspot detection methods.

  1. Re-processing TOMS UV Measurements to Retrieve SO2 Emissions From Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, B. L.; Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Li, C.; Haffner, D. P.; Leonard, P.; Carn, S. A.; Telling, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The SO2 Monitoring Group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is producing a new multi-satellite long term data set of volcanic SO2 column amounts and heights (MSVOLSO2L4) as part of the NASA MEaSUREs Program. Here we present re-analysis of the UV measurements (BUV) from the NASA Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (N7 TOMS: 1978-1993). Ozone is the dominant atmospheric absorber in the BUV spectrum, but volcanic eruptions can produce enough SO2 to be distinguished from ozone background. Quantitative retrieval of volcanic SO2 requires:1) Separation of the O3 and SO2 absorption in BUV radiances;2) Close to zero mean SO2 background;3) RT forward model that accounts for the presence of volcanic ash in the plume; 4) A priori knowledge of the ozone and SO2 vertical profiles.Our iterative retrieval algorithm returns O3 and SO2 column amounts, effective reflectivity and its spectral slope. The retrieval model also generates a 4 x 4 gain matrix for the SO2 free regions that is used to soft calibrate the measured 340 nm BUV radiance. The spectral slope implicitly accounts for the interference of volcanic ash, but more explicit ash treatment is required to better quantify SO2 errors in volcanic plumes heavily loaded with ash. This presentation will discuss the methods used to characterize the error sources and assess the quality of this unique long-term SO2 data set.

  2. Volcanic activity in the Acambay Graben: a < 25 Ka subplinian eruption from the Temascalcingo volcano and implications for volcanic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Aguirre Díaz, Gerardo; Sunyé Puchol, Ivan; Bartolini, Stefania; Geyer, Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) contains a large number of stratovolcanoes, some well-known, as Popocatepetl, Iztaccihuatl, Nevado de Toluca, or Colima and many others of more modest dimensions that are not well known but constitute the majority in the TMVB. Such volcanoes are, for example, Tequila, San Juan, Sangangüey, Cerro Culiacán, Cerro Grande, El Zamorano, La Joya, Palo Huerfano, Jocotitlán, Altamirano and Temascalcingo, among many others. The Temascalcingo volcano (TV) is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) at the eastern part of the Acambay Graben (northwest portion of Estado de México). The TV is composed mainly by dacitic, porphyritic lavas, block and ash deposits and subordinate pumice fall deposits and ignimbrites (Roldán-Quintana et al., 2011). The volcanic structure includes a summit caldera that has a rectangular shape, 2.5×3.5 km, with the largest side oriented E-W, parallel to major normal faults affecting the edifice. The San Mateo Pumice eruption is one of the greatest paroxysmal episodes of this volcano with pumice deposits mainly exposed at the scarp of the Acambay-Tixmadeje fault and at the northern and northeastern flanks of TV. It overlies a paleosol dated at 25 Ka. A NE-trending dispersion was obtained from field data covering an area of at least 80 km2. These deposits overlie older lava flows and mud flows and are discontinuously covered and eroded by younger reworked deposits of Temascalcingo volcano. This event represents a highly explosive phase that generated a relatively thick and widespread pumice fallout deposit that may occur again in future eruptions. A similar eruption today would have a significantly impact in the region, overall due to the fact that there has been no systematic assessment of the volcanic hazard in any of the studies that have been conducted so far in the area. So, this is a pending and urgent subject that must be tackled without delay. Financed by

  3. The eruptive chronology of the Ampato-Sabancaya volcanic complex (Southern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniego, Pablo; Rivera, Marco; Mariño, Jersy; Guillou, Hervé; Liorzou, Céline; Zerathe, Swann; Delgado, Rosmery; Valderrama, Patricio; Scao, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    We have reconstructed the eruptive chronology of the Ampato-Sabancaya volcanic complex (Southern Peru) on the basis of extensive fieldwork, and a large dataset of geochronological (40K-40Ar, 14C and 3He) and geochemical (major and trace element) data. This volcanic complex is composed of two successive edifices that have experienced discontinuous volcanic activity from Middle Pleistocene to Holocene times. The Ampato compound volcano consists of a basal edifice constructed over at least two cone-building stages dated at 450-400 ka and 230-200 ka. After a period of quiescence, the Ampato Upper edifice was constructed firstly during an effusive stage (80-70 ka), and then by the formation of three successive peaks: the Northern, Southern (40-20 ka) and Central cones (20-10 ka). The Southern peak, which is the biggest, experienced large explosive phases, resulting in deposits such as the Corinta plinian fallout. During the Holocene, eruptive activity migrated to the NE and constructed the mostly effusive Sabancaya edifice. This cone comprised many andesitic and dacitic blocky lava flows and a young terminal cone, mostly composed of pyroclastic material. Most samples from the Ampato-Sabancaya define a broad high-K magmatic trend composed of andesites and dacites with a mineral assemblage of plagioclase, amphibole, biotite, ortho- and clino-pyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxides. A secondary trend also exists, corresponding to rare dacitic explosive eruptions (i.e. Corinta fallout and flow deposits). Both magmatic trends are derived by fractional crystallisation involving an amphibole-rich cumulate with variable amounts of upper crustal assimilation. A marked change in the overall eruptive rate has been identified between Ampato (~ 0.1 km3/ka) and Sabancaya (0.6-1.7 km3/ka). This abrupt change demonstrates that eruptive rates have not been homogeneous throughout the volcano's history. Based on tephrochronologic studies, the Late Holocene Sabancaya activity is characterised by strong

  4. Effects of volcanic eruptions on China's monsoon precipitation over the past 700 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Z.; Gao, C.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical volcanic eruptions were found to affect precipitation especially in Asia and Africa monsoon region. However, studies with different types of eruptions suggested different impacts as well as the spatial patterns. In this study, we combined the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas (MADA, [Cook et al., 2010]) and the Chinese Historical Drought Disaster Index (CHDDI) compiled from the historic meteorological records to study the effect of volcanic eruptions on China's monsoon precipitation over the past 700 years. Histories of past volcanism were compiled from the IVI2[Gao et al., 2008] and Crowley2013[Crowley and Unterman, 2013] reconstructions. Volcanic events were classified into 2×Pinatubo, 1×Pinatubo , ≥5 Tg sulfate aerosols injection in the northern hemisphere (NH) stratosphere for IVI2; and NH sulfate flux more than 20/15/10/5 kg km-2 for Crowley2013. In both cases, average MADA show a drying trend over mainland China from year zero(0) to year three(+3) after the eruption; and the more sulfate aerosol injected into the NH stratosphere or the larger the sulfate flux, the more severe this drying trend seem to reveal. In comparison, a wetting trend was found in the eruption year with Southern Hemisphere (SH) only injections. Superposed epoch analysis with a 10,000 Monte Carlo resampling procedure showed that 97.9% (96.9%) of the observed MADA values are statistically significant at the 95% (99%) confidence level. The drying is probably caused by a reduction of the latent heat flux due to volcanic aerosol' cooling effect, leading to the weakening of south Asian monsoon and decrease of moisture vapor over tropical oceans, which contribute to a reduced moisture flux over china. Spatial distribution of the average MADA show a southward movement of the driest areas in eastern China from year zero to year three after the 1×Pinatubo and 2×Pinatubo eruptions, whereas part of north china experienced unusual wetting condition. This is in good agreement with CHDDI, which

  5. Major optical depth perturbations to the stratosphere from volcanic eruptions: Steller extinction period, 1961-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    2001-02-01

    A revised chronology of stratospheric aerosol extinction due to volcanic eruptions has been assembled for the period 1961-1978, which immediately precedes the era of dedicated satellite measurements. On the whole, the most accurate data consist of published observations of stellar extinction, supplemented in part by other kinds of observational data. The period covered encompasses the important eruptions of Agung (1963) and Fuego (1974), whose dust veils are discussed with respect to their transport, decay, and total mass. The effective (area-weighted mean) radii of the aerosols for both eruptions are found to be 0.3-0.4 μm. It is confirmed that, among known tropical eruptions, Agung's dust was unique for a low-latitude eruption in remaining almost entirely confined to the hemisphere of its production. A new table of homogeneous visual optical depth perturbations, listed by year and by hemisphere, is provided for the whole period 1881-1978, including the pyrheliometric period before 1961 that was investigated previously.

  6. Reduction of randomness in seismic noise as a short-term precursor to a volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, C. C.; Konstantinou, K. I.

    2016-11-01

    Ambient seismic noise is characterized by randomness incurred by the random position and strength of the noise sources as well as the heterogeneous properties of the medium through which it propagates. Here we use ambient noise data recorded prior to the 1996 Gjálp eruption in Iceland in order to show that a reduction of noise randomness can be a clear short-term precursor to volcanic activity. The eruption was preceded on 29 September 1996 by a Mw ~5.6 earthquake that occurred in the caldera rim of the Bárdarbunga volcano. A significant reduction of randomness started occurring 8 days before the earthquake and 10 days before the onset of the eruption. This reduction was observed even at stations more than 100 km away from the eruption site. Randomness increased to its previous levels 160 minutes after the Bárdarbunga earthquake, during which time aftershocks migrated from the Bárdarbunga caldera to a site near the Gjálp eruption fissure. We attribute this precursory reduction of randomness to the lack of higher frequencies (>1 Hz) in the noise wavefield caused by high absorption losses as hot magma ascended in the upper crust.

  7. Maximum horizontal range of volcanic ballistic projectiles ejected during explosive eruptions at Santorini caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, K. I.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the hazard posed by Volcanic Ballistic Projectiles (VBPs) to the Santorini islands considering eruption scenarios that include low (VEI = 2-3) and higher energy (VEI > 3) eruptions. A model that describes rapid decompression of pressurized magma below a caprock along with its fragmentation and acceleration of particles is utilized for estimating initial velocities during vulcanian-style eruptions. These initial velocities are inserted into the ballistic equations assuming that VBPs have a cube-like shape, are subjected to gravity/drag forces and are launched into a zone of reduced drag. Four different diameters of VBPs are considered (0.35 m, 1.0 m, 2.0 m, 3.0 m) and also different values of gas fractions and extent of the reduced drag zone are investigated. The results of these calculations show that an area of 1-2 km width along the western coast of Thera will be within the maximum range of VBPs, provided that the eruptive vent will develop either on Nea Kameni or between Nea Kameni and Thera. Initial velocities for higher energy eruptions are estimated by considering the conversion efficiency of thermal to kinetic energy. For the case of an eruption with VEI = 4 and a number of vents centered between Nea and Palea Kameni, calculations show that the coastal areas of Thera and Therasia are within the maximum horizontal range of VBPs with diameter larger than 0.35 m. As the exact position of the eruptive vent seems to be of crucial importance for determining the areas at risk, continuous seismic and geodetic monitoring of the caldera is needed in order to decipher its likely location.

  8. Experimental study of jet gas-particle interaction generated during explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, E. F.; Waite, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    During violent volcanic eruptions, a shock wave may be generated that is immediately followed by the formation of a supersonic jet. The overpressurized vapor-solid-liquid mixture being ejected begins to expand and accelerate. Oblique shock waves and rarefaction waves are generated at the edge of the crater. The oblique shock waves, inclined relatively to the flow axis, intersect forming a structure called a "Mach disk" or "Mach diamond". This pattern repeats until the jet decelerates into subsonic flow. In an explosive volcanic eruption, unlike other applications involving jets, a mixture of hot gas and solid particles is present. The mixture typically contains a relatively high percentage of solid particles of different sizes. The relationship between jet and particle is one the major parameters affecting the formation of ash plume dynamics and the pyroclastic flows. Therefore, a more comprehensive study is needed in order to understand the mixing occurring within the volcanic eruption jet, specifically, the effect of particle size and concentration. In this work, a series of analog explosive volcanic experiments using an atmospheric shock tube are performed to generate supersonic jets. High-speed video imaging of the expanding jet as well as the pressure evolution at different points in space are recorded for different values of initial energy and particle sizes and concentrations. Particles of different sizes and in various concentrations are placed inside the jet stream in which all the environmental conditions are monitored. Understanding of the coupling between the particles and the jet dynamics interaction is the first step toward a more thorough understanding of ash plume dynamics and the pyroclastic flows formation.

  9. Ice-melt rates during volcanic eruptions within water-drained, low-pressure subglacial cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, D. C.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Subglacial volcanism generates proximal and distal hazards including large-scale flooding and increased levels of explosivity. Direct observation of subglacial volcanic processes is infeasible; therefore, we model heat transfer mechanisms during subglacial eruptions under conditions where cavities have become depressurized by connection to the atmosphere. We consider basaltic eruptions in a water-drained, low-pressure subglacial cavity, including the case when an eruption jet develops. Such drained cavities may develop on sloping terrain, where ice may be relatively shallow and where gravity drainage of meltwater will be promoted. We quantify, for the first time, the heat fluxes to the ice cavity surface that result from steam condensation during free convection at atmospheric pressure and from direct and indirect radiative heat transfer from an eruption jet. Our calculations indicate that the direct radiative heat flux from a lava fountain (a "dry" end-member eruption jet) to ice is c. 25 kW m-2 and is a minor component. The dominant heat transfer mechanism involves free convection of steam within the cavity; we estimate the resulting condensation heat flux to be c. 250 kW m-2. Absorption of radiation from a lava fountain by steam enhances convection, but the increase in condensing heat flux is modest at c. 25 kW m-2. Overall, heat fluxes to the ice cavity surface are likely to be no greater than c. 300 kW m-2. These are comparable with heat fluxes obtained by single phase convection of water in a subglacial cavity but much less than those obtained by two-phase convection.

  10. Human survival in volcanic eruptions: Thermal injuries in pyroclastic surges, their causes, prognosis and emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Peter J; Jenkins, Susanna; Seswandhana, Rosadi; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Dunn, Ken; Purser, David; Voight, Barry; Shelley, Ian

    2017-08-01

    This study of burns patients from two eruptions of Merapi volcano, Java, in 1994 and 2010, is the first detailed analysis to be reported of thermal injuries in a large series of hospitalised victims of pyroclastic surges, one of the most devastating phenomena in explosive eruptions. Emergency planners in volcanic crises in populated areas have to integrate the health sector into disaster management and be aware of the nature of the surge impacts and the types of burns victims to be expected in a worst scenario, potentially in numbers and in severity that would overwhelm normal treatment facilities. In our series, 106 patients from the two eruptions were treated in the same major hospital in Yogyakarta and a third of these survived. Seventy-eight per cent were admitted with over 40% TBSA (total body surface area) burns and around 80% of patients were suspected of having at least some degree of inhalation injury as well. Thirty five patients suffered over 80% TBSA burns and only one of these survived. Crucially, 45% of patients were in the 40-79% TBSA range, with most suspected of suffering from inhalation injury, for whom survival was most dependent on the hospital treatment they received. After reviewing the evidence from recent major eruptions and outlining the thermal hazards of surges, we relate the type and severity of the injuries of these patients to the temperatures and dynamics of the pyroclastic surges, as derived from the environmental impacts and associated eruption processes evaluated in our field surveys and interviews conducted by our multi-disciplinary team. Effective warnings, adequate evacuation measures, and political will are all essential in volcanic crises in populated areas to prevent future catastrophes on this scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Petrography, geochemistry and tectonic setting of Salmabad Tertiary volcanic rocks, southeast of Sarbisheh, eastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Goodarzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The area reviewed and studied in this paper is located 5 km southeast of Sarbisheh city at eastern border of the Lut block (Jung et al., 1983; Karimpour et al., 2011; Richards et al., 2012 in eastern Iran between 59° 47′ and 59° 53′ E longitude and 32°30′ and 32°34′ N latitude. The magmatic activity in the Lut block began in middle Jurassic (165-162 Ma and reached its peak in Tertiary (Jung et al., 1983. Volcanic and subvolcanic rocks of Tertiary age cover over half of Lut block with up to 2000 m thickness and formed due to subduction prior to the collision of the Arabian and Asian plates (Camp and Griffis, 1982; Tirrul et al., 1983; Berberianet et al., 1982. Most of magmatic activity in the Lut block formed in middle Eocene (Karimpour et al., 2011 The andesitic volcanics were erupted together with the dacites and rhyodacites during a time interval of some 50 Ma from early Cretaceous to early Neogene. It can be assumed that the intensity of the volcanic activity was varying significantly during this time span (Jung et al., 1983.Tertiary volcanic rocks (Eocene-Oligocene to Pliocene with intermediate composition associated with pyroclastic rocks cropped out in eastern parts of Salmabad village, southeast of Sarbisheh. The main purpose of this paper is better understand the tectono-magmatic setting of the Tertiary volcanic rocks in southeast of Sarbisheh, eastern Iran based on geochemical characteristics. Materials and methods Eleven samples were analyzed for major elements by inductively coupled plasma (ICP technologies and trace elements were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, following a lithium metaborate/tetraborate fusion and nitric acid total digestion, at the SGS Laboratories, Toronto, Canada. Results In the Salmabad area, Tertiary volcanic rocks with mainly intermediate (andesitic composition are exposed associated with pyroclastic deposits such as tuff, breccia and agglomerate

  12. A GIS-based volcanic hazard and risk assessment of eruptions sourced within Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorn, Rebecca; Panter, Kurt S.; Gorsevski, Pece V.

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the spatial extent of a possible future eruption using a GIS-based volcanic hazard tool designed to simulate pyroclastic fallout and density currents (PDCs) as well as lava flows and to assess the social and economic vulnerabilities of the area at risk. Simulated pyroclastic fallout deposits originating from the El Cajete crater within the Valles Caldera, Jemez Mountains volcanic field, New Mexico, are calibrated to isopach and lithic isopleth maps of the Lower and Upper El Cajete as constructed by Wolff et al. (2011). The change in the axial orientation of fallout deposits between the Lower and Upper El Cajete is best matched using seasonal variations in wind speed and direction based on modern atmospheric records. The calibration of PDCs is based on the distribution and run-out of the Battleship Rock Ignimbrite. Once calibrated, hazards are simulated at a second vent location determined from probability distributions of structural features. The resulting hazard simulation maps show the potential distribution of pyroclastic fallout, PDCs and lava flows, indicating areas to the S/SE of Valles Caldera to be at greatest risk.

  13. Cooling-dominated cracking in thermally stressed volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-08-01

    Most studies of thermally induced cracking in rocks have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating and thermal expansion. Both the nature and the mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesized to be different from those formed during heating. We present in situ acoustic emission data recorded as a proxy for crack damage evolution in a series of heating and cooling experiments on samples of basalt and dacite. Results show that both the rate and the energy of acoustic emission are consistently much higher during cooling than during heating. Seismic velocity comparisons and crack morphology analysis of our heated and cooled samples support the contemporaneous acoustic emission data and also indicate that thermal cracking is largely isotropic. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as dikes, sills, and lava flows.

  14. Spatial probability distribution of future volcanic eruptions at El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Laura; Cappello, Annalisa; Galindo, Inés; Neri, Marco; Del Negro, Ciro

    2013-05-01

    The 2011 submarine eruption that took place in the proximity of El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) has raised the need to identify the most likely future emission zones even on volcanoes characterized by low frequency activity. Here, we propose a probabilistic method to build the susceptibility map of El Hierro, i.e. the spatial distribution of vent opening for future eruptions, based on the probabilistic analysis of volcano-structural data of the Island collected through new fieldwork measurements, bathymetric information, as well as analysis of geological maps, orthophotos and aerial photographs. These data have been divided into different datasets and converted into separate and weighted probability density functions, which were included in a non-homogeneous Poisson process to produce the volcanic susceptibility map. The most likely area to host new eruptions in El Hierro is in the south-western part of the West rift. High probability locations are also found in the Northeast and South rifts, and along the submarine parts of the rifts. This map represents the first effort to deal with the volcanic hazard at El Hierro and can be a support tool for decision makers in land planning, emergency measures and civil defense actions.

  15. Atmospheric Dispersal and Dispostion of Tephra From a Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Keating; W.Statham

    2004-02-12

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (ASHPLUME) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. The ASHPLUME conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The ASHPLUME mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report will improve and clarify the previous documentation of the ASHPLUME mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model.

  16. Nonequilibrium flow in volcanic conduits and application to the eruptions of Mt. St. Helens on May 18, 1980, and Vesuvius in AD 79

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobran, Flavio

    1992-02-01

    A steady-state, one-dimensional, and nonhomogeneous two-phase flow model was developed for the prediction of local flow properties in volcanic conduits. The model incorporates the effects of relative velocity between the phases and for the variable magma viscosity. The resulting set of nonlinear differential equations was solved by a stiff numerical solver and the results were verified with the results of basaltic fissure eruptions obtained by a homogeneous two-phase flow model, before applying the model to the eruptions of Mt. St. Helens and Vesuvius volcanoes. This verification, and a study of the sensitivity of several modeling parameters, proved effective in establishing the confidence in the predicted nonequilibrium results of flow distribution in the conduits when the mass flow rate is critical or maximum. The application of the model to the plinian eruptions of Mt. St. Helens on May 18, 1980, and Vesuvius in AD 79, demonstrates the sensitivity of the magma discharge rate and distributions of pressure, volumetric fraction, and velocities of phases, on the hydrous magma viscosity feeding the volcanic conduits. Larger magma viscosities produce smaller mass discharge rates (or greater conduit diameters), smaller exit pressures, larger disequilibrium between the phases, and larger difference between the local lithostatic and fluid pressures in the conduit. This large pressure difference occurs when magma fragments and may cause a rupture of the conduit wall rocks, producing a closure of the conduit and cessation of the volcanic eruption, or water pouring into the conduit from underground aquifers leading to phreatomagmatic explosions. The motion of the magma fragmentation zone along a conduit during an eruption can be caused by the varying viscosity of magma feeding the volcanic conduit and may cause intermittent phreatomagmatic explosions during the plinian phases as different underground aquifers are activated at different depths. The variation of magma

  17. Geochronology and correlation of Tertiary volcanic and intrusive rocks in part of the southern Toquima Range, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawe, Daniel R.; Snee, Lawrence W.; Byers, Frank M.; du Bray, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive volcanic and intrusive igneous activity, partly localized along regional structural zones, characterized the southern Toquima Range, Nevada, in the late Eocene, Oligocene, and Miocene. The general chronology of igneous activity has been defined previously. This major episode of Tertiary magmatism began with emplacement of a variety of intrusive rocks, followed by formation of nine major calderas and associated with voluminous extrusive and additional intrusive activity. Emplacement of volcanic eruptive and collapse megabreccias accompanied formation of some calderas. Penecontemporaneous volcanism in central Nevada resulted in deposition of distally derived outflow facies ash-flow tuff units that are interleaved in the Toquima Range with proximally derived ash-flow tuffs. Eruption of the Northumberland Tuff in the north part of the southern Toquima Range and collapse of the Northumberland caldera occurred about 32.3 million years ago. The poorly defined Corcoran Canyon caldera farther to the southeast formed following eruption of the tuff of Corcoran Canyon about 27.2 million years ago. The Big Ten Peak caldera in the south part of the southern Toquima Range Tertiary volcanic complex formed about 27 million years ago during eruption of the tuff of Big Ten Peak and associated air-fall tuffs. The inferred Ryecroft Canyon caldera formed in the south end of the Monitor Valley adjacent to the southern Toquima Range and just north of the Big Ten Peak caldera in response to eruption of the tuff of Ryecroft Canyon about 27 million years ago, and the Moores Creek caldera just south of the Northumberland caldera developed at about the same time. Eruption of the tuff of Mount Jefferson about 26.8 million years ago was accompanied by collapse of the Mount Jefferson caldera in the central part of the southern Toquima Range. An inferred caldera, mostly buried beneath alluvium of Big Smoky Valley southwest of the Mount Jefferson caldera, formed about 26.5 million years

  18. Hazards posed by distal ash transport and sedimentation from extreme volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahagian, D. L.; Proussevitch, A. A.; White, C. M.; Klewicki, J.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic ash injected into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere poses a significant hazard to aviation and human security as a result of extreme, explosive eruptions. These have occurred in the recent geologic past, and are expected to occur again, now that modern society and its infrastructure is far more vulnerable than ever before. Atmospheric transport, dispersion, and sedimentation of Ash particles is controlled by fundamentally different processes than control other particles normally transported in the atmosphere due to their complex internal and external morphology. It is thus necessary to elucidate the fundamental processes of particle-fluid interactions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, where most air traffic resides, and thereby enhance the capability of volcanic ash transport models to predict the ash concentration in distal regions that pose aviation and other hazards. Current Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion (VATD) models use simplistic stokes settling velocities for larger ash particles, and treat smaller ash particles (that are a large part of the hazard) merely as passive tracers. By incorporating the dynamics of fine ash particle-atmosphere interactions into existing VATD models provides the foundation for a much more accurate assessment framework applied to the hazard posed by specific future extreme eruptions, and thus dramatically reduce both the risk to air traffic and the cost of airport and flight closures, in addition to human health, water quality, agricultural, infrastructure hazards, as well as ice cap albedo and short term climate impacts.

  19. Assessing and optimizing the performance of infrasound networks to monitor volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailpied, Dorianne; Le Pichon, Alexis; Marchetti, Emanuele; Assink, Jelle; Vergniolle, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    We propose a numerical modeling technique based on a frequency-dependent attenuation relation to assess, quantify and optimize the performance of any arbitrary infrasound network to monitor explosive sources such as volcanic eruptions. Simulations are further enhanced by including realistic sources and propagation effects. We apply our approach to both hemispheres by considering the Euro-Mediterranean and the Eastern Australian regions. In these regions, we use quasi-permanent infrasound signals from Mt. Etna recorded in Tunisia and from Mt. Yasur recorded in New Caledonia. These well-instrumented volcanoes offer a unique opportunity to validate our attenuation model. In particular, accurate comparisons between near- and far-field recordings demonstrate the potential of the proposed methodology to remotely monitor volcanoes. A good agreement is found between modeled and observed results, especially when incorporating representative 10 m s-1 wind perturbations in the atmospheric specifications according to previous campaign measurements. To optimize the network layout in order to ensure the best monitoring of the volcanoes, we proceed through a grid search to find optimum locations of an additional array. We show that adding one array at an appropriate location in both regions under study could significantly improve detections half of the year. The application of the proposed methodology can provide in near real-time a realistic confidence level of volcanic eruption detections, useful to mitigate the risk of aircrafts encountering volcanic ash.

  20. Age, petrogenesis, and tectonic setting of the Permian bimodal volcanic rocks in the eastern Jiamusi Massif, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jun-Hui; Ge, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hao; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Dong, Yu; Liu, Xi-Wen; Ji, Zheng

    2017-02-01

    We present new in situ zircon U-Pb and Hf isotope, whole-rock geochemical, and Sr-Nd isotopic data for volcanic rocks from the Jiejinkou and Baoqing areas in the eastern Jiamusi Massif. These volcanic rocks are bimodal and consist of basalts, basaltic andesites, rhyolites, and rhyolitic tuffs that can be subdivided into mafic and silicic groups. Zircon U-Pb dating by LA-ICP-MS indicates that these volcanic rocks were erupted between the Early and Middle Permian (290-267 Ma). The mafic rocks in this area have positive εNd(t) (+0.07 to +6.43) values, and are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and depleted in heavy REE, Nb, and Ta. From these rocks, the meta-basalt of Jinlu and basaltic andesite of Taipinggou and Haojiatun were derived from parental magmas generated by the partial melting of depleted mantle wedge material that was metasomatized by subduction-related melts. These magmas then underwent variable degrees of fractional crystallization and assimilated insignificant amounts of crustal material. The meta-basalt of Liming likely originated from the metasomatized mantle-derived melts hybridized by the convective asthenosphere during the evolution of the magmas. In comparison, the silicic rocks have negative εNd(t) and variable zircon εHf(t) values, are enriched in the large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and LREE, and are depleted in high-field-strength elements (e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti), yielding arc-like geochemical signatures. The geochemical and zircon εHf(t) characteristics of Jiangfeng and Longtouqiao rhyolites are indicative of formation from magmas generated by the partial melting of mafic lower crustal material, whereas the Liming meta-rhyolite was probably produced from a source involving some depleted mantle components. The bimodal volcanic rocks provide convincing evidence that the Early-Middle Permian volcanism in the Jiamusi Massif occurred in an extensional environment probably associated with slab break-off during the westward

  1. New microphysical volcanic forcing datasets for the Agung, El Chichon and Pinatubo eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Marshall, Lauren; Carslaw, Kenneth; Chipperfield, Martyn; Bellouin, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Olaf; Johnson, Colin; O'Connor, Fiona

    2017-04-01

    Major tropical volcanic eruptions inject huge amounts of SO2 directly into the stratosphere, and create a long-lasting perturbation to the stratospheric aerosol. The abruptly elevated aerosol has strong climate impacts, principally surface cooling via scattering incoming solar radiation. The enhanced tropical stratospheric aerosol can also absorb outgoing long wave radiation causing a warming of the stratosphere and subsequent complex composition-dynamics responses (e.g. Dhomse et al., 2015). In this presentation we apply the composition-climate model UM-UKCA with interactive stratospheric chemistry and aerosol microphysics (Dhomse et al., 2014) to assess the enhancement to the stratospheric aerosol and associated radiative forcings from the three largest tropical eruptions in the last 60 years: Mt Agung (February 1963), El Chichon (April 1982) and Mt. Pinatubo (June 1991). Accurately characterising the forcing signature from these major eruptions is important for attribution of recent climate change and volcanic effects have been identified as a key requirement for robust attribution of multi-decadal surface temperature trends (e.g. Marotzke and Forster, 2015). Aligning with the design of the ISA-MIP co-ordinated multi-model "Historical Eruption SO2 Emissions Assessment" (HErSEA), we have carried out 3-member ensemble of simulations with each of upper, low and mid-point best estimates for SO2 and injection height for each eruption. We evaluate simulated aerosol properties (e.g. extinction, AOD, effective radius, particle size distribution) against a range of satellite and in-situ observational datasets and assess stratospheric heating against temperature anomalies are compared against reanalysis and other datasets. References: Dhomse SS, Chipperfield MP, Feng W, Hossaini R, Mann GW, Santee ML (2015) Revisiting the hemispheric asymmetry in midlatitude ozone changes following the Mount Pinatubo eruption: A 3-D model study, Geophysical Research Letters, 42, pp.3038

  2. Paleointensity determinations from Middle Miocene volcanic rocks, Far East, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Shcherbakova, Valentina; Zhidkov, Grigoriy; Bretstein, Yury

    2010-05-01

    Paleomagnetic and paleointensity studies of a representative collection of Middle Miocene volcanic rocks of (12.4-10.0) Ma age from Far East, Russia were carried out. A comprehensive rock magnetic investigation has been performed in order to determine the mineralogy of magnetic fraction and to identify the origin of NRM. Successful Thellier palaeointensity determinations with pTRM checks were obtained for 4 sites (33 samples). The Thellier experiments were complimented by the Wilson's express method. Values of the VDMs range from 3.1 to 7.5 (10^22 Am^2) with the mean VDM = 5.5×10^22 Am^2. A total 88 Thellier-type palaeointensity determinations were found in the World Paleointensity database for the 5-23 Ma period with the overall mean VDM = 5×10^22 Am^2. The VDM distribution is characterized by high variance from 1.5 to 12 (10^22 Am^2). No significant difference between the VDM distributions for the normal and reverse polarity intervals was revealed.

  3. New thermoluminescence age estimates for the Nyos maar eruption (Cameroon Volcanic Line).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph; Tchouankoue, Jean Pierre; Nkouamen Nemzoue, Peguy Noel; Ayaba, Félicité; Nformidah-Ndah, Siggy Signe; Nformi Chifu, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Nyos maar is located in the Cameroon Volcanic Line and generates a multitude of primary and secondary hazards to the local population. For risk assessment and hazard mitigation, the age of the Nyos maar eruption provides some vital information. Since previous dating efforts using a range of techniques resulted in vastly varying eruption ages, we applied thermoluminescence (TL) methods to obtain independent and direct chronological constraints for the time of maar formation. Target minerals were granitic quartz clasts contained in pyroclastic surge deposits. Thermoluminescence plateau results prove that heat and/or pressure during the phreatomagmatic eruption was sufficient to reset the inherited luminescence signal of granitic bedrock quartz. Parallel application of three TL measurement protocols to one of the two samples gave consistent equivalent doses for the quartz ultra-violet emission. Despite the robustness of our dose estimates, the assessment of the dose rate was accompanied by methodological challenges, such as estimation of the original size distribution of quartz grains in the pyroclastic deposits. Considering results from additional laboratory analyses to constrain these uncertainties, we calculate an average maximum TL age of 12.3 ± 1.5 ka for the Nyos maar eruption. Based on these new data, a more solid risk assessment can be envisaged.

  4. Petrology, mineral chemistry and tectono-magmatic setting of volcanic rocks from northeast Farmahin, north of Arak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Zarei Sahamieh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The study area is a small part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar structural zone in the Markazi province, located in the northeastern part of the Farmahin, north of Arak (Hajian, 1970. The volcanic rocks studied from the area include andesite, dacite, rhyodacite, ignimbrite and tuff of Middle to Late Eocene age (middle Lutetian to upper Lutetian (Ameri et al., 2009. It seems that folding and faulting is caused in sedimentary basin and volcanic activities. On the other hand, except of orogeny maybe rifting had rule in eruption so that this case has seen in the other area such as Taft and Khezrabad in central Iran (Zarei Sahamieh et al., 2008. The oldest formation in the studied area is Triassic limestones. The dominant textures of these rocks are porphyritic, microlite porphyritic, microlitic and rarely sieve-texture. Sieve texture and dusty texture (dusty plagioclases indicates magma mixing. Mineralogically, they contain plagioclases, clinopyroxenes, amphiboles, quartz and biotite as the main constituents and zircon, apatite, and opaque minerals as accessories. Plagioclases in the andesitic and basaltic- andesite rocks are labradorite, bytownite and anorthite (based on electron microprobe .Moreover, plagioclases in andesitic rocks show that H2O is lesser than 2.5 precent. Amphibole is found in both plagioclases and groundmass. Materials and methods In this article are used different analyses methods such as XRF, ICP-MS and EPMA. Whole-rock major and trace element analyses were determined with ICP-MS method. The major and trace element composition of some rock was determined by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA using a Cameca SX100 instrument in Iran Mineral Processing Research Center (IMPRC. Moreover, whole-rock major and some trace element analyses for some samples were obtained by X-ray fluorescence (XRF, using an ARL Advant-XP automated X-ray spectrometer. Results Chemical data based on electron micro probe studies of minerals indicate

  5. Pre-Venus-Transit Dark Lunar Eclipse Reveals a Very Large Volcanic Eruption in 1761

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Kepler's third law states Sun-planet distances in AU. International observations of the solar parallax during the 1761/1769 Venus transits gave us the first AU in miles. Benjamin Franklin promoted American participation in the project. While serving as Ambassador to France he observed that a "dry fog” from the 1783 Laki eruption in Iceland had obscured the Sun, and led to a cold summer and winter. Using Benjamin Franklin's method I analyzed photometric observations of the dark lunar eclipse made just before the 1761 Venus transit, ice core, tree ring, and Chinese weather data, and conclude that a very large previously unknown volcanic eruption in early 1761 had cooled the world climate. Observers worldwide found the 18 May 1761 totally eclipsed Moon very dark or invisible, e.g., Wargentin could not see the Moon for 38 minutes even with a 2-ft telescope (Phil. Trans. 52, 208, 1761-1762). Since the totally eclipsed Moon is illuminated only by sunlight refracted by the Earth's atmosphere, the obscuration must have been very severe. Ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica have large sulfuric acid contents in 1761-1762, precipitated from the global volcanic acid cloud (Zeilinski, J. Geophys. Res. 102, 26625, 1997). Frost-damaged rings in American bristlecone pines confirm that 1761 was very cold (LaMarche, Nature 307, 121, 1984). Contemporary Chinese chronicles report that heavy sustained snow fell from the Tropic of Cancer to the Yellow River. Wells and rivers froze, e.g., Taihu "Great Lake” and nearby Yangtze tributaries were not navigable. Innumerable trees, birds and livestock perished, etc. All observations are consistent with the above conclusion. Finally Benjamin Franklin's criteria for a climate-altering volcanic eruption are still universally used. Moreover his legacy continues to inspire climate researchers. See Pang, Eos 74, no. 43, 106, 1993; and as cited in "Earth in Balance,” Al Gore, p. 379, 1993.

  6. The Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption from the MACC perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Richard; Flemming, Johannes; Benedetti, Angela; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Simmons, Adrian; MACC Consortium

    2010-05-01

    The recent eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano on Iceland triggered a strong response from many modelling and observation groups around Europe. MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) is building the atmospheric component of Europe's GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) initiative and has used its pre-operational global assimilation and forecasting system to provide simulations of the development of the volcanic ash plume. Some basic assumptions were made about the height of the injection and the life time of the tracer. These simulations have been provided on a daily basis on the MACC web site. At the same time MACC has also tried to gather relevant observations on top of those that are already assimilated in the pre-operational system. This will allow validation of our plume forecasts as well as assessment of the potential of assimilating these additional observations. The main aim now is to further develop the MACC system to a stage where it can adequately respond to similar events in the future when GMES becomes operational. MACC will then be able to offer support to the official Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres in their task of advising the aviation authorities. In this presentation we will present our plume simulations as well as some initial validation. We will also present some preliminary data assimilation experiments to show the potential and difficulties of data assimilation in case of volcanic eruptions. Finally, we will try to make a first assessment of what is needed in the near future in terms of model development and observations to be fully prepared for events like the eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull

  7. Ar-Ar geochronology of Late Mesozoic volcanic rocks from the Yanji area,NE China and tectonic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChaoWen; GUO Feng; FAN WeiMing; GAO XiaoFeng

    2007-01-01

    Ar-Ar dating results of late Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic rocks from the Yanji area, NE China provide a new volcano-sedimentary stratigraphic framework. The previously defined "Triassic-Jurassic" volcanic rocks(including those from Sanxianling, Tuntianying, Tianqiaoling and Jingouling Fms.)were erupted during 118-106Ma,corresponding to Early Cretaceous. The new eruption age span is slightly younger than the main stage(130-120 Ma)of the extensive magmatism in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt and its adjacent regions. Subduction-related adakites occurring in the previously defined Quanshuicun Fm. Were extruded at ca.55 Ma. Based on these new Ar-Ar ages, the late Mesozoic to Palaeocene volcano-sedimentary sequences is rebuilt as:Tuopangou Fm., Sanxianling/Tuntianying Fm.(118-115 Ma),Malugou/Tianqiaoling Fm.(K1),Huoshanyan/Jingouling Fm.(108-106 Ma),Changcai Fm.(K2),Quanshuicun Fm.(~55 Ma)and Dalazi Fm. Our results suggest that subduction of the Palaeo-Pacific Ocean beneath the East Asian continental margin occurred during 106to 55 Ma. Consistent with the paleomagnetic observations and magmatic records which indicated that the Izanagi-Farallon ridge subduction beneath the southwestern Japan took place during 95-65 Ma.

  8. Ar-Ar geochronology of Late Mesozoic volcanic rocks from the Yanji area, NE China and tectonic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ar-Ar dating results of late Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic rocks from the Yanji area, NE China provide a new volcano-sedimentary stratigraphic framework. The previously defined “Triassic-Jurassic” volcanic rocks (including those from Sanxianling, Tuntianying, Tianqiaoling and Jingouling Fms.) were erupted during 118―106 Ma, corresponding to Early Cretaceous. The new eruption age span is slightly younger than the main stage (130―120 Ma) of the extensive magmatism in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt and its adjacent regions. Subduction-related adakites occurring in the previously defined Quanshuicun Fm. were extruded at ca. 55 Ma. Based on these new Ar-Ar ages, the late Mesozoic to Palaeocene volcano-sedimentary sequences is rebuilt as: Tuopangou Fm., Sanxianling/Tuntianying Fm. (118―115 Ma), Malugou/Tianqiaoling Fm. (K1), Huoshanyan/Jingouling Fm. (108―106 Ma), Changcai Fm. (K2), Quanshuicun Fm. (~55 Ma) and Dalazi Fm. Our results suggest that subduction of the Pa- laeo-Pacific Ocean beneath the East Asian continental margin occurred during 106 to 55 Ma, consistent with the paleomagnetic observations and magmatic records which indicated that the Izanagi-Farallon ridge subduction beneath the southwestern Japan took place during 95―65 Ma.

  9. Geochemical constraints on the evolution of mafic and felsic rocks in the Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence of Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashima Saikia; Bibhuti Gogoi; Mansoor Ahmad; Talat Ahmad

    2014-07-01

    The Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary (BVS) sequence is a volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence, best exposed near Bathani village in Gaya district of Bihar. It is located in the northern fringe of the Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC). The volcano-sedimentary unit comprises of garnet-mica schist, rhyolite, tuff, banded iron formation (BIF) and chert bands with carbonate rocks as enclaves within the rhyolite and the differentiated volcanic sequence comprises of rhyolite, andesite, pillow basalt, massive basalt, tuff and mafic pyroclasts. Emplacement of diverse felsic and mafic rocks together testifies for a multi-stage and multi-source magmatism for the area. The presence of pillow basalt marks the eruption of these rocks in a subaqueous environment. Intermittent eruption of mafic and felsic magmas resulted in the formation of rhyolite, mafic pyroclasts, and tuff. Mixing and mingling of the felsic and mafic magmas resulted in the hybrid rock andesite. Granites are emplaced later, crosscutting the volcanic sequence and are probably products of fractional crystallization of basaltic magma. The present work characterizes the geochemical characteristics of the magmatic rocks comprising of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, tuff, and granite of the area. Tholeiitic trend for basalt and calc-alkaline affinities of andesite, rhyolite and granite is consistent with their generation in an island arc, subduction related setting. The rocks of the BVS sequence probably mark the collision of the northern and southern Indian blocks during Proterozoic period. The explosive submarine volcanism may be related to culmination of the collision of the aforementioned blocks during the Neoproterozoic (1.0 Ga) as the Grenvillian metamorphism is well established in various parts of CGGC.

  10. Geochemical constraints on the evolution of mafic and felsic rocks in the Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence of Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Ashima; Gogoi, Bibhuti; Ahmad, Mansoor; Ahmad, Talat

    2014-06-01

    The Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary (BVS) sequence is a volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence, best exposed near Bathani village in Gaya district of Bihar. It is located in the northern fringe of the Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC). The volcano-sedimentary unit comprises of garnet-mica schist, rhyolite, tuff, banded iron formation (BIF) and chert bands with carbonate rocks as enclaves within the rhyolite and the differentiated volcanic sequence comprises of rhyolite, andesite, pillow basalt, massive basalt, tuff and mafic pyroclasts. Emplacement of diverse felsic and mafic rocks together testifies for a multi-stage and multi-source magmatism for the area. The presence of pillow basalt marks the eruption of these rocks in a subaqueous environment. Intermittent eruption of mafic and felsic magmas resulted in the formation of rhyolite, mafic pyroclasts, and tuff. Mixing and mingling of the felsic and mafic magmas resulted in the hybrid rock andesite. Granites are emplaced later, cross-cutting the volcanic sequence and are probably products of fractional crystallization of basaltic magma. The present work characterizes the geochemical characteristics of the magmatic rocks comprising of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, tuff, and granite of the area. Tholeiitic trend for basalt and calc-alkaline affinities of andesite, rhyolite and granite is consistent with their generation in an island arc, subduction related setting. The rocks of the BVS sequence probably mark the collision of the northern and southern Indian blocks during Proterozoic period. The explosive submarine volcanism may be related to culmination of the collision of the aforementioned blocks during the Neoproterozoic (1.0 Ga) as the Grenvillian metamorphism is well established in various parts of CGGC.

  11. Halogens behaviours in Magma Degassing: Insights into Eruptive Dynamics, Hydrothermal Systems and Atmospheric Impact of Andesitic Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemant, B.; Balcone, H.; Mouatt, J.; Michel, A.; Komorowski, J.; Boudon, G.

    2007-12-01

    Shallow degassing of H2O in andesitic magmas determines the eruptive styles of volcanic eruptions and contributes to the hydrothermal systems developed around active volcanoes. Halogens behaviour during magma degassing primarily depends on their incompatible behaviour in the melts and on water solubility. Thus, residual contents of halogens in volcanic juvenile vitric clasts may be used as tracers of H2O degassing processes during explosive and effusive eruptions. Because of the large range of water-melt partition coefficients of halogens and their relatively low diffusion coefficients, a comparison of F, Cl, Br and I contents in volcanic clasts in function of their vesicularity and micro-cristallinity allows to precisely model the main degassing processes and to establish constraints on pre-eruptive conditions. Halogens acids (HCl, HBr and HI) extracted in the vapour phase have much more complex behaviours because of their high solubility in low temperature thermal waters, their variable condensation temperatures and their very high reactivity when mixed with low temperature and oxidizing atmospheric gases. A comparison of model compositions of high temperature gases with the composition of thermal waters, and gases from fumaroles or plumes of active volcanoes allows to characterise the shallow volcanic system and its evolutionary states. Variable halogen behaviours are discussed for a variety of eruption types (plinian, vulcanian and dome-forming) and active volcanic systems from the Lesser Antilles (Montagne Pelee, Soufrière of Guadeloupe, Soufriere Hills of Montserrat).

  12. Triboelectric charging of volcanic ash from the 2011 Gr\\'{i}msv\\"{o}tn eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, Isobel M. P.; Aplin, Karen L.; Nicoll, Keri

    2013-01-01

    The plume from the 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn was highly electrically charged, as shown by the considerable lightning activity measured by the United Kingdom Met Office’s low-frequency lightning detection network. Previous measurements of volcanic plumes have shown that ash particles are electrically charged up to hundreds of kilometers away from the vent, which indicates that the ash continues to charge in the plume [R. G. Harrison, K. A. Nicoll, Z. Ulanowski, and T. A. Mather, Environ. Res....

  13. Geochemistry of high-potassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcanic center, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, Reinhard A.; Mochel, David W.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Eide, Elizabeth A.; Rothwarf, Miriam T.; Loeffler, Bruce M.; Johnson, David A.; Keating, Gordon N.; Sultze, Kimberly; Benjamin, Anne E.; Venzke, Edward A.; Filson, Tammy

    1990-07-01

    The Guffey volcanic center is the largest within the 2000 km2 mid-Tertiary Thirtynine Mile volcanic field of central Colorado. This study is the first to provide extensive chemical data for these alkalic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which represent the eroded remnants of a large stratovolcano of Oligocene age. Formation of early domes and flows of latite and trachyte within the Guffey center was followed by extrusion of a thick series of basalt, trachybasalt, and shoshonite flows and lahars. Plugs, dikes, and vents ranging from basalt to rhyolite cut the thick mafic deposits, and felsic tuffs and tuff breccias chemically identical to the small rhyolitic plutons are locally preserved. Whole-rock major and trace element analyses of 80 samples, ranging almost continuously from 47% to 78%SiO2, indicate that the rocks of the Guffey center are among the most highly enriched in K2O (up to 6%) and rare earth elements (typically 200-300 ppm) of any volcanic rocks in Colorado. These observations, along with the relatively high concentrations of Ba and Rb and the depletion of Cr and Ni, suggest an appreciable contribution of lower crustal material to the magmas that produced the Thirtynine Mile volcanic rocks.

  14. Effect of Mesozoic volcanic eruptions in the western Liaoning Province, China on paleoclimate and paleoenvironment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Zhengfu(郭正府); LIU; Jiaqi(刘嘉麒); WANG; Xiaolin(汪筱林)

    2003-01-01

    Well-preserved Mesozoic vertebrate fossils were found from lacustrine deposits interbedded with tuff and tuffites in the lower part of the Yixian Formation, western Liaoning Province, China. The fossil-rich layers were preserved in the intermediate-acid volcanic deposits in Sihetun excavating profile. Based on the petrographic studies of samples of the tuff and tuffites collected from the profile, this paper determines major element concentrations and volatile compositions of the melt inclusions in phenocrysts and matrix glasses with electron microprobe analysis. Volatile (S, F, Cl and H2O) contents emitted into the atmosphere were estimated by comparing pre- and post-eruptive volatile concentrations. Amount of volatiles (except for water) emitted in western Liaoning are much higher than those in the historic eruptions which had a substantial effect on climate and environment. Based on the nature and amount of the gases emitted in the eruptions of western Liaoning, we present a hypothesis that volatile-rich volcanism could result in mass mortality of vertebrates in the study area by injecting a large amount of volatiles (e.g., SO2, H2S, HCl, HF and H2O) into the stratosphere that would have triggered abrupt environmental and climate changes and altered lake chemistry. In terms of contents of volatile emissions, the eruptions in western Liaoning can be subdivided into the following three categories. The first group is dominated by HF emission, which had a fatal but possibly short-lived effect on paleoclimate and paleoenvironment and finally caused the mass mortality of the primitive birds. The second group presents the highest halogen concentrations emitted. However, contents of chlorine erupted is higher than those of fluorine emitted. The reactive chlorine compounds probably led to the ozone layer depletion and, therefore, caused mass mortality of most of all vertebrates including fishes, turtles and dinosaurs. The third one consists mainly of sulfur gases

  15. Volcanic unrest leading to the July-August 2001 lateral eruption at Mt. Etna: Seismological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicali, Simona; Barberi, Graziella; Cocina, Ornella; Musumeci, Carla; Patanè, Domenico

    2015-10-01

    A close relationship between earthquake swarms, volcanic eruptions, and ground deformation at Mt. Etna was well documented shortly before the beginning of the July-August 2001 eruption. Past experiences at this volcano suggest how magma/dike intrusion in the shallow crust or in the upper part of the volcanic pile normally occurs after several years/months of internal recharging. Since seismic investigations provide a means to study the scale and origin of stress perturbations at active volcanoes, allowing to better investigating the preparation phase of an eruption, in this paper, we performed a close examination of the seismic activity recorded at Mt. Etna in the months preceding the 2001 eruption and in particular between November 2000 and July 2001. After integrating data recorded by the two networks operating during that time and run by the Istituto Internazionale di Vulcanologia and SISTEMA POSEIDON, we relocated 522 earthquakes by using the tomoDD code in a 3D velocity model, and then we computed their fault plane solutions. The application of different selection criteria enabled obtaining a good-quality revised data set consisting of 111 fault plane solutions. The high-precision locations identified well-defined seismic clusters, in different periods, suggesting a link with the magma migration from a depth of 8-13 km b.s.l. towards shallower zones. Moreover, the computed maximum compressive stress axis, as inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms, indicated a roughly W-E-oriented σ1. This findings reflect an overpressure of the mid to shallow crust due to the progressive magma uprising in central portion of the volcano and also highlighted a rotation of the local stress field with respect to the regional one N-S trending. In addition, P-axis distribution pointed out the presence of a center of pressure located to the south of the Central Craters. These results provide particularly compelling evidence for a direct causal link between pressurization of the

  16. Sedimentology, eruptive mechanism and facies architecture of basaltic scoria cones from the Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly

    2016-09-01

    Scoria cones are a common type of basaltic to andesitic small-volume volcanoes (e.g. 10- 1-10- 5 km3) that results from gas-bubble driven explosive eruptive styles. Although they are small in volume, they can produce complex eruptions, involving multiple eruptive styles. Eight scoria cones from the Quaternary Auckland Volcanic Field in New Zealand were selected to define the eruptive style variability from their volcanic facies architecture. The reconstruction of their eruptive and pyroclastic transport mechanisms was established on the basis of study of their volcanic sedimentology, stratigraphy, and measurement of their pyroclast density, porosity, Scanning Electron Microscopy, 2D particle morphology analysis and Visible and Near Visible Infrared Spectroscopy. Collection of these data allowed defining three end-member types of scoria cones inferred to be constructed from lava-fountaining, transitional fountaining and Strombolian type, and explosive Strombolian type. Using the physical and field-based characteristics of scoriaceous samples a simple generalised facies model of basaltic scoria cones for the AVF is developed that can be extended to other scoria cones elsewhere. The typical AVF scoria cone has an initial phreatomagmatic phases that might reduce the volume of magma available for subsequent scoria cone forming eruptions. This inferred to have the main reason to have decreased cone volumes recognised from Auckland in comparison to other volcanic fields evolved dominantly in dry eruptive condition (e.g. no external water influence). It suggests that such subtle eruptive style variations through a scoria cone evolution need to be integrated into the hazard assessment of a potentially active volcanic field such as that in Auckland.

  17. Magmatic Source Composition and Magmatism of the Volcanic Rocks in the Area of Kuruktag, Southern Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Changyi; BAI Kaiyin; HI Aizhi; ZHAO Xiaoning; ZHANG Hongbo

    2001-01-01

    In the Sinian-Cambrian strata in the area of Kuruktag, southern Xingjiang, four layers of volcanic rocks occurred in the Early Sinian Beiyixi Formation, Late Sinian Zhamoketi Formation and Shuiquan Formation, and Early Cambrian Xishanbulake Formation, respectively. Volcanics of the Shuiquan Formation and Xishanbulake Formation are of alkali basalt series, those of the Zhamoketi Formation are of alkali basalt series and tholeiite series, and those of the Beiyixi Formation are obviously characterized by bimodal assemblage and mostly belong to alkali volcanics. Multi-element distribution patterns of the rocks show continental tumescence characters of interplate basalt.Fractional crystallization of plagioclase led to negative Eu-anomalies of some volcanics and the cumulation of olivine resulted in high MgO and low SiO2 content of some volcanic rocks. The SiO2 saturability of volcanic rocks of the Xishanbulake Formation and Shuiquan Formation is lower than that of tholeiite of the Zhamoketi Formation. Correspondingly, the abundance of incompatible elements in the first two formations is higher than those in the last formation, and the differences can be attributed to the different degrees of partial melting. The intense fractionation of REE and the obvious depletion of HREE suggest that these volcanic rocks were derived from garnet Iherzolite of the mantle in the continental lithosphere. The Ba/Nb, La/Nb, Ba/La, Ba/Th and Rb/Nb rations demonstrate that these volcanic rocks were exclusively derived from the enriched mantle, mainly the EMI type mantle.

  18. A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash-cloud transport and dispersion during eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, L.G.; Guffanti, M.; Servranckx, R.; Webley, P.; Barsotti, S.; Dean, K.; Durant, A.; Ewert, J.W.; Neri, A.; Rose, William I.; Schneider, D.; Siebert, L.; Stunder, B.; Swanson, G.; Tupper, A.; Volentik, A.; Waythomas, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    During volcanic eruptions, volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs) are used to forecast the location and movement of ash clouds over hours to days in order to define hazards to aircraft and to communities downwind. Those models use input parameters, called "eruption source parameters", such as plume height H, mass eruption rate ???, duration D, and the mass fraction m63 of erupted debris finer than about 4??{symbol} or 63????m, which can remain in the cloud for many hours or days. Observational constraints on the value of such parameters are frequently unavailable in the first minutes or hours after an eruption is detected. Moreover, observed plume height may change during an eruption, requiring rapid assignment of new parameters. This paper reports on a group effort to improve the accuracy of source parameters used by VATDs in the early hours of an eruption. We do so by first compiling a list of eruptions for which these parameters are well constrained, and then using these data to review and update previously studied parameter relationships. We find that the existing scatter in plots of H versus ??? yields an uncertainty within the 50% confidence interval of plus or minus a factor of four in eruption rate for a given plume height. This scatter is not clearly attributable to biases in measurement techniques or to well-recognized processes such as elutriation from pyroclastic flows. Sparse data on total grain-size distribution suggest that the mass fraction of fine debris m63 could vary by nearly two orders of magnitude between small basaltic eruptions (??? 0.01) and large silicic ones (> 0.5). We classify eleven eruption types; four types each for different sizes of silicic and mafic eruptions; submarine eruptions; "brief" or Vulcanian eruptions; and eruptions that generate co-ignimbrite or co-pyroclastic flow plumes. For each eruption type we assign source parameters. We then assign a characteristic eruption type to each of the world's ??? 1500

  19. A Petrographic and Mineralogical Study of Volcanic Rocks from the Mayaxueshan Area, North Qilian Fold Belt, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐达伟; 萧炎宏

    2002-01-01

    The Ordovician volcanic rocks in the Mayaxueshan area have been pervasively altered or metamorphosedand contain abundant secondary minerals such as albite, chlorite, epidote, prehnite, pumpellyite, actinolite, titanite, quartz,and/or calcite. They were denoted as spilites or spilitic rocks in terms of their petrographic features and mineral assem-blages. The metamorphic grades of the volcanic rocks are equivalent to that of the intercalated metaclastic rocks. Thisindicates that both the spilitic volcanic rocks and metaclastic rocks in the Mayaxueshan area have formed as a result ofCaledonian regional metamorphism. We suggest that the previously denoted spilitic rocks or altered volcanic rocks shouldbe re-denoted as metabasalts or metabasaltic rocks. The metamorphic grade of the volcanic rocks increases with their age:prehnite-pumpellyite facies for the upper part of the Middle Ordovician volcanic rocks, prehnite-pumpellyite to lowergreenschist facies for the lower part of the Middle Ordovician volcanic rocks, and lower greenschist facies for the LowerOrdovician volcanic rocks. The P-T conditions are estimated as T = 240 - 290C and P = 1.5 - 4.5 kbar for the lower partof the Middle Ordovician rocks, and T = ~ 300~C for the Lower Ordovician rocks. The variations of mineral assemblagesoccurring at different domains of the volcanic rocks were controlled by the variations of the effective bulk composition inthose domains during metamorphism. The geochemical characteristics of Mg-Al chromite in the Mayaxueshan volcanicrocks are consistent with an origin of island arc environment.

  20. Relationship between volcanic ash fallouts and seismic tremor: quantitative assessment of the 2015 eruptive period at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Battaglia, Jean; Proaño, Antonio; Hidalgo, Silvana; Vásconez, Francisco; Hernandez, Stephen; Ruiz, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the relationships between geophysical signals and volcanic products is critical to improving real-time volcanic hazard assessment. Thanks to high-frequency sampling campaigns of ash fallouts (15 campaigns, 461 samples), the 2015 Cotopaxi eruption is an outstanding candidate for quantitatively comparing the amplitude of seismic tremor with the amount of ash emitted. This eruption emitted a total of 1.2E + 9 kg of ash ( 8.6E + 5 m3) during four distinct phases, with masses ranging from 3.5E + 7 to 7.7E + 8 kg of ash. We compare the ash fallout mass and the corresponding cumulative quadratic median amplitude of the seismic tremor and find excellent correlations when the dataset is divided by eruptive phase. We use scaling factors based on the individual correlations to reconstruct the eruptive process and to extract synthetic Eruption Source Parameters (daily mass of ash, mass eruption rate, and column height) from the seismic records. We hypothesize that the change in scaling factor through time, associated with a decrease in seismic amplitudes compared to ash emissions, is the result of a more efficient fragmentation and transport process. These results open the possibility of feeding numerical models with continuous geophysical data, after adequate calibration, in order to better characterize volcanic hazards during explosive eruptions.

  1. Quantifying the impact of early 21st century volcanic eruptions on global-mean surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerie, Paul-Arthur; Moine, Marie-Pierre; Terray, Laurent; Valcke, Sophie

    2017-05-01

    Despite a continuous increase in well-mixed greenhouse gases, the global-mean surface temperature has shown a quasi-stabilization since 1998. This muted warming has been linked to the combined effects of internal climate variability and external forcing. The latter includes the impact of recent increase in the volcanic activity and of solar irradiance changes. Here we used a high-resolution coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model to assess the impact of the recent volcanic eruptions on the Earth's temperature, compared with the low volcanic activity of the early 2000s. Two sets of simulations are performed, one with realistic aerosol optical depth values, and the other with a fixed value of aerosol optical depth corresponding to a period of weak volcanic activity (1998-2002). We conclude that the observed recent increase in the volcanic activity led to a reduced warming trend (from 2003 to 2012) of 0.08 °C in ten years. The induced cooling is stronger during the last five-year period (2008-2012), with an annual global mean cooling of 0.04 °C (+/- 0.04 °C). The cooling is similar in summer (0.05 °C +/- 0.04 °C cooling) than in winter (0.03 °C +/- 0.04 °C cooling), but stronger in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. Although equatorial and Arctic precipitation decreases in summer, the change in precipitation does not indicate robust changes at a local scale. Global heat content variations are found not to be impacted by the recent increase in volcanic activity.

  2. Modelling wet deposition in simulations of volcanic ash dispersion from hypothetical eruptions of Merapi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Richard A.; Potts, Rodney J.; Wain, Alan G.

    2016-10-01

    The statistical impact of including the process of wet deposition in dispersion model predictions of the movement of volcanic ash is assessed. Based on hypothetical eruptions of Merapi, Indonesia, sets of dispersion model simulations were generated, each containing four simulations per day over a period of three years, to provide results based on a wide range of atmospheric conditions. While on average dry sedimentation removes approximately 10% of the volcanic ash from the atmosphere during the first 24 h, wet deposition removes an additional 30% during seasons with highest rainfall (December and January) but only an additional 1% during August and September. The majority of the wet removal is due to in-cloud rather than below-cloud collection of volcanic ash particles. The largest uncertainties in the amount of volcanic ash removed by the process of wet deposition result from the choice of user-defined parameters used to compute the scavenging coefficient, and from the definition of the cloud top height. Errors in the precipitation field provided by the numerical weather prediction model utilised here have relatively less impact.

  3. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-05-18

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions.

  4. Multiphase flow modelling of explosive volcanic eruptions using adaptive unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christian T.; Collins, Gareth S.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Kramer, Stephan C.

    2014-05-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate highly energetic plumes of hot gas and ash particles that produce diagnostic deposits and pose an extreme environmental hazard. The formation, dispersion and collapse of these volcanic plumes are complex multiscale processes that are extremely challenging to simulate numerically. Accurate description of particle and droplet aggregation, movement and settling requires a model capable of capturing the dynamics on a range of scales (from cm to km) and a model that can correctly describe the important multiphase interactions that take place. However, even the most advanced models of eruption dynamics to date are restricted by the fixed mesh-based approaches that they employ. The research presented herein describes the development of a compressible multiphase flow model within Fluidity, a combined finite element / control volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. Fluidity adopts a state-of-the-art adaptive unstructured mesh-based approach to discretise the domain and focus numerical resolution only in areas important to the dynamics, while decreasing resolution where it is not needed as a simulation progresses. This allows the accurate but economical representation of the flow dynamics throughout time, and potentially allows large multi-scale problems to become tractable in complex 3D domains. The multiphase flow model is verified with the method of manufactured solutions, and validated by simulating published gas-solid shock tube experiments and comparing the numerical results against pressure gauge data. The application of the model considers an idealised 7 km by 7 km domain in which the violent eruption of hot gas and volcanic ash high into the atmosphere is simulated. Although the simulations do not correspond to a particular eruption case study, the key flow features observed in a typical explosive eruption event are successfully captured. These include a shock wave resulting

  5. The 1998-2001 submarine lava balloon eruption at the Serreta ridge (Azores archipelago): Constraints from volcanic facies architecture, isotope geochemistry and magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Pedro; Rosa, Carlos; Marques, Ana Filipa; Silva, Pedro; Moreira, Manuel; Hamelin, Cédric; Relvas, Jorge; Lourenço, Nuno; Conceição, Patrícia; Pinto de Abreu, Manuel; Barriga, Fernando J. A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The most recent submarine eruption observed offshore the Azores archipelago occurred between 1998 and 2001 along the submarine Serreta ridge (SSR), 4-5 nautical miles WNW of Terceira Island. This submarine eruption delivered abundant basaltic lava balloons floating at the sea surface and significantly changed the bathymetry around the eruption area. Our work combines bathymetry, volcanic facies cartography, petrography, rock magnetism and geochemistry in order to (1) track the possible vent source at seabed, (2) better constrain the Azores magma source(s) sampled through the Serreta submarine volcanic event, and (3) interpret the data within the small-scale mantle source heterogeneity framework that has been demonstrated for the Azores archipelago. Lava balloons sampled at sea surface display a radiogenic signature, which is also correlated with relatively primitive (low) 4He/3He isotopic ratios. Conversely, SSR lavas are characterized by significantly lower radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios than the lava balloons and the onshore lavas from the Terceira Island. SSR lavas are primitive, but incompatible trace-enriched. Apparent decoupling between the enriched incompatible trace element abundances and depleted radiogenic isotope ratios is best explained by binary mixing of a depleted MORB source and a HIMU­type component into magma batches that evolved by similar shallower processes in their travel to the surface. The collected data suggest that the freshest samples collected in the SSR may correspond to volcanic products of an unnoticed and more recent eruption than the 1998-2001 episode.

  6. New thermo and geochronological constraints on the Pliocene-Pleistocene eruption history of the Paipa-Iza volcanic complex, Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, Matthias; Urueña, Cindy; Amaya, Sergio; Peña, Mary L.

    2016-11-01

    The Paipa-Iza volcanic complex is the only volcanic edifice in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. Zircon fission-track and Usbnd Pb data from deposits of two eruption epochs presented in this study constrain the time of volcanic activity between 5.9 Ma in the late Miocene and at least 1.8 Ma during the early Pleistocene. These ages correspond to 3.6 to 4.7 Ma zircon fission-track ages reported from tephra deposits of the Tierra Negra region to the southwest of the Paipa-Iza volcanic complex in the Eastern Cordillera. A 4 Myr period of volcanic activity is longer than the previously documented 2.5 Ma to 1.9 Ma activity in the Paipa-Iza area. Therefore, our data show that the Paipa-Iza volcanic complex was active during the entire Pliocene phase of rapid surface uplift, when the Eastern Cordillera reached its present-day elevation. Unclear is if the magma chamber of the Paipa-Iza volcanic complex was passively uplifted with the rest of the Eastern Cordillera, or if magmatism contributed to surface uplift. Hydrothermal activity and steep thermal gradients in the study area today indicate that a magma chamber is still present at depth. In both the zircon fission-track and Usbnd Pb data of this study the recycling of zircon from underlying Mesozoic sedimentary rocks is evident in the wide age spectra. The fission-track data show that many recycled zircons were affected at least by partial annealing, but further research is needed for constraining the thermal impact of the Paipa-Iza volcanism on the Eastern Cordillera.

  7. Fracture Detection in Geothermal Wells Drilled in Volcanic Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonfalini, Mauro; Chelini, Walter; Cheruvier, Etienne; Suau, Jean; Klopf, Werner

    1987-01-20

    The Phlegrean Fields, close to Naples, are the site of important geothermal activity. The formations are volcanic and mostly tuffites. They are originally very tight but the geothermal alteration locally produces fractures with large increase in permeability. The lack of geological markers makes well-to-well correlation quite difficult. Thus the local detection of fractured zones in each well is very important for the evaluation of its potential. The Mofete 8 D well is a typical example. A rather complete logging program was run for fracture detection. Standard methods turned out to be disappointing. However several non-standard detectors were found to be very consistent and, later on, in excellent agreement with the analysis of cuttings. They are derived from the Dual Laterolog, the SP, the Temperature log and, most particularly, the Acoustic Waveforms from the Long Spacing Sonic. The Dual Laterolog and the Temperature Log indicate invasion by fresh and cold mud filtrate; the SP behaves as in a typical Sand-Shale sequence. Sonic Waveforms were first analyzed by a purely empirical method derived from consistent log patterns. A practical algorithm compares the total energy measured in each of the two fixed time windows located the one before, the other after the fluid arrivals. The altered zones (i.e. fractured and permeable) are clearly shown by a complete reversal of the relative energy of these two windows. A more scientific method was then applied to the Waveforms; it is based on both logging experiments and physical considerations. The energy carried by the tube wave is separated by a frequency discrimination: it correlates very well with formation alteration, thus also with the other indicators including the empirical Waveform method. It should have two advantages: – It should permit at least a semi quantitative permeability evaluation – It seems to be promising in other formations: non-volcanic geothermal wells and even hydrocarbon-bearing rocks. 10 refs

  8. Discovery of Enclaves from Cenozoic Pulu Volcanic Rocks in West Kunlun Mountains and Its Geological Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present the occurrence and mineral components of the enclaves firstly discovered in the Cenozoic Pulu volcanic rocks in west Kunlun Mountains, and propose that the enclave is accumulated by fractional crystallization within high-level magma chamber. In addition, the chemical compositions of its primary magma are calculated. The calculated compositions are similar to those of the Kangxiwa volcanic rocks that belong to the same volcanic belt in the Pulu volcanic region, suggesting their origin from the same source region. However, the temperatures and oxygen fugacity of magmas at high-level magma chamber decreased along with fractional crystallization.

  9. Geomorphic change along a gravel bed river affected by volcanic eruption: Rio Blanco - Volcan Chaiten (South Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Lorenzo; Ravazzolo, Diego; Ulloa, Hector; Iroumé, Andres; Aristide Lenzi, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Gravel bed rivers are environments shaped by the balance of flow, sediment regimes, large wood (LW) and vegetation. Geomorphic changes are response to fluctuations and changes of runoff and sediment supply involving mutual interactions among these factors. Typically, many natural disasters (i.e. debris flows, floods and forest fires) can affect the river basin dynamics. Explosive volcanic eruptions present, instead, the potential of exerting severe impacts as, for example, filling river valleys or changing river network patterns thanks to massive deposition of tephra and volcanic sediment all over the main channel and over the basin. These consistent impacts can strongly affect both hydrology and sediment transport dynamics, all over the river system, producing huge geomorphic changes. During the last years there has been a consistent increase in the survey technologies that permit to monitor geomorphic changes and to estimate sediment budgets through repeat topographic surveys. The calculation of differences between subsequent DEMs (difference of DEMs, DoD) is a commonly applied method to analyze and quantify these dynamics. Typically the higher uncertainty values are registered in areas with higher topographic variability and lower point density. This research was conducted along a ~ 2.2 km-long sub-reach of the Blanco River (Southern Chile), a fourth-order stream that presents a mainly rainfall regime with winter peak flows. The May 2008 Chaitén volcanic eruption strongly affected the entire Rio Blanco basin. The entire valley was highly exposed to the pyroclastic and fluvial flows, which affected directly a consistent area of evergreen forests. Extreme runoff from the upper Blanco catchment aggraded the channel and deposited up to several meters of tephra, alluvium, and LW along the entire river system. Aims of this contribution are to define and quantify the short term evolution of the Blanco River after the big eruption event and a subsequent consistent

  10. Constraining the dynamics of volcanic eruptions by characterization of pumice textures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Polacci

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized the textures of pumice clasts from Phlegraean Fields to gain insights into the conduit flow-dynamics of alkaline explosive eruptions. Vesicularities, vesicle number densities, and vesicle sizes and shapes were measured to obtain the bulk and groundmass properties of the juvenile fraction of Campanian Ignimbrite (CI and Agnano Monte Spina (AMS eruptions. The results report the coexistence of three end-member pumice types in the deposits of both eruptions, 1 microvesicular, 2 tube and 3 expanded, which differ according to clast morphology and the macro- to microscopic vesicle texture. Vesicularities (0.85-0.94 for CI, 0.51-0.91 for AMS and vesicle number densities (2-4×105 cm-2 in CI, 3×105-106 cm-2 in AMS span quite a wide range in all the three pumice types. Overall, tube pumices exhibit the highest bulk (0.89 and groundmass (CI 0.85, AMS 0.82 average vesicle volume fractions but the lowest average vesicle number densities (CI 2×105, AMS 4×105 cm-2. Comparison with textures of calc-alkaline pumices has revealed many similarities and points to a common origin and distribution of the products from both magma compositions within the volcanic conduit. In addition, the results of the textural analysis were interpreted in the light of the conduit flow modeling of Phlegraean Fields eruptions. The comparison of textural observations with results from simulations of conduit magma ascent has exhibited a good agreement between measured and numerically calculated vesicularities for both compositions, helping to constrain the overall dynamics of alkaline versus calc-alkaline eruptions.

  11. Sulfur mass loading of the atmosphere from volcanic eruptions: Calibration of the ice core record on basis of sulfate aerosol deposition in polar regions from the 1982 El Chichon eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Laj, Paolo

    1990-01-01

    Major volcanic eruptions disperse large quantities of sulfur compound throughout the Earth's atmosphere. The sulfuric acid aerosols resulting from such eruptions are scavenged by snow within the polar regions and appear in polar ice cores as elevated acidity layers. Glacio-chemical studies of ice cores can, thus, provide a record of past volcanism, as well as the means for understanding the fate of volcanic sulfur in the atmosphere. The primary objectives of this project are to study the chemistry and physical properties of volcanic fallout in a Greenland Ice Core in order to evaluate the impact of the volcanic gases on the atmospheric chemistry and the total atmospheric mass of volcanic aerosols emitted by major volcanic eruptions. We propose to compare the ice core record to other atmospheric records performed during the last 10 years to investigate transport and deposition of volcanic materials.

  12. Composition of volcanic gases emitted during repeating Vulcanian eruption stage of Shinmoedake, Kirishima volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, H.

    2013-06-01

    Volcanic gas compositions of Shinmoedake, Kirishima volcano, Japan were measured by Multi-GAS during the persistent degassing period with repeating Vulcanian eruptions from March 2011 to March 2012. In order to avoid risks due to eruptions, the measurements were performed with the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) that fly through the plume with the Multi-GAS and by an automatic Multi-GAS monitoring station installed 5 km away from the summit. Based on the UAV measurements on May 18, 2011, most of the major volcanic gas components were quantified as CO2/SO2 = 8, SO2/H2S = 0.8, H2O/CO2 = 70 and H2/SO2 = 0.03 (mol ratio), and the SO2/H2S ratio of the plume was quantified as 8 on March 15, 2011. The Multi-GAS monitoring station occasionally detected a dilute plume with an SO2/H2S ratio ranging from 0.8 to 3.3 from April 2011 to March 2012. The decrease of the SO2/H2S ratio from March 15, 2011, to May 18, 2011, is interpreted as the result of a ten times increase of the degassing pressure. Based on the SO2 fluxes and the gas compositions, the conduit magma convection is considered to be the gas supply mechanism at the Shinmoedake, and the degassing pressure changes are attributed to the change of depth of the convecting magma column top.

  13. A relation to predict the failure of materials and potential application to volcanic eruptions and landslides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shengwang; Liu, Chao; Lu, Chunsheng; Elsworth, Derek

    2016-06-16

    A theoretical explanation of a time-to-failure relation is presented, with this relationship then used to describe the failure of materials. This provides the potential to predict timing (tf - t) immediately before failure by extrapolating the trajectory as it asymptotes to zero with no need to fit unknown exponents as previously proposed in critical power law behaviors. This generalized relation is verified by comparison with approaches to criticality for volcanic eruptions and creep failure. A new relation based on changes with stress is proposed as an alternative expression of Voight's relation, which is widely used to describe the accelerating precursory signals before material failure and broadly applied to volcanic eruptions, landslides and other phenomena. The new generalized relation reduces to Voight's relation if stress is limited to increase at a constant rate with time. This implies that the time-derivatives in Voight's analysis may be a subset of a more general expression connecting stress derivatives, and thus provides a potential method for forecasting these events.

  14. Spatio-temporal occurrence of eruptions in El Hierro (Canary Islands). Sequential steps for long-term volcanic hazard assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Laura; Bartolini, Stefania; Sobradelo, Rosa; Martí, Joan; María Morales, José; Galindo, Inés; Geyer, Adelina

    2014-05-01

    Long term volcanic hazard assessment requires the attainment of several sequential steps, including the compilation of geological and volcanological information, the characterization of past eruptions, spatial and temporal probabilistic studies, and the simulation of different eruptive scenarios to get qualitative and representative results. Volcanic hazard assessment has not been yet systematically conducted in the Canary Islands, in spite of being a densely populated active volcanic region that receives millions of visitors per year. In this paper we focus our attention on El Hierro, the youngest and latest island affected by an eruption in the Canary Islands. We analyze the past eruptive activity (how), the spatial probability (where), and the temporal probability (when) on the island. Looking at the past eruptive behavior of the island, and assuming future eruptive patterns will be similar, we try to identify the most likely set of volcanic scenarios and corresponding hazards that could occur in the future (eg. lava flows, pyroclastic fallout, and pyroclastic density currents) and estimate their probability of occurrence. The final result shows the first volcanic hazard map of the island. This study represents a step forward in the evaluation of long term volcanic hazard at El Hierro Island with regard to previous studies. The obtained results should represent the main pillars on which to build risk mitigation programs as it is required for territorial planning and to develop emergency plans. This research was partially funded by IGME, CSIC and the European Commission (FT7 Theme: ENV.2011.1.3.3-1; Grant 282759: "VUELCO"), and MINECO grant GL2011-16144-E.

  15. The origin of volcanic rock fragments in Upper Pliocene Grad Member of the Mura Formation, North-Eastern Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Kralj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Fresh-water, coarse-grained and detritus-dominated Mura Formation in North Eastern Slovenia includes pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits originating from Upper Pliocene volcanic activity of basaltic geochemical character. Although localized in occurrence at the hamlet Grad, these pyroclastic and volcaniclastic sediments forma distinctive depositional unit, for which the term “Grad Member” is proposed and introduced in this paper.In the Grad area no lavas or cinder cones are preserved, and the origin of volcaniclastic fragments still uncertain. For this reason, chemical composition of basaltic rock fragments from the Grad Member volcaniclastics has been studied and compared with basaltic rocks from the neighboring locations at Klöch, Kindsberg, Dölling and Neuhaus. The Grad Member pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits seem to be fed from the same source which is different from the occurrences in Austria. That supports the idea about the existence of a local volcanic centre in the present Grad area. The old volcanic edificeswerepossiblydestroyed by the late-stage hydrovolcanic eruptions, and pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits subjected to constant reworking by fluvial currents in a dynamic sedimentary environment of alluvial fan and braided river systems.

  16. Possible connection between large volcanic eruptions and level rise episodes in the Dead Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, R.; Filin, S.; Avni, Y.; Rosenfeld, D.; Marco, S.

    2014-12-01

    The June 1991 Pinatubo volcanic eruption perturbed the atmosphere, triggering short-term worldwide changes in climate. The following winter was anomalously wet in the Levant, with a ~2-meter increase in the Dead Sea level that created a morphological terrace along the lake's shore. Given the global effects of volcanogenic aerosols, we tested the hypothesis that the 1991-92 shore terrace is a modern analogue to the linkage between past volcanic eruptions and a sequence of shore terraces in the Dead Sea Basin. Analysis of precipitation series from Jerusalem showed a significant positive correlation between the Dust Veil Index (DVI) of the modern eruptions and annual rainfall. The DVI was found to explain nearly 50% of the variability in the annual rainfall, such that greater DVI means more rainfall. Other factors that may affect the annual rainfall in the region as the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and the North Atlantic oscillations (NAO) were incorporated along with the DVI in a linear multiple regression model. It was found that the NAO did not contribute anything except for increased noise, but the added SOI increased the explained variability of rainfall to more than 60%. Volcanic eruptions with a VEI of 6, as in the Pinatubo, occurred about once a century during the Holocene and the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This occurrence is similar to the frequency of shore terrace build-up during the Lake Lisan desiccation. Sixteen shore terraces, detected using airborne laser scanning data, were interpreted as indicating short-term level rises due to episodes of enhanced precipitation and runoff during the dramatic drop in Lake Lisan's (palaeo-Dead Sea) level at the end of the LGM. The terraces were compared with a time series of volcanogenic sulfate from the GISP2 record, and similar numbers of sulfate concentration peaks and terraces were found. Furthermore, a significant correlation was found between SO4 concentration peaks and the terraces heights. This

  17. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Harrington

    2004-10-25

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit

  18. Application of computer-assisted mapping to volcanic hazard evaluation of surge eruptions: Vulcano, lipari, and vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Michael F.; Malin, Michael C.

    1983-09-01

    A previously developed computer-assisted model has been applied to several pyroclastic-surge eruptions at three active volcanoes in Italy. Model hazard maps created for various vent locations, eruption types, and mass production rates reasonably reproduced pyroclastic-surge deposits from several recent eruptions on Vulcano, Lipari, and Vesuvius. Small-scale phreatic eruptions on the island of Vulcano (e.g. the 1727 explosion of Forgia Vecchia) pose a limited but serious threat to the village of Porto. The most dangerous zone affected by this type of eruption follows a NNW fissure system between Fossa and Vulcanello. Moderate-sized eruptions on Vulcano, such as those associated with the present Fossa Crater are a much more serious threat to Porto as well as the entire area within the caldera surrounding the cone. The less frequent surge eruptions on Lipari have been even more violent. The extreme mobility of surges like those produced from Monte Guardia (approx. 20,000 y.b.p.) and Monte Pilato would not only threaten the entire island of Lipari, but also the northern part of neighboring Vulcano. Eruptions at Vesuvius with energy and efficiency similar to that of the May 18, 1980 blast of Mount St. Helens would be still more destructive because of the great initial elevation of the summit vent. In addition, surge eruptions at Vesuvius are generally part of more complex eruption cycles that involve several other types of volcanic phenomena including Plinian fall and pyroclastic flows.

  19. Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER) project and a next-generation real-time volcano hazard assessment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, S.

    2012-12-01

    The first Workshop of Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER1) was held in Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan from February 23 to 24, 2012. The workshop focused on the formulation of strategies to reduce the risks of disasters worldwide caused by the occurrence of earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions. More than 150 participants attended the workshop. During the workshop, the G-EVER1 accord was approved by the participants. The Accord consists of 10 recommendations like enhancing collaboration, sharing of resources, and making information about the risks of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions freely available and understandable. The G-EVER Hub website (http://g-ever.org) was established to promote the exchange of information and knowledge among the Asia-Pacific countries. Several G-EVER Working Groups and Task Forces were proposed. One of the working groups was tasked to make the next-generation real-time volcano hazard assessment system. The next-generation volcano hazard assessment system is useful for volcanic eruption prediction, risk assessment, and evacuation at various eruption stages. The assessment system is planned to be developed based on volcanic eruption scenario datasets, volcanic eruption database, and numerical simulations. Defining volcanic eruption scenarios based on precursor phenomena leading up to major eruptions of active volcanoes is quite important for the future prediction of volcanic eruptions. Compiling volcanic eruption scenarios after a major eruption is also important. A high quality volcanic eruption database, which contains compilations of eruption dates, volumes, and styles, is important for the next-generation volcano hazard assessment system. The volcanic eruption database is developed based on past eruption results, which only represent a subset of possible future scenarios. Hence, different distributions from the previous deposits are mainly observed due to the differences in

  20. Health effects following the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Hanne Krage; Hauksdottir, Arna; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur Anna; Gíslason, Thorarinn; Einarsdottir, Gunnlaug; Runolfsson, Halldor; Briem, Haraldur; Finnbjornsdottir, Ragnhildur Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Sigurdur; Kolbeinsson, Thorir Björn; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Pétursdóttir, Gudrun

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed to determine whether exposure to a volcanic eruption was associated with increased prevalence of physical and/or mental symptoms. Design Cohort, with non-exposed control group. Setting Natural disasters like volcanic eruptions constitute a major public-health threat. The Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull exposed residents in southern Iceland to continuous ash fall for more than 5 weeks in spring 2010. This study was conducted during November 2010–March 2011, 6–9 months after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Participants Adult (18–80 years of age) eruption-exposed South Icelanders (N=1148) and a control population of residents of Skagafjörður, North Iceland (N=510). The participation rate was 72%. Main outcome measures Physical symptoms in the previous year (chronic), in the previous month (recent), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) measured psychological morbidity. Results The likelihood of having symptoms during the last month was higher in the exposed population, such as; tightness in the chest (OR 2.5; 95% CI 1.1 to 5.8), cough (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.7 to 3.9), phlegm (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.3 to 3.2), eye irritation (OR 2.9; 95% CI 2.0 to 4.1) and psychological morbidity symptoms (OR 1.3; 95% CI 1.0 to 1.7). Respiratory symptoms during the last 12 months were also more common in the exposed population; cough (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.6 to 2.9), dyspnoea (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.3), although the prevalence of underlying asthma and heart disease was similar. Twice as many in the exposed population had two or more symptoms from nose, eyes or upper-respiratory tract (24% vs 13%, peruption. Conclusions 6–9 months after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption, residents living in the exposed area, particularly those closest to the volcano, had markedly increased prevalence of various physical symptoms. A portion of the exposed population reported multiple symptoms and may be at risk for long-term physical and psychological morbidity. Studies

  1. Assessing volcanic risk in regions with low frequency eruptions: the Laacher See case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riede, Felix; Blong, Russell

    2017-04-01

    Approximately 13,000 years ago, the Laacher See volcano located in present-day western Germany (East Eifel volcanic field, Rhenish Shield) erupted cataclysmically and, to-date, for the last time. In addition to the near-vent destruction wrought by pyroclastic flows and massive tephra deposition, a swath of airfall ash covered Europe from the Alps to the Baltic. Mofettes in the caldera lake as well as tomography studies clearly reveal the presence of a still-active hot spot in the Eifel suggestive of the possibility of renewed activity. Previous studies have focused on the near-vent situation and on unraveling the eruption sequence. Archive legacy data harvested from a variety of disciplinary and often obscure sources (palynology, pedology, archaeology, geological grey literature) now provide new insights into the medial, distal and ultra-distal distribution of Laacher See fallout. This tephra-fall distribution and its utility as a chronostratigraphic marker at archaeological sites allow a detailed reconstruction of contemporaneous human impacts. At the same time, tephra samples collected from sites across northern Europe also reveal the causal contributions of different hazard phenomena (dental abrasion, vegetation impacts, health hazards). Given the high density of key infrastructure installations and of population in the region, risk calculations using the recently proposed Volcanic Risk Coefficient (VRC) place the Laacher See volcano on par with many more active and routinely monitored volcanoes (e.g. Teide, Ischia) - despite the Laacher See's long repose period. Indeed, the lack of prior exposure of Western European populations, coupled with the large number of countries likely to be affected by any future eruption would further aggravate any given impact. The data extant now could be used to construct robust Realistic Disaster Scenarios, and to improve outreach efforts aimed at raising awareness of this major volcano in the heart of Europe.

  2. Terminal Pleistocene to early Holocene volcanic eruptions at Zuni Salt Lake, west-central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Jill; Forman, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Zuni Salt Lake (ZSL) is a large maar in the Red Hill-Quemado volcanic field located in west-central New Mexico in the southwestern USA. Stratigraphic analysis of sections in and around the maar, coupled with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating, indicate that ZSL volcanic activity occurred between ˜13.4 and 9.9 ka and was most likely confined to a ≤500-year interval sometime between ˜12.3 and 11.0 ka. The basal volcanic unit consists of locally widespread basaltic ash fallout interpreted to represent a violent or wind-aided strombolian eruption tentatively attributed to Cerro Pomo, a scoria cone ˜10 km south of ZSL. Subsequent eruptions emanated from vents near or within the present-day ZSL maar crater. Strombolian eruptions of multiple spatter and scoria cones produced basaltic lava and scoria lapilli fallout. Next, a phreatomagmatic eruption created the maar crater and surrounding tephra rim and apron. ZSL eruptions ended with strombolian eruptions that formed three scoria cones on the crater floor. The revised age range of ZSL is younger and more precise than the 190-24 ka 2-sigma age range derived from previous argon dating. This implies that other morphologically youthful, argon-dated volcanoes on the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau might be substantially younger than previously reported.

  3. Effects of large volcanic eruptions on Eurasian climate and societies: unravelling past evidence to predict future impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churakova Sidorova, Olga; Guillet, Sébastien; Corona, Christophe; Khodri, Myriam; Vaganov, Eugene; Siegwolf, Rolf; Bryukhanova, Marina; Naumova, Oksana; Kirdyanov, Aleksander; Myglan, Vladimir; Sviderskaya, Irina; Pyzhev, Anton; Grachev, Alexei; Saurer, Matthias; Beniston, Martin; Stoffel, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Substantial evidence exists for the sulphur deposition in ice cores of Greenland and Antarctica after major volcanic eruptions but their impacts have not been documented with sufficient detail so far. This is true for temperature, of which the cooling induced by eruptions has been vividly debated in recent years, but even more so for precipitation. In the Era.Net RUS Plus ELVECS, we are currently quantifying climate disturbance induced by major Common Era eruptions, the persistence of changes and their impact on short- to mid-term temperature and precipitation anomalies by using an unprecedented dataset of tree-ring records across Eurasia and a large body of recently unearthed historical archives. We will compile a comprehensive database of tree-ring proxies and historical archives; quantify temperature and precipitation impacts of large eruptions; simulate on a case-by-case basis volcanic microphysical processes and radiative forcing induced by the eruptions as well as evaluate results against tree-ring records; quantify impacts of large volcanic eruptions on atmospheric and oceanic circulations and feedbacks; and assess impacts of possible future eruptions. The new and diversified proxy data sources and more sophisticated modelling are expected to reduce discrepancies and uncertainties related to climatic responses to some of the largest eruptions. We expect to capture persistence of anomalies correctly by climate models, even more so if they are evaluated against highly resolved proxy data of past events. This will increase our confidence in the overall reliability of climate models and help to correctly capture, and therefore predict, the cooling and precipitation anomalies of possible future, large eruptions. These predictions of climatic anomalies will then be used to quantify their likely impacts on major economy and society, including food security, migration and air traffic. Acknowledgements: Era.Net RUS Plus ELVECS project № 122

  4. Young volcanoes in the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone: A statistical approach to eruption prediction based on time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierma, Y.; Wehrmann, H.

    2010-03-01

    Forecasting volcanic activity has long been an aim of applied volcanology with regard to mitigating consequences of volcanic eruptions. Effective disaster management requires both information on expected physical eruption behaviour such as types and magnitudes of eruptions as typical for the individual volcano, usually reconstructed from deposits of past eruptions, and the likelihood that a new eruption will occur within a given time. Here we apply a statistical procedure to provide a probability estimate for future eruptions based on eruption time series, and discuss the limitations of this approach. The statistical investigation encompasses a series of young volcanoes of the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone. Most of the volcanoes considered have been active in historical times, in addition to several volcanoes with a longer eruption record from Late-Pleistocene to Holocene. Furthermore, eruption rates of neighbouring volcanoes are compared with the aim to reveal possible regional relations, potentially resulting from local to medium-scale tectonic dynamics. One special focus is directed to the two currently most active volcanoes of South America, Llaima and Villarrica, whose eruption records comprise about 50 historical eruptions over the past centuries. These two front volcanoes are considered together with Lanín Volcano, situated in the back-arc of Villarrica, for which the analysis is based on eight eruptions in the past 10 ka. For Llaima and Villarrica, affirmed tests for independence of the repose times between successive eruptions permit to assume Poisson processes; which is hampered for Lanín because of the more limited availability of documented eruptions. The assumption of stationarity reaches varying degrees of confidence depending on the time interval considered, ameliorating towards the more recent and hence probably more complete eruption record. With these pre-requisites of the time series, several distribution functions are fit and the goodness of

  5. A Multi-Sensor Approach for Volcanic Ash Cloud Retrieval and Eruption Characterization: The 23 November 2013 Etna Lava Fountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Corradini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic activity is observed worldwide with a variety of ground and space-based remote sensing instruments, each with advantages and drawbacks. No single system can give a comprehensive description of eruptive activity, and so, a multi-sensor approach is required. This work integrates infrared and microwave volcanic ash retrievals obtained from the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI, the polar-orbiting Aqua-MODIS and ground-based weather radar. The expected outcomes are improvements in satellite volcanic ash cloud retrieval (altitude, mass, aerosol optical depth and effective radius, the generation of new satellite products (ash concentration and particle number density in the thermal infrared and better characterization of volcanic eruptions (plume altitude, total ash mass erupted and particle number density from thermal infrared to microwave. This approach is the core of the multi-platform volcanic ash cloud estimation procedure being developed within the European FP7-APhoRISM project. The Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy volcano lava fountaining event of 23 November 2013 was considered as a test case. The results of the integration show the presence of two volcanic cloud layers at different altitudes. The improvement of the volcanic ash cloud altitude leads to a mean difference between the SEVIRI ash mass estimations, before and after the integration, of about the 30%. Moreover, the percentage of the airborne “fine” ash retrieved from the satellite is estimated to be about 1%–2% of the total ash emitted during the eruption. Finally, all of the estimated parameters (volcanic ash cloud altitude, thickness and total mass were also validated with ground-based visible camera measurements, HYSPLIT forward trajectories, Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI satellite data and tephra deposits.

  6. Isotopic microanalysis sheds light on the magmatic endmembers feeding volcanic eruptions: The Astroni 6 case study (Campi Flegrei, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arienzo, I.; D'Antonio, M.; Di Renzo, V.; Tonarini, S.; Minolfi, G.; Orsi, G.; Carandente, A.; Belviso, P.; Civetta, L.

    2015-10-01

    Sr-isotopic microanalysis has been performed on selected minerals from the Campi Flegrei caldera, together with Sr and Nd isotopic ratio determinations on bulk mineral and glass fractions. The aim was a better characterization of the chemically homogeneous, but isotopically distinct magmatic components which fed volcanic eruptions of the caldera over the past 5 ka, in order to enhance our knowledge about one of the most dangerous volcanoes on Earth. Information on the involved magmatic endmembers, unobtainable by analyzing the isotopic composition of whole rock samples and bulk mineral fractions, has been acquired through high-precision determination of 87Sr/86Sr on single crystals and microdrilled mineral powders. We focused our investigations on the products emplaced during the Astroni 6 eruption (4.23 cal ka BP), assumed representative of the expected event in case of renewed volcanic activity in the Campi Flegrei caldera. Data on single crystals and microdrilled mineral powders have been compared with Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of bulk mineral fractions from products emplaced during the whole Astroni activity, which included seven distinct eruptions. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of single crystals and microdrilled mineral powders are in the 0.7060 to 0.7076 range, much wider than that of bulk mineral fractions, which range from 0.7066 to 0.7076. Moreover, the Sr isotopic ratios are inversely correlated to 143Nd/144Nd. The new data allow us to better define the magmatic endmembers involved in mingling/mixing processes that occurred prior to/during the Astroni activity. One magmatic endmember, characterized by average 87Sr/86Sr ratio of ~ 0.70750, was quite common in the past 15 ka activity of the Campi Flegrei caldera; the other, as evidenced by the isotopic composition of single feldspar and clinopyroxene crystals, is less enriched in radiogenic Sr (87Sr/86Sr ~ 0.70724). The latter is interpreted to represent a new magmatic component that entered the Campi Flegrei

  7. A GIS-based volcanic hazard and risk assessment of eruptions sourced within Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorn, R.; Panter, K. S.; Gorsevski, P.; Ye, X.

    2013-05-01

    The Jemez Volcanic field in New Mexico is best known for the two cataclysmic eruptions that formed the Valles Caldera and deposited the Bandelier tuff at 1.61 and 1.25 Ma. This was followed by a period of small-scale activity limited to within the moat until ~ 55 ka when plinian eruptions sourced from the El Cajete crater dispersed tephra well beyond the caldera wall. These deposits include the El Cajete pyroclastic beds and the Battleship Rock Ignimbrite. Following the eruption of the Banco Bonito lava flow at ~40 ka, the Valles caldera has lain dormant. However, there is potential for future activity and it is prudent to assess the risk to the surrounding area and consider possible mitigation strategies well before a disaster strikes. The objective of this study is to evaluate the spatial extent of a possible future eruption using a GIS-based volcanic hazards tool designed to simulate pyroclastic fallout and density currents (PDCs) as well as lava flows [1] and to assess the social and economic vulnerability of the area at risk. Simulated pyroclastic fall deposits originating from the El Cajete crater are calibrated to isopach and lithic isopleth maps of the Lower and Upper El Cajete as constructed by [2]. The change in the axial orientation of fall deposits between the Lower and Upper El Cajete is best matched using seasonal variations in wind speed and direction based on modern atmospheric records. The calibration of PDCs is based on the distribution and run-out of the Battleship Rock Ignimbrite. Once calibrated, hazards are simulated at two other vent locations determined from probability distributions of structural features. The resulting hazard maps show the potential distribution of pyroclastic fall, PDCs and lava flows, indicating areas to the S/SE of Valles Caldera to be at greatest risk. To assess hazard preparedness, social vulnerability is evaluated for all census-designated places (CDP) within the study site. Based on methods by [3], twenty

  8. Characteristics and geological significance of olivine xenocrysts in Cenozoic volcanic rocks from western Qinling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Benxun; ZHANG Hongfu; XIAO Yan; ZHAO Xinmiao

    2006-01-01

    Cenozoic volcanic rocks from the Haoti, Dangchang County of the western Qinling Mountains, contain a few clearlyzoned olivines. These olivines are relatively big in grain sizes and usually have cracks or broken features. Their cores have similar compositions (Mg# = 90.4- 91.0) to those for the peridotitic xenoliths entrained in host volcanic rocks and their rims are close to the compositions of olivine phenocrysts (Mg# = 85.5 81.9). The CaO contents in these zoned olivines are lower than 0.1%. These features demonstrate that the clearly zoned olivines are xenocrysts and disaggregated from mantle peridotites. The zoned texture was the result of the interaction between the olivine and host magma. Available data show that the volcanic rocks would have been derived from the mantle source metasomatized by subducted hydrathermally-altered oceanic crust. The formation of these Cenozoic volcanic rocks was perhaps related to the rapid uplift of the Tibetan Plateau.

  9. Influence of mesostasis in volcanic rocks on the alkali-aggregate reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Tiecher, Francieli

    2012-11-01

    Mesostasis material present in the interstices of volcanic rocks is the main cause of the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in concretes made with these rock aggregates. Mesostasis often is referred to as volcanic glass, because it has amorphous features when analyzed by optical microscopy. However, this study demonstrates that mesostasis in the interstitials of volcanic rocks most often consists of micro to cryptocrystalline mineral phases of quartz, feldspars, and clays. Mesostasis has been identified as having different characteristics, and, thus, this new characterization calls for a re-evaluation of their influence on the reactivity of the volcanic rocks. The main purpose of this study is to correlate the characteristics of mesostasis with the AAR in mortar bars containing basalts and rhyolites. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 3-D high-speed imaging of volcanic bomb trajectory in basaltic explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J.; Houghton, B. F.; Orr, T. R.; Andronico, D.; Del Bello, E.; Kueppers, U.; Ricci, T.; Scarlato, P.

    2016-10-01

    Imaging, in general, and high speed imaging in particular are important emerging tools for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. However, traditional 2-D video observations cannot measure volcanic ejecta motion toward and away from the camera, strongly hindering our capability to fully determine crucial hazard-related parameters such as explosion directionality and pyroclasts' absolute velocity. In this paper, we use up to three synchronized high-speed cameras to reconstruct pyroclasts trajectories in three dimensions. Classical stereographic techniques are adapted to overcome the difficult observation conditions of active volcanic vents, including the large number of overlapping pyroclasts which may change shape in flight, variable lighting and clouding conditions, and lack of direct access to the target. In particular, we use a laser rangefinder to measure the geometry of the filming setup and manually track pyroclasts on the videos. This method reduces uncertainties to 10° in azimuth and dip angle of the pyroclasts, and down to 20% in the absolute velocity estimation. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by three examples: the development of an explosion at Stromboli, a bubble burst at Halema'uma'u lava lake, and an in-flight collision between two bombs at Stromboli.

  11. 3-D high-speed imaging of volcanic bomb trajectory in basaltic explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J; Houghton, B. F.; Orr, Tim R.; Andronico, D.; Del Bello, E.; Kueppers, U.; Ricci, T.; Scarlato, P.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging, in general, and high speed imaging in particular are important emerging tools for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. However, traditional 2-D video observations cannot measure volcanic ejecta motion toward and away from the camera, strongly hindering our capability to fully determine crucial hazard-related parameters such as explosion directionality and pyroclasts' absolute velocity. In this paper, we use up to three synchronized high-speed cameras to reconstruct pyroclasts trajectories in three dimensions. Classical stereographic techniques are adapted to overcome the difficult observation conditions of active volcanic vents, including the large number of overlapping pyroclasts which may change shape in flight, variable lighting and clouding conditions, and lack of direct access to the target. In particular, we use a laser rangefinder to measure the geometry of the filming setup and manually track pyroclasts on the videos. This method reduces uncertainties to 10° in azimuth and dip angle of the pyroclasts, and down to 20% in the absolute velocity estimation. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by three examples: the development of an explosion at Stromboli, a bubble burst at Halema'uma'u lava lake, and an in-flight collision between two bombs at Stromboli.

  12. Testing the reliability of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value to aid volcanic eruption forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nick; Bell, Andrew; Main, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The distribution of earthquake magnitudes is an important additional attribute of a volcanic earthquake catalogue and analyses of properties of the "frequency-magnitude distribution" (FMD) underpins most studies of volcanic seismicity. The event rate and inter-event intervals are of primary interest as their changes can be a primary indicator of volcanic unrest. The classic model for the earthquake FMD is the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) relation (Gutenberg and Richter, 1954): log(N) = a - bM, where N is the cumulative number of earthquakes of magnitude equal to or greater than M, a is a measure of the total seismicity rate of the region and the b-value represents the relative proportion of large and small events in the catalogue. The b-value for tectonic earthquakes has been well studied with a global average of approximately 1. However, b-values in volcanic settings are often reported to be much higher, sometimes with values as high as 3. Spatial variations in the volcanic b-value have been used to map stress conditions and magma reservoirs, and it has been argued that temporal variations have the potential to forecast eruptive activity. Here we assess different methodologies for analysing properties of the FMD, and re-evaluate what we know about the FMD of volcanic earthquakes. Using synthetic models we evaluate the reliability of methods for calculating the catalogue completeness magnitude where earthquake rates fluctuate rapidly in time to simulate pre-, syn- and post- earthquake swarm activity. We also evaluate to what extent volcanic FMDs are consistent with the GR model, using earthquake data from volcanoes including El Hierro, Canary Islands and Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii. We suggest that much of the proposed variation in b-value can be attributed to uncertainty in the completeness magnitude, and FMDs not displaying GR properties. In the case where event rate is pulsing or swarming the b-value has a tendency not to stabilise with increasing completeness

  13. Measurements of the gas emission from Holuhraun volcanic fissure eruption on Iceland, using Scanning DOAS instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Bo; Pfeffer, Melissa; Arellano, Santiago; Bergsson, Baldur; Conde, Vladimir; Barsotti, Sara; Stefansdottir, Gerdur; Ingvarsson, Thorgils; Bergsson, Bergur; Weber, Konradin

    2016-04-01

    On 31 August 2014 a volcanic fissure eruption started at Holuhraun on Iceland. The eruption lasted for 6 months and was by far the strongest source of sulfur dioxide in Europe over the last 230 years, with sustained emission rates exceeding 100 000 ton/day. This gas emission severely affected people within Iceland. Under the scope of the EU-project FUTUREVOLC, a project with 3.5 years duration, aiming at making Iceland a supersite for volcanological research as a European contribution to GEO, a version of the Scanning DOAS instrument that is adapted to high latitudes with low UV radiation and severe meteorological conditions was developed. Since the first day of the eruption several of these novel instruments were monitoring the SO2 emission from the eruption. A lot of work was needed to sustain this operation during the winter at a very remote site and under severe field conditions. At the same time the very high concentrations in the gas plume, in combination with bad meteorological conditions has required the development of novel methods to derive reliable flux estimates. A simple approach to make a first order correction for atmospheric scattering has been applied, as well as filtering of the dataset to remove the data most affected by scattering. Substantial work has also been made to obtain realistic information on plume height and wind speed. The data from these instruments are the only sustained ground-based measurements of this important gas emission event. In this presentation we will discuss the instrumental issues and evaluation procedures and present the latest version of the emission estimates made from our measurements.

  14. Basic and ultrabasic volcanic rocks from the Argyll Group (Dalradian) of NE Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The Dalradian Supergroup of the Scottish Highlands is a largely metasedimentary succession of Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian age, metamorphosed during the Caledonian Orogeny. The rocks were deposited on the Laurentian margin during and following the break-up of Rodinia. This rift setting is evidenced, in the upper half of the succession, by the presence of several volcanic sequences. A significant development of these volcanic rocks occurs in the NE Grampian Highlands. There, the Blackwater...

  15. K—Ar Geochronology and Evolution of Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks in Eastrn China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧芬; 杨学昌; 等

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic volcanic rocks widespread in eastern China constitute an important part of the circum-Pacific volcanic belt.This paper presents more than 150K-Ar dates and a great deal of petrochemical analysis data from the Cenozoic volcanic rocks distributed in Tengchong,China's southeast coast,Shandong,Hebei,Nei Monggol and Northeast China.An integrated study shows that ubiquitous but uneven volcanic activities prevailed from the Eogene to the Holocene,characterized as being multi-eqisodic and multicycled.For example,in the Paleocene(67-58Ma),Eocene(57-37.5Ma),Miocene(22-18,16-19Ma),Pliocene(8-3Ma),and Early Pleistocene-Middle Pleistocene(1.2-0.5Ma) there were upsurges of volcanism,while in the Oligocene there was a repose period.In space,the older Eogene volcanic rocks are distributed within the region or in the central part of the NE-NNE-striking fault depression,while the younger Neogene and Quaternary volcanic rocks are distributed in the eastern and western parts.Petrologically,they belong essentially to tholeiite-series and alkali-series basalts,with alkalinity in the rocks increasing from old to youg.The above regularities are controlled by both global plate movement and regional inherent tectonic pattern.

  16. The anatomy of a cinder cone: preliminary paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, structural, and petrologic data from the La Cienega volcano, Cerros del Rio volcanic field, northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronis, M. S.; Foucher, M.; Lineline, J.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Cerros del Rio volcanic field is one of several middle Pliocene to Pleistocene basaltic volcanic fields of the axial Rio Grande Rift in central and northern New Mexico. It is a monogenetic volcanic field that comprises about 60 cinder-spatter cones, occupies ~ 700 km2, and ranges in age from 2.7 Ma to 1.1 Ma. Eruptive centers are typically central vent volcanoes, ranging from low-relief shields to steep-sided, breached cinder and spatter cone remnants. They represent short eruptive events that likely were derived from rapidly evolving reservoir-conduit systems. Mining activity has exposed the volcanic plumbing system of the Cienega Mine cinder cone, just west of Santa Fe, NM. Here, geologists from France and USA have been investigating the exposed roots of this eviscerated Pliocene volcano to investigate magma conduit geometry, magma flow structures, and eruption patterns. We are testing models for magma transport and volcano construction using a variety of field and laboratory tools. Common models of volcanic construction envision the magma feeder as a dike or pipe-like conduit transporting molten rock from a deep reservoir to the eruptive vent. We posit that small volcanic pluming systems are inherently more complex and actually involve numerous feeder geometries throughout the volcano lifespan. Our preliminary work suggests that the simple exteriors of some cinder cones hide a long life and complex history, both of which would change the appreciation of the related volcanic hazards in active systems. The Cienega Mine cinder cone consists of several meter- to decimeter-wide intrusions that connect to eruptive centers. These intrusions show a continuity of brittle to ductile structures from their margins to interiors. We have collected samples across each intrusion as well as along strike for anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and petrographic analysis in order to establish magma flow patterns. AMS results yield a remarkably consistent dataset that

  17. Geochemistry of ultrapotassic volcanic rocks in Xiaogulihe NE China: Implications for the role of ancient subducted sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Ying, Jifeng; Zhou, Xinhua; Shao, Ji'an; Chu, Zhuyin; Su, Benxun

    2014-11-01

    The unique eruptions of ultrapotassic volcanic rocks in eastern China reported so far took place in the Xiaogulihe area of western Heilongjiang Province, NE China. These ultrapotassic rocks are characterized by extremely high K2O contents (> 7 wt.%), abnormally unradiogenic Pb isotopic compositions (206Pb/204Pb = 16.44-16.55; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.39-15.46; 208Pb/204Pb = 36.35-36.61), and moderately high 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7053-0.7057), which can be basically correlated with those of ultrapotassic igneous rocks distributed widely in northwestern America and Aldan Shield. The positive correlation between 187Os/188Os and 1/Os argues that these ultrapotassic rocks have probably experienced negligible lower continental crust addition (less than 1%) during magma ascent. The high contents of K2O and negative correlation between 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb of these ultrapotassic rocks indicate the presence of a potassic phase, mostly phlogopite, in their mantle source. Their strong fractionation of rare earth elements and lack of Nd-Hf isotopic decoupling reveal a low-degree partial melting of garnet-bearing source rocks. In addition, the low CaO and Al2O3 contents of whole-rock compositions and low Fe/Mn ratios of olivine phenocryst chemistries suggest peridotites rather than pyroxenites as dominant source rocks for the Xiaogulihe ultrapotassic rocks. Based on these distinctive geochemical characteristics, we thus propose that the ultimate mantle source of the Xiaogulihe ultrapotassic volcanic rocks is phlogopite-bearing garnet peridotite within the lower part of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) that had been metasomatized by potassium-rich silicate melts. Combined with the unradiogenic Pb compositions, the most likely source of these potassium-rich silicate melts is the ancient subducted continental-derived sediments (> 1.5 Ga). These ancient subducted sediments, possessing relatively low initial Pb isotopic compositions, had experienced large U/Pb fractionation

  18. Divergent El Niño responses to volcanic eruptions at different latitudes over the past millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Li, Jinbao; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Li, Tim; Huang, Gang; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2017-08-01

    Detection and attribution of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) responses to radiative forcing perturbation are critical for predicting the future change of ENSO under global warming. One of such forcing perturbation is the volcanic eruption. Our understanding of the responses of ENSO system to explosive tropical volcanic eruptions remains controversial, and we know little about the responses to high-latitude eruptions. Here, we synthesize proxy-based ENSO reconstructions, to show that there exist an El Niño-like response to the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and tropical eruptions and a La Niña-like response to the Southern Hemisphere (SH) eruptions over the past millennium. Our climate model simulation results show good agreement with the proxy records. The simulation reveals that due to different meridional thermal contrasts, the westerly wind anomalies can be excited over the tropical Pacific to the south of, at, or to the north of the equator in the first boreal winter after the NH, tropical, or SH eruptions, respectively. Thus, the eastern-Pacific El Niño can develop and peak in the second winter after the NH and tropical eruptions via the Bjerknes feedback. The model simulation only shows a central-Pacific El Niño-like response to the SH eruptions. The reason is that the anticyclonic wind anomaly associated with the SH eruption-induced southeast Pacific cooling will excite westward current anomalies and prevent the development of eastern-Pacific El Niño-like anomaly. These divergent responses to eruptions at different latitudes and in different hemispheres underline the sensitivity of the ENSO system to the spatial structure of radiative disturbances in the atmosphere.

  19. Geochemistry of the late Holocene rocks from the Tolbachik volcanic field, Kamchatka: Quantitative modelling of subduction-related open magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnyagin, Maxim; Duggen, Svend; Hauff, Folkmar; Mironov, Nikita; Bindeman, Ilya; Thirlwall, Matthew; Hoernle, Kaj

    2015-12-01

    We present new major and trace element, high-precision Sr-Nd-Pb (double spike), and O-isotope data for the whole range of rocks from the Holocene Tolbachik volcanic field in the Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD). The Tolbachik rocks range from high-Mg basalts to low-Mg basaltic trachyandesites. The rocks considered in this paper represent mostly Late Holocene eruptions (using tephrochronological dating), including historic ones in 1941, 1975-1976 and 2012-2013. Major compositional features of the Tolbachik volcanic rocks include the prolonged predominance of one erupted magma type, close association of middle-K primitive and high-K evolved rocks, large variations in incompatible element abundances and ratios but narrow range in isotopic composition. We quantify the conditions of the Tolbachik magma origin and evolution and revise previously proposed models. We conclude that all Tolbachik rocks are genetically related by crystal fractionation of medium-K primary magmas with only a small range in trace element and isotope composition. The primary Tolbachik magmas contain ~ 14 wt.% of MgO and ~ 4% wt.% of H2O and originated by partial melting (~ 6%) of moderately depleted mantle peridotite with Indian-MORB-type isotopic composition at temperature of ~ 1250 °C and pressure of ~ 2 GPa. The melting of the mantle wedge was triggered by slab-derived hydrous melts formed at ~ 2.8 GPa and ~ 725 °C from a mixture of sediments and MORB- and Meiji-type altered oceanic crust. The primary magmas experienced a complex open-system evolution termed Recharge-Evacuation-Fractional Crystallization (REFC). First the original primary magmas underwent open-system crystal fractionation combined with periodic recharge of the magma chamber with more primitive magma, followed by mixing of both magma types, further fractionation and finally eruption. Evolved high-K basalts, which predominate in the Tolbachik field, and basaltic trachyandesites erupted in 2012-2013 approach steady-state REFC

  20. Sr, Nd, Pb Isotope geochemistry and magma evolution of the potassic volcanic rocks, Wudalianchi, Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junwen, W.; Guanghong, X.; Tatsumoto, M.; Basu, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    Wudalianchi volcanic rocks are the most typical Cenozoic potassic volcanic rocks in eastern China. Compositional comparisons between whole rocks and glasses of various occurrences indicate that the magma tends to become rich in silica and alkalis as a result of crystal differentiation in the course of evolution. They are unique in isotopic composition with more radiogenic Sr but less radiogenic Pb.87Sr /86 Sr is higher and143Nd/144Nd is lower than the undifferentiated global values. In comparison to continental potash volcanic rocks, Pb isotopes are apparently lower. These various threads of evidence indicate that the rocks were derived from a primary enriched mantle which had not been subjected to reworking and shows no sign of incorporation of crustal material. The correlation between Pb and Sr suggests the regional heterogeneity in the upper mantle in terms of chemical composition. ?? 1989 Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Volcanic ash and daily mortality in Sweden after the Icelandic volcano eruption of May 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudin, Anna; Carlsen, Hanne K; Forsberg, Bertil; Johansson, Christer

    2013-12-10

    In the aftermath of the Icelandic volcano Grimsvötn's eruption on 21 May 2011, volcanic ash reached Northern Europe. Elevated levels of ambient particles (PM) were registered in mid Sweden. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the Grimsvötn eruption had an effect on mortality in Sweden. Based on PM measurements at 16 sites across Sweden, data were classified into an ash exposed data set (Ash area) and an unexposed data set (No ash area). Data on daily all-cause mortality were obtained from Statistics Sweden for the time period 1 April through 31 July 2011. Mortality ratios were calculated as the ratio between the daily number of deaths in the Ash area and the No ash area. The exposure period was defined as the week following the days with elevated particle concentrations, namely 24 May through 31 May. The control period was defined as 1 April through 23 May and 1 June through 31 July. There was no absolute increase in mortality during the exposure period. However, during the exposure period the mean mortality ratio was 2.42 compared with 2.17 during the control period, implying a relatively higher number of deaths in the Ash area than in the No ash area. The differences in ratios were mostly due to a single day, 31 May, and were not statistically significant when tested with a Mann-Whitney non-parametric test (p > 0.3). The statistical power was low with only 8 days in the exposure period (24 May through 31 May). Assuming that the observed relative differences were not due to chance, the results would imply an increase of 128 deaths during the exposure period 24-31 May. If 31 May was excluded, the number of extra deaths was reduced to 20. The results of the present study are contradicting and inconclusive, but may indicate that all-cause mortality was increased by the ash-fall from the Grimsvötn eruption. Meta-analysis or pooled analysis of data from neighboring countries might make it possible to reach sufficient statistical power to study effects

  2. The eruptive history and magmatic evolution of Aluto volcano: new insights into silicic peralkaline volcanism in the Ethiopian rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, William; Pyle, David M.; Mather, Tamsin A.; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Biggs, Juliet; Cohen, Benjamin E.; Barfod, Dan N.; Lewi, Elias

    2016-12-01

    The silicic peralkaline volcanoes of the East African Rift are some of the least studied volcanoes on Earth. Here we bring together new constraints from fieldwork, remote sensing, geochronology and geochemistry to present the first detailed account of the eruptive history of Aluto, a restless silicic volcano located in a densely populated section of the Main Ethiopian Rift. Prior to the growth of the Aluto volcanic complex (before 500 ka) the region was characterized by a significant period of fault development and mafic fissure eruptions. The earliest volcanism at Aluto built up a trachytic complex over 8 km in diameter. Aluto then underwent large-volume ignimbrite eruptions at 316 ± 19 ka and 306 ± 12 ka developing a 42 km2 collapse structure. After a hiatus of 250 ka, a phase of post-caldera volcanism initiated at 55 ± 19 ka and the most recent eruption of Aluto has a radiocarbon age of 0.40 ± 0.05 cal. ka BP. During this post-caldera phase highly-evolved peralkaline rhyolite lavas, ignimbrites and pumice fall deposits have erupted from vents across the complex. Geochemical modelling is consistent with rhyolite genesis from protracted fractionation (> 80%) of basalt that is compositionally similar to rift-related basalts found east of the complex. Based on the style and volume of recent eruptions we suggest that silicic eruptions occur at an average rate of 1 per 1000 years, and that future eruptions of Aluto will involve explosive emplacement of localised pumice cones and effusive obsidian coulees of volumes in the range 1-100 × 106 m3.

  3. Induced polarization of volcanic rocks. 1Surface versus quadrature conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.; Breton, M. Le; Niu, Q.; Wallin, E.; Haskins, E.; Thomas, D. M.

    2016-11-01

    We performed complex conductivity measurements on 28 core samples from the hole drilled for the Humu´ula Groundwater Research Project (Hawai´i Island, HI, USA). The complex conductivity measurements were performed at 4 different pore water conductivities (0.07, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0, and 10 S m-1 prepared with NaCl) over the frequency range 1 mHz to 45 kHz at 22 ± 1°C. The in-phase conductivity data are plotted against the pore water conductivity to determine, sample by sample, the intrinsic formation factor and the surface conductivity. The intrinsic formation factor is related to porosity by Archie's law with an average value of the cementation exponent m of 2.45, indicating that only a small fraction of the connected pore space controls the transport properties. Both the surface and quadrature conductivities are found to be linearly related to the cation exchange capacity of the material, which was measured with the cobalt hexamine chloride method. Surface and quadrature conductivities are found to be proportional to each other like for sedimentary siliclastic rocks. A Stern layer polarization model is used to explain these experimental results. Despite the fact that the samples contain some magnetite (up to 5% wt.), we were not able to identify the effect of this mineral on the complex conductivity spectra. These results are very encouraging in showing that galvanometric induced polarization measurements can be used in volcanic areas to separate the bulk from the surface conductivity and therefore to define some alteration attributes. Such a goal cannot be achieved with resistivity alone.

  4. Induced polarization of volcanic rocks - 1. Surface versus quadrature conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.; Le Breton, M.; Niu, Q.; Wallin, E.; Haskins, E.; Thomas, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    We performed complex conductivity measurements on 28 core samples from the hole drilled for the Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project (Hawai'i Island, HI, USA). The complex conductivity measurements were performed at 4 different pore water conductivities (0.07, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0, and 10 S m-1 prepared with NaCl) over the frequency range 1 mHz to 45 kHz at 22 ± 1 °C. The in-phase conductivity data are plotted against the pore water conductivity to determine, sample by sample, the intrinsic formation factor and the surface conductivity. The intrinsic formation factor is related to porosity by Archie's law with an average value of the cementation exponent m of 2.45, indicating that only a small fraction of the connected pore space controls the transport properties. Both the surface and quadrature conductivities are found to be linearly related to the cation exchange capacity of the material, which was measured with the cobalt hexamine chloride method. Surface and quadrature conductivities are found to be proportional to each other like for sedimentary siliclastic rocks. A Stern layer polarization model is used to explain these experimental results. Despite the fact that the samples contain some magnetite (up to 5 per cent wt.), we were not able to identify the effect of this mineral on the complex conductivity spectra. These results are very encouraging in showing that galvanometric induced polarization measurements can be used in volcanic areas to separate the bulk from the surface conductivity and therefore to define some alteration attributes. Such a goal cannot be achieved with resistivity alone.

  5. Statistical eruption forecast for the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone: typical probabilities of volcanic eruptions as baseline for possibly enhanced activity following the large 2010 Concepción earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Dzierma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A probabilistic eruption forecast is provided for ten volcanoes of the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ. Since 70% of the Chilean population lives in this area, the estimation of future eruption likelihood is an important part of hazard assessment. After investigating the completeness and stationarity of the historical eruption time series, the exponential, Weibull, and log-logistic distribution functions are fit to the repose time distributions for the individual volcanoes and the models are evaluated. This procedure has been implemented in two different ways to methodologically compare details in the fitting process. With regard to the probability of at least one VEI ≥ 2 eruption in the next decade, Llaima, Villarrica and Nevados de Chillán are most likely to erupt, while Osorno shows the lowest eruption probability among the volcanoes analysed. In addition to giving a compilation of the statistical eruption forecasts along the historically most active volcanoes of the SVZ, this paper aims to give "typical" eruption probabilities, which may in the future permit to distinguish possibly enhanced activity in the aftermath of the large 2010 Concepción earthquake.

  6. REE Geochemical Characteristics of Volcanic Rocks in Zhejiang and Jiangxi Provinces and Their Gological Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王剑锋

    1991-01-01

    Based on the data of 64 samples ,the REE geochemical characteristics of volcanic rocks in northern Zhejiang and eastern Jiangxi provinces are discussed in this paper.The REE distribution patterns in acid and intermediate-acid volcanic rocks in these areas display some similarities,as indicated by rightward-inclined V-shaped curves with negative Eu anomalies,which are parallel to earch other.In addi-tion,their REE parameters(ΣREE,ΣLREE/ΣHREE,δEu,Ce/Yb,La/Sm,La/Yb,etc)also va-ry over a narrow range with small deviations.HREE are particularly concentrated in the volcanic rocks as-sociated with uranium mineralization.The initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the volcanic rocks is about 0.7056-0.7139.All these features in conjunction with strontium isotopic data indicate that the rock-forming materials come from the sialic crust.The REE distribution patterns and REE geochemical parameters of the volcanic rocks ,as well as La/Sm-La and Ce/Yb-Eu/Yb diagrams may be applied to the sources of rock-forming and ore-forming materials.

  7. Differences in recovery between deep-sea hydrothermal vent and vent-proximate communities after a volcanic eruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gollner, S.; Govenar, B.; Martinez Arbizu, P.; Mills, S.; Le Bris, N.; Weinbauer, M.; Shank, T.M.; Bright, M.

    2015-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents and the surrounding basalt seafloor are subject to major natural disturbance events such as volcanic eruptions. In the near future, anthropogenic disturbance in the form of deep-sea mining could also significantly affect the faunal communities of hydrothermal vents. In th

  8. Soluble iron inputs to the Southern Ocean through recent andesitic to rhyolitic volcanic ash eruptions from the Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonella, L. E.; Palomeque, M. E.; Croot, P. L.; Stein, A.; Kupczewski, M.; Rosales, A.; Montes, M. L.; Colombo, F.; García, M. G.; Villarosa, G.; Gaiero, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    Patagonia, due to its geographic position and the dominance of westerly winds, is a key area that contributes to the supply of nutrients to the Southern Ocean, both through mineral dust and through the periodic deposits of volcanic ash. Here we evaluate the characteristics of Fe dissolved (into soluble and colloidal species) from volcanic ash for three recent southern Andes volcanic eruptions having contrasting features and chemical compositions. Contact between cloud waters (wet deposition) and end-members of andesitic (Hudson volcano) and rhyolitic (Chaitén volcano) materials was simulated. Results indicate higher Fe release and faster liberation rates in the andesitic material. Fe release during particle-seawater interaction (dry deposition) has higher rates in rhyolitic-type ashes. Rhyolitic ashes under acidic conditions release Fe in higher amounts and at a slower rate, while in those samples containing mostly glass shards, Fe release was lower and faster. The 2011 Puyehue eruption was observed by a dust monitoring station. Puyehue-type eruptions can contribute soluble Fe to the ocean via dry or wet deposition, nearly reaching the limit required for phytoplankton growth. In contrast, the input of Fe after processing by an acidic eruption plume could raise the amount of dissolved Fe in surface ocean waters several times, above the threshold required to initiate phytoplankton blooms. A single eruption like the Puyehue one represents more than half of the yearly Fe flux contributed by dust.

  9. Comparison of TOMS and AVHRR volcanic ssh retrievals from the August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, N.A.; Torres, O.; Seftor, C.; Krueger, A.J.; Kostinski, A.; Rose, William I.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Schneider, D.; Schaefer, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    On August 19, 1992, the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard NOAA-12 and NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite simultaneously detected and mapped the ash cloud from the eruption of Mt. Spurr, Alaska. The spatial extent and geometry of the cloud derived from the two datasets are in good agreement and both AVHRR split window IR (11-12??m brightness temperature difference) and the TOMS UV Aerosol Index (0.34-0.38??m ultraviolet backscattering and absorption) methods give the same range of total cloud ash mass. Redundant methods for determination of ash masses in drifting volcanic clouds offer many advantages for potential application to the mitigation of aircraft hazards.

  10. Severe dental fluorosis in juvenile deer linked to a recent volcanic eruption in Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueck, Werner T; Smith-Flueck, Jo Anne M

    2013-04-01

    The Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic eruption deposited large amounts of tephra (ashes) on about 36 million ha of Argentina in June of 2011. Tephra was considered chemically innoxious based on water leachates, surface water fluoride levels were determined to be safe, and livestock losses were attributable to inanition and excessive tooth wear. To evaluate effects on wild ungulates, we sampled wild red deer (Cervus elaphus) at 100 km from the volcano in September-November 2012. We show that tephra caused severe dental fluorosis, with bone fluoride levels up to 5,175 ppm. Among subadults, tephra caused pathologic development of newly emerging teeth typical of fluorosis, including enamel hypoplasia, breakages, pitting, mottling, and extremely rapid ablation of entire crowns down to underlying pulp cavities. The loss of teeth functionality affected physical condition, and none of the subadults was able to conceive. Susceptibility to fluorosis among these herbivores likely resides in ruminant food processing: 1) mastication and tephra size reduction, 2) thorough and repeated mixing with alkaline saliva, 3) water-soluble extraction in the rumen, and 4) extraction in the acidic abomasum. Although initial analyses of water and tephra were interpreted not to present a concern, ruminants as a major component of this ecosystem are shown to be highly susceptible to fluorosis, with average bone level increasing over 38-fold during the first 15.5 mo of exposure to tephra. This is the first report of fluorosis in wild ungulates from a volcanic eruption. The described impact will reverberate through several aspects of the ecology of the deer, including effects on population dynamics, morbidity, predation susceptibility, and other components of the ecosystem such as scavenger and plant communities. We anticipate further impact on livestock production systems, yet until now, existence of fluorosis had not been recognized.

  11. Presenting Numerical Modelling of Explosive Volcanic Eruption to a General Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaria, C.; Todesco, M.; Neri, A.; Blasi, G.

    2001-12-01

    Numerical modeling of explosive volcanic eruptions has been widely applied, during the last decades, to study pyroclastic flows dispersion along volcano's flanks and to evaluate their impact on urban areas. Results from these transient multi-phase and multi-component simulations are often reproduced in form of computer animations, representing the spatial and temporal evolution of relevant flow variables (such as temperature, or particle concentration). Despite being a sophisticated, technical tool to analyze and share modeling results within the scientific community, these animations truly look like colorful cartoons showing an erupting volcano and are especially suited to be shown to a general public. Thanks to their particular appeal, and to the large interest usually risen by exploding volcanoes, these animations have been presented several times on television and magazines and are currently displayed in a permanent exposition, at the Vesuvius Observatory in Naples. This work represents an effort to produce an accompanying tool for these animations, capable of explaining to a large audience the scientific meaning of what can otherwise look as a graphical exercise. Dealing with research aimed at the study of dangerous, explosive volcanoes, improving the general understanding of these scientific results plays an important role as far as risk perception is concerned. An educated population has better chances to follow an appropriate behavior, i.e.: one that could lead, on the long period, to a reduction of the potential risk. In this sense, a correct divulgation of scientific results, while improving the confidence of the population in the scientific community, should belong to the strategies adopted to mitigate volcanic risk. Due to the relevance of the long term final goal of such divulgation experiment, this work represents an interdisciplinary effort, combining scientific expertise and specific competence from the modern communication science and risk

  12. Petrographic analysis and correlation of volcanic rocks in Bostic 1-A well near Mountain Home, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arney, B.H.; Gardner, J.N.; Belluomini, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed examination of volcanic rock cuttings from the Bostic 1-A well near Mountain Home, Idaho, provides data that correlate the stratigraphy of the well with the regional stratigraphy of the western Snake River Plain. The Bostic 1-A well penetrates basalt of the Middle Pleistocene Bruneau Formation and underlying sedimentary rocks of the Upper Pliocene Glenns Ferry Formation. Basalt underlying the Glenns Ferry Formation is most likely Banbury Basalt of Middle Pliocene age or Banbury equivalent. A 350-ft interval of felsic volcanics is then intersected above another 600 ft of basalt. The well bottoms in altered felsic volcanics. The lowest 600 ft of basalt flows has not been correlated with any basalt observed on the surface. From the established stratigraphy of the region, and from petrographic evidence, the silicic volcanic rocks occurring both above and below the lowermost basalts in the well are probably lower Pliocene Idavada Volcanics. North of the well, in the Mt. Bennett Hills, Idavada Volcanics overlie crystalline rocks of the Idaho batholith. No estimate of depth to plutonic bedrock can be made from the well data alone. Stratigraphic comparisons suggest as little as 0.2 to 0.3 km more of Idavada lie beneath the Bostic 1-A well. Results of geophysical studies suggest additional basalt lies beneath the Bostic 1-A rather than granitic rocks of the batholith.

  13. An independently dated 2000-yr volcanic record from Law Dome, East Antarctica, including a new perspective on the dating of the c. 1450s eruption of Kuwae, Vanuatu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Plummer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions are an important cause of natural climate variability. In order to improve the accuracy of climate models, precise dating and magnitude of the climatic effects of past volcanism are necessary. Here we present a 2000-yr record of Southern Hemisphere volcanism recorded in ice cores from the high accumulation Law Dome site, East Antarctica. The ice cores were analyzed for a suite of chemistry signals and are independently dated via annual layer counting, with 11 ambiguous years by the end of the record. Independently dated records are important to avoid circular dating where volcanic signatures are assigned a date from some external information rather than using the date it is found in the ice core. Forty-five volcanic events have been identified using the sulfate chemistry of the Law Dome record. Comparisons between Law Dome and NGRIP (Greenland volcanic records suggest Law Dome is the most accurately dated Antarctic volcanic dataset and allows for the records to be synchronized with NGRIP, leading to an improved global volcanic forcing dataset. Volcanic sulfate deposition estimates are important for modeling the climatic response to eruptions. The largest volcanic sulfate events in our record are dated at 1458 CE (Kuwae, Vanuatu, 1257 and 423 CE (unidentified. Using our record we refine the dating of previously known volcanic events and present evidence for two separate eruptions during the period 1450–1460 CE, potentially causing confusion in the assignment of the Kuwae (Vanuatu eruption to volcanic signatures during this time interval.

  14. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, C.; Graf, H. F.; Herzog, M.; Oberhuber, J. M.; Rose, William I.; Ernst, G. G. J.

    2006-02-01

    The aggregation of volcanic ash particles within the eruption column of explosive eruptions has been observed at many volcanoes. It influences the residence time of ash in the atmosphere and the radiative properties of the umbrella cloud. However, the information on the processes leading to aggregate formation are still either lacking or very incomplete. We examine the fate of ash particles through numerical experiments with the plume model ATHAM (Active Tracer High resolution Atmospheric Model) in order to determine the conditions that promote ash particle aggregation. In this paper we describe the microphysics and parameterization of ash and hydrometeors. In a companion paper (this issue) we use this information in a series of numerical experiments. The parameterization includes the condensation of water vapor in the rising eruption column. The formation of liquid and solid hydrometeors and the effect of latent heat release on the eruption column dynamics are considered. The interactions of hydrometeors and volcanic ash within the eruption column that lead to aggregate formation are simulated for the first time within a rising eruption column. The microphysical parameterization follows a modal approach. The hydrometeors are described by two size classes, each of which is divided into a liquid and a frozen category. By analogy with the hydrometeor classification, we specify four categories of volcanic ash particles. We imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can be contained in all categories of hydrometeors, thus forming mixed particles of any composition reaching from mud rain to accretionary lapilli. Collisions are caused by gravitational capture of particles with different fall velocity. Coalescence of hydrometeor-ash aggregates is assumed to be a function of the hydrometeor mass fraction within the mixed particles. The parameterization also includes simplified descriptions of electrostatics and salinity

  15. The 2010 Eyja eruption evolution by using IR satellite sensors measurements: retrieval comparison and insights into explosive volcanic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscini, A.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Scollo, S.

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 April-May Eyja eruption caused an unprecedented disruption to economic, political and cultural activities in Europe and across the world. Because of the harming effects of fine ash particles on aircrafts, many European airports were in fact closed causing millions of passengers to be stranded, and with a worldwide airline industry loss estimated of about 2.5 billion Euros. Both security and economical issues require robust and affordable volcanic cloud retrievals that may be really improved through the intercomparison among different remote sensing instruments. In this work the Thermal InfraRed (TIR) measurements of different polar and geostationary satellites instruments as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI), have been used to retrieve the volcanic ash and SO2 in the entire eruption period over Iceland. The ash retrievals (mass, AOD and effective radius) have been carried out by means of the split window BTD technique using the channels centered around 11 and 12 micron. The least square fit procedure is used for the SO2 retrieval by using the 7.3 and 8.7 micron channels. The simulated TOA radiance Look-Up Table (LUT) needed for both the ash and SO2 column abundance retrievals have been computed using the MODTRAN 4 Radiative Transfer Model. Further, the volcanic plume column altitude and ash density have been computed and compared, when available, with ground observations. The results coming from the retrieval of different IR sensors show a good agreement over the entire eruption period. The column height, the volcanic ash and the SO2 emission trend confirm the indentified different phases occurred during the Eyja eruption. We remark that the retrieved volcanic plume evolution can give important insights into eruptive dynamics during long-lived explosive activity.

  16. Collateral variations between the concentrations of mercury and other water soluble ions in volcanic ash samples and volcanic activity during the 2014-2016 eruptive episodes at Aso volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Kohji; Sudo, Yasuaki; Nagamatsu, Yoshizumi

    2017-07-01

    During 2014-2016, the Aso volcano, located in the center of the Kyushu Islands, Japan, erupted and emitted large amounts of volcanic gases and ash. Two episodes of the eruption were observed; firstly Strombolian magmatic eruptive episodes from 25 November 2014 to the middle of May 2015, and secondly phreatomagmatic and phreatic eruptive episodes from September 2015 to February 2016. Bulk chemical analyses on total mercury (Hg) and major ions in water soluble fraction in volcanic ash fall samples were conducted. During the Strombolian magmatic eruptive episodes, total Hg concentrations averaged 1.69 ± 0.87 ng g- 1 (N = 33), with a range from 0.47 to 3.8 ng g- 1. In addition, the temporal variation of total Hg concentrations in volcanic ash varied with the amplitude change of seismic signals. In the Aso volcano, the volcanic tremors are always observed during eruptive stages and quiet interludes, and the amplitudes of tremors increase at eruptive stages. So, the temporal variation of total Hg concentrations could provide an indication of the level of volcanic activity. During the phreatomagmatic and phreatic eruptive episodes, on the other hand, total Hg concentrations in the volcanic ash fall samples averaged 220 ± 88 ng g- 1 (N = 5), corresponding to 100 times higher than those during the Strombolian eruptive episode. Therefore, it is possible that total Hg concentrations in volcanic ash samples are largely varied depending on the eruptive type. In addition, the ash fall amounts were also largely different among the two eruptive episodes. This can be also one of the factors controlling Hg concentrations in volcanic ash.

  17. Initializing HYSPLIT with satellite observations of volcanic ash: A case study of the 2008 Kasatochi eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Alice M.; Stunder, Barbara J. B.; Ngan, Fong; Pavolonis, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    The current work focuses on improving volcanic ash forecasts by integrating satellite observations of ash into the Lagrangian transport and dispersion model, HYSPLIT. The accuracy of HYSPLIT output is dependent on the accuracy of the initialization: the initial position, size distribution, and amount of ash as a function of time. Satellite observations from passive infrared, IR, sensors are used both to construct the initialization term and for verification. Space-based lidar observations are used for further verification. We compare model output produced using different initializations for the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi in the Aleutian Islands. Simple source terms, such as a uniform vertical line or cylindrical source above the vent, are compared to initializations derived from satellite measurements of position, mass loading, effective radius, and height of the downwind ash cloud. Using satellite measurements of column mass loading of ash to constrain the source term produces better long-term predictions than using an empirical equation relating mass eruption rate and plume height above the vent. Even though some quantities, such as the cloud thickness, must be estimated, initializations which release particles at the position of the observed ash cloud produce model output which is comparable to or better than the model output produced with source terms located above and around the vent. Space-based lidar data, passive IR retrievals of ash cloud top height, and model output agree well with each other, and all suggest that the Kasatochi ash cloud evolved into a complex three-dimensional structure.

  18. Volcanic ash forecast – application to the May 2008 Chaitén eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Folch

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We model the transport and subsequent deposition of ash from Chaitén volcano, Chile, during the first week of May 2008. The simulation couples the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF meteorological model with the FALL3D dispersion model. We only use semi-quantitative volcanological inputs based on the first eruption reports. We consider two different run types based on forecasted and hindcasted meteorological conditions. The first simulation type can be regarded as a syn-eruptive operational forecast for the 2–8 May period. We predict the evolution of the ash cloud position, the concentration of ash on air, the expected deposit thickness, and the ash accumulation rates at different localities. The comparison of model results with observed cloud arrival times and satellite images shows the goodness of the combined WRF+FALL3D forecast system and points out the feasibility of combining these two models for short-term forecast of volcanic clouds and ash fallout.

  19. U-Th-He age determinations on volcanic rocks: A new tool for Quaternary geochronology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aciego, S. M.; Kennedy, B. M.; Christensen, J. N.; Depaolo, D. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2002-12-01

    The U-Th/He system, which has been used successfully for thermochronology, also has potential for dating young volcanic rocks. To test this possibility the age of garnet phenocrysts from the 79 AD eruption of Mt. Vesuvius was measured. The samples consisted of 600-1000 μm diameter andradite-grossular garnet crystals separated from a volcanic tuff previously dated by Ar-Ar (Renne et al, 1997). Our age calculation accounts for diffusive loss of radiogenic He since eruption, loss of He by alpha ejection from the garnet grains, U series disequilibrium, and non-uniform U-Th distribution within the mineral grains. The effect of diffusion was investigated using existing diffusivity and activation energy data for almandine rich garnet (Dunai and Roselieb, 1996), and by step-wise degassing of the Vesuvius garnets. Diffusivity was measured over 7 temperature steps ranging from 800oC to 1300oC with one additional 1500oC step for complete extraction. Even up to the 1300oC step the diffusivity remains linear, indicating an Arrhenius relationship with an activation energy of approximately 427 kJ/mol and a frequency factor, Do/a2 = 0.578 s-1. Alpha emission is accounted for by modeling the garnet grains as spheres with the injection and ejection of alphas from the sphere depending on the concentration and distribution of the U and Th inside and outside of the mineral grain. Distribution of U, Th was determined by ion-probe analysis across garnet grains in thin section. While the overall concentration of U and Th within the garnets is quite high (approximately 16-19ppm and 23-27ppm, respectively), there is a deficiency in 230Th and 226Ra. The 234U/238U and 230Th/238U activity we measure directly, while the 226Ra/238U activity ratio was estimated by assuming Ra follows barium. Due to machine limitations, U, Th concentrations and He concentrations were determined on different aliquots. The measured concentration of 4He in the garnet grains varies from 3.72x10-9 to 4.16x10-9 cc STP

  20. Palaeomagnetic refinement of the eruption ages of Holocene lava flows, and implications for the eruptive history of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Annika; Turner, Gillian M.; Conway, Chris E.; Townsend, Dougal B.; Gamble, John A.; Leonard, Graham S.

    2016-11-01

    We present a detailed palaeomagnetic study from 35 sites on Holocene lava flows of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre, central North Island, New Zealand. Prior to the study the eruption ages of these flows were constrained to within a few thousand years by recently published high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronological data and tephrostratigraphic controls. Correlation of flow mean palaeomagnetic directions with a recently published continuous sediment record from Lake Mavora, Fiordland, allows us to reduce the age uncertainty to 300-500 yr in some cases. Our refined ages significantly improve the chronology of Holocene effusive eruptions of the volcanoes of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre. For instance, differences in the palaeomagnetic directions recorded by lavas from the voluminous Iwikau and Rangataua members suggest that individual effusive periods lasted up to thousands of years and that these bursts have been irregularly spaced over time. While over the last few millennia the effusive eruptive activity from Mt Ruapehu has been relatively quiet, the very young age (200-500 BP) of a Red Crater sourced flow suggests that effusive activity around Mt Tongariro lasted into the past few centuries. This adds an important hazard context to the historical record, which has otherwise comprised frequent relatively small, tephra producing, explosive eruptions without the production of lava flows.

  1. Petrology and chemistry of late Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the southernmost segment of the Western Cordillera of Colombia (South America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadea, P.; Espinosa, A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents new data on the petrology and chemistry of the igneous rocks composing the Mesozoic basement of southernmost Western Cordillera of Colombia along the Ricaurte-Altaquer section. The studied sequence includes variably metamorphosed submarine lavas, breccias, tuffs and dykes of basalt to andesite composition, and minor, shallow quartz microdiorite intrusives. A Campanian age is recorded by radiolarian faunas from chert strata capping the lavas. Two different tholeiitic suites and a younger calc-alkaline suite, represented by hornblende andesite, are distinguished. One tholeiitic suite, represented by plagioclase and pyroxene phyric lavas, evolves from basalt to basaltic andesite. It is characterized by the occurrence of diopsidic pyroxene as early crystallising phase, by depletion in high-field strength elements, particularly Nb and by relative enrichment in light REE and Th. The second tholeiitic suite, which includes aphyric or poorly phyric lavas of basalt to dacite composition, differs from the first group in having moderately low {FeO tot}/{MgO} ratio and lower P 2O 5 content for a given SiO 2, and higher {Ti}/{Zr}and{Y}/{Zr} ratios. The pyroxene chemistry of the two suites also differs. The primary geochemical characteristics of the two suites suggest a similarity with tholeiitic suites generated in island-arc environment. The hornblende andesite has mineralogical and chemical characteristics of calc-alkaline lavas erupted in an oceanic setting in an evolved island-arc. Petrologic and geochemical evidence suggests that the volcanic rocks from the Ricaurte-Altraquer section are similar to the island-arc tholeiite volcanics from the upper Macuchi Formation of northern Ecuador and can be correlated partly with this unit. Conversely, they are petrochemically dissimilar from the typical Diabase Group volcanic rocks, characterized by transitional MORB lavas, extensively present to the north in the Western Cordillera of Colombia.

  2. Archaeological calibration of remagnetized volcanic rocks from pottery firing kilns in Cuentepec, Morelos, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    L. M. Alva-Valdivia; J. A. González-Rangel; A. M. Soler-Arechalde; S. L. López-Varela; H. López-Loera

    2006-01-01

    Ethnoarchaeological research at the site of Cuentepec, Mexico includes experimental pottery dating in which social knowledge is obtained from archaeometric techniques. At Cuentepec, open kilns are used for firing pottery. Samples from volcanic rocks in the kilns were taken to verify the reliability of the magnetic direction in these rocks as compared with data from Teoloyucan Geomagnetic Observatory, near Mexico City. In the laboratory, forty-seven cores from eight hand oriented rock samples ...

  3. Pre-eruptive volatile and erupted gas phase characterization of the 2014 basalt of Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Baptiste; Moune, Séverine; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Gauthier, Pierre-Jean; Gouhier, Mathieu

    2015-04-01

    The 2014 Holuhraun eruption on the Bárðarbunga Volcanic System is the largest fissure eruption in Iceland since the 1783 Laki eruption. The eruption started end of August 2014 and has been characterized by large emission of SO2 into the atmosphere. It provides a rare opportunity to study in details magmatic and degassing processes during a large-volume fissure eruption. In order to characterize the pre-eruptive magmatic composition and to assess the plume chemistry at the eruption site, lava and tephra were sampled together with the eruption plume. The basalt composition is olivine tholeiite with MgO close to 7 wt%. It is phenocryst-poor with plagioclase as the dominant mineral phase but olivine and clinopyroxene are also present together with sulphide globules composed principally of pyrite and chalcopyrite. The volatile (S, Cl and F) and major element concentrations were measured by the electron microprobe in melt inclusions (MIs) trapped in plagioclase and clinopyroxene and groundmass glass. The MIs composition ranges from fairly primitive basaltic compositions (MgO: 9.03 wt%) down to evolved qz-tholeiites (MgO: 5.57 wt%), with estimated pre-eruptive S concentrations of 1500 ppm. Tephra groundmass glass contains 400 ppm S, whereas Cl and F concentrations are respectively slightly lower and indistinguishable from those in the MIs. This implies limited exsolution of halogens but 75% of the initial sulphur content. Relatively to their total iron content, MIs are sulphur saturated, and their oxygen fugacity close to the FMQ buffer. The difference between the estimated initial volatile concentrations measured in the MIs and in the tephra groundmass (i.e. the so-called petrological method) yields 7.2 Mt SO2, limited HCl and no HF atmospheric mass loading from the Holuhraun 2014 eruption. The SO2/HCl molar ratio of the gas phase, calculated from the MIs, is 13 and 14, respectively, using average and estimated pre-eruptive S and Cl concentrations in the MIs. Filter

  4. Genesis and Eruptive Dynamics of the Garnet-Bearing Rhyolites from the Ramadas Volcanic Centre (Altiplano-Puna Plateau, Central Andes, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Astis, G.; Baez, W.; Bardelli, L.; Becchio, R.; Giordano, G.; Lucci, F.; Rossetti, F.; Viramonte, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Ramadas volcanic centre (6.6 Ma) is a monogenetic calderic depression, now largely obliterated, almost coeval with the Late Miocene outbreak of highly explosive silicic activity in the Altiplano-Puna plateau. Ramadas erupted a rather complex suite of garnet-bearing, rhyolitic pyroclastic rocks, dominated by a >35 km3 fall deposit and preceded by the emplacement of a lag breccia containing abundant metasedimentary lithics and garnet-tourmaline leucogranites. During the waning stage of the eruption, small volume phreatomagmatic deposits formed a small tuff-ring, followed by a lava coulée emplacement. Volcanological data together with textural features of typical tube pumice evidence a volatiles-rich, plinian eruption. Petrographic and textural studies on juveniles confirm the presence of euhedral garnet as dominant phase and identify micrometric metaigneous fragments (Qtz+Bt+Kfs+Mt+Tur). BSE imaging and microprobe analyses on glasses, garnets and accessory mineral phases (zircon and monazite) provide further data to understand the genesis and eruptive conditions of these atypical rhyolites, geochemically different from those outcropping in the same region. Garnets display a homogeneous, unzoned almandine-spessartine composition (Alm72-71Sps24-23Pyr0-1Grs4-3) and are contained in a glassy rhyolitic magma with peraluminous character, HREE depleted and relative LREE enriched. It's known that primary igneous garnets are rare and can only develop under restricted conditions. Additionally, the presence of Zr and Mnz is associated with both magmatic and high-T metamorphic processes. Although more data need to be collected, our study and preliminary modelling point to the occurrence of thermal metamorphism shifting to partial melting of Fe-MnO-rich metapelitic rocks (or even re-melting of older acid volcanics), with final extraction of volatiles-rich rhyolitic melts, able to produce a plinian eruption. Here, Alm-Sps garnet could represent the peritectic product of the

  5. 231Pa systematics in postglacial volcanic rocks from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon; Kokfelt, Thomas; Hoernle, Kaj; Lundstrom, Craig; Hauff, Folkmar

    2016-07-01

    Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of combined 238U-230Th and 235U-231Pa systematics to constrain upwelling rates and the role of recycled mafic lithologies in mantle plume-derived basalts. Accordingly, we present measurements of the 231Pa concentrations from 26 mafic volcanic rocks from Iceland, including off-axis basalts from the Snaefellsnes Peninsula, to complement previously published 238U-230Th-226Ra data. 231Pa concentrations vary from 27 to 624 fg/g and (231Pa/235U) ratios from 1.12 to 2.11 with the exception of one anomalous sample from the Southeast Rift which has a 231Pa deficit with (231Pa/235U) = 0.86. An important new result is that basalts from the Southeast Rift and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula define a trend at relatively low (231Pa/235U) for a given (230Th/238U) ratio. Many of the remaining samples fall in or around the global field for ocean island basalts but those from the Mid-Iceland Belt and the Southwest Rift/Reykjanes Peninsula extend to higher (231Pa/235U) ratios at a given (230Th/238U), similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts. In principle, these lavas could result from melting of peridotite at lower pressures. However, there is no reason to suspect that the Mid-Iceland Belt and the Southwest Rift lavas reflect shallower melting than elsewhere in Iceland. In our preferred model, these lavas reflect melting of garnet peridotite whereas those from the Southeast Rift and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula contain a significant contribution (up to 20%) of melt from garnet pyroxenite. This is consistent with incompatible trace element and radiogenic isotope evidence for recycled oceanic crust in these lavas. There is increasing agreement that the displacement of ocean island basalts to lower (231Pa/235U) ratios at a given (230Th/238U), compared to mid-ocean ridge basalts, reflects the role of recycled mafic lithologies such as garnet pyroxenite as well as higher average pressures of melting. It now seems likely that this interpretation may

  6. The effect of volcanic eruptions on the North Atlantic ocean temperatures over the past millennium (800-2000 AD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrina, M.; Wagner, S.; Zorita, E.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies suggest that the North Atlantic Ocean is of particular importance for the climate variability, especially that of western Europe (Schlesinger M. E. & Ramankutty 1994, Knight J., Folland C. K. & Scaife A. 2006). The changes in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures are related to the thermohaline's circulation strength (Kushnir Y., 1994) and affected by volcanic eruptions (Church J.A, White N.J. & Arblaster J.M. 2005), due to their release of aerosols into the stratosphere. In this study we examine the signal of tropical volcanic eruptions in the temperatures of the North Atlantic Ocean in various depths (6, 100, 560 and 3070 m from the sea surface), for the past millennium. The temperatures are derived from the comprehensive COSMOS Earth System Model (ECHAM5-OM at T30 spatial resolution) and are presented for a control run and for three fully forced ensemble simulations including changes in orbital, solar, volcanic, land use and greenhouse gas changes. The model shows a response in the years following volcanic eruptions, being mostly pronounced after the large eruptions that took place between 1200 and 1300 AD, as well as at the beginning of the 19thcentury. The strongest impact on the ocean temperatures, due to the increased atmospheric optical depth, is evident in the uppermost level, especially for two out of the three ensemble simulations. In these simulations a pronounced decrease in the ocean temperature between 1400 and 1500 AD is observed due to the increase of the aerosol effective radius. In the mixed ocean layers the response to volcanic aerosols is more obvious in the third ensemble simulation, whereas in the deep ocean the temperatures do not seem to be strongly affected by volcanic eruptions. Schlesinger, M. E. & Ramankutty, N. An oscillation in the global climate system of period 65-70 years. Nature 367, 723-726 (1994). Kushnir, Y. Interdecadal variations in North Atlantic sea surface temperature and associated atmospheric conditions

  7. The relationship between carbonate facies, volcanic rocks and plant remains in a late Palaeozoic lacustrine system (San Ignacio Fm, Frontal Cordillera, San Juan province, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, P.; Méndez-Bedia, I.; Gallastegui, G.; Colombo, F.; Cardó, R.; Limarino, O.; Heredia, N.; Césari, S. N.

    2013-07-01

    The San Ignacio Fm, a late Palaeozoic foreland basin succession that crops out in the Frontal Cordillera (Argentinean Andes), contains lacustrine microbial carbonates and volcanic rocks. Modification by extensive pedogenic processes contributed to the massive aspect of the calcareous beds. Most of the volcanic deposits in the San Ignacio Fm consist of pyroclastic rocks and resedimented volcaniclastic deposits. Less frequent lava flows produced during effusive eruptions led to the generation of tabular layers of fine-grained, greenish or grey andesites, trachytes and dacites. Pyroclastic flow deposits correspond mainly to welded ignimbrites made up of former glassy pyroclasts devitrified to microcrystalline groundmass, scarce crystals of euhedral plagioclase, quartz and K-feldspar, opaque minerals, aggregates of fine-grained phyllosilicates and fiammes defining a bedding-parallel foliation generated by welding or diagenetic compaction. Widespread silicified and silica-permineralized plant remains and carbonate mud clasts are found, usually embedded within the ignimbrites. The carbonate sequences are underlain and overlain by volcanic rocks. The carbonate sequence bottoms are mostly gradational, while their tops are usually sharp. The lower part of the carbonate sequences is made up of mud which appear progressively, filling interstices in the top of the underlying volcanic rocks. They gradually become more abundant until they form the whole of the rock fabric. Carbonate on volcanic sandstones and pyroclastic deposits occur, with the nucleation of micritic carbonate and associated production of pyrite. Cyanobacteria, which formed the locus of mineral precipitation, were related with this nucleation. The growth of some of the algal mounds was halted by the progressive accumulation of volcanic ash particles, but in most cases the upper boundary is sharp and suddenly truncated by pyroclastic flows or volcanic avalanches. These pyroclastic flows partially destroyed the

  8. Two likely stratospheric volcanic eruptions in the 1450s C.E. found in a bipolar, subannually dated 800 year ice core record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole-Dai, Jihong; Ferris, David G.; Lanciki, Alyson L.; Savarino, Joël.; Thiemens, Mark H.; McConnell, Joseph R.

    2013-07-01

    An 800 year volcanic record is constructed from high-resolution chemical analysis of recently obtained West Antarctica and central Greenland ice cores. The high accuracy and precision of the ice core chronologies are a result of dating by annual ice layer counting. Nineteen bipolar volcanic signals in this record represent large, explosive eruptions in the tropics with probable climatic impact. One of the two bipolar volcanic signals dated at 1453 and 1459 is probably left by the eruption of the submarine volcano Kuwae in the tropical Pacific, one of the largest volcanic eruptions in the last millennium. The discovery of the two signals in the 1450s casts doubt on the eruption year of 1452 or 1453 for Kuwae based on previous ice core records. The volcanic sulfate deposition patterns in this bipolar record suggest that the later signal is likely from the Kuwae eruption in 1458, although a firm attribution is not possible. Sulfur isotope composition in the volcanic sulfate in the central Greenland cores indicates that both eruptions in the 1450s injected sulfur gases into the stratosphere with probable impact on the global climate. These results are in agreement with tree ring records showing two short cold episodes during that decade. The bipolar volcanic record supports the hypothesis that unusually active volcanism in the thirteenth century contributed to the onset of the Little Ice Age and another active period in the mid fifteenth century may have helped to sustain the Little Ice Age.

  9. Rising from the ashes: Changes in salmonid fish assemblages after 30 months of the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallement, Mailén; Macchi, Patricio J; Vigliano, Pablo; Juarez, Santiago; Rechencq, Magalí; Baker, Matthew; Bouwes, Nicolaas; Crowl, Todd

    2016-01-15

    Events such as volcanic eruptions may act as disturbance agents modifying the landscape spatial diversity and increasing environmental instability. On June 4, 2011 the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic complex located on Chile (2236 m.a.s.l., 40° 02' 24" S- 70° 14' 26" W) experience a rift zone eruption ejecting during the first day 950 million metric tons into the atmosphere. Due to the westerly winds predominance, ash fell differentially upon 24 million ha of Patagonia Argentinean, been thicker deposits accumulated towards the West. In order to analyze changes on stream fish assemblages we studied seven streams 8, 19 and 30 months after the eruption along the ash deposition gradient, and compare those data to pre eruption ones. Habitat features and structure of the benthic macroinvertebrate food base of fish was studied. After the eruption, substantial environmental changes were observed in association with the large amount of ash fallout. In western sites, habitat loss due to ash accumulation, changes in the riparian zone and morphology of the main channels were observed. Turbidity was the water quality variable which reflected the most changes throughout time, with NTU values decreasing sharply from West to East sites. In west sites, increased Chironomid densities were recorded 8 months after the initial eruption as well as low EPT index values. These relationships were reversed in the less affected streams farther away from the volcano. Fish assemblages were greatly influenced both by habitat and macroinvertebrate changes. The eruption brought about an initial sharp decline in fish densities and the almost total loss of young of the year in the most western streams affecting recruitment. This effect diminished rapidly with distance from the emission center. Thirty months after the eruption, environmental changes are still occurring as a consequence of basin wide ash remobilization and transport.

  10. Identifying the Volcanic Eruption Depicted in a Neolithic Painting at Çatalhöyük, Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Danišík, Martin; Aydar, Erkan; Şen, Erdal; Ulusoy, İnan; Lovera, Oscar M.

    2014-01-01

    A mural excavated at the Neolithic Çatalhöyük site (Central Anatolia, Turkey) has been interpreted as the oldest known map. Dating to ∼6600 BCE, it putatively depicts an explosive summit eruption of the Hasan Dağı twin-peaks volcano located ∼130 km northeast of Çatalhöyük, and a birds-eye view of a town plan in the foreground. This interpretation, however, has remained controversial not least because independent evidence for a contemporaneous explosive volcanic eruption of Hasan Dağı has been lacking. Here, we document the presence of andesitic pumice veneer on the summit of Hasan Dağı, which we dated using (U-Th)/He zircon geochronology. The (U-Th)/He zircon eruption age of 8.97±0.64 ka (or 6960±640 BCE; uncertainties 2σ) overlaps closely with 14C ages for cultural strata at Çatalhöyük, including level VII containing the “map” mural. A second pumice sample from a surficial deposit near the base of Hasan Dağı records an older explosive eruption at 28.9±1.5 ka. U-Th zircon crystallization ages in both samples range from near-eruption to secular equilibrium (>380 ka). Collectively, our results reveal protracted intrusive activity at Hasan Dağı punctuated by explosive venting, and provide the first radiometric ages for a Holocene explosive eruption which was most likely witnessed by humans in the area. Geologic and geochronologic lines of evidence thus support previous interpretations that residents of Çatalhöyük artistically represented an explosive eruption of Hasan Dağı volcano. The magmatic longevity recorded by quasi-continuous zircon crystallization coupled with new evidence for late-Pleistocene and Holocene explosive eruptions implicates Hasan Dağı as a potential volcanic hazard. PMID:24416270

  11. Monitoring the volcanic unrest of El Hierro (Canary Islands) before the onset of the 2011-2012 submarine eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, C.; Blanco, M. J.; Abella, R.; Brenes, B.; Cabrera Rodríguez, V. M.; Casas, B.; Domínguez Cerdeña, I.; Felpeto, A.; de Villalta, M. Fernández; del Fresno, C.; García, O.; García-Arias, M. J.; García-Cañada, L.; Gomis Moreno, A.; González-Alonso, E.; Guzmán Pérez, J.; Iribarren, I.; López-Díaz, R.; Luengo-Oroz, N.; Meletlidis, S.; Moreno, M.; Moure, D.; de Pablo, J. Pereda; Rodero, C.; Romero, E.; Sainz-Maza, S.; Sentre Domingo, M. A.; Torres, P. A.; Trigo, P.; Villasante-Marcos, V.

    2012-07-01

    On 10 October 2011, a submarine volcanic eruption started 2 km south from El Hierro Island (Spain). Since July 2011 a dense multiparametric monitoring network was deployed all over the island by Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN). By the time the eruption started, almost 10000 earthquakes had been located and the deformation analyses showed a maximum deformation of more than 5 cm. Earthquake migration from the north to the south of the island and acceleration of seismicity are in good correlation with changes in the deformation pattern as well as with some anomalies in geochemical and geomagnetic parameters. An earthquake of local magnitude 4.3 at 12 km depth (8 October 2011) and shallower seismicity a day after, preceded the onset of the eruption. This is the first time that a volcanic eruption is fully monitored in the Canary Islands. Data recorded during this unrest episode at El Hierro will contribute to understand reawakening of volcanic activity in this region and others of similar characteristics.

  12. Recognition and Significance of Volcanic Rocks of the Anda Depression of the Songliao Basin in Jurassic-Cretaceous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuhong Gao; Dongpo Wang; Xinrong Zhang; Guixia Ji; Jian Zhao

    2003-01-01

    A series of volcanic rocks were developed in the deep part of Anda faulting depression. The reflection of therocks are mainly stratiform and hummocky. Three kinds of volcanic facies, e.g. explosion facies, effusion facies andsub-volcanic facies,were recognized by different reflecting characteristics in the seismic profile. The volcanic rocks areformed during three episodes of volcanic activities from Shahezi Formation to Yingcheng Formation. The volcanismshave relation to the formation of Songliao Basin and regional tectonics of northeastern China. Some of the volcanic rocksare good oil and gas reservoirs.

  13. Formation and failure of volcanic debris dams in the Chakachatna River valley associated with eruptions of the Spurr volcanic complex, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of lahars and a debris avalanche during Holocene eruptions of the Spurr volcanic complex in south-central Alaska have led to the development of volcanic debris dams in the Chakachatna River valley. Debris dams composed of lahar and debris-avalanche deposits formed at least five times in the last 8000-10,000 years and most recently during eruptions of Crater Peak vent in 1953 and 1992. Water impounded by a large debris avalanche of early Holocene (?) age may have destabilized an upstream glacier-dammed lake causing a catastrophic flood on the Chakachatna River. A large alluvial fan just downstream of the debris-avalanche deposit is strewn with boulders and blocks and is probably the deposit generated by this flood. Application of a physically based dam-break model yields estimates of peak discharge (Qp) attained during failure of the debris-avalanche dam in the range 104 debris dams were in the range 103 debris dams have formed at other volcanoes in the Cook Inlet region, Aleutian arc, and Wrangell Mountains but apparently did not fail rapidly or result in large or catastrophic outflows. Steep valley topography and frequent eruptions at volcanoes in this region make for significant hazards associated with the formation and failure of volcanic debris dams. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Pre-eruptive conditions of the ~31 ka rhyolitic magma of Tlaloc volcano, Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, J.; Arce, J.; Rueda, H.; Gardner, J.

    2008-12-01

    Tlaloc volcano is located at the northern tip of the Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range in Central Mexico. This Pleistocene to Recent volcanic range consists from north to south of Tlaloc-Telapón-Teyotl-Iztaccíhuatl-and- Popocatépetl volcanoes. While andesitic to barely dacitic volcanism dominates the southern part of the range (i.e. Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl); dacitic and rare rhyolithic volcanism (i.e. Telapón, Tlaloc) dominates the northern end. The known locus of rhyolitic magmatism took place at Tlaloc volcano with a Plinian-Subplinian eruption that occurred 31 ka ago. The eruption emplaced the so-called multilayered fallout and pumiceous pyroclastic flows (~2 km3 DRE). The deposit consists of 95% vol. of juvenile particles (pumice + crystals) and minor altered lithics 5% vol. The mineral association of the pumice fragments (74-76 % wt. SiO2) consists of quartz + plagioclase + sanidine + biotite and rare oxides set in a glassy groundmass with voids. Melt inclusions in quartz phenocrysts suggest that prior to the eruption the rhyolitic contain ~7% of H2O and Toluca volcano (~6 km) some 50 km to the southwest.

  15. The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program: Working with International Partners to Reduce the Risk from Volcanic Eruptions Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Pallister, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) is a joint effort between USGS and the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). OFDA leads and coordinates disaster responses overseas for the U.S. government and is a unique stakeholder concerned with volcano disaster risk reduction as an international humanitarian assistance donor. One year after the tragic eruption of Nevado del Ruiz in 1985, OFDA began funding USGS to implement VDAP. VDAP's mission is to reduce the loss of life and property and limit the economic impact from foreign volcano crises, thereby preventing such crises from becoming disasters. VDAP fulfills this mission and complements OFDA's humanitarian assistance by providing crisis response, capacity-building, technical training, and hazard assessments to developing countries before, during, and after eruptions. During the past 30 years, VDAP has responded to more than 27 major volcanic crises, built capacity in 12+ countries, and helped counterparts save tens of thousands of lives and hundreds of millions of dollars in property. VDAP responses have evolved as host-country capabilities have grown, but the pace of work has not diminished; as a result of VDAP's work at 27 volcanoes in fiscal year 2014, more than 1.3 million people who could have been impacted by volcanic activity benefitted from VDAP assistance, 11 geological policies were modified, 188 scientists were trained, and several successful eruption forecasts were made. VDAP is developing new initiatives to help counterparts monitor volcanoes and communicate volcanic risk. These include developing the Eruption Forecasting Information System (EFIS) to learn from compiled crisis data from 30 years of VDAP responses, creating event trees to forecast eruptions at restless volcanoes, and exploring the use of unmanned aerial systems for monitoring. The use of these new methods, along with traditional VDAP assistance, has improved VDAP

  16. Geochemical characteristics of the oceanic island- type volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; ZHANG Zhibin; CHONGPAN Chonglakmani

    2009-01-01

    The oceanic island volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand, are usually covered by Lower Carboniferous and Upper Permian shallow-water carbonate rocks, with the Hawaii rocks and potash trachybasalt being the main rock types. The alkaline series is dominant with sub-alkaline series occurring in few cases. The geochemical characteristics are described as follows: the major chemical compositions are characterized by high TiO2, high P2O5 and medium K2O; the rare-earth elements are characterized by right-inclined strong LREE-enrichment patterns; the trace element patterns are of the upward-bulging K-Ti enrichment type; multi-component plots falling within the fields of oceanic island basalts and alkali basalts, belonging to the oceanic island-type volcanic rocks, which are similar to the equivalents in Deqin and Gengma (the Changning-Menglian zone) of Yunnan Province, China.

  17. 徐东地区营城组一段火山喷发模式特征%Mode Characteristics of Volcanic Eruption of the Member 1 of Yingcheng Formation in Xudong Area in Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈欢庆; 胡永乐; 冉启全; 衣丽萍; 许磊

    2012-01-01

    According to the structural environment and cycle characteristic of the volcanic eruption, original magma, volcanic rock feature, and the types of the volcanic eruption, the mode characteristics of volcanic eruption of volcanic gas reservoir of the Member 1 of Yingcheng Formation in Xudong Area in Xushen Gas Field are studied. The results indicate that the aimed stratum in study areas was formed under an intraplate setting and the fractures cut-through the base plays a definitive role. The study stratum fall into three gyrations of 1 and II and III from bottom to top. Gyre I correspond to Yd III and Gyre II corresponds YC]II' and YCiII2 and Gyre III corresponds YCiI1 and YCiI2. The stratum in study areas mainly developed fissure-center eruption, the center eruption taking the secondary place. The conditions of oil source rock and accumulation and rock cap are excellent. The volcanic eruption mode controlls development characteristics of different types of volcanic lithofacies. The favorable areas mainly develop in the high-order bit of eruption facies near the volcanic crater and lower part and upper part and top part sub-facies of overflow facies and volcanic neck sub-facies of volcanic channels facies.%从火山喷发的构造环境、火山喷发旋回特征出发,结合原始岩浆来源、火山岩岩性特征、火山喷发类型等,总结了徐深气田徐东地区营城组一段火山喷发模式,分析了其对储层的影响.结果表明,切穿基底的深大断裂在火山喷发中起着决定性的作用.目的层自下而上划分为3个旋回,旋回Ⅰ对应YC1 Ⅲ,旋回Ⅱ对应YC1 Ⅱ1和YC1Ⅱ2,旋回Ⅲ对应小层YC1Ⅰ1和YC1Ⅰ2.火山喷发以裂隙-中心式喷发为主,中心式喷发为辅.火山喷发模式控制着不同类型火山岩相的发育特征.靠近火山口的爆发相的高部位、溢流相下部亚相、项部亚相、上部亚相、火山通道相的火山颈亚相等是有利的开发区域.

  18. Geochemical characteristics of island-arc volcanic rocks in the Nan-Nam Pat-Phetchabun zone, northern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; YANG Wenqiang; ZHANG Zhibin; Chongpom Chonglakmani

    2010-01-01

    Late Permian-Early Triassic (P2-T1) volcanic rocks distributed on the eastern side of ocean-ridge and oceanic-island basalts in the Nan-Uttaradit zone were analyzed from aspects of petrographic characteristics, rock assemblage, REE, trace elements, geotectonic setting, etc., indicating that those volcanic rocks possess the characteristic features of island-arc volcanic rocks. The volcanic rock assemblage is basalt-basaltic andesite-andesite. The volcanic rocks are sub-alkaline, dominated by calc-alkaline series, with tholeiite series coming next. The chemical composition of the volcanic rocks is characterized by low TiO2 and K2O and high Al2O3 and Na2O. Their REE patterns are of the flat, weak LREE-enrichment right-inclined type. The trace elements are characterized by the enrichment of large cation elements such as K, Rb and Ba, common enrichment of U and Th, and depletion of Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf. The petrochemical plot falls within the field of volcanic rocks, in consistency with the plot of island-arc volcanic rocks in the Jinsha River zone of China. This island-arc volcanic zone, together with the ocean-ridge/oceanic island type volcanic rocks in the Nan-Uttaradit zone, constitutes the ocean-ridge volcanic rock-island-arc magmatic rock zones which are distributed in pairs, indicating that the oceanic crust of the Nan-Uttaradit zone once was of eastward subduction. This work is of great significance in exploring the evolution of paleo-Tethys in the Nan-Uttaradit zone.

  19. Raman-IR vibrational and XRD characterization of ancient and modern mineralogy from volcanic eruption in Tenerife Island: Implication for Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Lalla

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A detailed vibrational Raman-IR spectroscopic and diffractional analyses have been performed on basalts from two locations from Tenerife Island: (1 the Arenas Negras volcano which belongs to the historical eruption not showing visible alteration and (2 Pillow Lavas zone from Anaga Massif which shows a clearly fluid-rock interaction caused by submarine alteration. These places have been extensively studied due to its similarity with the surface of Mars. The analysis is based on the mineral detection of selected samples by a Micro-Raman study of the materials. The complementary techniques have confirmed the mineralogy detected by the Raman measurement. The results show a volcanic environment behavior with primary phases like olivine, pyroxene, and feldspar/plagioclase. Moreover, the presence of accessory minerals or secondary mineralization like phosphate, iron oxides, zeolite or carbonates shows the alteration processes on each outcrop. The variation in the crystallinity and amorphous phases is related to fluid-rock interaction caused by hydrothermal episodes and external weathering processes, which shows several analogies with the ancient volcanic activity from Mars.

  20. Petrogenesis of Cenozoic Potassic Volcanic Rocks in the Nangqên Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Nangqên basin is one of the Tertiary pull-apart basins situated in the east of the Qiangtang block. Similar to the adjacent Dengqên basin and Baxoi basin, there occurred a series of potassic volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks, ranging from basic, intermediate to intermediate-acid in lithology. Based on the study of petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry, including REEs, trace elements, isotopic elements and chronology, the authors concluded that the Cenozoic potassic volcanic rocks in the Nangqên basin were formed in the post-collisional intraplate tectonic settings. The relations between the basic, intermediate and intermediate-acid rocks are neither differentiation nor evolution, but instead the geochemical variability is mainly attributable to the different partial melting degrees of the mantle sources formed at depths of 50(80 km. The sources of the potassic rocks are enriched metasomatic mantle that has experienced multiple mixing of components mainly derived from the crust. The recycling model can be described as follows: after they had subducted to the mantle wedge, the crust-derived rocks were metasomatized with the mantle materials. In view of the fact that the ratio of crust-derived rocks increases by the age of volcanism, it can be concluded that the sources of the potassic rocks moved upwards progressively with time. The underplating of small scattered magmas upwelling from the asthenosphere may have induced partial melting of the sources of the volcanic rocks in some pull-apart basins in the Hengduanshan area and the intense tectonic movements of large-scale strike-slip belts provided conduits for the ascending melts.

  1. Modification of the Continental Crust by Subduction Zone Magmatism and Vice-Versa: Across-Strike Geochemical Variations of Silicic Lavas from Individual Eruptive Centers in the Andean Central Volcanic Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. Michelfelder

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the origin of across-strike K2O enrichments in silicic volcanic rocks from the Andean Central Volcanic Zone, we compare geochemical data for Quaternary volcanic rocks erupted from three well-characterized composite volcanoes situated along a southeast striking transect between 21° and 22° S latitude (Aucanquilcha, Ollagüe, and Uturuncu. At a given SiO2 content, lavas erupted with increasing distance from the arc front display systematically higher K2O, Rb, Th, Y, REE and HFSE contents; Rb/Sr ratios; and Sr isotopic ratios. In contrast, the lavas display systematically lower Al2O3, Na2O, Sr, and Ba contents; Ba/La, Ba/Zr, K/Rb, and Sr/Y ratios; Nd isotopic ratios; and more negative Eu anomalies toward the east. We suggest that silicic magmas along the arc front reflect melting of relatively young, mafic composition amphibolitic source rocks and that the mid- to deep-crust becomes increasingly older with a more felsic bulk composition in which residual mineralogies are progressively more feldspar-rich toward the east. Collectively, these data suggest the continental crust becomes strongly hybridized beneath frontal arc localities due to protracted intrusion of primary, mantle-derived basaltic magmas with a diminishing effect behind the arc front because of smaller degrees of mantle partial melting and primary melt generation.

  2. Geochemistry and geochronology of late Mesozoic volcanic rocks in the northern part of the Eastern Pontide Orogenic Belt (NE Turkey): Implications for the closure of the Neo-Tethys Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdamar, Şenel

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb age data, Sr-Nd isotopes, whole-rock and mineral compositions of Upper Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the Ordu area of the Eastern Pontide Orogenic Belt (EPOB) in northeastern Turkey. The volcanic rocks exhibit a wide compositional range: basalt, basaltic-andesites, andesites and a rhyodacite suite; they are characterized by subparallel light rare earth element (LREE)-enrichment, relatively flat heavy rare earth element (HREE) patterns with Eu anomalies and moderate fractionation [average (La/Yb)N = 8.55]. The geochemical results show that the volcanic rocks have calc-alkaline affinity consistent with arc volcanic rocks erupted in an active continental margin. Initial 87Sr/86Sr values vary between 0.70569 and 0.70606, while initial 143Nd/144Nd values lie between 0.51244 and 0.51249. Crustal contamination affected the mantle-originated primary magma, as indicated by increased 87Sr/86Sr and decreased 143Nd/144Nd ratios with increasing SiO2. New precise laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS) 206Pb-238U age analyses of zircon and 40Ar/39Ar age data of plagioclase from the volcanics enable a more precise reconstruction of the EBOP. The ages provide insight into the timing of arc formation in this region, constrain the volcanic activity between 86 My (Coniacian) and 75 My (Campanian) and constrain the timing of closure of the Neo-Tethys.

  3. Petrogenesis of Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks in Tengchong Region of Western Yunnan Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    从柏林; 陈秋媛; 张儒瑷; 吴根耀; 徐平

    1994-01-01

    The Tengchong Cenozoic volcanic rocks belong to the high-K calc-alkaline rock series.They are strongly depleted in high field strength (HFS) elements and enriched in large-ion lithophile(LIL) elements and LREE.The generation of Tengchong volcanic rocks has been considered to be relatedto the evolution of the Neo-Tethys.The Indian Plate was subducted beneath the southeastern Asia conti-nent,which resulted in the formation of Indo-Burman Arc in the Late Cretaeeous-Palaeocene time.Thecollision between the Indian continent and Indo-Burman Arc started in Eocene and lasted to the present.The Andaman Sea and the Inner Burman Tertiary Basin are a back-arc basin that has been extended sincethe Late Miocene.A distinct characteristic of Tengchong volcanics is that they show a chemical affinityrelated to island arc but their generation postdated the subduetion of the ocean plate.

  4. Segmentation and Tracking of Anticyclonic Eddies during a Submarine Volcanic Eruption Using Ocean Colour Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Marcello

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The eruptive phase of a submarine volcano located 2 km away from the southern coast of El Hierro Island started on October 2011. This extraordinary event provoked a dramatic perturbation of the water column. In order to understand and quantify the environmental impacts caused, a regular multidisciplinary monitoring was carried out using remote sensing sensors. In this context, we performed the systematic processing of every MODIS and MERIS and selected high resolution Worldview-2 imagery to provide information on the concentration of a number of biological, physical and chemical parameters. On the other hand, the eruption provided an exceptional source of tracer that allowed the study a variety of oceanographic structures. Specifically, the Canary Islands belong to a very active zone of long-lived eddies. Such structures are usually monitored using sea level anomaly fields. However these products have coarse spatial resolution and they are not suitable to perform submesoscale studies. Thanks to the volcanic tracer, detailed studies were undertaken with ocean colour imagery allowing, using the diffuse attenuation coefficient, to monitor the process of filamentation and axisymmetrization predicted by theoretical studies and numerical modelling. In our work, a novel 2-step segmentation methodology has been developed. The approach incorporates different segmentation algorithms and region growing techniques. In particular, the first step obtains an initial eddy segmentation using thresholding or clustering methods and, next, the fine detail is achieved by the iterative identification of the points to grow and the subsequent application of watershed or thresholding strategies. The methodology has demonstrated an excellent performance and robustness and it has proven to properly capture the eddy and its filaments.

  5. Chronological dating and tectonic implications of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks and lacustrine sequence in Oiyug Basin of southern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of uplift history of the Tibetan Plateau is crucial for understanding its environmental impacts. The Oiyug Basin in southern Tibet contains multiple periods of sedimentary sequences and volcanic rocks that span much of the Cenozoic and has great potential for further studying this issue. However, these strata were poorly dated. This paper presents a chronological study of the 145 m thick and horizontally-distributed lacustrine sequence using paleomagnetic method as well as a K-Ar dating of the underlying volcanic rocks. Based on these dating results, a chronostratigraphic framework and the basin-developmental history have been established for the past 15 Ma, during which three tectonic stages are identified. The period of 15-8.1 Ma is characterized by intense volcanic activities involving at least three major eruptions. Subsequently, the basin came into a tectonically quiescent period and a lacustrine sedimentary sequence was developed. Around 2.5 Ma, an N-S fault occurred across the southern margin of the basin, leading to the disappearance of the lake environment and the development of the Oiyug River. The Gyirong basin on northern slope of the Himalayas shows a similar basin developmental history and thus there is a good agreement in tectonic activities between the Himalayan and Gangdise orogenic belts. Therefore, the tectonic evolution stages experienced by the Oiyug Basin during the past 15 Ma could have a regional significance for southern Tibet. The chronological data obtained from this study may provide some constraints for further studies with regard to the tectonic processes and environmental changes in southern Tibetan Plateau.

  6. Short-period volcanic gas precursors to phreatic eruptions: Insights from Poás Volcano, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, Maarten; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Pacheco, Javier; Avard, Geoffroy; Kern, Christoph; Liuzzo, Marco; Martinez, Maria; Giudice, Gaetano; Fischer, Tobias P.

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions involving interaction with water are amongst the most violent and unpredictable geologic phenomena on Earth. Phreatic eruptions are exceptionally difficult to forecast by traditional geophysical techniques. Here we report on short-term precursory variations in gas emissions related to phreatic blasts at Poás volcano, Costa Rica, as measured with an in situ multiple gas analyzer that was deployed at the edge of the erupting lake. Gas emitted from this hyper-acid crater lake approaches magmatic values of SO2/CO2 1–6 days prior to eruption. The SO2 flux derived from magmatic degassing through the lake is measureable by differential optical absorption spectrometry (sporadic campaign measurements), which allows us to constrain lake gas output and input for the major gas species during eruptive and non-eruptive periods. We can further calculate power supply to the hydrothermal system using volatile mass balance and thermodynamics, which indicates that the magmatic heat flux into the shallow hydrothermal system increases from ∼27 MW during quiescence to ∼59 MW during periods of phreatic events. These transient pulses of gas and heat from the deeper magmatic system generate both phreatic eruptions and the observed short-term changes in gas composition, because at high gas flux scrubbing of sulfur by the hydrothermal system is both kinetically and thermodynamically inhibited whereas CO2gas is always essentially inert in hyperacid conditions. Thus, the SO2/CO2 of lake emissions approaches magmatic values as gas and power supply to the sub-limnic hydrothermal system increase, vaporizing fluids and priming the hydrothermal system for eruption. Our results suggest that high-frequency real-time gas monitoring could provide useful short-term eruptive precursors at volcanoes prone to phreatic explosions.

  7. Alarm systems detect volcanic tremor and earthquake swarms during Redoubt eruption, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G.; West, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    We ran two alarm algorithms on real-time data from Redoubt volcano during the 2009 crisis. The first algorithm was designed to detect escalations in continuous seismicity (tremor). This is implemented within an application called IceWeb which computes reduced displacement, and produces plots of reduced displacement and spectrograms linked to the Alaska Volcano Observatory internal webpage every 10 minutes. Reduced displacement is a measure of the amplitude of volcanic tremor, and is computed by applying a geometrical spreading correction to a displacement seismogram. When the reduced displacement at multiple stations exceeds pre-defined thresholds and there has been a factor of 3 increase in reduced displacement over the previous hour, a tremor alarm is declared. The second algorithm was to designed to detect earthquake swarms. The mean and median event rates are computed every 5 minutes based on the last hour of data from a real-time event catalog. By comparing these with thresholds, three swarm alarm conditions can be declared: a new swarm, an escalation in a swarm, and the end of a swarm. The end of swarm alarm is important as it may mark a transition from swarm to continuous tremor. Alarms from both systems were dispatched using a generic alarm management system which implements a call-down list, allowing observatory scientists to be called in sequence until someone acknowledged the alarm via a confirmation web page. The results of this simple approach are encouraging. The tremor alarm algorithm detected 26 of the 27 explosive eruptions that occurred from 23 March - 4 April. The swarm alarm algorithm detected all five of the main volcanic earthquake swarm episodes which occurred during the Redoubt crisis on 26-27 February, 21-23 March, 26 March, 2-4 April and 3-7 May. The end-of-swarm alarms on 23 March and 4 April were particularly helpful as they were caused by transitions from swarm to tremor shortly preceding explosive eruptions; transitions which were

  8. Geologic Features of Wangjiatun Deep Gas Reservoirs of Volcanic Rock in Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Xuanlong; CHEN Shumin; WU Dawei; Zang Yudong

    2001-01-01

    Wangjiatun gas pool is located at the north part of Xujiaweizi in Songliao basin. Commercial gas flow has been found in the intermediate and acid volcanic rock of upper Jurassic - lower Cretaceous, which makes a breakthrough in deep nature gas prospecting in Songliao basin. The deep natural gas entrapment regularity is discussed in the paper by the study of deep strata, structure and reservoir. Andesite, rhyolite and little pyroclastic rock are the main reservoirs. There are two types of volcanic reservoir space assemblage in this area: the pore and fissure and the pure fissure. Changes had taken place for volcanic reservoir space during long geologic time, which was controlled by tectonic movement and geologic environment.The developed degree of reservoir space was controlled by tectonic movement, weathering and filtering, corrosion and Filling. There are three types of source- reservoir-caprock assemblage in this area: lower source- upper reservoir model,upper source - lower reservoir model and lateral change model. Mudstone in Dengluoku formation and the compacted volcanic rock of upper Jurassic - lower Cretaceous are the caprock for deep gas reservoirs. Dark mudstone of deep lacustrine facies in Shahezi formation and lower part of Dengluoku formation are the source rock of deep gas. It can be concluded that deep gas pools are mainly volcanic lithologic reservoirs.

  9. Geochemical Characteristics of Danfeng Meta-Volcanic Rocks in Shangzhou Area,Shaanxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    The Danfeng meta-volcanics in the Shangzhou area, Shaanxi Province are characterized by oceanic island arc volcanic geochemistry. They are a suite of low-K tholeiitic series and calc-alkaline series meta-volcanic rocks derived from different sources respectively.These meta-volcanics have high Th/Ta ratios and low contents of Ni,Ta,Ti,Y and Yb, suggesting that they were influenced by the subduction zone components.Many lines of evidence show that the Danfeng meta-volcanics were produced in an oceanic island are setting of the supra-subduction zone at the southern margin of the North China Block during the Early Paleozoic.

  10. Experimental and textural constraints on mafic enclave formation in volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, M.L.; Eichelberger, J.C.; Rutherford, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    We have used experiments and textural analysis to investigate the process of enclave formation during magma mixing at Southwest Trident volcano, Alaska. Andesite enclaves are present throughout the four dacite lava flows produced by the eruption, and resemble mafic enclaves commonly found in other volcanic rocks. Our experiments replicate the pressure-temperature-time path taken by enclave-forming andesite magma as it is engulfed in dacite during magma mixing. Pressure and temperature information for the andesite and dacite are from [Coombs et al., Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 140 (2000) 99-118]. The andesite was annealed at 1000??C, and then cooled to 890??C at rates of 110??C h1, 10??C h1 and 2??C h1. Once cooled to 890??C, andesite was held at this lower temperature from times ranging from 1 to 40 h. The andesite that was cooled at the slower rates of 2??C h1 and 10??C h1 most resembles enclave groundmass texturally and compositionally. Based on simple thermal calculations, these rates are more consistent with cooling of the andesite groundmass below an andesite-dacite interface than with cooling of enclave-sized spheres. If enclaves do crystallize as spheres, post-crystallization disaggregation must occur. Calculations using the MELTS algorithm [Ghiorso and Sack, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 119 (1995) 197-212] show that for incoming andesite to become less dense than the dacite to become less dense ???34 volume % of its groundmass must crystallize to undergo~18 volume % vesiculation; these values are similar to those determined for Southwest Trident enclaves. Thus such crystallization may lead to 'flotation' of enclaves and be a viable mechanism for enclave formation and dispersal. The residual melt in the cooling experiments did not evolve to rhyolitic compositions such as seen in natural enclaves due to a lack of a decompression step in the experiments. Decompression experiments on Southwest Trident dacite suggest an average ascent rate for the eruption of ???2

  11. The Maar-Diatreme System in a Mixed "Hard/Soft-Rock" Setting: an Example from the Pali Aike Volcanic Field, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpit, S.; Ross, P.

    2009-05-01

    The eruptive processes in diatremes remain poorly understood compared to those at other volcano types, because these processes occur at depth. Except for maar-diatreme volcanoes formed during kimberlitic eruptions, volcanologists agree that these systems are of phreatomagmatic origin. The origin of kimberlitic diatremes is more contentious, but studying non kimberlitic equivalents can be a good approach to better understand kimberlitic diatremes considering their numerous common characteristics. The geometry of maar-diatreme systems is strongly influenced by their setting in "hard-rock" or "soft-rock" environments (Lorenz, 2003, Geolines 15:72-83). Formation of maar-diatreme systems in "hard-rock" environments, like in the West Eifel Volcanic Field of Germany, is largely described in the literature but emplacement in "soft-rock" environments or mixed settings is not. In the case of "hard-rock" environments external water is provided by fracture aquifers. The eruption products are juvenile clasts and country rock fragments. The inner crater walls of the maar, and the diatreme walls, have steep slopes. In the case of "soft- rock" environments, water is contained in the sediment pores and the walls tend to be at lower angles. We recently conducted field work on maars, cinder cones and spatter rings of the Pali Aike Volcanic Field of southern Argentina as part of the Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project (PASADO). These Quaternary monogenetic volcanoes were emplaced in a mixed "hard/soft-rock" environment containing young glacial sediments, basaltic lava flows, partly consolidated fluviatile sediments, and older indurated sedimentary rocks. The mixed environment of emplacement is reflected in a phreatomagmatic deposit on the inner slope of a tephra ring exposing some lapilli-tuff layers. The lapilli fraction comprises approximately 40% lithics on average (visual estimate): at least half of the fraction is composed of basaltic lava derived from a pre

  12. Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkleff, P. G.; Cahill, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual glass shard ash particles are angular, uniformly-sized, consist of calc-alkaline whole-rock elements (Si, Al, Fe, Na, and Ca) and are not collocated on the sample media with non-silicate, Cl and S bearing sea salt particles. Aggregate particles occur as two types: pure ash aggregates and sea salt-cored aggregates. Pure ash aggregates are made up of only ash particles and contain no other constituents. Sea salt-cored aggregates are ash particles commingled with sea salts. Determining the formation processes of the different ash particle types need further investigation but some possibilities are proposed here. Individual ash particles may exist when the ambient air is generally dry, little electrical charge exists on ash particles, the eruptive cloud is generally dry, or the number of individual particles exceeds the scavenging capacity of the water droplets present. Another possibility is that ash aggregates may break apart as relative humidity drops over time and causes ash-laden water droplets to evaporate and subsequently break apart. Pure ash aggregates may form when the ambient air and plume is relatively dry but the ash has a significant charge to cause ash to aggregate. Or they could form during long-range transport when turbulent or Brownian motion can cause ash particles to collide and coagulate. Pure ash aggregates could also form as a result of water droplet scavenging and subsequent evaporation of water droplets, leaving behind only ash. In this case, droplets would not have interacted with a sea salt

  13. Phreatomagmatic eruptions through unconsolidated coastal plain sequences, Maungataketake, Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Flores, Javier; Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Kereszturi, Gábor; Brand, Brittany D.; Smith, Ian E. M.

    2014-04-01

    Maungataketake is a monogenetic basaltic volcano formed at ~ 85-89 ka in the southern part of the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand. It comprises a basal 1100-m diameter tuff ring, with a central scoria/spatter cone and lava flows. The tuff ring was formed under hydrogeological and geographic conditions very similar to the present. The tuff records numerous density stratified, wet base surges that radiated outward up to 1 km, decelerating rapidly and becoming less turbulent with distance. The pyroclastic units dominantly comprise fine-grained expelled grains from various sedimentary deposits beneath the volcano mixed with a minor component of juvenile pyroclasts (~ 35 vol.%). Subtle lateral changes relate to deceleration with distance and vertical transformations are minor, pointing to stable explosion depths and conditions, with gradual transitions between units and no evidence for eruptive pauses. This volcano formed within and on ~ 60 m-thick Plio/Pleistocene, poorly consolidated, highly permeable shelly sands and silts (Kaawa Formation) capped by near-impermeable, water-saturated muds (Tauranga Group). These sediments rest on moderately consolidated Miocene-aged permeable turbiditic sandstones and siltstones (Waitemata Group). Magma-water fuelled thermohydraulic explosions remained in the shallow sedimentary layers, excavating fine-grained sediments without brittle fragmentation required. On the whole, the resulting cool, wet pyroclastic density currents were of low energy. The unconsolidated shallow sediments deformed to accommodate rapidly rising magma, leading to development of complex sill-like bodies and a range of magma-water contact conditions at any time. The weak saturated sediments were also readily liquefied to provide an enduring supply of water and fine sediment to the explosion loci. Changes in magma flux and/or subsequent stabilisation of the conduit area by a lava ring-barrier led to ensuing Strombolian and fire-fountaining eruption

  14. Paleomagnetic Results of the Red Soil-Volcanic Rock Series of Yingfengling Section, Southern Leizhou Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊达; 梁池生

    2002-01-01

    The Yingfengling section composed of red soil and volcanic rocks can be distinguished into 8 stratigraphic units and 4 red soil-volcanic rock cycles. 64 paleomagnetic-orientated sam ples were collected from the bottom to the top of the section. Natural remanent magnetization and magnetic susceptibility were firstly measured. All the samples were stepwisely treated with thermal or/and alternating fields. Four clear polarity segments were recorded in the section.Compared with the geo-magnetic polarity scale, the section was formed since the late Olduvai subchron, about 1.37 Ma. B. P.

  15. Detection and estimation of volcanic eruption onset and mass flow rate using weather radar and infrasonic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Frank S.; Mereu, Luigi; Montopoli, Mario; Picciotti, Errico; Di Fabio, Saverio; Bonadonna, Costanza; Marchetti, Emanuele; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    The explosive eruption of sub-glacial Eyjafjallajökull volcano in 2010 was of modest size, but ash was widely dispersed over Iceland and Europe. The Eyjafjallajökull pulsating explosive activity started on April 14 and ended on May 22. The combination of a prolonged and sustained ejection of volcanic ash and persistent northwesterly winds resulted in dispersal the volcanic cloud over a large part of Europe. Tephra dispersal from an explosive eruption is a function of multiple factors, including magma mass flow rate (MFR), degree of magma fragmentation, vent geometry, plume height, particle size distribution (PSD) and wind velocity. One of the most important geophysical parameters, derivable from the analysis of tephra deposits, is the erupted mass, which is essential for the source characterization and assessment of the associated hazards. MFR can then be derived by dividing the erupted mass by the eruption duration (if known) or based on empirical and analytical relations with plume height. Microwave weather radars at C and X band can provide plume height, ash concentration and loading, and, to some extent, PSD and MFR. Radar technology is well established and can nowadays provide fast three-dimensional (3D) scanning antennas together with Doppler and dual polarization capabilities. However, some factors can limit the detection and the accuracy of the radar products aforementioned. For example, the sensitivity of microwave radar measurements depends on the distance between the radar antenna and the target, the transmitter central wavelength, receiver minimum detachable power and the resolution volume. In addition, radar measurements are sensitive to particle sizes larger than few tens of microns thus limiting the radar-based quantitative estimates to the larger portion of the PSD. Volcanic activity produces infrasonic waves (i.e., acoustic waves below 20 Hz), which can propagate in the atmosphere useful for the remote monitoring of volcanic activity. Infrasound

  16. The 2007-8 volcanic eruption on Jebel at Tair island (Red Sea) observed by satellite radar and optical images

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenbin

    2014-01-31

    We use high-resolution optical images and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to study the September 2007-January 2008 Jebel at Tair eruption. Comparison of pre- and post-eruption optical images reveals several fresh ground fissures, a new scoria cone near the summit, and that 5.9 ± 0.1 km2 of new lava covered about half of the island. Decorrelation in the InSAR images indicates that lava flowed both to the western and to the northeastern part of the island after the start of the eruption, while later lavas were mainly deposited near the summit and onto the north flank of the volcano. From the InSAR data, we also estimate that the average thickness of the lava flows is 3.8 m, resulting in a bulk volume of around 2.2 × 107 m3. We observe no volcano-wide pre- or post-eruption uplift, which suggests that the magma source may be deep. The co-eruption interferograms, on the other hand, reveal local and rather complex deformation. We use these observations to constrain a tensile dislocation model that represents the dike intrusion that fed the eruption. The model results show that the orientation of the dike is perpendicular to the Red Sea rift, implying that the local stresses within the volcanic edifice are decoupled from the regional stress field. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  17. Reconstructing the plinian and co-ignimbrite sources of large volcanic eruptions: A novel approach for the Campanian Ignimbrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Alejandro; Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Engwell, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    The 39 ka Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) super-eruption was the largest volcanic eruption of the past 200 ka in Europe. Tephra deposits indicate two distinct plume forming phases, Plinian and co-ignimbrite, characteristic of many caldera-forming eruptions. Previous numerical studies have characterized the eruption as a single-phase event, potentially leading to inaccurate assessment of eruption dynamics. To reconstruct the volume, intensity, and duration of the tephra dispersal, we applied a computational inversion method that explicitly accounts for the Plinian and co-ignimbrite phases and for gravitational spreading of the umbrella cloud. To verify the consistency of our results, we performed an additional single-phase inversion using an independent thickness dataset. Our better-fitting two-phase model suggests a higher mass eruption rate than previous studies, and estimates that 3/4 of the total fallout volume is co-ignimbrite in origin. Gravitational spreading of the umbrella cloud dominates tephra transport only within the first hundred kilometres due to strong stratospheric winds in our best-fit wind model. Finally, tephra fallout impacts would have interrupted the westward migration of modern hominid groups in Europe, possibly supporting the hypothesis of prolonged Neanderthal survival in South-Western Europe during the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition.

  18. Eruptive dynamics and hazards associated with obsidian bearing ignimbrites of the Geghama Volcanic Highland, Central Armenia: a textural insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Zoe; Manning, Christina J.

    2017-04-01

    The Geghama Volcanic highland in central Armenia is an ideal setting to study the young ( 750-25 ka [1]) volcanism that characterises the Lesser Caucasus region. The volcanism in the area is bimodal in composition: the eastern highlands are dominated by numerous monogenetic scoria cones, whilst the west shows more evolved volcanism centered on two obsidian bearing, polygenetic domes (Hatis and Gutanasar) [2]. Activity at Hatis and Gutanasar is thought to have spanned 550ka-200ka [3] and produced a range of products including obsidian flows, ignimbrites and basaltic scoria cones, consistent with long lived and complex magma storage systems. During a similar time period there is evidence for the presence of hominin groups in the surrounding region [3] and it is likely that at least some of the volcanic activity at Hatis and Gutanasar impacted on their distribution [4]. A better understanding of the eruptive behaviour of these volcanoes during this period could therefore shed light on the effect of volcanic activity on the dispersal of man through this period. Whilst large regional studies have striven to better understand the timing and source of volcanism in Armenia, there have been few detailed studies on single volcanoes. Obsidian is ubiquitous within the volcanic material of both Gutanasar and Hatis as lava flows, dome deposits and within ignimbrites. This study aims to better understand the eruptive history of Gutanasar, with specific focus upon the determination of the petrogenetic history of obsidian lenses observed within the ignimbrite deposits. Identification of these obsidians as the result of welding or in-situ melting will help constrain eruptive volumes and flow thickness, important for the reconstruction of palaeo-volcanic hazards. In order to interpret how this obsidian was deposited, macro textural analysis is combined with micro textural measurements of microlite crystals. Quantitative measurements of microlites in obsidian can provide significant

  19. Influence of volcanic tephra on photovoltaic (PV)-modules: An experimental study with application to the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Edgar; Walter, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions may lead to significant tephra dispersion, crossing borders and affecting distant and industrial societies in various ways. While the effects of volcanic ash clouds on the aviation industry have been recognized, damaging effects on the photovoltaic energy sector are poorly investigated. Here we describe the influence of volcanic tephra deposition on photovoltaic (PV) modules that we experimentally analyzed and evaluated. A systematic set of experiments was conducted under controlled conditions using an artificial light source and measuring the electrical power generated from the PV-modules with the aim to determine the dependency of the amount of tephra covering a module and its subsequent loss in power production (measured in voltage and current) as well as the influence of the tephra grain size. We find that a mass of fine tephra has a stronger influence on the PV-modules power generation than the same mass of coarser particles. An application to the fine-grained 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland and the resulting ash-cloud reveals that the power produced by PV-modules in continental Europe might have been affected significantly. Deposits were thick enough to cause complete failures of PV-modules up to a distance of about 300 km downwind. Although this distance is largely over the ocean in this particular case, our results imply that similar and larger eruptions of other volcanoes elsewhere might harm commercial or private energy production at distances of hundreds to thousands of kilometers from the volcano. Given that volcanic eruptions are frequent and the fact that the PV-industry is growing rapidly, negative impacts are expected in the future, requiring close tephra dispersion monitoring and PV-maintenance strategies.

  20. Temporal changes in thermal waters related to volcanic activity of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan: implications for forecasting future eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Shibata, Tomo; Murayama, Yasuji; Ogino, Tagiru; Okazaki, Noritoshi

    2015-01-01

    In order to detect changes in volcanic activity of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan, we have continuously monitored thermal waters discharging at the western to southwestern flank of the volcano since 1986. The steam-heated waters in the Nukkakushi crater discharged with boiling temperature until 2002. Thermal waters at the Tokachidake spa area have similar compositions to fumarolic gas emitted from the summit craters, indicating that the waters formed by absorption of volcanic gas into shallow aquifers. Thermal waters at the Fukiage spa area were derived from the same aquifer as the Tokachidake spa area until early 1986. However, after that time, NaCl-type thermal water entered the Fukiage spa area during the increase in volcanic activity associated with the 1988-1989 eruption, thus leading to a clear increase in Cl concentrations and temperature. After the eruption, the supply of the NaCl-type thermal water was halted, and the Cl concentrations of the thermal waters decreased. In contrast, SO4 concentrations gradually increased in the Fukiage spa area after 1989, and the temperature has been maintained. These observations indicate that SO4-rich thermal water with a relatively high temperature entered the system instead of the NaCl-type thermal water. As was the case for the 1988-1989 eruption, the Cl concentrations at the Fukiage spa area increased in 2012 during an increase in volcanic activity, implying that the supply of the NaCl-type thermal water had resumed. However, the chemical changes in the thermal waters since 2012 are small compared with those before the 1988-1989 eruption, with oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions remaining nearly the same as those of meteoric waters.

  1. Credible occurrence probabilities for extreme geophysical events: earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Statistical analysis is made of rare, extreme geophysical events recorded in historical data -- counting the number of events $k$ with sizes that exceed chosen thresholds during specific durations of time $\\tau$. Under transformations that stabilize data and model-parameter variances, the most likely Poisson-event occurrence rate, $k/\\tau$, applies for frequentist inference and, also, for Bayesian inference with a Jeffreys prior that ensures posterior invariance under changes of variables. Frequentist confidence intervals and Bayesian (Jeffreys) credibility intervals are approximately the same and easy to calculate: $(1/\\tau)[(\\sqrt{k} - z/2)^{2},(\\sqrt{k} + z/2)^{2}]$, where $z$ is a parameter that specifies the width, $z=1$ ($z=2$) corresponding to $1\\sigma$, $68.3\\%$ ($2\\sigma$, $95.4\\%$). If only a few events have been observed, as is usually the case for extreme events, then these "error-bar" intervals might be considered to be relatively wide. From historical records, we estimate most likely long-term occurrence rates, 10-yr occurrence probabilities, and intervals of frequentist confidence and Bayesian credibility for large earthquakes, explosive volcanic eruptions, and magnetic storms.

  2. Satellite observations of atmospheric SO 2 from volcanic eruptions during the time-period of 1996-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Frankenberg, C.; Van Roozendael, M.; Beirle, S.; Kühl, S.; Richter, A.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    In this article, we present satellite observations of atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO 2) from volcanic eruptions. Global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) data for the years 1996-2002 is analyzed using a DOAS based algorithm with the aim of retrieving SO 2 slant column densities (SCD). The retrieval of SO 2 SCD in the UV spectral region is difficult due to strong and interfering ozone absorptions. It is also likely affected by instrumental effects. We investigated these effects in detail to obviate systematic biases in the SO 2 retrieval. A quantitative study of about 20 volcanoes from Italy, Iceland, Congo/Zaire, Ecuador, Japan, Vanuatu Island and Mexico is presented. The focus is on both eruption and out gassing scenarios. We prepared a 7-year mean map (1996-2002) of SO 2 SCD observed by GOME and tabulated the ratios of the maximum SO 2 SCD observed to the average SO 2 SCD as seen in the 7-year mean map. The further aim of this study is to provide information about unknown volcanic eruptions, e.g., Bandai Honshu Japan, Central Islands Vanuatu, Piton de la Fournaise Réunion Island France, Kamchatka region of Russia and from Indonesia especially. The results demonstrate a high sensitivity of the GOME instrument towards SO 2 emissions during both eruption and degassing episodes.

  3. Inclusion of Ash and SO2 emissions from volcanic eruptions in WRF-CHEM: development and some applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Peckham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new functionality within the Weather Research and Forecasting model with coupled Chemistry (WRF-Chem that allows simulating emission, transport, dispersion, transformation and sedimentation of pollutants released during volcanic activities. Emissions from both an explosive eruption case and relatively calm degassing situation are considered using the most recent volcanic emission databases. A preprocessor tool provides emission fields and additional information needed to establish the initial three-dimensional cloud umbrella/vertical distribution within the transport model grid, as well as the timing and duration of an eruption. From this source condition, the transport, dispersion and sedimentation of the ash-cloud can be realistically simulated by WRF-Chem using its own dynamics, physical parameterization as well as data assimilation. Examples of model validation include a comparison of tephra fall deposits from the 1989 eruption of Mount Redoubt (Alaska, and the dispersion of ash from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland. Both model applications show good coincidence between WRF-Chem and observations.

  4. Inclusion of ash and SO2 emissions from volcanic eruptions in WRF-Chem: development and some applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stuefer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new functionality within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model with coupled Chemistry (WRF-Chem that allows simulating emission, transport, dispersion, transformation and sedimentation of pollutants released during volcanic activities. Emissions from both an explosive eruption case and a relatively calm degassing situation are considered using the most recent volcanic emission databases. A preprocessor tool provides emission fields and additional information needed to establish the initial three-dimensional cloud umbrella/vertical distribution within the transport model grid, as well as the timing and duration of an eruption. From this source condition, the transport, dispersion and sedimentation of the ash cloud can be realistically simulated by WRF-Chem using its own dynamics and physical parameterization as well as data assimilation. Examples of model applications include a comparison of tephra fall deposits from the 1989 eruption of Mount Redoubt (Alaska and the dispersion of ash from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland. Both model applications show good coincidence between WRF-Chem and observations.

  5. Fermi Problem: Power developed at the eruption of the Puyehue-Cord\\'on Caulle volcanic system in June 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Asorey, Hernan

    2011-01-01

    On June 4 2011 the Puyehue-Cord\\'on Caulle volcanic system produced a pyroclastic subplinian eruption reaching level 3 in the volcanic explosivity index. The first stage of the eruption released sand and ashes that affected small towns and cities in the surrounding areas, including San Carlos de Bariloche, in Argentina, one of the largest cities in the North Patagonian andean region. By treating the eruption as a Fermi problem, we estimated the volume and mass of sand ejected as well as the energy and power released during the eruptive phase. We then put the results in context by comparing the obtained values with everyday quantities, like the load of a cargo truck or the electric power produced in Argentina. These calculations have been done as a pedagogic exercise, and after evaluation of the hypothesis was done in the classroom, the calculations have been performed by the students. These are students of the first physics course at the Physics and Chemistry Teacher Programs of the Universidad Nacional de R\\...

  6. Insights from Pb and O isotopes into along-arc variations in subduction inputs and crustal assimilation for volcanic rocks in Java, Sunda arc, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Heather K.; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Gertisser, Ralf; Macpherson, Colin G.; Turner, Simon P.; Zaennudin, Akhmad; Abdurrachman, Mirzam

    2014-08-01

    New Pb isotope data are presented for Gede Volcanic Complex, Salak and Galunggung volcanoes in West Java, Merbabu and Merapi volcanoes in Central Java and Ijen Volcanic Complex in East Java of the Sunda arc, Indonesia. New O isotope data for Merbabu and new geochemical and radiogenic isotope data (Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb) for three West Javanese, upper crustal, Tertiary sedimentary rocks are also presented. The data are combined with published geochemical and iso