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Sample records for volcanic depressions part

  1. Recognition and Significance of Volcanic Rocks of the Anda Depression of the Songliao Basin in Jurassic-Cretaceous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuhong Gao; Dongpo Wang; Xinrong Zhang; Guixia Ji; Jian Zhao

    2003-01-01

    A series of volcanic rocks were developed in the deep part of Anda faulting depression. The reflection of therocks are mainly stratiform and hummocky. Three kinds of volcanic facies, e.g. explosion facies, effusion facies andsub-volcanic facies,were recognized by different reflecting characteristics in the seismic profile. The volcanic rocks areformed during three episodes of volcanic activities from Shahezi Formation to Yingcheng Formation. The volcanismshave relation to the formation of Songliao Basin and regional tectonics of northeastern China. Some of the volcanic rocksare good oil and gas reservoirs.

  2. Candidate volcanic and impact-induced ice depressions on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joseph S.; Goudge, Timothy A.; Head, James W.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis of two concentrically-fractured depressions on Mars, one in northern Hellas and the second in Galaxias Fossae. Volumetric measurements indicate that ∼2.4 km3 and ∼0.2 km3 of material was removed in order to form the North Hellas and Galaxias depressions. The removed material is inferred to be predominantly water ice. Calorimetric estimates suggest that up to ∼103-105 m3 of magma would have been required to melt/sublimate such a volume of ice under an ice/magma interaction scenario. This process would lead to subsidence and cracking of the surface, which could produce the observed concentric fracture (crevasse-like) morphology. While the Galaxias Fossae landform morphology is consistent with an impact origin, the large volume of removed material in North Hellas is less consistent with an impact origin and is interpreted to have resulted from volcanic melting of ice. The possibility of liquid water formation during or subsequent to volcanism or an impact could generate locally-enhanced habitable conditions, making these features tantalizing geological and astrobiological exploration targets.

  3. Mid Miocene volcanism in Nicaragua and implications for the formation of the Nicaraguan Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saginor, I.; Gazel, E.; Carr, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    Northwest Nicaragua contains Mid Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression consisting of portions of the Coyol Formation to the East and the Tamarindo Formation to the West. The Tamarindo Formation is a narrow band of basaltic to andesitic lavas interlayered with thick ignimbrite deposits and volcaniclastic sediments that parallel Nicaragua’s Pacific coast to the west of the modern volcanic front with ages from 14.7-11.7 Ma. The Coyol represents primarily Miocene volcanism from 25-7 Ma and lies east of the active front. The presence of Mid Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression has led to speculation that the two coeval units, which are currently separated by almost 100km, were once connected and have since been separated by extension. Here, we present data that show the Tamarindo and Coyol are geochemically distinct and therefore cannot be considered part of the same unit. First, the Tamarindo has lower La/Yb values than Coyol, which suggests that the Tamarindo was formed by a higher degree of partial melting, assuming that mantle source compositions are similar for both units. In addition, the Tamarindo has higher Zr/Nb values than Coyol, which are indicative of High Field Strength Element (HFSE) depletion common in arc volcanics. Because the degree of partial melting and HFSE depletion is expected to increase towards the trench, both Tamarindo’s La/Yb and Zr/Nb values are consistent with its being emplaced closer to the trench than Coyol and the presence of these two units of Mid-Miocene age on opposite sides of the Nicaraguan Depression cannot be used as proof of significant extension. In addition, currently available data do not show the significant crustal thinning and large-scale structural surface features that would be expected if the Tamarindo and Coyol were once connected and later separated by extension. Fault displacement along the Nicaraguan Depression is insufficient to accommodate this extension and

  4. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O.; Tesfai, T.; Duffield, W.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Smith, James G.; Woldegiorgis, L.; Weldemariam, K.; Kahsai, G.

    1999-01-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression.Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of approx. 10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely

  5. Rifting, volcanism, and magma genesis at the northern end of the Danakil Depression: The Alid volcanic center of Eritrea (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Clynne, M. A.; Duffield, W. A.; Smith, J. G.; Woldegiorgis, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Alid volcanic center, Eritrea, is a structural dome formed by subvolcanic intrusion of pyroxene-bearing rhyolite, subsequently erupted as pumice and lava, during the period 40,000 to 15,000 years ago. The northern Danakil Depression is thought to be the most recently developed part of the Afar, and represents an active continental rift subparallel to the Red Sea spreading center. The location of Alid may be controlled by the intersection of the structural grain of the NE trending Senafe-Alid lineament with the NW trending Danakil Depression. Our work began as a geothermal assessment (Duffield et al., 1997, USGS Open-file 97-291) that found evidence for 300 meters of vertical offset of early Pleistocene basalt flows over the past 1.1 million years. Structural uplift at Alid reveals Proterozoic metamorphic basement rocks overlain by Quaternary marine sediments including siltstone, and sandstones interbedded with pillow lavas and hyaloclastites. These units are overlain by subaerial amphibole-bearing rhyolites (dated at ~200 ka), basalts, and andesites that were deposited on a relatively flat surface and before significant growth of a large volcanic edifice. About 1 km of structural uplift of the marine sediments began 40 ka when pyroxene-bearing rhyolitic magma intruded close to the surface. Uplift was accompanied by contemporaneous eruptions of pumice falls and more common obsidian domes and lava flows over the next 20,000 years. Uplift apparently ceased after eruption of pyroclastic flows and vent-clogging lava about 15 ka. The pumice deposits contain cognate xenoliths of granophyric pyroxene-granite (Lowenstern et al., 1997, J. Petrol. 38:1707). Our geochronology of the uplift is consistent with the idea that growth of the Alid volcanic center played a role in isolating the southern Danakil Depression from the Red Sea, helping to initiate dessication of the rift and producing the young evaporites found today at Baddha and further south at Dallol. U

  6. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowenstern, J.B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (US)] [and others

    1999-04-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of {approx} 10 km{sup 2} on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures > 225{sup o}C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression. (author)

  7. Maars to calderas: end-members on a spectrum of explosive volcanic depressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo M. Palladino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We discuss maar-diatremes and calderas as end-members on a spectrum of negative volcanic landforms (depressions produced by explosive eruptions (note – we focus on calderas formed during explosive eruptions, recognizing that some caldera types are not related to such activity. The former are dominated by ejection of material during numerous discrete phreatomagmatic explosions, brecciation, and subsidence of diatreme fill, while the latter are dominated by subsidence over a partly evacuated magma chamber during sustained, magmatic volatile-driven discharge. Many examples share characteristics of both, including landforms that are identified as maars but preserve deposits from non-phreatomagmatic explosive activity, and ambiguous structures that appear to be coalesced maars but that also produced sustained explosive eruptions with likely magma reservoir subsidence. A convergence of research directions on issues related to magma-water interaction and shallow reservoir mechanics is an important avenue toward developing a unified picture of the maar-diatreme-caldera spectrum.

  8. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  9. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  10. Quaternary Volcanic Activities in Shandong Peninsula and Northern Parts of Jiangsu and Anhui Provinces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑洪汉; 高维明; 等

    1990-01-01

    Quaternary volcanic rocks often coexist with loess,as observed in the same geologic sections in the Shandong Peninsula and northern parts of Jiangsu and Anhui provinces.The development age of Shandong loess in close to that in the middle reaches of the Yellow River.Loess strata are of synchronous implication in the loess belt of North China.So the ages of volcanic activities can be es-timated approximately from the stratigraphic relations between loess layers and volcanic rocks.The re-sults of dating of the Quaternary volcanic rocks,baked layers and the TL dates of loess samples sug-gest that the Quaternary volcanic activity can be divided into 4 stages in the region studied,with the ages being 1.15-1.03,0.86-0.72,0.55-0.33 and 0.02 Ma B.P.respectively .The occurrence of tephra in the Shandong loess sections is possible due to multiple episodes of volcanism during the Quaternary time.

  11. Contribution to recognition of Variscan tectonics of the eastern part of the North Sudety depression (Lower Silesia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewicz, J.

    1987-10-01

    Describes the development of Variscan tectonics in the region of Zgorzelec-Lwowek-Zlotoryja-Swierzawa in Lower Silesia. Strata underlying the North Sudety depression consist mainly of sandstone, clayey shale and some limestone. These formations became metamorphosed and they overlie the Lower Carboniferous. In the Upper Carboniferous, the area began to sink forming a rift valley. Sediments in this rift valley can be divided into two megacycles: the lower one formed of the lower part of the new red sandstone (1. cyclotheme) and the upper part of it (2. cyclotheme) with tectonic movement which caused the depression to expand towards the north, to crack and to become covered by volcanic lava and tuffs. The volcanic complex consists of about 300 million year old dacites, trachybasalts and andesites. In the period between formation of Autunian volcanic and sedimentary rock and sediments of Sachsonian rock, Saalic tectonic processes occurred. The local sedimentation subsidences expanded. However the subsidence center was located in the northern part of the depression where the 3. cyclotheme sediments are 600 m thick. The Sachsonian rock of the North Sudety depression presents a post-tectonic molasse. No lower or upper part can be distinguished there. The last movements of the tectonic epoch consisted in disjunctive movements, followed by large-radius epeirogenic subsidences which caused a transgression towards the Permian Sea in the north. This sea reached the northern parts of the North Sudety depression. Adjacent fragments of the Kaczawa metamorphic turing are already a typical epicontinental formation which initiated a new era in the development of the North Sudety depression. 7 refs.

  12. The Quaternary volcanic rocks of the northern Afar Depression (northern Ethiopia): Perspectives on petrology, geochemistry, and tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagos, Miruts; Koeberl, Christian; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    The northern Afar Depression is one of the most volcano-tectonically active parts of the East African Rift system, a place where oceanic rifting may be beginning to form an incipient oceanic crust. In its center, over an area that is ∼80 km long and ∼50 km wide, there are seven major NNW-SSE-aligned shield volcanoes/volcanic edifices surrounded by compositionally distinct fissure-fed basalts. The Quaternary lavas in this area range from transitional to tholeiitic basalts, with significant across-axis variation both in mineralogy and chemistry. The variation in the contents of the major elements (TiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3), incompatible trace elements (Nd, Hf, Th, Ta), and the contents and ratios of the rare earth elements (REE) (e.g., (La/Yb)n = 5.3-8.9) indicate some variation in the petrogenetic processes responsible for the formation of these basalts. However, the variation in isotopic compositions of the mafic lavas is minimal (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7036-0.7041, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51286-0.51289), which suggests only one source for all the Danakil Depression basalts. These basalts have isotope and incompatible trace element ratios that overlap with those of the Oligocene High-Ti2 flood basalts from the Ethiopian Plateau, interpreted as being derived from the last phase/tail of the Afar mantle plume source. Moreover, the Ce/Pb, Ba/U ratios indicate that the involvement of continental crust in the petrogenesis of the basaltic rocks is minimal; instead, both depth and degree of melting of the source reservoir underneath the northern Afar Depression played a major role for the production of incompatible element-enriched basalts (e.g., AleBagu Shield basalts) and the incompatible element-depleted tholeiitic basalts (e.g., Erta'Ale and Alu Shield basalts).

  13. Geology and Geochronology of the Central Part of Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, P. W.

    2006-12-01

    The Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (CVA) is a 150 km stretch of volcanoes irregularly aligned in a northwest direction, including El Chichón volcano located in the central portion of the State of Chiapas, southern Mexico. It lies between two great volcanic features: the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Arc to the northwest, and the Central American Volcanic Arc to the southeast, in a complex zone of the interaction of the North American, Caribbean and Cocos Plates. The central part of the CVA is composed of an irregular northwest alignment of at least 12 volcanic structures located 80 km to the southeast of El Chichón (the only currently active volcano in the CVA). These structures include one explosion crater (Navenchauc), one collapse structure (Apas), one dome complex (Tzontehuitz) and nine volcanic domes (Navenchauc, Huitepec, Amahuitz, La Iglesia, Mispía, La Lanza, Venustiano Carranza, Miguel Hidalgo and Santotón) with associated pyroclastic flow deposits. The juvenile lithics from these deposits have a porphyritic texture with phenocrysts of plagioclase (±), amphibole (±), clinopyroxene (±), orthopyroxene (±) and Fe-Ti oxides surrounded by a matrix composed by microlites of plagioclase and glass. The chemical results obtained from representative samples from the deposits and structures indicate that these belong to the series of subalkaline rocks, and fall into the calcalkaline field with medium to high contents of potassium. They vary in their composition from andesite to dacite with an interval of silica between a 56 to a 66% (wt.). The ages reported in the literature and obtained in this study by means of the K-Ar and the 40Ar/39Ar methods, respectively, indicated that volcanism was episodic and spanned a time from 2100 ky ago (Tzontehuitz) to 225 ky ago (Venustiano Carranza).

  14. Characteristics of volcanic reservoirs and distribution rules of effective reservoirs in the Changling fault depression, Songliao Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujun Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the Songliao Basin, volcanic oil and gas reservoirs are important exploration domains. Based on drilling, logging, and 3D seismic (1495 km2 data, 546 sets of measured physical properties and gas testing productivity of 66 wells in the Changling fault depression, Songliao Basin, eruptive cycles and sub-lithofacies were distinguished after lithologic correction of the 19,384 m volcanic well intervals, so that a quantitative analysis was conducted on the relation between the eruptive cycles, lithologies and lithofacies and the distribution of effective reservoirs. After the relationship was established between lithologies, lithofacies & cycles and reservoir physical properties & oil and gas bearing situations, an analysis was conducted on the characteristics of volcanic reservoirs and the distribution rules of effective reservoirs. It is indicated that 10 eruptive cycles of 3 sections are totally developed in this area, and the effective reservoirs are mainly distributed at the top cycles of eruptive sequences, with those of the 1st and 3rd Members of Yingcheng Formation presenting the best reservoir properties. In this area, there are mainly 11 types of volcanic rocks, among which rhyolite, rhyolitic tuff, rhyolitic tuffo lava and rhyolitic volcanic breccia are the dominant lithologies of effective reservoirs. In the target area are mainly developed 4 volcanic lithofacies (11 sub-lithofacies, among which upper sub-lithofacies of effusive facies and thermal clastic sub-lithofacies of explosion lithofacies are predominant in effective reservoirs. There is an obvious corresponding relationship between the physical properties of volcanic reservoirs and the development degree of effective reservoirs. The distribution of effective reservoirs is controlled by reservoir physical properties, and the formation of effective reservoirs is influenced more by porosity than by permeability. It is concluded that deep volcanic gas exploration presents a good

  15. Mapping local singularities using magnetic data to investigate the volcanic rocks of the Qikou depression, Dagang oilfield, eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spatial structural characteristics of geological anomaly, including singularity and self-similarity, can be analysed using fractal or multifractal modelling. Here we apply the multifractal methods to potential fields to demonstrate that singularities can characterise geological bodies, including rock density and magnetic susceptibility. In addition to enhancing weak gravity and magnetic anomalies with respect to either strong or weak background levels, the local singularity index (α ≈ 2 can be used to delineate the edges of geological bodies. Two models were established to evaluate the effectiveness of mapping singularities for extracting weak anomalies and delineating edges of buried geological bodies. The Qikou depression of the Dagang oilfield in eastern China has been chosen as a study area for demonstrating the extraction of weak anomalies of volcanic rocks, using the singularity mapping technique to analyse complex magnetic anomalies caused by complex geological background. The results have shown that the singularities of magnetic data mapped in the paper are associated with buried volcanic rocks, which have been verified by both drilling and seismic survey, and the S–N and E–W faults in the region. The targets delineated for deeply seated faults and volcanic rocks in the Qikou depression should be further investigated for the potential application in undiscovered oil and gas reservoirs exploration.

  16. Zircon U/Pb Dating of Cretaceous Adakitic Volcanic Rocks in the Eastern Part of North Dabie Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛怀民; 董树文; 刘晓春

    2003-01-01

    Mesozoic volcanic rocks in the eastern part of the North Dabie Mountains are rich inNa ( Na2O=4.03%, Na2O/K2O = 1.31 ), Sr (865μg/g) and Ba ( 1361μg/g) , and high inSr/Y ratio (66.1) but low in Nb, Y and HREE. They have experienced strong fractionation ofREE [ (La/Yb)N = 26.6 ], and are similar to adakite in geochemical characteristics. The U-Pbdating of zircon from the volcanic rocks is ( 129.2 + 2.6) Ma, belonging to Early Cretaceous.These rocks are similar to the volcanic rocks of North Huaiyang not only in age and rare-earth el-ement and trace element geochemistry, but also in the formation temperature and pressure of theminerals. The results indicated that the delamination of mountain root and underplating of mafic-ultramafic magma had happened in the Dabie orogen before Early Cretaceous. Mesozoic mag-matism was intense in the North Dabie Mountains, including the intrusion of mafic-ultramaficmagma, uplifting of gneiss dome, explosion of volcanic rocks and intrusion of granitic magma.The Mesozoic volcanic rocks in the eastern part of the North Dabie Mountains may be one part ofthe Mesozoic volcano-intrusive complex belt of North Huaiyang. The existence of Mesozoic vol-canic remnant cap means the denudation of the Dabie orogenic belt was not very strong sinceEarly Cretaceous.

  17. Features of Minerogenic Series Related to Continental Volcanic Rocks in the Southeastern Coastal Area of China-A Case Study of the Daiyunshan-Shiniushan Volcanic Depression in Fujian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Daiyunshan-Shiniushan volcanic depression in Fujian Province is situated in a volcanic belt of the southeast coastal area in China along the west Pacific Ocean. A new breakthrough has been made in the exploration of gold and silver ore deposits in recent years. The minerogenic series of the Daiyunshan-Shiniushan volcanic depression is discussed in this paper based on the analysis of major metallogenic types and factors. According to the study of enormous ore deposits and occurrences in the study area, two minerogenic series have been recognized: 1. Late Jurassic Au-Ag-Pb-Zn minerogenic series related to intermediate-acid, acid volcanic formations; 2. nonmetallic minerogenic series (pyrophyllite, alunite pearlite, andalusite, zeolite, corundum and so on) related to intermediate and acid volcanic formations. The division and study of the minerogenic series have revealed metallogenic and time-space distribution characteristics of the ore deposits in the volcanic belt of the southeast coastal area in China , which are of economic importance for metallogenic prognosis .

  18. Formation Conditions and Distribution Regularities of Oil—gas Pools in Tertiary Volcanic Rocks in Western Huimin Depression,Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽容; 王永杰; 等

    1989-01-01

    The formation conditions and distribution regularities of oil-gas pools in volcanic rocks in western Huimin Depression have been studied in terms of geolgic,sesmic and well logging information,This paper discusses the types and lithofacies,development and distribution of Tertiary volcanic rocks in the area.The results demonstrate that volcanic activity occurred mainly during the period from the Sha-4 stage to the Guantao episode,i.e.,before the oil-generating period(before the end of the Guantao episode and the Minghuazhen episode).The activity did not destroy oil and gas formation and accumulation,but was favourable for the concentration of organic matter and its conversion to hydrocarbons;besides,volcanic rocks can serve as reservoir rocks and cap rocks,playing a role very similar to that of a syndepositional anticline,The volcanic rocks are distributed near the margins of the oil-generating depression;there are many secondary interstices in the rocks,which are connected with each other.These are the leading conditions for the formation of oil-generating period and their self-sealing or good combination with other cap rocks are important factors for forming volcanic rock-hosted oil and gas pools.The oil-gas pools associated with volcanic rocks in western Huimin are mainly distributed around the deep oil-generating depression,in the central up lift or the high structural levels on the margins of the depression.In particular,the sites where several faults cross are usually locatons where hith-yielding oil-gas pools in volcanic rocks are concentrated.

  19. Catastrophic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  20. Petrology and geochemistry of mafic and ultramafic cumulates occurring as xenoliths in volcanic rocks from Polish part of Central European Volcanic Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajek, Michał; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2015-04-01

    Mafic xenoliths coexisting with the peridotitic ones in rocks from Polish part of Cenozoic European Volcanic Province have been scarcely examined. (Bakun-Czubarow and Białowolska, 2003, Mineralogical Society of Poland- Spec. Pap. and references therein; Matusiak, 2006, Min. Polonica- Spec. Pap.; Puziewicz et al., 2011, JoP). In this study we present new results on mafic and ultramafic xenolithic rocks from the Wilcza Góra, Winna Góra, Góra Świątek, Mnisia Górka and Grodziec volcanic rocks in the Złotoryja-Jawor Volcanic Complex. The studied xenoliths are either plagioclase-free (clinopyroxenite, websterite) or plagioclase-bearing (anorthosite, gabbro, olivine-bearing gabbro and norite). Both the types may occur in the same volcanic rock. The cumulative xenoliths are smaller than peridotitic ones, blackish and show clear cumulative, coarse grained textures. Beside the rock-forming phases, the xenoliths occasionally contain spinel, sulfides and amphibole. Usually clinopyroxene grains occurring in gabbros are strongly corroded or disintegrated, while other phases are well-preserved. Contacts between xenolith and host volcanic rock are usually sharp with subhedral crystals of clinopyroxene growing at the xenolith surface. The mineral grains are usually zoned and chemical equilibrium between phases is scarce. Clinopyroxene in plagioclase-free rocks has composition of diopside with occasionally elevated Al, Ti and Cr contents. It's mg# varies from 0.89 to 0.79. It is slightly to moderately enriched in LREE; the REE patterns are concave, and the normalized values vary significantly between localities. It shows negative Sr anomaly, depth of Ti anomaly is variable. Orthopyroxene is Al-rich enstatite with mg# varying from 0.85 down to 0.75. Orthopyroxene in websterites is LREE depleted and show strong positive Ti and Zr-Hf anomalies. Opaques are ilmenite - Ti-magnetite solid solution and/or sulfides Clinopyroxene forming plagioclase-bearing rocks also has composition

  1. Geologic Map of Part of the Uinkaret Volcanic Field, Mohave County, Northwestern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, George H.; Hamblin, W. Kenneth; Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Dudash, Stephanie L.

    2001-01-01

    The geologic map of part of the Uinkaret Volcanic Field is one product of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Land Management to provide geologic information about this part of the Grand Canyon-Parashant Canyon National Monument of Arizona. The Uinkaret Volcanic Field is a unique part of western Grand Canyon where volcanic rocks have preserved the geomorphic development of the landscape. Most of the Grand Canyon, and parts of adjacent plateaus have already been mapped. This map completes one of the remaining areas where uniform quality geologic mapping was needed. A few dozen volcanoes and lava flows within the Grand Canyon are not included in the map area, but their geologic significance to Grand Canyon development is documented by Hamblin (1994) and mapped by Billingsley and Huntoon (1983) and Wenrich and others (1997). The geologic information in this report may be useful to resource managers of the Bureau of Land Management for range management, biological, archaeological, and flood control programs. The map area lies within the Shivwits, Uinkaret, and Kanab Plateaus, which are subplateaus of the Colorado Plateaus physiographic province (Billingsley and others, 1997), and is part of the Arizona Strip north of the Colorado River. The nearest settlement is Colorado City, Arizona, about 58 km (36 mi) north of the map area (fig. 1). Elevations range from about 2,447 m (8,029 ft) at Mount Trumbull, in the northwest quarter of the map area, to about 732 m (2,400 ft) in Cove Canyon, in the southeast quarter of the map area. Vehicle access is via the Toroweap and Mount Trumbull dirt roads (fig. 1). Unimproved dirt roads traverse other parts of the area except in designated wilderness. Extra fuel, two spare tires, and extra food and water are highly recommended for travelers in this remote area. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Arizona Strip Field Office, St. George, Utah manages most of the area. In

  2. Sill emplacement and corresponding ground deformation processes at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Craig; Bastow, Ian; Hetherington, Rachel; van Wyk de Vries, Ben; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A consensus has emerged from a variety of disciplines over the past 15 years that Quaternary magmatism in Ethiopia is almost entirely dominated by dike intrusion. Focused dike intrusion within 60 km long, 20 km wide, rift zones is considered to mark the present day locus of extension in Ethiopia, and represent the proto-ridge axis location of an incipient ocean spreading centre. However, it has been suggested on the strength of Moho depths and Quaternary eruptive volumes in northernmost Ethiopia, that the final transition from continental rifting to incipient oceanic spreading may instead be characterised by an abrupt, rheologically driven, late-phase of crustal thinning. Development of a sedimentary basin and mantle decompression melting occurring in the Danakil Depression, driven by this late-phase crustal thinning, should result in a markedly different style of magmatism in the upper crust: i.e. field observations, high-resolution seismic reflection studies, and experimental modelling suggest that interconnected networks of sill intrusions dominate in sedimentary basins. Here, we present the first evidence from the Danakil Depression that links surficial structures, observed at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre, to the ongoing emplacement of an underlying sill. In particular, we use satellite imagery to examine a dome-shaped fold, associated fracture patterns, and surrounding lava flows, which we suggest likely formed in response to roof uplift above and extrusion from a saucer-shaped sill; i.e. a sub-horizontal inner sill encircled by an inward-dipping, transgressive inclined rim. InSAR observations by Pagli et al. (2012) of ground uplift and deflation occurring during the eruption of basaltic lava at Alu-Dalafilla in 2008 capture what we believe to be the first real-time evidence for intrusion-induced forced folding dynamics above a saucer-shaped sill. InSAR data further suggest that intrusion occurred at a depth of ~1 km, likely placing the sill within an

  3. Communication Counseling as Part of a Treatment Plan for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterbaugh, Dolores T.

    2006-01-01

    It has been estimated that 1 in 4 persons will experience a depressive episode over his or her lifetime (G. Gintner, 2001). The author discusses various etiologies of depression, interpersonal factors related to depression, and research on various communication-focused counseling interventions. The author maintains that published literature…

  4. Chronology and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks in Woruo Mountain region,Northern Qiangtang depression:Implications to the Late Triassic volcanic-sedimentary events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A suite of sedimentary-volcaniclastic rocks intercalated with the volcanic rocks unconformably overlies the Triassic Xiaochaka Formation in the Woruo Mountain region, Qiangtang Basin, northern Tibet. The vitric tuff from the base of these strata gives a SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age of 216 ± 4.5 Ma, which represents the age of the Late Triassic volcanic-sedimentary events in the Woruo Mountain region, and is consistent with that of the formation of the volcanic rocks from the Nadi Kangri Formation in the Nadigangri-Shishui River zone. There is a striking similarity in geochemical signatures of the volcanic rocks from the Woruo Mountain region and its adjacent Nadigangri-Shishui River zone, indicating that all the volcanic rocks from the Qiangtang region might have the same magmatic source and similar tectonic setting during the Late Triassic. The proper recognition of the Late Triassic large-scale volcanic eruption and volcanic-sedimentary events has important implications for the interpretation of the Late Triassic biotic extinction, climatic changes and regressive events in the eastern Tethyan domain, as well as the understanding of the initiation and nature, and sedimentary features of the Qiangtang Basin during the Late Triassic-Jurassic.

  5. Chronology and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks in Woruo Mountain region, Northern Qiangtang depression: Implications to the Late Triassic volcanic-sedimentary events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; FU XiuGen; CHEN WenXi; WANG ZhengJiang; TAN FuWen; CHEN Ming; ZHUO JieWen

    2008-01-01

    A suite of sedimentary-volcaniclastic rocks intercalated with the volcanic rocks unconformably overlies the Triassic Xiaochaka Formation in the Woruo Mountain region, Qiangtang Basin, northern Tibet. The sents the age of the Late Triassic volcanic-sedimentary events in the Woruo Mountain region, and is consistent with that of the formation of the volcanic rocks from the Nadi Kangri Formation in the Nadigangri-Shishui River zone. There is a striking similarity in geochemical signatures of the volcanic rocks from the Woruo Mountain region and its adjacent Nadigangri-Shishui River zone, indicating that all the volcanic rocks from the Qiangtang region might have the same magmatic source and similar tectonic setting during the Late Triassic. The proper recognition of the Late Triassic large-scale volcanic eruption and volcanic-sedimentary events has important implications for the interpretation of the Late Triassic biotic extinction, climatic changes and regressive events in the eastern Tethyan domain,as well as the understanding of the initiation and nature, and sedimentary features of the Qiangtang Basin during the Late Triassic-Jurassic.

  6. Various origins of clinopyroxene megacrysts from basanites from the eastern part of Central European Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipa, Danuta; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Kukuła, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Clinopyroxene megacrysts up to few centimetres in size occur in Cenozoic alkaline lavas forming the north-eastern part of Central European Volcanic Province in Lower Silesia (SW Poland). The megacrysts occur, among other, in the Miocene basanite from Ostrzyca Proboszczowicka (bulk rock mg# 0.65-0.66) and in that from Lutynia (Pliocene, K-Ar age: 4.56 +/- 0.2 Ma; Birkenmajer et al. 2002; bulk rock mg# 0.64). The megacrysts typically consist of homogeneous core surrounded by patchy and spongy mantle, which is covered by a thin outermost rim of composition similar to that of the groundmass clinopyroxene occurring in the host basanite. The mantles of the megacrysts have been affected by melting, whereas the cores preserve their primary composition. We compare the core parts of megacrysts in the following. The Ostrzyca clinopyroxene megacrysts contain euhedral apatite intergrowths. The clinopyroxene has the composition of Fe-rich diopside (mg# = 0.61 - 0.70), contain significant sodium (to 0.12 a pfu) and are calcium rich (0.89-0.92 a pfu). The Lutynia megacrysts have the composition of augite and diopside (mg# 0.80-0.83). The sodium content is also high (to 0.12 a pfu), but calcium varies from 0.68 to 0.77 a pfu. The REE concentrations for Lutynia (1-10 x PM) are lower relative to Ostrzyca, enriched 10-100 times relative to PM. In both sites the megacrysts are strongly enriched in LREE relative to HREE and TE are characterized by positive Th, La and Ce anomalies, slight negative Sr and Y anomalies and strong Pb anomaly in the PM normalised patterns. The megacrysts from Ostrzyca reveal slight negative Ti and strong positive Zr and Hf anomalies, whereas those Lutynia have negative Zr anomaly and Ti anomaly is absent. Major and trace element composition shows that the megacrysts from Ostrzyca formed as coarse-grained cumulate at significant depth (lower crust?) from the LREE enriched alkaline melt. That melt was very rich in phosphorous which enabled its saturation in

  7. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of extension-related magmas close to the volcanic front of the central part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Torres-Sánchez, Darío; Velasco-Tapia, Fernando; Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Manikyamba, C.; Bhutani, Rajneesh

    2016-12-01

    New geochemical data for 23 samples from the Sierra de Chichinautzin (SCN) and Sierra Santa Catarina (SSC) located at the volcanic front of the central part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt were combined with the published data on 580 samples from the SCN to explore the origin and evolution of the Quaternary trachybasalt and basalt to andesite and dacite. The rare-earth element concentrations for the evolved intermediate and acid rocks are lower than those for the more basic varieties, implying that the evolved magmas cannot be generated by a simple fractional crystallisation process without crustal assimilation. The size of the Nb and Ta negative anomalies increases from basic to acid, which is similar to the behaviour of most continental rifts and extension-related areas, but contrasts from all island and continental arcs. The multidimensional tectonomagmatic diagrams indicate a continental rift setting from basic and alkaline intermediate magmas. The SSC represents a new site of within-plate alkaline magmas discovered in this work, which complements the earlier interpretation of the adjacent SCN as a manifestation of continental rift or extension-related magmatism.

  8. Volcanism subprogram: Volcanological interpretation of the northern part of the Occidental Cordillera of Bolivia, utilizing ERTS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, C. E. (Principal Investigator); Kussmaul, S.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In the present study, 6 ERTS-1 images have been interpreted on a 1:1 million scale (black and white) with the respective field reconnaissance. The area studied is located in the region bordering with Chile and includes the western part of the Bolivian Altiplano, the volcano Cordillera (western cordillera) and the northern part of Chile to the Pacific Coast. The greater part of this region is formed by Pliocene/Pleistocene volcani rock, which is discordant with the Tertiary sediments with intercalations of calcareous tuff. The ERTS-1 imagery permits the tracing of regional boundaries of the great volcanic formations and the alinements of the volcanic bodies along the fault zones. They also permit a clear examination of the volcanic apparatus, including their secondary forms, such as lava flows, parasitic cones, and lava domes. Because of the great scale, it is not possible to identify either the small structures or those of low relief. On the basis of the interpretation of the images, it is possible to give an idea of the relative age of the volcanoes.

  9. Evidences of active and ancient Volcanism on Mars. A review. Second Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. HÉDERVÀRI

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of recent research have brought some further evidence of volcanism on the planet Mars. At the same time certain erroneous descriptions and conclusions, which are to be found in the first paper (3, are here corrected.

  10. Seismotectonic pattern and the source region of volcanism in the central part of Sunda Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špičák, Aleš; Hanuš, Václav; Vaněk, Jiří

    2005-07-01

    The seismotectonic pattern in the central part of the Sunda Arc (Java, Nusa Tenggara) was studied in relation to the distribution of active calc-alkaline volcanoes, using global seismological data. Hypocentral determinations of the International Seismological Centre from the period 1964-1999, as relocated by Engdahl, and Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor Solutions from the period 1976-2003 were used. The following phenomena, which could assist the location of the source region of primary magma for island arc calc-alkaline volcanism, were observed: (1) An aseismic gap without any strong teleseismically recorded earthquakes was found in the Wadati-Benioff zone of the subducting slab along the whole investigated region of the Sunda Arc, forming a continuous strip of laterally variable depth and shape, at depths between 100 and 200 km. The absence of strong earthquakes (with mb>4.0) indicates a significant change in the mechanical properties of the subducting slab at intermediate depths. All active calc-alkaline volcanoes in the Sunda Arc are located above this gap. (2) The majority of earthquakes occurring in the lithospheric wedge of the Eurasian Plate above the subducted slab could be attributed to several deep-rooted seismically active fracture zones of regional extent. All delineated active fracture zones display a thrust tectonic regime as shown by the available fault plane solutions. (3) Clusters of earthquakes were found beneath active volcanoes of western Java, Bali and Nusa Tenggara in the lithospheric wedge above the slab and identified as seismically active columns. These clusters occur only beneath the volcanoes that are located at the outcrops of seismically active fracture zones. We interpret the earthquakes in these clusters beneath volcanoes as events induced by magma transport through the medium of the lithospheric wedge that has been subcritically pre-stressed by the process of plate convergence. (4) Beneath the volcanoes of central Java no seismically

  11. Essential elements in depression and anxiety. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Davies, Claire Linzi; de Agüero Sánchez, Irene Gómez; Pytka, Karolina; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Nowak, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Essential elements are very important for the proper functioning of the human body. They are required for fundamental life processes such as cell division and differentiation and protein synthesis. Thus a deficiency of these essential elements is associated with an enormous health risk that can ultimately lead to death. In recent years, studies have provided valuable information on the involvement of essential elements in psychiatric disorders, in particular depression and anxiety. There is strong evidence indicating that deficiency of essential elements can lead to the development of depressive and/or anxiogenic behaviour and supplementation can enhance therapeutic effect of antidepressants and anxiolytics. This review presents the most important results from preclinical and clinical studies showing involvement of essential elements such as zinc, magnesium, lithium, iron, calcium and chromium in depression and anxiety. From these studies it is evident that different types of depression and anxiety respond to treatment at different receptors indicating that the underlying mechanisms are slightly different. Furthermore, administration of low dose antidepressants supplemented with an element is effective and can reduce unwanted side effects in different types of depression/anxiety. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Pattern integrations in young depressed women: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeber, L S

    1996-06-01

    The enduring patterns of interpersonal relations between young depressed women and their significant others create a theater for early interventions. As noted by Hildegard Peplau, interpersonal relations include patterns that are organized around appraisals from significant others, ultimately forming the internal sense of self-regard that is deeply disrupted in depression. Pattern integrations, or the "fit" of the woman and her significant others become maintained as a way of avoiding anxiety and negative appraisals. Complementary, mutual, alternating, and antagonistic patterns have been identified by Peplau, and the relationship to anxiety, the maintenance of self-worth, and the therapeutic use of these patterns by the nurse are explored.

  13. An empirical model of global climate – Part 1: A critical evaluation of volcanic cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Canty

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Observed reductions in Earth's surface temperature following explosive volcanic eruptions have been used as a proxy for geoengineering of climate by the artificial enhancement of stratospheric sulfate. Earth cools following major eruptions due to an increase in the reflection of sunlight caused by a dramatic enhancement of the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden. Significant global cooling has been observed following the four major eruptions since 1900: Santa María, Mount Agung, El Chichón and Mt. Pinatubo, leading IPCC (2007 to state "major volcanic eruptions can, thus, cause a drop in global mean surface temperature of about half a degree Celsius that can last for months and even years". We use a multiple linear regression model applied to the global surface temperature anomaly to suggest that exchange of heat between the atmosphere and ocean, driven by variations in the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC, has been a factor in the decline of global temperature following these eruptions. The veracity of this suggestion depends on whether sea surface temperature (SST in the North Atlantic, sometimes called the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, but here referred to as Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV, truly represents a proxy for the strength of the AMOC. Also, precise quantification of global cooling due to volcanoes depends on how the AMV index is detrended. If the AMV index is detrended using anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate, we find that surface cooling attributed to Mt. Pinatubo, using the Hadley Centre/University of East Anglia surface temperature record, maximises at 0.14 °C globally and 0.32 °C over land. These values are about a factor of 2 less than found when the AMV index is neglected in the model and quite a bit lower than the canonical 0.5 °C cooling usually attributed to Pinatubo. This result is driven by the high amplitude, low frequency component of the AMV index

  14. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  15. Model of deep non-volcanic tremor part II: episodic tremor and slip

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of tremor accompany a moving slip pulse in Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events. The sources of this non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are largely unknown. We have developed a model describing the mechanism of NTV generation. According to this model, NTV is a reflection of resonant-type oscillations excited in a fault at certain depth ranges. From a mathematical viewpoint, tremor (phonons) and slip pulses (solitons) are two different solutions of the sine-Gordon equation describing frictional processes inside a fault. In an ETS event, a moving slip pulse generates tremor due to interaction with structural heterogeneities in a fault and to failures of small asperities. Observed tremor parameters, such as central frequency and frequency attenuation curve, are associated with fault parameters and conditions, such as elastic modulus, effective normal stress, penetration hardness and friction. Model prediction of NTV frequency content is consistent with observations. In the framework of this model it is possible t...

  16. Geochronology and correlation of Tertiary volcanic and intrusive rocks in part of the southern Toquima Range, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawe, Daniel R.; Snee, Lawrence W.; Byers, Frank M.; du Bray, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive volcanic and intrusive igneous activity, partly localized along regional structural zones, characterized the southern Toquima Range, Nevada, in the late Eocene, Oligocene, and Miocene. The general chronology of igneous activity has been defined previously. This major episode of Tertiary magmatism began with emplacement of a variety of intrusive rocks, followed by formation of nine major calderas and associated with voluminous extrusive and additional intrusive activity. Emplacement of volcanic eruptive and collapse megabreccias accompanied formation of some calderas. Penecontemporaneous volcanism in central Nevada resulted in deposition of distally derived outflow facies ash-flow tuff units that are interleaved in the Toquima Range with proximally derived ash-flow tuffs. Eruption of the Northumberland Tuff in the north part of the southern Toquima Range and collapse of the Northumberland caldera occurred about 32.3 million years ago. The poorly defined Corcoran Canyon caldera farther to the southeast formed following eruption of the tuff of Corcoran Canyon about 27.2 million years ago. The Big Ten Peak caldera in the south part of the southern Toquima Range Tertiary volcanic complex formed about 27 million years ago during eruption of the tuff of Big Ten Peak and associated air-fall tuffs. The inferred Ryecroft Canyon caldera formed in the south end of the Monitor Valley adjacent to the southern Toquima Range and just north of the Big Ten Peak caldera in response to eruption of the tuff of Ryecroft Canyon about 27 million years ago, and the Moores Creek caldera just south of the Northumberland caldera developed at about the same time. Eruption of the tuff of Mount Jefferson about 26.8 million years ago was accompanied by collapse of the Mount Jefferson caldera in the central part of the southern Toquima Range. An inferred caldera, mostly buried beneath alluvium of Big Smoky Valley southwest of the Mount Jefferson caldera, formed about 26.5 million years

  17. Hydrothermal alteration in volcanic rocks, eastern part of the Lukavice Group, Železné Hory Mountains, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertold, Z.; Watkinson, D. H.; Novotný, L.

    1993-06-01

    Many rocks mapped as felsic metavolcanics in the eastern part of the Lukavice Group are shown to be altered mafic metavolcanics, similar to those in the Noranda and Flin Flon-Snow Lake mining districts, Canada. The relatively fresh rocks of the Lukavice Group are rhyolite, dacite-andesite, and andesite-basalt of calcalka-line character. Assuming no substantial volume change during alteration, Ti, P, La, Ce, Yb, Lu, Th (partly), Sc and V contents remained unchanged. Altered rocks are enriched in (Fe + Mg), K and Si and depleted in Na, Ca and Zr. Some elements show both increased and decreased contents in altered rocks (Mg, Ba, Sm, eu, Tb and Hf). Although hydrothermal alteration in the Lukavice Group is of large extent, it is of the proximal Kuroko style and not of regional ‘Amulet Rhyolite’ style. Implications for a large hydrothermal system within a volcanic pile are discussed in relation to the Ordovician Lukavice Group and its mineral deposits and to some other parts of the Bohemian Massif with volcanosedimentary sequences of the same age.

  18. Geology, Geochemistry and Geochronology of the Upper Cretaceous high-K volcanics in the southern Part of the Eastern Pontides: Implications for Mesozoic Geodynamic Evolution of NE Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyuboglu, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The Eastern Pontide Orogenic Belt is one of the most complex geodynamic settings in the Alpine-Mediterranean region. Its geodynamic evolution is very controversial due to lack of systematic, quantitative structural, geochemical and geochronological data. This belt is divided into three subgroups: northern, southern and axial zones, distinguished from north to south by different lithological units, facies changes and tectonic characteristics. Especially, the southern zone is very attractive with its numerous rock associations such as alaskan-type mafic-ultramafic intrusions, shoshonitic and ultrapotassic volcanics, adakitic magmatics, glaucophane-bearing gabbros, metamorphic and ultramafic massifes. This study focuses on the petrology, geotectonic setting and evidence for subduction polarity of the Upper Cretaceous shoshonitic and ultrapotassic volcanics exposed in the most southerly part of the eastern Pontide magmatic arc. Geological, geochemical and isotopic data indicate that there were two distinct cycles of high-K volcanic activity in the southern part of the eastern Pontide magmatic arc during the Late Cretaceous. The first cycle (Early Campanian), represented by shoshonitic trachyandesites and associated pyroclastics, containing high K2O (2.74-4.81 wt %) and Na2O (3.60-5.51 wt %), overlies the Middle-Cretaceous ophiolitic-olistostromal melange formed during the rifting stage of a back-arc basin (Neotethys). The second cycle of high-K volcanism is characterized by potassic or ultrapotassic analcime-bearing volcanics, erupted in a lagoonal environment during the Maastrichtian. Progressive shallowing of the basin indicates that Upper Cretaceous high-K volcanism developed during the final stage of pull-apart basin development in the southern zone of the eastern Pontides. These volcanic rocks, intercalated with continental detritus, are characterized by high Na2O (3.22-7.16 wt %) concentrated in secondary analcime crystals. Their K2O contents also range between 0

  19. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques.

  20. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  1. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  2. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  3. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  4. 松辽盆地南部长岭断陷火山岩岩性岩相特征及其对储层的控制作用%Lithologic and Lithofacies Characteristics of Volcanic Rock and Their Controlling Effects on Reservoirs of Changling Fault Depression in the South of Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜雪; 邹华耀; 饶勇; 杨元元

    2009-01-01

    长岭断陷是松辽盆地南部最大的断陷,其深层勘探程度低、油气资源丰富、火山岩分布面积大,是很好的油气储集空间.为了明确长岭断陷层火山岩的分布规律以预测有利的储层,本文通过对火山岩的岩心观察、薄片鉴定、测井资料、二维、三维地震资料的综合分析,提出长岭断陷层火山岩主要发育于火石岭组和营城组,以火山熔岩和火山碎屑岩为主;发育出爆发相、溢流相、火山通道相、侵出相和火山沉积相5种火山岩岩相及11种亚相,其中以爆发相和溢流相为主;长岭断陷深层火山岩主要沿深大断裂呈带状分布.裂隙式和中心式喷发兼有,在垂向上表现为多期次喷发序列的叠置:营城组发育三个火山喷发旋回.统计显示溢流相上部和下部亚相的流纹岩和爆发相热碎屑流亚相的凝灰岩的气孔、溶孔和裂缝发育,储集物性最好.%The Changling fault depression is the largest fault depression in the south of Songliao Basin. The deep formation in the depression with a low exploration degree contains abundant hydrocarbon resources, where volcanic rocks are distributedextensively, as a good reservoir of oil and gasses. According to core observation, thin section identification and integration of well log and 2D/3D seismic data, the Yingcheng formation and Huoshiling formation are rich in volcanic rocks, mainly consisting of lava and pyroclastic rocks. 5 types of volcanic lithofacies and 11 types of volcanic subfacies such as explosive facies, overflow facies, volcanic conduit facies, extrusive facies and eruptive-sedimentary facies can be identified, which are mainly overflow facies and explosive facies. The volcanic rocks in the depression are distributed along big deep faults and superimposed by many times of volcanic eruption in the vertical direction in models of eruption of both central type and fissure type. And three volcanic eruption cycles can be identified in

  5. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  6. Evaluation of CNS depressant activity of different plant parts of Nyctanthes arbortristis linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sanjita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with the water-soluble portion of the ethanol extracts of flowers, barks, seeds and leaves of Nyctanthes arbortristis Linn. to confirm their CNS depressant activity. The ethanol extracts of the plant parts were obtained by soxhlet extraction. After performing the gross behavioral study, the CNS depressant activity was evaluated by observing the prolongation of sleeping time induced by pentobarbital sodium in mice. Attempts have been made to explore the possible mechanism behind this activity by determining their effect on brain monoamine neurotransmitters like dopamine and serotonin. The gross behavioral study showed that ethanol extracts of the leaves, flowers and seeds possess significant CNS depressant activity. The leaves, flowers, seeds and barks (600 mg/kg showed significant and dose-dependent prolongation of onset and duration of sleep and so found to cause decrease dopamine and increase serotonin level. From which it can be concluded that the CNS depressant activity of the ethanol extracts of seeds, leaves and flowers may be due to the decrease in dopamine and increase in serotonin level.

  7. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  8. Anxiety and depression in care homes in Malta and Australia: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldacchino, Donia R; Bonello, Lllian

    This cross-sectional comparative study, conducted in two phases, assessed the levels of and factors contributing to anxiety and depression in older people in residential homes in Malta and Australia. Part 1 presented the methodology of this cross-sectional study and presented the quantitative findings; this constituted phase 1. Part 2 presents the qualitative findings on the contributing factors to anxiety and depression and discusses the overall findings. Maltese residents were recruited from four church homes in Malta and Australia and two state residences in Malta; there was a high response rate in phase 2 of 89.4% (n=42, mean age 71.9 years). The residents were all mobile Roman Catholics who had lived in the homes for a minimum of 6 months. Data was collected using audiotaped focus groups. The qualitative data generated three contributing factors: physical functional abilities, adaptation to institutionalisation, and personal outlook towards the future. Mobility was found to foster an active life, which appeared to help residents to control their anxiety and depression. Rehabilitation programmes and facilitation of strategies were recommended to strengthen relationships with family members, room mates, health professionals and pets to help residents live meaningfully. Further cross-cultural longitudinal research would identify the role of other influencing variables such as culture, spirituality and caring relationships.

  9. Volcanic activities in the Southern part of East African rift initiation: Melilitites and nephelinites from the Manyara Basin (North Tanzania rift axis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, Celine; Parat, Fleurice; Tiberi, Christel; Gautier, Stéphanie; Peyrat, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    The East African Rift exposes different stages of plate boundary extension, from the initiation of the rift (North (N) Tanzania) to oceanic accretion (Afar). The N Tanzania rift-axis (north-south (S) trend) is divided into 2 different volcanic and seismic activities: (1) the Natron basin (N) with shallow seismicity and intense volcanism and (2) the Manyara basin (S) with deep crustal earthquakes and sparse volcanism. The Natron basin is characterized by extinct volcanoes (2 Ma-0.75 Ma) and active volcano (Oldoinyo Lengai) and a link between seismicity and volcanism has been observed during the Oldoinyo Lengai crisis in 2007. In the S part of the N Tanzanian rift, volcanoes erupted in the Manyara basin between 0.4 and 0.9 Ma. In this study, we used geochemical signature of magmas and deep fluids that percolate into the lithosphere beneath Manyara basin, to define the compositions of magmas and fluids at depth beneath the S part of the N Tanzania rift, compare to the Natron basin and place constrain on the volcanic and seismic activities. The Manyara basin has distinct volcanic activities with mafic magmas as melilitites (Labait) and Mg-nephelinites (carbonatite, Kwaraha), and more differentiated magmas as Mg-poor nephelinites (Hanang). Melilitites and Mg-nephelinites are primary magmas with olivine, clinopyroxene (cpx), and phlogopite recording high-pressure crystallization environment, (melilitites >4 GPa and Mg-nephelinites>1 GPa) with high volatile contents (whole rock: 0.7-4.6 wt% CO2, 0.1-0.3 wt% F and 0.1 wt% Cl). FTIR analyses of olivine constrained the water content of Labait and Kwaraha magmas at 0.1 and 0.4 wt% H2O, respectively. Geochemical modelling suggests that mafic magmas result from a low degree of partial melting (1-2%) of a peridotitic source with garnet and phlogopite (high Tb/Yb (>0.6) and Rb/Sr (0.03-0.12) ratio). Mg-poor nephelinites from Hanang volcano crystallized cpx, Ti-garnet, and nepheline as phenocrysts. Magmas result from fractional

  10. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  11. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  12. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, C.; Graf, H. F.; Herzog, M.; Oberhuber, J. M.; Rose, William I.; Ernst, G. G. J.

    2006-02-01

    The aggregation of volcanic ash particles within the eruption column of explosive eruptions has been observed at many volcanoes. It influences the residence time of ash in the atmosphere and the radiative properties of the umbrella cloud. However, the information on the processes leading to aggregate formation are still either lacking or very incomplete. We examine the fate of ash particles through numerical experiments with the plume model ATHAM (Active Tracer High resolution Atmospheric Model) in order to determine the conditions that promote ash particle aggregation. In this paper we describe the microphysics and parameterization of ash and hydrometeors. In a companion paper (this issue) we use this information in a series of numerical experiments. The parameterization includes the condensation of water vapor in the rising eruption column. The formation of liquid and solid hydrometeors and the effect of latent heat release on the eruption column dynamics are considered. The interactions of hydrometeors and volcanic ash within the eruption column that lead to aggregate formation are simulated for the first time within a rising eruption column. The microphysical parameterization follows a modal approach. The hydrometeors are described by two size classes, each of which is divided into a liquid and a frozen category. By analogy with the hydrometeor classification, we specify four categories of volcanic ash particles. We imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can be contained in all categories of hydrometeors, thus forming mixed particles of any composition reaching from mud rain to accretionary lapilli. Collisions are caused by gravitational capture of particles with different fall velocity. Coalescence of hydrometeor-ash aggregates is assumed to be a function of the hydrometeor mass fraction within the mixed particles. The parameterization also includes simplified descriptions of electrostatics and salinity

  13. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy – Part 1: Slant-columns and their ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grutter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The composition and emission rates of volcanic gas plumes provide insight of the geologic internal activity, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol formation and radiative processes around it. Observations are necessary for public security and the aviation industry. Ground-based thermal emission infrared spectroscopy, which uses the radiation of the volcanic gas itself, allows for continuously monitoring during day and night from a safe distance. We present measurements on Popocatépetl volcano based on thermal emission spectroscopy during different campaigns between 2006–2009 using a Scanning Infrared Gas Imaging System (SIGIS. The experimental set-up, measurement geometries and analytical algorithms are described. The equipment was operated from a safe distance of 12 km from the volcano at two different spectral resolutions: 0.5 and 4 cm−1. The 2-dimensional scanning capability of the instrument allows for an on-line visualization of the volcanic SO2 plume and its animation. SiF4 was also identified in the infrared spectra recorded at both resolutions. The SiF4/SO2 molecular ratio can be calculated from each image and used as a highly useful parameter to follow changes in volcanic activity. A small Vulcanian eruption was monitored during the night of 16 to 17 November 2008 and strong ash emission together with a pronounced SO2 cloud was registered around 01:00 a.m. LST (Local Standard Time. Enhanced SiF4/SO2 ratios were observed before and after the eruption. A validation of the results from thermal emission measurements with those from absorption spectra of the moon taken at the same time, as well as an error analysis, are presented. The inferred propagation speed from sequential images is used in a subsequent paper (Part 2 to calculate the emission rates at different distances from the crater.

  14. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy - Part 1: Slant-columns and their ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremme, W.; Krueger, A.; Harig, R.; Grutter, M.

    2012-02-01

    The composition and emission rates of volcanic gas plumes provide insight of the geologic internal activity, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol formation and radiative processes around it. Observations are necessary for public security and the aviation industry. Ground-based thermal emission infrared spectroscopy, which uses the radiation of the volcanic gas itself, allows for continuously monitoring during day and night from a safe distance. We present measurements on Popocatépetl volcano based on thermal emission spectroscopy during different campaigns between 2006-2009 using a Scanning Infrared Gas Imaging System (SIGIS). The experimental set-up, measurement geometries and analytical algorithms are described. The equipment was operated from a safe distance of 12 km from the volcano at two different spectral resolutions: 0.5 and 4 cm-1. The 2-dimensional scanning capability of the instrument allows for an on-line visualization of the volcanic SO2 plume and its animation. SiF4 was also identified in the infrared spectra recorded at both resolutions. The SiF4/SO2 molecular ratio can be calculated from each image and used as a highly useful parameter to follow changes in volcanic activity. A small Vulcanian eruption was monitored during the night of 16 to 17 November 2008 and strong ash emission together with a pronounced SO2 cloud was registered around 01:00 a.m. LST (Local Standard Time). Enhanced SiF4/SO2 ratios were observed before and after the eruption. A validation of the results from thermal emission measurements with those from absorption spectra of the moon taken at the same time, as well as an error analysis, are presented. The inferred propagation speed from sequential images is used in a subsequent paper (Part 2) to calculate the emission rates at different distances from the crater.

  15. Tectonics Along Western-Central Part of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt as Inferred From Palaeomagnetic Data: A Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Elguera, J.; Goguichaisvilli, A.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2007-05-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), one of the largest continental volcanic arcs built on the North America plate, spans about 1000 km and crosses central Mexico from the Pacific Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. The initial stage of the TMVB is marked by widespread Miocene basaltic volcanism, emplaced from the Nayarit state, in the west, to the longitude of Mexico City. This volcanism is characterized by plateau-like structures resulting from the shield volcanoes and fissure lava flows, which have an estimated aggregate volume ranging between 3200 and 6800 km3. The western-central Mexico has been affected by right-lateral transtension within the western TMVB but previous paleomagnetic studies indicate some 15-20° anticlockwise tectonic rotations for the Rio Grande de Santiago canyon and surrounding areas, in accordance with a Miocene left-lateral transtensional tectonic regime. We present a summary of paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic studies of that Miocene volcanic succession from the TMVB. A total of 114 consecutive basaltic lava flows (more than 550 oriented samples) were collected from four localities: Tepic, Guadalajara, Los Altos, and Queretaro which span from 11 to 7.5 Ma. The mean paleodirection obtained for Tepic area is I = 33.7°, D = 358.4°, k = 140, á95 = 3.0°, N = 17. These directions are in perfect agreement with the expected paleodirections for late Miocene time, as derived from reference poles given by Besse and Courtillot (1991) for North America.. The mean paleodirection obtained for Guadalajara is I = 31.1°, D = 354.6°, k = 124, 95 = 2.1°, which corresponds to the mean paleomagnetic pole position Plat = 84°, Plong = 129.8°, k = 29, 95 = 4.4°. These directions are in reasonably good agreement with the expected paleodirections for middle Miocene time. The mean paleomagnetic direction calculated for Los Altos and Queretaro is I = 32.46°, D = 341.2°, k = 7.2 and 95 = 11.6°. Thus, our results suggest that no major block rotation has

  16. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Different people have different symptoms. Some symptoms of depression include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness ...

  17. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  18. Timing of volcanism and initiation of rifting in Omo-Turkana Depression, Southwestern Ethiopia: Evidence from Paleomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbello, A.; Kidane, T.; Brown, F.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract This Paleomagnetic study was carried out on thin widely spread lava flows of Gombe Group basalts from the lower Omo Valley in southwestern Ethiopia. The objective of the study is to integrate paleomagnetic results with previous geochronological data to know timing of volcanism and to infer the time for which the present architecture of the basin was attained. 80 oriented core samples were taken from nine sites in two field trips. Rock magnetic, petrology and paleomagnetic studies were done in the laboratory of Earth Sciences at Addis Ababa University. Pilot specimens were subjected to alternating field (AF) and thermal (TH) demagnetization and acquisition experiments. The Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM) direction comprises two vector components in most samples. The first component of magnetization was easily erased at 5 to 25mT AF demagnetization and 120°C to 250°C TH demagnetization. A step wise increasing application of magnetic field to selected specimens revealed a saturation magnetization at about 300°C. The magnetization curve results from the acquisition experiment together with TH demagnetization of the same specimens and AF demagnetization results indicates that titanomagnetite is the dominant magnetic carrier. About 50% of magnetization is removed between Temperature ranges of 2500C and 4300C suggesting pseudo single domains as a primary carrier of magnetic remanence. From a total of nine sites, six sites show reversed polarity and two sites show normal polarity. One site has been removed because of samples from that site may have been affected by lightning. The normal and reversed polarities are 1800 apart thus they are antipodal to one another. The overall mean direction for 6 sites of reversed polarity is (DS=186.1, IS=-1.9,KS=38.8, α95=10.9) where as the two sites with normal polarity yield (DS=348.4, IS=4.6, K=378.9, α95=12.9).By using the available upper age control of Moiti tuff (3.98Ma) and Naibar tuff (4.02 Ma) which have never

  19. New Pliocene-Pleistocene 40Ar/ 39Ar ages fill in temporal gaps in the Nicaraguan volcanic record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saginor, Ian; Gazel, Esteban; Carr, Michael J.; Swisher, Carl C., III; Turrin, Brent

    2011-04-01

    The volcanic record of western Nicaragua documents a significant lull in volcanic activity that has persisted from the late Miocene (~ 7 Ma) to the formation of the modern volcanic front around 350 ka. This study fills this gap for the first time with samples collected in Northwest Nicaragua between Cosigüina and San Cristóbal volcanoes and with samples collected from the Nicaraguan Depression. We found two previously unknown volcanic units ranging from 3.6 to 1.3 Ma and the improved volcanic record allows us to reconstruct the geochemical evolution of the Nicaraguan arc. U/Th values increased by nearly threefold since the Miocene following the "carbonate crash" at 10 Ma, when dominantly carbonate sediment deposition shifted toward hemipelagic sediment deposition. This transition was thought to be abrupt, however our new data show that it took place gradually over the last 7 Ma. Northwest Nicaragua is a particularly interesting case study because it contains Middle Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression, the Coyol Formation (25-7 Ma) to the East and the Tamarindo Formation (14.7-11.7 Ma) to the West. The presence of Mid Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression has led to the hypothesis that the two coeval units, currently separated by ~ 100 km, were once connected and have since been separated by extension. Here, we present data suggesting that the Tamarindo and Coyol are geochemically distinct and therefore cannot be considered part of the same unit.

  20. 松辽盆地北部徐家围子断陷火山岩储层成因机制%Volcanic rock reservoirs mechanism in North Songliao Basin Xujiaweizi Fault Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩刚; 张文婧; 任延广; 黄清华; 梁江平; 包丽

    2011-01-01

    松辽盆地北部徐家围子断陷徐深气田是我国迄今为止发现的最大的火山岩气田.营城组火山岩具有分布广、厚度大、岩性复杂等特点,既有酸性的流纹岩、流纹质熔结凝灰岩,也有中性的安山岩、安山质集块岩和基性的玄武岩.研究表明,酸性流纹岩、流纹质熔结凝灰岩普遍发育较好的原生气孔,而火山角砾岩、火山集块岩一般发育火山岩原生裂缝,这些为优质火山岩储层形成奠定了物质基础,成岩作用过程中深部流体活动和选择性溶蚀作用,不仅增大了火山岩的有效储集空间,同时也改善了火山岩储集层空间结构,而构造运动所形成的构造裂缝,不仅为深部流体活动和油气运移提供了主要通道,而且有效地增大了火山岩的油气储集空间.%The Xushen gas field locates in Xujiaweizi Fault Depression of North Songliao Basin. It is so far the greatest volcanic rock gas field in China. The Xushen gas field develops typical Yingcheng Formation volcanic rocks. The Yingcheng Formation volcanic rocks have such characteristic as extensive distribution range, great thickness, and complex lithology. By using methods such as core and scanning electron microscope observation, body of casting slice, analysis and assay, we found the lithology of Yingcheng Formation volcanic rocks consist of not only acidic rhyolite, rhyolite-cementing tuff, but also neutral andesite, andesite-agglomerate and basic basalt. We conducted subtly researchs. The purpose is to see into the cause-mechanism of volcanic rocks reservoirs, and then provide reliable evidences in conducting oil-gas exploration, seeking favorable reservoirs and improving the success rate of prospecting well. Researches have made clearly that acidic rhyolite, rhyolite-cementing tuffs develop generally preferable original pore, but volcanic breccias and volcanic agglomerates commonly develop volcanic primary fracture. These establish foundation for

  1. The Southern Part of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SSVZ; 42-46S) of the Andes: History of Medium and Large Explosive Holocene Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, C. R.; Naranjo, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Chaitén volcano is one of 13 large volcanic centers, and numerous small cones, comprising the southern part of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), that results from the subduction of the Nazca plate (at 7.8 cm/yr) between the landward extension of the Chiloé FZ at 42S and the Chile Rise - Trench triple junction at 46S. Chaitén is a rhyolite dome inside a 3 km diameter caldera located 15 km west of the larger Michinmahuida stratovolcano. Other stratovolcanoes in the SSVZ include Yate, Hornopirén, Corcovado, Yanteles, Melimoyu, Mentolat, Cay and Macá. Hudson volcano, the southernmost in the Southern SVZ, is a large 10 km caldera, while Huequi and Hualaihué - Cordón Cabrera are a group of small aligned cinder cones possibly related to a larger eroded volcanic complex. Prior to the May 2008 eruption of Chaitén, the only well documented historic eruptions in this segment of the Andean arc were the explosive eruption of Hudson in August 1991 (Naranjo et al. 1993), and two eruptions of Michinmahuida in 1742 and 1834-35. Tephra deposits provide evidence of 11 prehistoric explosive Holocene eruptions of the southernmost SSVZ Hudson volcano, including two large eruptions near Boletin No 44, SERNAGEOMIN, 50 p. Naranjo and Stern 1998, Bull Volcanology 59: 291-306. Naranjo and Stern 2004, Revista Geologica de Chile 31: 225-240. Stern et al. 2002, Anales del Intituto de la Patagonia 30: 167-174.

  2. K—Ar Geochronology and Evolution of Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks in Eastrn China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧芬; 杨学昌; 等

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic volcanic rocks widespread in eastern China constitute an important part of the circum-Pacific volcanic belt.This paper presents more than 150K-Ar dates and a great deal of petrochemical analysis data from the Cenozoic volcanic rocks distributed in Tengchong,China's southeast coast,Shandong,Hebei,Nei Monggol and Northeast China.An integrated study shows that ubiquitous but uneven volcanic activities prevailed from the Eogene to the Holocene,characterized as being multi-eqisodic and multicycled.For example,in the Paleocene(67-58Ma),Eocene(57-37.5Ma),Miocene(22-18,16-19Ma),Pliocene(8-3Ma),and Early Pleistocene-Middle Pleistocene(1.2-0.5Ma) there were upsurges of volcanism,while in the Oligocene there was a repose period.In space,the older Eogene volcanic rocks are distributed within the region or in the central part of the NE-NNE-striking fault depression,while the younger Neogene and Quaternary volcanic rocks are distributed in the eastern and western parts.Petrologically,they belong essentially to tholeiite-series and alkali-series basalts,with alkalinity in the rocks increasing from old to youg.The above regularities are controlled by both global plate movement and regional inherent tectonic pattern.

  3. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  4. Morphology and development of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli and associated features from a monogenetic basaltic volcanic field, Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Ezz El Din Abdel Hakim; Hammed, Mohamed Saleh

    2016-01-01

    The dimensions, landforms, and structural characteristics of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli from Bahariya Depression are collectively reported here for the first time. The flow-lobe tumuli documented here characterize hummocky flow surfaces. These tumuli are characterized by low, dome-like mounds, lava-inflation clefts, and squeeze ups. Flow-lobe tumuli are of various shapes and sizes, which are affected by the mechanism of inflation because they formed in response to the increase of pressure within the flow when the flow's crust becomes thicker. The tumuli often appear isolated or in small groups in the middle sectors of the lava flows, whereas in the distal sectors they form large concentration, suggesting the presence of complex lava tubes inside of the flow. Tumuli exhibited by El Bahariya lava flows are between 3.0 and 50 m in length and up to 5.0 m in height with lenticular geometry in aerial view. The flow emplacement of flow-lobe tumuli is controlled by variations in local characteristics such as nature of the substrate, flow orientation, slope, interferrence with other lobes, and rate of lava supply. Their presence generally towards the terminal ends of flow fields suggests that they seldom form over the clogged portions of distributary tubes or pathways. Thus, localized inflations that formed over blockages in major lava tubes result in formation of flow-lobe tumuli. The three-tiered (crust-core-basal zone) internal structure of the flow-lobe tumuli, resembling the typical distribution of vesicles in P-type lobes, confirms emplacement by the mechanism of inflation. All the available data show that the morphology and emplacement mechanism of the studied flow-lobe tumuli may be analogous to similar features preserved within topographically confined areas of the Hawaiian and Deccan hummocky lava flows. Considering the age of the studied volcanic fields (˜22 Ma) it is most probable that the structures described here may be amongst the oldest recognized examples

  5. The Diagenesis of Volcanic Rocks and Its Effects on the Reservior Quality in Xujiaweizi Fault Depression, Soliao Basin%徐家围子断陷火山岩成岩作用与储层质量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡文婷; 柳成志; 赵辉; 栾慷; 周振东; 姚洪鹏

    2011-01-01

    The Xjiaweizi fault depression is the largest volcanic reserviors ever discovered in China which is located in the northern Songliao Basin.Study of the petrological characteristics, pore types and the diagenesis of volcanic rocks, shows that volcanic rocks types can be divided into two kinds,including lavas and pyroclastic rocks, the major volcanic reservior rocks are rhyolite and ignimbrite.The reservior spaces include primary pore, primary facture,secondary pore and secondary fracture.While the favorable volcanic rock reserviors in this area are mainly composed of initial bubbles, micropores resulted from devitrification and secondary dissolution pores.The diagenesis of volcanic rocks can be devided into three stages which include syndiagenetic phase, hypergenesis phase and burialdiagenesis phase.There are 12 volcanic diagenesis types, and the reservior guality are greatly effected by the diagenesis events including packing action,devitrify and dissolution.%徐家围子断陷位于松辽盆地北部古中央隆起带东侧,断陷期火山活动强烈,营城组火山岩是本区深层天然气重要的储集空间.对徐家围子断陷营城组火山岩的岩石学特征、储集空间类型以及火山岩的成岩作用研究表明,本区火山岩岩石类型有熔岩和火山碎屑岩两大类,以流纹岩、熔结凝灰岩为主.孔隙类型有4种,不同的岩石类型具有不同的孔隙类型组合,最主要的孔隙类型为原生气孔、脱玻化孔和次生溶孔.火山岩的成岩演化可以分为三个阶段,目前本区火山岩主要出于埋藏成岩阶段II期.本区火山岩一共有12种成岩作用类型,不同成岩阶段的成岩作用类型不相同,对储层质量影响最重要的成岩作用是脱玻化作用、充填作用和溶解作用.

  6. The pro-inflammatory profile of depressed patients is (partly) related to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Richard C; Falola, Michael; Li, Li; Zajecka, John; Fava, Maurizio; Papakostas, George I

    2015-11-01

    Many people with major depressive disorder (MDD) show evidence of systemic inflammation, including elevations in inflammatory factors, but the cause is unclear. The purpose of this analysis was to determine if obesity might contribute to the pro-inflammatory state in MDD patients. Blood was obtained from 135 MDD patients and 50 controls. Serum was extracted and assayed for interleukin (IL) -1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17, interferon-γ (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, and adiponectin using single- or multi-plex human immunoassay kits. The primary analysis contrasted IL-6, TNFα, and CRP between MDD and control groups with body mass index (BMI) as a covariate. The other analytes were compared in an exploratory fashion. IL-6 (but not TNFα or CRP) showed significant differences between MDD and controls even after covarying for BMI. Obese controls and obese MDD groups were significantly higher in IL-6 than both lean groups, but the two obese groups did not differ from each other. In the exploratory analyses, the IL-2 level showed robust and significant differences between MDD and controls even after covarying for BMI. Both lean and obese MDD were higher than lean and obese controls. Adiponectin levels were also lower in the MDD sample than controls. Prior findings of higher IL-6, and CRP in MDD patients may be explained, at least in part, based on obesity. High IL-2, however, was associated with depression and not obesity. The results have significant implications for the understanding of pathophysiology and, potentially treatment of MDD.

  7. Methane-rich fluid inclusions and their hosting volcanic reservoir rocks of the Songliao Basin, NE China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Pu-Jun; HOU Qi-jun; CHENG Ri-hui; LI Quan-lin; GUO Zhen-hua; HUANG Yu-long

    2004-01-01

    Methane-rich fluids were recognized to be hosted in the reservoir volcanic rocks as primary inclusions.Samples were collected from core-drillings of volcanic gas reservoirs with reversed δ12C of alkane in the Xujiaweizi depression of the Songliao Basin. The volcanic rocks are rhyolite dominant being enriched in the more incompatible elements like Cs, Rb, Ba, Th, U and Th with relative high LREE, depleted HREE and negative anomalies of Ti and Nb,suggesting a melt involving both in mantle source and crustal assimilation. Primary fluids hosted in the volcanic rocks should have the same provenance with the magma. The authors concluded that the enclosed CH4 in the volcanics are mantle/magma-derived alkane and the reversed δ13C of alkane in the corresponding gas reservoirs is partly resulted from mixture between biogenic and abiogenic gases.

  8. Holocene flows of the Cima volcanic field, Mojave Desert (California), Part 1: Remote sensing and multi-scale morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, J. R.; Luecke, A.; Polun, S. G.; Robertson, T.; Savage, A.; Soldati, A.; Whittington, A. G.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology and texture can provide insight into rheological and other physical properties of the flow. Studies of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial lava flows rely heavily on remotely sensed observations. This research aims to quantify micromorphology and texture of a Holocene lava flow in the Cima volcanic field (eastern California) using digital elevation models and radar backscatter imagery. We are testing the hypothesis that spatial patterns in morphometry and backscatter roughness correspond with varying rheological conditions during emplacement. The site is ideally suited for morphological study owing to the youthfulness of the flow, as well as the lack of vegetation and minimal surface erosion resulting from the high desert climate. The studied lava flow spans approximately 2.5 km and exhibits well defined lobate forms and lava ropes with clear A'a' to Pahoehoe transitions. This study assesses lava flow micromorphology using a very high resolution (5 cm pixel) digital elevation model (DEM). The DEM was constructed from low-altitude aerial photos acquired using a remotely-controlled model aircraft. In addition to the DEM, the resulting orthoimagery provided a basis for distinguishing pristine lava flow surfaces from areas covered by vegetation and/or eolian deposits. Longer-wavelength morphology (spatial scales greater than 1 meter) is analyzed using a 50 cm pixel DEM produced using stereoscopic NAPP aerial photographs. Roughness estimates are compared with radar backscatter images including steeply incident C-band (5.6 cm wavelength) and L-band (24 cm wavelength) satellite data, as well as shallow incidence Ku-band data (1.7 cm wavelength) acquired using a ground-based imaging radar from an adjacent cinder cone. Photogrammetry and radar provide complementary information on lava flow morphology and micromorphological roughness, which are assessed at different spatial scales using general statistics, as well as the local hypsometric integral.

  9. [Treatment-resistant depression: state of the art. Part I. Nosography and clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchini, Federica; Cosentino, Luca; Pensabene, Laura; Mauri, Mauro; Lattanzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    This work would give an overall vision of the actual knowledge about nosography and clinic of treatment-resistant depression. A PubMed, PsychInfo, Google Scolar search was done using the key words "resistant depression", "STAR*D", "bipolar depression", "staging". Have been selected exclusively works in English, French and Italian languages. Treatment-resistant depression is one of the most important problem in public health. Nevertheless a general consensus about its definition and staging does not exist at now. Principal risk factors and associated comorbidities are well known including the association with bipolar spectrum; anyway the disease particularly common among depressed outpatients is still very disabling, responsible of an often chronic course, with numerous relapses and high risk of suicide. The future investigations, once improved procedures for differential diagnosis and subtyping of clinical depression, should be directed to the search of a shared definition of treatment resistance and the development of specific therapeutic protocols.

  10. Relationship between Volcanic Rocks and Hydrocarbon Accumulation during Dominant Period of Basin Formation in Liaohe Depression%主成盆期火山岩与油气成藏关系探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振岩; 仇劲涛; 王璞珺; 李湃; 张培先; 刘鑫; 郝涛; 聂桂民

    2011-01-01

    The dominant period of basin formation is defined as the period with the strongest tectonic movements,the largest extent of subsidence and the best development of source rocks.The sedimentary period of the 3rd member(Shasan,E2s3) and 4th member(Shasi,E2s4) of Shahejie Formation is the dominant period for basin formation.There were many episodes of volcanic movements during Cenozoic in Liaohe Depression,forming distribution of volcanic rocks with many series and types,which changes with the tectonic center and has the less strong activity in the earlier stages.The volcanic movements in the dominant period of Liaohe depression are abnormally strong and the appearances of volcanic rocks are frequent.The reservoirs which are altered by structural fractures and the corrosion and dissolution by formation water are favorable for oil and gas accumulation.The superposition in plane and the alternation in profile provide enough provision conditions of oil and gas sources for volcanic rock reservoirs.Furthermore,the volcanic rocks from dominant period of basin are of large thickness,widespread distribution and various traps and accumulation types,owning many advantages for oil and/or gas accumulation in many respects.The volcanic rock reservoirs for oil and/or gas in the areas of Huangshatuo and Oulituozi are typical representations among the above favorable reservoirs.The volcanic rocks from the dominant period of basin formation with favorable combination of oil and/or gas accumulation,enriching the content of oil and /or gas accumulation and the types of oil and /or gas exploration,are the important field for hydrocarbon discovery and exploration.%裂陷盆地的主成盆期是构造活动性最强、沉降幅度最大、烃源岩发育最好的时期,辽河坳陷的主成盆期是E2s4~E2s3时期。辽河坳陷新生代发生了多期火山活动,形成了多套、多类型的火山岩分布,火山活动总体上具有早强晚弱、平面上具有随沉降中

  11. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... among older adults, but it is NOT a normal part of aging. In fact, studies show that most older adults feel satisfied with their lives, despite having more illnesses or physical problems. Important life changes that happen as we get older may cause ...

  12. Anxiety and depression in care homes in Malta and Australia: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldacchino, Donia R; Bonello, Lilian

    This cross-sectional comparative study, conducted in two phases, assessed the levels of and factors contributing towards anxiety and depression in older people in residential homes in Malta and Australia. A mixed-method approach was adopted and the cognitive theory of stress and coping (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984) guided the study. Maltese residents were recruited from four church-run homes in Malta and Australia and two state residences in Malta. Response rates were high, with phase 1 at 94.48% (n = 137; mean age = 72.8 years) and phase 2 at 89.4%, (n = 42, mean age = 71.9 years). All the residents were mobile, were Roman Catholics and had lived in the homes for at least 6 months. In phase 1, quantitative data was collected using a demographic questionnaire and the hospital anxiety and depression scale. Normal ranges of anxiety and depression were found (anxiety: mean = 3.53-4.35; depression: mean = 2.67-4.72). No significant differences were found in anxiety and depression between countries, demographic characteristics and some other variables. The only significant difference lay in depression by mobility (F = 5.263; P = 0.006; df = 2), with wheelchair users scoring the highest mean (mean = 6.77; SD = 5.847; P = 0.007). Mobility was linked to functional abilities, which appeared to control anxiety and depression. Recommendations are made for rehabilitation and cross-cultural longitudinal research to investigate other influencing variables such as spirituality and caring relationships.

  13. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    The Persani small volume volcanism is located in the SE corner of the Transylvanian Depression, at the north-western edge of the intra-mountainous Brasov basin. It represents the south-easternmost segment of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic chain of the East Carpathians. The alkaline basalt monogenetic volcanic field is partly coeval with the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism south of Harghita Mountains (1-1.6 Ma). Its eruptions post-dated the calc-alkaline volcanism in the Harghita Mountains (5.3-1.6 Ma), but pre-dated the high-K calc-alkaline emissions of Ciomadul volcano (1.0-0.03 Ma). The major volcanic forms have been mapped in previous geological surveys. Still, due to the small size of the volcanoes and large extent of tephra deposits and recent sediments, the location of some vents or other volcanic structures has been incompletely revealed. To overcome this problem, the area was subject to several near-surface geophysical investigations, including paleomagnetic research. However, due to their large-scale features, the previous geophysical surveys proved to be an inappropriate approach to the volcanological issues. Therefore, during the summers of 2014 and 2015, based on the high magnetic contrast between the volcanic rocks and the hosting sedimentary formations, a detailed ground geomagnetic survey has been designed and conducted, within central Persani volcanism area, in order to outline the presence of volcanic structures hidden beneath the overlying deposits. Additionally, information on the rock magnetic properties was also targeted by sampling and analysing several outcrops in the area. Based on the acquired data, a detailed total intensity scalar geomagnetic anomaly map was constructed by using the recent IGRF12 model. The revealed pattern of the geomagnetic field proved to be fully consistent with the direction of magnetisation previously determined on rock samples. In order to enhance the signal/noise ratio, the results were further processed by

  14. Xenoliths From Isla Isabel, Nayarit, Mexico: The Nature of the Upper Mantle Underneath the Western Part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housh, T. B.; Aranda-Gomez, J. J.; Luhr, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    Isla Isabel is located ~65 km NW of San Blas (Nayarit), off the Pacific coast of central Mexico. The island is a Quaternary (Ar/Ar < 0.7 Ma) volcanic complex built atop attenuated continental crust. Isabel lies on the east side of the mouth of the Gulf of California, near the area previously occupied (early Pliocene) by Los Cabos Block. Southeast of Isabel, on the mainland, is the NW-trending Tepic-Zacoalco rift, a major volcano-tectonic structure in the western part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. On land, the rift is the boundary between the Jalisco and Sierra Madre Occidental blocks, and Isabel lies along its projection. Immediately S of Isabel is the San Blas Trough, a swale that trends NW-SE, co-linear with a gravity lineation parallel to the Tamayo and San Blas fault zones, which are the transform boundaries between the northern Rivera and North American plates. Plio-Quaternary alkaline and calc-alkaline lavas have erupted contemporaneously in the Tepic-Zacoalco rift, but so far no mantle xenoliths have been reported in them. Isabel's rocks are intra-plate type alkaline basalts to trachybasalts, with 5-6%\\ normative Ne. Primary paragenesis in the lavas is: Ol + Pl + Cpx + TMt. Small (< 5 cm) peridotite xenoliths, and xenocrysts derived from them, are ubiquitous in the rocks. Eleven xenoliths were studied comprising 3 dunites, 7 harzburgites (one Pl-bearing), and 1 gabbro. Compared to other Mexican xenolith localities N of the MVB, they are refractory as they are depleted in, or lack, Cpx. Ol crystals in xenoliths are homogenous and their Mg#\\ s range as follows: peridotites (92-88), gabbro (84), and Pl-harzburgite (80). Cores of primary Ol phenocrysts (90.5-86.5) in Isabel's volcanic rocks are significantly higher in Mg#\\ s than in Ol from other Mexican xenolith localities (max. 86) and overlap with the associated peridotite xenoliths. Such overlap has not been reported for other Mexican xenolith localities. Xenolith equilibration temperatures for 5

  15. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  16. Paleomagnetism of the Quaternary Cerro Prieto, Crater Elegante, and Salton Buttes volcanic domes in the northern part of the Gulf of California rhombochasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Boer, J.

    1980-02-01

    Deviating thermomagnetic directions in volcanics representing the second and fifth or sixth pulse of volcanism suggest that the Cerro Prieto volcano originated about 110,000 years B.P. and continued to be active intermittently until about 10,000 years ago.

  17. Evaluation and Treatment of Depression (Part I): Benefits for Patients, Providers, and Payors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Depression is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, contributing to high medical expenditures, poor clinical outcomes, low productivity, and compromised quality of life. Efficacious treatments are available for the treatment of depression across a broad age range (children/adolescents to elderly). Care management initiatives that include these promising interventions ameliorate the impact of the disorder among patients receiving mental health services in primary care and behavior...

  18. Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... satisfaction and control in your life Help ease depression symptoms such as hopelessness and anger As part of your treatment, it's important to also address other conditions that often accompany atypical depression, in particular anxiety and drug or alcohol use, ...

  19. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    , Tungurahua in Ecuador, Mt. Etna in Italy, Rabaul caldera in Papua New Guinea, Mt. Spurr and Mt. St. Helens in the USA, Ruapehu in New Zealand, Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, and Anatahan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (part of the USA). Ten countries - USA, Indonesia, Ecuador, Papua New Guinea, Italy, New Zealand, Philippines, Mexico, Japan, and United Kingdom - have the highest volcanic hazard and/or vulnerability measures for airports. The adverse impacts of volcanic eruptions on airports can be mitigated by preparedness and forewarning. Methods that have been used to forewarn airports of volcanic activity include real-time detection of explosive volcanic activity, forecasts of ash dispersion and deposition, and detection of approaching ash clouds using ground-based Doppler radar. Given the demonstrated vulnerability of airports to disruption from volcanic activity, at-risk airports should develop operational plans for ashfall events, and volcano-monitoring agencies should provide timely forewarning of imminent volcanic-ash hazards directly to airport operators. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  20. Tectono-karst depressions in the central-western part of the MehedinTi Mountains (SW Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Povara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The horst structure of the Mehedinţi Mountains, bounded to the east by the Mehedinţi Plateau, and to the west by the Cerna Graben, has been leveled by the Râul Şes II karst planation surface, at an altitude of 1250-1030 m. Part of the Mesozoic sedimentary cover, limestones developed in Urgonian facies widely outcrop, overlying the crystalline-granite bedrock. On a system of faults adjacent to the graben, close to the Cerna Valley slope, uvala and mega-sinkhole depressions, with various depths, have been developed. From NNE to SSW they are extended over a distance of 14 km and an area of 10.376 km 2 . Their orientation follows the direction of the faults to which they are related. The entire plateau presents an endorhei c character. There were three different stages of genesis and evolution of the depressions: (1 active valley; (2 Quaternary tectonic hanging of the valley; (3 endorheic evolution. Recent depressions evolved only during the last two stages. The most developed depressions are opened westward, as a consequence of the eastward retreat of the Cerna Valley tectonic slope. The rainfall infiltration water is drained towards east and west, outflowing at the base of tectonic sunken blocks as permanent springs with maximum flow rates of up to 50 l/s.

  1. Evaluation of the ongoing rifting and subduction processes in the geochemistry of magmas from the western part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Pandarinath, Kailasa; Rivera-Gómez, M. Abdelaly

    2016-03-01

    A compilation of new and published geochemical data for 1512 samples of volcanic rocks from the western part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt was first subdivided according to the age group (136 samples of Miocene and 1376 samples of Pliocene-Holocene). Rocks of the younger group were then subdivided as Rift (1014 samples from the triple-rift system) and No Rift (362 samples outside of the triple-rift system) or Near Trench (937 samples) and Far Trench (439 samples) magmas. These subdivisions were considered separately as basic, intermediate, and acid magmatic rocks. The application of the conventional and multidimensional techniques confirmed the great tectonic and geochemical complexity of this region. The presence of oceanic-type basalts suggested to result from a mantle plume was not confirmed from the tectonomagmatic multidimensional diagrams. The Miocene rocks, which are present at the surface far from the Middle-America Trench, showed a likely continental rift setting in most diagrams for basic rocks and a continental arc setting for intermediate rocks. These differences can be explained in terms of the petrogenetic origin of the magmas. Unlike the current thinking, the triple-rift system seems to have influenced the chemistry of Pliocene-Holocene basic rocks, which indicated a continental rift setting. The Pliocene-Holocene intermediate and acid rocks, however, did not show such an influence. The Pliocene-Holocene basic rocks indicated a continental rift setting, irrespective of the Near Trench and Far Trench subdivision because numerous Near Trench rocks also lie in the triple-rift and graben systems. However, the intermediate rocks having a crustal component in their genesis indicated a continental arc (Near Trench) or a transitional arc to within-plate setting (Far Trench). The acid rocks having a crustal component also suggested a continental arc (Near Trench) or a transitional setting (Far Trench). The application of the tectonomagmatic multidimensional

  2. Late-Life Depression.  Also a field for psychotherapists! Part One

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Late-life depression is a complicated disorder with diagnostic and treatment pitfalls due to interference of serious conditions of life in old age and due to an "atypical" profile of symptoms.  The article treats the nature of these difficulties.  It is concluded that late-life depression is a fi...... is a field demanding extended somatic knowledge by the psychotherapist.  It is also concluded that even though the last decades have brought much clarification, there are still unanswered questions especially related to causal mechanisms....

  3. Large magnitude silicic volcanism in north Afar: the Nabro Volcanic Range and Ma'alalta volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiart, Pierre; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2005-02-01

    Much of the volcanological work carried out in north Afar (Ethiopia and Eritrea) has focused on the nature of Quaternary basaltic volcanic ranges, which have been interpreted by some as incipient oceanic ridges. However, we show here that comparable volumes of silicic magmas have been erupted in the region. In particular, the virtually undocumented Nabro Volcanic Range, which runs NNE for more than 100 km from the margin of the Danakil Depression to the Red Sea coast, has a subaerial volume of the order of 550 km3, comparable to the volume of the much better known Erta’Ale axial volcanic range. Nabro volcano itself forms part of an enigmatic double caldera structure with a neighbouring volcano, Mallahle. The twin caldera may have formed simultaneously with the eruption of between 20 and 100 km3 of ignimbrite, which is readily identified in Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery. This may have been the largest explosive eruption in north Afar, and is certain to have deposited a regionally distributed tephra layer which could in the future be located in distal sections as a stratigraphic marker. An integrated analysis of optical and synthetic aperture radar imagery, digital topographic data, field observations and limited geochemical measurements, permits here descriptions and first order inferences about the structure, stratigraphy and compositions of several major volcanoes of the Afar Triangle, and a reappraisal of their regional significance.

  4. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  5. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid Volcanic Center, Eritrea, Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clynne, M.A.; Duffield, W.A.; Fournier, R.O.; Janik, C.J. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Alid volcanic center is a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa. This mountain straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Though volcanism associated with this crustal spreading is predominantly basaltic, centers of silicic volcanism, including Alid, are present locally. Silicic centers imply a magma reservoir in the crust and thus a possible potent shallow heat source for a hydrothermal-convection system. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250{degrees}C. Alid is a 7-km x 5-km structural dome. The domed rocks, in decreasing age, are Precambrian schist and granite, a sequence of intercalated sedimentary rocks and basaltic lavas, and a sequence of basaltic and rhyolitic lava flows. Though isotopic ages are not yet determined, the domed volcanic rocks of Alid appear to be late Tertiary and/or Quaternary. Doming was likely caused by intrusion of relatively low density silicic magma into the upper crust. Subsequent to dome formation, a substantial volume of this magma was erupted from a vent near the west end of the summit area of the dome. This eruption produced a blanket of plinian rhyolite pumice over most, if not all, of the dome and fed pyroclastic flows that covered the part of the Danakil Depression around the base of the dome. The pumice deposits contain abundant inclusions of granophyric, miarolitic pyroxene granite, chemically indistinguishable from the pumice. This granite likely represents the uppermost part of the magma reservoir, which crystallized just prior to the pumice eruption.

  6. [Recited depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucci, M; Cossio, M

    1984-01-01

    Several subjects who tell their depression and play a part of it in front of the doctor without being really depressed are reported. Some of them try to hide the symptoms (irritability or erethism, ceremonials of obsessive neurosis, shunning of phobia) which, in their opinion, might be detrimental to their reputation. Others neglect to describe some of the symptoms of their polymorphous clinical picture only underlining the depressive signs. Some others play a part of depression because they have believed to recognize themselves in persons presented by mass media, because it seems to them a duty to show an adequate depression in case of mournful event, or because they "convert" their problem into a depression. Some others use depression as a blackmail, or to obtain an advantage from doctor's conviction about their illness. The reason for the high frequency of similar cases in the present time are examined: the scientific divulgation and the acceptance of depression by the modern society are among the most important ones. The peculiar semantic vicissitudes of the word depression are also reviewed. A widening of the boundaries of depression has contributed to an increase in the number of the cases. Finally, in addition to patients who are depressed without being aware of it, the authors focus the inverse possibility: patients who believed or try to make their doctor believe (playing the part of depression in front of them) that they are depressed.

  7. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 1--major and trace element composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W; Bellomo, S; Brusca, L; Martin, R S; Saiano, F; Parello, F

    2015-01-01

    Active biomonitoring using moss-bags was applied to an active volcanic environment for the first time. Bioaccumulation originating from atmospheric deposition was evaluated by exposing mixtures of washed and air-dried mosses (Sphagnum species) at 24 sites on Mt. Etna volcano (Italy). Concentrations of major and a large suite of trace elements were analysed by inductively coupled mass and optical spectrometry (ICP-MS and ICP-OES) after total acid digestion. Of the 49 elements analysed those which closely reflect summit volcanic emissions were S, Tl, Bi, Se, Cd, As, Cu, B, Na, Fe, Al. Enrichment factors and cluster analysis allowed clear distinction between volcanogenic, geogenic and anthropogenic inputs that affect the local atmospheric deposition. This study demonstrates that active biomonitoring with moss-bags is a suitable and robust technique for implementing inexpensive monitoring in scarcely accessible and harsh volcanic environments, giving time-averaged quantitative results of the local exposure to volcanic emissions. This task is especially important in the study area because the summit area of Mt. Etna is visited by nearly one hundred thousand tourists each year who are exposed to potentially harmful volcanic emissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Volcanic Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  9. Fatty acid facts, Part I. Essential fatty acids as treatment for depression, or food for mood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawels, E K J; Volterrani, D

    2008-10-01

    The epidemic character of depressive disorders has prompted further research into dietary habits that could make an etiological contribution. One clear change in the diet of the population in developed countries has been the replacement of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids by saturated fats and trans-fats as well as by omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential fatty acids, and the members of the -3 and -6 series are crucial for human health. In biochemical processes there is a competition between these two series. A higher dietary intake of omega-6 results in the excessive incorporation of these molecules in the cell membrane with numerous pathological consequences, presumably due to the formation of proinflammatory eicosanoids. Members of the omega-3 family and their derivatives modulate the inflammatory action. Essential fatty acids play a major role in brain development and brain functioning. The omega-3 series members docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) provide fluidity to the cell membrane, facilitating certain processes including neurotransmission and ion channel flow. It is thought that omega-3 deficiency during the fetal and postnatal period may have a long-term effect at various levels. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a positive association between omega-3 deficits and mood disorders. As for treatment, there is convincing evidence that add-on omega-3 fatty acids to standard antidepressant pharmacotherapy results in improved mood. There is no evidence that fatty acid monotherapy has a mood-elevating effect, with a possible exception for childhood depression. There are indications that omega-3 has a prophylactic effect on perinatal depression and has a negative effect on natural killer cell activity and T-lymphocyte function. These observations need further study in view of the popularity of self-medication. Copyright 2008 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  10. THE PRO-INFLAMMATORY PROFILE OF DEPRESSED PATIENTS IS (PARTLY) RELATED TO OBESITY

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Richard C.; Falola, Michael; Li LI; Zajecka, John; Fava, Maurizio; Papakostas, George I

    2015-01-01

    Many people with major depressive disorder (MDD) show evidence of systemic inflammation, including elevations in inflammatory factors, but the cause is unclear. The purpose of this analysis was to determine if obesity might contribute to the pro-inflammatory state in MDD patients. Blood was obtained from 135 MDD patients and 50 controls. Serum was extracted and assayed for interleukin (IL) −1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17, interferon-γ (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)...

  11. Lakshmi Planum: A distinctive highland volcanic province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kari M.; Head, James W.

    Lakshmi Planum, a broad smooth plain located in western Ishtar Terra and containing two large oval depressions (Colette and Sacajawea), has been interpreted as a highland plain of volcanic origin. Lakshmi is situated 3 to 5 km above the mean planetary radius and is surrounded on all sides by bands of mountains interpreted to be of compressional tectonic origin. Four primary characteristics distinguish Lakshmi from other volcanic regions known on the planet, such as Beta Regio: (1) high altitude, (2) plateau-like nature, (3) the presence of very large, low volcanic constructs with distinctive central calderas, and (4) its compressional tectonic surroundings. Building on the previous work of Pronin, the objective is to establish the detailed nature of the volcanic deposits on Lakshmi, interpret eruption styles and conditions, sketch out an eruption history, and determine the relationship between volcanism and the tectonic environment of the region.

  12. Geochronology and Petrogenesis of Intermediate-Basic Volcanic Rocks from Changling Depression in the Songliao Basin%松辽盆地长岭断陷中基性火山岩的时代与其成因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温升福; 刘曼丽; 刘玮; 李瑞磊; 苟军; 武鹏飞; 王天豪; 柳小明; 孙德有

    2013-01-01

    锆石 U Pb 定年结果显示,松辽盆地长岭断陷松南180井中基性火山岩形成于101~116 Ma 的早白垩世晚期,属于营城组,非火石岭组火山岩。岩相学观察主要由安山岩和橄榄玄武岩组成,化学成分显示为玄武岩、粗面玄武岩和玄武质粗面安山岩,属碱性系列,镁质量分数较低,镁值较小(Mg#=0.27~0.53)。稀土元素总量较高(w (∑ REE)=(164.98~257.27)×10-6),轻重稀土分馏明显((La/Yb)N =6.60~10.96),铕异常微弱(δEu=0.85~1.02)。富集大离子亲石元素和轻稀土元素,Rb,K 相对亏损,相容元素(Cr、Co、Ni)质量分数低,高场强元素 Nb、Ta 弱富集,整体表现出与 OIB(洋岛玄武岩)一致的稀土图谱和微量元素特征。岩浆源区为软流圈地幔,经历了深部地幔流体的交代富集作用,岩浆未遭受地壳物质的混染。%Zircon U Pb dating results show that the intermediate-basic volcanic rocks from Changling depression in the Songliao basin formed at Early Cretaceous,rangingd from 101 Ma to 116 Ma,which belong to Yingcheng Formation rather than Huoshiling Formation.Petrologically,the volcanic rocks are composed dominantly of olivine basalt and andesite,but geochemical data show that the volcanic rocks belong to alkaline series and are composed mainly of basalt,trachybasalt and basaltic trachyandesite.The intermediate-basic volcanic rocks have low contents of MgO and small Mg#(0.27 0.53);The chondrite-normalized rare earth element (REE)patterns indicate that the volcanic rocks show significant fractionation of HREE and LREE [(La/Yb)N = 6.60 10.96]and weak Eu anoalies (δEu=0.85 1.02);The trace element geochemistry are characterized by enrichment in large ionic lithophile elements and LREEs,weak positive anomalies in Nb,Ta,depletion in compatible elements (Cr,Co,Ni)and Rb,K.All of the samples display highly consistent REE patterns and

  13. Submarine volcanoes along the Aegean volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Alexandri, Matina; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Rousakis, Grigoris

    2013-06-01

    The Aegean volcanic arc has been investigated along its offshore areas and several submarine volcanic outcrops have been discovered in the last 25 years of research. The basic data including swath bathymetric maps, air-gun profiles, underwater photos and samples analysis have been presented along the four main volcanic groups of the arc. The description concerns: (i) Paphsanias submarine volcano in the Methana group, (ii) three volcanic domes to the east of Antimilos Volcano and hydrothermal activity in southeast Milos in the Milos group, (iii) three volcanic domes east of Christiana and a chain of about twenty volcanic domes and craters in the Kolumbo zone northeast of Santorini in the Santorini group and (iv) several volcanic domes and a volcanic caldera together with very deep slopes of several volcanic islands in the Nisyros group. The tectonic structure of the volcanic centers is described and related to the geometry of the arc and the neotectonic graben structures that usually host them. The NE-SW direction is dominant in the Santorini and Nisyros volcanic groups, located at the eastern part of the arc, where strike-slip is also present, whereas NW-SE direction dominates in Milos and Methana at the western part, where co-existence of E-W disrupting normal faults is observed. The volcanic relief reaches 1100-1200 m in most cases. This is produced from the outcrops of the volcanic centers emerging usually at 400-600 m depth and ending either below sea level or at high altitudes of 600-700 m on the islands. Hydrothermal activity at relatively high temperatures observed in Kolumbo is remarkable whereas low temperature phenomena have been detected in the Santorini caldera around Kameni islands and in the area southeast of Milos. In Methana and Nisyros, hydrothermal activity seems to be limited in the coastal areas without other offshore manifestations.

  14. Impact of river overflowing on trace element contamination of volcanic soils in south Italy: part I. Trace element speciation in relation to soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, P; Zampella, M; Gianfreda, L; Renella, G; Rutigliano, F A; Terribile, F

    2006-11-01

    Volcanic soils affected by different numbers of polluted river flooding events were investigated. Chromium and Cu were the major soil contaminants. Nickel, Fe, Zn and Mn total content never exceeded the Italian mandatory limits. The distribution of Cr and Cu total contents among studied soils indicated that only Cr contamination was related to overflowing events. In polluted soils, sequential chemical extractions revealed a preferential association of Cr and Cu with organic forms. A progressive Cr insolubilization with ageing was observed. Significant amounts of Cr and Cu were extracted by NH(4)-oxalate, suggesting metals association with short-range-order aluminosilicates and organo-mineral complexes. Possible methodological drawbacks in the use of the EU-BCR chemical speciation protocol on volcanic soils are discussed. Micromorphology and SEM/WDS analyses revealed Cr and Cu enriched silt and clay coatings in surface and subsurface soil horizons, suggesting a transfer of metal-rich sediments along the soil pore network with water movement.

  15. Diretrizes da World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP para tratamento biológico de transtornos depressivos unipolares, 2ª parte: tratamento de manutenção do transtorno depressivo maior e tratamento dos transtornos depressivos crônicos e das depressões subliminares World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP Guidelines for biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders, part 2: maintenance treatment of major depressive disorder and treatment of chronic depressive disorders and subthreshold depressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bauer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Estas diretrizes práticas para o tratamento biológico de transtornos depressivos unipolares foram desenvolvidas por uma Força-Tarefa internacional da Federação Mundial de Sociedades de Psiquiatria Biológica (WFSBP. O objetivo ao desenvolver tais diretrizes foi rever sistematicamente todas as evidências existentes referentes ao tratamento de transtornos depressivos unipolares e produzir uma série de recomendações práticas com significado clínico e científico, baseadas nas evidências existentes. Têm como objetivo seu uso por todos os médicos que atendam e tratem pacientes com essas afecções. Os dados usados para o desenvolvimento das diretrizes foram extraídos primariamente de várias diretrizes e painéis nacionais de tratamento para transtornos depressivos, bem como de metanálises e revisões sobre a eficácia dos antidepressivos e outras intervenções de tratamento biológico identificadas por uma busca no banco de dados MEDLINE e Cochrane Library. A literatura identificada foi avaliada quanto à força das evidências sobre sua eficácia e, então, categorizada em quatro níveis de evidências (A a D. Esta primeira parte das diretrizes abrange definição, classificação, epidemiologia e evolução dos transtornos depressivos unipolares, bem como tratamento das fases aguda e de manutenção. As diretrizes se referem primariamente ao tratamento biológico (incluindo antidepressivos, outros medicamentos psicofarmacológicos e hormonais, eletroconvulsoterapia, fototerapia, estratégias terapêuticas complementares e novas de adultos jovens e também, embora em menor grau, de crianças, adolescentes e adultos idosos.These practice guidelines for the biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders were developed by an international Task Force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP. The goal for developing these guidelines was to systematically review all available evidence pertaining to the

  16. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  17. Volcanic characteristics and rule of hydrocarbon accumulation of Shuanglong area in Lishu faulted depression%梨树断陷双龙地区火山发育特征及油气成藏规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴勇信; 刘长利; 朱建伟; 李烨

    2016-01-01

    Cretaceous Huoshiling Formation of the Shuanglong area in Lishu faulted depression of Songliao Basin developed two types of eruptive volcanos,including the central vent eruption and fissure eruption.They dif-fer in terms of the development scale and hydrocarbon accumulation.The central vent eruption has the characteris-tics of violent activity,long duration,extensive distribution scale of volcanic rocks,large thickness and the lithol-ogy progressively shift from the mafic to the neutral.The fissure eruption has the characteristics of weak activity, short duration,less distribution scale of volcanic rocks,thin thickness and the lithology is mainly neutral.The central vent eruption volcano is adjacent to lake basin,forming the environment of volcanic-lacustrine deposit. With the alternate deposition of volcanic rocks,conglomerate and deep and semi-deep lake mudstone,the Hu-oshiling Formation of central vent eruption area has good association pattern of source rocks,reservoirs and caps rock,and forms self-generation and self-bearing combination of source-reservoir-cap.The fissure eruption volcano is far away from the lake basin and the distribution of volcanic rocks has no directly contact with the deep lacustrine facies mudstone,coupled with poor reservoir properties,the Huoshiling Formation of the fissure eruption volcano area has poor conditions of hydrocarbon accumulation.According to the comprehensive analysis of the data of drill-ing,oil testing and earthquake,it could be considered that the central vent eruption volcano in the western studied area is the favorable exploration area of Huoshiling Formation,in which the source rocks are deep and semi-deep lake mudstones,reservoir including pyroclastic rock,conglomerate and volcanic rocks,the reservoir space are mainly fracture and pore.%松辽盆地梨树断陷双龙地区白垩系火石岭组发育中心式和裂隙式两种喷发型火山,其在发育规模、油气成藏等方面存在不同。中心式喷

  18. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    [eng] One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing volcanic crisis. The impact of a natural event, as a volcanic eruption, can s...

  19. Faults and volcanoes: Main volcanic structures in the Acambay Graben, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Suñe-Puchol, I.; Lacan, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) province is best known by the major stratovolcanoes, such as Popocatepetl and Colima, but most of the province is formed by modest size stratovolcanoes and monogenetic cones. Regional fault systems were developed together with the building of the volcanic province; the most notorious one is Chapala-Tula Fault System (CTFS), which runs parallel to the central sector of the MVB, and thus it is also referred to as the Intra-Arc fault system. Acambay graben (AG) is part of this central system. It is a 20 x 70 km depression located 100 km to the NW of Mexico City, at the easternmost end of the E-W trending CTFS, and was formed as the result of NS to NE oriented extension. Seismically active normal faults, such as the Acambay-Tixmadejé fault, with a mB =7 earthquake in 1912, delimit the AG. The graben includes several volcanic structures and associated deposits ranging in age from Miocene to 3 ka. The main structures are two stratovolcanoes, Altamirano (900 m high) and Temascalcingo (800 m high). There are also several Miocene-Pliocene lava domes, and Quaternary small cinder cones and shield volcanoes. Faulting of the Acambay graben affects all these volcanic forms, but depending on their ages, the volcanoes are cut by several faults or by a few. That is the case of Altamirano and Temascalcingo volcanoes, where the former is almost unaffected whereas the latter is highly dissected by faults. Altamirano is younger than Temascalcingo; youngest pyroclastic deposits from Altamirano are dated at 12-3 ka, and those from Temascalcingo at 40-25 ka (radiocarbon ages). The relatively young ages found in volcanic deposits within the Acambay graben raise the volcanic danger level in this area, originally marked as an inactive volcanic zone, but activity could restart at any time. Supported by DGAPA-PAPIIT-UNAM grant IN-104615.

  20. Impact of river overflowing on trace element contamination of volcanic soils in south Italy: Part I. Trace element speciation in relation to soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamo, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, Portici, 80055 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: adamo@unina.it; Zampella, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, Portici, 80055 Naples (Italy); Gianfreda, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, Portici, 80055 Naples (Italy); Renella, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza del Suolo e Nutrizione della Pianta, Universita di Firenze, P.le delle Cascine 28, 50144 Firenze (Italy); Rutigliano, F.A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita di Napoli, Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Terribile, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, Portici, 80055 Naples (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    Volcanic soils affected by different numbers of polluted river flooding events were investigated. Chromium and Cu were the major soil contaminants. Nickel, Fe, Zn and Mn total content never exceeded the Italian mandatory limits. The distribution of Cr and Cu total contents among studied soils indicated that only Cr contamination was related to overflowing events. In polluted soils, sequential chemical extractions revealed a preferential association of Cr and Cu with organic forms. A progressive Cr insolubilization with ageing was observed. Significant amounts of Cr and Cu were extracted by NH{sub 4}-oxalate, suggesting metals association with short-range-order aluminosilicates and organo-mineral complexes. Possible methodological drawbacks in the use of the EU-BCR chemical speciation protocol on volcanic soils are discussed. Micromorphology and SEM/WDS analyses revealed Cr and Cu enriched silt and clay coatings in surface and subsurface soil horizons, suggesting a transfer of metal-rich sediments along the soil pore network with water movement. - River overflowing adds up soil with Cr-rich sediments which, although chemically low reactive, transfer metal along the soil pore network during water movement.

  1. [Integral Care Guide for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder in Adults. Integral Attention of Adults with a Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder: Part III: Treatment of Resistant Depression and Psychotic Depression, Occupational Therapy and Day Hospital Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia Bohórquez; Valencia, Jenny García; Guarín, Maritza Rodríguez; Ángel, Juliana Rodríguez; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; Acosta, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Pedraza, Ricardo Sánchez; Díaz, Sergio Mario Castro; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María

    2012-12-01

    This article presents recommendations based on the evidence gathered to answer a series of clinical questions concerning the depressive episode and the recurrent depressive disorder. Emphasis was given to general treatment issues of resistant depression and psychotic depression, occupational therapy and day hospital treatment so as to grant diagnosed adult patients the health care parameters based on the best and more updated evidence available and achieve minimum quality standards. A practical clinical guide was elaborated according to standards of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection. Recommendation from NICE90 and CANMAT guides were adopted and updated so as to answer the questions posed while de novo questions were developed. Recommendations 23-25 corresponding to the management of depression are presented. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Geochemistry and geodynamics of a Late Cretaceous bimodal volcanic association from the southern part of the Pannonian Basin in Slavonija (Northern Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamic, J.; Belak, M.; Bullen, T.D.; Lanphere, M.A.; McKee, E.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present petrological and geochemical information on a bimodal basaltrhyolite suite associated with A-type granites of Late Cretaceous age from the South Pannonian Basin in Slavonija (Croatia). Basalts and alkali-feldspar rhyolites, associated in some places with ignimbrites, occur in volcanic bodies that are interlayered with pyroclastic and fossiliferous Upper Cretaceus sedimentary rocks. The petrology and geochemistry of the basalts and alkali-feldspar rhyolites are constrained by microprobe analyses, major and trace element analyses including REE, and radiogenic and stable isotope data. Basalts that are mostly transformed into metabasalts (mainly spilites), are alkalic to subalkalic and their geochemical signatures, particularly trace element and REE patterns, are similar to recent back-arc basalts. Alkali-feldspar rhyolites have similar geochemical features to the associated cogenetic A-type granites, as shown by their large variation of Na2O and K2O (total 8-9%), very low MgO and CaO, and very high Zr contents ranging between 710 and 149ppm. Geochemical data indicate an amphibole lherzolite source within a metasomatized upper mantle wedge, with the influence of upper mantle diapir with MORB signatures and continental crust contamination. Sr incorporated in the primary basalt melt had an initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.7039 indicating an upper mantle origin, whereas the 87Sr/86Sr ratio for the alkalifeldspar rhyolites and associated A-type granites is 0.7073 indicating an apparent continental crust origin. However, some other geochemical data favour the idea that they might have mainly originated by fractionation of primary mafic melt coupled with contamination of continental crust. Only one rhyolite sample appears to be the product of melting of continental crust. Geological and geodynamic data indicate that the basalt-rhyolite association was probably related to Alpine subduction processes in the Dinaridic Tethys which can be correlated with

  3. The geological structure and prospects of the prospecting nonanticlinal structures of the eastern part of the near southern zone of the Dnieper-Donetsk Depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimov, R.V.; Ignatova, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    By using seismic investigations, the geological structure of a part of the near southern zone of the Dnieper-Donetsk depression was studied in detail, and structural constructions were made according to specific layers, characterizing conditions of the occurrence of C/sub 1/V/sub 1/ and C/sub 1/t/sub 1/ deposits. The latter form a monocline steeply stressed toward the center of the depression, complicated in the near side by swelling stresses and a number of shallow folded structures, grouped into a single zone, coinciding in plan with the free parts of the protrusions of the foundation and connecting their troughs. The structures of that zone represent broken up elevations, existing, probably, in the lower Prewisean period. In the interstructural depressions, the thickness of the upper part of the deposits C/sub 1/V/sub 1/ increases by 150 to 200 meters. It is surmised that here favorable conditions existed for the formation of nonanticlinal traps of stratigraphic or lithological stratigraphic types. By taking into consideration that the C/sub 1/t/sub 1/ layer is oil and gas bearing on the whole regionally, and in the part under investigation, is productive, the prospects of further prospecting the region are connected with the nonanticlinal traps in the interstructural zones.

  4. Depression and Associated Suicidal Behaviour in Children and Adolescents: Current Views and the Problem State Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Rymsha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been performed the analytical analysis of the world literature dedicated to the epidemiology, etiology, current approaches to the pathogenesis, clinical picture and diagnosis criteria for the depressive disorders in children and adolescents as well as the associated suicidal behavior and the social significance of this disease with its consequences. Key recommendations on the treatment and prophylaxis of depression in children and adolescents according to the last evidence-base European and American guidelines are considered.

  5. Impact of river overflowing on trace element contamination of volcanic soils in south Italy: Part II. Soil biological and biochemical properties in relation to trace element speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ascoli, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)]. E-mail: rosaria.dascoli@unina2.it; Rao, M.A. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)]. E-mail: maria.rao@unina.it; Adamo, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)]. E-mail: adamo@unina.it; Renella, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza del Suolo e Nutrizione della Pianta, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, P.le delle Cascine 28, 50144 Firenze (Italy)]. E-mail: giancarlo.renella@unifi.it; Landi, L. [Dipartimento di Scienza del Suolo e Nutrizione della Pianta, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, P.le delle Cascine 28, 50144 Firenze (Italy)]. E-mail: loretta.landi@unifi.it; Rutigliano, F.A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)]. E-mail: floraa.rutigliano@unina2.it; Terribile, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)]. E-mail: terribil@unina.it; Gianfreda, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)]. E-mail: liliana.gianfreda@unina.it

    2006-11-15

    The effect of heavy metal contamination on biological and biochemical properties of Italian volcanic soils was evaluated in a multidisciplinary study, involving pedoenvironmental, micromorphological, physical, chemical, biological and biochemical analyses. Soils affected by recurring river overflowing, with Cr(III)-contaminated water and sediments, and a non-flooded control soil were analysed for microbial biomass, total and active fungal mycelium, enzyme activities (i.e., FDA hydrolase, dehydrogenase, {beta}-glucosidase, urease, arylsulphatase, acid phosphatase) and bacterial diversity (DGGE characterisation). Biological and biochemical data were related with both total and selected fractions of Cr and Cu (the latter deriving from agricultural chemical products) as well as with total and extractable organic C. The growth and activity of soil microbial community were influenced by soil organic C content rather than Cu or Cr contents. In fact, positive correlations between all studied parameters and organic C content were found. On the contrary, negative correlations were observed only between total fungal mycelium, dehydrogenase, arylsulphatase and acid phosphatase activities and only one Cr fraction (the soluble, exchangeable and carbonate bound). However, total Cr content negatively affected the eubacterial diversity but it did not determine changes in soil activity, probably because of the redundancy of functions within species of soil microbial community. On the other hand, expressing biological and biochemical parameters per unit of total organic C, Cu pollution negatively influenced microbial biomass, fungal mycelium and several enzyme activities, confirming soil organic matter is able to mask the negative effects of Cu on microbial community. - In studied soils organic C content resulted the principal factor influencing growth and activity of microbial community, with Cu and Cr contents having a lower relevance.

  6. Effects of the El Chichon volcanic cloud in the stratosphere on the intensity of light from the sky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, K L

    1983-08-01

    This is the second of two papers dealing with the effects of volcanic debris from the eruption of El Chichon on light from the sunlit sky. The polarization of skylight was considered in the first of the two, whereas this one is devoted to skylight intensity. It is shown here that the magnitude of the skylight intensity is modified very significantly from its clear sky value by the volcanic cloud, as is its change with solar depression angle during twilight and its distribution over the sky during the day. Emphasis is on measurements at a wavelength of 0.07 microm. Generally the volcanic cloud produces a diminution of zenith intensity during twilight with a considerable enhancement of intensity over the sky throughout the main part of the day. The solar aureole is not as sharp as it is in normally clear conditions, but the volcanic cloud causes a very diffuse type of aureole which covers a large portion of the sky. The preferential scattering of the longer wavelengths of sunlight, which is made evident by brilliant red and yellow colors in the sunrise period, causes a pronounced change of longwave/shortwave color ratios during twilight from their values in clear atmospheric conditions. The combination of intensity data shown here with polarization data in the previous paper should give a relatively complete picture of the effects of volcanic debris on solar radiation in the atmosphere and be useful in the verification of radiative transfer models of atmospheric turbidity.

  7. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  8. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  9. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Heemink, A.; Lu, S.; Segers, A.; Weber, K.; Lin, H.X.

    2016-01-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain,

  10. Undiagnosed Bipolar Disorders in Patients with Major Depressive Episode: Iran’s Part of a Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Ahmadi Abhari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bipolar spectrum disorders may often go undiagnosed or unrecognized. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of bipolar disorder symptoms in Iranian patients with a major depressive episode.Methods: 313 patients with a current DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th ed. Text rev. diagnosed with a major depressive episode entered this cross-sectional study. Thirty two items revised Hypomania/ mania Symptoms Checklist (HCL-32 was used to determine the frequency of bipolar episodes.Results: Considerable proportion of patients (53.9% previously diagnosed as major depressive disorder fulfilled the criteria for bipolar disorder by Bipolarity Specifier. The Bipolarity Specifier additionally identified significant association for manic / hypomanic states during antidepressants therapy (p<0.0003 and current mixed mood symptoms (p<0.0001Conclusion: Bipolar symptoms meeting the criteria for bipolar disorders in depressed patients who have not been previously diagnosed with bipolar disorder are frequent. Current DSM criteria may not be sufficient to diagnose more subtle or atypical forms of bipolar disorders.

  11. Sequence stratigraphy and depositional environments of the Sarmatian sediments in the NW part of the Vienna Basin: Moravian Central Depression, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohuslava Sopková

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study is focused on the development of the Sarmatian sedimentary record in the NW Vienna Basin, Moravian Central Depression. To identify key surfaces, the principles of sequence stratigraphy and electrosequence analysis were used together with the well logs and well cores data as well as data obtained from final reports. The identified sequence boundaries (SB and surfaces (ts, mfs divide the Sarmatian sediments into sequences of the relative base level change of the third and fourth order. Except the third order cycle related to Haq's TB 2.6 cycle, which includes the whole Sarmatian stage, two individual cycles of higher order were revealed in the sedimentary record for the Moravian Central Depression. Their occurrence was also proved in Austrian as well as in Slovak part of the Vienna Basin, what points to their interregional character.

  12. ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC FACIES AND APPARATUS OF YINGCHENG FORMATION IN XUJAWEIZI FAULTING DEPRESSION,SONGLIAO BASIN NORTHEAST CHINA%松辽盆地徐家围子断陷营城组 火山岩相和火山机构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    徐家围子断陷营城组火山岩极为发育。文章通过对火山岩的岩芯观察、薄片鉴定、岩芯测试及测井资料、二维、三维地震资料的综合分析,将营城组火山岩盆地分为3大相区,即火山喷发区、过渡区和沉积区。火山喷发区岩性由各种熔岩、火山碎屑岩和少量砂砾岩组成;过渡区岩性以火山碎屑岩与沉积岩互层为特征,夹少量火山熔岩;沉积区岩性包括砂砾岩、砂岩、粉砂岩和泥岩。火山喷发区内可识别出8种类型的火山岩相(空落相、溢流相、基底涌流相、火山碎屑流相、火山泥石流相、火山沉积相、次火山相、隐爆角砾岩相)和3种类型的火山机构(层火山、微型盾火山和渣锥火山)。不同类型的火山机构具有不同火山作用、岩相分布特征和含油气性。因此火山岩相及火山机构分析对火山作用研究和油气勘探均有重要意义。%Yingcheng formation in Xujaweizi faulting depression, Songliao Basin, is rich in volcanic rock. Based on core observation, thin sections identification and integration of well log and 2D/3D seismic data, 3 facies zones are identified in Yingcheng Formation in this basin, which is the eruption zone of volcanic, transitional zone and sedimentary zone. The eruption zone consists of lava, pyroclastic and limited sandy conglomerate. The transitional zone is characterized by interbedding of pyroclastic and sedimentary rocks,and a little volcanic lava rocks was also found in the strata. Sandy conglomerate, sandy stone and siltstone are developed in the sedimentary zone. Moreover, 8 types of volcanic lithofacies such as fallout facies, effusion facies, base surges facies, pyroclastics flow facies, lahar facies, eruption-sedimentary facies, sub-volcanic rock facis and sub-explosive breccia facies, and three kinds of volcanic apparatus such as layered volcano, micro-shield volcano and cone Volcano can be identified in the

  13. Inexpensive Instrument for In Situ Characterization of Particulate Matter in Volcanic Ash Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volcanic research is a significant part of the "Earth Surface & Interior" focus area of the NASA Earth Science program. After a volcanic eruption, the...

  14. Depression (Major Depressive Disorder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally miserable or unhappy without really knowing why. Depression symptoms in children and teens Common signs and ... in normal activities, and avoidance of social interaction. Depression symptoms in older adults Depression is not a ...

  15. Synaptic depression and short-term habituation are located in the sensory part of the mammalian startle pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Pilz Peter KD; Plappert Claudia F; Weber Maruschka; Simons-Weidenmaier Nadine S; Schmid Susanne

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Short-term habituation of the startle response represents an elementary form of learning in mammals. The underlying mechanism is located within the primary startle pathway, presumably at sensory synapses on giant neurons in the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC). Short trains of action potentials in sensory afferent fibers induce depression of synaptic responses in PnC giant neurons, a phenomenon that has been proposed to be the cellular correlate for short-term habitu...

  16. Volcanic Alert System (VAS) developed during the (2011-2013) El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ramon; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Garcia, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas with long repose periods (as El Hierro), recently installed monitoring networks offer no instrumental record of past eruptions nor experience in handling a volcanic crisis. Both conditions, uncertainty and inexperience, contribute to make the communication of hazard more difficult. In fact, in the initial phases of the unrest at El Hierro, the perception of volcanic risk was somewhat distorted, as even relatively low volcanic hazards caused a high political impact. The need of a Volcanic Alert System became then evident. In general, the Volcanic Alert System is comprised of the monitoring network, the software tools for the analysis of the observables, the management of the Volcanic Activity Level, and the assessment of the threat. The Volcanic Alert System presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself. As part of the Volcanic Alert System, we introduce here the Volcanic Activity Level which continuously applies a routine analysis of monitoring data (particularly seismic and deformation data) to detect data trend changes or monitoring network failures. The data trend changes are quantified according to the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). When data changes and/or malfunctions are detected, by an automated watchdog, warnings are automatically issued to the Monitoring Scientific Team. Changes in the data patterns are then translated by the Monitoring Scientific Team into a simple Volcanic Activity Level, that is easy to use and understand by the scientists and technicians in charge for the technical management of the unrest. The main feature of the Volcanic Activity Level is its objectivity, as it does not depend on expert opinions, which are left to the Scientific Committee, and its capabilities for early detection of precursors. As a consequence of the El Hierro

  17. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  18. The Emerging Role of Mindfulness Meditation as Effective Self-Management Strategy, Part 1: Clinical Implications for Depression, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusid, Marina A; Vythilingam, Meena

    2016-09-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have been increasingly utilized in the management of mental health conditions. This first review of a two-part series evaluates the efficacy, mechanism, and safety of mindfulness meditation for mental health conditions frequently seen after return from deployment. Standard databases were searched until August 4, 2015. 52 systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials were included. The Strength of Recommendation (SOR) Taxonomy was used to assess the quality of individual studies and to rate the strength of evidence for each clinical condition. Adjunctive mindfulness-based cognitive therapy is effective for decreasing symptom severity during current depressive episode, and for reducing relapse rate in recovered patients during maintenance phase of depression management (SOR moderate [SOR B]). Adjunctive mindfulness-based stress reduction is effective for improving symptoms, mental health-related quality of life, and mindfulness in veterans with combat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (SOR B). Currently, there is no sufficient data to recommend MBIs for generalized anxiety disorder (SOR B). MBIs are safe, portable, cost-effective, and can be recommended as an adjunct to standard care or self-management strategy for major depressive disorder and PTSD. Future large, well-designed randomized clinical trials in service members and veterans can help plan for the anticipated increase in demand for behavioral health services.

  19. Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

    2013-12-01

    volcano operated by ERI, Tokyo University. In all cases, we could estimated volcanic gas compositions, such as CO2/SO2 ratios, but also found out that it is necessary to improve the techniques to avoid the contamination of the exhaust gases and to approach more concentrated part of the plume. It was also revealed that the aerial measurements have an advantage of the stable background. The error of the volcanic gas composition estimates are largely due to the large fluctuation of the atmospheric H2O and CO2 concentrations near the ground. The stable atmospheric background obtained by the UAV measurements enables accurate estimate of the volcanic gas compositions. One of the most successful measurements was that on May 18, 2011 at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano during repeating Vulcanian eruption stage. The major component composition was obtained as H2O=97, CO2=1.5, SO2=0.2, H2S=0.24, H2=0.006 mol%; the high CO2 contents suggests relatively deep source of the magma degassing and the apparent equilibrium temperature obtained as 400°C indicates that the gas was cooled during ascent to the surface. The volcanic plume measurement with UAV will become an important tool for the volcano monitoring that provides important information to understand eruption processes.

  20. Detrital and volcanic zircon U-Pb ages from southern Mendoza (Argentina): An insight on the source regions in the northern part of the Neuquén Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naipauer, Maximiliano; Tapia, Felipe; Mescua, José; Farías, Marcelo; Pimentel, Marcio M.; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    The infill of the Neuquén Basin recorded the Meso-Cenozoic geological and tectonic evolution of the southern Central Andes being an excellent site to investigate how the pattern of detrital zircon ages varies trough time. In this work we analyze the U-Pb (LA-MC-ICP-MS) zircon ages from sedimentary and volcanic rocks related to synrift and retroarc stages of the northern part of the Neuquén Basin. These data define the crystallization age of the synrift volcanism at 223 ± 2 Ma (Cerro Negro Andesite) and the maximum depositional age of the original synrift sediments at ca. 204 Ma (El Freno Formation). Two different pulses of rifting could be recognized according to the absolute ages, the oldest developed during the Norian and the younger during the Rhaetian-Sinemurian. The source regions of the El Freno Formation show that the Choiyoi magmatic province was the main source rock of sediment supply. An important amount of detrital zircons with Triassic ages was identified and interpreted as a source area related to the synrift magmatism. The maximum depositional age calculated for the Tordillo Formation in the Atuel-La Valenciana depocenter is at ca. 149 Ma; as well as in other places of the Neuquén Basin, the U-Pb ages calculated in the Late Jurassic Tordillo Formation do not agree with the absolute age of the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian boundary (ca. 152 Ma). The main source region of sediment in the Tordillo Formation was the Andean magmatic arc. Basement regions were also present with age peaks at the Carboniferous, Neoproterozoic, and Mesoproterozoic; these regions were probably located to the east in the San Rafael Block. The pattern of zircon ages summarized for the Late Jurassic Tordillo and Lagunillas formations were interpreted as a record of the magmatic activity during the Triassic and Jurassic in the southern Central Andes. A waning of the magmatism is inferred to have happened during the Triassic. The evident lack of ages observed around ca. 200 Ma suggests

  1. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  2. The volcanism of the western part of the Los Frailes Meseta (Bolivia): a representative example of the Andean volcanism since the Upper Oligocene; Le volcanisme de la bordure occidentale de la Meseta de Los Frailes (Bolivie): un jalon representatif du volcanisme andin depuis l`Oligocene superieur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, L. [Nancy-1 Univ., 54 (France); Jimenez, N.

    1996-12-31

    The Los Frailes Meseta (Bolivia) is one of the large tertiary ignimbritic fields of the inner volcanic arc from Central Andes (Central Volcanic Zone. CVZ), in contact zone between the Altiplano to the west and the Eastern Cordillera to the east. Field observations and mineralogical and geochemical studies (major and trace elements) lead to distinguish two types of volcanism in the western border to the Meseta. During the Middle Miocene and Pliocene, the volcanic activity can be subdivided into three pyroclastic emission cycles, the Larco, Coroma and Pliocene ignimbrites, the first two being separated by the Quechua 2 orogeny. All these ignimbrites are very similar and correspond to peraluminous rhyolites to rhyodacites. In the studies area, the Coroma cycle is the only one where an ignimbrite-less evolved resurgent dome association can be observed. Beside these ignimbrites, isolated small lava flows and domes overlay and/or intrude all the other formations. They are meta-aluminous lavas with a shoshonitic affinity. A quaternary age can be attributed to his second volcanism. These two volcanic types are well-known in the CVZ and are related to the different deformation stages, either compressional or extensional, which occur alternately in the Cordillera since 26 Ma. (authors). 61 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Handling Depression | Smokefree 60+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everyone feels blue now and then. It's a part of life. But if your feelings last more than few days and interfere with your normal daily activities, you may be suffering from depression. On this page: Symptoms of depression Who gets depressed and why?

  4. The pre-Cainozoic basement delineation by magnetotelluric methods in the western part of the Liptovská kotlina Depression (Western Carpathians, Slovakia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendek, Marián; Grand, Tomáš; Daniel, Slavomír; Blanárová, Veronika; Kultan, Vincent; Bielik, Miroslav

    2017-08-01

    The geology and hydrogeology of the Liptovská Kotlina Depression were studied by means of new geophysical methods. Controlled source audio-frequency magnetotellurics enabled us to delineate the relief of the pre-Cainozoic basement in the western part of the Liptovská Kotlina Depression into two segments with different lithostratigraphic units. Our complex findings disprove the interconnection between the Bešeňová and Lúčky water bearing structures located in the study area. The results were interpreted in the form of a resistivity cross section and resistivity model. The geological interpretation of the obtained results, taking into account the other geophysical and geological constrains showed that the pre-Cainozoic basement has a tectonically disrupted, broken relief. The Bešeňová and Lúčky structures appear to be isolated by the Palaeogene sediments (sandstone, claystone) and in the deeper part also by marly carbonates and marlstones of the Jurassic age belonging to the Fatricum. It was confirmed that the structural connectivity of geothermal aquifers in the area between the Bešeňová and Lúčky-Kaľameny should not exist. The assumption of different circulation depth was also confirmed by geothermometry and existing radiocarbon analyses applied on groundwater in both areas.

  5. The pre-Cainozoic basement delineation by magnetotelluric methods in the western part of the Liptovská kotlina Depression (Western Carpathians, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fendek Marián

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The geology and hydrogeology of the Liptovská Kotlina Depression were studied by means of new geophysical methods. Controlled source audio-frequency magnetotellurics enabled us to delineate the relief of the pre-Cainozoic basement in the western part of the Liptovská Kotlina Depression into two segments with different lithostratigraphic units. Our complex findings disprove the interconnection between the Bešeňová and Lúčky water bearing structures located in the study area. The results were interpreted in the form of a resistivity cross section and resistivity model. The geological interpretation of the obtained results, taking into account the other geophysical and geological constrains showed that the pre-Cainozoic basement has a tectonically disrupted, broken relief. The Bešeňová and Lúčky structures appear to be isolated by the Palaeogene sediments (sandstone, claystone and in the deeper part also by marly carbonates and marlstones of the Jurassic age belonging to the Fatricum. It was confirmed that the structural connectivity of geothermal aquifers in the area between the Bešeňová and Lúčky–Kaľameny should not exist. The assumption of different circulation depth was also confirmed by geothermometry and existing radiocarbon analyses applied on groundwater in both areas.

  6. Geochemistry and geochronology of late Mesozoic volcanic rocks in the northern part of the Eastern Pontide Orogenic Belt (NE Turkey): Implications for the closure of the Neo-Tethys Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdamar, Şenel

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb age data, Sr-Nd isotopes, whole-rock and mineral compositions of Upper Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the Ordu area of the Eastern Pontide Orogenic Belt (EPOB) in northeastern Turkey. The volcanic rocks exhibit a wide compositional range: basalt, basaltic-andesites, andesites and a rhyodacite suite; they are characterized by subparallel light rare earth element (LREE)-enrichment, relatively flat heavy rare earth element (HREE) patterns with Eu anomalies and moderate fractionation [average (La/Yb)N = 8.55]. The geochemical results show that the volcanic rocks have calc-alkaline affinity consistent with arc volcanic rocks erupted in an active continental margin. Initial 87Sr/86Sr values vary between 0.70569 and 0.70606, while initial 143Nd/144Nd values lie between 0.51244 and 0.51249. Crustal contamination affected the mantle-originated primary magma, as indicated by increased 87Sr/86Sr and decreased 143Nd/144Nd ratios with increasing SiO2. New precise laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS) 206Pb-238U age analyses of zircon and 40Ar/39Ar age data of plagioclase from the volcanics enable a more precise reconstruction of the EBOP. The ages provide insight into the timing of arc formation in this region, constrain the volcanic activity between 86 My (Coniacian) and 75 My (Campanian) and constrain the timing of closure of the Neo-Tethys.

  7. Depositional Characteristics of Lake-Floor Fan of Cretaceous Lower Yaojia Formation in Western Part of Central Depression Region,Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Renchen; Li Guifan; Feng Zhiqiang; Liang Jiangping; Lin Changsong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the integrated subsurface data,including those of over 600 m drilled cores,more than 30 drilled wells and 600 km2 three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection data of the study area, the characteristics of the lake-floor fan of lower Yaojia(姚家) Formation have been clarified.An evident lacustrine slope break and a steep slope belt developed in the west of Songliao(松辽)basin during depositional period of Qingshankou(青山口)-Yaojia formations(K2).The slope gradient was about 15 m/km.During the depositional period of lower Yaojia Formation,the lake shrank and the shore line of the western Songliao basin shifted to the lacustrine slope-break.The wedge-shaped sediment body,which is interpreted as the lowstand system tract of SQy1 (LSTy1),developed in the area below the slope-break.The LSTyl is pinched out in the west of the study area.As to the thickness of LSTyl,ft is thicker in the east with SO m in its thickness than in the west The LSTyl,rich in sandstone,can be divided into lower part LSTylL and upper part LSTy1u based on two onlap seismic reflection phases,and core and logging data clearly.The various sediments' gravity flow deposits developed and the complex of lake-floor fan formed in the LSTyl under the slope-break in the western part of the central depression region.The lake-floor fan consists of various sediments' gravity flow deposits,including: (1) turbidity deposits with characteristics of Bouma sequences; (2) sand-bearing muddy debrite dominated by mud and mixed by sand; (3) mud-bearing sandy debrites characterized by dominated sand and mixed by mud; (4) sandy debris laminar flow deposits with massive or inclined bedding,and (5) sandy slump deposits developed as deforma tional sedimentary structure.During the lower lake-level period (LSTy1L),the western clinoform region was erosion or sediment pass-by area; the terrigenous clastic was directly transported to deep-water area,converted to channelized sandy debris flow,and combined with slump

  8. Characteristics and hydrocarbon accumulation patterns of volcanic rocks in the Yixin Formation Zhangqiang depression,southern Songliao Basin%松辽盆地南部张强凹陷义县组火山岩储层特征及成藏规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌

    2013-01-01

    松辽盆地南部辽河外围探区的义县组广泛发育中-基性火山岩,并在张强凹陷获得了工业油流。依据岩心观察和薄片分析,可将义县组火山岩归纳为14种岩石类型,安山岩类揭示厚度最大、分布范围最广。火山岩主要发育3类岩相7种亚相,喷溢相约占84%。研究区共发育6类主要的原生、次生储集空间类型,4种主要的孔隙组合方式。岩性、岩相和断裂共同控制了储层的平面分带和纵向展布,成岩作用和构造作用决定了储层的储集空间类型、储集性、渗透性和连通性。物性和油藏资料分析表明,火山碎屑熔岩、气孔杏仁状熔岩和火山通道相(火山颈亚相、隐爆角砾岩亚相)、喷溢相上部亚相是最有利的储集岩性、岩相带。在靠近或紧邻生烃洼陷和靠近大断裂的构造高部位,寻找火山口-近火山口相带、以及火山岩喷发旋回的上部和顶部,火山岩油气成藏几率最大。%Mafic-intermediate volcanic rocks are widely developed in the Cretaceous Yixian Formation ( K1y ) in the pe-riphery of Liaohe oilfield in southern Songliao Basin ,and commercial oil flow has been tested in these volcanic rocks in Zhangqiang depression .Based on core observation and slice analysis ,14 different rock types have been recognized in the Yixian Fm vocanic rocks.Among them,andesitic lava and andesitic volcanoclastic rocks have the greatest thickness and most extensive distribution .The volcanic lithofacies can be divided into 3 lithofacies and 7 subfacies , of which effusive lithofacies accounts for about 84%.The volcanic reservoirs have 6 main types of primary and secondary reservoir spaces and 4 kinds of pore associations .The plane and vertical distribution of reservoirs are jointly controlled by lithology ,litho-facies and faults .The reservoir space types ,reservoir capacity ,permeability and connectivity are determined by diagenesis and tectonism

  9. Research and application of fracturing technology in volcanic reservoir in Chagan Depression%查干凹陷火山岩储层压裂技术研究与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴亚红; 李明志; 许超兰; 耿智强; 田西山

    2016-01-01

    With the progress of the exploration and development technologies ,the number of fracturing wells in volcanic reservoirs gradually increases .Since there are large changes in lithological characters ,poor heterogeneity ,and high fracture pressure in volcanic reservoir ,it is difficult to reach a good stimulation effect by conventional fracturing techniques .There-fore,aiming at the geological characteristics and fracturing difficulties of volcanic reservoir in Chagan area ,based on the a-nalysis experiments of reservoir sensitivity and rock mechanics property ,a low residue and damage fracturing fluid was se-lected .And then it was carried out studies on the temporary plugging agent and the entire process assisted liquid nitrogen injection technology .Finally,it was formed a more effective hydraulic fracturing technology system for volcanic reservoir . The field application obtained obvious stimulation effect .Thus,the technology can provide an effective stimulation method for high efficient development of volcanic reservoir .%随着勘探开发技术的不断进步,火山岩储层压裂井次数逐渐增多。但由于火山岩储层具有岩性变化大、非均质性差、破裂压力高等特点,采用常规压裂改造技术往往达不到满意的增产效果。因此,针对查干地区火山岩油藏的储层地质特征和压裂改造难点,结合储层敏感性及岩石力学特征分析实验,优选出低残渣、低伤害的压裂液体系。在压裂工艺技术方面,进行了暂堵剂转向、全程伴注液氮工艺的研究,初步形成了一套较为有效的火山岩油藏储层水力压裂工艺技术体系。现场应用取得了显著的增产效果,对火山岩油藏的高效开发提供了一套有效的储层改造技术。

  10. [Integral Care Guide for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder in Adults. Integral Attention of Adults with a Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder: Part II: General Aspects of Treatment, Management of the Acute Phase, Continuation and Maintenance of Patients with a Depression Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia Bohórquez; Valencia, Jenny García; Guarín, Maritza Rodríguez; Borrero, Álvaro Enrique Arenas; Díaz, Sergio Mario Castro; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Riveros, Patricia Maldonado; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; Brito, Enrique; Acosta, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Pedraza, Ricardo Sánchez; González-Pacheco, Juan; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    This article presents recommendations based on evidence gathered to answer a series of clinical questions concerning the depressive episode and the recurrent depressive disorder, with emphasis on general treatment aspects, treatment in the acute phase and management of the continuation/maintenance, all intended to grant health care parameters based on the best and more updated available evidence for achieving minimum quality standards with adult patients thus diagnosed. A practical clinical guide was elaborated according to standards of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection. Recommendation from NICE90 and CANMAT guides were adopted and updated so as to answer the questions posed while de novo questions were developed. Recommendations 5-22 corresponding to management of depression are presented. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-depressant and anxiolytic potential of Acacia hydaspica R. Parker aerial parts extract: Modulation of brain antioxidant enzyme status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Tayyaba; Razak, Suhail; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Almajwal, Ali

    2017-04-24

    Oxidative stress may link to psychiatric disorders, and is being regarded as a plausible mechanism that can affect the regulation of these illnesses. The present study was undertaken to investigate the antidepressant and anxiolytic potential of A. hydaspica R. parkers. Brain oxidative stress enzyme levels were analyzed to correlate depression and stress with brain antioxidant status. Antidepressant and anxiolytic effect of methanol extract of A. hydaspica and its derived soluble fractions [n-hexane (AHH), ethyl-acetate (AHE), chloroform (AHC), n-butanol (AHB) and remaining aqueous fraction (AHA)] was investigated by using three behavioral models; the Forced swimming test, Tail suspension test and Elevated plus-maze test (EPM). Chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS) was employed to induce stress in rats. AHM and AHE (200 mg/kg, p.o), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg, i.p) and diazepam (DZM) (1 mg/kg, p.o) were administered during the 7 day stress exposure period, and rats were assessed for antidepressant and anxiolytic behavioral despair paradigms. Antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress markers were measured in brain tissue of depressed rats. Phytochemical analysis was done by GCMS experimentation. AHM and AHE (acute dose) significantly (p antioxidant enzyme levels and increase in MDA, H2O2 and NO level were observed in stressed rats. AHM and AHE (for 7 days/CMS) significantly improved behavior in FST, TST and EPMT. Treatment also improved antioxidant enzyme level and controlled the oxidative stress markers in brain tissues. GCMS analysis indicated the presence of 10 different chemical constituents in A. hydaspica. The present study revealed that A. hydaspica exerts an antidepressant and anxiolytic effect by improving brain antioxidant status. The observed activities might be due to the presence of diverse phytochemicals.

  12. Depression - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  13. How academic psychiatry can better prepare students for their future patients. Part I: the failure to recognize depression and risk for suicide in primary care; problem identification, responsibility, and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, C Raymond

    2008-01-01

    The author, after a review of the relevant literature, found that depression and the risk for suicide remain unacceptably underrecognized in primary care (PC). The negative consequences are substantial for patients and their physicians. Suicide prevention in PC begins with the recognition of depression because suicide occurs largely during depression. In this article (Part I), the author suggests causes, responsibilities, and solutions for that failure. He also addresses the role of academic psychiatry's traditional curriculum. The comprehensive, initial diagnostic interview that is typically taught to medical students in psychiatry may decrease recognition in PC care because of the time required to complete it. In Part II, the author offers guidelines to develop a weekly interview course with an instrument targeting abbreviated diagnostic screening for only the most critical psychiatric problems such as depression and the risk for suicide.

  14. [Integral Care Guide for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder in Adults. Integral Attention of Adults with a Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder: Part I: Risk Factors, Screening, Suicide Risk Diagnosis and Assessment in Patients with a Depression Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia Bohórquez; Valencia, Jenny García; Guarín, Maritza Rodríguez; Narváez, Eliana Bravo; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; Acosta, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Pedraza, Ricardo Sánchez; Díaz, Sergio Mario Castro

    2012-12-01

    Depression is an important cause of morbidity and disability in the world; however, it is under-diagnosed at all care levels. The purpose here is to present recommendations based on the evidence gathered to answer a series of clinical questions concerning risk factors, screening, suicide risk diagnosis and evaluation in patients undergoing a depressive episode and recurrent depressive disorder. Emphasis has been made upon the approach used at the primary care level so as to grant adult diagnosed patients the health care guidelines based on the best and more updated evidence available thus achieving minimum quality standards. A practical clinical guide was elaborated according to standards of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection. Recommendation from guides NICE90 and CANMAT were adopted and updated so as to answer the questions posed while de novo questions were developed. Recommendations 1-22 corresponding to screening, suicide risk and depression diagnosis were presented. The corresponding degree of recommendation is included. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Precambrian Lunar Volcanic Protolife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Green

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated.

  16. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make existing lung problems worse. ... deep into the lungs. Breathing in volcanic smog irritates the lungs and mucus membranes. It can affect ...

  17. Postpartum depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - postpartum; Postnatal depression; Postpartum psychological reactions ... behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT) are types of talk therapy that often help postpartum depression. ...

  18. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  19. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  20. Fusion characteristics of volcanic ash relevant to aviation hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Damby, David E.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-04-01

    The fusion dynamics of volcanic ash strongly impacts deposition in hot parts of jet engines. In this study, we investigate the sintering behavior of volcanic ash using natural ash of intermediate composition, erupted in 2012 at Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala. A material science procedure was followed in which we monitored the geometrical evolution of cylindrical-shaped volcanic ash compact upon heating from 50 to 1400°C in a heating microscope. Combined morphological, mineralogical, and rheological analyses helped define the evolution of volcanic ash during fusion and sintering and constrain their sticking potential as well as their ability to flow at characteristic temperatures. For the ash investigated, 1240°C marks the onset of adhesion and flowability. The much higher fusibility of ash compared to that of typical test sands demonstrates for the need of a more extensive fusion characterization of volcanic ash in order to mitigate the risk posed on jet engine operation.

  1. Evidence for volcanism in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, L.; Greeley, Ronald

    Venera 15/16 radar data for an area in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus, show an area with moderate radar return and a smooth textured surface which embays low lying areas of the surrounding mountainous terrain. Although this unit may be an extension of the lava plains of Lakshmi Planum to the southeast, detailed study suggests a separate volcanic center in NW Ishtar Terra. Lakshmi Planum, on the Ishtar Terra highland, exhibits major volcanic and tectonic features. On the Venera radar image radar brightness is influenced by slope and roughness; radar-facing slopes (east-facing) and rough surfaces (approx. 8 cm average relief) are bright, while west-facing slopes and smooth surfaces are dark. A series of semi-circular features, apparently topographic depressions, do not conform in orientation to major structural trends in this region of NW Ishtar Terra. The large depression in NW Ishtar Terra is similar to the calderas of Colette and Sacajawea Paterae, as all three structures are large irregular depressions. NW Ishtar Terra appears to be the site of a volcanic center with a complex caldera structure, possibly more than one eruptive vent, and associated lobed flows at lower elevations. The morphologic similarity between this volcanic center and those of Colette and Sacajawea suggests that centralized eruptions have been the dominant form of volcanism in Ishtar. The location of this volcanic center at the intersection of two major compressional mountain belts and the large size of the calders (with an inferred large/deep magma source) support a crustal thickening/melting rather than a hot-spot origin for these magmas.

  2. Evidence for sub-lacustrine volcanic activity in Lake Bolsena (central Italy) revealed by high resolution seismic data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhorst, Katja; Krastel, Sebastian; Wagner, Bernd; Schuerer, Anke

    2017-06-01

    The Bolsena caldera that formed between 0.6 and 0.2 Ma has a well preserved structural rim, which makes it an ideal site to study the tectonic and volcanic evolution of calderas. However, the main area is covered by a 150 m deep lake which makes it rather difficult to investigate the subsurface structure directly. To overcome this problem new high resolution hydro-acoustic surveys using a multichannel reflection seismic system and a sediment echo-sounder system were conducted in September 2012. As space was limited we used a rowing boat towed by a rubber boat to handle a 36 m long and 24 channel streamer to receive seismic reflections produced using a Mini GI-Gun (0.25 l). The subsurface structure of Lake Bolsena was imaged up to a sediment depth of 190 m, which is estimated to have filled over a period of 333 kyrs. However, massive pyroclastic flow deposits found in the deeper parts of the basin indicate an initial infill of volcanic deposits from two adjacent younger calderas, the Latera (W) and Montefiascone (SE) calderas. Our data suggest that the caldera has a long history of active volcanism, because the lacustrine sediments show post-sedimentary influences of geothermal fluids. We mapped several mound structures at various stratigraphic depths. Two volcanic structures outcrop at the modern lake surface implying recent activity. One of these structures is hardly covered by sediments and has a crater-like feature in its summit. The other structure shows a pockmark-like depression on top. Another observable feature is a partially sediment filled crater located in the western part of the lake which further implies the existence of a magma chamber located beneath the Bolsena caldera. Since the late Pleistocene and Holocene, the sedimentation was mainly hemipelagic evidenced by a sediment drape of up to 10 m thick sediment drape on the uppermost sediments. Beneath the drape we found evidence for a distal tephra layer likely related to an explosive eruption from

  3. A study on characteristics of tectonic block motion and tectonic setting of strong earthquakes in northern part of the Shanxi fault depression zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于慎谔

    2004-01-01

    This paper makes a systematical study on characteristics of structure and motion of the tectonic blocks in northern part of the Shanxi fault depression zone by means of geometrical and kinematical analysis of the blocks. The kinetic behavior of the blocks is discussed by comparing associated geomorphic features of fault movement. All analyses and studies are based on a Domino model. The block movement, fault basin extension and their regional distribution are systematically investigated. The result shows: (a) The studied region is divided into sub-regions by NW striking faults: the western, middle and eastern sub-region with crustal extension being 4.46 km, 2.80 km and 1.86 km, respectively. The extensional amount of each block in the region is estimated being generally about 1 km. The calculated result using the block motion model approximately fits the data of geologic survey. (b) Block kinematical features are obviously different between the northern and southern part, with the Hengshan block in between, of the studied region. Moreover, the magnitude of the largest historical earthquake in the northern part is about 6, while that in the southern is 7. The faulted blocks in the northern sub-region show northwestward extension, indicating a feature of extensional graben, while the blocks in the southern part manifest tilt motion, extending southeastward, in the opposite sense of fault dipping. Additional tectonic stress generated by block rotation may be one of major factors affecting seismogenic process in the region. It is responsible for the difference in the movement of the block boundary faults and seismic activities between the two sub-regions.

  4. The Ventotene Volcanic Ridge: a newly explored complex in the central Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, Marco; Martorelli, Eleonora; Bosman, Alessandro; Conti, Alessia; Bigi, Sabina; Muccini, Filippo; Cocchi, Luca; Ligi, Marco; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Scrocca, Davide; Canese, Simonepietro; Chiocci, Francesco L.; Conte, Aida M.; Doglioni, Carlo; Perinelli, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    New high-resolution geophysical data collected along the eastern margin of the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin, in the Pontine Islands area, reveal a ˜NW-SE elongated morphological high, the Ventotene Volcanic Ridge (VR), located on the northern edge of the Ventotene Basin. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry, combined with magnetic data, multi- and single-channel seismic profiles, and ROV dives, suggest that VR results from aggregation of a series of volcanic edifices. The summit of these volcanoes is flat and occurs at about 170 m water depth. Given their depths, we propose that flat morphologies were probably caused by surf erosion during Quaternary glacial sea level lowstands. Seismic stratigraphy together with magnetic data suggest that the volcanic activity in this area is older than 190-130 ka age and may be coeval with that of Ventotene Island (Middle Pleistocene). The submarine volcanoes, located 25 km north of Ventotene, are part of a ˜E-W regional volcanic alignment and extend the Pontine volcanism landward toward the Gaeta bay. Integration of structural data from multichannel seismic profiles in this sector of the eastern Tyrrhenian margin indicates that several normal and/or transtensional faults, striking WNW-ESE, NNW-SSE, and NE-SW, offset the basement and form alternating structural highs and depressions filled by thick, mostly undeformed, sedimentary units. Arc-related magmatism is widespread in the study area, where the VR is placed at the hangingwall of the west-directed Apennines subduction zone, which is undergoing tensional and transtensional tectonics. Bathymetric and topographic evidence shows that VR lies in between a major NE-SW trending escarpment east of Ponza and a NE-SW trending graben southwest of the Roccamonfina volcano, a NE-SW transfer zone that accommodate the extension along this segmented portion of the margin. This suggests that the interaction between NE-SW and NW-SE trending fault systems acts as a structural control on

  5. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid volcanic center, Eritrea, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Michael A.; Duffield, Wendell A.; Fournier, Robert O.; Giorgis, Leake W.; Janik, Cathy J.; Kahsai, Gabreab; Lowenstern, Jacob; Mariam, Kidane W.; Smith, James G.; Tesfai, Theoderos; ,

    1996-01-01

    Alid volcanic center, a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa, straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250 ??C. The history of volcanism and the high reservoir temperature indicated by the Alid fumarole gases suggest that a geothermal resource of electrical grade lies beneath the mountain. Though drilling is needed to determine subsurface conditions, the process of dome formation and the ongoing crustal spreading can create and maintain fracture permeability in the hydrothermal system that feeds the Alid fumaroles.

  6. PRELIMINARY ESTIMATE OF CO2 STORAGE CAPACITY BY PETROPHYSICAL MODELLING IN UPPER MIOCENE POLJANA SANDSTONES IN THE WESTERN PART OF THE SAVA DEPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Podbojec

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary assessment of the capacity of regional geological storage in the western part of the Sava Depression was based on data obtained from several deep exploration wells. The Poljana Sandstones represent a regional deep sandstone body, in most parts saturated with water, with promising underground facilities for the storage of CO₂ in the study area. Poljana Sandstones (member of Kloštar-Ivanić Formation bounded between E-log markers Rνand Z' have favourable petrophysical properties and are situated at reasonable depths. According to previous investigations, at depths greater than 800 meters supercritical conditions of temperature and pressure CO₂ are achieved, which ensures easy and safe injection into storage underground facilities. For the creation of a model in Petrel software, various data was used, including the distribution of CO₂ density, porosity, effective thickness and the relative depth of sandstone. Spatial distribution of porosity was made regarding neutron porosity logs. The most important parameter in the estimate of storage capacity is effective thickness, defined by the interval between E–log markers Rν and Z’. Hence, the effective thickness was used for top and bottom surface of sandstones. Density of CO₂ was created according to their spatial distribution regarding the depth and the temperature. The capacity of CO2 storage was calculated by the volumetric method. The use of a calculated Petrel model can subsequently determine the amount of CO₂ storage in the underground facilities of the study area.

  7. Tempo, idade e cultura: uma contribuição à psicopatologia da depressão no idoso. Parte III: A depressão, o tempo e a cultura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Lyra Bastos

    Full Text Available Procuramos aqui relacionar dois aspectos fundamentais das intuições culturais sobre a passagem do tempo - a temporalidade cíclica e a contínua - com a terapêutica médica e especialmente com a psicopatologia, numa visão crítica do constructo moderno da depressão no idoso. Inspirado em perspectivas de natureza antropológica, o texto se apoia na experiência clínica cotidiana e na atitude fenomenológica que orienta essa prática. Nas concepções culturais que tendem a perceber a passagem do tempo de forma predominantemente cíclica, o envelhecer é parte de um movimento eterno e a família se perpetua em seus descendentes, nas suas tradições, no vínculo com a terra ou no exercício do ofício familiar. As transformações culturais que têm proporcionado a passagem para enfoques mais direcionais do tempo vão destacando cada vez mais o papel individual na história social. Quanto mais difícil for a passagem de Weltanschauungen tradicionais, de tendência circular, fatalista, repetitiva e eterna para outras de tendência individualizante, burocratizante, planejadora e sucessiva, maiores as dificuldades para uma senectude satisfatória e maior a tendência à medicalização desse fracasso. Esta é a terceira parte de uma série de três artigos.

  8. Durham, North Carolina, Students Study Martian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the wall of a graben a depressed block of land between two parellel faults in Tyrrhena Terra, in Mars' ancient southern highlands, was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0914 UTC (4:14 a.m. EST) on February 6, 2008, near 17.3 degrees south latitude, 95.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 35 meters (115 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point. This image was part of an investigation planned by students in four high schools in Durham, North Carolina. The students are working with the CRISM science team in a project called the Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT), which is part of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program and Arizona State University's Mars Education Program. Starting with a medium-resolution map of the area, taken as part of CRISM's 'multispectral survey' campaign to map Mars in 72 colors at 200 meters (660 feet) per pixel, the students identified a key rock outcrop to test their hypothesis that the irregular depression was formed by Martian volcanism. They provided the coordinates of the target to CRISM's operations team, who took a high-resolution image of the site. The Context Imager (CTX) accompanied CRISM with a 6 meter (20 feet) per pixel, high-resolution image to sharpen the relationship of spectral variations to the underlying surface structures. The Durham students worked with a mentor on the CRISM team to analyze the data, and presented their results at the 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, held in League City, Texas, on March 10-14, 2008. The upper panel of the image shows the location of the CRISM data and the surrounding, larger CTX image, overlain on an image mosaic taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on Mars Odyssey. The mosaic has been color-coded for elevation using data from the Mars Orbiter Laser

  9. Durham, North Carolina, Students Study Martian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the wall of a graben a depressed block of land between two parellel faults in Tyrrhena Terra, in Mars' ancient southern highlands, was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0914 UTC (4:14 a.m. EST) on February 6, 2008, near 17.3 degrees south latitude, 95.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 35 meters (115 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point. This image was part of an investigation planned by students in four high schools in Durham, North Carolina. The students are working with the CRISM science team in a project called the Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT), which is part of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program and Arizona State University's Mars Education Program. Starting with a medium-resolution map of the area, taken as part of CRISM's 'multispectral survey' campaign to map Mars in 72 colors at 200 meters (660 feet) per pixel, the students identified a key rock outcrop to test their hypothesis that the irregular depression was formed by Martian volcanism. They provided the coordinates of the target to CRISM's operations team, who took a high-resolution image of the site. The Context Imager (CTX) accompanied CRISM with a 6 meter (20 feet) per pixel, high-resolution image to sharpen the relationship of spectral variations to the underlying surface structures. The Durham students worked with a mentor on the CRISM team to analyze the data, and presented their results at the 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, held in League City, Texas, on March 10-14, 2008. The upper panel of the image shows the location of the CRISM data and the surrounding, larger CTX image, overlain on an image mosaic taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on Mars Odyssey. The mosaic has been color-coded for elevation using data from the Mars Orbiter Laser

  10. Submarine Volcanic Morphology of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P.; Croff Bell, K.; Carey, S.; Bejelou, K.; Parks, M.; Antoniou, V.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini volcanic group form the central part of the modern Aegean volcanic arc, developed within the Hellenic arc and trench system, because of the ongoing subduction of the African plate beneath the European margin throughout Cenozoic. It comprises three distinct volcanic structures occurring along a NE-SW direction: Christianna form the southwestern part of the group, Santorini occupies the middle part and Koloumbo volcanic rift zone extends towards the northeastern part. The geology of the Santorini volcano has been described by a large number of researchers with petrological as well as geochronological data. The offshore area of the Santorini volcanic field has only recently been investigated with emphasis mainly inside the Santorini caldera and the submarine volcano of Kolumbo. In September 2011, cruise NA-014 on the E/V Nautilus carried out new surveys on the submarine volcanism of the study area, investigating the seafloor morphology with high-definition video imaging. Submarine hydrothermal vents were found on the seafloor of the northern basin of the Santorini caldera with no evidence of high temperature fluid discharges or massive sulphide formations, but only low temperature seeps characterized by meter-high mounds of bacteria-rich sediment. This vent field is located in line with the normal fault system of the Kolumbo rift, and also near the margin of a shallow intrusion that occurs within the sediments of the North Basin. Push cores have been collected and they will provide insights for their geochemical characteristics and their relationship to the active vents of the Kolumbo underwater volcano. Similar vent mounds occur in the South Basin, at shallow depths around the islets of Nea and Palaia Kameni. ROV exploration at the northern slopes of Nea Kameni revealed a fascinating underwater landscape of lava flows, lava spines and fractured lava blocks that have been formed as a result of 1707-1711 and 1925-1928 AD eruptions. A hummocky topography at

  11. Insight of the fusion behavior of volcanic ash: Implications for Volcanic ash Hazards to Aircraft Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Küppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Cimarelli, Corrado; Lavallée, Yan; Sohyun, Park; Gattermann, Ulf; Müller, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of volcanic ash with jet turbines during via ingestion of ash into engines operating at supra-volcanic temperatures is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for jet aircraft. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The fusibility of volcanic ash is believed to impact strongly its deposition in the hotter parts of jet engines. Despite this, explicit investigation of ash sintering using standardized techniques is in its infancy. Volcanic ash may vary widely in its physical state and chemical composition between and even within explosive volcanic eruptions. Thus a comparative study of the fusibility of ash which involves a standard recognized techniques would be highly desirable. In this work, nine samples of fine ash, deposited from co-pyroclastic offrom nine different volcanoes which cover a broad range of chemical composition, were investigated. Eight of them were collected from 2001-2009 eruptions. Because of the currently elevated level of eruptive activity and its potential hazards to aircraft safety and the remaining one sample was collected from a 12,121 ± 114 yr B.P. eruption. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by defining four characteristic temperatures (shrinkage temperature, deformation temperature, hemispherical temperature, and flow temperature) by means of heating microscope instrument and different thermal analysis methods. Here, we find that there are similar sticking ability and flow behavior of

  12. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Thermal-IR Observations of Jupiter and Io with ISAAC at the VLT Summary Impressive thermal-infrared images have been obtained of the giant planet Jupiter during tests of a new detector in the ISAAC instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). . They show in particular the full extent of the northern auroral ring and part of the southern aurora. A volcanic eruption was also imaged on Io , the very active inner Jovian moon. Although these observations are of an experimental nature, they demonstrate a great potential for regular monitoring of the Jovian magnetosphere by ground-based telescopes together with space-based facilities. They also provide the added benefit of direct comparison with the terrestrial magnetosphere. PR Photo 21a/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (L-band: 3.5-4.0 µm) . PR Photo 21b/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 4.07 µm) . PR Photo 21c/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.28 µm) . PR Photo 21d/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.21 µm) . PR Photo 21e/01 : ISAAC image of the Jovian aurorae (false-colour). PR Photo 21f/01 : ISAAC image of volcanic activity on Io . Addendum : The Jovian aurorae and polar haze. Aladdin Meets Jupiter Thermal-infrared images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io have been obtained during a series of system tests with the new Aladdin detector in the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) , in combination with an upgrade of the ESO-developed detector control electronics IRACE. This state-of-the-art instrument is attached to the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The observations were made on November 14, 2000, through various filters that isolate selected wavebands in the thermal-infrared spectral region [1]. They include a broad-band L-filter (wavelength interval 3.5 - 4.0 µm) as well as several narrow-band filters (3.21, 3.28 and 4.07 µm). The filters allow to record the light from different components of the Jovian atmosphere

  13. Exploring Hawaiian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-02-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai`i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO's founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists' understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  14. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  15. Subdiffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is performed on volcanic seismicities at Mt.Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland and Mt. Etna in Sicily, Italy, from the viewpoint of science of complex systems, and the discovery of remarkable similarities between them regarding their exotic spatio-temporal properties is reported. In both of the volcanic seismicities as point processes, the jump probability distributions of earthquakes are found to obey the exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distributions follow the power law. In particular, a careful analysis is made about the finite size effects on the waiting-time distributions, and accordingly, the previously reported results for Mt. Etna [S. Abe and N. Suzuki, EPL 110, 59001 (2015)] are reinterpreted. It is shown that spreads of the volcanic earthquakes are subdiffusive at both of the volcanoes. The aging phenomenon is observed in the "event-time-averaged" mean-squared displacements of the hypocenters. A comment is also made on presence/absence of long term memories in the context of t...

  16. The Whole Is Greater than the Sum of the Parts: The Effects of an Antenatal Orientation Interviews Training for Prospective Parents Postnatal Depression Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Pinar; Barut, Yasar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine an antenatal orientation interviews training for prospective parents' postnatal depression levels. A quasi-experimental study carried out with 26 (12 experimental, 14 control) prospective mother and father. Participants completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale one week before the intervention and 12…

  17. Volcanic Ash Nephelometer Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes may enable unprecedented observations of...

  18. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  19. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  20. System of Volcanic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. HÉDERVARI

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison is made among the systems of B. G.
    Escher (3, of R. W. van Bemmelen (1 and that of the author (4. In this
    connection, on the basis of Esclier's classification, the terms of "constructiv
    e " and "destructive" eruptions are introduced into the author's system and
    at the same time Escher's concept on the possible relation between the depth
    of magma-chamber and the measure of the gas-pressure is discussed briefly.
    Three complementary remarks to the first paper (4 011 the subject of system
    of volcanic activity are added.

  1. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... starts about 1–3 weeks after childbirth. What causes postpartum depression? Postpartum depression probably is caused by a combination ... better. Can antidepressants cause side effects? Antidepressants can ... If your depression worsens soon after starting medication or if you ...

  2. Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  3. Geothermal systems in volcanic arcs: Volcanic characteristics and surface manifestations as indicators of geothermal potential and favorability worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelling, P.; Shevenell, L.; Hinz, N.; Coolbaugh, M.; Melosh, G.; Cumming, W.

    2016-09-01

    This paper brings a global perspective to volcanic arc geothermal assessments by evaluating trends and correlations of volcanic characteristic and surface manifestation data from world power production sites in subduction zone volcanic settings. The focus of the work was to evaluate volcanic centers individually and as a group in these arcs by correlating various geologic characteristics with known potential to host electricity grade geothermal systems at the volcanic centers. A database was developed that describes key geologic factors expected to be indicative of productive geothermal systems in a global training set, which includes all 74 subduction zone volcanic centers world-wide with current or proven power production capability. Importantly, this data set only contains data from subduction zone volcanoes and contains no negative cases, limiting the populations of any statistical groups. Regardless, this is the most robust geothermal benchmark training set for magmatic-heated systems to date that has been made public. The work reported here is part of a larger project that included data collection, evaluation, correlations and weightings, fairway and favorability modeling and mapping, prediction of blind systems, and uncertainty analysis to estimate errors associated with model predictions. This first paper describes volcano characteristics, compositions and eruption ages and trends along with surface manifestation observations and temperatures as they relate to known power producing systems. Our findings show a strong correlation between the presence and size of active flank fumarole areas and installed power production. Additionally, the majority of volcanic characteristics, including long-held anecdotal correlations related to magmatic composition or size, have limited to no correlation with power production potential. Notable exceptions are correlations between greater power yield from geothermal systems associated with older (Pleistocene) caldera systems

  4. Volcan Reventador's Unusual Umbrella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P.; Gioia, G.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the past two decades, field observations of the deposits of volcanoes have been supplemented by systemmatic, and sometimes, opportunistic photographic documentation. Two photographs of the umbrella of the December 3, 2002 eruption of Volcan Reventador, Ecuador, reveal a prominently scalloped umbrella that is unlike any umbrella previously documented on a volcanic column. The material in the umbrella was being swept off a descending pyroclastic flow, and was, therefore, a co-ignimbrite cloud. We propose that the scallops are the result of a turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with no precedents in volcanology. We ascribe the rare loss of buoyancy that drives this instability to the fact that the Reventador column fed on a cool co-ignimbrite cloud. On the basis of the observed wavelength of the scallops, we estimate a value for the eddy viscosity of the umbrella of 4000 ~m2/s. This value is consistent with a previously obtained lower bound (200 ~m2/s, K. Wohletz, priv. comm., 2005). We do not know the fate of the material in the umbrella subsequent to the photos. The analysis suggests that the umbrella was negatively buoyant. Field work on the co-ignimbrite deposits might reveal whether or not the material reimpacted, and if so, where and whether or not this material was involved in the hazardous flows that affected the main oil pipeline across Ecuador.

  5. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  6. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  7. Basaltic ignimbrites in monogenetic volcanism: the example of La Garrotxa volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, J.; Planagumà, L. l.; Geyer, A.; Aguirre-Díaz, G.; Pedrazzi, D.; Bolós, X.

    2017-05-01

    Ignimbrites are pyroclastic density current deposits common in explosive volcanism involving intermediate and silicic magmas and in less abundance in eruptions of basaltic central and shield volcanoes. However, they are not widely described in association with monogenetic volcanism, where typical products include lava flows, scoria and lapilli fall deposits, as well as various kinds of pyroclastic density current deposits and explosion breccias. In La Garrotxa basaltic monogenetic volcanic field, part of the Neogene-Quaternary European rift system located in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, we have identified a particular group of pyroclastic density current deposits that show similar textural characteristics to silicic ignimbrites, indicating an overlap in transport and depositional processes. These deposits can be clearly distinguished from other pyroclastic density current deposits generated during phreatomagmatic phases that typically correspond to thinly laminated units with planar-to-cross-bedded stratification. The monogenetic ignimbrite deposits correspond to a few meters to several tens of meters thick units rich in lithic- and lapilli scoria fragments, with an abundant ash matrix, and internally massive structure, emplaced along valleys and gullies, with run-out distances up to 6 km and individual volumes ranging from 106 to 1.5 × 107 m3. The presence of flattened scoria and columnar jointing in some of these deposits suggests relatively high emplacement temperatures, coinciding with available paleomagnetic data that suggests an emplacement temperature around 450-500 °C. In this work, we describe the main characteristics of these pyroclastic deposits that were generated by a number of phreatomagmatic episodes. Comparison with similar deposits from silicic eruptions and previous examples of ignimbrites associated with basaltic volcanism allows us to classify them as `basaltic ignimbrites'. The recognition in monogenetic volcanism of such

  8. Volcanic passive margins: another way to break up continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, L; Burov, E B; Werner, P

    2015-10-07

    Two major types of passive margins are recognized, i.e. volcanic and non-volcanic, without proposing distinctive mechanisms for their formation. Volcanic passive margins are associated with the extrusion and intrusion of large volumes of magma, predominantly mafic, and represent distinctive features of Larges Igneous Provinces, in which regional fissural volcanism predates localized syn-magmatic break-up of the lithosphere. In contrast with non-volcanic margins, continentward-dipping detachment faults accommodate crustal necking at both conjugate volcanic margins. These faults root on a two-layer deformed ductile crust that appears to be partly of igneous nature. This lower crust is exhumed up to the bottom of the syn-extension extrusives at the outer parts of the margin. Our numerical modelling suggests that strengthening of deep continental crust during early magmatic stages provokes a divergent flow of the ductile lithosphere away from a central continental block, which becomes thinner with time due to the flow-induced mechanical erosion acting at its base. Crustal-scale faults dipping continentward are rooted over this flowing material, thus isolating micro-continents within the future oceanic domain. Pure-shear type deformation affects the bulk lithosphere at VPMs until continental breakup, and the geometry of the margin is closely related to the dynamics of an active and melting mantle.

  9. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-03-02

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  10. Tempo, idade e cultura: uma contribuição à psicopatologia da depressão no idoso. Parte I: Temporalidade e cultura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lyra Bastos

    Full Text Available Procuramos aqui relacionar dois aspectos fundamentais das intuições culturais sobre a passagem do tempo – a temporalidade cíclica e a contínua – com a terapêutica médica e especialmente com a psicopatologia, numa visão crítica do constructo moderno da depressão no idoso. Inspirado em perspectivas de natureza antropológica, o texto se apóia na experiência clínica cotidiana e na atitude fenomenológica que orienta essa prática. Nas concepções culturais que tendem a perceber a passagem do tempo de forma predominantemente cíclica, o envelhecer é parte de um movimento eterno, e a família se perpetua em seus descendentes, nas suas tradições, no vínculo com a terra ou no exercício do ofício familiar. As transformações culturais que têm proporcionado a passagem para enfoques mais direcionais do tempo vão destacando cada vez mais o papel individual na história social. Quando mais difícil for a passagem de Weltanschauungen tradicionais, de tendência circular, fatalista, repetitiva e eterna, para outras de tendência individualizante, burocratizante, planejadora e sucessiva, maiores as dificuldades para uma senectude satisfatória e maior a tendência à medicalização desse fracasso.

  11. Volcanic sulfur dioxide index and volcanic explosivity index inferred from eruptive volume of volcanoes in Jeju Island, Korea: application to volcanic hazard mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bokyun; Yun, Sung-Hyo

    2016-04-01

    Jeju Island located in the southwestern part of Korea Peninsula is a volcanic island composed of lavaflows, pyroclasts, and around 450 monogenetic volcanoes. The volcanic activity of the island commenced with phreatomagmatic eruptions under subaqueous condition ca. 1.8-2.0 Ma and lasted until ca. 1,000 year BP. For evaluating volcanic activity of the most recently erupted volcanoes with reported age, volcanic explosivity index (VEI) and volcanic sulfur dioxide index (VSI) of three volcanoes (Ilchulbong tuff cone, Songaksan tuff ring, and Biyangdo scoria cone) are inferred from their eruptive volumes. The quantity of eruptive materials such as tuff, lavaflow, scoria, and so on, is calculated using a model developed in Auckland Volcanic Field which has similar volcanic setting to the island. The eruptive volumes of them are 11,911,534 m3, 24,987,557 m3, and 9,652,025 m3, which correspond to VEI of 3, 3, and 2, respectively. According to the correlation between VEI and VSI, the average quantity of SO2 emission during an eruption with VEI of 3 is 2-8 × 103 kiloton considering that the island was formed under intraplate tectonic setting. Jeju Island was regarded as an extinct volcano, however, several studies have recently reported some volcanic eruption ages within 10,000 year BP owing to the development in age dating technique. Thus, the island is a dormant volcano potentially implying high probability to erupt again in the future. The volcanoes might have explosive eruptions (vulcanian to plinian) with the possibility that SO2 emitted by the eruption reaches stratosphere causing climate change due to backscattering incoming solar radiation, increase in cloud reflectivity, etc. Consequently, recommencement of volcanic eruption in the island is able to result in serious volcanic hazard and this study provides fundamental and important data for volcanic hazard mitigation of East Asia as well as the island. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: This research was supported by a grant [MPSS

  12. 加权Logistic回归模型在火山岩型铜矿预测中的应用:以宁芜盆地中段为例%Application of the Weighted Logistic Regression Model in Prediction of Volcanic Rock-Hosted Copper Deposits-Taking the Middle Part of Ning-Wu Basin as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵增玉; 陈火根; 潘懋; 贾根; 李向前; 徐士银; 郭刚; 张祥云

    2016-01-01

    Application of the Weighted Logistic Regression model in prediction of volcanic rock type Copper deposits in the Middle part of Ning-Wu Basin is studied. First, the geological setting of ore-forming processes is analyzed. Three kinds of factors including geological body, structure and wall rock alteration are extracted based on the spatial distribution of copper deposits from the geologic map. Then, the spatial relationships between Copper mineral occurrence and each evidence factor are analyzed. It is suggested that Niangniangshan and Gushan volcanic edifice play an important role in spatial distributions of volcanic rock-hosted Copper deposits. The ten evidence raster layers including Longwangshan Formation, Gushan Formation, trachyte porphyry of Gushan volcanic edifice, monzonite porphyry of Niangniangshan volcanic edifice, buffers of the structure lines with NE, NW and EW trending, and the alteration areas of chalcopyrite, silicide and Limonite are selected. Finally, metallogenic probabilities are calculated using the Weighted Logistic Regression model. Four ore-forming prospects, including P1, P2, P3 and P4, are indicated based on the geological conditions of metallogenesis and model results. Among these prospecting areas, P1, P2 and P3, which are controlled by Niangniangshan and Gushan volcanic edifice, are spread in the northeast direction. P4 extends in the west-east direction and is controlled by Longwangshan volcanic edifice. The copper ore bodies are already found in these prospecting areas, suggesting that the results should be generally reliable.%文中探讨了加权Logistic回归模型在宁芜盆地中段火山岩型铜矿预测中的应用.首先,结合研究区的成矿地质背景,提取地质体、构造、围岩蚀变三大类证据因子;其次,分析各证据因子与铜矿点之间的空间关系,认为姑山旋回、娘娘山旋回火山机构控制了本区火山岩型铜矿的空间分布,根据计算结果,选取与火山岩型铜矿密

  13. Radar Imaging of Volcanic Fields and Sand Dune Fields: Implications for VOIR

    OpenAIRE

    Elachi, C.; Blom, R; Daily, M.; Farr, T; Saunders, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A number of volcanic fields and sand dune fields in the western part of North America were studied using aircraft and Seasat synthetic aperture radar images and LANDSAT images. The capability of radars with different characteristics (i.e., frequency, polarization and look angles was assessed to identify and map different volcanic features, lava flows and sand dune types. It was concluded that: (1) volcanic features which have a relatively large topographic expression (i.e., cinder cones, coll...

  14. Geologic Map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    focusing of basaltic flux from the mantle and resultant enhanced interaction of mafic magma with the crust. Collectively, volcanic centers mark the axis of the southernmost Cascade Range. The map area includes the entire Lassen Volcanic Center, parts of three older volcanic centers (Maidu, Dittmar, and Latour), and the products of regional volcanism (fig. 4, sheet 3). Terminology used for subdivision of the Lassen Volcanic Center has been modified from Clynne (1984, 1990).

  15. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  16. Diretrizes da World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP para tratamento biológico de transtornos depressivos unipolares, 1ª parte: tratamento agudo e de continuação do transtorno depressivo maior World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP Guidelines for biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders, part 1: acute and continuation treatment of major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bauer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Estas diretrizes práticas para o tratamento biológico de transtornos depressivos unipolares foram desenvolvidas por uma Força-Tarefa internacional da Federação Mundial de Sociedades de Psiquiatria Biológica (WFSBP. O objetivo ao desenvolver tais diretrizes foi rever sistematicamente todas as evidências existentes referentes ao tratamento de transtornos depressivos unipolares e produzir uma série de recomendações práticas com significado clínico e científico, baseadas nas evidências existentes. Têm como objetivo seu uso por todos os médicos que atendam e tratem pacientes com essas afecções. Os dados usados para o desenvolvimento das diretrizes foram extraídos primariamente de várias diretrizes e painéis nacionais de tratamento para transtornos depressivos, bem como de metanálises e revisões sobre a eficácia dos antidepressivos e outras intervenções de tratamento biológico identificadas por uma busca no banco de dados MEDLINE e Cochrane Library. A literatura identificada foi avaliada quanto à força das evidências sobre sua eficácia e, então, categorizada em quatro níveis de evidências (A a D. Esta primeira parte das diretrizes abrange definição, classificação, epidemiologia e evolução dos transtornos depressivos unipolares, bem como tratamento das fases aguda e de manutenção. As diretrizes se referem primariamente ao tratamento biológico (incluindo antidepressivos, outros medicamentos psicofarmacológicos e hormonais, eletroconvulsoterapia, fototerapia, estratégias terapêuticas complementares e novas de adultos jovens e também, embora em menor grau, de crianças, adolescentes e adultos idosos.These practice guidelines for the biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders were developed by an international Task Force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP. The goal for developing these guidelines was to systematically review all available evidence pertaining to the

  17. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  18. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    The extensive Quaternary volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Mendoza, Argentina, is investigated in this study by major and trace element analyses, Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb-isotopic analyses and Zr-Hf isotope dilution data on samples from almost the entire province. The samples are mainly...... in basalts from all the studied volcanic fields in Payenia is signs of lower crustal contamination indicating assimilation of, in some cases, large amounts of trace element depleted, mafic, plagioclase-bearing rocks. The northern Payenia is dominated by backarc basalts erupted between late Pliocene to late...

  19. Magma genesis of the acidic volcanism in the intra-arc rift zone of the Izu volcanic arc, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, S.; Tokuyama, H.; Ishii, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Izu volcanic arc extends over 550 km from the Izu Peninsula, Japan, to the Nishinoshima Trough or Sofugan tectonic line. It is the northernmost segment of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system, which is located at the eastern side of the Philippine Sea Plate. The recent magmatism of the Izu arc is bimodal and characterized by basalt and rhyolite (e.g. Tamura and Tatsumi 2002). In the southern Izu arc, volcanic front from the Aogashima to the Torishima islands is characterized by submarine calderas and acidic volcanisms. The intra-arc rifting, characterized by back-arc depressions, small volcanic knolls and ridges, is active in this region. Volcanic rocks were obtained in 1995 during a research cruise of the R/V MOANA WAVE (Hawaii University, cruise MW9507). Geochemical variation of volcanic rocks and magma genesis was studied by Hochstaedter et al. (2000, 2001), Machida et al (2008), etc. These studies focused magma and mantle dynamics of basaltic volcanism in the wedge mantle. Acidic volcanic rocks were also dredged during the curies MW9507. However, studies of these acidic volcanics were rare. Herein, we present petrographical and chemical analyses of these acidic rocks, and compare these results with those of other acidic rocks in the Izu arc and lab experiments, and propose a model of magma genesis in a context of acidic volcanism. Dredge sites by the cruise MW9507 are 120, and about 50 sites are in the rift zone. Recovered rocks are dominated by the bimodal assemblage of basalt-basaltic andesite and dacite-rhyolite. The most abundant phase is olivine basalt, less than 50 wt% SiO2. Andesites are minor in volume and compositional gap from 56 to 65 wt% SiO2 exists. The across-arc variation of the HFSE contents and ratios, such as Zr/Y and Nb/Zr of rhyolites exhibit depleted in the volcanic front side and enriched in reararc side. This characteristic is similar to basaltic volcanism pointed out by Hochstaedter et al (2000). The petrographical features of rhyolites

  20. Training health visitors in cognitive behavioural and person-centred approaches for depression in postnatal women as part of a cluster randomised trial and economic evaluation in primary care: the PoNDER trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, C Jane; Ricketts, Tom; Tudor, Keith; Williams, Chris; Curran, Joe; Barkham, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the training preparation for health visitors who took part in the intervention arm of a cluster randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of training for health visitors - the POstNatal Depression Economic evaluation and Randomised (the PoNDER) trial. A secondary aim is to make available, by electronic links, the training manuals developed for and used for the cognitive behavioural approach (CBA) and the person-centred approach (PCA) training for the health visitors. The paper is of relevance to health visitors, general practitioners, nurse practitioners, midwives, clinical psychologists, mental health nurses, community psychiatric nurses, counsellors, and service commissioners. The trial clinical outcomes have been published, indicating the pragmatic effectiveness of the package of training for health visitors to identify depressive symptoms and provide a psychologically informed intervention. The training was associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms at six months postnatally among intervention group women and some evidence of a benefit for the intervention group for some of the secondary outcomes at 18 months follow-up. The two experimental interventions examined in the PoNDER trial built upon promising work on the potential for psychological interventions to help women recover from postnatal depression as an alternative to pharmaceutical interventions and to address the limitations of previous research in the area. The package of health visitor training comprised the development of clinical skills in assessing postnatal women and identifying depressive symptoms, and the delivery of a CBA or a PCA for eligible women. This was the largest trial a health visitor intervention and of postnatal depression ever conducted. We are aware of no other rigorously performed trial that has published details of an extensively tested training programme for the benefit of health-care professionals and clients.

  1. Alteration geochemistry of the volcanic-hosted Dedeninyurdu, Yergen and Fındıklıyar Cu-Fe mineralization, Northern part of Gökçedoǧan Village, Çorum-Kargi Region, Turkey: Implications for the rare earth elements geochemical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sercan; Gumus, Lokman; Abdelnasser, Amr; Yalçin, Cihan; Kumral, Mustafa; Hanilçi, Nurullah

    2016-04-01

    This study deals with the rare earth element (REE) geochemical behavior the alteration zonesassociated with the volcanic-hosted Cu-Femineralization at the northern part of Gökçedoǧan village, Çorum-Kargi region (N Turkey) which are Dedeninyurdu, Yergen and Fındıklıyar mineralization. The study areacomprises Bekirli Formation, Saraycık Formation, Beşpınar Formation, and Ilgaz Formation. Saraycık Formation consists ofUpper Cretaceous KargıOphiolites, pelagic limestone, siltstone, chert and spilitic volcanic rocks. Fe-Cu mineralization occurred in the spiliticvolcanic rocks of Saraycık Formation representing the host rockand is related with the silicification and sericitizationalteration zones. Dedeninyurdu and Yergen mineralization zone directed nearly N75-80oEis following structural a line but Fındıklıyar mineralization zone has nearly NW direction. The ore mineralogy in these zonesinclude pyrite, chalcopyrite, covellite, hematite with malachite, goethite and a limonite as a result of oxidation. The geochemical characteristics of REE of the least altered spiliticbasalt show flat light and heavy REE with slight positive Eu- and Sr-anomalies according to their chondrite-, N-type MORB, and primitive mantle-normalized REE patterns. While the REE geochemical features of the altered rocks collected from the different alteration zones show that there are negative Eu and Sr anomalies as a result of leaching during the alteration processes.There are positive and negative correlations between K2O index with LREE and HREE, respectively. This is due to the additions of K and La during the alteration processes referring to the pervasive sericitization alteration is the responsible for the Cu-Fe mineralization at the study area. Keywords: Cu-Fe mineralization, Spilitic volcanic rocks, alteration, Rare earth elements (REE) geochemistry.

  2. Preliminary geochemical characterization of volcanic and geothermal fluids discharged from the Ecuadorian volcanic arc.

    OpenAIRE

    Inguaggiato, S.; Hidalgo, S.; Beate, B.; Bourquin, J.

    2009-01-01

    In Ecuador, magmatism results from the subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the North Western part of South America (Pennington, 1981; Kellogg and Vega, 1995; Witt et al., 2006). North of 2.5°S, the Ecuadorian Quaternary volcanic arc is characterized by about 60 volcanoes distributed in three different parallel chains. Many of these volcanoes are potentially active or currently in activity and display associated geothermal fields. South of this latitude, no active arc is present in Ecuador. ...

  3. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water

  4. Io. [theories concerning volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. V.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A report on the continuing investigation of Io is presented. Gravitational resonance is discussed as the cause of Io's volcanism, and the volcanic activity is explained in terms of sulfur chemistry. Theories concerning the reasons for the two main types of volcanic eruptions on Io are advanced and correlated with geographical features of the satellite. The sulfur and silicate models of the calderas are presented, citing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Problems of the gravitational resonance theory of Io's heat source are then described. Finally, observations of Io planned for the Galileo mission are summarized.

  5. A possible relict mantle wedge:Geochemical evidence from Paleogene volcanics in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The major and trace element and isotopic composition were analyzed for the Paleogene volcanics in North China dated by the K-Ar method. The geochemical data show that most volcanics are in caic-alkaline series and the minor is in alkaline series. They differ obviously from Neogene and Quaternary volcanics in geochemistry. In particular, the Paleogene volcanics from the southern part of North China were derived from enriched lithospheric mantle (EMⅡ), which were likely to be a relict mantle wedge formed during the subduction of the Yangtze plate into the North China plate in late Triassic (Indo- Sinian).

  6. The Boring Volcanic Field of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: tectonically anomalous forearc volcanism in an urban setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    More than 80 small volcanoes are scattered throughout the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area of northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. These volcanoes constitute the Boring Volcanic Field, which is centered in the Neogene Portland Basin and merges to the east with coeval volcanic centers of the High Cascade volcanic arc. Although the character of volcanic activity is typical of many monogenetic volcanic fields, its tectonic setting is not, being located in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction system well trenchward of the volcanic-arc axis. The history and petrology of this anomalous volcanic field have been elucidated by a comprehensive program of geologic mapping, geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and paleomag-netic studies. Volcanism began at 2.6 Ma with eruption of low-K tholeiite and related lavas in the southern part of the Portland Basin. At 1.6 Ma, following a hiatus of ~0.8 m.y., similar lavas erupted a few kilometers to the north, after which volcanism became widely dispersed, compositionally variable, and more or less continuous, with an average recurrence interval of 15,000 yr. The youngest centers, 50–130 ka, are found in the northern part of the field. Boring centers are generally monogenetic and mafic but a few larger edifices, ranging from basalt to low-SiO2 andesite, were also constructed. Low-K to high-K calc-alkaline compositions similar to those of the nearby volcanic arc dominate the field, but many centers erupted magmas that exhibit little influence of fluids derived from the subducting slab. The timing and compositional characteristics of Boring volcanism suggest a genetic relationship with late Neogene intra-arc rifting.

  7. Age of Tertiary volcanic rocks on the West Greenland continental margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lotte M.; Pedersen, Asger K.; Tegner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Radiometric ages for undated parts of the volcanic succession and intrusions in West Greenland were obtained by the 40Ar–39Ar incremental heating method. Acceptable crystallization ages were obtained for 27 samples. Combined with published results the new data provide a volcanic stratigraphy corr...

  8. A submarine perspective of the Honolulu Volcanics, Oahu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, David A.; Paduan, Jennifer B.; McIntosh, William C.; Cousens, Brian L.; Davis, Alicé S.; Reynolds, Jennifer R.

    2006-03-01

    Lavas and volcaniclastic deposits were observed and collected from 4 submarine cones that are part of the Honolulu Volcanics on Oahu, Hawaii. The locations of these and a few additional, but unsampled, vents demonstrate that nearly all the vents are located on or very close to the shoreline of Oahu, with the most distal vent just 12 km offshore. The clastic samples and outcrops range from coarse breccias to cross-bedded ash deposits and show that explosive volcanism at depths between about 350 and 590 m depth played a part in forming these volcanic cones. The eruptive styles appear to be dominantly effusive to strombolian at greater depths, but apparently include violent phreatomagmatic explosive activity at the shallower sites along the submarine southwest extension of the Koko Rift. The compositions of the recovered samples are broadly similar to the strongly alkalic subaerial Honolulu Volcanics lavas, but the submarine lavas, erupted further from the Koolau caldera, have slightly more radiogenic Sr isotopic ratios, and trace element patterns that are distinct from either the subaerial Honolulu Volcanics or the submarine North Arch lavas. These patterns are characterized by moderate to strong positive Sr and P anomalies, and moderate to strong negative Cs, Rb, U, Th, Zr, and Hf anomalies. Most samples have strong negative K and moderate negative Ti anomalies, as do all subaerial Honolulu Volcanics and North Arch samples, but one group of samples from the Koko Rift lack this chemical signature. The data are consistent with more garnet in the source region for the off-shore samples than for either the on-shore Honolulu Volcanics lavas. New Ar-Ar ages show that eruptions at the submarine vents and Diamond Head occurred between about 0.5 Ma and 0.1 Ma, with the youngest ages from the Koko Rift. These ages are in general agreement with most published ages for the formation and suggest that some much younger ages reported previously from the Koko Rift are probably

  9. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  10. Los volcanes y los hombres

    OpenAIRE

    García, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Desde las entrañas de la tierra, los volcanes han creado la atmósfera, el agua de los océanos, y esculpido los relieves del planeta: son, pues, los zahoríes de la vida. Existen volcanes que los hombres explotan o cultivan, y otros sobre los cuales se han construido observatorios en los que se llevan a cabo avanzadas investigaciones científicas.

  11. Volcanic hazards and aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; Thompson, Theodore B.; Ewert, John W.; ,

    1996-01-01

    An aeronautical chart was developed to determine the relative proximity of volcanoes or ash clouds to the airports and flight corridors that may be affected by volcanic debris. The map aims to inform and increase awareness about the close spatial relationship between volcanoes and aviation operations. It shows the locations of the active volcanoes together with selected aeronautical navigation aids and great-circle routes. The map mitigates the threat that volcanic hazards pose to aircraft and improves aviation safety.

  12. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  13. Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J. Weir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ is developed, to a depth of 25 km, formed from three constant density layers. The upper layer is formed from eruption products. A constant rate of eruption is assumed, which eventually implies a constant rate of extension, and a constant rate of volumetric creation in the middle and bottom layers. Tectonic extension creates volume which can accomodate magmatic intrusions. Spreading models assume this volume is distributed throughout the whole region, perhaps in vertical dykes, whereas rifting models assume the upper crust is thinned and the volume created lies under this upper crust. Bounds on the heat flow from such magmatic intrusions are calculated. Heat flow calculations are performed and some examples are provided which match the present total heat output from the TVZ of about 4200 MW, but these either have extension rates greater than the low values of about 8 ± 4 mm/a being reported from GPS measurements, or else consider extension rates in the TVZ to have varied over time.

  14. Combined intra-articular and varus opening wedge osteotomy for lateral depression and valgus malunion of the proximal part of the tibia. Surgical technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G.M.M.J.; Rademakers, M.V.; Altena, M.; Marti, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reconstructive surgical measures for treatment of posttraumatic deformities of the lateral tibial plateau are seldom reported on in the literature. We report the long-term follow-up results of a consecutive series of reconstructive osteotomies performed to treat depression and valgus mal

  15. Validity of the definite and semidefinite questionnaire version of the Hamilton Depression Scale, the Hamilton subscale and the Melancholia Scale. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Bent; Bech, Per

    2011-01-01

    -reporting versions (definitely and semidefinitely anchored) corresponding to the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Hamilton Subscale (HAM6), and the Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES) were compared to each other and the clinician-rated version. The unidimensional property of the sum score in each scale...

  16. Teen Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression is a real, treatable brain illness, or health problem. Depression can be caused by big transitions in life, stress, or changes in your body’s chemicals that affect your thoughts and moods. Even if you feel ...

  17. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  18. Depression Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3286 After hours (404) 639-2888 Contact Media Depression Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... How Do I Know if I Am Experiencing Depression? The following questions may help you determine if ...

  19. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Diseases + Condition Centers Mental Health Medical Library Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  20. Evidence for young volcanism on Mercury from the third MESSENGER flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockter, Louise M; Ernst, Carolyn M; Denevi, Brett W; Chapman, Clark R; Head, James W; Fassett, Caleb I; Merline, William J; Solomon, Sean C; Watters, Thomas R; Strom, Robert G; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marchi, Simone; Massironi, Matteo

    2010-08-06

    During its first two flybys of Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft acquired images confirming that pervasive volcanism occurred early in the planet's history. MESSENGER's third Mercury flyby revealed a 290-kilometer-diameter peak-ring impact basin, among the youngest basins yet seen, having an inner floor filled with spectrally distinct smooth plains. These plains are sparsely cratered, postdate the formation of the basin, apparently formed from material that once flowed across the surface, and are therefore interpreted to be volcanic in origin. An irregular depression surrounded by a halo of bright deposits northeast of the basin marks a candidate explosive volcanic vent larger than any previously identified on Mercury. Volcanism on the planet thus spanned a considerable duration, perhaps extending well into the second half of solar system history.

  1. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 3: Clinical Trial Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H; Macaluso, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients who develop abnormal movements during treatment with antipsychotics. The first column in the series presented a patient who developed abnormal movements while being treated with aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder (MDD) and reviewed data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias, the clinical presentations of which closely resemble each other. The second column in the series reviewed the unique mechanism of action of aripiprazole and preclinical studies and an early-phase human translational study that suggest a low, if not absent, risk of TD with aripiprazole. This column reviews clinical trial data to assess whether those data support the conclusion that aripiprazole has a low to absent risk of causing TD when used as an augmentation strategy to treat MDD. To date, no randomized, placebo-controlled trials have established a definitive link between exposure to aripiprazole and TD in patients with MDD. One long-term, open-label, safety trial examined aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy in individuals with MDD and found a rare occurrence (4/987, 0.4%, the confidence interval of which overlaps with zero) of an adverse event termed TD. In all 4 cases, the observed movements resolved within weeks of aripiprazole discontinuation, suggesting that they were either amenable to treatment or represented an acute syndrome rather than TD. No cases of TD were reported in the registration trials for the MDD indication for aripiprazole. These data were presented in a pooled analysis of

  2. Zircon U-Pb geochronology of the volcanic rocks from Fanchang-Ningwu volcanic basins in the Lower Yangtze region and its geological implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun; LIU HaiQuan; SONG ChuanZhong; XU XiSheng; AN YaJun; LIU Jia; DAI LiQun

    2009-01-01

    The latest eruptions in two important Mesozoic volcanic basins of Fanchang and Ningwu located in the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River formed the bimodal volcanic rocks of the Kedoushan Formation and ultrapotassic volcanic rocks of the Niangniangshan Formation,respectively.The representative volcanic rocks of the two Formations were selected for LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating.The results indicate that there exist a large amount of magmatic zircons as indicated by high Th/U ratios in these volcanic rocks.The weighted mean age of 21 analyses is 130.7±1.1 Ma for the Kedoushan Formation,and that of 20 analyses is 130.6±1.1 Ma for the Niangniangshan Formation.These U-Pb ages are interpreted to represent the formation times of the volcanic rocks.In combination with other known geochronological data for Mesozoic volcanic rocks from the Lower Yangtze region,it is proposed that the latest volcanic activations in the Jinniu,Luzong,Fanchang and Ningwu volcanic basins probably came to end prior to ca.128 Me.There is no significant time interval between the early and later volcanic activities in the Luzong and Ningwu basins,suggesting e short duration of volcanic activities and thus implying the onset of an extensional tectonic setting at about 130 Ma in the Lower Yangtze region.Integrated studies reveal that the Early Cretaceous magmatic activities and their geochronological framework in the Lower Yangtze region are a response to progressively dynamic deep processes that started with the transformation of tectonic setting from compression to extension,followed by delaminating of the lower part of the thickened lithosphere,lithospheric thinning,asthenosphere upwelling,and crust-mantle interaction.

  3. Tempo, idade e cultura: uma contribuição à psicopatologia da depressão no idoso. Parte III: A depressão, o tempo e a cultura

    OpenAIRE

    Cláudio Lyra Bastos

    2006-01-01

    Procuramos aqui relacionar dois aspectos fundamentais das intuições culturais sobre a passagem do tempo - a temporalidade cíclica e a contínua - com a terapêutica médica e especialmente com a psicopatologia, numa visão crítica do constructo moderno da depressão no idoso. Inspirado em perspectivas de natureza antropológica, o texto se apoia na experiência clínica cotidiana e na atitude fenomenológica que orienta essa prática. Nas concepções culturais que tendem a perceber a passagem do tempo d...

  4. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobisevich, Alexey L.; Masurenkov, Yuri P.; Pouzich, Irina N.; Laverova, Ninel I.

    2013-04-01

    . Hence, the ice that has overlain a volcano must be considered as a part of the environment for volcanism. In the area of Caucasus Mineral Waters (Pyatogorsk volcanic center) an interrelated annular zonality of structural, petro-geochemical, geothermal, and hydrochemical features is found. The probability of peripheral magmatic source existence at 9-15 km depth is shown. The relation between hydro-chemical properties of Caucasus Mineral Waters and structural as well as petrologic and geochemical features of the fluid-magmatic system of the Pyatogorsk volcanic center is determined and thus the Caucasus Mineral Waters region may be identified as a hydrothermal element of the system.

  5. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milgrom Jeannette

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Methods Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26–32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161 also completed questionnaires at 10–12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1. Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2. Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3. Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator

  6. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-04-16

    Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26-32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161) also completed questionnaires at 10-12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1). Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2). Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3). Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator for other risk factors. Risk factor profiles for

  7. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    primitive basalts and trachybasalts but also more evolved samples from the retroarc region and the larger volcanoes Payún Matrú and Payún Liso are presented. The samples cover a broad range of compositions from intraplate lavas similar to ocean island basalts to arc andesites. A common feature found...... Pleistocene times. These basalts mark the end of a period of shallow subduction of the Nazca slab beneath the Payenia province and volcanism in the Nevado volcanic field apparently followed the downwarping slab in a north-northwest direction ending in the Northern Segment. The northern Payenia basalts...... the literature. The Nevado basalts have been modelled by 4-10 % melting of a primitive mantle added 1-5 % upper continental crust. In the southern Payenia province, intraplate basalts dominate. The samples from the Payún Matrú and Río Colorado volcanic fields are apparently unaffected by the subducting slab...

  8. A-type volcanics in Central Eastern Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, M. D.; Moussa, H. E.; Azer, M. K.

    2007-04-01

    Alkaline rhyolitic and minor trachytic volcanics were erupted ˜580-530 Ma ago. They occur with their A-type intrusive equivalents in Sinai, southern Negev and southwestern Jordan. At Taba-Nuweiba district, these volcanics outcrop in three areas, namely, Wadi El-Mahash, Wadi Khileifiya and Gebel El-Homra. Mineralogically, they comprise alkali feldspars, iron-rich biotite and arfvedsonite together with rare ferro-eckermannite. Geochemically, the older rhyolitic volcanics are highly evolved, enriched in HFSE including REE and depleted in Ca, Mg, Sr and Eu. The rhyolitic rocks of Wadi El-Mahash and Gebel El-Homra are enriched in K 2O content (5.3-10.1 wt.%) and depleted in Na 2O content (0.08-2.97 wt.%), while the rhyolites of Wadi Khileifiya have normal contents of alkalis. Their REE patterns are uniform, parallel to subparallel, fractionated [(La/Yb) n = 5.4] and show prominent negative Eu-anomalies. They are classified as alkali rhyolites with minor comendites. The younger volcanics are classified as trachyandesite and quartz trachyte (56.6-62.9 wt.% SiO 2). Both older and younger volcanics represent two separate magmatic suites. The overall mineralogical and chemical characteristics of these volcanics are consistent with within plate tectonic setting. It is suggested that partial melting of crustal rocks yielded the source magma. Lithospheric extension and crustal rupture occurred prior to the eruption of these volcanics. The rather thin continental crust (˜35 km) as well as the continental upheaval and extensive erosion that preceded their emplacement favoured pressure release and increasing mantle contribution. The volatiles of the upper mantle were important agents for heat transfer, and sufficient for the anatexis of the crustal rocks. A petrogenetic hypothesis is proposed for the genesis of the recorded potassic and ultrapotassic rhyolitic rocks through the action of dissolved volatiles and their accumulation in the uppermost part of the magma chamber.

  9. The Sierra de Mil Cumbres, Michoacán, México: Transitional volcanism between the Sierra Madre Occidental and the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Vasconcelos, Martha Gabriela; Garduño-Monroy, Víctor Hugo; Macías, José Luis; Layer, Paul W.; Benowitz, Jeff A.

    2015-08-01

    The Sierra de Mil Cumbres is a Miocene volcanic range located in central México, in the north-eastern part of the State of Michoacán, near the city of Morelia. Structurally it is a ENE-trending horst that covers an area of 1022 km2 (approximately 20 km wide × 60 km long) and contains exposures of chemically-bimodal volcanism in the form of ignimbrites, lava domes, lava flows, cinder cones, and related deposits. The main volcanic manifestations of this range are the La Escalera Caldera (16.3-23 Ma), the Garnica Volcanic Complex (18.3-17.9 Ma), the Atécuaro Caldera (16.3-19.4 Ma), and the Indaparapeo Volcanic Complex (14.1-17.5 Ma). The Sierra de Mil Cumbres stands in space and time at the intersection between the Miocene-Recent Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and the Late Cretaceous-Early Miocene Sierra Madre Occidental, and so provides new insights into the geological evolution of central México. Arc volcanism in the Sierra de Mil Cumbres was initiated by a massive NNW-SSE extension, probably during the counterclockwise rotation of the Sierra Madre Occidental. New geological mapping, stratigraphic analysis, detailed geochemistry and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology demonstrates that this intra-plate volcanism was emplaced between 14 and 23 Ma.

  10. Geology and geochemistry of volcanic centers within the eastern half of the Sonoma volcanic field, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Rytuba, James J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Sonoma volcanic field in the northern California Coast Ranges contain heterogeneous assemblages of a variety of compositionally diverse volcanic rocks. We have used field mapping, new and existing age determinations, and 343 new major and trace element analyses of whole-rock samples from lavas and tuff to define for the first time volcanic source areas for many parts of the Sonoma volcanic field. Geophysical data and models have helped to define the thickness of the volcanic pile and the location of caldera structures. Volcanic rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field show a broad range in eruptive style that is spatially variable and specific to an individual eruptive center. Major, minor, and trace-element geochemical data for intracaldera and outflow tuffs and their distal fall equivalents suggest caldera-related sources for the Pinole and Lawlor Tuffs in southern Napa Valley and for the tuff of Franz Valley in northern Napa Valley. Stratigraphic correlations based on similarity in eruptive sequence and style coupled with geochemical data allow an estimate of 30 km of right-lateral offset across the West Napa-Carneros fault zones since ~5 Ma.

  11. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  12. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  13. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  14. Volcanic influence on centennial to millennial Holocene Greenland temperature change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Takuro; Menviel, Laurie; Jeltsch-Thömmes, Aurich; Vinther, Bo M; Box, Jason E; Muscheler, Raimund; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Pfister, Patrik L; Döring, Michael; Leuenberger, Markus; Wanner, Heinz; Ohmura, Atsumu

    2017-05-03

    Solar variability has been hypothesized to be a major driver of North Atlantic millennial-scale climate variations through the Holocene along with orbitally induced insolation change. However, another important climate driver, volcanic forcing has generally been underestimated prior to the past 2,500 years partly owing to the lack of proper proxy temperature records. Here, we reconstruct seasonally unbiased and physically constrained Greenland Summit temperatures over the Holocene using argon and nitrogen isotopes within trapped air in a Greenland ice core (GISP2). We show that a series of volcanic eruptions through the Holocene played an important role in driving centennial to millennial-scale temperature changes in Greenland. The reconstructed Greenland temperature exhibits significant millennial correlations with K(+) and Na(+) ions in the GISP2 ice core (proxies for atmospheric circulation patterns), and δ(18)O of Oman and Chinese Dongge cave stalagmites (proxies for monsoon activity), indicating that the reconstructed temperature contains hemispheric signals. Climate model simulations forced with the volcanic forcing further suggest that a series of large volcanic eruptions induced hemispheric-wide centennial to millennial-scale variability through ocean/sea-ice feedbacks. Therefore, we conclude that volcanic activity played a critical role in driving centennial to millennial-scale Holocene temperature variability in Greenland and likely beyond.

  15. Geopulsation, Volcanism and Astronomical Periods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xuexiang; Chen Dianyou; Yang Xiaoying; Yang Shuchen

    2000-01-01

    Volcanism is mainly controlled by the intermittent release of energy in the earth. As far as the differential rotation of the earth's inner core is concerned, the Galactic Year may change the gravitational constant G, the solar radiative quantity and the moving speed of the solar system and affect the exchange of angular momentum between core and mantle as well as the energy exchange between crust and mantle. As a result, this leads to eruptions of superplumes and magma, and controls the energy flow from core - mantle boundary (CMB) to crust. When the earth' s speed decreases, it will release a huge amount of energy. They are the reason of the correspondence of the volcanic cycles one by one with the astronomical periods one by one. According to the astronomical periods, volcanic eruptions may possibly be predicted in the future.

  16. Volcanic eruptions and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The historical record of large volcanic eruptions from 1500 to 1980 is subjected to detailed time series analysis. In two weak but probably statistically significant periodicities of about 11 and 80 yr, the frequency of volcanic eruptions increases (decreases) slightly around the times of solar minimum (maximum). Time series analysis of the volcanogenic acidities in a deep ice core from Greenland reveals several very long periods ranging from about 80 to about 350 yr which are similar to the very slow solar cycles previously detected in auroral and C-14 records. Solar flares may cause changes in atmospheric circulation patterns that abruptly alter the earth's spin. The resulting jolt probably triggers small earthquakes which affect volcanism.

  17. Geochemical study for volcanic surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panichi, C.; La Ruffa, G. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, International Institute for Geothermal Research Ghezzano, PI (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    For years, geologists have been striving to reconstruct volcanic eruptions from the analysis of pyroclastic deposits and lava flows on the surface of the earth and in the oceans. This effort has produced valuable information on volcanic petrology and magma generation, separation, mixing, crystallisation, and interaction with water in phreatomagmatic and submarine eruptions. The volcanological process are tied to the dynamics of the earth's crust and lithosphere. The mantle, subducted oceanic crust, and continental crust contain different rock types and are sources of different magmas. Magmas consist primarily of completely or partially molten silicates containing volatile materials either dissolved in the melt or as bubbles of gas. The silicate and volatile portions affect the physical properties of magma and, therefore, the nature of a volcanic eruption.

  18. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  19. 3D-Reconstruction of recent volcanic activity from ROV-video, Charles Darwin Seamounts, Cape Verdes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Hansteen, T. H.; Kutterolf, S.; Freundt, A.; Devey, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    As well as providing well-localized samples, Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) produce huge quantities of visual data whose potential for geological data mining has seldom if ever been fully realized. We present a new workflow to derive essential results of field geology such as quantitative stratigraphy and tectonic surveying from ROV-based photo and video material. We demonstrate the procedure on the Charles Darwin Seamounts, a field of small hot spot volcanoes recently identified at a depth of ca. 3500m southwest of the island of Santo Antao in the Cape Verdes. The Charles Darwin Seamounts feature a wide spectrum of volcanic edifices with forms suggestive of scoria cones, lava domes, tuff rings and maar-type depressions, all of comparable dimensions. These forms, coupled with the highly fragmented volcaniclastic samples recovered by dredging, motivated surveying parts of some edifices down to centimeter scale. ROV-based surveys yielded volcaniclastic samples of key structures linked by extensive coverage of stereoscopic photographs and high-resolution video. Based upon the latter, we present our workflow to derive three-dimensional models of outcrops from a single-camera video sequence, allowing quantitative measurements of fault orientation, bedding structure, grain size distribution and photo mosaicking within a geo-referenced framework. With this information we can identify episodes of repetitive eruptive activity at individual volcanic centers and see changes in eruptive style over time, which, despite their proximity to each other, is highly variable.

  20. Properties of volcanic soils in cold climate conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena

    2017-04-01

    studies on weathering of volcanic ash and developing volcanic soils under cold climatic conditions were carried out, especially in areas with permafrost (Bäumler, 2003). Most of research on volcanic permafrost soils was done in Yukon (Canada), Kamchatka (Russia), and Antarctica, or on seasonal frost in mountain area in Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, and Ecuador. Soils of Iceland and Antarctica are used as terrestrial analogs to Martian soils (Gooding & Keil, 1978; Allen et al., 1981). The review of existing data demonstrates that there is a strong correlation between the thermal conductivity, the water-ice content, and the mineralogy of the weathered part of the volcanic ash, enhanced amount of amorphous clay minerals (allophane, palagonite) increase the proportion of unfrozen water and decrease thermal conductivity (Kuznetsova et al., 2012, 2013; Kuznetsova & Motenko, 2014), and amorphous silica does not alter to halloysite or other clay minerals even in ashes of Early Pleistocene age (Kamchatka) or Miocene and Pliocene deposits (Antarctica) due to cold temperatures. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to the reconstruction of past climates and the influence of volcanic ash on permafrost aggradation and degradation, snow and ice ablation, and the development of glaciers.

  1. Structural significance of the south Tyrrhenian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiosi, G.; Musacchio, G.; Ventura, G.; de Astis, G.

    2003-04-01

    The southern part of the Tyrrhenian Sea represents a transition from ocenic- (the Tyrrhenian Sea) to continental-domain (the Calabrian Arc) and is affected by active calkalkaline to potassic volcanism (the Eolian Islands). Active extensional tectonics, coupled with the general upwelling of northern Sicily and Calabria continental crust, coexists with active subduction of the Ionian Plate beneath the Calabrian Arc. This has been interpreted as the result of the detachment of the slab beneath the Calbrian Arc. Present-day tectonics is characterized by NE-SW normal faults and NNW- SSE dextral oblique-slip faults. The normal faults form the major peri- Tyrrhenian basins. Refraction and high resolution onshore-offshore wide-angle-reflection profiles, as well as potential field modeling, provide a 3D image of the Moho. Short wave-length undulations characterize the Moho beneath the Aeolian Arch. The major upraise is about 6 km, beneath the Aeolian active volcanic area, and affects all the crustal boundaries. Another sharp crustal thinning is observed beneath the gulf of Patti at the south-eastern edge of the Tyrrhenian basin. We suggest that the graben-like structure, occurring along the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano islands and oriented at high angles to the trench, is lithospheric and can be followed down to Moho depths. NNW-SSE dextral oblique-slip faults, like the Tindari Letojanni fault system, control the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano portion of the Aeolian volcanism and connect the oceanic crust of the Marsili Basin to the Malta Escarpment, through the Etna volcano. Across this lineament seismicity changes from mostly shallow to the west, to deep intra- slab to the east.

  2. Morphometric characterization of monogenetic volcanic cones of the Chichinautzin and Michoacán-Guanajuato monogenetic volcanic fields in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazua-Carbajal, Maria Cristina; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2014-05-01

    Morphometric characterization of volcanic edifices is one of the main approaches providing information about a volcano eruptive history, whether it has one or more eruptive vents or if it had any sector collapses. It also provides essential information about the physical processes that modify their shapes during periods of quietness, and quite significantly, about the volcanoes' ages. In the case of monogenetic activity, a volcanic field can be characterized by the size and slope distributions, and other cone's morphometric parameter distributions that may provide valuable information about the temporal evolution of the volcanic field. The increasingly available high-resolution digital elevation models and the continuously developing computer tools have allowed a faster development and more detailed morphometric characterization techniques. We present here a methodology to readily obtain diverse volcanic cone shape parameters from the contour curves such as mean slope, slope distribution, dimensions of the cone and crater, crater location within the cone, orientation of the cone's principal axis, eccentricity, and other morphological features using an analysis algorithm that we developed, programmed in Python and ArcPy. Preliminary results from the implementation of this methodology to the Chichinautzin and Michoacán-Guanajuato monogenetic volcanic fields in Mexico have permitted a preliminary estimation of the age distribution of some of the cones with an acceptable correlation with the available radiometric ages. A large part of the Chichinautzin region DEM was obtained from a LIDAR survey by the Mexican National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI).

  3. Recurrence models of volcanic events: Applications to volcanic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Picard, R.; Valentine, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perry, F.V. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Risk used in this context refers to a combined assessment of the probability and consequences of future volcanic activity. Past studies established bounds on the probability of magmatic disruption of a repository. These bounds were revised as additional data were gathered from site characterization studies. The probability of direct intersection of a potential repository located in an eight km{sup 2} area of Yucca Mountain by ascending basalt magma was bounded by the range of 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1 2}. The consequences of magmatic disruption of a repository were estimated in previous studies to be limited. The exact releases from such an event are dependent on the strike of an intruding basalt dike relative to the repository geometry, the timing of the basaltic event relative to the age of the radioactive waste and the mechanisms of release and dispersal of the waste radionuclides in the accessible environment. The combined low probability of repository disruption and the limited releases associated with this event established the basis for the judgement that the risk of future volcanism was relatively low. It was reasoned that that risk of future volcanism was not likely to result in disqualification of the potential Yucca Mountain site.

  4. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics – Part 1: Surface tension depression and light-absorbing products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. McNeill

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that methylglyoxal forms light-absorbing secondary organic material in aqueous ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosol particles. The light-absorbing products form on the order of minutes, and solution composition continues to change over several days. The results suggest an aldol condensation pathway involving the participation of the ammonium ion. Aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal, with and without inorganic salts, exhibit surface tension depression. Methylglyoxal uptake could potentially change the optical properties, climate effects, and heterogeneous chemistry of the seed aerosol over its lifetime.

  5. Controls on volcanism at intraplate basaltic volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hove, Jackson C.; Van Otterloo, Jozua; Betts, Peter G.; Ailleres, Laurent; Cas, Ray A. F.

    2017-02-01

    A broad range of controlling mechanisms is described for intraplate basaltic volcanic fields (IBVFs) in the literature. These correspond with those relating to shallow tectonic processes and to deep mantle plumes. Accurate measurement of the physical parameters of intraplate volcanism is fundamental to gain an understanding of the controlling factors that influence the scale and location of a specific IBVF. Detailed volume and geochronology data are required for this; however, these are not available for many IBVFs. In this study the primary controls on magma genesis and transportation are established for the Pliocene-Recent Newer Volcanics Province (NVP) of south-eastern Australia as a case-study for one of such IBVF. The NVP is a large and spatio-temporally complex IBVF that has been described as either being related to a deep mantle plume, or upper mantle and crustal processes. We use innovative high resolution aeromagnetic and 3D modelling analysis, constrained by well-log data, to calculate its dimensions, volume and long-term eruptive flux. Our estimates suggest volcanic deposits cover an area of 23,100 ± 530 km2 and have a preserved dense rock equivalent of erupted volcanics of least 680 km3, and may have been as large as 900 km3. The long-term mean eruptive flux of the NVP is estimated between 0.15 and 0.20 km3/ka, which is relatively high compared with other IBVFs. Our comparison with other IBVFs shows eruptive fluxes vary up to two orders of magnitude within individual fields. Most examples where a range of eruptive flux is available for an IBVF show a correlation between eruptive flux and the rate of local tectonic processes, suggesting tectonic control. Limited age dating of the NVP has been used to suggest there were pulses in its eruptive flux, which are not resolvable using current data. These changes in eruptive flux are not directly relatable to the rate of any interpreted tectonic driver such as edge-driven convection. However, the NVP and other

  6. Global Volcanism on Mercury at About 3.8 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, P. K.; Ostrach, L. R.; Denevi, B. W.; Head, J. W., III; Hauck, S. A., II; Murchie, S. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    four study sites, are spatially associated with impact structures; even the NP lie in a regional depression that may be impact-related. Because impacts remove overburden, deposit subsurface heat, and relax pre-existing stress, basins and craters may represent preferential sites for volcanic resurfacing on a globally contracting planet.

  7. Réunion (Indian Ocean) Oceanic Island Volcanism: Seismic Structure and Heterogeneity of the Upper Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirn, A.

    2002-12-01

    Réunion island in the Indian Ocean is commonly considered as the recent and active expression of the hotspot that formed the Deccan traps, although both the hypothesis of recent small hotspots for both Reunion and Mauritius, or of relation with the plate heterogeneity have been proposed. Structural studies by seismic methods, from the scale of the upper cone of the active Fournaise volcano to that of the crust 100 km around, have been carried out. At this scale significant departures appear from the Hawaiian case to which it is traditionally compared, with the seismic signature of active volcanism showing differences too. Refraction-reflection seismics do not see a geometry of the top of the underlying plate towards the island, expected in plate flexure modelling by analogy with other hotspot island. Where it is sampled, doming is suggested instead. There appears to be less magmatic products than if there was a large amount buried in a flexural depression. The velocity structure resolved for the volcanic island, apart from high velocity cores under the volcanoes leads to smaller overall density than usually considered in flexure modelling. The same appears to hold for the material of the cone of about 120 km radius rising above the regional sea-bottom level to the 30 km radius island, from coincident reflection and refraction seismics on several lines radial to the southeastern half of the island. At the crust-mantle level, there is evidence from reflection-refraction line extending 150 km either side of the island for a layer of velocity intermediate between normal crust and mantle values. Two radial reflection line to the SSW, close to each other detect a differences in depth of the oceanic basement. This may coincide with a fracture zone suggested from the reconstruction of the sea-floor spreading history from the magnetic anomaly pattern. The latter has been interpreted previously to indicate that the western part of Réunion developed atop a Paleogene fossil

  8. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 4: Case Report Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Matthew; Flynn, Alexandra; Preskorn, Sheldon

    2016-05-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients who develop abnormal movements during treatment with antipsychotics. The first column in the series presented a patient who developed abnormal movements while being treated with aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder and reviewed data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias, the clinical presentations of which closely resemble each other. The second column in the series reviewed the unique mechanism of action of aripiprazole and reviewed preclinical studies and an early-phase human translational study that suggest a low, if not absent, risk of TD with aripiprazole. The third column in this series reviewed the registration trial data for aripiprazole across all of its indications and found a raw incidence of TD ranging from 0.004 (4 out of 987) in long-term studies of the drug as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder to 0.0016 (19 out of 11,897) based on all short-term (ie, weeks to causal relationship between aripiprazole and TD exists.

  9. A quantitative model for volcanic hazard assessment

    OpenAIRE

    W. Marzocchi; Sandri, L.; Furlan, C

    2006-01-01

    Volcanic hazard assessment is a basic ingredient for risk-based decision-making in land-use planning and emergency management. Volcanic hazard is defined as the probability of any particular area being affected by a destructive volcanic event within a given period of time (Fournier d’Albe 1979). The probabilistic nature of such an important issue derives from the fact that volcanic activity is a complex process, characterized by several and usually unknown degrees o...

  10. Mantle updrafts and mechanisms of oceanic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Don L.; Natland, James H.

    2014-10-01

    Convection in an isolated planet is characterized by narrow downwellings and broad updrafts-consequences of Archimedes' principle, the cooling required by the second law of thermodynamics, and the effect of compression on material properties. A mature cooling planet with a conductive low-viscosity core develops a thick insulating surface boundary layer with a thermal maximum, a subadiabatic interior, and a cooling highly conductive but thin boundary layer above the core. Parts of the surface layer sink into the interior, displacing older, colder material, which is entrained by spreading ridges. Magma characteristics of intraplate volcanoes are derived from within the upper boundary layer. Upper mantle features revealed by seismic tomography and that are apparently related to surface volcanoes are intrinsically broad and are not due to unresolved narrow jets. Their morphology, aspect ratio, inferred ascent rate, and temperature show that they are passively responding to downward fluxes, as appropriate for a cooling planet that is losing more heat through its surface than is being provided from its core or from radioactive heating. Response to doward flux is the inverse of the heat-pipe/mantle-plume mode of planetary cooling. Shear-driven melt extraction from the surface boundary layer explains volcanic provinces such as Yellowstone, Hawaii, and Samoa. Passive upwellings from deeper in the upper mantle feed ridges and near-ridge hotspots, and others interact with the sheared and metasomatized surface layer. Normal plate tectonic processes are responsible both for plate boundary and intraplate swells and volcanism.

  11. Volcanic forcing in decadal forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménégoz, Martin; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; Guemas, Virginie; Asif, Muhammad; Prodhomme, chloe

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can significantly impact the climate system, by injecting large amounts of particles into the stratosphere. By reflecting backward the solar radiation, these particles cool the troposphere, and by absorbing the longwave radiation, they warm the stratosphere. As a consequence of this radiative forcing, the global mean surface temperature can decrease by several tenths of degrees. However, large eruptions are also associated to a complex dynamical response of the climate system that is particularly tricky do understand regarding the low number of available observations. Observations seem to show an increase of the positive phases of the Northern Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) the two winters following large eruptions, associated to positive temperature anomalies over the Eurasian continent. The summers following large eruptions are generally particularly cold, especially over the continents of the Northern Hemisphere. Overall, it is really challenging to forecast the climate response to large eruptions, as it is both modulated by, and superimposed to the climate background conditions, largely driven themselves by internal variability at seasonal to decadal scales. This work describes the additional skill of a forecast system used for seasonal and decadal predictions when it includes observed volcanic forcing over the last decades. An idealized volcanic forcing that could be used for real-time forecasts is also evaluated. This work consists in a base for forecasts that will be performed in the context of the next large volcanic eruption.

  12. Exceptional Volumes of Rejuvenated Volcanism in Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konter, J. G.; Jackson, M.; Storm, L.

    2010-12-01

    Samoan shield volcanism, as revealed on the islands of Upolu and Tutuila. On Savai’i, a previously collected trachyte cobble, combined with several evolved plagioclase-phyric lavas collected as cobbles for this study, suggest that this transitional stage is exposed in the deepest parts of the canyon. Interestingly, a number of these evolved samples define an intermediate trend in Pb isotopes between the rejuvenated lavas and Fagaloa shield lavas on Upolu. This suggests the source composition shifted at the end of shield volcanism when more evolved rocks were erupted. The age of the trachyte cobble suggests this shift occurred around 2 Ma, implying the shield stage lasted 3 Ma, given the age (5 Ma) of recently dredged Savai’i samples. Therefore, the shield stage may have lasted longer than typical Hawaiian shields, the post-shield stage did not erupt all expected rock types, and the rejuvenated lavas erupted an unusually large volume.

  13. Communicating Uncertainty in Volcanic Ash Forecasts: Decision-Making and Information Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Kelsey; Black, Alison; Charlton-Perez, Andrew; McCloy, Rachel; Lickiss, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The Robust Assessment and Communication of Environmental Risk (RACER) consortium, an interdisciplinary research team focusing on communication of uncertainty with respect to natural hazards, hosted a Volcanic Ash Workshop to discuss issues related to volcanic ash forecasting, especially forecast uncertainty. Part of the workshop was a decision game in which participants including forecasters, academics, and members of the Aviation Industry were given hypothetical volcanic ash concentration forecasts and asked whether they would approve a given flight path. The uncertainty information was presented in different formats including hazard maps, line graphs, and percent probabilities. Results from the decision game will be presented with a focus on information preferences, understanding of the forecasts, and whether different formats of the same volcanic ash forecast resulted in different flight decisions. Implications of this research will help the design and presentation of volcanic ash plume decision tools and can also help advise design of other natural hazard information.

  14. Experimental generation of volcanic lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes that are responsible for injecting large quantities of aerosols into the atmosphere are often associated with intense electrical activity. Direct measurement of the electric potential at the crater, where the electric activity in the volcanic plume is first observed, is severely impeded, limiting progress in its investigation. We have achieved volcanic lightning in the laboratory during rapid decompression experiments of gas-particle mixtures under controlled conditions. Upon decompression (from ~100 bar argon pressure to atmospheric pressure), loose particles are vertically accelerated and ejected through a nozzle of 2.8 cm diameter into a large tank filled with air at atmospheric conditions. Because of their impulsive character, our experiments most closely represent the conditions encountered in the gas-thrust region of the plume, when ash is first ejected from the crater. We used sieved natural ash with different grain sizes from Popocatépetl (Mexico), Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland), and Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) volcanoes, as well as micrometric glass beads to constrain the influence of material properties on lightning. We monitored the dynamics of the particle-laden jets with a high-speed camera and the pressure and electric potential at the nozzle using a pressure transducer and two copper ring antennas connected to a high-impedance data acquisition system, respectively. We find that lightning is controlled by the dynamics of the particle-laden jet and by the abundance of fine particles. Two main conditions are required to generate lightning: 1) self-electrification of the particles and 2) clustering of the particles driven by the jet fluid dynamics. The relative movement of clusters of charged particles within the plume generates the gradient in electrical potential, which is necessary for lightning. In this manner it is the gas-particle dynamics together with the evolving particle-density distribution within different regions of

  15. Geology and geochemistry characteristics of the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (Central Area), Chiapas Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, J. C.; Jaimes-Viera, M. C.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Layer, P. W.; Pompa-Mera, V.; Godinez, M. L.

    2007-04-01

    The Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (CVA), located in the central portion of the State of Chiapas, is a 150 km stretch of volcanoes irregularly aligned in the northwest direction between two great volcanic features: the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the northwest and the Central American Volcanic Arc to the southeast. The CVA is located in a complex zone marking the interaction of the North American, Caribbean and Cocos plates, near the Motagua-Polochic fault system, the boundary between North American and Caribbean plates. The central part of the CVA is composed of an irregular northwest alignment of at least 10 volcanic structures generally lying along NNW-SSE-trending faults splayed from the Motagua-Polochic system. Among the structures there are seven volcanic domes (Huitepec, Amahuitz, La Iglesia, Mispía, La Lanza, Venustiano Carranza and Santotón), one explosion crater (Navenchauc), one collapse structure (Apas), and one dome complex (Tzontehuitz). In the majority of the structures there is a clear resurgence with the formation of several domes in the same structure, with the destruction of previous domes (Navenchauc) or with the formation of new explosion craters or collapse structures (Apas). The volcanic activity in the CVA was mainly effusive accompanied by explosive and phreatomagmatic events and is characterized by volcanic domes accompanied by block-and-ash-flows, ash flows with accretionary lapilli, falls, and pumice flows. The volcanic structures and deposits are calcalkaline in composition with a medium to high content of potassium. CVA volcanic rocks vary from andesite to dacite with SiO 2 between 57 and 66 wt.%, show low concentrations of Ti, P, Nb and Ta, are enriched in Light Rare Earths, depleted in Heavy Rare Earths, and show a small Eu anomaly; all indicative of arc-related volcanism associated with subduction of the Cocos plate under the North American plate, but complicated by the geometry of the plate boundary fault system.

  16. Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Russia: preventing the danger of volcanic eruptions to aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girina, O.; Neal, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) has been a collaborative project of scientists from the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Surveys, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (IVS, KB GS and AVO). The purpose of KVERT is to reduce the risk of costly, damaging, and possibly deadly encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds. To reduce this risk, KVERT collects all possible volcanic information and issues eruption alerts to aviation and other emergency officials. KVERT was founded by Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry FED RAS in 1993 (in 2004, IVGG merged with the Institute of Volcanology to become IVS). KVERT analyzes volcano monitoring data (seismic, satellite, visual and video, and pilot reports), assigns the Aviation Color Code, and issues reports on eruptive activity and unrest at Kamchatkan (since 1993) and Northern Kurile (since 2003) volcanoes. KVERT receives seismic monitoring data from KB GS (the Laboratory for Seismic and Volcanic Activity). KB GS maintains telemetered seismic stations to investigate 11 of the most active volcanoes in Kamchatka. Data are received around the clock and analysts evaluate data each day for every monitored volcano. Satellite data are provided from several sources to KVERT. AVO conducts satellite analysis of the Kuriles, Kamchatka, and Alaska as part of it daily monitoring and sends the interpretation to KVERT staff. KVERT interprets MODIS and MTSAT images and processes AVHRR data to look for evidence of volcanic ash and thermal anomalies. KVERT obtains visual volcanic information from volcanologist's field trips, web-cameras that monitor Klyuchevskoy (established in 2000), Sheveluch (2002), Bezymianny (2003), Koryaksky (2009), Avachinsky (2009), Kizimen (2011), and Gorely (2011) volcanoes, and pilots. KVERT staff work closely with staff of AVO, AMC (Airport Meteorological Center) at Yelizovo Airport and the Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), the

  17. A Volcanic Hydrogen Habitable Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    The classical habitable zone (HZ) is the circular region around a star in which liquid water could exist on the surface of a rocky planet. The outer edge of the traditional N2–CO2–H2O HZ extends out to nearly ∼1.7 au in our solar system, beyond which condensation and scattering by CO2 outstrips its greenhouse capacity. Here, we show that volcanic outgassing of atmospheric H2 can extend the outer edge of the HZ to ∼2.4 au in our solar system. This wider volcanic-hydrogen HZ (N2–CO2–H2O–H2) can be sustained as long as volcanic H2 output offsets its escape from the top of the atmosphere. We use a single-column radiative-convective climate model to compute the HZ limits of this volcanic hydrogen HZ for hydrogen concentrations between 1% and 50%, assuming diffusion-limited atmospheric escape. At a hydrogen concentration of 50%, the effective stellar flux required to support the outer edge decreases by ∼35%–60% for M–A stars. The corresponding orbital distances increase by ∼30%–60%. The inner edge of this HZ only moves out ∼0.1%–4% relative to the classical HZ because H2 warming is reduced in dense H2O atmospheres. The atmospheric scale heights of such volcanic H2 atmospheres near the outer edge of the HZ also increase, facilitating remote detection of atmospheric signatures.

  18. A novel relationship for schizophrenia, bipolar and major depressive disorder Part 7: A hint from chromosome 7 high density association screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Long, Feng; Cai, Bin; Chen, Xiaohong; Chen, Gang

    2015-10-15

    Convergent evidence from genetics, symptology and psychopharmacology imply that there are intrinsic connection between schizophrenia (SCZ), bipolar disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Also, any two or even three of these disorders could co-existe in some families. A total of 47,144 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) on chromosome 7 were genotyped by Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0 on 119 SCZ, 253 BPD (type-I), 177 MDD, and 1000 controls. Associated SNP loci were comprehensively revealed and outstanding susceptibility genes were identified including CNTNAP2. a neurexin family gene. Unexpectedly, flanking genes for up to 94.74 % of of the associated SNPs were replicated (P≤9.9 E-8) in an enlarged cohort of 986 SCZ patients. Considering other convergent evidence, our results further implicate that BPD and MDD are subtypes of SCZ.

  19. The Extremes of Volcanic Activity: Earth and Jupiter's Moon Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, L. L.; Lopes, R.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the solar system's most volcanically active body, and the only place that magmatic volcanic eruptions have been observed beyond Earth. One of the first images of Io obtained by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979 shows a plume above one of its volcanoes. The NASA Voyager and Galileo spacecraft imaged many explosive eruptions of plumes and deposits - which travel hundreds of kilometers (farther than on the Earth or the Moon). Very hot lavas that are erupting from volcanic vents on Io may be similar to lavas that erupted on Earth billions of years ago. Understanding the physical processes driving volcanic eruptions is important for the understanding of terrestrial volcanoes, not only because of their potential hazards, but also as geologic resources, biologic environments, and for their role in shaping the surface of Earth and other planets. Volcanic eruptions are perhaps the most dramatic events on Earth, and are of intrinsic interest to students, youth, and adults. Topics involving volcanoes are a part of the national science education benchmarks for understanding the Earth's composition and structure for grades 6-8 (the process of creating landforms) and grades 9-12 (the effects of movement of crustal plates). Natural events on Earth coupled with exciting discoveries in space can serve to heighten the awareness of these phenomena and provide learning opportunities for real world applications of science. Educational applications for youth to compare volcanic activity on Io and Earth have been done through NASA-sponsored field trip workshops to places such as Yellowstone National Park (allowing educators to experience environments similar to those on other worlds), targeted classroom and hands-on activities, special interest books, and other resources. A sampling of such activities will be presented, and discussion invited on other related developmentally appropriate resources and activities.

  20. Volcanic hazards at Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond; Mullineaux, Donal Ray

    1967-01-01

    Mount Rainier is a large stratovolcano of andesitic rock in the Cascade Range of western Washington. Although the volcano as it now stands was almost completely formed before the last major glaciation, geologic formations record a variety of events that have occurred at the volcano in postglacial time. Repetition of some of these events today without warning would result in property damage and loss of life on a catastrophic scale. It is appropriate, therefore, to examine the extent, frequency, and apparent origin of these phenomena and to attempt to predict the effects on man of similar events in the future. The present report was prompted by a contrast that we noted during a study of surficial geologic deposits in Mount Rainier National Park, between the present tranquil landscape adjacent to the volcano and the violent events that shaped parts of that same landscape in the recent past. Natural catastrophes that have geologic causes - such as eruptions, landslides, earthquakes, and floods - all too often are disastrous primarily because man has not understood and made allowance for the geologic environment he occupies. Assessment of the potential hazards of a volcanic environment is especially difficult, for prediction of the time and kind of volcanic activity is still an imperfect art, even at active volcanoes whose behavior has been closely observed for many years. Qualified predictions, however, can be used to plan ways in which hazards to life and property can be minimized. The prediction of eruptions is handicapped because volcanism results from conditions far beneath the surface of the earth, where the causative factors cannot be seen and, for the most part, cannot be measured. Consequently, long-range predictions at Mount Rainier can be based only on the past behavior of the volcano, as revealed by study of the deposits that resulted from previous eruptions. Predictions of this sort, of course, cannot be specific as to time and locale of future events, and

  1. How Volcanism Controls Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large explosive volcanoes eject megatons of sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere where it spreads around the world within months and is oxidized slowly to form a sulfuric-acid aerosol with particle sizes that grow large enough to reflect and scatter solar radiation, cooling Earth ~0.5C for up to 3 years. Explosive eruptions also deplete total column ozone ~6% causing up to 3C winter warming at mid-latitudes over continents. Global cooling predominates. Extrusive, basaltic volcanoes deplete ozone ~6% but do not eject much sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere, causing net global warming. Anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) deplete ozone ~3% for up to a century while each volcanic eruption, even small ones, depletes ozone twice as much but for less than a decade through eruption of halogens and ensuing photochemical processes. The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, the 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn, plus anthropogenic CFCs depleted ozone over Toronto Canada 14% in 2012, causing an unusually warm winter and drought. Total column ozone determines how much solar ultraviolet energy with wavelengths between 290 and 340 nanometers reaches Earth where it is absorbed most efficiently by the ocean. A 25% depletion of ozone increases the amount of this radiation reaching Earth by 1 W m-2 for overhead sun and 0.25 W m-2 for a solar zenith angle of 70 degrees. The tropopause is the boundary between the troposphere heated from below by a sun-warmed Earth and the stratosphere heated from above by the Sun through photodissociation primarily of oxygen and ozone. The mean annual height of the tropopause increased ~160 m between 1980 and 2004 at the same time that northern mid-latitude total column ozone was depleted by ~4%, the lower stratosphere cooled ~2C, the upper troposphere warmed ~0.1C, and mean surface temperatures in the northern hemisphere rose ~0.5C. Regional total ozone columns are observed to increase as rapidly as 20% within 5 hours with an associated 5

  2. Glass shards, pumice fragments and volcanic aerosol particles - diagenesis a recorder of volcanic activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenholzner, J. H.; Schroettner, H.; Poelt, P.; Delgado, H.

    2003-04-01

    Detailed SEM/EDS studies of Triassic (Southern Alps, A, I, Sl) and Miocene (Mixteca Alta, Mexico) tuffs revealed that volcanic glass shards can be replaced by zeolites (analcite), chlorites and smectites preserving the shape of primary shards (1). The Triassic pyroclastic deposits have been incorporated in the pre-Alpine burial diagenesis, the Miocene pyroclastic deposits are bentonites. The volcanologist is impressed by the circumstances that million years old pyroclast relict textures can be sized. Shape parameters obtained by image analysis can be compared with much younger pyroclastic deposits (2). Both deposits have not been effected by shearing. The alteration of pumice fragments of Triassic age is not a simple replacement process. Intergrowth of different illites and chlorites and probably vesicle filling by SiO2 and subsequent overgrowth make a reconstruction sometimes difficult. These processes are accompanied by the formation of REE-, Y- and Zr-bearing minerals as well as with the alteration of zircons. Studies of recently erupted ash from Popocatepetl volcano reveal the presence of a variety of µm-sized contact-metamorphosed clasts being a part of the volcanic ash (3). Such clasts should be present in many older pyroclastic deposits, especially where volcanoes had been situated on massive sedimentary units providing contact metamorphism in the realm of a magma chamber or during magma ascent. Volcanic aerosol particles collected in 1997 from the passively degassing plume of Popocatepetl volcano revealed in FESEM/EDS analysis (H. Schroettner and P. Poelt) a wide spectrum of fluffy, spherical and coagulated spherical particles (µm-sized). Under pre-vacuum conditions they remained stable for ca. 3 years (3). In nature the fate of these particles in the atmosphere is unknown. Are there relicts in marine, lacustrine sediments and ice cores, which could be used as proxies of volcanic activity? (1) Obenholzner &Heiken,1999. Ann.Naturhist.Mus.Wien, 100 A, 13

  3. Petrogenesis and geodynamic significance of silicic volcanism in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, C. M.; Ferrari, L.; Orozco, M. A.; Lopez Martinez, M.

    2012-04-01

    Silicic volcanism in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (WTMVB) was defined a Pliocene ignimbrite flare-up associated with the rifting of the Jalisco block from mainland Mexico (Frey et al., 2007; GSAB). With the integration of new and published geochronologic, geochemical, and isotope data we revise this interpretation and propose a new petrogenetic model. The oldest silicic volcanism consists of large silicic domes and minor pyroclastic flows (~370 km3) emplaced to the north of Guadalajara above a thick succession of ~11 to 8.7 Ma basaltic lavas, which yielded Ar-Ar and obsidian FT ages of ~7.5 to 5 Ma. Shortly after (4.9 to 2.9 Ma) large amount of rhyolitic lavas and ash flow tuffs (~500 km3) were emplaced in a WNW-ESE trending belt from Guadalajara to Compostela. Rhyolitic domes and flows (~430 km3) were emplaced also in the Pleistocene mostly between Tequila and Guadalajara with the late Pleistocene La Primavera caldera (~35 km3) as the sole explosive volcanic episodes. As a whole, silicic volcanism occurred from Late Miocene to the Pleistocene, and was dominated by dome and lava flows. Most rhyolites have high LILE/HFSE values and negative spikes at Nb, P and Ti. They also show the same Ba/Nb and K/Rb values and slightly higher Rb/Sr ratios as the 11-8 Ma basalts. Rhyolite Sr isotope data (87Sr/86Sr init = 0.70371 - 070598) are only slightly more radiogenic than the 11-8 basalts (87Sr/86Sr init = 0.70349-0.70410), whereas Nd isotope ratios are indistinguishable from them. Sr and Nd isotope ratios of the rhyolites are also similar to the crust nearby, indicating that they can be compatible either with fractional crystallization (FC) of basalts or with crust assimilation/melting. However REE contents are too low to be the result of basalt FC. Isotope and REE data can be successfully modelled with an initial crustal melt which subsequently undergone fractional crystallization of feldspar and quartz. Late Miocene slab detachment and subsequent slab rollback

  4. Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 2. An evaluation of thermal water in the Bruneau-Grand View area, southwest Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.; Hoover, D.B.; Tippens, C.L.

    1975-07-01

    The Bruneau-Grand View area occupies about 1,100 square miles in southwest Idaho and is on the southern flank of the large depression in which lies the western Snake River Plain. The igneous and sedimentary rocks in the area range in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. The aquifers in the area have been separated into two broad units: (1) the volcanic-rock aquifers, and (2) the overlying sedimentary-rock aquifers. The Idavada Volcanics or underlying rock units probably constitute the reservoir that contains thermal water. An audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a large conductive zone having apparent resistivities approaching 2 ohm-meters underlies a part of the area at a relatively shallow depth. Chemical analysis of 94 water samples collected in 1973 show that the thermal waters in the area are of a sodium bicarbonate type. Although dissolved-solids concentrations of water ranged from 181 to 1,100 milligrams per litre (mg/1) in the volcanic-rock aquifers, they were generally less than 500 mg/1. Measured chloride concentrations of water in the volcanic-rock aquifers were less than 20 mg/1. Temperatures of water from wells and springs ranged from 9.5/sup 0/ to 83.0/sup 0/C. Temperatures of water from the volcanic-rock aquifers ranged from 40.0/sup 0/ to 83.0/sup 0/C, whereas temperatures of water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers seldom exceeded 35/sup 0/C. Aquifer temperatures at depth, as estimated by silica and sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, probably do not exceed 150/sup 0/C. The gas in water from the volcanic-rock aquifers is composed chiefly of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen. Methane gas (probably derived from organic material) was also found in some water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers.

  5. Timing and sources of neogene and quaternary volcanism in South-Central Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, James H.

    1987-08-01

    Five new and six existing radiometric age dates place constraints on the timing of volcanic episodes in a 1400-km 2 area east of Guatemala City. The source of the voluminous Miocene rhyolitic welded tuffs was the newly discovered Santa Rosa de Lima caldera, in the northern part of the area, not fissure eruptions as was previously believed. Resurgence during the Pliocene included the eruption of more silicic tuffs, followed by post-collapse volcanism around the perimeter. Volcanism in the southern part of the area occurred along the Neogene volcanic front. The sources for these Late Miocene and Pliocene andesitic lavas were not fissure eruptions, as was once believed, but were four large volcanic centers, Cerro Pinula, Ixhuatán, Teanzul, and Cerro La Gabia. The Santa Rosa de Lima caldera structure deflects the Jalpatagua Fault forming tensional fractures along which eruptions in the Quaternary Cuilapa-Barbarena cinder cone field took place. Pleistocene ash flows were erupted from Ixhuatán and Tecuamburro volcanoes in the southern part of the area. Tephras from Ayarza, Amatitlán, and Atitlán blanket the northern and central portions. Present-day activity is restricted to hot springs around the northern and eastern base of Tecuamburro volcano. Based on the work in this area it is proposed that rocks of the Miocene Chalatenango Formation throughout northern Central America were erupted from calderas behind the Neogene volcanic front. Rocks of the Mio-Pliocene Bálsamo Formation in Guatemala and El Salvador were erupted from discrete volcanic centers along the Neogene volcanic front. Pliocene rocks of the Cuscatlán Formation probably represent post-collapse volcanism around earlier caldera structures.

  6. Assessing the Altitude and Dispersion of Volcanic Plumes Using MISR Multi-angle Imaging from Space: Sixteen Years of Volcanic Activity in the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Verity J. B.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent a significant source of atmospheric aerosols and can display local, regional and global effects, impacting earth systems and human populations. In order to assess the relative impacts of these events, accurate plume injection altitude measurements are needed. In this work, volcanic plumes generated from seven Kamchatka Peninsula volcanoes (Shiveluch, Kliuchevskoi, Bezymianny, Tolbachik, Kizimen, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky), were identified using over 16 years of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadimeter (MISR) measurements. Eighty-eight volcanic plumes were observed by MISR, capturing 3-25% of reported events at individual volcanoes. Retrievals were most successful where high intensity events persisted over a period of weeks to months. Compared with existing ground and airborne observations, and alternative satellite-based reports compiled by the Global Volcanism Program (GVP), MISR plume height retrievals showed general consistency; the comparison reports appear to be skewed towards the region of highest concentration observed in MISR-constrained vertical plume extent. The report observations display less discrepancy with MISR toward the end of the analysis period, with improvements in the suborbital data likely the result of the deployment of new instrumentation. Conversely, the general consistency of MISR plume heights with conventionally reported observations supports the use of MISR in the ongoing assessment of volcanic activity globally, especially where other types of volcanic plume observations are unavailable. Differences between the northern (Shiveluch, Kliuchevskoi, Bezymianny and Tolbachik) and southern (Kizimen, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky) volcanoes broadly correspond to the Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD) and Eastern Volcanic Front (EVF), respectively, geological sub-regions of Kamchatka distinguished by varying magma composition. For example, by comparison with reanalysis-model simulations of local meteorological conditions

  7. Magnetic Anomaly Modeling of Volcanic Structure and Stratigraphy - Socorro Island, Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Escorza-Reyes, Marisol; Pavon-Moreno, Julio; Perez-Cruz, Ligia; Sanchez-Zamora, Osvaldo

    2013-04-01

    Results of a magnetic survey of the volcanic structure of Socorro Island in the Revillagigedo Archipielago are presented. Socorro is part of a group of seamounts and oceanic islands built by volcanic activity at the northern end of the Mathematician ridge and intersection with the Clarion and Rivera fracture zones. Subaerial volcanic activity is characterized by alkaline and peralkaline compositions, marked by pre-, syn- and post-caldera phases of the Evermann volcano, and the Holocene mafic activity of the Lomas Coloradas. The magnetic survey conducted in the central-southern sector of the island permits to investigate the volcanic structure and subsurface stratigraphy. Regional fields for second- and third-degree polynomials show a magnetic low over the caldera, positive anomalies above the pre-caldera deposits and intermediate amplitude anomalies over Lomas Coloradas. Residual fields delineate the structural rim of the caldera, anomaly trends for the pre- and post-caldera deposits and a broad anomaly over Lomas Coloradas. Regional-residual anomalies, first vertical derivative, analytical upward and downward continuations, and forward four-layer modeling are used to construct the geophysical models. Rock magnetic properties were analyzed on samples collected at 24 different sites. Magnetic susceptibility showed wide range of variation from ~10 to ~500 10-3 SI, corresponding to the different lithologies from trachytes and glass-rich tuffs to alkali basalts. Data have been divided into groups with low, intermediate and high values. Rock magnetic analyses indicate that magnetite and titanomagnetites are the main magnetization carriers. Magnetic hysteresis loops indicate low coercivity minerals, with high saturation and remanent magnetizations and PSD domain states. Magnetic susceptibility versus temperature curves show irreversible behavior with Curie temperatures around 560-575 C, suggesting magnetite and Ti-poor titanomagnetites. Paleomagnetic directions

  8. Deccan volcanism at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtillot, V.; Vandamme, D.; Besse, J.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy with which one can claim that Deccan trap volcanism occurred at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (KTB) over a very short time interval is of key importance in deciding whether a volcanic origin of the KTB events should be taken seriously. In the two years since paleomagnetic, paleontological and geodynamic evidence was published, further data have become available and the case now appears to be well constrained. The Ar-40/Ar-39 results from six labs have yielded some 24 reliable plateau ages that narrow the age range to 65 to 69 Ma. Moreover, it appears that a significant part of this range results from inter-lab spread and possible minor alteration. Paleontology demonstrates that volcanism started in the Maestrichtian, more precisely in the A. mayaroensis zone. Paleomagnetism shows that volcanism spanned only 3 chrons and only one correlation remains possible, that of the main central reversed chron with 29R. Therefore, whereas Ar-40/Ar-39 is able only to restrict the duration of volcanism to some 4 Ma, paleomagnetism restricts it to 0.5 Ma. Using some geochemical indicators such as C-13 as proxy, it is suggested that volcanism actually consists of a few shorter events of unequal magnitude. Extrusion rates may be as high as 100 cu km/yr and fissure lengths as long as several 100 km. Such a scenario appears to be at least as successful as others in accounting for most anomalies observed at the KTB. Particularly important are Iridium and other platinum group elements (PGE) profiles, Sr-87/Sr-86, C-13, 0-18, other exotic geochemical signatures, spherules, soot, shocked minerals, selective and stepwise extinctions. The environmental impact of CO2 possibly released during explosive phases of volcanism, and SO2 released during effusive phases, and the ability of volcanism to ensure worldwide distribution of KTB products are now all addressed. In conclusion, the case for a causal link between internal hotspot activity, birth of the Reunion hotspot itself as

  9. A Petrographic and Mineralogical Study of Volcanic Rocks from the Mayaxueshan Area, North Qilian Fold Belt, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐达伟; 萧炎宏

    2002-01-01

    The Ordovician volcanic rocks in the Mayaxueshan area have been pervasively altered or metamorphosedand contain abundant secondary minerals such as albite, chlorite, epidote, prehnite, pumpellyite, actinolite, titanite, quartz,and/or calcite. They were denoted as spilites or spilitic rocks in terms of their petrographic features and mineral assem-blages. The metamorphic grades of the volcanic rocks are equivalent to that of the intercalated metaclastic rocks. Thisindicates that both the spilitic volcanic rocks and metaclastic rocks in the Mayaxueshan area have formed as a result ofCaledonian regional metamorphism. We suggest that the previously denoted spilitic rocks or altered volcanic rocks shouldbe re-denoted as metabasalts or metabasaltic rocks. The metamorphic grade of the volcanic rocks increases with their age:prehnite-pumpellyite facies for the upper part of the Middle Ordovician volcanic rocks, prehnite-pumpellyite to lowergreenschist facies for the lower part of the Middle Ordovician volcanic rocks, and lower greenschist facies for the LowerOrdovician volcanic rocks. The P-T conditions are estimated as T = 240 - 290C and P = 1.5 - 4.5 kbar for the lower partof the Middle Ordovician rocks, and T = ~ 300~C for the Lower Ordovician rocks. The variations of mineral assemblagesoccurring at different domains of the volcanic rocks were controlled by the variations of the effective bulk composition inthose domains during metamorphism. The geochemical characteristics of Mg-Al chromite in the Mayaxueshan volcanicrocks are consistent with an origin of island arc environment.

  10. Source mechanisms of volcanic tsunamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Raphaël

    2015-10-28

    Volcanic tsunamis are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including volcano-tectonic earthquakes, slope instabilities, pyroclastic flows, underwater explosions, shock waves and caldera collapse. In this review, we focus on the lessons that can be learnt from past events and address the influence of parameters such as volume flux of mass flows, explosion energy or duration of caldera collapse on tsunami generation. The diversity of waves in terms of amplitude, period, form, dispersion, etc. poses difficulties for integration and harmonization of sources to be used for numerical models and probabilistic tsunami hazard maps. In many cases, monitoring and warning of volcanic tsunamis remain challenging (further technical and scientific developments being necessary) and must be coupled with policies of population preparedness. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Anomalous diffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic seismicity at Mt. Etna is studied. It is found that the associated stochastic process exhibits a subdiffusive phenomenon. The jump probability distribution well obeys an exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distribution follows a power law in a wide range. Although these results would seem to suggest that the phenomenon could be described by temporally-fractional kinetic theory based on the viewpoint of continuous-time random walks, the exponent of the power-law waiting-time distribution actually lies outside of the range allowed in the theory. In addition, there exists the aging phenomenon in the event-time averaged mean squared displacement, in contrast to the picture of fractional Brownian motion. Comments are also made on possible relevances of random walks on fractals as well as nonlinear kinetics. Thus, problems of volcanic seismicity are highly challenging for science of complex systems.

  12. Geologic map of the Simcoe Mountains Volcanic Field, main central segment, Yakama Nation, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Mountainous parts of the Yakama Nation lands in south-central Washington are mostly covered by basaltic lava flows and cinder cones that make up the Simcoe Mountains volcanic field. The accompanying geologic map of the central part of the volcanic field has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on behalf of the Water Resources Program of the Yakama Nation. The volcanic terrain stretches continuously from Mount Adams eastward as far as Satus Pass and Mill Creek Guard Station. Most of the many hills and buttes are volcanic cones where cinders and spatter piled up around erupting vents while lava flows spread downslope. All of these small volcanoes are now extinct, and, even during their active lifetimes, most of them erupted for no more than a few years. On the Yakama Nation lands, the only large long-lived volcano capable of erupting again in the future is Mount Adams, on the western boundary.

  13. Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 μg kg-1) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 μg kg-1). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark—in pyroclastic wounds—and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 μg kg-1) and bark (6.0 μg kg-1) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

  14. Spreading dynamic of viscous volcanic ash in stimulated jet engine conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    song, wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash is widely recognised as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The volcanic ash deposition process in a jet turbine is potentially complex. Volcanic ash in the air stream enters the inner liners of the combustors and partially or completely melts under the flames up to 2000 °C, at which point part of the ash deposits in the combustor fuel nozzle. Molten volcanic particles within high energy airflow escape the combustor to enter the turbine and impact the stationary (e.g., inlet nozzle guide vanes) and rotating airfoils (e.g., first stage high-pressure turbine blades) at high speed (up to Mach 1.25) in different directions, with the result that ash may stick, flow and remain liquid or solidify. Thus, the wetting behaviour of molten volcanic ash particle is fundamental to investigate impingement phenomena of ash droplet on the surface of real jet engine operation. The topic of wetting has received tremendous interest from both fundamental and applied points of view. However, due to the interdisciplinary gap between jet engine engineering and geology science, explicit investigation of wetting behaviour of volcanic ash at high temperature is in its infancy. We have taken a big step towards meeting this challenge. Here, we experimentally and theoretically investigate the wetting behaviour of viscous volcanic ash over a wide temperature range from 1100 to 1550 °C using an improved sessile-drop method. The results of our experiment demonstrate that temperature and viscosity play a critical role in determining the wetting possibility and governing the spreading kinetics of volcanic ash at high temperatures. Our systemic analysis of spreading of molten volcanic ash systems allows us to report on the fundamental differences between the mechanisms controlling spreading of organic liquids at room temperature and molten volcanic ash droplets.

  15. Volcanic ash supports a diverse bacterial community in a marine mesocosm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verena Witt,; Paul M Ayris,; Damby, David; Corrado Cimarelli,; Ulrich Kueppers,; Donald B Dingwell,; Gert Wörheide,

    2017-01-01

    Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems, particularly those already impaired by anthropogenic pressures, may be highly sensitive to disturbances from natural catastrophic events, such as volcanic eruptions. Explosive volcanic eruptions expel large quantities of silicate ash particles into the atmosphere, which can disperse across millions of square kilometres and deposit into coral reef ecosystems. Following heavy ash deposition, mass mortality of reef biota is expected, but little is known about the recovery of post-burial reef ecosystems. Reef regeneration depends partly upon the capacity of the ash deposit to be colonised by waterborne bacterial communities and may be influenced to an unknown extent by the physiochemical properties of the ash substrate itself. To determine the potential for volcanic ash to support pioneer bacterial colonisation, we exposed five well-characterised volcanic and coral reef substrates to a marine aquarium under low light conditions for 3 months: volcanic ash, synthetic volcanic glass, carbonate reef sand, calcite sand and quartz sand. Multivariate statistical analysis of Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) fingerprinting data demonstrates clear segregation of volcanic substrates from the quartz and coral reef substrates over 3 months of bacterial colonisation. Overall bacterial diversity showed shared and substrate-specific bacterial communities; however, the volcanic ash substrate supported the most diverse bacterial community. These data suggest a significant influence of substrate properties (composition, granulometry and colour) on bacterial settlement. Our findings provide first insights into physicochemical controls on pioneer bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash and highlight the potential for volcanic ash deposits to support bacterial diversity in the aftermath of reef burial, on timescales that could permit cascading effects on larval settlement.

  16. Carbothermal reduction process of silica formed from shirasu volcanic ash using solar furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Hatakeyama Keisuke; Sato Keigo; Nishioka Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Metallurgical grade silicon was formed using Shirasu volcanic ash as starting material with solar furnace. The solar furnace was composed of two parts: Fresnel lens and reacting furnace. The reacting furnace was composed of a cylindrical vacuum chamber and quartz glass plate functioning to guide the concentrated sunlight into the furnace, and was placed at the focal point of the Fresnel lens. The sample was made from a mixture of silica formed from Shirasu volcanic ash and carbon, and placed ...

  17. Fault-fracture mesh petroleum plays in the Zhanhua Depression, Bohai Bay Basin: Part 1: Source rock characterization and quantitative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongshi Wang; Dishi Shi [SINOPEC Shengli Oilfield Co., Shandong (China). Geoscience Research Inst.; Maowen Li; Dong Xia [Petroleum Univ., Beijing (China); Geological Survey of Canada, NW Calgary (Canada); Xiongqi Pang [Petroleum Univ., Beijing (China); Shanwen Zhang [SINOPEC Shengli Oilfield Co., Shandong (China)

    2005-02-01

    In the prolific Zhanhua Depression of the Bohai Bay Basin, eastern China, over 76% of the proven petroleum reserves occur in the Neogene Guantao and Minhuazhen formations. Detailed geological and geochemical mapping of the Phanerozoic strata in this area reveals that oil shales and dark mudstones in the Es{sub 4}, Es{sub 3} and Es{sub 1} members of the Eocene-Oligocene Shahejie Formation have excellent potential as petroleum source rocks. Regional distributions of total organic carbon content, kerogen type and thermal maturation indicate that abundant mature source rocks are present in several discrete sag areas bounded by extensive basement-related fault networks. In contrast, source rocks along the paleo-topographic highs are currently immature with respect to the generation of conventional oils. This study examined the key molecular characteristics for the common isoprenoid, hopanoid and steroid biomarkers, in relation to source facies variations in lacustrine sediments. The hydrocarbon source potential and expulsion efficiency for each of the source rock units were evaluated, which integrated the source rock characteristics with regional thermal subsidence and sediment burial. An important observation made during this study is the striking contrast between the source potential and proven oil reserves within each stratigraphic section, illustrating how significant the migration of hydrocarbon fluids derived from deep mature source kitchens through over 2000 m of fine-grained formations must have been to form several giant oil accumulations in the shallow strata. These results support the concept of the 'Neogene fault-fracture mesh petroleum plays' proposed by Zhang et al. (2004) [Marine and Petroleum Geology, 21, 651-668] and the vital role that the faults and fracture systems have in controlling hydrocarbon migration conduits and accumulation habitat in this rift basin. (Author)

  18. Depressive symptoms and cognitive performance in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Park, Hyuntae; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Lee, Sangyoon; Suzuki, Takao

    2014-10-01

    Many longitudinal studies have found that older adults with depressive symptoms or depression have increased risk of cognitive impairment. We investigated the relationships between depressive symptoms or depression, cognitive function, serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and volumetric MRI measurements in older adults. A total of 4352 individuals aged 65 years or older (mean age 72 years) participated in the study. We investigated medical history and geriatric depression scale-15 (GDS-15) items to determine depression and depressive symptoms. Cognitive tests included the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), story memory, word list memory, trail-making tests, and the symbol digit substitution task. Of the 4352 participants, 570 (13%) fulfilled the criteria for depressive symptoms (GDS-15: 6 + points) and 87 (2%) were diagnosed with depression. All cognitive tests showed significant differences between the 'no depressive symptoms', 'depressive symptoms', and 'depression' groups. The 'depressive symptoms' and 'depression' groups showed lower serum BDNF (p depressive symptoms' group. The 'depressive symptoms' group exhibited greater atrophy of the right medial temporal lobe than did the 'no depressive symptoms' group (p = 0.023). These results suggest that memory, executive function, and processing speed examinations are useful to identify cognitive decline in older adults who have depressive symptoms and depression. Serum BDNF concentration and atrophy of the right medial temporal lobe may in part mediate the relationships between depressive symptoms and cognitive decline.

  19. Adolescence depressions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matot, J P

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the depressive problematics emerging during adolescence in the frame of the transformations that characterize this period of life, with a focus on the interference of socio-cultural dimensions...

  20. Postpartum Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne

    Background: In three academic articles, this PhD thesis investigates maternal postpartum depression (PPD) as a risk factor for the infant-mother attachment and infant development. Previous studies have been contradictory with respect to the question of whether PPD can have long term effects...... on offspring. This may be due to not differing between when PPD is only occurring in the postpartum period and when effects are also due to ongoing or recurrent depression. However, it may also be due to viewing maternal depression as a unitary construct, and not considering underlying maternal psychological...... difficulties which may moderate potential adverse effects. The present thesis investigates two potential maternal moderators of risk:. Comorbid personality disorder and adult attachment insecurity. Moreover, the question of early environmental effects of PPD versus effects of later or ongoing depression...

  1. Lifestyle medicine for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; O'Neil, Adrienne; Coulson, Carolyn E; Schweitzer, Isaac; Berk, Michael

    2014-04-10

    , due to the complexity of human illness/wellbeing, the emerging evidence encourages a more integrative approach for depression, and an acknowledgment that lifestyle modification should be a routine part of treatment and preventative efforts.

  2. Detailed Seismic Reflection Images of the Central American Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, K. D.; Fulthorpe, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    New high-resolution seismic reflection profiles across the Central American volcanic arc (CAVA) reveal an asymmetric deformation pattern with large-scale folding and uplift of basinal strata in the forearc contrasted by intrusive bodies, normal faults, and possible strikes-slip faults in the backarc. Since Miocene times the CAVA has migrated seaward, apparently impinging on the Sandino forearc basin and creating or modifying the low-lying Nicaragua depression, which contains the backarc and much of the arc. However the structural nature of the depression and its possible relationship to forearc sliver movement is poorly known. In November-December 2004 we recorded a large, high-resolution, seismic reflection dataset largely on the Pacific shelf (forearc) area of Central America, extending from NW Costa Rica to the SE edge of El Salvador's territorial waters. We seized an opportunity to study the nature of the CAVA by recording data into the Gulf of Fonseca, a large embayment at the intersection of Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador. With 3 GI airguns and a 2100 m streamer we recorded data with typical penetration of 2-3 seconds in the Sandino basin and frequency content of ~10-250 Hz (at shallow levels). Penetration was limited over the arc summit with high velocity volcanic rocks encountered at depths as shallow as a few hundred meters. To the NE the edge of the Nicaragua depression occurs abruptly; our data show a well-developed sedimentary basin 1.5-3 km thick separated by numerous steeply-dipping faults. The broadband signal and good penetration of this dataset will help us determine the chronology of arc development in this position and the styles of deformation in the forearc, arc, and backarc areas. In turn, this will help us understand the regional tectonic and stratigraphic development of this margin due to the profound affects of the arc.

  3. Geology of Volcan Las Navajas, a pleistocene trachyte/peralkaline rhyolite volcanic center in Nayarit, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegre, J.A.; Nelson, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Volcan Las Navajas, located in the northwestern portion of the Mexican Volcanic Belt has produced a sequence of volcanic rocks with compositions in marked contrast to the predominantly calc-alkaline volcanoes which predominate in this part of Mexico. The oldest exposed lavas consist of trachytes with 63% SiO/sub 2/, 6% FeO*, and 500 ppm Zr along with comenditic rhyolites with 68% SiO/sub 2/, 5% FeO*, 800 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.0. These lavas were followed by the eruption of a comenditic ash-flow tuff and the formation of a caldera 2.7 km in diameter. This caldera was subsequently filled by eruptions of pantelleritic rhyolite obsidian lava flows with 72% SiO/sub 2/, 8% FeO*, 1100 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.5 to 1.9. A second caldera was then formed which is offset to the south of the main eruptive vents for previous eruptions. This younger caldera has a diameter of about 4.8 km and its southern walls have been covered by calc-alkaline andesitic lavas erupted from nearby Sanganguey volcano. Volcanoclastic sediments in the floor of the younger caldera have been tilted and faulted in a manner suggestive of late stage resurgence. Subsequent eruptions within the caldera, however, have been restricted to calc-alkaline andesites. Tectonically, the area in which this volcano occurs appears to have been undergoing a crustal rifting event since the Pliocene. The occurrence of these peralkaline rocks lends further support to such a hypothesis.

  4. Numerical modelling of collapsing volcanic edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The flanks of Oceanic Volcanic Edifice's (OVEs) can occasionally become unstable. If that occurs, they can deform in two different modes: either slowly along localization failure zones (slumps) or catastrophically as debris avalanches. Yet the physics of this process is incompletely understood, and the role of factors such as the OVE's strength (viscosity, cohesion, friction angle), dimensions, geometry, and existence of weak layers remain to be addressed. Here we perform numerical simulations to study the interplay between viscous and plastic deformation on the gravitational collapse of an OVE (diffuse deformation vs. localization of failure along discrete structures). We focus on the contribution of the edifice's strength parameters for the mode of deformation, as well as on the type of basement. Tests were performed for a large OVE (7.5 km high, 200 km long) and either purely viscous (overall volcano edifice viscosities between 1019-1023 Pa.s), or viscoplastic rheology (within a range of cohesion and friction angle values). Results show that (a) for a strong basement (no slip basal boundary condition), the deformation pattern suggests wide/diffuse "listric" deformation within the volcanic edifice, without the development of discrete plastic failure zones; (b) for a weak basement (free slip basal boundary condition), rapid collapse of the edifice through the propagation of plastic failure structures within the edifice occurs. Tests for a smaller OVE (4.5 km by 30 km) show that failure localization along large-scale listric structures occurs more readily for different combinations of cohesion and friction angles. In these tests, high cohesion values combined with small friction angles lead to focusing of deformation along a narrower band. Tests with a weak layer underlying part of the volcanic edifice base show deformation focused along discrete structures mainly dipping towards the distal sector of the volcano. These tests for a small OVE constitute a promising

  5. Significance of an Active Volcanic Front in the Far Western Aleutian Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hoernle, K.

    2015-12-01

    Discovery of a volcanic front west of Buldir Volcano, the western-most emergent Aleutian volcano, demonstrates that the surface expression of Aleutian volcanism falls below sea level just west of 175.9° E longitude, but is otherwise continuous from mainland Alaska to Kamchatka. The newly discovered sites of western Aleutian seafloor volcanism are the Ingenstrem Depression, a 60 km-long structural depression just west of Buldir, and an unnamed area 300 km further west, referred to as the Western Cones. These locations fall along a volcanic front that stretches from Buldir to Piip Seamount near the Komandorsky Islands. Western Aleutian seafloor volcanic rocks include large quantities of high-silica andesite and dacite, which define a highly calc-alkaline igneous series and carry trace element signatures that are unmistakably subduction-related. This indicates that subducting oceanic lithosphere is present beneath the westernmost Aleutian arc. The rarity of earthquakes below depths of 200 km indicates that the subducting plate is unusually hot. Some seafloor volcanoes are 6-8 km wide at the base, and so are as large as many emergent Aleutian volcanoes. The seafloor volcanoes are submerged in water depths >3000 m because they sit on oceanic lithosphere of the Bering Sea. The volcanic front is thus displaced to the north of the ridge of arc crust that underlies the western Aleutian Islands. This displacement, which developed since approximately 6 Ma when volcanism was last active on the islands, must be a consequence of oblique convergence in a system where the subducting plate and large blocks of arc crust are both moving primarily in an arc-parallel sense. The result is a hot-slab system where low subduction rates probably limit advection of hot mantle to the subarc, and produce a relatively cool and perhaps stagnant mantle wedge. The oceanic setting and highly oblique subduction geometry also severely limit rates of sediment subduction, so the volcanic rocks, which

  6. Shallow crustal structure of eastern-central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Ramón, V. M.; Lermo-Samaniego, J.

    2015-12-01

    Central-eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is featured by large basins (i.e., Toluca, Mexico, Puebla-Tlaxcala, Libres-Oriental). It has been supposed that major crustal faults limit these basins. Sierra de Las Cruces range separates the Toluca and Mexico basins. The Sierra Nevada range separates Mexico basin from the Puebla-Tlaxcala basin. Based in gravity and seismic data we inferred the Toluca basin is constituted by the Ixtlahuaca sub-basin, to the north, and the Toluca sub-basin to the south, which are separated by a relative structural high. The Toluca depression is more symmetric and bounded by sub-vertical faults. In particular its eastern master fault controlled the emplacement of Sierra de Las Cruces range. Easternmost Acambay graben constitutes the northern and deepest part of the Ixtlahuaca depression. The Toluca-Ixtlahuaca basin is inside the Taxco-San Miguel de Allende fault system, and limited to the west by the Guerrero terrane which continues beneath the TMVB up to the Acambay graben. Mexico basin basement occupies an intermediate position and featured by a relative structural high to the north-east, as established by previous studies. This relative structural high is limited to the west by the north-south Mixhuca trough, while to the south it is bounded by the east-west Copilco-Xochimilco-Chalco sub-basin. The Puebla-Tlaxcala basin basement is the shallowest of these 3 tectonic depressions. In general, features (i.e., depth) and relationship between these basins, from west to east, are controlled by the regional behavior of the Sierra Madre Oriental fold and thrust belt basement (i.e., Oaxaca Complex?). This study indicates that an active east-west regional fault system limits to the south the TMVB (from the Nevado de Toluca volcano through the Popocatepetl volcano and eastward along southern Puebla-Tlaxcala basin). The Tenango and La Pera fault systems constituting the western part of this regional fault system coincide with northern

  7. Reservoir characteristics and control factors of Carboniferous volcanic gas reservoirs in the Dixi area of Junggar Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji'an Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Field outcrop observation, drilling core description, thin-section analysis, SEM analysis, and geochemistry, indicate that Dixi area of Carboniferous volcanic rock gas reservoir belongs to the volcanic rock oil reservoir of the authigenic gas reservoir. The source rocks make contact with volcanic rock reservoir directly or by fault, and having the characteristics of near source accumulation. The volcanic rock reservoir rocks mainly consist of acidic rhyolite and dacite, intermediate andesite, basic basalt and volcanic breccia: (1 Acidic rhyolite and dacite reservoirs are developed in the middle-lower part of the structure, have suffered strong denudation effect, and the secondary pores have formed in the weathering and tectonic burial stages, but primary pores are not developed within the early diagenesis stage. Average porosity is only at 8%, and the maximum porosity is at 13.5%, with oil and gas accumulation showing poor performance. (2 Intermediate andesite and basic basalt reservoirs are mainly distributed near the crater, which resembles the size of and suggests a volcanic eruption. Primary pores are formed in the early diagenetic stage, secondary pores developed in weathering and erosion transformation stage, and secondary fractures formed in the tectonic burial stage. The average porosity is at 9.2%, and the maximum porosity is at 21.9%: it is of the high-quality reservoir types in Dixi area. (3 The volcanic breccia reservoir has the same diagenetic features with sedimentary rocks, but also has the same mineral composition with volcanic rock; rigid components can keep the primary porosity without being affected by compaction during the burial process. At the same time, the brittleness of volcanic breccia reservoir makes it easily fracture under the stress; internal fracture was developmental. Volcanic breccia developed in the structural high part and suffered a long-term leaching effect. The original pore-fracture combination also made

  8. Frequent underwater volcanism in the central Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebscher, C.; Ruhnau, M.; Dehghani, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The extinction of the Minoan culture in the mid second millennium BCE is a well known consequence of the Plinian eruption of Thera volcano (Santorini Island). Santorini is a member of the South Aegean arc forming a chain from the Gulf of Saronikos (Susaki, Egina, Poros, Methana) at West, to an area close to the Anatolian coast at East (Kos, Nisyros and minor islands), through the central part (Milos and Santorini island groups). Underwater volcanic activity was manifested historically only once. During 1649-1650 CE the Kolumbo underwater volcano evolved about 8 km northeast of Santorini. As a consequence of this eruption volcanic ash covered the entire Aegean area and a hazardous tsunami was triggered. Here we show by means of reflection seismic and magnetic data that underwater volcanism occurred more frequently in the central Aegean Sea than previously assumed. Seismic data show that Kolumbo constitutes of five vertically stacked cones of pyroclastic sediment plus at least four smaller cones on the flank of the volcano. The formation of Kolumbo started synchronous with Santorini Island. The entire volume of the Kolumbo pyroclastic cones is estimated to more than 15 cubic-kilometers. Several small-scale cones have been detected in the Anyhdros Basin some km north-east of Kolumbo, being previously interpreted as mud volcanoes by other authors. However, the similarity of seismic and magnetic signatures of these cones and Kolumbo strongly suggest that these cones were also created by underwater volcanism. Volcanic cones, Kolumbo and Santorini are situated along a NE-SW striking graben system that evolved during five extensional tectonic pulses in the Pliocene.

  9. Scientific Drilling in a Central Italian Volcanic District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Montone

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The Colli Albani Volcanic District, located 15 km SE of Rome (Fig. 1, is part of the Roman Magmatic Province, a belt of potassic to ultra-potassic volcanic districts that developed along the Tyrrhenian Sea margin since Middle Pleistocene time (Conticelli and Peccerillo, 1992; Marra et al., 2004; Giordano et al., 2006 and references therein. Eruption centers are aligned along NW-SE oriented majorextensional structures guiding the dislocation of Meso-Cenozoic siliceous-carbonate sedimentary successions at the rear of the Apennine belt. Volcanic districts developed in structural sectors with most favorable conditions for magma uprise. In particular, the Colli Albani volcanism is located in a N-S shear zone where it intersects the extensional NW- and NE-trending fault systems. In the last decade, geochronological measurements allowed for reconstructions of the eruptive history and led to the classification as "dormant" volcano. The volcanic history may be roughly subdivided into three main phases marked by different eruptive mechanisms andmagma volumes. The early Tuscolano-Artemisio Phase (ca. 561–351 ky, the most explosive and voluminous one, is characterized by five large pyroclastic flow-forming eruptions. After a ~40-ky-long dormancy, a lesser energetic phase of activity took place (Faete Phase; ca. 308–250 ky, which started with peripheral effusive eruptions coupled with subordinate hydromagmatic activity. A new ~50-ky-long dormancypreceded the start of the late hydromagmatic phase (ca. 200–36 ky, which was dominated by pyroclastic-surge eruptions, with formation of several monogenetic or multiple maars and/or tuff rings.

  10. Quaternary bimodal volcanism in the Niğde Volcanic Complex (Cappadocia, central Anatolia, Turkey): age, petrogenesis and geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Faruk; Schmitt, Axel K.; Siebel, Wolfgang; Sönmez, Mustafa; Ersoy, Yalçın; Lermi, Abdurrahman; Dirik, Kadir; Duncan, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The late Neogene to Quaternary Cappadocian Volcanic Province (CVP) in central Anatolia is one of the most impressive volcanic fields of Turkey because of its extent and spectacular erosionally sculptured landscape. The late Neogene evolution of the CVP started with the eruption of extensive andesitic-dacitic lavas and ignimbrites with minor basaltic lavas. This stage was followed by Quaternary bimodal volcanism. Here, we present geochemical, isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb and δ18O isotopes) and geochronological (U-Pb zircon and Ar-Ar amphibole and whole-rock ages) data for bimodal volcanic rocks of the Niğde Volcanic Complex (NVC) in the western part of the CVP to determine mantle melting dynamics and magmatic processes within the overlying continental crust during the Quaternary. Geochronological data suggest that the bimodal volcanic activity in the study area occurred between ca. 1.1 and ca. 0.2 Ma (Pleistocene) and comprises (1) mafic lavas consisting of basalts, trachybasalts, basaltic andesites and scoria lapilli fallout deposits with mainly basaltic composition, (2) felsic lavas consisting of mostly rhyolites and pumice lapilli fall-out and surge deposits with dacitic to rhyolitic composition. The most mafic sample is basalt from a monogenetic cone, which is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7038, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.5128, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.80, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.60 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.68, suggesting a moderately depleted signature of the mantle source. Felsic volcanic rocks define a narrow range of 143Nd/144Nd isotope ratios (0.5126-0.5128) and are homogeneous in Pb isotope composition (206Pb/204Pb = 18.84-18.87, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.64-15.67 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.93-38.99). 87Sr/86Sr isotopic compositions of mafic (0.7038-0.7053) and felsic (0.7040-0.7052) samples are similar, reflecting a common mantle source. The felsic rocks have relatively low zircon δ18O values (5.6 ± 0.6 ‰) overlapping mantle values (5.3 ± 0.3 %), consistent with an origin by fractional crystallization

  11. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes.

  12. Nephelometric Dropsonde for Volcanic Ash Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes could enable unprecedented observations of...

  13. The concurrent emergence and causes of double volcanic hotspot tracks on the Pacific plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T. D.; Davies, D. R.; Campbell, I. H.; Iaffaldano, G.; Yaxley, G.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2017-05-01

    Mantle plumes are buoyant upwellings of hot rock that transport heat from Earth’s core to its surface, generating anomalous regions of volcanism that are not directly associated with plate tectonic processes. The best-studied example is the Hawaiian-Emperor chain, but the emergence of two sub-parallel volcanic tracks along this chain, Loa and Kea, and the systematic geochemical differences between them have remained unexplained. Here we argue that the emergence of these tracks coincides with the appearance of other double volcanic tracks on the Pacific plate and a recent azimuthal change in the motion of the plate. We propose a three-part model that explains the evolution of Hawaiian double-track volcanism: first, mantle flow beneath the rapidly moving Pacific plate strongly tilts the Hawaiian plume and leads to lateral separation between high- and low-pressure melt source regions; second, the recent azimuthal change in Pacific plate motion exposes high- and low-pressure melt products as geographically distinct volcanoes, explaining the simultaneous emergence of double-track volcanism across the Pacific; and finally, secondary pyroxenite, which is formed as eclogite melt reacts with peridotite, dominates the low-pressure melt region beneath Loa-track volcanism, yielding the systematic geochemical differences observed between Loa- and Kea-type lavas. Our results imply that the formation of double-track volcanism is transitory and can be used to identify and place temporal bounds on plate-motion changes.

  14. Tube coalescence in the Jingfudong lava tube and implications for lava flow hazard of Tengchong volcanism

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengquan Chen; Yongshun Liu; Haiquan Wei; Jiandong Xu; Wenfeng Guo

    2016-01-01

    Tube-fed structure occurs as a general phenomenon in Tengchong basic lavas, such as lava tubes, lava plugs and tube-related collapse depressions. We deduced the development of Laoguipo lava flows, which is the longest lava tube (Jingfudong lava tube) evolved in Tengchong volcanic area. Following the detailed documentation of the tube morphology of the Jingfudong lava tube, we propose that the Jingfudong lava tube was formed through vertical coalescence of at least three tubes. The coalescence...

  15. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the ‘strength’ of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  16. Felsic volcanism in a basic shield (El Hierro, Canary Islands). Implications in terms of volcanic hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Becerril Carretero, Laura; Martí Molist, Joan; Meletlidis, Stavros; Galindo Jiménez, Inés

    2014-05-01

    El Hierro, the southwesternmost and smallest island of the Canary Archipelago, is a complex basaltic shield volcano characterized by mainly effusive volcanism with both Strombolian and Hawaiian activity. Explosive felsic volcanism is not a common feature of the archipelago and, so far, it has only been reported on the central islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria, where it has been responsible for the formation of large central volcanic complexes. The presence of felsic rocks on the other islands of the archipelago and specifically on El Hierro is mostly restricted to subvolcanic intrusions and a few lava flows, generally associated with the oldest parts of the islands. We hereby report the presence of a trachytic pumice deposit on the island of El Hierro, referred to here as the Malpaso Member. A detailed stratigraphic, lithological, and sedimentological study was carried out on the deposits of this explosive episode of felsic composition, which is the only one found on the Canary Islands apart from those of Gran Canaria and Tenerife. Four different subunits were identified on the basis of their lithological and granulometrical characteristics. The products of the eruption correspond to a single eruptive event and cover an area of about 13 km2. This deposit originated from a base-surge-type explosive eruption with a subsequent radial emplacement of dilute PDC currents, was emplaced from the vent that would have been located in a similar position to the volcano of Tanganasoga. The low vesicularity of juvenile fragments and the morphological characteristics of the fine particles, as well as the high proportion of lithic fragments and the ash-rich nature of the deposit, suggest that magma/water interaction controlled the dynamics of the eruption. This study demonstrates that magmas from El Hierro could have the potential for producing an explosive eruption, in an environment in which the majority of the eruptions are basaltic and effusive in nature. Bearing in mind

  17. Late Cretaceous volcanic arc system in Southwest Korea: Occurrence, lithological characteristics, SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age, and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hee Jae; Kwon, Chang Woo

    2017-04-01

    In the southwest region of the Korean Peninsula, four large volcanoes, the Buan, Seonunsan, Wido, and Beopseongpo, with a maximum diameter of ca 20 km, form a distinct topographic undulation along the NE-SW-trending Hamyeol Fault. These volcanics comprise various types of pyroclastic, sedimentary, and lava/intrusive rocks, and are interpreted as remnants of calderas resulting from various volcanic eruptions, indicating that Hamyeol Fault, together with crustal extension, played an important role in volcano formation in this region. SHRIMP U-Pb ages of zircon isolated from each volcanics are as follows. For Buan Volcanics, Cheonmasan Tuff 87.23 ±0.92 Ma, Udongje Tuff 86.79 ±0.71 Ma, Seokpo Tuff 87.30 ±0.99 Ma and Yujeongje Tuff 86.66 ±0.93 Ma. For Seonunsan Volcanics, Gyeongsusan Tuff 84.9 ±1.1 Ma and Yeongije Tuff 86.61 ±0.67 Ma. These ages indicate that the four volcanics were formed in the Late Cretaceous. The ages are comparable to those of the volcanic rocks of the Aioi and Arima groups in Southwestern Japan, suggesting that the Late Cretaceous volcanic arc systems developed in a NE-SW direction from the Japanese Islands to the southwestern part of the Korean Peninsula caused by regional magmatism together with crustal deformation as reflected by occurrence of the volcanic rocks along the Hamyeol Fault.

  18. Water in volcanic glass: From volcanic degassing to secondary hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Angela N.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watkins, James M.; Ross, Abigail M.

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic glass is deposited with trace amounts (0.1-0.6 wt.%) of undegassed magmatic water dissolved in the glass. After deposition, meteoric water penetrates into the glass structure mostly as molecular H2O. Due to the lower δD (‰) values of non-tropical meteoric waters and the ∼30‰ offset between volcanic glass and environmental water during hydration, secondary water imparts lighter hydrogen isotopic values during secondary hydration up to a saturation concentration of 3-4 wt.% H2O. We analyzed compositionally and globally diverse volcanic glass from 0 to 10 ka for their δD and H2Ot across different climatic zones, and thus different δD of precipitation, on a thermal conversion elemental analyzer (TCEA) furnace attached to a mass spectrometer. We find that tephrachronologically coeval rhyolite glass is hydrated faster than basaltic glass, and in the majority of glasses an increase in age and total water content leads to a decrease in δD (‰), while a few equatorial glasses have little change in δD (‰). We compute a magmatic water correction based on our non-hydrated glasses, and calculate an average 103lnαglass-water for our hydrated felsic glasses of -33‰, which is similar to the 103lnαglass-water determined by Friedman et al. (1993a) of -34‰. We also determine a smaller average 103lnαglass-water for all our mafic glasses of -23‰. We compare the δD values of water extracted from our glasses to local meteoric waters following the inclusion of a -33‰ 103lnαglass-water. We find that, following a correction for residual magmatic water based on an average δD and wt.% H2Ot of recently erupted ashes from our study, the δD value of water extracted from hydrated volcanic glass is, on average, within 4‰ of local meteoric water. To better understand the difference in hydration rates of mafic and felsic glasses, we imaged 6 tephra clasts ranging in age and chemical composition with BSE (by FEI SEM) down to a submicron resolution. Mafic tephra

  19. Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenesis of Volcanic Rocks as Exemplified by Volcanic Rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁庚; 叶霖

    1997-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang,occurring in the collision zone between the Siberia Plate and the Junggar Plate,are distributed along the Eritix River Valley in northern Xinjiang.The volcanic rocks were dated at Late Paleozoic and can be divided into the spilite-keratophyre series and the basalt-andesite series.The spilite-keratophyre series volcanic rocks occur in the Altay orogenic belt at the southwest margin of the Siberia Plate.In addition to sodic volcanic rocks.There are also associated potassic-sodic volcanic rocks and potassic volcanic rocks.The potassic-sodic volcanic rocks occur at the bottom of the eruption cycle and control the distribution of Pb and Zn deposits.The potassic volcanic rocks occur at the top of the eruption cycle and are associated with Au and Cu mineralizations.The sodic volcanic rocks occur in the middle stage of eruption cycle and control the occurrence of Cu(Zn) deposits.The basalt-andesite series volcanic rocks distributed in the North Junggar orogenic belt at the north margin of the Junggar-Kazakstan Plate belong to the potassic sodic volcain rocks.The volcanic rocks distributed along the Ulungur fault are relatively rich in sodium and poor in potassium and are predominated by Cu mineralization and associated with Au mineralization.Those volcanic rocks distributed along the Ertix fault are relatively rich in K and poor in Na,with Au mineralization being dominant.

  20. High resolution seismic reflection profiles of Holocene volcanic and tectonic features, Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, A. S.; Hart, P. E.; Bursik, M. I.; McClain, J. S.; Moore, J. C.; Boyle, M.; Childs, J. R.; Novick, M.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Roeske, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Inyo-Mono Craters of Long Valley and Mono Basin, California are the youngest eruptive vents of the Great Basin, USA and the second youngest in California. They are one of two seismically active volcanic centers with geothermal power production in the Walker Lane, western Great Basin, the other being the Coso Volcanic Field to the south. High resolution seismic reflection data collected from the northern tip of the Mono Craters eruptive centers in Mono Lake delinates two structural zones proximal to the active volcanic centers in Mono Lake. A growth structure drapped by ~30 m or more of bedded sediment shows increasing deformation and offset of clastic deposits on the northwest margin of the basin. Coherent thin-bedded stratigraphic sections with strong reflectors to 30-100m depth are preserved on the western and northern margins of the basin. The southern and southeastern areas of the lake are generally seismically opaque, due to extensive ash and tephra deposits as well as widespread methane. Thin pockets of well-bedded, poorly consolidated sediment of probable Holocene and last glacial age are present within intrabasin depressions providing some local age constraints on surfaces adjacent to volcanic vents and volcanically modified features.

  1. Depositional model of Permian Luodianian volcanic island and its impact on the distribution of fusulinid assemblage in southern Qinghai, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU ZhiJun; XU AnWu; WANG JianXiong; DUAN QiFa; ZHAO XiaoMing; YAO HuaZhou

    2008-01-01

    Pan-riftizational tectonic activity reached climax at Luodianian (Permian) in the East Tethyan Domain,Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Because of eruptive volcanics and influence of terrigenous materials, a complex volcanic-sedimentary landform formed on the sea floor in southern Qinghai. Four sedimentary facies types were recognized based on detailed field mapping. Spatially, platform facies volcanic-limestone type was located at the center belt approximately trending NWW, surrounded by shallow water slope facies tuff/tuffite type at the two flanks and deep water slope facies breccia/calcirudite at the most outside. The depression facies sandstone-mudstone type, which comprised mainly mudstone, deposited between volcanic islands (platform facies volcanic-limestone type). Based on the field mapping and stratigraphic section data, seven rift-related sedimentary facies were recognized and a depositional model for volcanic island was proposed. It is revealed that some volcanic island chain formed quickly and intermittently in the Qamdo Block during violent eruption, and small carbonate reef, shoal,platform occurred above or on edge of volcanic island, and some slope sedimentary facies surrounded volcano island chain during dormant period of volcanic activities. Three types of fusulinid assemblages were distinguished in the carbonate rocks, which deposited in varied positions of a palaeo-volcanic island: (1) Misellina- Schwagerina assemblage occurred above or on edge of volcanic island, (2) Parafusulina assemblage was located at restricted depression facies among volcanic islands or carbonate platform, and (3) the reworked Pseudofusulina-Schwagerina assemblage occurred at slope facies near margin of volcanic island, which originally deposited in the shallow-water carbonate platform, then collapsed along the volcanic island margin with fusulinid-bearing grain-supported carbonate conglomerate or calcirudite, and finally re-deposited on the deeper slope. The sedimentary sequence

  2. Depositional model of Permian Luodianian volcanic island and its impact on the distribution of fusulinid assemblage in southern Qinghai,Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Pan-riftizational tectonic activity reached climax at Luodianian (Permian) in the East Tethyan Domain, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Because of eruptive volcanics and influence of terrigenous materials, a complex volcanic-sedimentary landform formed on the sea floor in southern Qinghai. Four sedimentary facies types were recognized based on detailed field mapping. Spatially, platform facies volcanic-limestone type was located at the center belt approximately trending NWW, surrounded by shallow water slope facies tuff/tuffite type at the two flanks and deep water slope facies breccia/calcirudite at the most outside. The depression facies sandstone-mudstone type, which comprised mainly mudstone, de-posited between volcanic islands (platform facies volcanic-limestone type). Based on the field map-ping and stratigraphic section data, seven rift-related sedimentary facies were recognized and a depo-sitional model for volcanic island was proposed. It is revealed that some volcanic island chain formed quickly and intermittently in the Qamdo Block during violent eruption, and small carbonate reef, shoal, platform occurred above or on edge of volcanic island, and some slope sedimentary facies surrounded volcano island chain during dormant period of volcanic activities. Three types of fusulinid assemblages were distinguished in the carbonate rocks, which deposited in varied positions of a palaeo-volcanic island: (1) Misellina-Schwagerina assemblage occurred above or on edge of volcanic island, (2) Para-fusulina assemblage was located at restricted depression facies among volcanic islands or carbonate platform, and (3) the reworked Pseudofusulina-Schwagerina assemblage occurred at slope facies near margin of volcanic island, which originally deposited in the shallow-water carbonate platform, then collapsed along the volcanic island margin with fusulinid-bearing grain-supported carbonate con-glomerate or calcirudite, and finally re-deposited on the deeper slope. The sedimentary

  3. The Dras arc: two successive volcanic events on eroded oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Ingrid

    1989-04-01

    The Dras arc is recognized as a volcanic arc system in the western part of the Indus suture zone and it constitutes the link between the Ladakh batholith and the Kohistan arc. This study is based on detailed mapping of the area between Dras, Kargil and Sanku which revealed the following: (1) The ultramafics of Dras and Thasgam can be followed across the Suru Dras ridge and are not intrusive into the arc volcanics, but instead constitute the most probably oceanic substratum of these volcanics. (2) Successive volcanic events are distinguished: (a) Dras I is a variable volcaniclastic series rich in slates and carbonates, which can probably be assigned to the Albo-Cenomanian, as dated by orbitolines. This series is intruded by gabbro, diorite and granite and is deformed, essentially in the northern part. It is unconformably overlain by (b) the Dras II pyroclastics which grade southward into volcanic breccia and thus enable the location of the centres of volcanic activity during this younger period.

  4. Mode switching in volcanic seismicity: El Hierro 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nick S.; Bell, Andrew F.; Main, Ian G.

    2016-05-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter b value is commonly used in volcanic eruption forecasting to infer material or mechanical properties from earthquake distributions. Such studies typically analyze discrete time windows or phases, but the choice of such windows is subjective and can introduce significant bias. Here we minimize this sample bias by iteratively sampling catalogs with randomly chosen windows and then stack the resulting probability density functions for the estimated b>˜ value to determine a net probability density function. We examine data from the El Hierro seismic catalog during a period of unrest in 2011-2013 and demonstrate clear multimodal behavior. Individual modes are relatively stable in time, but the most probable b>˜ value intermittently switches between modes, one of which is similar to that of tectonic seismicity. Multimodality is primarily associated with intermittent activation and cessation of activity in different parts of the volcanic system rather than with respect to any systematic inferred underlying process.

  5. Descartes region - Evidence for Copernican-age volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W., III; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1972-01-01

    A model that suggests that the high-albedo central region of the Descartes Formation was formed by Copernican-age volcanism was developed from Orbiter photography, Apollo 12 multispectral photography, earth-based spectrophotometry, and thermal IR and radar data. The bright surface either is abundant in centimeter-sized rocks or is formed from an insulating debris layer overlying a surface with an abundance of rocks in the 1- to 20-cm size range. On the basis of these data, the bright unit is thought to be a young pyroclastic deposit mantling older volcanic units of the Descartes Formation. Since the Apollo 16 target point is only 50 km NW of the central part of this unit, evidence for material associated with this unique highland formation should be searched for in returned soil and rock samples.

  6. Engineering geological characterization of volcanic rocks of ethiopian and sardinian highlands to be used as construction materials

    OpenAIRE

    Engidasew, Tesfaye Asresahagne

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of the study conducted on the “Geoengineering characterization of volcanic rocks from Ethiopian and Sardinian highlands to be used as construction materials”. Though, the two project areas are geographically far apart, both are partly covered with volcanic rocks mainly consisting of basic and subordinate felsic rocks. The research was conducted in two countries; part I, the Ethiopian Project area located on the northwestern central Highlands of ...

  7. The concurrent emergence and causes of double volcanic hotspot tracks on the Pacific plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, David T; Davies, D. R.; Campbell, I. H.

    2017-01-01

    Mantle plumes are buoyant upwellings of hot rock that transport heat from Earth's core to its surface, generating anomalous regions of volcanism that are not directly associated with plate tectonic processes. The best-studied example is the Hawaiian-Emperor chain, but the emergence of two sub......-parallel volcanic tracks along this chain, Loa and Kea, and the systematic geochemical differences between them have remained unexplained. Here we argue that the emergence of these tracks coincides with the appearance of other double volcanic tracks on the Pacific plate and a recent azimuthal change in the motion...... of the plate. We propose a three-part model that explains the evolution of Hawaiian double-track volcanism: first, mantle flow beneath the rapidly moving Pacific plate strongly tilts the Hawaiian plume and leads to lateral separation between high- and low-pressure melt source regions; second, the recent...

  8. Massive Volcanic Glass: Natural Pozzolan in the West of São Paulo State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcísio José Montanheiro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Some occurrences of massive volcanic glass have been recorded in the western region of São Paulo State duringgeological mapping and prospecting and technological characterization of pozzolanic materials. The massive volcanic glassis associated with trachydacites from the Serra Geral Formation. The geometry of these layers has not been determined yetbecause they are covered by sediments. These rocks were identified as natural pozzolans because their active component,volcanic glass, reacted with lime forming a calcium silicate. The technological properties of the cement produced using suchpozzolans were improved. Furthermore, the use of pozzolans reduces carbon dioxide emission and limestone extractionsince pozzolans replace part of the portland clinker in the final product. This paper presents results of some studies onmassive volcanic glass as an active component of pozzolans. In addition to that, this paper discusses the importance of thisfinding for construction industry and the great potential of pozzolanic materials, due to the considerable size of Serra GeralFormation in Brazil.

  9. Differentiation and volcanism in the lunar highlands: photogeologic evidence and Apollo 16 implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, N.J.; McCauley, J.F.

    1972-01-01

    Materials of possible volcanic origin in the lunar highlands include (1) highland plains materials, (2) materials forming closely spaced hills in which summit furrows and chains of craters are common and (3) materials forming closely spaced hills (some of which parallel the lunar grid) on which summit furrows and chain craters are rare. The highland plains materials probably are basaltic lavas with less Fe and Ti than the mare plains materials. The two hilly units appear to consist of materials that, if volcanic, were more viscous in the molten state than any of the lunar plains units; thus these materials may be significantly enriched in felsic components. Most of the highland materials of possible volcanic origin formed after the Imbrium multi-ring basin but before mare material completed flooding parts of the moon; they therefore postdate accretion of the moon and may represent several episodes of premare volcanism. ?? 1972.

  10. Uzon-Geysernaya volcano-tectonic depression: geodynamics phenomena last years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaenko, Yulia

    2010-05-01

    One of the most active volcanic arcs in the Pacific Rim, Kamchatka is also one with poor geophysical constraints on its shallow magma plumbing systems. Uzon calderas lie within a graben approximately 20 km wide running beneath the eastern Kamchatka volcanic group. Cross sections of the shallow crustal graben show that it steps WNW from its southeasterly bounding fault beneath Kikhpinych volcano, deepening toward Uzon caldera. Uzon Caldera Summary (by Global Volcanism Program, http://www.volcano.si.edu ): Country, Subregion Name: Russia; Kamchatka Peninsula Volcano Number: 1000-17 Volcano Type: Calderas Last Known Eruption: 200 AD +/- 300 years Summit Elevation: 1617 m (5,305 feet) Coordinates: 54.50°N, 159.97°E Kikhpinych volcano Summary (by Global Volcanism Program, http://www.volcano.si.edu ): Country, Subregion Name: Russia, Kamchatka Peninsula Volcano Number: 1000-18 Volcano Type: Stratovolcanoes Last Known Eruption: 1550 (?) Summit Elevation: 1552 m (5,092 feet) Coordinates: 160.253°N, 160.253°E The twin Uzon and Geysernaya calderas, containing Kamchatka's largest geothermal area, from a 7x18 km Uzon-Geysernaya volcano-tectonic depression that originated during multiple eruptions during the mid-Pleistocene. Post-caldera activity was largely Pleistocene in age and consisted of the extrusion of small silicic lava domes and flows, maar formation and several Holocene phreatic eruptions. The extensive high-temperature hydrothermal system includes the many hot springs, mudpots, and geysers of the Valley of the Geysers on the SE margin of the Uzon-Geysernaya depression. Hydrothermal explosions took place in the western part of caldera in 1986 and 1989. The Valley of the Geysers in the far eastern portion of Uzon caldera is considered derived from shallow meteoric water in contact with a heat source associated with Kikhpinych volcano The general structure places a deep aquifer shallower than a depth of about 2 km with the top of a cooling magma chamber at depths

  11. The Role of Magmatic and Volcanic Loads in Generating Seaward Dipping Reflector Structures on Volcanic Rifted Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X.; Buck, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    The largest volcanic constructs on Earth are the seismically imaged seaward dipping reflector (SDR) units found offshore of many rifted continental margins, including a large portion that border the Atlantic Ocean. There is considerable controversy over whether their formation requires large offset (i.e. 10s of km) normal faults or not. Although there is some evidence for faulting in association with SDRs, we here show that a wide range of SDRs structures can be produced solely by volcanic loading. To do this we first derive a simple analytic description of a particular type of volcanic construct. We assume that the increase in density when fluid magma in a dike solidifies provides load at the rift center onto the end of a lithospheric plate. Extrusives are assumed to form flat-topped layers that fill in the flexural depression produced by the load of the solidified dike. The thin-plate flexure approximation is used to calculate the deflections due to the vertical load. This simple model produces structures similar to the observed SDRs. Expressions for the maximum thickness of the volcanic pile and the dip of an individual SDR are derived in terms of the flexure parameter and material densities. Asymmetry of SDR units seen across some conjugate margins can be explained with this model if periodic offsets, or jumps of the center of magmatism are included. In addition, we developed a numerical model of lithospheric extension, magma intrusion and volcanism with a temperature dependent elasto-viscous and brittle-plastic rheology. Results of these 2D cross-sectional models with fixed thermal structure confirm the qualitative predictions of the analytic model without the simplified uniform plate assumption. Preliminary results suggest that the rapid subsidence of SDRs, inferred for some rifted margins, can occur if magma is supplied only to the brittle upper layer and the hot weak lower crust is thinned by stretching. This numerical approach may also allow us to test

  12. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  13. Relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption inferred from historical records

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪洲; 高峰; 吴雪娟; 孟宪森

    2004-01-01

    A large number of seismic records are discovered for the first time in the historical materials about Wudalianchi volcanic group eruption in 1720~1721, which provides us with abundant volcanic earthquake information. Based on the written records, the relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption is discussed in the paper. Furthermore it is pointed that earthquake swarm is an important indication of volcanic eruption. Therefore, monitoring volcanic earthquakes is of great significance for forecasting volcanic eruption.

  14. Can Lupus Cause Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lupus Living well with lupus Can lupus cause depression? Life with lupus can be challenging. With symptoms ... treatable illness called clinical depression. Symptoms of Clinical Depression People are considered clinically depressed when they have ...

  15. Older Adults and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find more information? Reprints Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... depression need treatment to feel better. Types of Depression There are several types of depression. The most ...

  16. Depression and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms Depression Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Depression Depression Fatigue Walking (Gait) Difficulties Numbness or Tingling ... away from addictive substances such as alcohol. Clinical depression It’s important to distinguish between mild, everyday “blues” — ...

  17. Geomorphological Approach for Regional Zoning In The Merapi Volcanic Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langgeng Wahyu Santosa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphologial approach can be used as the basic for identifying and analyzing the natural resources potentials, especially in volcanic landscape. Based on its geomorphology, Merapi volcanic landscape can be divided into 5 morphological units, i.e.: volcanic cone, volcanic slope, volcanic foot, volcanic foot plain, and fluvio-volcanic plain. Each of these morphological units has specific characteristic and natural resources potential. Based on the condition of geomorphology, the regional zoning can be compiled to support the land use planning and to maintain the conservation of environmental function in the Merapi Volcanic area.

  18. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  19. Volcanism and associated hazards: The Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R.I.

    2009-01-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  20. Volcanic evolution of central Basse-Terre Island revisited on the basis of new geochronology and geomorphology data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, J.; Quidelleur, X.; Lahitte, P.

    2015-10-01

    Twenty-six new and seven previous K-Ar ages obtained on groundmass separates for samples from the Axial Chain massif (Guadeloupe, F.W.I.), associated with geomorphological investigations, allow us to propose a new model of the volcanic evolution of the central part of Basse-Terre Island. The Axial Chain is composed of four edifices, Moustique, Matéliane, Capesterre, and Icaque mounts, showing coeval activity from 681 ± 12 to 509 ± 10 ka, which contradicts a previous hypothesis that flank collapse affected them successively. Our geomorphological reconstruction shows that the Axial Chain can be considered as a single large volcano, named the Southern Axial Chain volcano (SCA), rather than a succession of several smaller volcanoes. It raises questions regarding the formation of a large depression within the SCA volcano, prior to the construction of the Sans-Toucher volcano between 451 ± 13 and 412 ± 8 ka. Given presently available evidence, a slump affecting the western part of the SCA volcano is the most probable scenario to reconcile the complete age dataset and the present-day morphology of central Basse-Terre. Finally, our study shows that the SCA volcano had a post-activity volume of 90 km3, implying a construction rate of 0.5 km3/kyr. This value strongly constrains interpretations of magma generation processes throughout the Lesser Antilles arc.

  1. Engineering a robotic approach to mapping exposed volcanic fissures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcheta, C. E.; Parness, A.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Field geology provides a framework for advanced computer models and theoretical calculations of volcanic systems. Some field terrains, though, are poorly preserved or accessible, making documentation, quantification, and investigation impossible. Over 200 volcanologists at the 2012 Kona Chapman Conference on volcanology agreed that and important step forward in the field over the next 100 years should address the realistic size and shape of volcanic conduits. The 1969 Mauna Ulu eruption of Kīlauea provides a unique opportunity to document volcanic fissure conduits, thus, we have an ideal location to begin addressing this topic and provide data on these geometries. Exposed fissures can be mapped with robotics using machine vision. In order to test the hypothesis that fissures have irregularities with depth that will influence their fluid dynamical behavior, we must first map the fissure vents and shallow conduit to deci- or centimeter scale. We have designed, constructed, and field-tested the first version of a robotic device that will image an exposed volcanic fissure in three dimensions. The design phase included three steps: 1) create the payload harness and protective shell to prevent damage to the electronics and robot, 2) construct a circuit board to have the electronics communicate with a surface-based computer, and 3) prototype wheel shapes that can handle a variety of volcanic rock textures. The robot's mechanical parts were built using 3d printing, milling, casting and laser cutting techniques, and the electronics were assembled from off the shelf components. The testing phase took place at Mauna Ulu, Kīlauea, Hawai'i, from May 5 - 9, 2014. Many valuable design lessons were learned during the week, and the first ever 3D map from inside a volcanic fissure were successfully collected. Three vents had between 25% and 95% of their internal surfaces imaged. A fourth location, a non-eruptive crack (possibly a fault line) had two transects imaging the textures

  2. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia. Part 3: Update 2015 Management of special circumstances: Depression, Suicidality, substance use disorders and pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthøj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    These updated guidelines are based on the first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in the years 2005 and 2006. For this 2015 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations which are clinically and scientifically relevant. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines a systematic review, as well as a data extraction from national guidelines have been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and subsequently categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). This third part of the updated guidelines covers the management of the following specific treatment circumstances: comorbid depression, suicidality, various comorbid substance use disorders (legal and illegal drugs), and pregnancy and lactation. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of patients with schizophrenia.

  3. Tempo, idade e cultura: uma contribuição à psicopatologia da depressão no idoso. Parte II: Uma investigação sobre a temporalidade e a medicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Lyra Bastos

    Full Text Available Procuramos aqui relacionar dois aspectos fundamentais das intuições culturais sobre a passagem do tempo – a temporalidade cíclica e a contínua – com a terapêutica médica e especialmente com a psicopatologia, numa visão crítica do constructo moderno da depressão no idoso. Inspirado em perspectivas de natureza antropológica, o texto se apóia na experiência clínica cotidiana e na atitude fenomenológica que orienta essa prática. Nas concepções culturais que tendem a perceber a passagem do tempo de forma predominantemente cíclica, o envelhecer é parte de um movimento eterno, e a família se perpetua em seus descendentes, nas suas tradições, no vínculo com a terra ou no exercício do ofício familiar. As transformações culturais que têm proporcionado a passagem para enfoques mais direcionais do tempo vão destacando cada vez mais o papel individual na história social. Quanto mais difícil for a passagem de Weltanschauungen tradicionais – de tendência circular, fatalista, repetitiva e eterna – para outras de tendência individualizante, burocratizante, planejadora e sucessiva, maiores as dificuldades para uma senectude satisfatória e maior a tendência à medicalização desse fracasso. Esta é a primeira (segunda parte de uma série de três artigos.

  4. Microscopic Evolution of Laboratory Volcanic Hybrid Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, H. O.; Griffith, W. A.; Benson, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the interaction between fluids and microscopic defects is one of the long-standing challenges in understanding a broad range of cracking processes, in part because they are so difficult to study experimentally. We address this issue by reexamining records of emitted acoustic phonon events during rock mechanics experiments under wet and dry conditions. The frequency spectrum of these events provides direct information regarding the state of the system. Such events are typically subdivided into high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) events, whereas intermediate “Hybrid” events, have HF onsets followed by LF ringing. At a larger scale in volcanic terranes, hybrid events are used empirically to predict eruptions, but their ambiguous physical origin limits their diagnostic use. By studying acoustic phonon emissions from individual microcracking events we show that the onset of a secondary instability-related to the transition from HF to LF-occurs during the fast equilibration phase of the system, leading to sudden increase of fluid pressure in the process zone. As a result of this squeezing process, a secondary instability akin to the LF event occurs. This mechanism is consistent with observations of hybrid earthquakes.

  5. Venus - Stereoscopic Images of Volcanic Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan image depicts a stereoscopic pair of an area on Venus with small volcanic domes. Stereoscopic images of Venus offer exciting new possibilities for scientific analysis of Venusian landforms, such as the domes shown here, impact craters, graben -- long rifts bounded by faults -- and other geologic features. Stereopsis, or a three-dimensional view of this scene, may be obtained by viewing with a stereoscope. One may also cut this photograph into two parts and look at the left image with the left eye and the right image with the right eye; conjugate images (the same features) should be about 5 centimeters (2 inches) apart when viewing. This area is located at 38.4 degrees south latitude and 78.3 degrees east longitude. The incidence, or look, angle of the left image is 28.5 degrees and that of the right image is 15.6 degrees. Radar illumination for both images comes from the left. A small dome at left center is about 140 meters (464 feet) high and 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) wide. Other domes with smaller relief can be perceived in three dimensions. At the smaller incidence angle used to acquire the image on the right, radar brightness is more sensitive to small changes in topography. This enhances the visibility of many of the domes in this scene.

  6. Microscopic Evolution of Laboratory Volcanic Hybrid Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, H. O.; Griffith, W. A.; Benson, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the interaction between fluids and microscopic defects is one of the long-standing challenges in understanding a broad range of cracking processes, in part because they are so difficult to study experimentally. We address this issue by reexamining records of emitted acoustic phonon events during rock mechanics experiments under wet and dry conditions. The frequency spectrum of these events provides direct information regarding the state of the system. Such events are typically subdivided into high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) events, whereas intermediate “Hybrid” events, have HF onsets followed by LF ringing. At a larger scale in volcanic terranes, hybrid events are used empirically to predict eruptions, but their ambiguous physical origin limits their diagnostic use. By studying acoustic phonon emissions from individual microcracking events we show that the onset of a secondary instability–related to the transition from HF to LF–occurs during the fast equilibration phase of the system, leading to sudden increase of fluid pressure in the process zone. As a result of this squeezing process, a secondary instability akin to the LF event occurs. This mechanism is consistent with observations of hybrid earthquakes. PMID:28074878

  7. Predicted Abundances of Carbon Compounds in Volcanic Gases on Io

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, L; Schaefer, Laura

    2004-01-01

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of carbon in volcanic gases on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K), pressure (10^-8 to 10^+2 bars), and composition ranges (bulk O/S atomic ratios \\~0 to 3), which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (1760 K, 0.01 bar, O/S ~ 1.5). Bulk C/S atomic ratios ranging from 10^-6 to 10^-1 in volcanic gases are used with a nominal value of 10^-3 based upon upper limits from Voyager for carbon in the Loki plume on Io. Carbon monoxide and CO2 are the two major carbon gases under all conditions studied. Carbonyl sulfide and CS2 are orders of magnitude less abundant. Consideration of different loss processes (photolysis, condensation, kinetic reactions in the plume) indicates that photolysis is probably the major loss process for all gases. Both CO and CO2 should be observable in volcanic plumes and in Io's atmosphere at abundances of several hundred parts per million by volume for a bulk C/S ratio of 10^-3.

  8. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I.; Romero, M. C.; Sánchez, N.; Morales, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures. PMID:27265878

  9. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I.; Romero, M. C.; Sánchez, N.; Morales, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures.

  10. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I; Romero, M C; Sánchez, N; Morales, J M

    2016-06-06

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures.

  11. The structural architecture of the Los Humeros volcanic complex and geothermal field, Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Sulpizio, Roberto; Carrasco Núñez, Gerardo; Davila Harris, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    the structural features of the studied area. The integration of these structural data with available stratigraphy, geological maps and well logs is used to propose a new model of the caldera and geothermal field. As a result of our study, we interpret the Xaltipan and Zaragoza calderas mainly as trap-door structures. These calderas affected a cone-shaped volcanic sequence, formed mainly by effusive products emitted in the pre-caldera forming phase and now hosting the geothermal reservoir (11-1.5 Ma). The main ring faults of the two calderas are buried and sealed by widespread post-calderas volcanic products, and for this reason probably do not have enough secondary permeability to be main channels for hydrothermal fluid circulation. Active, fast-moving subvertical faults have been identified inside the Zaragoza caldera depression. These structures affect recent post-caldera pyroclastic deposits and probably are related both to active resurgence inside the caldera and to regional faults NW-SE striking. The presence of active faults generating high secondary permeability is the most important structural element shaping the geothermal reservoir. Future plans of expansion of the geothermal field should focus on these active faults, considering their geometry at depth and the whole structural architecture of the Los Humeros volcanic complex.

  12. Risk factors of depression occurrence in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Miloseva, Lence

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this lecture is focus on different aspects of occurerence of depression in Adolescence, especially with focus on risk factors. I introduced epidemiology of depression : causes, treatment, and prevention (Abela & Hankin,2008). The special part of the lecture was focus on etiology of depression. Adolescence is characterized by positive gains in cognitive maturity, better interpersonal skills, new experiences, increased autonomy, and hormonal changes (Feldman & Elliot, 1990). Alt...

  13. The Temporal and Spatial Association of Faulting and Volcanism in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field - Rio Grande Rift, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. A.; Hudson, M. R.; Minor, S. A.; McIntosh, W. C.; Miggins, D. P.; Grauch, V.

    2008-12-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene Cerros del Rio volcanic field (CdRVF) in northern New Mexico is one of the largest ( greater than 700 square kilometers) predominantly basaltic and andesitic volcanic centers of the Rio Grande rift; it records the late-stage, volcano-tectonic evolution of the SW part of the Espanola Basin. The CdRVF reflects both regional proclivity toward Pliocene basaltic volcanism following protracted Neogene extensional tectonism and localized eruptive response to migration of basin- bounding faults. Approximately 180 cubic kilometers of flat lying to gently dipping basalt, andesite, and minor dacite lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of the CdRVF were erupted from more than 50 exposed vents between 2.8 Ma and 1.14 Ma. Subsurface interpretations of drill hole data and incised canyon exposures of the Rio Grande show that volcanic deposits are interbedded with Santa Fe Group sediments deposited in actively subsiding sub-basins of the southernmost Espanola Basin. Major basin-bounding faults in this area strike north to northwest, dip basinward, and have mostly dip-slip and subordinate strike-slip displacement. Although major basin-bounding faults were active prior to the onset of volcanism in the CdRVF, protracted extension resulted in a westward migration of graben-bounding faults. Phases of coeval volcanism at 2.8-2.6 Ma, 2.5-2.2 Ma, and 1.5-1.1 Ma, decreased in eruptive volume through time and are delineated on the basis of mapped stratigraphy, argon geochronology, paleomagnetic and aeromagnetic properties, and record a syntectonic westward migration of eruptive centers. The alignment of vent areas with mapped faults strongly suggests deep magmatic sources utilized local structures as conduits (i.e. faults and fractures developed in response to regional stress). However, some near-surface feeder dikes associated with eroded cinder cones record orientations that are not typically correlative with regional fault patterns suggesting near-surface conduits are

  14. Re-processing TOMS UV Measurements to Retrieve SO2 Emissions From Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, B. L.; Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Li, C.; Haffner, D. P.; Leonard, P.; Carn, S. A.; Telling, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The SO2 Monitoring Group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is producing a new multi-satellite long term data set of volcanic SO2 column amounts and heights (MSVOLSO2L4) as part of the NASA MEaSUREs Program. Here we present re-analysis of the UV measurements (BUV) from the NASA Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (N7 TOMS: 1978-1993). Ozone is the dominant atmospheric absorber in the BUV spectrum, but volcanic eruptions can produce enough SO2 to be distinguished from ozone background. Quantitative retrieval of volcanic SO2 requires:1) Separation of the O3 and SO2 absorption in BUV radiances;2) Close to zero mean SO2 background;3) RT forward model that accounts for the presence of volcanic ash in the plume; 4) A priori knowledge of the ozone and SO2 vertical profiles.Our iterative retrieval algorithm returns O3 and SO2 column amounts, effective reflectivity and its spectral slope. The retrieval model also generates a 4 x 4 gain matrix for the SO2 free regions that is used to soft calibrate the measured 340 nm BUV radiance. The spectral slope implicitly accounts for the interference of volcanic ash, but more explicit ash treatment is required to better quantify SO2 errors in volcanic plumes heavily loaded with ash. This presentation will discuss the methods used to characterize the error sources and assess the quality of this unique long-term SO2 data set.

  15. Volcanic caves of East Africa - an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim W. Simons

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous Tertiary to recent volcanoes are located in East Africa. Thus, much of the region is made up volcanic rock, which hosts the largest and greatest variety of East Africas caves. Exploration of volcanic caves has preoccupied members of Cave Exploration Group of East Africa (CEGEA for the past 30 years. The various publications edited by CEGEA are in this respect a treasure troves of speleological information. In the present paper an overview on the most important volcanic caves and areas are shortly reported.

  16. Toward Forecasting Volcanic Eruptions using Seismic Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Brenguier, Florent; Campillo, Michel; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Duputel, Zacharie; Coutant, Olivier; Nercessian, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    During inter-eruption periods, magma pressurization yields subtle changes of the elastic properties of volcanic edifices. We use the reproducibility properties of the ambient seismic noise recorded on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano to measure relative seismic velocity variations of less than 0.1 % with a temporal resolution of one day. Our results show that five studied volcanic eruptions were preceded by clearly detectable seismic velocity decreases within the zone of magma injection. These precursors reflect the edifice dilatation induced by magma pressurization and can be useful indicators to improve the forecasting of volcanic eruptions.

  17. How Academic Psychiatry Can Better Prepare Students for Their Future Patients: Part I--The Failure to Recognize Depression and Risk for Suicide in Primary Care; Problem Identification, Responsibility, and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, C. Raymond

    2008-01-01

    The author, after a review of the relevant literature, found that depression and the risk for suicide remain unacceptably underrecognized in primary care (PC). The negative consequences are substantial for patients and their physicians. Suicide prevention in PC begins with the recognition of depression because suicide occurs largely during…

  18. Volcanic risk assessment: Quantifying physical vulnerability in the built environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, S. F.; Spence, R. J. S.; Fonseca, J. F. B. D.; Solidum, R. U.; Wilson, T. M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents structured and cost-effective methods for assessing the physical vulnerability of at-risk communities to the range of volcanic hazards, developed as part of the MIA-VITA project (2009-2012). An initial assessment of building and infrastructure vulnerability has been carried out for a set of broadly defined building types and infrastructure categories, with the likelihood of damage considered separately for projectile impact, ash fall loading, pyroclastic density current dynamic pressure and earthquake ground shaking intensities. In refining these estimates for two case study areas: Kanlaon volcano in the Philippines and Fogo volcano in Cape Verde, we have developed guidelines and methodologies for carrying out physical vulnerability assessments in the field. These include identifying primary building characteristics, such as construction material and method, as well as subsidiary characteristics, for example the size and prevalence of openings, that may be important in assessing eruption impacts. At-risk buildings around Kanlaon were found to be dominated by timber frame buildings that exhibit a high vulnerability to pyroclastic density currents, but a low vulnerability to failure from seismic shaking. Around Fogo, the predominance of unreinforced masonry buildings with reinforced concrete slab roofs suggests a high vulnerability to volcanic earthquake but a low vulnerability to ash fall loading. Given the importance of agriculture for local livelihoods around Kanlaon and Fogo, we discuss the potential impact of infrastructure vulnerability for local agricultural economies, with implications for volcanic areas worldwide. These methodologies and tools go some way towards offering a standardised approach to carrying out future vulnerability assessments for populated volcanic areas.

  19. Volcanic Eruptions in the southern Red Sea 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsson, Sigurjón; Xu, Wenbin; Ruch, Joël

    2017-04-01

    After more than a century of volcanic quiescence the southern Red Sea has seen three volcanic eruptions during the past decade. The eruptions occurred on Jebel at Tair Island in 2007-8 and within the Zubair archipelago in 2011-12 and 2013. As the islands are remote, without geophysical instrumentation, and lack direct observers, we obtained most of the information about these eruptions from studying Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and optical satellite images. We used the images to deduce the timing and progress of the volcanic activity and to constrain the geometry of the dikes feeding the eruptions. The Jebel at Tair eruption started energetically and caused damage to Yemeni military buildings on the island and even a few casualties. The erupted lava came from a short summit fissure and covers about 6 km2, which is almost half of the island. The fissure orientations of this and previous eruptions indicate that the stress field on Tair Island is temporarily varying and isolated from the regional Red Sea stress field. The eruptions within the Zubair archipelago, which is located about 50 km southeast of Tair Island, produced two new islands and were fed by dikes much larger than the small size of the new islands might suggest. This is indicated by relative displacements between different islands in the archipelago, derived from offset tracking of SAR images. Together the three volcanic eruptions and several seismic swarms indicate that the southern Red Sea has been experiencing a rifting episode with multiple dike intrusions and meter-scale extension, and that this part of the plate boundary is more active than previously thought.

  20. Resident perception of volcanic hazards and evacuation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, D. K.; Gisladottir, G.; Dominey-Howes, D.

    2009-02-01

    Katla volcano, located beneath the Mýrdalsjökull ice cap in southern Iceland, is capable of producing catastrophic jökulhlaup. The Icelandic Civil Protection (ICP), in conjunction with scientists, local police and emergency managers, developed mitigation strategies for possible jökulhlaup produced during future Katla eruptions. These strategies were tested during a full-scale evacuation exercise in March 2006. A positive public response during a volcanic crisis not only depends upon the public's knowledge of the evacuation plan but also their knowledge and perception of the possible hazards. To improve the effectiveness of residents' compliance with warning and evacuation messages it is important that emergency management officials understand how the public interpret their situation in relation to volcanic hazards and their potential response during a crisis and apply this information to the ongoing development of risk mitigation strategies. We adopted a mixed methods approach in order to gain a broad understanding of residents' knowledge and perception of the Katla volcano in general, jökulhlaup hazards specifically and the regional emergency evacuation plan. This entailed field observations during the major evacuation exercise, interviews with key emergency management officials and questionnaire survey interviews with local residents. Our survey shows that despite living within the hazard zone, many residents do not perceive that their homes could be affected by a jökulhlaup, and many participants who perceive that their homes are safe, stated that they would not evacuate if an evacuation warning was issued. Alarmingly, most participants did not receive an evacuation message during the exercise. However, the majority of participants who took part in the exercise were positive about its implementation. This assessment of resident knowledge and perception of volcanic hazards and the evacuation plan is the first of its kind in this region. Our data can be used

  1. The radiation of surface wave energy: Implications for volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, M. M.; Denolle, M.; Lyons, J. J.; Nakahara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The seismic energy radiated by active volcanism is one common measurement of eruption size. For example, the magnitudes of individual earthquakes in volcano-tectonic (VT) swarms can be summed and expressed in terms of cumulative magnitude, energy, or moment release. However, discrepancies exist in current practice when treating the radiated energy of volcano seismicity dominated by surface waves. This has implications for volcanic tremor, since eruption tremor typically originates at shallow depth and is made up of surface waves. In the absence of a method to compute surface wave energy, estimates of eruption energy partitioning between acoustic and seismic waves typically assume seismic energy is composed of body waves. Furthermore, without the proper treatment of surface wave energy, it is unclear how much volcanic tremor contributes to the overall seismic energy budget during volcanic unrest. To address this issue, we derive, from first principles, the expression of surface wave radiated energy. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave energy equation is naturally expressed in the frequency domain instead of the time domain. We validate our result by reproducing an analytical solution for the radiated power of a vertical force source acting on a free surface. We further show that the surface wave energy equation leads to an explicit relationship between energy and the imaginary part of the surface wave Green's tensor at the source location, a fundamental property recognized within the field of seismic interferometry. With the new surface wave energy equation, we make clear connections to reduced displacement and propose an improved formula for the calculation of surface wave reduced displacement involving integration over the frequency band of tremor. As an alternative to reduced displacement, we show that reduced particle velocity squared is also a valid physical measure of tremor size, one based on seismic energy rate instead of seismic moment rate. These

  2. Bibliotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Tegan

    2013-04-01

    Bibliotherapy can be used to treat mild to moderate depression or subthreshold depressive symptoms, as a sole or supplementary therapy. Bibliotherapy is a form of guided self-help. The patient works through a structured book, independently from the doctor. The role of the doctor is to support and motivate the patient as they continue through the book and to help clarify any questions or concerns the patient may have. Relevant books can be purchased or often borrowed from a library, with limited cost and good accessibility from a patient perspective. Patients need to have a reading age above 12 years and have a positive attitude toward self-help. Bibliotherapy has NHMRC Level 1 evidence of efficacy and no serious adverse effects have been reported. This article forms part of a series on non-drug treatments, which summarise the indications, considerations and the evidence, and where clinicians and patients can find further information.

  3. Ages and geochemical comparison of coeval plutons and volcanics from the central and eastern Aleutian arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y.; Kelemen, P. B.; Goldstein, S. L.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Hemming, S. R.; Rioux, M. E.; Cooperdock, E. H. G.

    2016-12-01

    On average, arc volcanics are compositionally different from the bulk continental crust. The relatively little known plutonic part of intra-oceanic arcs is more similar to continental crust, and may play a significant role for understanding continental crust formation. Our pilot study [1] demonstrated that in the central and eastern Aleutian islands, predominantly tholeiitic Quaternary volcanic rocks have statistically different Pb-Nd-Sr-Hf isotopic signatures than predominantly calc-alkaline Miocene and older plutonic rocks, showing that these plutonics and volcanics were derived from compositionally different sources. However, studies of older volcanics are needed to determine whether (1) there was a change in magma chemistry in the central and eastern Aleutian arc between the Miocene and the present-day, or (2) coeval plutonics and volcanics are compositionally different, and formed by different processes. For example, silica- and water-rich calc-alkaline magmas may preferentially stall and form plutons after extensive degassing and rapid viscosity increase in the mid-crust, while silica- and water-poor tholeiitic magmas tend to erupt at the surface. Here we report new geochronological and geochemical results on samples collected during the 2015 GeoPRISMS shared logistics field campaign. We collected more than 500 volcanic and plutonic samples from Unalaska, Umnak and Atka islands, including pillow lavas, sills, and larger plutons. A subset of 50 samples has been analyzed for major and trace element chemistry, Pb-Nd-Sr-Hf isotopes, and Ar-Ar geochronology. So far,40Ar/39Ar cooling dates measured for the volcanics span a wide range, from zero to 35 Ma, which is comparable to the age distribution of the plutons ( 9 Ma to 39 Ma) from these islands. The forthcoming, combined geochronology and geochemistry of coeval plutonics and volcanics will contribute to our understanding of the connections between arc magmatism and continental crust formation. [1] Cai et al

  4. Importance of tropospheric volcanic aerosol for indirect radiative forcing of climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmidt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Observations and models have shown that continuously degassing volcanoes have a potentially large effect on the natural background aerosol loading and the radiative state of the atmosphere. Here, we use a global aerosol microphysics model to quantify the impact of these volcanic emissions on the cloud albedo radiative forcing under pre-industrial (PI and present-day (PD conditions. We find that volcanic degassing increases global annual mean cloud droplet number concentrations by 40% under PI conditions, but by only 10% under PD conditions. Consequently, volcanic degassing causes a global annual mean cloud albedo effect of −1.06 W m−2 in the PI era but only −0.56 W m−2 in the PD era. This non-equal effect is explained partly by the lower background aerosol concentrations in the PI era, but also because more aerosol particles are produced per unit of volcanic sulphur emission in the PI atmosphere. The higher sensitivity of the PI atmosphere to volcanic emissions has an important consequence for the anthropogenic cloud radiative forcing because the large uncertainty in volcanic emissions translates into an uncertainty in the PI baseline cloud radiative state. Assuming a −50/+100% uncertainty range in the volcanic sulphur flux, we estimate the annual mean anthropogenic cloud albedo forcing to lie between −1.16 W m−2 and −0.86 W m−2. Therefore, the volcanically induced uncertainty in the PI baseline cloud radiative state substantially adds to the already large uncertainty in the magnitude of the indirect radiative forcing of climate.

  5. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating for volcanic rocks of the Dasi Formation in southeast Hubei Province, middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River and its implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Guiqing; MAO Jingwen; LI Ruiling; ZHOU Shaodong; YE Huishou; YAN Quanren; ZHANG Zusong

    2006-01-01

    The Jinniu Basin in southeast Hubei,located at the westernmost part of middle-lower valley of the Yangtze River, is one of the important volcanic basins in East China. Volcanic rocks in the Jinniu Basin are distributed mainly in the Majiashan Formation, the Lingxiang Formation and the Dasi Formation, consisting of rhyolite, basalt and basaltic andesite, (trachy)-basalt and basaltic trachy-andesite and (trachy)-andesite and (trachy)-dacite and rhyolite respectively, in which the Dasi volcanism is volumetrically dominant and widespread. The Dasi volcanic rocks were selected for SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating to confirm the timing of volcanism. The results indicate that there exist a large amount of magmatic zircons characterized by high U and Th contents in the volcanic rocks. The concordia ages for 13 points are 128±1Ma (MSWD = 3.0). On account of the shape of zircons and Th/U ratios, this age is considered to represent the crystallization time of the Dasi volcanism. The volcanic rocks in the Dasi, Majiashan and Lingxiang Formations share similar trace element and REE partition patterns as well as Sr-Nd isotopic compositions. In combination with the regional geology, it is proposed that the southeast Hubei volcanic rocks were formed mainly during the Early Cretaceous, just like other volcanic basins in middle-lower Yangtze valley. A lithospheric extension is also suggested for tectonic regime in this region in the Cretaceous Period.

  6. How older adults combine medical and experiential notions of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittink, Marsha N; Dahlberg, Britt; Biruk, Crystal; Barg, Frances K

    2008-09-01

    Past research has suggested that patients might not accept depression treatment in part because of differences between patient and doctor understandings of depression. In this article, we use a cultural models approach to explore how older adults incorporate clinical and experiential knowledge into their model of depression. We conducted semistructured interviews about depression with 19 patients aged 65 years and older who were identified by their physicians as depressed. We found that whereas older adults viewed as helpful the doctor's ability to identify symptoms and "put it all together" into a diagnosis, they felt that this viewpoint omitted important information about the etiology and feeling of depression grounded in embodied experience and social context. Our findings suggest that more emphasis on issues related to the etiology of depression, the effect of depression on social relationships, and emotions emanating from depression might lead to more acceptable depression treatments for older adults.

  7. [Olfaction in depressive disorders: Issues and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, G; Schaal, B

    2017-04-01

    Research on sensorial interactions with psychiatric diseases and particularly with the depressive syndrome has mainly focused on visual or auditory processes and much less on olfaction. The depressive illness is one of the most frequent psychiatric diagnoses in the community, with approximately one in five women and one in eight men experiencing a major depressive episode during their lifetime. Although genetic, epigenetic, neuroanatomical, neurochemical, neuroendocrinological and neuroimmunological changes can be detected during depression, the etiology of depression remains partly unclear. The current explanatory models are based on two main factors, i.e. pharmacological dysfunctions and stress effects. In this way and because of strong connections between olfactory pathways and cerebral areas implied in mood regulation and emotions (i.e. the limbic system and prefrontal areas), the interactions between olfaction and depression could constitute a relevant way of research at three different levels. First, olfactory dysfunction observed in depression could serve the diagnosis and contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms implied in thymic pathologies. Published papers show a decrease of olfactory sensitivity in major depression which does not occur in bipolar or saisonal depression. Second, it has been shown that olfactory deficits could induce depressive symptoms. In this context, an animal model (olfactory bulbectomized rat) reinforces the hypothesis of the important role of olfaction in depression based on neuroanatomical and neurochemical observations. Third, several publications have demonstrated that odors can positively impact the depressive mood. Thus, a remediation by odors in depression appears to be a promising way. From several decades, the olfaction/depression interactions have been covered by a broad literature. Thus, the present review will not propose an exhaustive examination but aims to point out the most recently published papers and

  8. Outcomes of Depression in Black Single Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Rahshida L

    2017-08-01

    Despite suggestions in the literature that depression has serious consequences, few studies have examined specific health and psychosocial outcomes of depression in Black single mothers. The purpose of this study was to estimate paths in a just-identified theoretical model of outcomes of depression for Black single mothers based on theoretical propositions and empirical findings. The model included the variables, depressive cognitions, depressive symptomatology, perceived social support, and positive health practices. Five direct and two indirect hypothesized relationships were estimated using structural equation modeling. A nonprobability sample of convenience of 159 Black single mothers aged 18 to 45 years was recruited for the study. This study used a cross-sectional correlational design. The participants responded in person or via the U.S. mail to the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale, the Depressive Cognition Scale, the Personal Resource Questionnaire 85-Part 2, and the Personal Lifestyle Questionnaire. Beta and Gamma path coefficients were statistically significant for four out of five hypothesized direct relationships within the model ( p .05). The two indirect paths were weak but statistically significant ( p < .01). Depressive symptoms and perceived social support were outcomes of depressive cognitions. Positive health practices was not a direct outcome of depressive cognitions. Perceived social support and positive health practices were outcomes of depressive symptoms.

  9. S-wave velocity structure inferred from receiver function inversion in Tengchong volcanic area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺传松; 王椿镛; 吴建平

    2004-01-01

    Tengchong volcanic area is located near the impinging and underthrust margin of India and Eurasia plates. The volcanic activity is closely related to the tectonic environment. The deep structure characteristics are inferred from the receiver function inversion with the teleseismic records in the paper. The results show that the low velocity zone is influenced by the NE-trending Dayingjiang fault. The S-wave low velocity structure occurs obviously in the southern part of the fault, but unobviously in its northern part. There are low velocity zones in the shallow position, which coincides with the seismicity. It also demonstrates that the low velocity zone is directly related to the thermal activity in the volcanic area. Therefore, we consider that the volcano may be alive again.

  10. GOSAT/TANSO-FTS Measurement of Volcanic and Geothermal CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Newhall, Christopher G.

    2010-05-01

    Approximately one tenth of the Earth's human population lives in direct reach of volcanic hazards. Being able to provide sufficiently early and scientifically sound warning is a key to volcanic hazard mitigation. Quantitative time-series monitoring of volcanic CO2 emissions will likely play a key role in such early warning activities in the future. Impending volcanic eruptions or any potentially disastrous activity that involves movement of magma in the subsurface, is often preceded by an early increase of CO2 emissions. Conventionally, volcanic CO2 monitoring is done either in campaigns of soil emission measurements (grid of one-time measuring points) that are labor intensive and slow, or by ground-based remote FTIR measurements in emission plumes. These methods are not easily available at all sites of potential activity and prohibitively costly to employ on a large number of volcanoes. In addition, both of these ground-based approaches pose a significant risk to the workers conducting these measurements. Some aircraft-based measurements have been conducted as well in the past, however these are limited by the usually meager funding situation of individual observatories, the hazard such flights pose to equipment and crew, and by the inaccessibility of parts of the plume due to ash hazards. The core motivation for this study is therefore to develop a method for volcanic CO2 monitoring from space that will provide sufficient coverage, resolution, and data quality for an application to quantitative time series monitoring and correlation with other available datasets, from a safe distance and with potentially global reach. In summary, the purpose of the proposed research is to quantify volcanic CO2 emissions using satellite-borne observations. Quantitative estimates will be useful for warning of impending volcanic eruptions, and assessing the contribution of volcanic CO2 to global GHG. Our approach encompasses method development and testing for the detection of

  11. Volcanic hazard and risk assessment in a multi-source volcanic area: the example of Napoli city (Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Alberico

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The possible emplacement of pyroclastic fall and flow products from Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvio represents a threat for the population living in Napoli city. For this area, the volcanic hazard was always partially investigated to define the hazard related to the Campi Flegrei or to the Somma-Vesuvio activity one at a time. A new volcanic hazard and risk assessment, at the municipality scale, as a vital tool for decision-making about territorial management and future planning, is presented here.

    In order to assess the hazard related to the explosive activity of both sources, we integrated the results of field studies and numerical simulations, to evaluate the future possibility for Napoli to be hit by the products of an explosive eruption. This is defined for the Somma Vesuvio central volcano through the sum of "field frequency" based on the thickness and distribution of past deposits (Lirer et al., 2001, and for the Campi Flegrei volcanic field by suitably processing simulated events based on numerical modelling (Alberico et al., 2002; Costa et al., 2009. Aiming at volcanic risk assessment, the hazard areas were joined with the exposure map, considered for our purposes as the economical value of artefacts exposed to hazard. We defined four risk classes, and argued that the medium and low-very low risk classes have the largest extent in Napoli municipality, whereas only few zones located in the eastern part of the city and in the westernmost coastal area show a high risk, owing to the correspondence of high economical value and high hazard.

  12. Differences in the ICD-10 diagnostic subtype of depression in bipolar disorder compared to recurrent depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.M.; Christensen, E.M.; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2008-01-01

    disorder, current episode of depression, were significantly less often outpatients (49.4 vs. 68.0%), significantly more often got a diagnosis of severe depression (42.7 vs. 23.3%) or a diagnosis of depression with psychotic symptoms (14.9 vs. 7.2%). The rate of subsequent hospitalization was increased...... with psychotic symptoms when it occurs as part of a bipolar disorder than as part of a recurrent depressive disorder. Copyright (C) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel Udgivelsesdato: 2008...... for patients with bipolar disorder, current episode of depression, compared with patients with a current depression as part of a recurrent depressive disorder (HR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.20-1.86). Conclusions: The results consistently indicate that a depressive episode is severer and/or more often associated...

  13. Volcanic Ash Advisory Database, 1983-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aviation and can also affect global climate patterns. To ensure safe navigation and monitor possible climatic impact, the...

  14. Palaeoclimate: Volcanism caused ancient global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Katrin J.; Bralower, Timothy J.

    2017-08-01

    A study confirms that volcanism set off one of Earth's fastest global-warming events. But the release of greenhouse gases was slow enough for negative feedbacks to mitigate impacts such as ocean acidification. See Letter p.573

  15. Volcanics in the Gulf Coast [volcanicg

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The volcanic provinces are modified after Plate 2, Principal structural features, Gulf of Mexico Basin (compiled by T.E. Ewing and R.F. Lopez) in Volume J, The...

  16. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  17. Global scale concentrations of volcanic activity on Venus: A summary of three 23rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference abstracts. 1: Venus volcanism: Global distribution and classification from Magellan data. 2: A major global-scale concentration of volcanic activity in the Beta-Atla-Themis region of Venus. 3: Two global concentrations of volcanism on Venus: Geologic associations and implications for global pattern of upwelling and downwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, Jayne C.; Head, James W.; Guest, J.; Saunders, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the analysis of data from the Magellan Mission, we have compiled a global survey of the location, dimensions, and subsidiary notes of all identified volcanic features on Venus. More than 90 percent of the surface area was examined and the final catalog comprehensively identifies 1548 individual volcanic features larger than approximately 20 km in diameter. Volcanic features included are large volcanoes, intermediate volcanoes, fields of small shield volcanoes, calderas, large lava channels, and lava floods as well as unusual features first noted on Venus such as coronae, arachnoids, and novae.

  18. A Proposed Community Network For Monitoring Volcanic Emissions In Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, E. P.; Beckles, D. M.; Robertson, R. E.; Latchman, J. L.; Edwards, S.

    2013-12-01

    Systematic geochemical monitoring of volcanic systems in the English-speaking islands of the Lesser Antilles was initiated by the UWI Seismic Research Centre (SRC) in 2000, as part of its volcanic surveillance programme for the English-speaking islands of the Lesser Antilles. This programme provided the first time-series observations used for the purpose of volcano monitoring in Dominica and Saint Lucia, permitted the characterization of the geothermal fluids associated with them, and established baseline studies for understanding of the hydrothermal systems during periods of quiescence (Joseph et al., 2011; Joseph et al., 2013). As part of efforts to improve and expand the capacity of SRC to provide volcanic surveillance through its geothermal monitoring programme, it is necessary to develop economically sustainable options for the monitoring of volcanic emissions/pollutants. Towards this effort we intend to work in collaboration with local authorities in Saint Lucia, to develop a monitoring network for quantifying the background exposure levels of ambient concentrations of volcanic pollutants, SO2 in air and As in waters (as health significant marker elements in the geothermal emissions) that would serve as a model for the emissions monitoring network for other volcanic islands. This programme would facilitate the building of local capacity and training to monitor the hazardous exposure, through the application and transfer of a regionally available low-cost and low-technology SO2 measurement/detection system in Saint Lucia. Existing monitoring technologies to inform evidence based health practices are too costly for small island Caribbean states, and no government policies or health services measures currently exist to address/mitigate these influences. Gases, aerosols and toxic elements from eruptive and non-eruptive volcanic activity are known to adversely affect human health and the environment (Baxter, 2000; Zhang et al., 2008). Investigations into the

  19. Monitoring Persistent Volcanic Emissions from Sulphur Springs, Saint Lucia: A Community Approach to Disaster Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, E. P.; Beckles, D. M.; Cox, L.; Jackson, V. B.; Alexander, D.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic and geothermal emissions are known natural sources of volatiles to the atmosphere. Volcanogenic air pollutants known to cause the most serious impact are carbon dioxide (CO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Some studies into the potential for volcanic emissions to produce chronic diseases in humans indicate that areas of major concern include respiratory problems, particularly silicosis (Allen et al. 2000; Baxter et al. 1999; Buist et al. 1986), psychological stress (Shore et al. 1986), and chemical impacts of gas or ash (Giammanco et al. 1998). Sulphur Springs Park in Saint Lucia has a very high recreational value with >200,000 visitors annually, while the nearby town of Soufrière has >8,400 residents. Residents and visitors have raised concerns about the volcanic emissions and its health effects. As part of the volcanic surveillance programme undertaken by the UWI, Seismic Research Centre (SRC) in Saint Lucia, a new monitoring network has been established for quantifying the ambient SO2 in air, to which staff and visitors at the volcanic park are exposed to. The implementation and continued operation of this network has involved the training of local personnel in the active field sampling and analytical techniques required for the assessment of ambient SO2 concentrations, using a low cost monitor as well as commercial passive samplers. This approach recognizes that environmental hazards are a usual part of life and productive livelihoods, and to minimize post-disaster response and recovery it is beneficial to promote preparedness and mitigation, which is best achieved at the local level with community involvement. It is also intended that the volcanic emissions monitoring network could be used as a method to establish and maintain community-based initiatives that would also be helpful when volcanic threat manifests.

  20. Volcanic rock properties control sector collapse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes constructed by superimposed layers of varying volcanic materials are inherently unstable structures. The heterogeneity of weak and strong layers consisting of ash, tephra and lavas, each with varying coherencies, porosities, crystallinities, glass content and ultimately, strength, can promote volcanic flank and sector collapses. These volcanoes often exist in areas with complex regional tectonics adding to instability caused by heterogeneity, flank overburden, magma movement and emplacement in addition to hydrothermal alteration and anomalous geothermal gradients. Recent studies conducted on the faulting properties of volcanic rocks at variable slip rates show the rate-weakening dependence of the friction coefficients (up to 90% reduction)[1], caused by a wide range of factors such as the generation of gouge and frictional melt lubrication [2]. Experimental data from experiments conducted on volcanic products suggests that frictional melt occurs at slip rates similar to those of plug flow in volcanic conduits [1] and the bases of mass material movements such as debris avalanches from volcanic flanks [3]. In volcanic rock, the generation of frictional heat may prompt the remobilisation of interstitial glass below melting temperatures due to passing of the glass transition temperature at ˜650-750 ˚C [4]. In addition, the crushing of pores in high porosity samples can lead to increased comminution and strain localisation along slip surfaces. Here we present the results of friction tests on both high density, glass rich samples from Santaguito (Guatemala) and synthetic glass samples with varying porosities (0-25%) to better understand frictional properties underlying volcanic collapse events. 1. Kendrick, J.E., et al., Extreme frictional processes in the volcanic conduit of Mount St. Helens (USA) during the 2004-2008 eruption. J. Structural Geology, 2012. 2. Di Toro, G., et al., Fault lubrication during earthquakes. Nature, 2011. 471(7339): p. 494-498. 3

  1. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tilling

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA, which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions" recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene.

    The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru. The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (<0.05 km3 in 1985 of Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia killed about 25 000 people – the worst volcanic disaster in the Andean region as well as the second worst in the world in the 20th century. The Ruiz tragedy has been attributed largely to ineffective communications of hazards information and indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent

  2. Helping your teen with depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teen depression - helping; Teen depression - talk therapy; Teen depression - medicine ... teen the most. The most effective treatments for depression are: Talk therapy Antidepressant medicines If your teen ...

  3. About the Mechanism of Volcanic Eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to the volcanic eruption theory is proposed. It is based on a simple physical mechanism of the imbalance in the system "magma-crust-fluid". This mechanism helps to explain from unified positions the different types of volcanic eruptions. A criterion of imbalance and magma eruption is derived. Stratovolcano and caldera formation is analyzed. High explosive eruptions of the silicic magma is discussed

  4. Episodic Volcanism and Geochemistry in Western Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saginor, I.; Carr, M. J.; Gazel, E.; Swisher, C.; Turrin, B.

    2007-12-01

    The active volcanic arc in western Nicaragua is separated from the Miocene arc by a temporal gap in the volcanic record, during which little volcanic material was erupted. Previous work suggested that this gap lasted from 7 to 1.6 Ma, during which volcanic production in Nicaragua was limited or nonexistent. Because the precise timing and duration of this gap has been poorly constrained, recent fieldwork has focused on locating samples that may have erupted close to or even during this apparent hiatus in activity. Recent 40Ar/39Ar dates reveal pulses of low- level episodic volcanism at 7 Ma and 1 Ma between the active and Miocene arcs with current volcanism beginning ~350 ka. In addition, sampling from an inactive area between Coseguina and San Cristobal yielded two distinct groupings of ages; one of Tamarindo age (13 Ma) and the other around 3.5 Ma-the only samples of that age collected on-strike with the active arc. This raises the possibility the bases of the other active volcanoes contain lavas that are older than expected, but have been covered by subsequent eruptions. The Miocene arc differs from the active arc in Central America in several ways, with the latter having higher Ba/La and U/Th values due to increased slab input and changes in subducted sediment composition. Analysis of sample C-51 and others taken from the same area may shed light on the timing of this shift from high to low Ba/La and U/Th values. More importantly, it may help explain why the arc experienced such a dramatic downturn in volcanic production during this time. We also report 25 new major and trace element analyses that shed some light on the origins of these minor episodes of Nicaraguan volcanism. These samples are currently awaiting Sr and Nd isotopic analyses.

  5. Volcanic risk perception in the Campi Flegrei area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, T.; Barberi, F.; Davis, M. S.; Isaia, R.; Nave, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Campi Flegrei which includes part of the city of Naples, is an active volcanic system; its last eruption occurred in 1538 AD. More recently two significant crises occurred between 1969 and 72 and 1982-84 and were accompanied by ground movements (bradyseism) and seismic activity, forcing people of the town of Pozzuoli to be evacuated. Since 1984 development of a volcanic emergency plan has been underway. In 2000 Civil Protection published a risk map which defined the Red Zone, an area highly at risk from pyroclastic flows, which would need to be evacuated before an eruption. The first study to evaluate the volcanic risk perceptions of the people living within the Campi Flegrei area was completed in spring 2006, resulting in the largest sample ever studied on this topic except for one on Vesuvio area residents by Barberi et al. (2008). A 46 item questionnaire was distributed to 2000 of the approximately 300,000 residents of the Campi Flegrei Red Zone, which includes three towns and four neighborhoods within the city of Naples. A total of 1161 questionnaires were returned, for an overall response rate of 58%. Surveys were distributed to junior high and high school students, as well as to adult members of the general population. Results indicated that unlike issues such as crime, traffic, trash, and unemployment, volcanic hazards are not spontaneously mentioned as a major problem facing their community. However, when asked specific questions about volcanic risks, respondents believe that an eruption is likely and could have serious consequences for themselves and their communities and they are quite worried about the threat. Considering the events of 1969-72 and 1982-84, it was not surprising that respondents indicated earthquakes and ground deformations as more serious threats than eruptive phenomena. Of significant importance is that only 17% of the sample knows about the existence of the Emergency Plan, announced in 2001, and 65% said that they have not received

  6. Volcanic Eruption: Students Develop a Contingency Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Dangerous, loud, sensational, exciting - natural hazards have what it takes to get students attention around the globe. Arising interest is the first step to develop an intrinsic motivation to learn about the matter and endure the hardships that students might discover along the way of the unit. Natural hazards thereby establish a close-knit connection between physical and anthropological geography through analyzing the hazardous event and its consequences for the people living in the affected area. Following a general principle of didactics we start searching right on our doorsteps to offer students the possibility to gain knowledge on the familiar and later transfer it to the unknown example. Even in Southwest Germany - a region that is rather known for its wine than its volcanic activity - we can find a potentially hazardous region. The "Laacher See" volcano (a caldera lake) in northern Rhineland-Palatinate is according to Prof. H.U. Schminke a "potentially active volcano" . Its activity can be proven by seismic activities, or experienced when visiting the lake's southeastern shore, where carbondioxid and sulphur gases from the underlying magma chamber still bubble up. The Laacher See is part of a range of volcanoes (classified from 'potentially active' to 'no longer active') of the East Eifel Volcanic Field. Precariously the Laacher See is located closely to the densely populated agglomerations of Cologne (NE, distance: 45 km) and the former capital Bonn (NE: 35km), as well as Koblenz (E: 24km) and the Rhine river. Apart from that, the towns of Andernach (E: 8km ± 30 000 inhabitants) and Mayen (SW: 11km ±20 000 inhabitants) and many smaller towns and villages are nearby due to economic reasons. The number of people affected by a possible eruption easily exceeds two million people considering the range as prime measurement. The underlying danger, as projected in a simulation presented by Prof. Schminke, is a lava stream running down the Brohltal valley

  7. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, H.H. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit

    1985-09-01

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  8. Volcanic evolution of an active magmatic rift segment on a 100 Kyr timescale: exposure dating of lavas from the Manda Hararo/Dabbahu segment of the Afar Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medynski, S.; Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Vye, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Yirgu, G.

    2012-12-01

    In the Afar depression (Ethiopia), extension is already organised along rift segments which morphologically resemble oceanic rifts. Segmentation here results from interactions between dyke injection and volcanism, as observed during the well documented 2005 event on the Dabbahu rift segment. During this tectono-volcanic crisis, a megadyke was injected, followed by 12 subsequent dike intrusions, sometimes associated with fissure flow eruptions. Despite the accurate surveying of the magmatic and tectonic interplay during this event via remote sensing techniques, there is a lack of data on timescales of 1 to 100 kyr, the period over which the main morphology of a rift is acquired. The Dabbahu rift segment represents an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of rift morphology as a response to volcanic and tectonic influences. It is possible to constrain the timing of fault growth relative to the infilling of the rift axial depression by lava flows, and to assess the influence of the different magma bodies involved in lava production along the rift-segment. We use cosmogenic nuclides (3He) to determine the ages of young (cartography (Landsat, ASTER and SPOT imagery), the rift geomorphology can be linked to the magmatic and tectonic history defined by surface exposure dating. The results show that over the last 100 ka the Northern part of the Dabbahu segment was supplied by two different magma reservoirs which can be identified based on their distinctive chemistries. The main reservoir is located beneath Dabbahu volcano, and has been supplied with magma for at least 72 ka. This magmatic centre supplies magma to most of the northern third of the rift segment. The second reservoir is located further south, on the axis, close to the current mid-segment magma chamber, which was responsible for the 2005 rifting episode. This second magmatic centre supplies magma to the remaining 2/3 of the segment, but scarcely impacts its Northern termination (where the Dabbahu

  9. Geologic Features of Wangjiatun Deep Gas Reservoirs of Volcanic Rock in Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Xuanlong; CHEN Shumin; WU Dawei; Zang Yudong

    2001-01-01

    Wangjiatun gas pool is located at the north part of Xujiaweizi in Songliao basin. Commercial gas flow has been found in the intermediate and acid volcanic rock of upper Jurassic - lower Cretaceous, which makes a breakthrough in deep nature gas prospecting in Songliao basin. The deep natural gas entrapment regularity is discussed in the paper by the study of deep strata, structure and reservoir. Andesite, rhyolite and little pyroclastic rock are the main reservoirs. There are two types of volcanic reservoir space assemblage in this area: the pore and fissure and the pure fissure. Changes had taken place for volcanic reservoir space during long geologic time, which was controlled by tectonic movement and geologic environment.The developed degree of reservoir space was controlled by tectonic movement, weathering and filtering, corrosion and Filling. There are three types of source- reservoir-caprock assemblage in this area: lower source- upper reservoir model,upper source - lower reservoir model and lateral change model. Mudstone in Dengluoku formation and the compacted volcanic rock of upper Jurassic - lower Cretaceous are the caprock for deep gas reservoirs. Dark mudstone of deep lacustrine facies in Shahezi formation and lower part of Dengluoku formation are the source rock of deep gas. It can be concluded that deep gas pools are mainly volcanic lithologic reservoirs.

  10. Shared genetic factors in migraine and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, A H.; de Vries, B; Janssens, A C.J.W.; Vanmolkot, K R.J.; Aulchenko, Y S.; Henneman, P; Oostra, B A.; Frants, R R.; van den Maagdenberg, A M.J.M.; Ferrari, M D.; van Duijn, C M.; Terwindt, G M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the co-occurrence of migraine and depression and assess whether shared genetic factors may underlie both diseases. Methods: Subjects were 2,652 participants of the Erasmus Rucphen Family genetic isolate study. Migraine was diagnosed using a validated 3-stage screening method that included a telephone interview. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale and the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D). The contribution of shared genetic factors in migraine and depression was investigated by comparing heritability estimates for migraine with and without adjustment for symptoms of depression, and by comparing the heritability scores of depression between migraineurs and controls. Results: We identified 360 migraine cases: 209 had migraine without aura (MO) and 151 had migraine with aura (MA). Odds ratios for depression in patients with migraine were 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.98–1.70) for MO and 1.70 (95% CI 1.28–2.24) for MA. Heritability estimates were significant for all migraine (0.56), MO (0.77), and MA (0.96), and decreased after adjustment for symptoms of depression or use of antidepressant medication, in particular for MA. Comparison of the heritability scores for depression between patients with migraine and controls showed a genetic correlation between HADS-D score and MA. Conclusions: There is a bidirectional association between depression and migraine, in particular migraine with aura, which can be explained, at least partly, by shared genetic factors. GLOSSARY CES-D = Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; CI = confidence interval; ERF = Erasmus Rucphen Family; HADS-D = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; IHS = International Headache Society; MA = migraine with aura; MO = migraine without aura; OR = odds ratio. PMID:20071666

  11. Bedout basement rise, offshore northwestern Australia: evidence of an unshocked mafic volcanic hyaloclastite volcanic breccia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, A.

    2004-12-01

    Core samples from Bedout-1 (3035.8-3044.95 m.), Bedout basement rise, offshore northwestern Australia, were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS and WDS spectrometry. At this stratigraphic depth level Becker et al. (2004) interpret cryptocrystalline alteration zones around and within plagioclase in terms of shock-induced transformation of feldspar into diaplectic maskelynite glass _u postulating a ~200 km-large impact structure and thereby an impact connection of the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction. However, the breccia is dominated by fragments of microlitic basalt and ophitic-textured dolerite with well preserved igneous textures, showing no evidence of shock metamorphism. Euhedral pseudomorphs of chlorite and amphibole, probably after pyroxene, protrude into or are enveloped by euhedral albite-twinned calcic plagioclase (andesine to bytownite). Minor phases include euhedral ilmenite needles and subhedral magnetite grains. Plagioclase is altered by cryptocrystalline albite and microcrystalline albite-chlorite matrix along crystal boundaries, along twin lamella and within internal oscillatory crystal zones, consistent with burial metamorphosed hydrovolcanic basalts and spilites (e.g. Amstutz, 1974). The volcanic fragments are set within, and injected by, microcrystalline intergranular mesostasis of mixed mineral fragments and volcanic meta-glass. Becker et al. (2004) refer to the breccia in part as product of Mg-rich sediments (e.g. dolomites). However, apart from the pristine igneous textures of the breccia, the transition element levels (chlorite in dolerite fragment "C Ni 97-160 ppm; Co 75-152 ppm; Cu 69-204 ppm; mesostasis "C Ni 29-45 ppm; Co 18-52 ppm; Cu 26-110 ppm) are consistent with Fe-rich basalts but exceed common abundances in carbonates and marls (BVTP, 1981; Wedepohl, 1978). No shock metamorphic features, such as planar deformation features (PDF), are observed in the feldspar or in any other phases. No criteria for discriminating

  12. Backscattering and geophysical features of volcanic ridges offshore Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Gulf of California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabriol, Hubert; Delgado-Argote, Luis A.; Dañobeitia, Juan José; Córdoba, Diego; González, Antonio; García-Abdeslem, Juan; Bartolomé, Rafael; Martín-Atienza, Beatriz; Frias-Camacho, Víctor

    1999-11-01

    Volcanic ridges formed by series of volcanic edifices are identified in the central part of the Gulf of California, between Isla Tortuga and La Reforma Caldera-Santa Rosalı´a region. Isla Tortuga is part of the 40-km-long Tortuga Volcanic Ridge (TVR) that trends almost perpendicular to the spreading center of the Guaymas Basin. The Rosalı´a Volcanic Ridge (RVR), older than TVR, is characterized by volcanic structures oriented towards 310°, following a fracture zone extension and the peninsular slope. It is interpreted that most of the aligned submarine volcanic edifices are developed on continental crust while Isla Tortuga lies on oceanic-like crust of the Guaymas Basin. From a complete Bouguer anomaly map, it is observed that the alignments of gravity highs trending 310° and 290° support the volcanic and subvolcanic origin of the bathymetric highs. Volcanic curvilinear structures, lava flows and mounds were identified from backscattering images around Isla Tortuga and over a 400-m high (Vı´rgenes High), where the TVR and the RVR intersect. A refraction/wide-angle seismic profile crossing perpendicular to the Vı´rgenes High, together with gravity and magnetic data indicate the presence of shallow intrusive bodies presumably of basaltic or andesitic composition. It is inferred that most volcanic edifices along the ridges have similar internal structures. We suggest that the growth of different segments of the ridges have a volcano-tectonic origin. The older RVR lies along the extension of a fracture zone and it probably is associated with Pliocene NE-SW extension.

  13. The Ecology of Youth Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kee Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Historically, teen depression has been seen as a symptom of other problems such as anxiety, irritability, mood swings, somatic complaints, substance use, and poor school performance. These symptoms were often considered as part of "adolescent turmoil"--a normal, understandable, and even expected phenomenon. For a long time, this viewpoint masked…

  14. Behaviour of a small sedimentary volcanic aquifer receiving irrigation return flows: La Aldea, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Fuentes, T.; Heredia, J.; Cabrera, M. C.; Custodio, E.

    2014-06-01

    In many arid and semi-arid areas, intensive cultivation is practiced despite water commonly being a limiting factor. Often, irrigation water is from local aquifers or imported from out-of-area aquifers and surface reservoirs. Irrigation return flows become a significant local recharge source, but they may deteriorate aquifer water quality. La Aldea valley, located in the western sector of Gran Canaria Island (Atlantic Ocean), is a coastal, half-closed depression in altered, low-permeability volcanics with alluvium in the gullies and scree deposits over a large part of the area. This area is intensively cultivated. Irrigation water comes from reservoirs upstream and is supplemented (average 30 %) by local groundwater; supplementation goes up to 70 % in dry years, in which groundwater reserves are used up to exhaustion if the dry period persists. Thus, La Aldea aquifer is key to the water-supply system, whose recharge is mostly from return irrigation flows and the scarce local rainfall recharge on the scree formations, conveyed to the gully deposits. To quantify the hydrogeological conceptual model and check data coherence, a simplified numerical model has been constructed, which can be used as a tool to help in water management.

  15. Possible Late Pleistocene volcanic activity on Nightingale Island, South Atlantic Ocean, based on geoelectrical resistivity measurements, sediment corings and 14C dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Anders Anker; Björck, Svante; Cronholm, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Tristan da Cunha is a volcanic island group situated in the central South Atlantic. The oldest of these islands, Nightingale Island, has an age of about 18Ma. In the interior of the island, there are several wetlands situated in topographic depressions. The ages of these basins have been unknown,...

  16. Depression: The Differing Narratives of Couples in Couple Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautiainen, Eija-Liisa; Aaltonen, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    How does the spouse of a person with depression take part in constructing narratives of depression in couple therapy? In this study we examined couples' ways of co-constructing narratives of depression in couple therapy. Three couple therapy processes were chosen for the study, one spouse in each couple having been referred to an outpatient clinic…

  17. What is depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of depression is defined by psychiatrists, and guidelines for treatment of patients with depression are created in psychiatry. However, most patients with depression are treated exclusively in general practice. Psychiatrists point out that general practitioners' (GPs') treatment of ...

  18. Sadness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Sadness and Depression KidsHealth > For Kids > Sadness and Depression A A ... big difference in your life. When Sadness Is Depression When you're in a sad mood, it ...

  19. Depression Strikes…Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Depression Depression Strikes… Anyone Winter 2017 Table of Contents Anyone can suffer from depression. And almost everyone has a friend or family ...

  20. Depression and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression and other mental health issues? Reference Share Depression and College Students Download PDF Download ePub Order ... Answers to college students’ frequently asked questions about depression Feeling moody, sad, or grouchy? Who doesn’t ...

  1. Sadness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Sadness and Depression KidsHealth > For Kids > Sadness and Depression Print A ... big difference in your life. When Sadness Is Depression When you're in a sad mood, it ...

  2. Postpartum Depression Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Where can I find more information? Share Postpartum Depression Facts Download PDF Download ePub Download Mobi Order ... for herself or her family. What is postpartum depression? Postpartum depression is a mood disorder that can ...

  3. Recognizing teen depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000648.htm Recognizing teen depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... life. Be Aware of the Risk for Teen Depression Your teen is more at risk for depression ...

  4. Men and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in crisis? For more information Share Men and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels sad or irritable sometimes, or has ...

  5. Venus volcanism - Classification of volcanic features and structures, associations, and global distribution from Magellan data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James W.; Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, Jayne C.; Guest, John E.; Saunders, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    A classification and documentation of the range of morphologic features and structures of volcanic origin on Venus, their size distribution, and their global distribution and associations are presented based on a preliminary analysis of Magellan data. Some of the major questions about volcanism on Venus are addressed.

  6. Outcomes of Depression in Black Single Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Rahshida L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite suggestions in the literature that depression has serious consequences, few studies have examined specific health and psychosocial outcomes of depression in Black single mothers. The purpose of this study was to estimate paths in a just-identified theoretical model of outcomes of depression for Black single mothers based on theoretical propositions and empirical findings. The model included the variables, depressive cognitions, depressive symptomatology, perceived social support, and positive health practices. Five direct and two indirect hypothesized relationships were estimated using structural equation modeling. A nonprobability sample of convenience of 159 Black single mothers aged 18 to 45 years was recruited for the study. This study used a cross-sectional correlational design. The participants responded in person or via the U.S. mail to the Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression scale, the Depressive Cognition Scale, the Personal Resource Questionnaire 85–Part 2, and the Personal Lifestyle Questionnaire. Beta and Gamma path coefficients were statistically significant for four out of five hypothesized direct relationships within the model (p supported (Gamma = −.11, p > .05). The two indirect paths were weak but statistically significant (p social support were outcomes of depressive cognitions. Positive health practices was not a direct outcome of depressive cognitions. Perceived social support and positive health practices were outcomes of depressive symptoms. PMID:26912710

  7. Volcanic Supersites as cross-disciplinary laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzale, Antonello; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Giamberini, Mariasilvia; Pennisi, Maddalena; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic Supersites, defined in the frame of the GEO-GSNL Initiative, are usually considered mainly for their geohazard and geological characteristics. However, volcanoes are extremely challenging areas from many other points of view, including environmental and climatic properties, ecosystems, hydrology, soil properties and biogeochemical cycling. Possibly, volcanoes are closer to early Earth conditions than most other types of environment. During FP7, EC effectively fostered the implementation of the European volcano Supersites (Mt. Etna, Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius and Iceland) through the MED-SUV and FUTUREVOLC projects. Currently, the large H2020 project ECOPOTENTIAL (2015-2019, 47 partners, http://www.ecopotential-project.eu/) contributes to GEO/GEOSS and to the GEO ECO Initiative, and it is devoted to making best use of remote sensing and in situ data to improve future ecosystem benefits, focusing on a network of Protected Areas of international relevance. In ECOPOTENTIAL, remote sensing and in situ data are collected, processed and used for a better understanding of the ecosystem dynamics, analysing and modelling the effects of global changes on ecosystem functions and services, over an array of different ecosystem types, including mountain, marine, coastal, arid and semi-arid ecosystems, and also areas of volcanic origin such as the Canary and La Reunion Islands. Here, we propose to extend the network of the ECOPOTENTIAL project to include active Volcanic Supersites, such as Mount Etna and other volcanic Protected Areas, and we discuss how they can be included in the framework of the ECOPOTENTIAL workflow. A coordinated and cross-disciplinary set of studies at these sites should include geological, biological, ecological, biogeochemical, climatic and biogeographical aspects, as well as their relationship with the antropogenic impact on the environment, and aim at the global analysis of the volcanic Earth Critical Zone - namely, the upper layer of the Earth

  8. Various forms of depression

    OpenAIRE

    BENAZZI, FRANCO

    2006-01-01

    The current subtyping of depression is based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) categorical division of bipolar and depressive disorders. Current evidence, however, supports a dimensional approach to depression, as a continuum/spectrum of overlapping disorders, ranging from bipolar I depression to major depressive disorder. Types of depression which have recently been the focus of most research will be reviewed ; bipolar II depressi...

  9. [Depressive symptoms and sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Vitamin D deficiency, depression course and mortality: Longitudinal results from the Netherlands Study on Depression in Older persons (NESDO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, K.S. van den; Marijnissen, R.M.; Brink, R.H. van den; Naarding, P.; Comijs, H.C.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of vitamin D levels on depression course and remission status after two years, as well as attrition and mortality, in an older cohort. METHODS: This study was part of the Netherlands Study on Depression in Older persons (NESDO), a prospective cohort study. 367 depresse

  11. EARLY LIGHT TREATMENT CAN PREVENT AN EMERGING WINTER DEPRESSION FROM DEVELOPING INTO A FULL-BLOWN DEPRESSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEESTERS, Y; JANSEN, JHC; BEERSMA, DGM; BOUHUYS, AL; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    The administration of light at the development of the first signs of a winter depression appears to prevent it from developing into a full-blown depression. Not a single patient from a group of 16 treated this way became severely depressed during the remaining part of the winter season, whereas 5

  12. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  13. Contemporaneous trachyandesitic and calc-alkaline volcanism of the Huerto Andesite, San Juan Volcanic Field, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parat, F.; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Locally, voluminous andesitic volcanism both preceded and followed large eruptions of silicic ash-flow tuff from many calderas in the San Juan volcanic field. The most voluminous post-collapse lava suite of the central San Juan caldera cluster is the 28 Ma Huerto Andesite, a diverse assemblage erupted from at least 5-6 volcanic centres that were active around the southern margins of the La Garita caldera shortly after eruption of the Fish Canyon Tuff. These andesitic centres are inferred, in part, to represent eruptions of magma that ponded and differentiated within the crust below the La Garita caldera, thereby providing the thermal energy necessary for rejuvenation and remobilization of the Fish Canyon magma body. The multiple Huerto eruptive centres produced two magmatic series that differ in phenocryst mineralogy (hydrous vs anhydrous assemblages), whole-rock major and trace element chemistry and isotopic compositions. Hornblende-bearing lavas from three volcanic centres located close to the southeastern margin of the La Garita caldera (Eagle Mountain - Fourmile Creek, West Fork of the San Juan River, Table Mountain) define a high-K calc-alkaline series (57-65 wt % SiO2) that is oxidized, hydrous and sulphur rich. Trachyandesitic lavas from widely separated centres at Baldy Mountain-Red Lake (western margin), Sugarloaf Mountain (southern margin) and Ribbon Mesa (20 km east of the La Garita caldera) are mutually indistinguishable (55-61 wt % SiO2); they are characterized by higher and more variable concentrations of alkalis and many incompatible trace elements (e.g. Zr, Nb, heavy rare earth elements), and they contain anhydrous phenocryst assemblages (including olivine). These mildly alkaline magmas were less water rich and oxidized than the hornblende-bearing calc-alkaline suite. The same distinctions characterize the voluminous precaldera andesitic lavas of the Conejos Formation, indicating that these contrasting suites are long-term manifestations of San Juan

  14. The Relationship Between the Signature of Subducted Sediments in Volcanic Gases and Volatile Flux along the Central American Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T. P.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hilton, D. R.; Shaw, A. M.; Cameron, B. I.; Walker, J. A.; Molina C., E.

    2002-05-01

    Volcanic arcs are locations where elements are recycled from the Earth's surface into the mantle. Fluxes of volcanic volatile emissions can vary significantly along a single arc and a fundamental aim of arc-related studies is to quantify these variations and compare them to subduction zone parameters. As part of the Central American arc study, we report N2, He and Ar abundance relationships and N-isotope ratios for 7 volcanic centers in Guatemala to complement on-going studies in Costa Rica. In Guatemala, the arc crust is thicker and older than in Costa Rica and the entire sediment sequence on the down-going plate is likely to contribute to the slab flux. Sulfur dioxide fluxes vary significantly along the arc (2001 measurements): in the Guatemala segment, Fuego and Pacaya emit a total of ~1500 t/day whereas in Costa Rica, Arenal and Poas are emitting only ~190 t/day. The Guatemalan volcanic centers of Amatitlan-Pacaya, Fuego, Moyuta, Tecuamburro, Amatitlan, Zunil and San Marcos have N2/He ratios ranging from 2200 - 8100, typical for arc-related fluids. N2/Ar ratios (40-500) and the high N2/He indicate addition of N2 from subducted sediments or arc crust to a mantle derived component (N2/He Guatemala are in contrast to typical mantle-derived N2/He ratios (160 - 600) measured at Poas and Turialba, Costa Rica. Nitrogen isotope ratios for the Guatemalan volcanic centers range from δ 15N = + 1.0‰ for San Marcos to + 5.8‰ for Fuego (δ 15N air = 0.0‰ ), indicating a sedimentary nitrogen component. The mantle-derived N2/He ratios for Poas (- 3.0‰ ) are consistent with a more mantle-like δ 15N. In Guatemala, the highest 3He/4He ratios (7.6 for Pacaya and 7.3 Ra for Fuego) correlate with the lowest N2/He ratios (1500 and 2100) and high δ 15N values (+3.8‰ and +5.8‰ ). Mixing relationships (3He/4He and δ 15N) suggest that at Fuego and Pacaya up to 20% of the nitrogen is of subducted sedimentary origin, contrary to Poas and Turialba where the slab derived

  15. The relation between white matter lesions of different parts of brain after acute cerebral infarction and depressive disorder%急性脑梗死后不同部位脑白质病变与抑郁的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜丽杰; 于敏; 周莹; 侯宇; 娄伟

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨急性脑梗死后不同部位的脑白质病变(WML)对抑郁发生的影响.方法 纳入大连市第三人民医院神经内科2012年3月至2013年4月住院的急性脑梗死患者97例,根据有无脑白质病变分为2组,比较2组间汉密尔顿焦虑量表(HAMA)评分及汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HAMD)评分有无差异.对有WML组行改良Scheltens评分,并将改良Scheltens评分与HAMD评分进行直线相关分析,了解额叶、颞叶、顶叶、枕叶、基底节、侧脑室旁及小脑、脑干等不同部位的白质损害程度与抑郁严重程度的相关性.结果 有WML组HAMD评分(10±6)分,HAMA评分(11±4)分,无WML组HAMD评分(6±4)分,HAMA评分(9±3)分,2组之间HAMD及HAMA评分比较差异均有统计学意义(均P<0.05);有WML组59例患者HAMD评分(10±6)分与改良Scheltens评分总分(4.39±0.49)分及额叶(2.76±0.43)分、枕叶白质(1.61±0.49)分、额部脑室旁白质(2.85±0.36)分,病变呈明显正相关(r=0.395,P=0.002;r=0.438,P =0.001;r =0.247,P=0.005;r =0.385,P=0.003).结论 急性脑梗死后不同部位的WML与抑郁障碍相关,主要以额部白质病变为主,额部白质病变越严重,抑郁程度越重.%Objective To evaluate the relationship between white matter lesions(WML) of different parts of brain after acute cerebral infarction and depressive disorder.Methods The clinical data of 97 patients with acute cerebral infarction were analyzed.All patients were divided into 2 groups according to with or without WML.The differences of Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) and Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) between 2 groups were analyzed.The WML group was scored using the semiquatitative rating scale of Scheltens Rating Scale(Scheltens).The correlation between the scheltens of lateral ventricle,frontal lobe,parietal lobe,temporal lobe,occipital lobe,basal ganglia,cerebella,brainstem and HAMD were observed.Results In WML group,the scale of HAMD was 10 ±6 and HAMA was 11 ±4.In without WML group

  16. Using high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to understand volcanic hazards within the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez lineament, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.; Heizler, M. T.; Lafferty, J.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Ar/Ar ages were generated for late Quaternary volcanic fields in the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez Lineament, New Mexico, to assess the time-space patterns of volcanism and begin quantifying volcanic hazards for the region. The published chronology of most late Quaternary volcanic centers in the region is not sufficiently precise, accurate, or complete for a comprehensive volcanic hazard assessment. Ar/Ar ages generated as part of this study were determined using the high-sensitivity, multi-collector ARGUS VI mass spectrometer, which provides about an order of magnitude more precise isotopic measurements compared to older generation, single-detector mass spectrometers. Ar/Ar ages suggest an apparent increase in eruption frequency during the late Quaternary within the Raton-Clayton volcanic field, northeastern NM. Only four volcanoes erupted between 426±8 and 97±3 ka. Contrastingly, four volcanoes erupted between 55±2 and 32±5 ka. This last eruptive phase displays a west to east migration of volcanism, has repose periods of 0 to 17 ka, and an average recurrence rate of 1 eruption per 5750 ka. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, west-central NM, is composed of the ~100 late Quaternary basaltic vents. Preliminary results suggest that most of the Chain of Craters, the largest and oldest part of the Zuni-Bandera field, erupted between ~100 and 250 ka. Volcanism then migrated to the east, where published ages indicate at least seven eruptions between 50 and 3 ka. Both volcanic fields display a west to east migration of volcanism during the last ~500 ka, although the pattern is more pronounced in the Zuni-Bandera field. A reassessment of low-precision published ages for other late Quaternary volcanic fields in region indicates that most fields display a similar west to east migration of volcanism during the last ~500 ka. One possible mechanism to explain the observed patterns of volcanism is the westward migration of the North American plate relative

  17. Origin of hydrocarbons in the Slovak part of the Danube Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milička Ján

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Danube Basin is one of our largest Neogene basins in Slovakia with the highest volume of potential source rocks in active hydrocarbon generation zones. The source rocks, however, are quite poor with low hydrocarbon potential. In Blatné- and Rišňovce depressions at the northern part of the Danube Basin only early oil and oil generation window were reached below 2900 m during the Upper Miocene to Pliocene, due the lower temperature. In the southern Central Gabčíkovo Depression (CGD that is explored by drilling only to 2700 m, all generation zones up to dry gas zone have been reached according to modelling. While the oil generation zone was reached at approximately 2800 m, dry gas is expected below 4000 m. The natural gas molecular composition and methane carbon isotopes indicate small local natural hydrocarbon gas accumulations associated mostly with oil generation that migrated to present reservoirs and mixed with biogenic methane. The carbon dioxide and partly also nitrogen here are most likely related to volcanic activity. The gasoline hydrocarbon range indicates that non biodegraded gasoline oil from the FGČ1 Čilistov well in the CGD is thermally very mature, with its origin most likely in the deeper parts of the CGD below 3500 m. In contrast, the oil trace from Sereď5 (Se5 well is strongly biodegraded and according to the sterane correlations it could have originated in any examined Neogene source reaching the oil window.

  18. Role of crustal assimilation and basement compositions in the petrogenesis of differentiated intraplate volcanic rocks: a case study from the Siebengebirge Volcanic Field, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K. P.; Kirchenbaur, M.; Fonseca, R. O. C.; Kasper, H. U.; Münker, C.; Froitzheim, N.

    2016-06-01

    The Siebengebirge Volcanic Field (SVF) in western Germany is part of the Cenozoic Central European Volcanic Province. Amongst these volcanic fields, the relatively small SVF comprises the entire range from silica-undersaturated mafic lavas to both silica-undersaturated and silica-saturated differentiated lavas. Owing to this circumstance, the SVF represents a valuable study area representative of intraplate volcanism in Europe. Compositions of the felsic lavas can shed some new light on differentiation of intraplate magmas and on the extent and composition of potential crustal assimilation processes. In this study, we provide detailed petrographic and geochemical data for various differentiated SVF lavas, including major and trace element concentrations as well as Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope compositions. Samples include tephriphonolites, latites, and trachytes with SiO2 contents ranging between 53 and 66 wt%. If compared to previously published compositions of mafic SVF lavas, relatively unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf coupled with radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb lead to the interpretation that the differentiated volcanic rocks have assimilated significant amounts of lower crustal mafic granulites like the ones found as xenoliths in the nearby Eifel volcanic field. These crustal contaminants should possess unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf, radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr, and highly radiogenic 207Pb/204Pb compositions requiring the presence of ancient components in the central European lower crust that are not sampled on the surface. Using energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallisation (EC-AFC) model calculations, differentiation of the SVF lithologies can be modelled by approximately 39-47 % fractional crystallisation and 6-15 % crustal assimilation. Notably, the transition from silica-undersaturated to silica-saturated compositions of many felsic lavas in the SVF that is difficult to account for in closed-system models is also well explained by

  19. The volcanic response to deglaciation: Evidence from glaciated arcs and a reassessment of global eruption records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Sebastian F. L.; Pyle, David M.; Mather, Tamsin A.

    Several lines of evidence have previously been used to suggest that ice retreat after the last glacial maximum (LGM) resulted in regionally-increased levels of volcanic activity. It has been proposed that this increase in volcanism was globally significant, forming a substantial component of the post-glacial rise in atmospheric CO2, and thereby contributing to climatic warming. However, as yet there has been no detailed investigation of activity in glaciated volcanic arcs following the LGM. Arc volcanism accounts for 90% of present-day subaerial volcanic eruptions. It is therefore important to constrain the impact of deglaciation on arc volcanoes, to understand fully the nature and magnitude of global-scale relationships between volcanism and glaciation. The first part of this paper examines the post-glacial explosive eruption history of the Andean southern volcanic zone (SVZ), a typical arc system, with additional data from the Kamchatka and Cascade arcs. In all cases, eruption rates in the early post-glacial period do not exceed those at later times at a statistically significant level. In part, the recognition and quantification of what may be small (i.e. less than a factor of two) increases in eruption rate is hindered by the size of our datasets. These datasets are limited to eruptions larger than 0.1 km3, because deviations from power-law magnitude-frequency relationships indicate strong relative under-sampling at smaller eruption volumes. In the southern SVZ, where ice unloading was greatest, eruption frequency in the early post-glacial period is approximately twice that of the mid post-glacial period (although frequency increases again in the late post-glacial). A comparable pattern occurs in Kamchatka, but is not observed in the Cascade arc. The early post-glacial period also coincides with a small number of very large explosive eruptions from the most active volcanoes in the southern and central SVZ, consistent with enhanced ponding of magma during

  20. Monogenetic volcanic fields and their geoheritage values of western Saudi Arabia and their implication to holistic geoeducation projects locally and globally (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, K.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    Monogeneitc volcanic fields are the most common manifestation of volcanism on Earth and other planets. They composed of small volume and short lived volcanoes each of them with a relatively simple eruption history. In spite of recent researches demonstrated complex, repeated and geochemically distinct eruption histories commonly associated with te formation of small-volume volcanoes, they are still considerred as volcanoes that are in human-scale and therefore ideal to use them as educational tools or part of volcanic geoheritage projects including geopark developments. In the western margin of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia there are at least 9 intracontinental volcanic fields subparalell with the Red Sea Rift ranging from alkaline basaltic to basalt-trachyte bimodal dispersed volcanic systems. Among these volcanic fields the geoheritage value of three fields were recently evaluated and proposed that they are suitable for further development to establish the first volcanic geoparks in the Arabian Peninsula in the area of 1) Al Madinah (AMVF) 2) Kishb (KVF) and 3) Hutaymah Volcanic Fields (HVF). The AMVF offers a natural concept based on specific volcanic precinct ordering of its volcanic geoheritages from the most accessable and most common volcanism that is historically significant (eg. scoria and lava spatter cones with extensive lava fields) toward a more adventure geotourism style approach in remote, less common but more destructive type of volcanism (eg. trachytic explosion craters). In the contrary, the KVF is a perfect site where phreatomagmatic volcanism and their consequences were identified as a major driving force for further geopark developments. The HVF with its rich archaeological and cultural sites and superbly exposed variously eroded tuff rings and maars offer a good location to develop geoeducation programs to highlight short- and long-term climatic and hydrologic changes in an area a volcanic field evolved. The three Saudi projects also demonstrate

  1. Study on shallow structural features in Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Ji-shun; GU Meng-lin; ZHAO Cheng-bin; PAN Su-zhen

    2006-01-01

    A seismic survey by 10 shallow profiles and 6 ultra-shallow profiles was performed in Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic region in 2002. The result shows that there are three (in some areas as many as seven) stable interfaces in the survey region, but no reflection phases are found in depths greater than 500 m. The number of interfaces in the southwestern part is obviously greater than in the northwestern part of Tianchi volcano, which suggests that the faults in the southwest have a stronger controlling power over the flow direction of volcano-spewed lava as compared with those in the northwest. Six shallow faults exist in the survey region. The shallow faults are nearly vertical graben-like faults and are mostly distributed on the southwest of Tianchi crater, indicating that volcanic activities in the southwest are stronger than in the northwest. On this ground, it could be further deduced that the NE-trending major fault of Tianchi volcano ( the Liudaogou-Tianchi-Zengfengshan fault) is more active than the NW-trending Baishanzhen-Tianchi-Jince fault.

  2. Borobudur, a basin under volcanic influence: 361,000 years BP to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, C.; Janin, M.; Lavigne, F.; Gertisser, R.; Charbonnier, S.; Lahitte, P.; Hadmoko, S. R.; Fort, M.; Wassmer, P.; Degroot, V.; Murwanto, H.

    2010-10-01

    Borobudur basin is located in Central Java (Indonesia), 30 km to the North of Yogyakarta City. The basin is famous for its UNESCO world heritage temple and for one of the world's most active volcanoes, Merapi, located to the East of Borobudur basin. Merapi is one of the three andesitic volcanoes that surround the basin: Merapi, Merbabu and Sumbing volcanoes. Therefore, volcanic activity has strongly influenced the evolution of Borobudur basin. The object of this contribution is to present the evolution of Borobudur basin over the last 161,000 years in the light of volcanic influence. The methodology and tools developed for this research span over different areas of expertise, from geochemistry, geology and geomorphology to remote sensing, GIS and archeology. Results highlight the following points: Two major volcanic events deposited volcaniclastic materials up to tens of meters thick ~ 119,000 years BP and ~ 31,000 years BP. in the Southern part of the Borobudur basin. The second volcanic event could correspond to the collapse of the older Ancient Merapi ( Camus et al., 2000) or Proto-Merapi Stage ( Newhall et al., 2000). There is no trace in the Borobudur basin of a large debris avalanche debris avalanche inferred in the literature for Merapi Volcano was either too small to reach 20 km from the actual summit of Merapi; or, despite the orientation of the avalanche caldera rim on Merapi Volcano, the debris avalanche was deposited more towards the South, completely eroded or covered by younger deposits. There are several generations of paleolakes in the Borobudur basin. The latest one has shrunk until historical times, corroborating the theory of Newhall et al. (2000) and Murwanto et al. (2004) that Borobudur Temple was standing by a water body. Most of these paleolakes were impounded following volcanic events. Paleolakes most probably originated from the blockage of the hydrographic network by volcanic material. Borobudur temple was never buried under volcanic

  3. Submarine volcanoes of the Kolumbo volcanic zone NE of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P.; Carey, S.; Papanikolaou, D.; Croff Bell, K.; Sakellariou, D.; Alexandri, M.; Bejelou, K.

    2012-06-01

    The seafloor northeast of Santorini volcano in Greece consists of a small, elongated rifted basin that has been the site of recent submarine volcanism. This area lies within the Cyclades back-arc region of the present Hellenic subduction zone where the seafloor of the eastern Mediterranean Sea is descending beneath the Aegean microplate. The Cycladic region and the Aegean Sea as a whole are known to be regions of north-south back-arc extension and thinning of continental crust. Nineteen submarine volcanic cones occur within this small rift zone, the largest of these being Kolumbo which last erupted explosively in 1650 AD, causing significant damage and fatalities on the nearby island of Santorini. Previous SEABEAM mapping and seismic studies from HCMR indicate that many of the smaller v'olcanic cones have been built above the present seafloor, while others are partly buried, indicating a range of ages for the activity along this volcanic line. None of the cones to the northeast of Kolumbo had been explored in detail prior to a cruise of the E/V Nautilus (NA007) in August 2010. The ROV Hercules was used to explore the slopes, summits and craters of 17 of the 19 centers identified on multibeam maps of the area. Water depths of the submarine volcano's summits ranged from 18 to 450 m. In general, the domes/craters northeast of Kolumbo were sediment covered and showed little evidence of recent volcanic activity. Outcrops of volcanic rock were found in the crater walls and slopes of some of the cones but they typically consisted of volcanic fragments of pumice and lava that have been cemented together by biological activity, indicative of the lack of recent eruptions. Geochemical analysis of samples collected on the northeast cones showed evidence of low temperature hydrothermal circulation on the summit and upper flanks in the form of stream-like manganese precipitates emanating from pits and fractures.

  4. Role of volcanism in climate and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelrod, D.I.

    1981-01-01

    Several major episodes of Tertiary explosive volcanism coincided with sharply lowered temperature as inferred from oxygen-isotope composition of foraminiferal tests in deep-sea cores. At these times, fossil floras in the western interior recorded significant changes. Reductions in taxa that required warmth occurred early in the Paleogene. Later, taxa that demand ample summer rain were reduced during a progressive change reflecting growth of the subtropic high. Other ecosystem changes that appear to have responded to volcanically induced climatic modifications include tachytely in Equidae (12 to 10 m.y. B.P.), rapid evolution of grasses (7 to 5 m.y. B.P.), evolution of marine mammals, and plankton flucuations. Although Lake Cretaceous extinctions commenced as epeiric seas retreated, the pulses of sharply lowered temperature induced by explosive volcanism, together with widespread falls of volcanic ash, may have led to extinction of dinosaurs, ammonites, cycadeoids, and other Cretaceous taxa. earlier, as Pangaea was assembled, Permian extinctions resulted not only from the elimination of oceans, epeiric seas, and shorelines, and the spread of more-continental climates, bu also from the climatic effects of major pulses of global volcanism and Gondwana glaciation.

  5. Sedimentation architecture of the volcanically-dammed Alf valley in the West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Luise; Lange, Thomas; Engelhardt, Jörn; Polom, Ulrich; Pirrung, Michael; Büchel, Georg

    2015-04-01

    In the southeastern part of the Quaternary West Eifel Volcanic Field, the Alf valley with its morphologically wide (~ 500 m) and flat valley bottom is visibly outstanding. This flat valley bottom was formed during the Marine Isotope Stage 2 due to fluviolacustrine sediments which deposited upstream of a natural volcanic dam. The dam consisted of lava and scoria breccia from the Wartgesberg Volcano complex (Cipa 1958, Hemfler et al. 1991) that erupted ~ 31 BP (40Ar/ 39Ar dating on glass shards, Mertz, pers. communication 2014). Due to this impoundment, the Alf creek turned into a dendritic lake, trapping the catchment sediments. The overall aim is to create the sedimentation architecture of the Alf valley. In comparison to maar archives like Holzmaar or Meerfelder Maar in the vicinity, the fluviolacustrine sediments of the Alf valley show clay-silt lamination despite the water percolation. This archive covers the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to Early Holocene (Pirrung et al. 2007). Focus of this study is the creation of a 3D model by applying the program ESRI ArcGIS 10.2 to reconstruct the pre-volcanic Alf valley. Moreover, the sedimentation architecture is reconstructed and the sediment fill quantified. Therefore, the digital elevation model with 5 m resolution from the State Survey and Geobasis Information of Rhineland-Palatinate, polreduced magnetic data measured on top of the Strohn lava stream, shear seismic data and core stratigraphies were utilized. Summarizing previous results, Lake Alf had a catchment area of ~ 55 km² (Meerfelder Maar: 1.27 km²) and a surface area of 8.2 km² (Meerfelder Maar: 0.24 km²) considering a maximum lake water level of 410 m a.s.l.. In the deepest parts (~ 50 m) of Lake Alf, lake sediments are laminated, up to 21 m thick and show a very high sedimentation rate ~ 3 mm a-1 (Dehner Maar ~ 1.5 mm a-1, (Sirocko et al. 2013)). The sediments become coarser upstream und stratigraphically above the fine-grained lake sediments

  6. The Early Andean Magmatic Province (EAMP): 40Ar/ 39Ar dating on Mesozoic volcanic and plutonic rocks from the Coastal Cordillera, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, Verónica; Féraud, Gilbert; Aguirre, Luis; Fornari, Michel; Morata, Diego

    2006-10-01

    The Early Andean Magmatic Province (EAMP), consists of about 150 000 km 3 of volcanic and plutonic units in the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile and southern Peru and represents a major magmatic Mesozoic event in the world, for which the precise age of the thick volcanic series was unknown. Thirty 40Ar/ 39Ar analyses were carried out on primary mineral phases of volcanic and plutonic rocks from northern Chile (18°30'-24°S). Reliable plateau and "mini plateau" ages were obtained on plagioclase, amphibole and biotite from volcanic and plutonic rocks, despite widespread strong alteration degree. In the Arica, Tocopilla and Antofagasta (700 km apart) regions, the ages obtained on lava flows constrain the volcanic activity between 164 and 150 Ma and no N-S migration of volcanism is observed. The uppermost lava flows of the volcanic sequence at the type locality of the La Negra Formation extruded at ca. 153-150 Ma, suggesting the end of the volcanic activity of the arc at that time. The oldest volcanic activity occurred probably at ca. 175-170 Ma in the Iquique area, although no plateau age could be obtained. The plutonic bodies of the same regions were dated between ca. 160 and 142 Ma, indicating that they were partly contemporaneous with the volcanic activity. At least one volcanic pulse around 160 Ma is evidenced over the entire investigated reach of the EAMP, according to the ages found in Arica, Tocopilla, Michilla and Mantos Blancos regions. The episodic emplacement of huge amounts of subduction related volcanism is observed throughout the whole Andean history and particularly during the Jurassic (southern Peru, northern Chile and southern Argentina). These events probably correspond to periodic extensional geodynamic episodes, as a consequence of particular subduction conditions, such as change of obliquity of the convergence, change in the subduction angle, slab roll back effect or lower convergence rate, that remain to be precisely defined.

  7. Volcanic unrest in Kenya: geological history from a satellite perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, E.; Biggs, J.; Edmonds, M.; Vye-Brown, C.

    2013-12-01

    The East African Rift (EAR) system is a 5,000 km long series of fault bounded depressions that run from Djibouti to Mozambique. In the Kenyan Rift, fourteen Quaternary volcanoes lie along the central rift axis. These volcanoes are principally composed of trachyte pyroclastics and trachyte and basaltic lavas forming low-angle multi-vent edifices. Between 1997 and 2008, geodetic activity has been observed at five Kenyan volcanoes, all of which have undergone periods of caldera collapse and explosive activity. We present a remote-sensing study to investigate the temporal and spatial development of volcanic activity at Longonot volcano. High-resolution mapping using ArcGIS and an immersive 3D visualisation suite (GeovisionaryTM) has been used with imagery derived from ASTER, SPOT5 and GDEM data to identify boundaries of eruptive units and establish relative age in order to add further detail to Longonot's recent eruptive history. Mapping of the deposits at Longonot is key to understand the recent geological history and forms the basis for future volcanic hazard research to inform risk assessments and mitigation programs in Kenya. Calderas at Kenyan volcanoes are elliptical in plan view and we use high-resolution imagery to investigate the regional stresses and structural control leading to the formation of these elliptical calderas. We find that volcanoes in the central and northern segments of the Kenyan rift are elongated nearly parallel to the direction of least horizontal compressive stress, likely as a reflection of the direction of the plate motion vector at the time of caldera collapse. The southern volcanoes however are elongated at an acute angle to the plate motion vector, most likely as a result of oblique opening of the Kenyan rift in this region.

  8. Observations of volcanic earthquakes and tremor at Deception Island - Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Morales

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Deception Island - South Shetlands, Antarctica is site of active volcanism. Since 1988 field surveys have been carried out with the aim of seismic monitoring, and in 1994 a seismic array was set up near the site of the Spanish summer base in order to better constrain the source location and spectral properties of the seismic events related to the volcanic activity. The array was maintained during the Antarctic summer of 1995 and the last field survey was carried out in 1996. Data show the existence of three different groups (or families of seismic events: 1 long period events, with a quasi-monochromatic spectral content (1-3 Hz peak frequency and a duration of more than 50 s, often occurring in small swarms lasting from several minutes to some day; 2 volcanic tremor, with a spectral shape similar to the long period events but with a duration of several minutes (2-10; 3 hybrid events, with a waveform characterised by the presence of a high frequency initial phase, followed by a low frequency phase with characteristics similar to those of the long period events. The high frequency phase of the hybrid events was analysed using polarisation techniques, showing the presence of P waves. This phase is presumably located at short epicentral distances and shallow source depth. All the analysed seismic events show back-azimuths between 120 and 330 degrees from north (corresponding to zones of volcanic activity showing no seismic activity in the middle of the caldera. Particle motion, Fourier spectral and spectrogram analysis show that the low frequency part of the three groups of the seismic signals have similar patterns. Moreover careful observations show that the high frequency phase which characterises the hybrid events is present in the long period and in the tremor events, even with lower signal to noise ratios. This evidence suggests that long period events are events in which the high frequency part is simply difficult to observe, due to a very

  9. Studies of crustal structure, seismic precursors to volcanic eruptions and earthquake hazard in the eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mavonga, T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, civil wars in the eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo have caused massive social disruptions, which have been exacerbated by volcanic and earthquake disasters. Seismic data were gathered and analysed as part...

  10. A preliminary evaluation of ERTS-1 images on the volcanic areas of Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinis, R.; Lechi, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    The test site selected for the investigation covers nearly all the regions of active and quiescent volcanism in southern Italy, i.e. the eastern part of the island of Sicily, the Aeolian Islands and the area of Naples. The three active European volcanoes (Etna, Stromboli and Vesuvius) are included. The investigation is in the frame of a program for the surveillance of active volcanoes by geophysical (including remote sensing thermal methods) and geochemical methods. By the multispectral analysis of ERTS-1 data it is intended to study the spectral behavior of the volcanic materials as well as the major geological lineaments with special reference to those associated with the volcanic region. Secondary objectives are also the determination of the hydrographic network seasonal behavior and the relationship between the vegetation cover and the different type of soils and rocks.

  11. Simulation of the trans-oceanic tsunami propagation due to the 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Choi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption has generated a destructive tsunami higher than 40 m on the Indonesian coast where more than 36 000 lives were lost. Sea level oscillations related with this event have been reported on significant distances from the source in the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Evidence of many manifestations of the Krakatau tsunami was a subject of the intense discussion, and it was suggested that some of them are not related with the direct propagation of the tsunami waves from the Krakatau volcanic eruption. Present paper analyzes the hydrodynamic part of the Krakatau event in details. The worldwide propagation of the tsunami waves generated by the Krakatau volcanic eruption is studied numerically using two conventional models: ray tracing method and two-dimensional linear shallow-water model. The results of the numerical simulations are compared with available data of the tsunami registration.

  12. Geochemistry of coastal sands of Eastern Mediterranean: The case of Nisyros volcanic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzifas, I.T.; Misaelides, P.; Godelitsas, A.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal sand samples collected from the northern part of Nisyros volcanic island (Dodecanese, Greece) were investigated for first time for their potential in strategic metals and compared with parental rocks of the island which are Quaternary volcanics with alternating lava flows, pyroclastic...... layers and lava domes and relevant materials located near granitoids of Northern Greece. The PXRD and SEM-EDS study of the sands revealed enhanced content of feldspars, Fe-Mn oxides, magnetite, tourmaline, pyroxenes, ilmenites, along with zircons, apatite and sulfide inclusions. The fresh hydrothermally...... (mainly ilmenite), and strategic metals including V (1920 mg/kg) and Nb (245 mg/kg), in the coastal sand. The low REE concentration(ΣREE + Y = 240 mg/kg) could be attributed to the absence of REE-rich minerals. Moreover, the sandsexhibit different geochemical patterns compared to the volcanic source rocks...

  13. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-08-14

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  14. Radar imaging of volcanic fields and sand dune fields: Implications for VOIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elachi, C.; Blom, R.; Daily, M.; Farr, T.; Saunders, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A number of volcanic fields and sand dune fields in the western part of North America were studied using aircraft and Seasat synthetic aperture radar images and LANDSAT images. The capability of radars with different characteristics (i.e., frequency, polarization and look angles was assessed to identify and map different volcanic features, lava flows and sand dune types. It was concluded that: (1) volcanic features which have a relatively large topographic expression (i.e., cinder cones, collapse craters, calderas, etc.) are easily identified; (2) lava flows of different ages can be identified, particularly on the L-band images; and (3) sand dunes are clearly observed and their extent and large scale geometric characteristics determined, provided the proper imaging geometry exists.

  15. Central San Juan caldera cluster: regional volcanic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    2000-01-01

    Eruption of at least 8800 km3 of dacitic-rhyolitic magma as 9 major ash-slow sheets (individually 150-5000 km3) was accompanied by recurrent caldera subsidence between 28.3 and about 26.5 Ma in the central San Juan Mountains, Colorado. Voluminous andesitic-decitic lavas and breccias were erupted from central volcanoes prior to the ash-flow eruptions, and similar lava eruptions continued within and adjacent to the calderas during the period of explosive volcanism, making the central San Juan caldera cluster an exceptional site for study of caldera-related volcanic processes. Exposed calderas vary in size from 10 to 75 km in maximum diameter, the largest calderas being associated with the most voluminous eruptions. After collapse of the giant La Garita caldera during eruption if the Fish Canyon Tuff at 17.6 Ma, seven additional explosive eruptions and calderas formed inside the La Garita depression within about 1 m.y. Because of the nested geometry, maximum loci of recurrently overlapping collapse events are inferred to have subsided as much as 10-17 km, far deeper than the roof of the composite subvolcanic batholith defined by gravity data, which represents solidified caldera-related magma bodies. Erosional dissection to depths of as much as 1.5 km, although insufficient to reach the subvolcanic batholith, has exposed diverse features of intracaldera ash-flow tuff and interleaved caldera-collapse landslide deposits that accumulated to multikilometer thickness within concurrently subsiding caldera structures. The calderas display a variety of postcollapse resurgent uplift structures, and caldera-forming events produced complex fault geometries that localized late mineralization, including the epithermal base- and precious-metal veins of the well-known Creede mining district. Most of the central San Juan calderas have been deeply eroded, and their identification is dependent on detailed geologic mapping. In contrast, the primary volcanic morphology of the

  16. Geochemistry and tectonic setting of alkaline volcanic rocks in the Antarctic Peninsula: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smellie, J. L.

    1987-06-01

    The numerous Miocene-Recent alkaline volcanic outcrops in the Antarctic Peninsula form a substantial volcanic province, the least well-known part of a major belt of alkaline volcanism that extends between South America and New Zealand. The outcrops consists mainly of aa and pahoehoe lavas and hyaloclastites which locally contain accidental nodules of spinel lherzolite and other mantle-derived lithologies. The province is predominantly basaltic with two major differentiation lineages: (1) a sodic series of olivine and alkali basalt, hawaiite, mugearite, trachy-phonolite and trachyte; and (2) a relatively potassic, highly undersaturated series of basanite, tephrite and phono-tephrite. All the lavas show varying effects of fractionation by crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene, joined by plagioclase in the hawaiites to trachytes. Fractional crystallization can probably explain most of the chemical variation observed within each outcrop, but variable partial melting is necessary to account for the differences in incompatible element enrichment between the two series, and between the individual outcrops. The degree of partial melting may not have exceeded 3%, as is the case for many other alkaline magmas. The volcanism is an intraplate phenomenon but there is no correlation in timing between the cessation of subduction and the inception of alkaline volcanism. The activity cannot be related to the passage of the coupled Pacific-Antarctic plate over a stationary mantle hot-spot. Although the precise causal relationship with tectonic setting is unknown, regional extension was a prerequisite for giving the magmas rapid access to the surface.

  17. Stratigraphy, geomorphology, geochemistry and hazard implications of the Nejapa Volcanic Field, western Managua, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellán, Denis Ramón; Macías, José Luis; Pardo, Natalia; Scolamacchia, Teresa; Rodriguez, Dionisio

    2012-02-01

    The Nejapa Volcanic Field (NVF) is located on the western outskirts of Managua, Nicaragua. It consists of at least 30 volcanic structures emplaced along the N-S Nejapa fault, which represents the western active edge of the Managua Graben. The study area covers the central and southern parts of the volcanic field. We document the basic geomorphology, stratigraphy, chemistry and evolution of 17 monogenetic volcanic structures: Ticomo (A, B, C, D and E); Altos de Ticomo; Nejapa; San Patricio; Nejapa-Norte; Motastepe; El Hormigón; La Embajada; Asososca; Satélite; Refinería; and Cuesta El Plomo (A and B). Stratigraphy aided by radiocarbon dating suggests that 23 eruptions have occurred in the area during the past ~ 34,000 years. Fifteen of these eruptions originated in the volcanic field between ~ 28,500 and 2,130 yr BP with recurrence intervals varying from 400 to 7,000 yr. Most of these eruptions were phreatomagmatic with minor strombolian and fissural lava flow events. A future eruption along the fault might be of a phreatomagmatic type posing a serious threat to the more than 500,000 inhabitants in western Managua.

  18. Mylonitic volcanics near Puging, Upper Siang district, Arunachal Pradesh: Evidence of oblique-slip thrusting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Goswami; P Bhattacharyya; D Bezbaruah

    2016-08-01

    The Abor volcanics of the continental flood basalt affinity are extensively exposed in different parts of the Siang valley. These are associated with Yinkiong Group of rocks of Paleocene–Eocene age and represent syn-sedimentary volcanism in a rift setting. Subsequent folding and thrusting of the Siyom and Rikor sequences above the Yinkiong Group of rocks represent changes from syn-to-post collisionalbrittle-ductile tectonic episodes. Mylonitic Abor volcanics in the thrust contacts are studied at several locations in the north and south of Puging in the Siang valley. Both the Abor volcanics and associated Rikor and Yinkiong Group of rocks preserve meso to micro-scale fabric asymmetries indicating that the thrust contacts are shear zones of brittle-ductile nature containing mylonitic textures of high shear strain.Two distinct hitherto unrecognised shear zones in the north and south of Puging are named as North Puging Shear Zone (NPSZ) and South Puging Shear Zone (SPSZ). The kinematic indicators along the thrust contact indicate oblique slip thrusting of the Rikor and Siyom thrust sheets above the Yinkiong Group of rocks. This paper provides field evidence proving that the compression due the Burmese plate made oblique slip thrusting and zones of mylonitised volcanics possible and associated metasediments were formed. The kinematic indicators in the NPSZ and SPSZ respectively indicate top-to-SSE and top-to-NNW sense of shears.

  19. Optical, microphysical and compositional properties of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rocha-Lima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Microphysical, optical, and compositional properties of the volcanic ash from the April–May (2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption are presented. Samples of the volcanic ash were taken on the ground in the vicinity of the volcano. The material was sieved, re-suspended, and collected on filters, separating particle sizes into coarse and fine modes. The spectral mass absorption efficiency αabs [m2 g−1] was determined for coarse and fine particles in the wavelength range from 300 to 2500 nm. Size distribution of particles on filters was obtained using a semi-automatic software to analyze images obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The grain density of the volcanic ash was determined as 2.16(13 g cm−3 by measuring the variation of air volume in a system with volcanic ash and air under compression. Using Mie–Lorenz and T-matrix theories, the imaginary part of the refractive index was derived. Results show the spectral imaginary refractive index ranging from 0.001 to 0.005. Fine and coarse particles were analyzed by X-Ray fluorescence for elemental composition. Fine and coarse mode particles exhibit distinct compositional and optical differences.

  20. Oil-bearing sediments beneath San Juan volcanics - Colorado's newest frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gries, R.R.

    1985-05-01

    During the Tertiary, the western part of the northern Sange de Cristo Range dropped 16,000 ft (4877 m) to become what is now known as the San Luis basin. The foreland basin formerly adjacent to and west of the range remained intact but was subsequently concealed by 10,000 ft (3048 m) of volcanic deposits. The existence of this concealed basin, a northeastern arm of the San Juan basin, was first suggested by Vincent Kelly who named it the San Juan sag. Oil, which was generated in the underlying Mancos Shale, migrated upward into vesicles and fractures in volcanic rocks. In at least two places, oil is currently seeping onto the volcanic surface or into overlying soil. These oil occurrences encouraged geologic and geophysical exploration and have led to confirmation by drilling that the basin exists. Porous reservoirs in both tertiary sedimentary rocks and volcanic rocks overlie a 2000 ft (610 m) Cretaceous Mancos Shale source rock. Within the Mancos Shale are fractured reservoirs, volcanic sills that have reservoir potential where fractured or porous, and stray sandstones. The Dakota Formation underlies the Mancos Shale and is about 200 ft (61 m) thick in this area. In addition, the Jurassic section has potential for source rocks in the Todilto Formation and reservoir rocks in the Entrada and Junction Creek Sandstones. The San Juan sag, a newly discovered basin of 2600 miS (6734 kmS) is a frontier for Colorado oil and gas exploration.

  1. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    The National Aviation Weather Program Strategic Plan (1997) and the National Aviation Weather Initiatives (1999) both identified volcanic ash as a high-priority informational need to aviation services. The risk to aviation from airborne volcanic ash is known and includes degraded engine performance (including flameout), loss of visibility, failure of critical navigational and operational instruments, and, in the worse case, loss of life. The immediate costs for aircraft encountering a dense plume are potentially major—damages up to $80 million have occurred to a single aircraft. Aircraft encountering less dense volcanic ash clouds can incur longer-term costs due to increased maintenance of engines and external surfaces. The overall goal, as stated in the Initiatives, is to eliminate encounters with ash that could degrade the in-flight safety of aircrews and passengers and cause damage to the aircraft. This goal can be accomplished by improving the ability to detect, track, and forecast hazardous ash clouds and to provide adequate warnings to the aviation community on the present and future location of the cloud. To reach this goal, the National Aviation Weather Program established three objectives: (1) prevention of accidental encounters with hazardous clouds; (2) reduction of air traffic delays, diversions, or evasive actions when hazardous clouds are present; and (3) the development of a single, worldwide standard for exchange of information on airborne hazardous materials. To that end, over the last several years, based on numerous documents (including an OFCMsponsored comprehensive study on aviation training and an update of Aviation Weather Programs/Projects), user forums, and two International Conferences on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety (1992 and 2004), the Working Group for Volcanic Ash (WG/VA), under the OFCM-sponsored Committee for Aviation Services and Research, developed the National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and Support of the

  2. Volcanic CO2 Emissions and Glacial Cycles: Coupled Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, J. M.; Huybers, P. J.; Katz, R. F.

    2016-12-01

    Following the mid-Pleistocene transition, the dominant period of glacial cycles changed from 40 ka to 100 ka. It is broadly accepted that the 40 ka glacial cycles were driven by cyclical changes in obliquity. However, this forcing does not explain the 100 ka glacial cycles. Mechanisms proposed for 100 ka cycles include isostatic bed depression and proglacial lakes destabilising the Laurentide ice sheet, non-linear responses to orbital eccentricity, and Antarctic ice sheets influencing deep-ocean stratification. None of these are universally accepted. Here we investigate the hypothesis that variations in volcanic CO2 emissions can cause 100 ka glacial cycles. Any proposed mechanism for 100 ka glacial cycles must give the Earth's climate system a memory of 10^4 - 10^5years. This timescale is difficult to achieve for surface processes, however it is possible for the solid Earth. Recent work suggests volcanic CO2 emissions change in response to glacial cycles [1] and that there could be a 50 ka delay in that response [2]. Such a lagged response could drive glacial cycles from 40 ka cycles to an integer multiple of the forcing period. Under what conditions could the climate system admit such a response? To address this, we use a simplified climate model modified from Huybers and Tziperman [3]. Our version comprises three component models for energy balance, ice sheet growth and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The model is driven by insolation alone with other components varying according to a system of coupled, differential equations. The model is run for 500 ka to produce several glacial cycles and the resulting changes in global ice volume and atmospheric CO2 concentration.We obtain a switch from 40 ka to 100 ka cycles as the volcanic CO2 response to glacial cycles is increased. These 100 ka cycles are phase-locked to obliquity, lasting 80 or 120 ka. Whilst the MOR response required (in this model) is larger than plausible estimates based on [2], it illustrates the

  3. Ozone depletion following future volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Klobas, J.; Wilmouth, David M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Anderson, James G.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    2017-07-01

    While explosive volcanic eruptions cause ozone loss in the current atmosphere due to an enhancement in the availability of reactive chlorine following the stratospheric injection of sulfur, future eruptions are expected to increase total column ozone as halogen loading approaches preindustrial levels. The timing of this shift in the impact of major volcanic eruptions on the thickness of the ozone layer is poorly known. Modeling four possible climate futures, we show that scenarios with the smallest increase in greenhouse gas concentrations lead to the greatest risk to ozone from heterogeneous chemical processing following future eruptions. We also show that the presence in the stratosphere of bromine from natural, very short-lived biogenic compounds is critically important for determining whether future eruptions will lead to ozone depletion. If volcanic eruptions inject hydrogen halides into the stratosphere, an effect not considered in current ozone assessments, potentially profound reductions in column ozone would result.

  4. Breaking the rhythm of depression : Cognitive Behavior Therapy and relapse prevention for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, Claudi L.H.

    2010-01-01

    A crucial part of the treatment of depression is the prevention of relapse and recurrence. Psychological interventions, especially cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) are helpful in preventing relapse and recurrence in depression. The effectivity of four types of relapse prevention cognitive behavior

  5. Breaking the rhythm of depression : Cognitive Behavior Therapy and relapse prevention for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, Claudi L.H.

    2010-01-01

    A crucial part of the treatment of depression is the prevention of relapse and recurrence. Psychological interventions, especially cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) are helpful in preventing relapse and recurrence in depression. The effectivity of four types of relapse prevention cognitive behavior t

  6. Breaking the rhythm of depression : Cognitive Behavior Therapy and relapse prevention for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, Claudi L.H.

    2010-01-01

    A crucial part of the treatment of depression is the prevention of relapse and recurrence. Psychological interventions, especially cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) are helpful in preventing relapse and recurrence in depression. The effectivity of four types of relapse prevention cognitive behavior t

  7. Late Cenozoic volcanism in the western Woodlark Basin area, SW Pacific: the sources of marine volcanic ash layers based on their elemental and Sr-Nd isotope compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackschewitz, K. S.; Mertz, D. F.; Devey, C. W.; Garbe-Schönberg, C.-D.

    2002-12-01

    Tephra fallout layers and volcaniclastic deposits, derived from volcanic sources around and on the Papuan Peninsula, form a substantial part of the Woodlark Basin marine sedimentary succession. Sampling by the Ocean Drilling Program Leg 180 in the western Woodlark Basin provides the opportunity to document the distribution of the volcanically-derived components as well as to evaluate their chronology, chemistry, and isotope compositions in order to gain information on the volcanic sources and original magmatic systems. Glass shards selected from 57 volcanogenic layers within the sampled Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary sequence show predominantly rhyolitic compositions, with subordinate basaltic andesites, basaltic trachy-andesites, andesites, trachy-andesites, dacites, and phonolites. It was possible to correlate only a few of the volcanogenic layers between sites using geochemical and age information apparently because of the formation of strongly compartmentalised sedimentary realms on this actively rifting margin. In many cases it was possible to correlate Leg 180 volcanic components with their eruption source areas based on chemical and isotope compositions. Likely sources for a considerable number of the volcanogenic deposits are Moresby and Dawson Strait volcanoes (D'Entrecasteaux Islands region) for high-K calc-alkaline glasses. The Dawson Strait volcanoes appear to represent the source for five peralkaline tephra layers. One basaltic andesitic volcaniclastic layer shows affinities to basaltic andesites from the Woodlark spreading tip and Cheshire Seamount. For other layers, a clear identification of the sources proved impossible, although their isotope and chemical signatures suggest similarities to south-west Pacific subduction volcanism, e.g. New Britain and Tonga-Kermadec island arcs. Volcanic islands in the Trobriand Arc (for example, Woodlark Island Amphlett Islands and/or Egum Atoll) are probable sources for several volcaniclastic layers with ages

  8. Eruptive Productivity of the Ceboruco-San Pedro Volcanic Field, Nayarit, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H. M.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Delgado-Granados, H.

    2002-12-01

    High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology coupled with GIS spatial analysis provides constraints on magma eruption rates over the past 1 Myr of the Ceboruco-San Pedro volcanic field (1870 km2), located in the Tepic-Zacoalco rift in western Mexico. The volcanic field is part of the Trans Mexican Volcanic arc and is dominated by the andesitic-dacitic stratocone of Volcan Ceboruco and includes peripheral fissure-fed flows, domes, and monogenetic cinder cones. The ages of these volcanic features were determined using 40Ar/39Ar laser step-heating techniques on groundmass or mineral separates, with 78% of the 52 analyses yielding plateau ages with a 2 sigma error < 50 kyrs. The volumes were determined using high resolution (1:50,000) digital elevation models, orthophotos, and GIS software, which allowed for the delineation of individual volcanic features, reconstruction of the pre-eruptive topography, and volume calculations by linear interpolation. The relative proportions of the 80 km3 erupted over the past 1 Myr are 14.5% basaltic andesite, 64.5% andesite, 20% dacite, and 1% rhyolite, demonstrating the dominance of intermediate magma types (in terms of silica content). Overall, there appears to be no systematic progression in the eruption of different magma types (e.g., basalt, andesite, dacite, etc.) with time. However, more than 75% of the total volume of lava within the Ceboruco-San Pedro volcanic field erupted in the last 100 kyrs. This reflects the youthfulness of Volcan Ceboruco, which was constructed during the last 50 kyrs and has a present day volume of 50 +/- 2.5 km3, accounting for 81% of the andesite and 50% of the dacite within the volcanic field. Eleven cinder cones, ranging from the Holocene to 0.37 Ma, display a narrow compositional range, with 52-58 wt% SiO2, 3-5.5 wt% MgO, and relatively high TiO2 concentrations (0.9-1.8 wt%). The total volume of the cinder cones is 0.83 km3. No lavas with < 51 wt% SiO2 have erupted in the past 1 Myr. Peripheral

  9. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the

  10. Tropical Volcanic Soils From Flores Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmatullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils that are developed intropical region with volcanic parent materials have many unique properties, and high potential for agricultural use.The purpose of this study is to characterize the soils developed on volcanic materials from Flores Island, Indonesia,and to examine if the soils meet the requirements for andic soil properties. Selected five soils profiles developed fromandesitic volcanic materials from Flores Island were studied to determine their properties. They were compared intheir physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics according to their parent material, and climatic characteristicdifferent. The soils were developed under humid tropical climate with ustic to udic soil moisture regimes withdifferent annual rainfall. The soils developed from volcanic ash parent materials in Flores Island showed differentproperties compared to the soils derived from volcanic tuff, even though they were developed from the sameintermediary volcanic materials. The silica contents, clay mineralogy and sand fractions, were shown as the differences.The different in climatic conditions developed similar properties such as deep solum, dark color, medium texture, andvery friable soil consistency. The soils have high organic materials, slightly acid to acid, low to medium cationexchange capacity (CEC. The soils in western region have higher clay content and showing more developed than ofthe eastern region. All the profiles meet the requirements for andic soil properties, and classified as Andisols order.The composition of sand mineral was dominated by hornblende, augite, and hypersthenes with high weatherablemineral reserves, while the clay fraction was dominated by disordered kaolinite, and hydrated halloysite. The soilswere classified into subgroup as Thaptic Hapludands, Typic Hapludands, and Dystric Haplustands

  11. Ages of plains volcanism on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, Ernst; Jagert, Felix; Broz, Petr

    2010-05-01

    Plain-style volcanism [1] is widespread in the Tharsis and Elysium volcanic provinces on Mars, [2,3]. Detailed images and topographic data reveal the morphology and topography of clusters of low shields and associated lava flows. The landforms of plains volcanism on Mars have all well-known terrestrial analogues in basaltic volcanic regions, such as Hawaii, Iceland, and in particular the Snake River Plains [4]. The very gentle flank slopes (Ga - 2.9 Ga). Our results indicate that Late Amazonian volcanism is more widespread in Tharsis than previously recognized. Based on our results it appears possible that Mars is volcanologically not dead yet. Ongoing work investigates the volumes of erupted products and implications for the outgassing history and atmospheric evolution of Mars. [1] Greeley R. (1982) JGR 87, 2705-2712. [2] Plescia J. (1981) Icarus, 45, 586-601. [3] Hodges C.A. and Moore H.J. (1994) Atlas of volcanic features on Mars: USGS Prof. Paper 1534, 194 p. [4] Hauber E. et al. (2009) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 185, 69-95. [5] Wilson L. et al. (2009) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 185, 28-46. [6] Vaucher, J. et al. (2009) Icarus 204, 418-442. [7] Baratoux D. et al. (2009) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 185, 47-68. [8] Bleacher J.E. et al. (2009) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 185, 96-102. [9] Ivanov B.A. (2001) Space Sci. Rev. 96, 87-104. [10] Hartmann W.H. and Neukum G. (2001) Space Sci. Rev. 96, 165-194 [11] Kneissl T. et al. (2010) LPS XVI, submitted. [12] Michael, G.G. and Neukum G. (2010) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., in press. . [13] Malin M.C. et al. (2007) JGR 112, E05S04, doi: 10.1029/2006JE002808.

  12. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  13. The evolution of pore connectivity in volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombier, Mathieu; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Gurioli, Lucia; Scheu, Bettina; Kueppers, Ulrich; Di Muro, Andrea; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-03-01

    Pore connectivity is a measure of the fraction of pore space (vesicles, voids or cracks) in a material that is interconnected on the system length scale. Pore connectivity is fundamentally related to permeability, which has been shown to control magma outgassing and the explosive potential of magma during ascent in the shallowest part of the crust. Here, we compile a database of connectivity and porosity from published sources and supplement this with additional measurements, using natural volcanic rocks produced in a broad range of eruptive styles and with a range of bulk composition. The database comprises 2715 pairs of connectivity C and porosity ϕ values for rocks from 35 volcanoes as well as 116 products of experimental work. For 535 volcanic rock samples, the permeability k was also measured. Data from experimental studies constrain the general features of the relationship between C and ϕ associated with both vesiculation and densification processes, which can then be used to interpret natural data. To a first order, we show that a suite of rocks originating from effusive eruptive behaviour can be distinguished from rocks originating from explosive eruptive behaviour using C and ϕ. We observe that on this basis, a particularly clear distinction can be made between scoria formed in fire-fountains and that formed in Strombolian activity. With increasing ϕ, the onset of connectivity occurs at the percolation threshold ϕc which in turn can be hugely variable. We demonstrate that C is an excellent metric for constraining ϕc in suites of porous rocks formed in a common process and discuss the range of ϕc values recorded in volcanic rocks. The percolation threshold is key to understanding the onset of permeability, outgassing and compaction in shallow magmas. We show that this threshold is dramatically different in rocks formed during densification processes than in rocks formed in vesiculating processes and propose that this value is the biggest factor in

  14. QVAST: a new Quantum GIS plugin for estimating volcanic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, S.; Cappello, A.; Martí, J.; Del Negro, C.

    2013-11-01

    One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology is the construction of hazard maps simulating different eruptive scenarios that can be used in risk-based decision making in land-use planning and emergency management. The first step in the quantitative assessment of volcanic hazards is the development of susceptibility maps (i.e., the spatial probability of a future vent opening given the past eruptive activity of a volcano). This challenging issue is generally tackled using probabilistic methods that use the calculation of a kernel function at each data location to estimate probability density functions (PDFs). The smoothness and the modeling ability of the kernel function are controlled by the smoothing parameter, also known as the bandwidth. Here we present a new tool, QVAST, part of the open-source geographic information system Quantum GIS, which is designed to create user-friendly quantitative assessments of volcanic susceptibility. QVAST allows the selection of an appropriate method for evaluating the bandwidth for the kernel function on the basis of the input parameters and the shapefile geometry, and can also evaluate the PDF with the Gaussian kernel. When different input data sets are available for the area, the total susceptibility map is obtained by assigning different weights to each of the PDFs, which are then combined via a weighted summation and modeled in a non-homogeneous Poisson process. The potential of QVAST, developed in a free and user-friendly environment, is here shown through its application in the volcanic fields of Lanzarote (Canary Islands) and La Garrotxa (NE Spain).

  15. Non-volcanic tremor driven by large transient shear stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Justin L; Vidale, John E; Gomberg, Joan; Bodin, Paul; Creager, Kenneth C; Malone, Stephen D

    2007-08-01

    Non-impulsive seismic radiation or 'tremor' has long been observed at volcanoes and more recently around subduction zones. Although the number of observations of non-volcanic tremor is steadily increasing, the causative mechanism remains unclear. Some have attributed non-volcanic tremor to the movement of fluids, while its coincidence with geodetically observed slow-slip events at regular intervals has led others to consider slip on the plate interface as its cause. Low-frequency earthquakes in Japan, which are believed to make up at least part of non-volcanic tremor, have focal mechanisms and locations that are consistent with tremor being generated by shear slip on the subduction interface. In Cascadia, however, tremor locations appear to be more distributed in depth than in Japan, making them harder to reconcile with a plate interface shear-slip model. Here we identify bursts of tremor that radiated from the Cascadia subduction zone near Vancouver Island, Canada, during the strongest shaking from the moment magnitude M(w) = 7.8, 2002 Denali, Alaska, earthquake. Tremor occurs when the Love wave displacements are to the southwest (the direction of plate convergence of the overriding plate), implying that the Love waves trigger the tremor. We show that these displacements correspond to shear stresses of approximately 40 kPa on the plate interface, which suggests that the effective stress on the plate interface is very low. These observations indicate that tremor and possibly slow slip can be instantaneously induced by shear stress increases on the subduction interface-effectively a frictional failure response to the driving stress.

  16. Constraining the onset of flood volcanism in Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angkasa, Syahreza; Jerram, Dougal. A.; Svensen, Henrik; Millet, John M.; Taylor, Ross; Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    In order to constrain eruption styles at the onset of flood volcanism, field observations were undertaken on basal sections of the Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province. This study investigates three specific sections; Camus Ban, Neist Point and Soay Sound which sample a large area about 1500 km2 and can be used to help explain the variability in palaeo-environments at the onset of flood volcanism. Petrological analysis is coupled with petrophysical lab data and photogrammetry data to create detailed facies models for the different styles of initiating flood basalt volcanism. Photogrammetry is used to create Ortho-rectified 3D models which, along with photomontage images, allow detailed geological observations to be mapped spatially. Petrographic analyses are combined with petrophysical lab data to identify key textural variation, mineral compositions and physical properties of the volcanic rocks emplaced during the initial eruptions. Volcanism initiated with effusive eruptions in either subaerial or subaqueous environments resulting in tuff/hyaloclastite materials or lava flow facies lying directly on the older Mesozoic strata. Volcanic facies indicative of lava-water interactions vary significantly in thickness between different sections suggesting a strong accommodation space control on the style of volcanism. Camus Ban shows hyaloclastite deposits with a thickness of 25m, whereas the Soay Sound area has tuffaceous sediments of under 0.1m in thickness. Subaerial lavas overly these variable deposits in all studied areas. The flood basalt eruptions took place in mixed wet and dry environments with some significant locally developed water bodies (e.g. Camus Ban). More explosive eruptions were promoted in some cases by interaction of lavas with these water bodies and possibly by local interaction with water - saturated sediments. We record key examples of how palaeotopography imparts a primary control on the style of volcanism during the

  17. Volcanic Pipe of the Namuaiv Mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir K. Karzhavin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed at reconstructing thermodynamic conditions required for the studied mineral assemblages to be created and exist in nature. The results of the investigations confirm to the recent ideas about an important, even leading, role of temperature, pressure and dioxide carbon in diamond formation in volcanic pipers. The results of this theoretical research allows assuming that one of the reasons for the absence of diamonds in the Namuaiv Mountain volcanic pipe may lie in the increased content of water and oxidizing environmental conditions of their formation

  18. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  19. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  20. Emplacement Scenarios for Volcanic Domes on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Steve M.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    2012-01-01

    One key to understanding the history of resurfacing on Venus is better constraints on the emplacement timescales for the range of volcanic features visible on the surface. A figure shows a Magellan radar image and topography for a putative lava dome on Venus. 175 such domes have been identified with diameters ranging from 19 - 94 km, and estimated thicknesses as great as 4 km. These domes are thought to be volcanic in origin and to have formed by the flow of viscous fluid (i.e., lava) on the surface.

  1. Volcanic air pollution hazards in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jeff

    2017-04-20

    Noxious sulfur dioxide gas and other air pollutants emitted from Kīlauea Volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i react with oxygen, atmospheric moisture, and sunlight to produce volcanic smog (vog) and acid rain. Vog can negatively affect human health and agriculture, and acid rain can contaminate household water supplies by leaching metals from building and plumbing materials in rooftop rainwater-catchment systems. U.S. Geological Survey scientists, along with health professionals and local government officials are working together to better understand volcanic air pollution and to enhance public awareness of this hazard.

  2. [Causes of depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Francisco Alonso

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes four nosological categories of depressive disorder according to the fundamental or prime cause: endogen depression, situative depression, psychogen depression and somatogen (also pharmacogen or addictive) depression. Recent advances in neurobiology provide the commun pathogenic mechanism distribuited in neurochemical, neuroendocrine and neuroinmune factors, with at the end a cellular and molecular sequence beyond the synapse. There is an increased risk of depression multiplied by three or four in the elderly, obese, unemployed and inmigrant and it is very frequent in terminally ill patients with a pervasive desire for death. Finally, eight personalized preventive guidelines enable to decrease the individual risk of depression in more than a fifty per cent.

  3. Family dynamics and postnatal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammentie, T; Tarkka, M-T; Astedt-Kurki, P; Paavilainen, E; Laippala, P

    2004-04-01

    Research has shown that postnatal depression (PND) affects 10-15% of mothers in Western societies. PND is not easily identified and therefore it often remains undetected. Untreated depression has a detrimental effect on the mother and child and the entire family. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the state of family dynamics after delivery and whether the mother's PND was associated with family dynamics. The study used a survey covering the catchment area of one Finnish university hospital. Both primi- and multiparas took part and data were collected using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for mothers and the Family Dynamics Measure II (FDM II) for both mothers and fathers. The data were analysed using SPSS statistical programme and frequency and percentage distributions, means and standard deviations were examined. Correlations were analysed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The significance of any differences between mothers' and fathers' scores was determined with a paired t-test. Of the families participating in the study (373 mothers and 314 partners), 13% of the mothers suffered from PND symptoms (EPDS score of 13 or more). As a whole, family dynamics in the families participating in the study were reported to be rather good. However, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics compared with other families. With the exception of individuation, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics than their partners. With the exception of role reciprocity, non-depressed mothers reported more positive family dynamics than their partners. Knowledge of the association of mothers' PND with family dynamics could help to develop nursing care at maternity and child welfare clinics and maternity hospitals. Depressed mothers and their families need support to be able to make family dynamics as good as possible.

  4. Cenozoic volcanic geology and probable age of inception of basin-range faulting in the southeasternmost Chocolate Mountains, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1978-02-01

    A complex sequence of Oligocene-age volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks form a major volcanic center in the Picacho area of the southeasternmost Chocolate Mountains, Imperial County, California. Basal-volcanic rocks consist of lava flows and flow breccia of trachybasalt, pyroxene rhyodacite, and pyroxene dacite (32 My old). These volcanic rocks locally overlie fanglomerate and rest unconformably on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. South and southeast of a prominent arcuate fault zone in the central part of the area, the rhyolite ignimbrite (26 My old) forms a major ash-flow sheet. In the southwestern part of the Picacho area the rhyolite ignimbrite interfingers with and is overlain by dacite flows and laharic breccia. The rhyolite ignimbrite and the dacite of Picacho Peak are overlapped by lava flows and breccia of pyroxene andesite (25 My old) that locally rest on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. The volcanic rocks of the Picacho area form a slightly bimodal volcanic suite consisting chiefly of silicic volcanic rocks with subordinate andesite. Late Miocene augite-olivine basalt is most similar in major-element abundances to transitional alkali-olivine basalt of the Basin and Range province. Normal separation faults in the Picacho area trend northwest and north parallel to major linear mountain ranges in the region. The areal distribution of the 26-My-old rhyolite ignimbrite and the local presence of megabreccia and fanglomerate flanking probable paleohighs suggest that the ignimbrite was erupted over irregular topography controlled by northwest- and north-trending probable basin-range faults. These relations date the inception of faulting in southeasternmost California at pre-26 and probably pre-32 My ago. A transition of basaltic volcanism in the area is dated at 13 My ago. 9 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Therapieresistente Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holsboer-Trachsler E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In der Behandlung einer Depression wird ein Nichtansprechen auf zwei adäquate Antidepressivatherapien während je 6–8 Wochen als Therapieresistenz bezeichnet. Da häufig zu geringe Dosierungen oder eine zu kurze Behandlungsdauer die Ursache für ein Nichtansprechen sind, sollte in einem ersten Schritt die medikamentöse Therapie hinsichtlich Dauer und Dosierung, eventuell unter Einbezug von Plasmaspiegelbestimmungen, überprüft und optimiert werden. Als pharmakologische Maßnahmen werden zunächst ein Wechsel des Antidepressivums und danach eine Kombination von verschiedenen Antidepressiva mit unterschiedlichem biochemischem Wirkungsansatz empfohlen. Zeigen beide nicht den gewünschten Erfolg, so sollte zusätzlich zur bestehenden Antidepressivabehandlung eine Augmentationstherapie, primär mit Lithium und/oder dem Schilddrüsenhormon T3, durchgeführt werden. Ein neuer, vielversprechender Behandlungsansatz ist eine Augmentationstherapie mit atypischen Neuroleptika. Als akut wirkende nichtpharmakologische Zusatzmaßnahme hat sich der partielle Schlafentzug bewährt. Weitere nichtpharmakologische Strategien umfassen Psychotherapie, Elektrokrampftherapie und Vagusnervstimulationsbehandlung.

  6. Volcanic spreading forcing and feedback in geothermal reservoir development, Amiata Volcano, Italia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Andrea; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Allocca, Carmine; Delcroix, Carlo; Micheli, Luigi; Vercellino, Alberto; Grieco, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    We made a stratigraphic, structural and morphologic study of the Amiata Volcano in Italy. We find that the edifice is dissected by intersecting grabens that accommodate the collapse of the higher sectors of the volcano. In turn, a number of compressive structures and diapirs exist around the margin of the volcano. These structures create an angular drainage pattern, with stream damming and captures, and a set of lakes within and around the volcano. We interpret these structures as the result of volcanic spreading of Amiata on its weak substratum, formed by the late Triassic evaporites (Burano Anhydrites) and the Middle-Jurassic to Early-Cretaceous clayey chaotic complexes (Ligurian Complex). Regional doming created a slope in the basement facilitating the outward flow and spreading of the ductile layers forced by the volcanic load. We model the dynamics of spreading with a scaled lubrication approximation of the Navier Stokes equations, and numerically study a set of solutions. In the model we include simple functions for volcanic deposition and surface erosion that change the topography over time. Scaling indicates that spreading at Amiata could still be active. The numerical solution shows that, as the central part of the edifice sinks into the weak basement, diapiric structures of the underlying formations form around the base of the volcano. Deposition of volcanic rocks within the volcano and surface erosion away from it both enhance spreading. In addition, a sloping basement may constitute a trigger for spreading and formation of trains of adjacent diapirs. As a feedback, the hot hydrothermal fluids decrease the shear strength of the anhydrites facilitating the spreading process. Finally, we observe that volcanic spreading has created ideal heat traps that constitute todays' exploited geothermal fields at Amiata. Normal faults generated by volcanic spreading, volcanic conduits, and direct contact between volcanic rocks (which host an extensive fresh

  7. Petrologic and petrographic variation of youthful eruptive products in the Tuxtla Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, C. B.; Kobs Nawotniak, S. E.; Fredrick, K. C.; Espindola, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is located near the Gulf of Mexico in the southern part of the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Volcanism in the region began around 7 Ma and has continued until recent times with the volcano San Martín Tuxtla’s latest eruptions in AD 1664 and 1793. The TVF rocks are mainly of alkaline composition and have been divided into two separate volcanic series, an older and younger. The TVF is a structural high located between the Veracruz Basin to the southwest and the Gulf of Mexico to the northeast, characterized by relatively thin crust with the depth to the Moho around 28 to 34 km. The TVF is unique because it is isolated from the nearest volcanic fields (the Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central American Volcanic Belt and the Eastern Alkaline Province) by at least 230km and because of the on-going debate over its magmatic origin. Many models have been proposed to explain the TVF’s alkaline nature in a unique location with most linking it either to the subduction of the Cocos plate to the west of Mexico and/or to extensional faulting in the region. The purpose of our study was to determine systematic changes in the youthful volcanic deposits across the TVF. Regional and local mapping was conducted and lava and scoria samples were collected from seven sites associated with two vent clusters in the TVF. Mapping of the easternmost cluster of deposits suggests chronological emplacement of the deposits through superposition and vent location and morphology. The petrography of lava and tephra deposits may further indicate magmatic origins and other factors influencing the development of the field, including chronology and possible mixing and/or differentiation. Previous published studies analyzed samples near the San Martin Tuxtla volcanic center. Their data is used as a comparative reference for these samples, most of which were collected from another, younger cluster east of Laguna Catemaco. From this study, a better understanding of past eruptive

  8. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder : findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; van Erp, T. G. M.; Saemann, P. G.; Frodl, T.; Jahanshad, N.; Loehrer, E.; Tiemeier, H.; Hofman, A.; Niessen, W. J.; Vernooij, M. W.; Ikram, M. A.; Wittfeld, K.; Grabe, H. J.; Block, A.; Hegenscheid, K.; Voelzke, H.; Hoehn, D.; Czisch, M.; Lagopoulos, J.; Hatton, S. N.; Hickie, I. B.; Goya-Maldonado, R.; Kraemer, B.; Gruber, O.; Couvy-Duchesne, B.; Renteria, M. E.; Strike, L. T.; Mills, N. T.; de Zubicaray, G. I.; McMahon, K. L.; Medland, S. E.; Martin, N. G.; Gillespie, N. A.; Wright, M. J.; Hall, G.B.; MacQueen, G. M.; Frey, E. M.; Carballedo, A.; van Velzen, L. S.; van Tol, M. J.; van der Wee, N. J.; Veer, I. M.; Walter, H.; Schnell, K.; Schramm, E.; Normann, C.; Schoepf, D.; Konrad, C.; Zurowski, B.; Nickson, T.; McIntosh, A. M.; Papmeyer, M.; Whalley, H. C.; Sussmann, J. E.; Godlewska, B. R.; Cowen, P. J.; Fischer, F. H.; Rose, M.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Thompson, P. M.; Hibar, D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical characteristic

  9. Resident perception of volcanic hazards and evacuation procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Bird

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Katla volcano, located beneath the Mýrdalsjökull ice cap in southern Iceland, is capable of producing catastrophic jökulhlaup. The Icelandic Civil Protection (ICP, in conjunction with scientists, local police and emergency managers, developed mitigation strategies for possible jökulhlaup produced during future Katla eruptions. These strategies were tested during a full-scale evacuation exercise in March 2006. A positive public response during a volcanic crisis not only depends upon the public's knowledge of the evacuation plan but also their knowledge and perception of the possible hazards. To improve the effectiveness of residents' compliance with warning and evacuation messages it is important that emergency management officials understand how the public interpret their situation in relation to volcanic hazards and their potential response during a crisis and apply this information to the ongoing development of risk mitigation strategies. We adopted a mixed methods approach in order to gain a broad understanding of residents' knowledge and perception of the Katla volcano in general, jökulhlaup hazards specifically and the regional emergency evacuation plan. This entailed field observations during the major evacuation exercise, interviews with key emergency management officials and questionnaire survey interviews with local residents. Our survey shows that despite living within the hazard zone, many residents do not perceive that their homes could be affected by a jökulhlaup, and many participants who perceive that their homes are safe, stated that they would not evacuate if an evacuation warning was issued. Alarmingly, most participants did not receive an evacuation message during the exercise. However, the majority of participants who took part in the exercise were positive about its implementation. This assessment of resident knowledge and perception of volcanic hazards and the evacuation plan is the first of its kind in

  10. The sub-volcanic system of El Hierro, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I.; Becerril, L.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2012-04-01

    The main volcanotectonic structures of El Hierro are three rift zones, trending northeast, west, and south. Most of the eruptions in El Hierro within these zones are basaltic fissure eruptions fed by subvertical dykes. The dykes appear as close to collinear or slightly offset segments, their surface expressions being clusters of cinder cones and eruptive vents. Three large landslides, referred to as El Golfo, El Julan, and Las Playas, have eroded the areas between rift axes and provide exposures that make it possible to provide a three-dimensional view of the uppermost part of the sub-volcanic system. Here we report the results of a structural study of the sub-volcanic system as obtained through the analysis of dykes and eruptive vents. The data obtained from surface outcrops have been combined with data from subsurface water galleries. More than 600 eruptive vents and 625 dykes have been studied in detail to characterise the subvolcanic system of the island. Using cinder-cone and other eruptive-vent alignments it has been possible to infer 115 eruptive fissures with lengths that range from 40 m to 2200 m. NE-SW trending volcanic fissures and dykes are common on the entire island and predominate in the northeast rift zone. The main strike of the dykes and fissures in the south and west rift zones are approximately NNW-SSE and E-W, respectively. However, in the west rift zone, eruptive fissures display a fan distribution with directions that range from N43°E to N124°E. Volcanic fissures within the El Golfo landslide valley trend parallel to the head scarp, except those that are close to the head of the valley, many of which are perpendicular to the scarp. Dykes show a radial distribution in the head scarp of the El Golfo landslide. Three feeder-dykes directly connected with their lava flows have been identified in El Hierro. Feeder dykes are difficult to observe in the field but provide important information when their lengths and thicknesses can be measured

  11. Geothermal surveys in the oceanic volcanic island of Mauritius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoya, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Pasqua, Claudio

    2017-04-01

    Oceanic island chains are generally characterised by young volcanic systems that are predominately composed of basaltic lavas and related magmatic products. Although hot springs are occasionally present, the pervasive, massive, recent outpourings of basaltic lavas are the primary manifestation of the existence of geothermal resources. These islands may have, in principle, significant potential for the exploitation of geothermal energy. In this paper, we present results of recent investigations aimed at the evaluation of geothermal resources of the island of Mauritius, that is the emerging portion of a huge submarine, aseismic, volcanic plateau extending in the SW part of the Indian Ocean. The plateau is related to a long-lived hotspot track, whose present-day expression is the active volcano of La Réunion Island, located about 200 km SW of Mauritius. The island does not show at present any volcanic activity, but magmatism is quite recent as it dates from 7.8 to 0.03 Myr. Geochemical data from water samples collected from boreholes do not indicate the presence of mature water, i.e. circulating in high-temperature geothermal reservoirs, and argue for short-term water-rock interaction in shallow hydrogeological circuits. However, this cannot rule out that a deep magmatic heat source, hydraulically insulated from shallow aquifers, may occur. To evaluate the geothermal gradient, a 270-m-deep hole was thus drilled in the island central portion, in which the most recent volcanic activity (0.03 Myr) took place. Temperature-depth profiles, recorded after complete thermal equilibration, revealed a thermal gradient of 40 mK/m. Attempts of extracting additional thermal information were also made by measuring the temperature in a 170-m-deep deep water hole, no longer used. The results were consistent with the gradient hole, i.e. pointing to a weak or null deep-seated thermal anomaly beneath Mauritius and low geothermal potential. The deep thermal process (mantle plume) invoked

  12. Two-year stability and change of neuroticism and extraversion in treated and untreated persons with depression : Findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renner, Fritz; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Peeters, Frenk; Cuijpers, Pim; Huibers, Marcus J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The personality dimensions neuroticism and extraversion likely represent part of the vulnerability to depression. The stability over longer time periods of these personality dimensions in depressed patients treated with psychological treatment or medication and in untreated persons with

  13. Two-year stability and change of neuroticism and extraversion in treated and untreated persons with depression : Findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renner, Fritz; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Peeters, Frenk; Cuijpers, Pim; Huibers, Marcus J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The personality dimensions neuroticism and extraversion likely represent part of the vulnerability to depression. The stability over longer time periods of these personality dimensions in depressed patients treated with psychological treatment or medication and in untreated persons with

  14. High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

    1995-01-01

    High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

  15. Payenia volcanic province, southern Mendoza, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin; Llambias, Eduardo Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Pleistocene to Holocene Payenia volcanic province is a backarc region of 60,000 km2 in Mendoza, Argentina, which is dominated by transitional to alkaline basalts and trachybasalts. We present major and trace element compositions of 139 rocks from this area of which the majority are basaltic...

  16. Monogenetic volcanism: personal views and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, K.; Kereszturi, G.

    2015-11-01

    Monogenetic volcanism produces small-volume volcanoes with a wide range of eruptive styles, lithological features and geomorphic architectures. They are classified as spatter cones, scoria (or cinder) cones, tuff rings, maars (maar-diatremes) and tuff cones based on the magma/water ratio, dominant eruption styles and their typical surface morphotypes. The common interplay between internal, such as the physical-chemical characteristics of magma, and external parameters, such as groundwater flow, substrate characteristics or topography, plays an important role in creating small-volume volcanoes with diverse architectures, which can give the impression of complexity and of similarities to large-volume polygenetic volcanoes. In spite of this volcanic facies complexity, we defend the term "monogenetic volcano" and highlight the term's value, especially to express volcano morphotypes. This study defines a monogenetic volcano, a volcanic edifice with a small cumulative volume (typically ≤1 km3) that has been built up by one continuous, or many discontinuous, small eruptions fed from one or multiple magma batches. This definition provides a reasonable explanation of the recently recognized chemical diversities of this type of volcanism.

  17. Is volcanic phenomena of fractal nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, R.; Lopez, D. A. L.; Alparone, S.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Sagiya, T.; Barrancos, J.; Rodriguez-Santana, A. A.; Ramos, A.; Calvari, S.; Perez, N. M.

    2016-12-01

    A particular resonance waveform pattern has been detected beneath different physical volcano manifestations from recent 2011-2012 period of volcanic unrest at El Hierro Island, Canary Islands, and also from other worldwide volcanoes with different volcanic typology. This mentioned pattern appears to be a fractal time dependent waveform repeated in different time scales (periods of time). This time dependent feature suggests this resonance as a new approach to volcano phenomena for predicting such interesting matters as earthquakes, gas emission, deformation etc. as this fractal signal has been discovered hidden in a wide typical volcanic parameters measurements. It is known that the resonance phenomenon occurring in nature usually denote a structure, symmetry or a subjacent law (Fermi et al., 1952; and later -about enhanced cross-sections symmetry in protons collisions), which, in this particular case, may be indicative of some physical interactions showing a sequence not completely chaotic but cyclic provided with symmetries. The resonance and fractal model mentioned allowed the authors to make predictions in cycles from a few weeks to months. In this work an equation for this waveform has been described and also correlations with volcanic parameters and fractal behavior demonstration have been performed, including also some suggestive possible explanations of this signal origin.

  18. Organic Entrainment and Preservation in Volcanic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Ojha, Lujendra; Brunner, Anna E.; Dufek, Josef D.; Wray, James Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unaltered pyroclastic deposits have previously been deemed to have "low" potential for the formation, concentration and preservation of organic material on the Martian surface. Yet volcanic glasses that have solidified very quickly after an eruption may be good candidates for containment and preservation of refractory organic material that existed in a biologic system pre-eruption due to their impermeability and ability to attenuate UV radiation. Analysis using NanoSIMS of volcanic glass could then be performed to both deduce carbon isotope ratios that indicate biologic origin and confirm entrainment during eruption. Terrestrial contamination is one of the biggest barriers to definitive Martian organic identification in soil and rock samples. While there is a greater potential to concentrate organics in sedimentary strata, volcanic glasses may better encapsulate and preserve organics over long time scales, and are widespread on Mars. If volcanic glass from many sites on Earth could be shown to contain biologically derived organics from the original environment, there could be significant implications for the search for biomarkers in ancient Martian environments.

  19. Monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Scollo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the results of a project ongoing at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV. The objective is to develop and implement a system for monitoring and forecasting volcanic plumes of Etna. Monitoring is based at present by multispectral infrared measurements from the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation geosynchronous satellite, visual and thermal cameras, and three radar disdrometers able to detect ash dispersal and fallout. Forecasting is performed by using automatic procedures for: i downloading weather forecast data from meteorological mesoscale models; ii running models of tephra dispersal, iii plotting hazard maps of volcanic ash dispersal and deposition for certain scenarios and, iv publishing the results on a web-site dedicated to the Italian Civil Protection. Simulations are based on eruptive scenarios obtained by analysing field data collected after the end of recent Etna eruptions. Forecasting is, hence, supported by plume observations carried out by the monitoring system. The system was tested on some explosive events occurred during 2006 and 2007 successfully. The potentiality use of monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes, in a way to prevent threats to aviation from volcanic ash, is finally discussed.

  20. Impact of Volcanic Activity on AMC Channel Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    IMPACT OF VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Matthew D... VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences...AFIT-ENS-GRP-14-J-11 IMPACT OF VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS Matthew D. Meshanko, BS, MA Major, USAF

  1. Implications of volcanic erratics in Quaternary deposits of North Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby; Larsen, Ole

    1982-01-01

    Erratic boulders, petrographically similar to the volcanics exposed around Kap Washington, are found on islands and along the coast much further to the east. Isotopic measurements on two such boulders show that these volcanic rocks are of the same age as the Kap Washington volcanics. The regional...

  2. Transition of magma genesis estimated by change of chemical composition of Izu-bonin arc volcanism associated with spreading of Shikoku Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, S.; Ishii, T.

    2006-12-01

    Arc volcanism in the Izu-Ogasawara arc is separated into first and latter term at the separate of Shikoku Basin. Middle to late Eocene early arc volcanism formed a vast terrane of boninites and island arc tholeiites that is unlike active arc systems. A following modern-style arc volcanism was active during the Oligocene, along which intense tholeiitic and calc-alkaline volcanism continued until 29Ma, before spreading of the back- arc basin. The recent arc volcanism in the Izu-Ogasawara arc have started in the middle Miocene, and it is assumed that arc volcanism were decline during spreading of back-arc basin. In the northern Kyushu-Palau Ridge, submarine bottom materials were dredged during the KT95-9 and KT97-8 cruise by the R/V Tansei-maru, Ocean Research Institute, university of Tokyo, and basaltic to andesitic volcanic rocks were recovered during both cruise except for Komahashi-Daini Seamount where recovered acidic plutonic rocks. Komahashi-Daini Seamount tonalite show 37.5Ma of K-Ar dating, and this age indicates early stage of normal arc volcanism. These volcanic rocks are mainly cpx basalt to andesite. Two pyroxene basalt and andesite are only found from Miyazaki Seamount, northern end of the Kyushu-Palau Ridge. Volcanic rocks show different characteristics from first term volcanism in the Izu-Ogasawara forearc rise and recent arc volcanism. The most characteristic is high content of incompatible elements, that is, these volcanics show two to three times content of incompatible elements to Komahashi-Daini Seamount tonalite and former normal arc volcanism in the Izu outer arc (ODP Leg126), and higher content than recent Izu arc volcanism. This characteristic is similar to some volcanics at the ODP Leg59 Site448 in the central Kyushu- Palau Ridge. Site448 volcanic rocks show 32-33Ma of Ar-Ar ages, which considered beginning of activity of Parece Vela Basin. It is considered that the dredged volcanic rocks are uppermost part of volcanism before spreading of

  3. Shear velocity structure of the Tyrrhenian region in relation to volcanism and tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulssen, H.; Greve, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present a detailed 3D shear velocity model of the Tyrrhenian Sea and surrounding onshore areas down to about 160 km depth. The high resolution of the model is achieved through the measurement of interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion curves in a small regional setting with dense station coverage. The most noticeable structure is a pronounced, nearly ringshaped low velocity region at about 80 km depth surrounding the Tyrrhenian Sea: from Corsica to the western part of the Italian mainland, continuing to the western part of Sicily and Sardinia. The thickness of this low velocity region is constrained to a maximum of 40 km, and it is independent of the chosen inversion parameters or the background model. The low values of the shear velocity suggest the presence of fluids or melt. The lateral extent of the low velocity region beneath the Italian mainland is well correlated with the locations of subduction-related volcanism, but there is also a striking continuation of the anomalous low-velocity region along the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea towards (and beneath) the island of Corsica. The recent (volcanism along the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea. Our seismic results now suggest that the anomalous mantle is still present beneath Corsica and the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea, although it does not produce any active volcanism anymore. The picture for the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea is different. Intriguingly, the sublithospheric low velocity anomaly does not continue to southeasternmost part of the Tyrrhenian Sea where the volcanism of the Aeolian arc is related to subduction of the steep, active Ionian slab. Instead, the seismic anomaly crosses the Tyrrhenian Sea from Vesuvius on the Italian mainland to the western part of Sicily, continuing to the southeast of Sardinia: a pattern which correlates with the locations of past subduction-related volcanism. It is striking that the Vavilov Basin in the central Tyrrhenian Sea, characterized by MORB-type volcanism, is a region of relatively normal

  4. Welcoming a monster to the world: Myths, oral tradition, and modern societal response to volcanic disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Katharine V.; Cronin, Shane J.

    2008-10-01

    Volcanic eruptions can overwhelm all senses of observers in their violence, spectacle and sheer incredibility. When an eruption is catastrophic or unexpected, neither individuals nor communities can easily assimilate the event into their world view. Psychological studies of disaster aftermaths have shown that trauma can shake the very foundations of a person's faith and trigger a search - supernatural, religious, or scientific - for answers. For this reason, the ability to rapidly comprehend a traumatic event by "accepting" the catastrophe as part the observer's world represents an important component of community resilience to natural hazards. A relationship with the event may be constructed by adapting existing cosmological, ancestral, or scientific frameworks, as well as through creative and artistic expression. In non-literate societies, communal perceptions of an event may be transformed into stories that offer myth-like explanations. As these stories make their way into oral traditions, they often undergo major changes to allow transmission through generations and, in some cases, to serve political or religious purposes. Disaster responses in literate societies are no different, except that they are more easily recorded and therefore are less prone to change over time. Here we explore ways in which the language, imagery and metaphor used to describe volcanic events may link disparate societies (both present and past) in their search for understanding of volcanic catastrophes. Responses to modern eruptions (1980 Mount St Helens, USA, and 1995-present Soufriere Hills, Montserrat) provide a baseline for examining the progression to older historic events that have already developed oral traditions (1886 Tarawera, New Zealand) and finally to oral traditions many hundreds of years old in both the Pacific Northwest US and New Zealand (NZ). We see that repeated volcanism over many generations produces rich webs of cosmology and history surrounding volcanoes. NZ Maori

  5. Halogen Chemistry in Volcanic Plumes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tjarda

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes release vast amounts of gases and particles in the atmosphere. Volcanic halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, HI) are co-emitted alongside SO2, and observations show rapid formation of BrO and OClO in the plume as it disperses into the troposphere. The development of 1D and Box models (e.g. PlumeChem) that simulate volcanic plume halogen chemistry aims to characterise how volcanic reactive halogens form and quantify their atmospheric impacts. Following recent advances, these models can broadly reproduce the observed downwind BrO/SO2 ratios using "bromine-explosion" chemistry schemes, provided they use a "high-temperature initialisation" to inject radicals (OH, Cl, Br and possibly NOx) which "kick-start" the low-temperature chemistry cycles that convert HBr into reactive bromine (initially as Br2). The modelled rise in BrO/SO2 and subsequent plateau/decline as the plume disperses downwind reflects cycling between reactive bromine, particularly Br-BrO, and BrO-HOBr-BrONO2. BrCl is produced when aerosol becomes HBr-depleted. Recent model simulations suggest this mechanism for reactive chlorine formation can broadly account for OClO/SO2 reported at Mt Etna. Predicted impacts of volcanic reactive halogen chemistry include the formation of HNO3 from NOx and depletion of ozone. This concurs with HNO3 widely reported in volcanic plumes (although the source of NOx remains under question), as well as observations of ozone depletion reported in plumes from several volcanoes (Mt Redoubt, Mt Etna, Eyjafjallajokull). The plume chemistry can transform mercury into more easily deposited and potentially toxic forms, for which observations are limited. Recent incorporation of volcanic halogen chemistry in a 3D regional model of degassing from Ambrym (Vanuatu) also predicts how halogen chemistry causes depletion of OH to lengthen the SO2 lifetime, and highlights the potential for halogen transport from the troposphere to the stratosphere. However, the model parameter-space is vast and

  6. Napoli and Volcanism - Vesuvius and Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    For more than 240 million years the region now known as Italy has been the scene of episodic volcanic activity. East-southeast of Napoli (Naples) stands the imposing cone of Vesuvius, which erupted explosively in 79 A.D. to bury Pompeii and Herculaneum. More recently, when the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-104 captured this view, Mt. Etna (Sicily, not seen in this image, but photographed the day before) was spewing ash and gas thousands of meters into the air, some of which can be seen as a brownish smear over Isola d' Ischia and the Tyrrhenian Sea. The Appenine ranges extend from northern Italy, down the boot of the peninsula and westward into Sicily. This photograph of the Appenino Napoletano is part of an 18-frame stereophoto mapping strip that spans the entire mountain chain. The almost 1200-km-long belt of volcanoes and folded/faulted mountains is a result of the ongoing collision of Africa and Eurasia, accompanied by the progressive closing of the Mediterranean Sea. Using overlapping pairs of stereophotos, and a special viewer, scientists can get a three-dimensional perspective on the ranges that surpasses any image viewed alone. For more information, see another image of Mt. Vesuvius, taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). References: Behncke, Boris, 2000, Vesuvio - The eruption of A.D. 79: Italy's Volcanoes - The Cradle of Volcanology [http://www.geo.mtu.edu/boris/VESUVIO_79.html (accessed 10/18/01)] Doglioni, C., and Flores, G., 1997, Italy, in Moores, E. M., and Fairbridge, R. W., editors, Encyclopedia of European and Asian Regional Geology: London, Chapman and Hall, p. 414-435 Shuttle photograph STS104-710-60 was taken 23 July 2001 from the orbiter Atlantis using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. The entire mapping series (of frames numbered in sequence from 50 through 68) can also be downloaded from the

  7. Napoli and Volcanism - Vesuvius and Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    For more than 240 million years the region now known as Italy has been the scene of episodic volcanic activity. East-southeast of Napoli (Naples) stands the imposing cone of Vesuvius, which erupted explosively in 79 A.D. to bury Pompeii and Herculaneum. More recently, when the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-104 captured this view, Mt. Etna (Sicily, not seen in this image, but photographed the day before) was spewing ash and gas thousands of meters into the air, some of which can be seen as a brownish smear over Isola d' Ischia and the Tyrrhenian Sea. The Appenine ranges extend from northern Italy, down the boot of the peninsula and westward into Sicily. This photograph of the Appenino Napoletano is part of an 18-frame stereophoto mapping strip that spans the entire mountain chain. The almost 1200-km-long belt of volcanoes and folded/faulted mountains is a result of the ongoing collision of Africa and Eurasia, accompanied by the progressive closing of the Mediterranean Sea. Using overlapping pairs of stereophotos, and a special viewer, scientists can get a three-dimensional perspective on the ranges that surpasses any image viewed alone. For more information, see another image of Mt. Vesuvius, taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). References: Behncke, Boris, 2000, Vesuvio - The eruption of A.D. 79: Italy's Volcanoes - The Cradle of Volcanology [http://www.geo.mtu.edu/boris/VESUVIO_79.html (accessed 10/18/01)] Doglioni, C., and Flores, G., 1997, Italy, in Moores, E. M., and Fairbridge, R. W., editors, Encyclopedia of European and Asian Regional Geology: London, Chapman and Hall, p. 414-435 Shuttle photograph STS104-710-60 was taken 23 July 2001 from the orbiter Atlantis using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. The entire mapping series (of frames numbered in sequence from 50 through 68) can also be downloaded from the

  8. Emotional recognition in depressed epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jesse G; Burton, Leslie A; Schaffer, Sarah G; Alper, Kenneth R; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William B

    2009-07-01

    The current study examined the relationship between emotional recognition and depression using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Second Edition (MMPI-2), in a population with epilepsy. Participants were a mixture of surgical candidates in addition to those receiving neuropsychological testing as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Results suggested that patients with epilepsy reporting increased levels of depression (Scale D) performed better than those patients reporting low levels of depression on an index of simple facial recognition, and depression was associated with poor prosody discrimination. Further, it is notable that more than half of the present sample had significantly elevated Scale D scores. The potential effects of a mood-congruent bias and implications for social functioning in depressed patients with epilepsy are discussed.

  9. Lunar Pyroclastic Eruptions: Basin Volcanism's Dying Gasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Nahm, A.; McGovern, P. J.; Kring, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between mare volcanism and impact basins has long been recognized, although the degree of influence basin formation has on volcanism remains a point of contention. For example, did melting of magma sources result from thermal energy imparted by a basin-forming event? Did basin impacts initiate mantle overturn of the unstable LMO cumulate pile, causing dense ilmenite to sink and drag radioactive KREEPy material to provide the thermal energy to initiate melting of the mare sources? Did the dramatically altered stress states provide pathways ideally suited for magma ascent? The chemistry of sampled lunar volcanic glasses indicates that they experienced very little fractional crystallization during their ascent to the surface - they have pristine melt compositions. Volatile abundances, including recent measurements of OH [1,2] suggest that the mantle source of at least the OH-analyzed glasses have a water abundance of ~700 ppm - comparable to that of Earth's upper mantle. More recently, [3] showed that the abundance of OH and other volatiles measured in these glasses is positively correlated with trace element abundances, which is expected since water is incompatible in a magma. Volatile enrichment in a deep mantle source would lower the melting temperature and provide the thrust for magma ascent through 500 km of mantle and crust [4]. We are exploring the idea that such basin-related lunar pyroclastic volcanism may represent the last phase of basaltic volcanism in a given region. Remote sensing studies have shown volcanic glasses are fairly common, and often found along the perimeter of mare-filled basins [5]. Recent modeling of the stresses related to the basin-forming process [6,7] show that basin margins provide the ideal conduit for low-volume lunar pyroclastic volcanism (compared with the high output of mare volcanism). Schrödinger's basin floor is largely composed of a compositionally uniform impact breccia. The exceptions are two distinct and

  10. The Association between Depression and Climatic Conditions in the Iran Way to Preventive of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Mirzakhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and serotonin, play an undeniable role in the incidence of mental illnesses. Almost all humans will experience depression. Furthermore, most humans lack the ability to control and reduce depression, the disorder can lead to physical damage. The main goal of this study was to determine the association between distribution of depression and the climatic conditions in the Iran country. Methods: Spatial distribution maps of depression were plotted by using data recorded during 2010 year in the Iran health center registry. The geographical mapping of depression and climatic conditions were then incorporated into a geographic information system to create a spatial distribution model and in this study we used neural network to model the trend of depression and climatic conditions. Results: The spatial distributions of depression diseases in the country, followed by were scattered based on climatic conditions. In fact, common depression was more prevalent in the parts of the country where cold and rainy weather was more abundant. Conclusions: The findings of this study can be useful for psychologists and controlling of this disease, because lack the ability to control and reduce depression, the disorder can lead to physical damage. Data are also important to establish further effects modeling for depression. Moreover, psychologists and health professionals should consider the impact of environmental factors on their patients′ health.

  11. Holocene explosive volcanism of the Jan Mayen (island) volcanic province, North-Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerløw, Eirik; Haflidason, H.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2016-07-01

    The volcanic island Jan Mayen, located in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, hosts the active stratovolcano of Beerenberg, the northernmost active subaerial volcano in the world. At least five eruptions are known from the island following its discovery in the 17th century, but its eruptive history prior to this is basically unknown. In this paper two sediment cores retrieved close to Jan Mayen have been studied in detail to shed light on the Holocene history of explosive volcanism from the Jan Mayen volcanic province. Horizons with elevated tephra concentrations were identified and tephra from these was analysed to determine major element chemistry of the tephra. The tephra chemistry was used to provide a link between the two cores and the land based tephra records from Jan Mayen Island. We managed to link two well-developed tephra peaks in the cores by their geochemical composition and age to Jan Mayen. One of these peaks represents the 1732 AD eruption of Eggøya while the other peak represents a previously undescribed eruption dated to around 10.3 ka BP. Two less prominent tephra peaks, one in each core, dated to approximately 2.3 and 3.0 ka BP, also have a distinct geochemical character linking them to Jan Mayen volcanism. However, the most prominent tephra layer in the cores located close to Jan Mayen and numerous other cores along the Jan Mayen ridge is the 12.1 ka BP Vedde Ash originating from the Iceland volcanic province. We find that the Holocene volcanism on Jan Mayen is much less explosive than volcanism in Iceland, and propose that either low amounts of explosive volcanic activity from the summit region of Beerenberg or small to absent glacier cover on Beerenberg is responsible for this.

  12. Volcanic lake systematics II. Chemical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekamp, J.C.; Pasternack, G.B.; Rowe, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    A database of 373 lake water analyses from the published literature was compiled and used to explore the geochemical systematics of volcanic lakes. Binary correlations and principal component analysis indicate strong internal coherence among most chemical parameters. Compositional variations are influenced by the flux of magmatic volatiles and/or deep hydrothermal fluids. The chemistry of the fluid entering a lake may be dominated by a high-temperature volcanic gas component or by a lower-temperature fluid that has interacted extensively with volcanic rocks. Precipitation of minerals like gypsum and silica can strongly affect the concentrations of Ca and Si in some lakes. A much less concentrated geothermal input fluid provides the mineralized components of some more dilute lakes. Temporal variations in dilution and evaporation rates ultimately control absolute concentrations of dissolved constituents, but not conservative element ratios. Most volcanic lake waters, and presumably their deep hydrothermal fluid inputs, classify as immature acid fluids that have not equilibrated with common secondary silicates such as clays or zeolites. Many such fluids may have equilibrated with secondary minerals earlier in their history but were re-acidified by mixing with fresh volcanic fluids. We use the concept of 'degree of neutralization' as a new parameter to characterize these acid fluids. This leads to a classification of gas-dominated versus rock-dominated lake waters. A further classification is based on a cluster analysis and a hydrothermal speedometer concept which uses the degree of silica equilibration of a fluid during cooling and dilution to evaluate the rate of fluid equilibration in volcano-hydrothermal systems.

  13. International Database of Volcanic Ash Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K.; Cameron, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Jenkins, S.; Brown, S.; Leonard, G.; Deligne, N.; Stewart, C.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash creates extensive impacts to people and property, yet we lack a global ash impacts catalog to organize, distribute, and archive this important information. Critical impact information is often stored in ephemeral news articles or other isolated resources, which cannot be queried or located easily. A global ash impacts database would improve 1) warning messages, 2) public and lifeline emergency preparation, and 3) eruption response and recovery. Ashfall can have varying consequences, such as disabling critical lifeline infrastructure (e.g. electrical generation and transmission, water supplies, telecommunications, aircraft and airports) or merely creating limited and expensive inconvenience to local communities. Impacts to the aviation sector can be a far-reaching global issue. The international volcanic ash impacts community formed a committee to develop a database to catalog the impacts of volcanic ash. We identify three user populations for this database: 1) research teams, who would use the database to assist in systematic collection, recording, and storage of ash impact data, and to prioritize impact assessment trips and lab experiments 2) volcanic risk assessment scientists who rely on impact data for assessments (especially vulnerability/fragility assessments); a complete dataset would have utility for global, regional, national and local scale risk assessments, and 3) citizen science volcanic hazard reporting. Publication of an international ash impacts database will encourage standardization and development of best practices for collecting and reporting impact information. Data entered will be highly categorized, searchable, and open source. Systematic cataloging of impact data will allow users to query the data and extract valuable information to aid in the development of improved emergency preparedness, response and recovery measures.

  14. Volcanic activity in the Acambay Graben: a < 25 Ka subplinian eruption from the Temascalcingo volcano and implications for volcanic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Aguirre Díaz, Gerardo; Sunyé Puchol, Ivan; Bartolini, Stefania; Geyer, Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) contains a large number of stratovolcanoes, some well-known, as Popocatepetl, Iztaccihuatl, Nevado de Toluca, or Colima and many others of more modest dimensions that are not well known but constitute the majority in the TMVB. Such volcanoes are, for example, Tequila, San Juan, Sangangüey, Cerro Culiacán, Cerro Grande, El Zamorano, La Joya, Palo Huerfano, Jocotitlán, Altamirano and Temascalcingo, among many others. The Temascalcingo volcano (TV) is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) at the eastern part of the Acambay Graben (northwest portion of Estado de México). The TV is composed mainly by dacitic, porphyritic lavas, block and ash deposits and subordinate pumice fall deposits and ignimbrites (Roldán-Quintana et al., 2011). The volcanic structure includes a summit caldera that has a rectangular shape, 2.5×3.5 km, with the largest side oriented E-W, parallel to major normal faults affecting the edifice. The San Mateo Pumice eruption is one of the greatest paroxysmal episodes of this volcano with pumice deposits mainly exposed at the scarp of the Acambay-Tixmadeje fault and at the northern and northeastern flanks of TV. It overlies a paleosol dated at 25 Ka. A NE-trending dispersion was obtained from field data covering an area of at least 80 km2. These deposits overlie older lava flows and mud flows and are discontinuously covered and eroded by younger reworked deposits of Temascalcingo volcano. This event represents a highly explosive phase that generated a relatively thick and widespread pumice fallout deposit that may occur again in future eruptions. A similar eruption today would have a significantly impact in the region, overall due to the fact that there has been no systematic assessment of the volcanic hazard in any of the studies that have been conducted so far in the area. So, this is a pending and urgent subject that must be tackled without delay. Financed by

  15. The Online GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report: Providing Timely Information About Worldwide Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Guffanti, M. C.; Luhr, J. F.; Venzke, E. A.; Wunderman, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    The awesome power and intricate inner workings of volcanoes have made them a popular subject with scientists and the general public alike. About 1500 known volcanoes have been active on Earth during the Holocene, approximately 50 of which erupt per year. With so much activity occurring around the world, often in remote locations, it can be difficult to find up-to-date information about current volcanism from a reliable source. To satisfy the desire for timely volcano-related information the Smithsonian Institution and US Geological Survey combined their strengths to create the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report. The Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) has developed a network of correspondents while reporting worldwide volcanism for over 30 years in their monthly Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network. The US Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program studies and monitors volcanoes in the United States and responds (upon invitation) to selected volcanic crises in other countries. The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is one of the most popular sites on both organization's websites. The core of the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is the brief summaries of current volcanic activity around the world. In addition to discussing various types of volcanism, the summaries also describe precursory activity (e.g. volcanic seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions), secondary activity (e.g. debris flows, mass wasting, and rockfalls), volcanic ash hazards to aviation, and preventative measures. The summaries are supplemented by links to definitions of technical terms found in the USGS photoglossary of volcano terms, links to information sources, and background information about reported volcanoes. The site also includes maps that highlight the location of reported volcanoes, an archive of weekly reports sorted by volcano and date, and links to commonly used acronyms. Since the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report's inception in November 2000, activity has been reported at

  16. Volcanic conduit migration over a basement landslide at Mount Etna (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi, I; Caracciolo, F D'Ajello; Branca, S; Ventura, G; Chiappini, M

    2014-06-13

    The flanks of volcanoes may slide in response to the loading of the edifice on a weak basement, magma push, and/or to tectonic stress. However, examples of stratovolcanoes emplaced on active landslides are lacking and the possible effects on the volcano dynamics unknown. Here, we use aeromagnetic data to construct a three-dimensional model of the clay-rich basement of Etna volcano (Italy). We provide evidence for a large stratovolcano growing on a pre-existing basement landslide and show that the eastern Etna flank, which slides toward the sea irrespective of volcanic activity, moves coherently with the underlying landslide. The filling of the landslide depression by lava flows through time allows the formation of a stiffness barrier, which is responsible for the long-term migration of the magma pathways from the coast to the present-day Etna summit. These unexpected results provide a new interpretation clue on the causes of the volcanic instability processes and of the mechanisms of deflection and migration of volcanic conduits.

  17. The trace-element characteristics of Aegean and Aeolian volcanic arc marine tephra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Peter; Blusztajn, Jerzy

    1999-10-01

    High-silica volcanic ashes are found within deep-sea sediments throughout the Eastern Mediterranean. Although coring by Ocean Drilling Program has penetrated Lower Pliocene (˜4 Ma) sediments, few ashes older than 400 k.y. have been recovered, suggesting a young initiation to subaerial Aegean Arc volcanism. Ashes derived from the Aegean volcanic front were cored south and east of the arc, and are typified by medium-K, calc-alkaline major-element compositions, contrasting with high-K ashes from the Aeolian Arc found in the Ionian Sea and as far east as Crete. Ion microprobe analysis of individual glass shards shows that all the ashes have a light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched pattern after normalizing against a chondrite standard. Aeolian Arc-derived ashes show greater enrichment than those from the Aegean area. Within the latter set, two groups are discernible, a mildly enriched set similar to the volcanoes of the arc volcanic front, and a more enriched group corresponding to lavas from the backarc region or possible from western Anatolia. Multi-element `spider diagrams' also show a bimodal division of enriched and depleted Aegean ashes, possibly caused by source depletion due to melt extraction in the Aegean backarc followed by remelting under the volcanic front. Relative Nb depletion, a characteristic of arc volcanism, is seen to be modest in Aegean and non-existent in Aeolian ashes. Using B/Be as a proxy for the flux of material from the subducting slab, this influence is seen to be low in the Aeolian Arc but higher than at Vesuvius. B/Be is higher again in the Aegean Arc. These differences may reflect the rate of subduction in each system. Data suggest caution is required when correlating ashes solely on the basis of major elements, as alkaline ashes from the central part of the study may be derived from Italy or from the Aegean backarc.

  18. Impact of explosive volcanic eruptions on the main climate variability modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingedouw, Didier; Mignot, Juliette; Ortega, Pablo; Khodri, Myriam; Menegoz, Martin; Cassou, Christophe; Hanquiez, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    Volcanic eruptions eject largeamounts of materials into the atmosphere, which can have an impact on climate. In particular, the sulphur dioxide gas released in the stratosphere leads to aerosol formation that reflects part of the incoming solar radiation, thereby affecting the climate energy balance. In this review paper, we analyse the regional climate imprints of large tropical volcanic explosive eruptions. For this purpose, we focus on the impact on three major climatic modes, located in the Atlantic (the North Atlantic Oscillation: NAO and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation: AMO) and Pacific (the El Niño Southern Oscillation, ENSO) sectors. We present an overview of the chain of events that contributes to modifying the temporal variability of these modes. Our literature review is complemented by new analyses based on observations of the instrumental era as well as on available proxy records and climate model simulations that cover the last millennium. We show that the impact of volcanic eruptions of the same magnitude or weaker than 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the NAO and ENSO is hard to detect, due to the noise from natural climate variability. There is however a clear impact of the direct radiative forcing resulting from tropical eruptions on the AMO index both in reconstructions and climate model simulations of the last millennium, while the impact on the ocean circulation remains model-dependent. To increase the signal to noise ratio and better evaluate the climate response to volcanic eruptions, improved reconstructions of these climatic modes and of the radiative effect of volcanic eruptions are required on a longer time frame than the instrumental era. Finally, we evaluate climate models' capabilities to reproduce the observed and anticipated impacts and mechanisms associated with volcanic forcing, and assess their potential for seasonal to decadal prediction. We find a very large spread in the simulated responses across the different climate

  19. The Global Framework for Providing Information about Volcanic-Ash Hazards to International Air Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, R. W.; Guffanti, M.

    2009-12-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) created the International Airways Volcano Watch (IAVW) in 1987 to establish a requirement for international dissemination of information about airborne ash hazards to safe air navigation. The IAVW is a set of operational protocols and guidelines that member countries agree to follow in order to implement a global, multi-faceted program to support the strategy of ash-cloud avoidance. Under the IAVW, the elements of eruption reporting, ash-cloud detecting, and forecasting expected cloud dispersion are coordinated to culminate in warnings sent to air traffic controllers, dispatchers, and pilots about the whereabouts of ash clouds. Nine worldwide Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) established under the IAVW have the responsibility for detecting the presence of ash in the atmosphere, primarily by looking at imagery from civilian meteorological satellites, and providing advisories about the location and movement of ash clouds to aviation meteorological offices and other aviation users. Volcano Observatories also are a vital part of the IAVW, as evidenced by the recent introduction of a universal message format for reporting the status of volcanic activity, including precursory unrest, to aviation users. Since 2003, the IAVW has been overseen by a standing group of scientific, technical, and regulatory experts that assists ICAO in the development of standards and other regulatory material related to volcanic ash. Some specific problems related to the implementation of the IAVW include: the lack of implementation of SIGMET (warning to aircraft in flight) provisions and delayed notifications of volcanic eruptions. Expected future challenges and developments involve the improvement in early notifications of volcanic eruptions, the consolidation of the issuance of SIGMETs, and the possibility of determining a “safe” concentration of volcanic ash.

  20. Abstracts for the October 2012 meeting on Volcanism in the American Southwest, Flagstaff, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2013-01-01

    Though volcanic eruptions are comparatively rare in the American Southwest, the States of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah host Holocene volcanic eruption deposits and are vulnerable to future volcanic activity. Compared with other parts of the western United States, comparatively little research has been focused on this area, and eruption probabilities are poorly constrained. Monitoring infrastructure consists of a variety of local seismic networks, and ”backbone“ geodetic networks with little integration. Emergency response planning for volcanic unrest has received little attention by either Federal or State agencies. On October 18–20, 2012, 90 people met at the U.S. Geological Survey campus in Flagstaff, Arizona, providing an opportunity for volcanologists, land managers, and emergency responders to meet, converse, and begin to plan protocols for any future activity. Geologists contributed data on recent findings of eruptive ages, eruption probabilities, and hazards extents (plume heights, ash dispersal). Geophysicists discussed evidence for magma intrusions from seismic, geodetic, and other geophysical techniques. Network operators publicized their recent work and the relevance of their equipment to volcanic regions. Land managers and emergency responders shared their experiences with emergency planning for earthquakes. The meeting was organized out of the recognition that little attention had been paid to planning for or mitigation of volcanic hazards in the American Southwest. Moreover, few geological meetings have hosted a session specifically devoted to this topic. This volume represents one official outcome of the meeting—a collection of abstracts related to talks and poster presentations shared during the first two days of the meeting. In addition, this report includes the meeting agenda as a record of the proceedings. One additional intended outcome will be greater discussion and coordination among emergency responders, geologists

  1. Using an innovative multiple regression procedure in a cancer population (Part II: fever, depressive affect, and mobility problems clarify an influential symptom pair (pain–fatigue/weakness and cluster (pain–fatigue/weakness–sleep problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoeur RB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard B Francoeur1,2 1School of Social Work and the Center for Health Innovation, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, USA; 2Center for the Psychosocial Study of Health and Illness, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Background: Most patients with advanced cancer experience symptom pairs or clusters among pain, fatigue, and insomnia. However, only combinations where symptoms are mutually influential hold potential for identifying patient subgroups at greater risk, and in some contexts, interventions with "cross-over" (multisymptom effects. Improved methods to detect and interpret interactions among symptoms, signs, or biomarkers are needed to reveal these influential pairs and clusters. I recently created sequential residual centering (SRC to reduce multicollinearity in moderated regression, which enhances sensitivity to detect these interactions. Methods: I applied SRC to moderated regressions of single-item symptoms that interact to predict outcomes from 268 palliative radiation outpatients. I investigated: 1 the hypothesis that the interaction, pain × fatigue/weakness × sleep problems, predicts depressive affect only when fever presents, and 2 an exploratory analysis, when fever is absent, that the interaction, pain × fatigue/weakness × sleep problems × depressive affect, predicts mobility problems. In the fever context, three-way interactions (and derivative terms of the four symptoms (pain, fatigue/weakness, fever, sleep problems are tested individually and simultaneously; in the non-fever context, a single four-way interaction (and derivative terms is tested. Results: Fever interacts separately with fatigue/weakness and sleep problems; these comoderators each magnify the pain–depressive affect relationship along the upper or full range of pain values. In non-fever contexts, fatigue/weakness, sleep problems, and depressive affect comagnify the relationship between pain and mobility problems. Conclusion: Different mechanisms

  2. [Lipids, depression and suicide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, A; Reggers, J; Castronovo, V; Ansseau, M

    2003-01-01

    Polyunsatured fatty acids are made out of a hydrocarbonated chain of variable length with several double bonds. The position of the first double bond (omega) differentiates polyunsatured omega 3 fatty acids (for example: alpha-linolenic acid or alpha-LNA) and polyunsatured omega 6 fatty acids (for example: linoleic acid or LA). These two classes of fatty acids are said to be essential because they cannot be synthetised by the organism and have to be taken from alimentation. The omega 3 are present in linseed oil, nuts, soya beans, wheat and cold water fish whereas omega 6 are present in maize, sunflower and sesame oil. Fatty acids are part of phospholipids and, consequently, of all biological membranes. The membrane fluidity, of crucial importance for its functioning, depends on its lipidic components. Phospholipids composed of chains of polyunsatured fatty acids increase the membrane fluidity because, by bending some chains, double bonds prevent them from compacting themselves perfectly. Membrane fluidity is also determined by the phospholipids/free cholesterol ratio, as cholesterol increases membrane viscosity. A diet based on a high proportion of essential polyunsatured fatty acids (fluid) would allow a higher incorporation of cholesterol (rigid) in the membranes to balance their fluidity, which would contribute to lower blood cholesterol levels. Brain membranes have a very high content in essential polyunsatured fatty acids for which they depend on alimentation. Any dietary lack of essential polyunsatured fatty acids has consequences on cerebral development, modifying the activity of enzymes of the cerebral membranes and decreasing efficiency in learning tasks. The prevalence of depression seems to increase continuously since the beginning of the century. Though different factors most probably contribute to this evolution, it has been suggested that it could be related to an evolution of alimentary patterns in the Western world, in which polyunsatured omega 3

  3. [Depression in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, A S

    1991-03-01

    Depressive symptoms are frequent during schizophrenia. Depression occurs in the course of a schizo affective psychose or in the course of a schizophrenia (either with acute psychotic symptoms, either without acute psychotic symptoms). Differentiating depression from negative symptoms of schizophrenia or from antipsychotic drug induced side effects can be difficult. The question to know whether depression is intrinsic to the disease process itself whether it is secondary to the schizophrenic process is still a matter of inquiry. Efficacy of antidepressive drugs during depression in schizophrenia remains a matter of controversy. Depression increases the risk for pejorative evolution and for suicide in schizophrenia.

  4. Using Spatial Density to Characterize Volcanic Fields on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C. B.; Connor, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new tool to planetary geology for quantifying the spatial arrangement of vent fields and volcanic provinces using non parametric kernel density estimation. Unlike parametricmethods where spatial density, and thus the spatial arrangement of volcanic vents, is simplified to fit a standard statistical distribution, non parametric methods offer more objective and data driven techniques to characterize volcanic vent fields. This method is applied to Syria Planum volcanic vent catalog data as well as catalog data for a vent field south of Pavonis Mons. The spatial densities are compared to terrestrial volcanic fields.

  5. Depression among type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghreed Mohamed El-Shafie ,Entesar Omar A. El-Saghier and Iman ,Kamal Ramadan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Diabetes and depression are highly prevalent conditions and have significant impact on health outcomes. The combination of depression with type 2 diabetes is a public health problem. Therefore, we aimed to assess some socio-demographic characteristics of type 2 diabetes and to investigate the relationship between type 2 diabetes and depression among patients aged from 40 to 60 years old. Methods: 125 patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes attending diabetes clinics in the Al-Zahraa hospital were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Patients were interviewed using structured questionnaires to gather data on socio-demographics, clinical, self care compliance, medication usage, and diabetes complications. The MADRS was administered as a screening tool for depression level evaluation. Binary logistic regression model was used to examine association between predictor variables and risk of depression among diagnosed type 2 diabetes at 95% C.I. and P < 0.05. Results: One hundred and twenty five participants completed the interview. More than half of participants were females (58.4% and the mean age was 48 (sd = 5.9, 47.2% hypertensive, and 59.2% on insulin. More than two third (74.4% of patients were depressed; (24.8% mild, 37.6% moderate and 12% severely depressed. Almost four out of five patients (88.8% had diabetes complications, Depression was strongly associated with neuropathy, age, retinopathy, sex and cardiac complications. However, the likelihood of depression was not associated with nephropathy, hypertension and sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: The current study demonstrates a strong correlation between depression and diabetes particularly complications. In particular, patients who are depressed tended to have poorer self-care, more severe physical symptoms and were less likely to adhere to prescribed care regimens. These findings raise the possibility that improving the mental health as part of a

  6. Geology and geochemistry of palaeoproterozoic low-grade metabasic volcanic rocks from Salumber area, Aravalli Supergroup, NW India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L S Shekhawat; M K Pandit; D W Joshi

    2007-12-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Aravalli Supergroup in Salumber region includes a basal unit of metabasic volcanic rocks (Salumber volcanic rocks) overlain by a volcaniclastic/conglomerate one. Although these volcanic rocks have been metamorphosed to green-schist facies, some primary volcanic features are still preserved. This metabasic volcanic sequence can be further differentiated on the basis of textural variations, and the mineral assemblages are: (a) oligoclase + actinolite + chlorite + epidote; and (b) oligoclase + hornblende+ chlorite + biotite + Fe-Ti oxides. The SiO2 content ranges from ∼47.7 to 55.8% and MgO from ∼4.2 to 12.8%. Geochemical characteristics allow their subdivision into high Mg and Fe tholeiites. Inverse relationship of MgO with silica, alkalis and Zr is generally consistent with fractionation mechanism, also suggested by a change in colour of the rocks from dark greenish to light greenish towards the upper parts of the sequence. These metabasic volcanic rocks are enriched in incompatible trace elements and LREE (La = 30 − 40 × chondrite, Lu = 2 − 5 × chondrite), and demonstrate affinity mainly with MORB and within plate settings in geochemical tectonic discrimination schemes. The geochemical characteristics suggest a complex evolutionary history envisaging derivation of the melt from an enriched heterogeneous lithospheric source.

  7. Petroleum exploration of shallow marine deposit Carboniferous volcanic tuff reservoir in the western margin of Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jianyong; Wang Xuezhong; Ma Liqun

    2013-01-01

    In 2011,petroleum exploration of shallow marine deposits Carboniferous and volcanic tuff reservoir re-alized breakthroughs at Chepaizi slope in the western margin of Junggar Basin. Pai 61 well ,with 855.7 ~949.6 m section,in the conventional test oil obtained 6 t/d industrial oil flow. The surface viscosity is 390 mPa· s (50℃). The marine deposit of Carboniferous are deep oil source rocks and high-quality reservoir. Magma volcanic activity provides the basis for volcanic reservoir development and distribution. The weathering crust and secondary cracks developed volcanic tuff by strong rock weathering and dissolution of organic acids which has become top quality reservoir. Deep Permian oil-gas migrated and accumulated to high parts along Hong-Che fault belt and stratigraphic unconformity stripping. Permian and Triassic volcanic rocks or dense mudstone sedimentary cover as a regional seal for the late Carboniferous oil-gas to save critically. The seismic pre-stack time migration processing technologies for the problem of poor inner structures of Carboniferous were developed. Respon